28 Burst results for "Chaplin"

Black Entrepreneurs Urged to Seize the Moment Despite Difficulties

Bloomberg Businessweek

02:36 min | 3 months ago

Black Entrepreneurs Urged to Seize the Moment Despite Difficulties

"Business becomes part of the conversation, and it becomes part of the community. You write about how These black own franchises of McDonald's shape the community around them. They goes beyond providing jobs. They play a leading cultural roll. Talk a little bit about that. Right, so African American franchise owners take on the role that black business owners have historically taken on, and that means that they're providing other resource is in communities because of the color line in government services and opportunities. So they're underwriting youth programs in schools there, making sure that first jobs are actually being created. In the communities. They're sponsoring things like the early Martin Luther King Jr holiday, So you start to see their influence not just in the business sector, but for historically black colleges and universities for the creation of the all American basketball team. And so these black franchise owners become incredibly visible and incredibly popular in these communities, because, as I say in my book, these communities are cut off from federal resource is and other types of opportunities in order to have their needs met. So, Dr Chaplin. How far does it extend beyond McDonald's? Because we do know that today in 2020 the gap in wealth between black Americans and white Americans. His massive. Why didn't this catch on Mohr beyond McDonald's? Well, we think that the reality is that you can't solve robust and complex and deep social problems simply by having business leave the way that we have. Public fear we have public policy with public resource is like taxes in order to do that. But what it does reveal is that this moment that McDonalds is in right now, saying that they stand for black lives donating to the end of the CP. It's not knew we have a 50 year plus history of McDonald's inserting itself into the civil rights struggle. So that they can appear that there on the right side of history. But in this early period when MacDonald was extending the opportunity for Franchising, people did not have the full understanding of the consequences of fast food on the American diet. As well as the concerns about wages in the industry today supporting black live visa be McDonald's has more to do with the quality of work. And benefits and providing for its people than some of these other solutions from the past.

Mcdonald Martin Luther King Jr Mcdonalds Dr Chaplin Basketball Macdonald Mohr
The Vatican Is Said to Be Hacked From China Before Talks With Beijing

The KFBK Morning News

00:22 sec | 3 months ago

The Vatican Is Said to Be Hacked From China Before Talks With Beijing

"Chinese hackers penetrated the Vatican's computer network in the lead up to negotiations between the Catholic Church and Beijing. The infiltration targeted the Vatican and a group of informal Vatican diplomats based in phone call who had been negotiating the church's status in China. A condolence letter to a Hong Kong Chaplin on Vatican stationary was used to insert the

Hong Kong Chaplin Catholic Church Beijing China
HBO Max: we checked it out

Talking Tech

02:47 min | 5 months ago

HBO Max: we checked it out

"To in the past. It's not give us fifteen bucks. You'll get a whole new world of programming instead it's keep subscribing to the HBO now Streaming Service because we just gave it a face lift and made it a whole lot better. I'm Jefferson Graham. This is talking tech. Let me fill you in Max's. Hbo Plus Movies TV series and cartoons from the Warner Brothers Library. Classic Hollywood and Foreign Films From The T. C. M. Film Library original animation and more now. Hbo Now just got a whole lot better. And for me since I was already subscribing. I have more of a reason to keep it. I like the programming selection. You may like it too if you have an apple TV or google chrome cast streaming device in the house but if you're like most people and get your streaming the a Roku or Amazon fire TV streaming player while you're out of luck for now. At and T. Which owns Warner media? Didn't make a deal with either. So it's either fork over thirty five dollars for chrome cast a hundred and fifty dollars for the Apple. Tv device or watch. Max on one of the newer Sony or Samsung. Tv's here's what you're gonNA find. Hbo IS PROMOTING. Heavily the complete collection of friends and the Big Bang theory at the top of the front. Page the Harry Potter films and others from the Warner Brothers Library including man and wonder woman Max is broken up into several hubs. This includes looney tunes cartoons. Adult swim in the cartoon network. Hbo MTC 'em some hubs are better than others. T is fully featured with classics Galore. Like the wizard of Oz gone with the wind and I really love this. The Complete Charlie Chaplin Film Collection Cartoon Network has just a handful of series like the power puff girls and dexterous laboratory. But it's missing some key titles like Johnny Bravo and courage the cowardly dog unlike the recent Disney plus launch which had hundreds of vintage animation from the bolt along with four current titles. Max has many of the best of bugs bunny porky pig and gang including a duck amuck corny concerto in gorilla my dreams but a big emission at least on the first day is the greatest looney tunes cartoon ever made. What's Opera Doc the? Hbo Hub is basically HBO now with. Yes. Every episode of Game of thrones the Sopranos Kirby enthusiasm plus more. But if you're looking for something outside of those hubs navigation is tough for instance. Max promised classics from the Hanna Barbera Library like the Flintstones and the jetsons an episode of Conan from the TBS Library

MAX HBO Warner Brothers Library Apple Jefferson Graham Hanna Barbera Library T. C. M. Film Library Hollywood Charlie Chaplin Warner Media MTC Amazon Johnny Bravo Harry Potter T. Which Disney
Chicago - Michael Jordan Turned Down $100 Million Deal For Two-Hour Appearance, Agent Says

Donna and Steve

07:49 min | 6 months ago

Chicago - Michael Jordan Turned Down $100 Million Deal For Two-Hour Appearance, Agent Says

"Michael Jackson Jackson Michael Jordan excuse me once had a chance to make one hundred million dollars for not much more than two hours of work and he turned it down for sure you think that's a true story yeah one hundred million who okay well tell me okay so his agent said they're not being very specific but he said this is according to his agent and it's a quote all he had to do was other than giving his name and likeness make one two hour appearance to announce the deal and he turned it down god bless him he's been so successful it gives him an opportunity to do whatever the hell he wants or not do things he doesn't want he's very very selective in the things he wants to be involved in yeah I mean unless it was some like tawdry it get them more role deal for a hundred million dollars even if you didn't keep that money you could have changed other people's lives yeah but then you could you could argue that a whole bunch of wishes worth two point one billion dollars I credit him okay we're not taking it okay so he doesn't need it oh goodness no he is he has his own brand I mean the deal that he has the jump man logo with Nike he owns the what was the NBA team the Charlotte bobcats were real I mean this dude is he is doing fine I I think that's awesome that he would just I also want to find out the percentage under million to two billion are you gonna get some rice throwing out your rice I was but you know he's so protective the reason he is so loaded one of the main reasons is because of how protective he is band of Michael Jordan the brand is still like this ESPN documentary that's on right now is the most that we have heard from Michael Jordan ever ever ever yes he you never did you interview so you never see more like him more Fallon or anything like that he just lays so low he didn't get into the commentating business like Barkley did in like Shaquille o'neal did he is always just taken this this different route and there's been this this sort of like smokescreen around him which makes the entry so much more I mean he's been out of the league for twenty years and his shoes are still the hot issues that sell each and every year everybody wants a new pair of Jordan so if that hundred million if he felt it went against the brand that he had carefully curated for all these years hi Tony has nice enough money where he could be like now pass and don't forget is Hanes commercials yeah is he in the commercial I haven't seen one recently but I always remember he wasn't you know not too long ago yeah he was on a plane we have the Charlie Chaplin mustache and he was telling people about his aching neck member who suck but yeah yeah T. shirts in his underwear talk about underpaying planes yeah generally frowned upon death have not seen that one

Michael Jackson Jackson Michael Jordan
Baby Peggy, child star of silent film era, dies at 101

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:52 sec | 8 months ago

Baby Peggy, child star of silent film era, dies at 101

"The Niles the family silent Film museum says Diana Serra Cary one of Hollywood's first child stars has died at the age of one hundred one CBS news correspondent Deborah Rodriguez looks back on her life and career baby Peggy was one of the top stars in Hollywood silent movies she first appeared on screen at the age of nineteen months by the time I was three I was a veteran by the time she was five she was a millionaire endorsed various products and was as famous as Charlie Chaplin or Mary Pickford wherever they had news reels we were the ones but Peggy's career ended abruptly in nineteen twenty five when her father had a falling out with the studio the most of her films have not survived she left a legacy the actress wrote in her memoirs that Judy garland's mother pushed her young daughter into show business

Film Museum Diana Serra Cary Hollywood Deborah Rodriguez Peggy Charlie Chaplin Mary Pickford Judy Garland CBS
"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

10:07 min | 10 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"If you won't and then I got basis actually for a Berry baseman summit you can put rose petals in it and you know so there's really simple bases and then you can. Just you know at different things. I've I've got a full fruit based stone. Fruit and apple is one yummy one with apple lime and saffron. That's really delicious. But it's like so simple. It's very very simple. But it's like just adding in different things as a blackberry rosemary and apple which is Yummy to and how long does it take a very quick. I mean the apples I guess you go to peel and core but the cooking is fast. I mean especially if you using frozen berries now and they lost like up to a week you mentioned saffron. I feel like I'm hearing a lot about saffron. These stays Camille. Sarah who's on our cover you know they're like someone's been growing it in. She gave a Safran plant. Wow how cool so beautiful. What are other good? Amy Chaplain intro reside. Well there's so we talk about soups and the then goes porridges. Then there's a lot of shots for cooking being beans and grains and roasting vegetables and steaming and these things sound so basic. But I get a lot of questions about how to do that and I actually love steamed vegetables been tweeting about steamed vegetables. People has they have a really bad reputation. But if you get a beautiful watermelon radish right now from the film's market and you steam it. It tastes amazing. It's really delicious and likes like carrots right now. And they're really you know they just so fresh delicious and then obviously Greens and all the things that you would normally stay in but you know steamed vegetables and a good dressing and there's a whole big dressing chapter in there that's also people of being loving that because they really vibrant and that she made from blending whole vegetables so like sweet corn in summer with Basil or Zucchini or even bottled artichoke. Hearts blended with Maya Lemon really delicious Tarragon so so yeah. They're they're really versatile and creamy from the vegetables. Not We have to go back to the steamed vegetables. Because I feel like it's just been such a roast vegetable the big picture and era. Yes I know right and I love roasted vegetables but you know coming home turning on the oven you know. A trade doesn't go that far always to and then if you do to train your oven than it often doesn't roast great. You know what's the secret to steaming. It is feeling the pot hot with enough water at the bottom. I have this thing going hurries. Doesn't it put a little bit. Get it going and then I'm like walkways like gooding I'm like. Oh my God. I can't even st match tables but no no. I love like big chunks of squash like bocce squash steamed this recipe and therewith Nari and chopped up scallions Tamari drizzled the result over steam Kubota. It's so easy but SORTA lucious right now or red curry squash those two of my favorites. 'cause they started dense sweet squashes actually roasting them. They can get a bit dry. I always roast them and they do. They can't really dry depending on when they're harvested steam them steaming. Yeah and it's quick and so if you cut them small quicker they it's still good the next day. I've got a leftover Mesa suit with steam leftover steamed vegetable soup in there. Where you just like make make a quick broth with ginger and add mecer and then just dumping oil leftover steamed vegetables and it's delicious? I'm officially starving. I should've eaten before this interview. You start to talk about dressings so tell us what your favorite dressings are business. Yeah there's the federal one l.. I love that one. Actually you do need a high powered blend for for that one. Because the finals kind of pours it's not cooked I but they've all got lime already like using lime. So this is a fence Alonzo and mint dressing yum. That is so. Are Ya like that drizzled over steamed veggies or grain bowl or beans. Or even. There's A. There's a picture in their roasted sweet potato. Dot with some Rancho Rancho Gordo beans the crumble of fitter and that dressing and it's just so yummy. This great Tangy beat cashew dressing with Chile. And it's very pink. Yeah and so. That's go to cook. beat everything else is roar but so yeah there's a base recipe and then there's variations. There's one with Tahini with the beat is really yummy. kind of like a source. They're not really addressing dressing Utah Server leafy lightly other. You could send them out. That's the key then is one with the sweet corn over tomatoes and associated the corns nut and season. Yeah but you know this is the thing about this book you can use it any time of year because there's going to be beats around or there's going to be something else around so you can wait for some of the Ritz. You can still get the whole idea of the Uh you know the recipe and how how to experiment yourself. And that's really what I talk about in the beginning of each chapter is how you you know what you're looking for in texture. extre what you can add in how to store it. You know. There's not a lot of. There's no hit notes in this book. which is like? Oh that's radical. Yeah it was like I just realized like to write one for every single recipe when a lot of them Variations was going to be had so I have like that like an introduction and then all these tips does everybody know what ahead notice out there in radio land. It's that paragraph or two above recipe explaining different things where the rest became from your inspiration bridge directors. Doing a book. I took away the fun part. So Hey amy is like no head notes and this one well what you get right into it. Yeah Yeah you get right into it and it's really about making the recipes your own. That's Rushie iced. Earl Grey Tea with almond milk and rosewater doesn't that is that so amazing. It sounds like it would be great anytime of the year so tell us about the process of making the book. It's so beautiful thing papers. It's beautiful matt paper and every picture so gorgeous and saturated and who's the team you worked with will I worked with Ottesen which was fantastic. They're really amazing. And just was so generous with giving me as much freedom as I wanted and I had just moved up state and was like I made it really complicated but it but it turned out I. I wanted to work with this. Australian photographer ends and smart. And he is in America's couple of times a So I sort of teamed up the shoot with him and then I started working with Lucy. Atwater who did props are last time. I did props with a friend of mine who also directed the book. And this this time I just knew with all these group shots which was I mean. It was my idea but it was so hard because I had to make everything you've got. You've got these wonderful pictures and it's like there's there's a Lotta food in those. I'd like those crackers took like three days. Yeah and I did everything myself. I mean I had to help you know with you. Know had like one or two people the first time and then I had to people the second time yeah. I'm doing different things. Because he had to run out and get ingredients. You know what it's like. I mean the shoots a crazy and then not directing as well and then they're like no let me take a photo of you in the kitchen. You're like really. I've been out for a week during making crackers and Granola anything that can keep. I made ahead you know but it was mind boggling ogling and I actually went into overwhelm before the first shoot like. I seriously thought I'm going to have a breakdown because had this half renovated kitchen that I've got to shoot in. I didn't know my way around my own entry and I was ordering jaws pregnant. Not Yes okay. I actually wasn't for any of the shoots. Okay God I was GonNa say that on top of it wasn't for the last shoot. I was we last one I was. Yeah it was only two days and it was much easier. These just like sure everything. People don't realize putting together a cookbook. A special is a special thing. Only people who do cookbooks really understand or care air. Yeah that's right I understand okay. That's a good one exactly but it's wonderful that this beautiful book is is out in the universe. What are you looking forward to in the new year? Well I haven't talked about it much at all but I'm actually working on a restaurant project. Hallelujah I wanted you have I know I know. It's like a curse because I had my own restaurants. I know how hard it is but I have actually wanted you to have a restaurant or a cafe because you make such beautiful food thank you. Yeah I know it's hard to say it loud because I sort of that dribble comes over because I know how much work it is. I mean you know what it's like and people people also don't understand that like you know it's not a fulltime job. It's to Serbia Serbian that and want to scare you away. It's so easy to do. No it's harder than a cookbook. I know that much. Yeah Yeah where tribeca Oh fun Oh that's great. Yeah Okay Yeah so You'll stay tuned. They'll be more about it soon. Yeah well that's wonderful news about it yet. Okay we'll works cited greatly from that and we will definitely be some of your best customers doubt what else you hoping for. Twenty twenty two survived. I know to survive. You know I think that's going to take over for a while because I'm so fussy so I have to really like work out how to get back into that. I haven't worked in a restaurant for almost ten years. So it's a whole different thing. It's been I've been focusing on the home. Kalkin making things easier for people and you know how to eat well at home and and you know and then when you go into a restaurant is completely different outlook. So I'm excited for that though. That's amazing and partners. Yeah my sister is one. Oh how nice yeah. So she's been here for about twenty two and she's worked front of House out all this time so people always said you know. When are you going to do a restaurant project together and I thought I never really? I thought maybe it wouldn't happen. But we have another partner and he kind of just brought us together and said we're doing this and so I just went along with it and announced really is happening. Oh congratulations thank you very exciting. Whatever we can do to help we are one hundred percent the here to support? So we're GONNA do the speed around. What is your favorite kitchen utensil? First thing came to my pressure cocoa but really my life song that makes you smile. Oh Oh a Dionne Warwick Song woken by most treasured cookbook. Oh Nourish by.

apple Amy Chaplain partner Camille Sarah Dionne Warwick Chile Greens Nari Utah Serbia Earl Grey Tea Alonzo Lucy Ottesen Rushie cook. America
"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

12:42 min | 10 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Taste your vegetables so in the twenty year study calcium levels and vegetables on average were depleted by twenty seven percent. I believe so. Because because of the ways that industrial industrial agriculture has really negatively affected our soil. which if you think about is the living I it's what nourishes rushes any food rate because it's really strip? The soil of nutrients are vegetables aren't nutrient density more. So you could be buying food food each eating your vegetables and fruits but you're not actually getting nutrients you think you're getting and to me. That really pisses me all these people don't know like they think they're doing the right thing and they just don't have the knowledge or they're being you know like marketed incorrectly. In addition to veggies Veggie farmers like doing the crop rotation also had talked about. I'm a big advocate of supporting livestock. Managers who were taking care of their cattle with multi-party greasing reasoning. If you WANNA get Kanna nerdy about it is just imagine taking like having your cows graze roam free land. They agree as one era of your land and and are constantly moved throughout the day to different parts of your land. The reason why that straight is that cows actually are incredible way of also helping this cluster. Mr Cartman I don't want to go to deep into it but just know that multi paddock grazing and pasture raise. Cattle is really really good question. Carbon and it's also former progenitor battering culture a lot of natural fertilizer. Exactly Yeah and I noticed you can order meat eggs cheese lots of different different things not just fruits and vegetables. Yeah I mean you know. We're obviously not could've eighty mostly plants but we are full diet option and we fully. I fully support the farmers that are doing their good work in you know raising really good eggs and Really great cattle and heritage pork. So we're we're GONNA do speed round with you okay. Ready favorite kitchen utensil. L. My hands. I'm sorry my your hands on a Lazy Cook People. Well don't give us that answer often song that makes you smile. Losing you salons dream vacation destination. There is a James Tyrrell. We'll temple. He built in Japan in the woods. That really needs to go to. I love him. He's he's an amazing artist list. Who does these really incredible installations with light in the sky and etcetera food? You would never eat the really really wet spoiled lettuce. Greens in a spirit of lettuce. Mix It's disgusting to me. It just represents so many things I hate. Oh God that's the best. I'm the same way I I know. I've been telling US broiled breath but I can't. It also just reminds it represents I think basic bitch sell mix which is really dislike. Bland salve makes that every cafe buys you know and then it reminds me of how long that Sabah's has been traveling from probably California to New York and has been sitting there. We are decomposing. Gross oldest thing in your fridge. It's probably have this Yuzu like syrup. uh-huh that I use. I think it's like maybe three years old but there's so much sugar in it. Good Okay Yeah. If you had to be trapped on a desert island with one food celebrity who would it be and why I might actually say Gail Simmons and I say that. Because we're we're friends. And she's the nicest person and she's fun so I just feel like why not party with your friend who can also cook you. Incredible Food and make you laugh. That would be fun meridia. We Love Gal. All right. We'll Wednesday we love you too. Thank you for stopping by. We'll be right back with amy chaplain after after this quick break. Hello this is producer Jess Zeidman. You know we have a podcast but did you also know we have a magazine we do you and we just released our fourteenth issue. It's all about the intersection of food and fashion. We have five incredible cover girls including chef enough and activist Angela. Dema Uganda and guess what you might even see a story or two written by a certain radio. Cherry baume producer about which footwear chefs prefer in the kitchen and my favorite vegetable cabbage subscribe now for more information in about all things Cherry bomb magazine visit Cherry Bomb Dot Com. So tell us about this book. What's it all about? How yeah this book? Will you know after you read a book you like. Oh that's everything I know in that book like that's how the first one was sort of my journey to to then and this came about from realizing thing that everything I make is pretty much the same as the first one you know and as everything to sell the cookbook everything I make the same. It sounds terrible but now it really really was like you know what I teach my classes and I cook privately for people and I did in the five years between books. That's what I was doing and so I was realizing someone says to me. Oh I've got to eat. You know warming spices and I wanna nut butter so I'd be like Oh okay. Let's put the mole in walnut not butter ginger and cinnamon and Cottam and then some mesquite and then I realized like these base recipes are just what I spring from. And it's what I teach in. My classes is is too. It's like once you know the formula for a simple period vegetable soup. That doesn't need stop just water and five other ingredients than you can really make any you have to add a bit more water You know if you add herbs or curry or Chilli they allow in the book and so you know. There's one with like toasted hazelnut milk in with Rosemary. And then it's like go fancy so I should read. The sub head transform the way you eat with two hundred and fifty vegetarian recipes free of gluten dairy and refined sugar. So were you working on the book all five years. Well I mean I was trying to work out what I would do and I didn't want to do this so many books that come out every week especially in my my field now. It's not unusual when I used to be. Now it's like mainstream in this so many great books every Tuesday that I say that a Vegan and vegetarian. So how do you you WanNa make it different and make it really useful. I felt like I touched on that. In my first one. With sort of mixing and matching ideas and really giving a a lot of information about ingredients and here. I just really wanted to show Mike instead of just saying Oh you know at at at whatever it's like no. I wanted to show exactly how you do that because even when I compare what how. What do you realize that you know? I have those questions and I read that in cookbook. So I really just wanted to like do a base and then show the variations written out in recipe form so that it was really clear so feel like it's great for beginnings but it's also great for people just like. They're making him a porridge everyday but then how do you mix it up. You know making a nut milk. It's like like how many recipes for almond milk do you need. I mean they're everywhere. They free on instagram. Their online. You know so the way the way I sort of elaborated on it was you. You can infuse the water that you use with teas and spices and different flavorings. And then add in other stuff and you know he is like twenty different variations. You are the queen of a porridge. Yeah both I mean the whole thing is she. I love both food. So you mentioned that that the ideas that you've brace for so long a become more mainstream. Is that exciting to you. Yes it's great. I mean I love it. I love that now. I mean East always be like Oh. I'm a ship vegetarian. Gympie Korea or great by next year. But now I think people are much more interested in obviously and plant based and and actually yeah really value it you know and WanNa know ooh how you make things taste great and have great texture and things like that so you mentioned that. You're a fan of an over stuffed cupboard overstocked doc pantry may be dating of dating back to your childhood. Walk us through your pantry. What's in there right now okay? Pretty Messy A lot of stuff. Leftover I I mean still from my shoot. I decided that 'cause I was shooting upstate you know so. It's like this whole complicated thing. I was like ordering like all this stuff is if I needed like five pounds of militants like no you still have a lot of ingredients leftover like and also freeze dried berries. You'd think I would have gobbled them up but no just haven't gotten to them. You know so I mean trying to work out ways to use it up. You know not just recipes from there but so it has a lot of different things. I mean it's got stuff experiment with like pill powder or or avoided some crazy mushroom powders. What's tell everybody what Pearl powder is? Well it's a powder made from bills. It's like a beauty food and I ordered some. It's still there and I would never waste it. So what do you put it and I put it in a not milk or a drink. I mean you could put it in anything. I'm not a smoothie eater so that's where people probably normally normally put it all right. What else is in there okay? So there's a lot of rancher goto beans which I kind of horde like like you know 'cause Rancho Gordo their beans like they're wonderful mail order you can buy them in stores to but there's a lot of they do a lot of mail order yet. I ordered a lot. Career being fanatic. And you don't know about them. You should look at their website. Yeah definitely what else. There's grains and beans and nuts and seeds and you know a lot of different edible flowers hours and just stuff. I love to experiment with and use. I'm trying to think what else though I mean now. I have time to cook so I eat a lot of toast. which is what people thinks? Insularity of Gluten Free Book I'm really interbred right. Now upstate. This incredible bakeries bakers. Actually I mean the Baker Revolution. We've talked about a lot it on the radio show. But it's just incredible. Sarah Owens always different. Yes and she wonderful how. She's amazing I mean. I know who knew bread could even get better. It's like it just gets better and better so yeah that is true so you are you making your own bread. No you're not I don't have time. They're just they're made with the whole grains and seeds if you are gluten free and you WanNa have whole grain thing like people keep saying. I'M GONNA make that my party I'm like Nah. Just have it for breakfast yourself like it's not. It's not a party breath. No it's not like a celebrator food you know they delicious and Yummy with like eggs and avacado like a whole meal because it's like the whole grain is crushed. Rushed up in there when you're doing a lot of toasts knowing you. It's not just a piece of bread in the toaster and you call it a day. I'm sure you're topping with really fabulous stuff not but as yeah and cultured. It should better. I mean you know. I'm breastfeeding burning calories like crazy so I'm like eating butter like it's going out of fashion which I never. I mean this is dairy free book but I appreciate good dairy so but it's just become like sweet obsession for me every day and not better either homemade like six. I just love like some flour and coconut mixed with Almond. You know different things. But time is scarce these days so I've been ordering this one from massive volumes. Have you heard of them in California. They make the best stored almond butter. He grows almonds brown rice. It's like my dream person and The Not Buddy so fresh. It's just like you made it okay. And it's really reasonable in. Its organic and everything I feel like. We've got to write down all these sources amy so walk us through some of the recipes in the in the cookbook. What's a good recipe? Start with. Well there's a lot of breakfast options. Someone pointed out and I was like. That's true yeah I mean the Berkshire Chea Bowls getting a lot of attention. Because you know you mix it up and in thirty minutes. It's twenty to thirty minutes and then lost four or five days in your fridge and you can flavored old different ways. How'd you flavor well in there? I've got options for like cow. How much and turmeric and I know they sound like usual things but you know it's kind of a bit different you can put like? There's one with apple will and raisins and orange like a typical butcher. And then if you top it with your flavored not milks and a compote. It's really like takes over the edge if you have time or you can just add like like fruit to it as well. There's like all these components for like there's a pear and citrus with Tamarack. That's really if you've got fresh turmeric. Walk us through when a compote is is right. It's just I mean I make it without any sweeteners. It's bit of orange juice already like using and thicken it with a bit of our rich and that's a pinch of salt and vanilla..

producer California Mr Cartman Kanna James Tyrrell Gail Simmons WanNa Japan Uganda Cherry bomb magazine New York Berkshire Chea Bowls Angela amy Sabah Rosemary Jess Zeidman Gympie Korea apple Mike
"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

08:26 min | 10 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Not only as whether other impacting farms and the stability of I mean there was never really stability in being a farmer. But it's even making it harder. I would say I was reading that like I think there's four main markets for foods like Kmart foods and I forgot the other two Walmart probably Walmart. Yeah but yeah we can just see this shift in to me. It feels like there is more popularity around organic food. But because there's it's more popular DOS becomes very competitive rate. Say like the landscape of the lure. Ganic a farming industry and farming in general is changing a lot. And there's a lot of greenwashing I see greenwashing really if you just think about marketing terms terms that confuse customers to make them feel like a product is more sustainable or ECO friendly than it. Really is the biodegradable. When makes me crazy because the New York City? There's not a separate place to put all the that biodegradable plastic. Yeah I mean there's all these things out of course we're allies. Were so so busy. How can we do all the research from point? A to Z right but swerve chinatrust brands tells the story. But we're not getting the full story for most companies as which is super frustrating to me. So yeah you can go to a whole foods and you're gonNA see something like labeled local or you can go to Kmart and he's says local or all natural but there's no regulation around local or all natural. So how do you know what they're selling to you. How do you know like who's your money is going to or the quality of your product if you if you just have this greenwashing term marketing it are you seeing more young farmers get into the business and stay? What I've heard is a lot of young people get into farming? They just don't stay in farming. Yeah I mean I can't tell you statistically but there's obviously huge huge interest in farming right it's from man-sized. It's a great way for someone to leave their finance job but most people don't stay in farming because when you learn to be a farmer. Most people aren't learning at business plan. They're not learning how to sell their product rate so it becomes hard. How do you sell your product and then people also relies Omega? There's actually no money or stability in farming unless you own your land and owning your land super difficult also so yeah I can see. There's a hint of interest by most people are not able to survive. That's rough and also sorry. The debt also for farmers have increased a lot I forgot the the number. But there's an increase in debt farms. There's actually a higher suicide. People are dropping out there. It's it's pretty. It's pretty depressing to all the farmers we have our. It's a miracle we have any farmers. Yeah I'm every day honestly like just so honored that there's people that want to grow food the right way and the best way despite how much harder it is and keep doing it despite. How Little Little Prophet there is How about folks who are lower income? Can they get access to local routes do price things a certain way so right now it's actually really New York state makes it really hard for CBS's or the CNC model to accept snap but we're going to do is we're really trying to pile it like Veggie Rx program room or health bucks programs working on that right now. The green market accepts snap though correct. Yeah it's it's the difference between something. Subscription basic like a New York state doesn't really want to have people prepay for season we using their snap benefits to make difficult but I would say that a lot. The markets are run by volunteers and volunteers get free food in exchange. So that's a really great way right now for people to access local routes produce By spending two and a half hours a week and it's a really great feeling to be the reason why your communities getting fresh produce. Can they apply through your website. Your local routes NYC DOT com. We have a whole volunteer opportunities. And we're actually go into have. We'll be launching something. In addition to the Veggie Rx program but some other things that are really big that will be able to also having a scaling tiered pricing. One of the other things I wanted to ask you about is all these ugly really produce companies that have sprung up seemingly overnight. I see them advertised in the subway. Here advertise radio. What's going on? Why why his that boomed all of a sudden I mean why have they all come up at the same time rate think? It's just a really funny looking vegetables or an easy thing to market right there. Super Instagram me. It's cheaper for someone to purchase for a company to purchase. I think it's incredible credible that there is no all of a sudden so much information out there about how much food is wasted. It's really making people. Think about their impact in the environment. So I love this movement I would say that I think look roots launched. We launched our imperfect vegetable option like five or six years ago ago and it was kind of before all these companies started and I was like this is going to be thankful and I would say actually one challenge. We have with it is that we. It's it's hard for us a source these products because a lot of our farmers you know they sell to farmers Parkinson. CSA's and the the things. I'll look funny. Funny are already being sold anyway. Regular markets so be actually. It's it is the one challenge. We have is finding enough funny-looking vegetables to to sell L.. which is kind of a weird thing to say but I would also? I don't know much about these companies. I do remember having one experience with one of them and they weren't I don't know I think you're trying to be diplomatic. Someone on our team had an experience with one of them and everything came completely over packaged. A A lot of the product was spoiled already and beyond spoiled what you would expect. Yeah it Kinda seems. It's very hypocritical. And and the the marketing their messages isn't holistic enough for me. Why are we talking about their packaging? Just because their marketing they have imperfect perfect produce. Or why are we talking about where they're how they're farmers are growing their food. If we're talking about we WANNA buy these imperfect vegetables to for an environmental reason right then you have to look at how these farmers are growing their food. Also so if they're not growing them well sustainably than one like should we even. I don't know it just feels like there's this huge disconnect and yeah. You can't talk about environmental factors without talking about soil health and farming practices. And there's I feel to me there's been there's no Oh farm story. There's no connection with the farmer with these products and I also I mean. I'm always skeptical of anything with modest. Start up money as just me because I always wonder like were all the marketing. Yeah good point and you've survived the song clearly by being so smart and scrappy. Yeah I don't know thank you for saying that you're welcome. You've mentioned regenerative farming a few times and I noticed it mentioned throughout your website for folks who are insured with that that is can you give us a quick lesson. Hoover genitive farming is one of my favorite things to talk about so regenerate farming means that the farmers are thinking about their soil health. mostly growing organically doing things like crop rotation using compost in their farm minimal. Tillage tillage is like when you're if you have like quintessential image of a farm where they're like Raking at the soil essentially plowing the field. Hong Appeals Yeah so these are some of the checkout points for if someone is rejected a farmer and soil health is the forefront of his movement because soil is the biggest sponge sponge for Co two. It can sequester Harpen so I think the road else. She came out with the.

New York City Walmart Kmart Hong CSA CBS
"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

Radio Cherry Bombe

12:55 min | 10 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Radio Cherry Bombe

"Now here's my conversation with when Jae Yang of local routes you are here to talk about local cool roots which is a company founded. How many years ago? Now eight and a half almost nine years ago tell us. The origin story depends how far back we wanted to go. But I guess the more exciting story is. I was on stage with the flaming lips which is like a rock band and it was my dream at the time to dance on stage with his band. So there's confetti like flying around me and looking at the Leeds they're gonNa wake this insane and so after the show you you hang out the band and Wayne the main singers asking me. I think I was like twenty three the time he's like. So what do you want to do through life. And I've always since I was little I always. I wanted to do something that gave back to the community. But I've also loved the idea of being like a storefront. A store owner grizzly usually greeting people. Anyway so I told them. Hey I really want to actually move to New Orleans to help with hurricane relief and his response was you know that's really great. You want to do that. But don't forget that people in your community. Your neighbors also always need your help so maybe think about what your what your neighbors need. They're really resonate with me. I've always love New York City so much. So local routes essentially became my love letter to New York City where I realized after reading an article that there's there's a decline of supermarkets in New York City. People don't have the access to the cons of food they want and to me in a place with so much abundance. There's so many options that became even access good food that tastes good and is good for us. Felt it was insane to me so essentially I volunteered at Fhu do justice nonprofit through Americorps for one year learn all about this grassroots movement. I got an shoes to see essays which stands for community supported agriculture. And I absolutely I fell in love with this combination of one building community in New York City where it's a place so hard to find connections but then also to supporting the underdog which is our local farmer it as one from Long Island. Who really you're open a shopping mall? This was this in a phallic. I finally found myself. I just love bringing people together. I love meeting. Other New Yorkers medium the New Yorkers who are really nice and kind friendly and unloved loves Muniz farmers who literally their their entire passion is feeding people really good food taking care of their land you know. It's so giving. That was great advice from Wayne. I know way way you know. He's great hair and great advice. I think especially now when everything seems so overwhelming and you everybody just wants to to change the world and make the world better place and you don't necessarily think you can literally start on your own block. Yeah and also like you know I come from the underground music scene when I met when I was playing lots of bands like booking my own shoe shows and tours and it I really took that Energy Gee and apply that to the food movement where I thought okay like. Nobody is giving us a kind of way to shop for food that I I want. Nobody's giving us a kind of community that I want. I'm I'm not going to just sit around and just be okay with given to me. I'm GONNA make that. I'm creating an achievable. Oh Utopia around food but farmers markets exist in New York City. Why wasn't that enough for you? Well because one to me I think farmers markets for my lifestyle style is inconvenient. You know they usually end by the time. I would finish work a wake-up exact playing in band. Yeah exactly you know like a weekend Saturday. Good morning farmers market is not going to do well when you're playing a show at like two. Am but also I love the way that CBS's actually brought the same people together the same day the same week week and you really had a connection to your arms at the farmer's market I love farmers markets. It always feels so big to me and to me the console Seoul shopping around. There's less of a connection and a lot of people that work the farmers markets actually aren't the farmer their people in New York City. Who are doing the work? That's what I used to do. I used to work at farmers markets gets but I love the idea that you could actually visit the farm. You could talk to the farmer you get these recipes. So community oriented can members of local local roots community sport agriculture. Go to the farms and visit them. Yes so they can either visit on their own. A lot of our farms have agritourism or wall. Plan Dan once a year of farm trip. So that's cool. Yeah and you know we. I am touching clean millennials. So I try to make it a virtual tour of our farms on her instagram right. So like just even pictures of what has killed look like or what is look to be growing mushrooms indoors. So how did you even start to put this organization together. You'd never run a company before no all right. How the heck did you put a company together? You know I feel like putting company together so much much easier than running and scaling company. God Writing Company was the easiest thing. I've done my entire life. Which is insane? Seriously I can really at this true. Okay well you have outlasted people who've raised tons of investor capital. You know you've you've had a lot of people try to come into your space and muscle their way in and they've come and gone and the time that you've been doing this. I'm actually pretty big advocate of not taking money unless you really really really need did it. And even then you should you should just also rethink do. I really need this money because I mean I started a business owing to support emission rates so I had to think of a way to make sure I could live in New York City by doing something that I absolutely loved. It would always had an incredible amount of passion and I will do anything to make sure that we're getting. The people are supporting our farmers. I think wind that dedication helps in not taking money. It also makes it so that I've always wanted to have more control over my company. I don't want to have to reach specific numbers and metrics just because someone gave me a ton of money any and then what am I going to do with this money right I anyway so how I started my company is I was working for a farm. They actually decided to corporate so unlike Mike any other industry when a small business wants to go corporate they tend to be off the original staffs rehire right so I was left there with his idea that I know no what I wanted to do with my life. There's literally no one in the world. That has his job. I WANNA start see assays and make them fun and convenient for people and that job didn't exist. My mom was like why don't you start your own business. which was very strange for for a Chinese mom to say to someone and I told her she was crazy? I actually got really mad at her. I was twenty five. No business experience. Who was on a trusted twenty five year old? You know like food businesses are they're everywhere now but when I started you know this wasn't really an industry Brooklyn grange rooftop harm had just started. This is the beginning of Artisanal Jam. I am in Brooklyn but I am someone who I'm really Batasuna something you don't want to do So I decided why not just try I and I would say for the first like five years. It really felt like a hobby is I never really considered myself a business person. I still have a hard time like I stole. Tried to learn how to do business and I always have these like a couple times a year. These like existential moral dilemmas of can I run a business. Assist without being a she person. Am I going to survive without being cut throat competitive in New York City and when it comes down to that question I always think like fucking like I'm GonNa keep doing it the way I wanna do it if it doesn't work out then that's what it is but I think there is something special official with the local routes brand and it's because it comes from an authentic voice so hopefully that's what resonates people. So is this your only job or do you have a bunch of side hustles. The smell job which I think consists when you have a business you know. It consists of a million side hustles. So even if it's not directly like a business thing you know I'm always he's doing something. Related to food or sustainability. Are you able to pay yourself consistently yeah consistently yes. I'm not saying I'm I don't make that much money you know. I'm probably much like a recent college Grad but I have full control over my business and and committed to this so if people want to take part in local routes today Who can and how can they? Well New Yorkers he he anyone can take part if you live in your city. So socially modernize as New Yorkers. If you don't know what to say is I think of us. As a subscription base customized customized farmers market. We bring right to you so if you want to take part in local routes you subscribe on our website look roots dot com. You'RE GONNA choose categories of food blake organic vegetables or artisanal cheese and you know pasteurized eggs. Everything from within a farm within two hours of New York City in all sustainable. So you're going to choose categories of food and then once you place your order you go to one of our many pickup locations in Brooklyn Manhattan. They're all located bars. Cafes or your office and then you go bring a bag and you pick up your food. We also do home delivery so the idea is imagine yourself grocery shopping but but it's integrated into your social life. We give recipe cards so it's super easy and the great thing about local routes which is what I'm really proud of is that we're making food and seasonal. He's not eating a lifestyle notches seasonal hobby. meaning that are Marcus go all year round. So if you do live in your city you probably know if you go to the farmer's markets they end and usually November and they start back up in about may but we work really hard to make sure. Our farmers are growing things like they're storing vegetables roles for us to have in the winter months but also we work with aeroponic farms and farmers of the greenhouses sober still getting like tomatoes and mustard Greens leafy if he greens round. So yeah you can always subscribe anytime you want throughout the year and you can always put your order on holds traveling. So we're really thinking about the New York Eric City lifestyle. How has your job changed? I'm guessing in the beginning that it was a lot of talking to farmers spending time with farmers and today you're dealing with a lot of logistics. It's all logistics. Yeah because there's so much of the back end that people never think about so. Let's say in the beginning ginning. I was thinking I was doing everything was graduates. I did every single thing. I didn't have an employee I didn't you know I didn't have any startup. Money as everything from like posting flyers and community unease to sign up for local routes to drive me everything delivering and being at the markets to create our customers. So now I have this incredible staff at super for small but they do a lot for me and I'm able to summertime really doing things like this. I mean obviously still very very much involved in the day to day logistics and I do all of our digital marketing social media that kind of stuff partnerships. But it is my goal to be a spokeswoman for local food and sustainability so I'm focusing more more time on that I speak a lot about swell health regenerative agriculture had a live more sustainably in New York City in your kitchen. How're things for the farmers today How's it changed percents you started? That's a great question whether Ozzy has changed a lot growing patterns have changed a lot for example strawberries super rainy in the beginning getting in the summertime. So rainy that farmers couldn't really go out to harvest strawberries. So the strawberry season Razz actually later than normal for us. A lot of crops were being. The season's just leader we also work one time of year with Louisiana citrus armor because we can't get citrus in New York. We have a strong connection with this apartment Louisiana. He grows Miss Pacific region. It's like southern part of Louisiana that is known known for their citrus. Better than Florida. Better Than California. It's incredible are fighting words. I know you can order right now on our website But he's one of the last farms in this area to be to keep farming because the weather is changing so much that people have to leave right so.

New York City New Orleans Wayne Brooklyn Jae Yang Louisiana Leeds New York Seoul CBS Florida Long Island California Fhu Brooklyn grange Writing Company Ozzy
Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

American Innovations

05:26 min | 10 months ago

Electronic Television: The Great Depression And The World's Fair

"It's nineteen thirty. The world is stuck in the early stages the great depression many Americans lift their spirits at the new moving picture shows in theaters and nickelodeon 's Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin comedies. These films are often introduced with Mickey mouse cartoons or newsreels one newsreel in particular dazzles the audience with the promise of soon bringing these new moving picture shows into their very own homes presents. A backstage preview television the newest miracle of modern Electrical Engineering Mr penalty shown shown at the right is working on the image dissect to photoelectric camera. Tube of his own invention that distinguishes his system of television from others. It is said to be responsible for the most clearly defined television pictures placed in the second of this receiving system is a funnel shaped cattle due the round flat surface of its bulb becomes the picture screen in Studio Monitor. It does it as well. As in home receiving sense the image detector Tube and the Cathode Ray tube are the heart and brain system. Television Vilo Farnsworth's image to sector tube and camera system had finally brought the long anticipated picture radio into being station equipment. The electrons become radio impulses to broadcast and picked up by receiving sense where the routine is with us. The radio impulsive becoming points of light that appear on the screen as picture thirty pictures. I completed every second. These earliest television programming was live performance music and sound accompanied. The OBAMAS was action both visible and audible elements going on the air in perfect synchronization battling with the speed of light to amaze of tubes and equipment. The show leaves the station send the towers viewed by the television public and audience as yet small and comparatively ignorant of the research and experiment. That makes it possible rush to see and hear people many miles away watching this newsreel in the movie theater. The audience is intrigued but sceptical. The most fanciful dream of mankind is day startling reality destined to become the world's most popular science in one thousand nine thirty in San Francisco. Two years have passed since Filo funds worth with help from his wife. Pam Gardner and her brother cliff triumphantly showed off off a working prototype of electronic television. Violence picture was on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle under a headline that called him a genius is name was being being mentioned in newsreels magazines journals and the Associated Press but he hadn't yet found a manufacturer to partner with so financially files fortunes agents hadn't changed Penn gave birth to their first son. Filo T farnsworth third the previous year and a second son. Kenny would follow in nineteen thirty one but now a curious envelope in the days male brings a new possibility. You got a letter here. Filo says it's from New York I can't believe. RCA is offering one hundred thousand dollars for the image sector would. That's wonderful that exactly pam they want to own it outright i. It's not ideal but one hundred thousand dollars is a lot of money. Not compared to what television will eventually be worth. It's a mistake to cash in too soon like this. We have to keep the faith. I understand. Filo it's your invention that's Pammy. It's not it it never was. It's it's all of the great minds that have come before to make this possible. And it's you it's cliff. All of us were a team but they wanna buy our work and call it. There's it's just not fair. They can license it if they like. I've spent my entire life working towards this Pam. It's like it's like trying to sell one of our children. The Lord will provide Filo a a few weeks later. The farnsworth's receive another big opportunity with visit to the lab from United Artists. The Film Production Company was Silent Age Film Stars like Charlie the chaplain. Douglas Fairbanks D W Griffith and Mary. PICKFORD PICKFORD is especially enthusiastic. We just had to see this amazing new television system. We've heard so much about it. But when the time comes the image to sector won't cooperate Filo is rattled. I I'm sorry folks. This is humiliating million chaplain smiles. Don't sweat it. I've seen worse like Douglas's latest picture a few hours later. After the stars leave cliff finds the problem on a wire wasn't plugged in it. Was that simple Dan. How did I not see that Pam tries to reassure him? Mary Pickford was here. We were all a bit distracted. It did keep the faith Filo when a third opportunity knocks a few weeks later Filo is determined to answer the call this time. FILC who radio in Philadelphia. They they they want to license the Patents Fund our research. But it'll still be ours with some help Vilo at Phil Co so in Philadelphia moving from the bay area to the city of brotherly love. What do you think it sounds great? And so the Farnsworth family packed packed their bags with their belongings precious equipment and board a train to head across the country to Philadelphia Pennsylvania. His family counting on him. Kylo could only pray he was making the right decision.

Filo Vilo Farnsworth Cliff Filo T Pam Gardner Mary Pickford Philadelphia Charlie Chaplin Pickford Pickford Buster Keaton San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Nickelodeon Obamas New York Pennsylvania
The Story of Food Fights

Hungry In Nashville

05:05 min | 10 months ago

The Story of Food Fights

"The day. There was a guy named soupy sales like so many before him the three stooges Harpo Marx Charlie Chaplin soupy was known for sight. gags one particular gag. Getting Pie in the face was his trademark mark. He said he's been hit by a pie or thrown apply twenty thousand times in his career. It's a joke almost as old as comedy itself and it never fails to get laugh. So how do you beat classic you amplify it make it explode. Yes ladies and germs. I'm talking about a food. Fight in Nineteen seventy-four Bell Brooke started a fight in blazing saddles that began in the studio commissary spilled onto a movie set and made its way out onto the streets of Los US Angeles in nineteen seventy eight. The John Belushi who fired the shot that started one of the best known food fights ever filmed. Today we examine Zaman food fights where to go. If you WANNA be part of one how you can stage your own and what. The best foods are for creating your own masterpiece at home. The idea food fight isn't hard to grasp. Is people throwing food at one another for fun. It's fun because it's so socially wrong. And it makes the best. These types of food food fights are fun but they don't always turn out the way you planned for instance. Ten San Antonio high school students were arrested after starting a fight in the school cafeteria because there is some nine hundred students in the cafeteria at the time and most of them are trying to get out. The students were charged with inciting a riot in two thousand sixteen gene. Another high school prank took place at Monarch High School in Coconut Creek Florida. The day began normally enough students using superglued seal lockers classroom doors then. Lunchtime came around the trumpet. Blue and students began to hurl as you could imagine. It took a lot of time and money to clean up leading one football player to say. I hope that doesn't affect our football program because we work hard to get our new stuff like New Jersey's and stuff like that how precious but what if you want to be part of a food fight in stay outside the prison cafeteria. Have I got some places for you. Probably the most famous one is law. Toma Tina held each year and billion Spain. It's here that friends. Neighbors tourist pitched tomatoes at each other. It happens in late August and about one hundred metric tons of tomatoes. Go flying for about an hour. I'll put a video link to it in the show notes. Moving up the road to Italy. You'll you'll find the battle of oranges. It began after a woman killed a ruler. WHO said he had the right to sleep with any bride on her wedding night? These days that Murderous Act Act is celebrated by soldiers in period costumes riding through the streets and chariots with people hurling oranges at him as a symbol of the people rising up against unjust rulers. I it's messy and fun with a hint of citrus. Charlie Chaplin inspired the World Custard Pie Championship in Cox Heath Britain teams of five work work against one another to land pie strategically on their opponents. A pie to the face gets the most points in reality. The pies are not made custard just flour power and water mandatory springs Colorado hosts a fruitcake tossing contest. It's designed to get rid of all those edible fruit cake to get. During the holidays. There are two classes one for two pound cakes and another four pound cakes and there are the automated divisions that include catapults and slingshots and As you would expect there are great throwing fights along with lots of other varieties. You could do some research it easily come up with more however if you prefer to. Diy Your own food nick. I've got some helpful hints. I attacked from the rear. If you're staging your own fight be sure to think about cleanup I because the whole point of this is to make commits if it's outdoors. Make sure there's a garden hose around before any one goes into the house. This is made even easier if you have a nude food fight. One in group of Pranksters plan their fight in a public park just before a major thunderstorm. They also had a friend with a pickup truck so they could ride in the bed. After the fight it has also been recommended to Rub Petroleum Jelly. All over your body before the fight to keep smells and colors from getting into your skin again. If you plan a new food fight right this can add another fund dimension. Apparently food fights are popular for children's birthday parties the kids can be divided into teams that use a progressive list of ingredients ingredients to vanquish their foes. One suggestion was to start with water then progressed to flower. Add a little butter some baking powder and you're ready to make biscuits as is an after battle tree. So what are you going to let everyone toss a balloon filled with fruit juice. Cookies with applesauce beings popcorn mashed potatoes. Pasta Pasta and marshmallows are all good choices. Some of those are good for spearing. So you can add insult to injury so now when it comes to food fights your smart Cookie

Charlie Chaplin Football Monarch High School Harpo Marx John Belushi Bell Brooke Toma Tina Spain New Jersey San Antonio Coconut Creek Florida Los Us Cox Heath Britain Italy Colorado
"chaplin" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:27 min | 11 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It any other way your book Kali really makes the case that Chaplin work to get to the performances we think of today she she didn't just fallen the singing that's true she started out again as he discovered biz Bessie Smith and Leadbelly and she would study those records I interviewed people that hung out with her back you know even in our teenage years and when she first came to San Francisco in sixty three she did try very hard to make it as a blues singer in the North Beach clubs the coffee gallery coughing confusion going out to you know Berkeley and all around the bay area and singing and trying really hard to make it in fact there's some incredible recordings of Janice from that period and she just tried to cover that up that striving but it was really part of her upbringing she was taught by her family that it was important to work really really hard at whatever your chosen profession was and to be the best that you could added and the single yourself out and that's what she tried to do but of course remember she gave that interview during the height of the counter culture when those kind of ambitions and career aspirations it was not cool to have that kind of thing you know it was just goes to follow your bliss yeah be here now is the great mom tosses thinks that and we we just lost but anyway so yeah she tried to cover that up but she tried very hard to make it early on and she was really she does Love Ted to mean she loves the blues and she would study the lyrics she actually started writing songs herself as early as the nineteen sixty two and she did that when she first moved to San Francisco in sixty three as well so she wasn't even just doing covers she was writing her own music as well so talk a little bit more about Janice in San Francisco in nineteen sixty three the this is it a few years before she's gonna hit it big what why was it such a struggle back at that point was she just not fully cooked yet well you know she was young she is twenty years old she hitchhiked from Austin with the great Chet Helms who of course played a huge role in sixty six bringing her back and joining Big Brother but she didn't want to stick around with him he was interested in trying to I guess kind of casually manage for but she wanted to strike out on our own again she really you know this was a place where she could explore her sexuality she met this beautiful young African American woman who became her lover and they began living together she also sharpened her talent as a pool player at Gino Carlos and hanging out playing pool in fact sheet in would kind of hustle up some pool games and make money that way but basically it was a very hand to mouth existence for the most part even though again her voice just as Chet Helms said not to people out of their socks you know she you know she was playing for tabs he was living off just a few dollars and she really didn't have a place to live except for the period when she lived with her lover in the house but most of the time she was sleeping on floors even at the cafe you know the cafes where she played and she fell into you know drink a glass of wine jug wine and very prevalent at the time and some a Cisco was methamphetamine and she started doing that hot and originally it was a way just to stay up all night and create and you know hang out and have fun but the more she did it to the harder it took a toll on her and eventually by nineteen sixty five she was a full on as she described in a letter you know match had she was speed freak she caught herself for me she was injecting math and just totally strung out and got down to like eighty eight pounds so by June of sixty five her friends and some a Cisco put on a greyhound bus and send it back to Texas to savor life basically and and I guess it save your life because she still had a few more left to live but that couldn't have been fun going back to Port Arthur after which she had had experienced in Texas well she was frightened she knew how close to death she had come and her parents of course immediately took her in nursed her back to health and the other thing that kind of kept her going with this horrific guy that she met who's a real hustler con man she met him in San Francisco he also was a speed addict and he proposed marriage to Janice and she suddenly found this kind of white picket fence ideal was being what was gonna think save her life and she never really had to this kind of romantic love you know ideal for her future and she just kind of bought into that and I think it was really kind of a lifeline to bring her back health wise and she totally stayed clean for almost a year no drugs no drinking she went back to college she was a commuter student to in Beaumont Texas and was actually a sociology major the good thing for us is that she wrote these unbelievably great letters to this guy about eighty letters of the course maybe three months which are just so fun to read I mean she's very self analytical she's she writes about her past what she wants for the future sure she's describing what life is like for her now you know it's trying to be one of those people that she never fit in with and eventually she realized she couldn't do that and also she was trying to stay away from music for awhile because she thought it was leading her down this to self destructive path but she couldn't stay away and she starts singing again she starts writing songs and performing at some little coffee houses around Houston with the likes of five pounds in sand guy Clark at that part of you know late sixty five and soon she's back performing in Austin again and you know music just was what made her thrive it brought her joy she had to saying she had to make music and even when this horrible guy turned out to be a con man she used music as a way to survive that yet again really horrible horrible hurt that she had to suffer well that seems like a good moment to throw in another cut from Janice when you get up there in your plane it doesn't have anything to do with money I mean are.

Chaplin
"chaplin" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Bay Curious

"Russia cargo team took me up to the projector room in the back of the theater. This is the original from nineteen thirteen as you can see. And why would it have been tim lined. Because of the nitrate fire hazard. You needed some kind of protection on the woods woods. So that if a fire did start wouldn't burn the whole place down. I think I should mention here. Photographic film is a strip of transparent plastic coated on on one side with a light sensitive. Gelatin emulsion do this with a nitro compound and you've got something so reactive it'll burn even after you submerged aged in water so these days keen roles prints not highly flammable nitrates as they're called but the projectors are from the silent film Myra and he literally cranks the films on Saturday nights here actually not too difficult to do you. Just watch the screen and you're on can put much automatically readjust on the fly while you're looking at the screen to see the image at its proper speed. He's also the guy who repairs and researches the background of footage people send here because they niles is a good home for silent films Samarasinghe. What's out there and still is turning up a family just not too long ago brought us five nitrate films that were under house in Stockton rare films that I've never seen before? And what were they up. There was one film that was shot by the miles brothers in Nineteen Tim. Twelve San Francisco Company at ten Franc Park aviation need some more footage from the San Francisco earthquake aftermath. Nineteen six some pretty amazing Steph Rachel. How long did the silent film era last almost forty years from the eighteen ninety s through the nineteen twenties? But a lot of people didn't take these films seriously back then didn't think anybody in the future would care about about a bit of fluff made for the moment or maybe they did but nitrates fires destroyed a lot of foam history. It's amazing how many many films that were made in that time period thousands and thousands of films only a fraction survive but but because there were so many made that still means that there are still a lot of them around. Fortunately were there any surprises for you doing story. You Know Olivia. I don't think I realized how many women were involved in silent film and not just involved. We talked about Charlie Chaplin. But he wasn't the only big talent of this period take for example Mabel normand with bouncy curls and expressive eyebrows. She was the first actress to be tied to the railroad tracks. She she was also at keystone when Charlie Chaplin arrived and taught him a few things before he moved onto Sa. She directed some of the movies. He was in served as his I leading lady for a stretch ran her own production company eventually just like Chaplin thanks to historians like Keane were rediscovering and treasures hidden in plain sight for close to a century. Now can I just watch some of these films on Youtube in my jammies with my own popcorn. Yes you can't but but I'll tell you I have done a lot of that for this story and a lot of the musical choices. Her awful also the quality of the prints nut so great either plus. There's something to the physical experience of watching a movie in a theater with a live piano player. And what does our question asker her Jose Nunez have to say about your story. I was really blown away by the very insightful. At it just basically gave me more for a history of my hometown. It's not only just a you know a piece of history for Free Monitor the bay area but also all of California. 'cause people think moviemaking. I was born and still lives in a so-called but this as bunches of North Korea as it is anything else so Olivia I just WanNa reemphasize. Something Keen said about us. The most successful silent film company in the Bay Area Jose's parents and it must be said a fair number of bay area. Journalists have suggested Niles was Hollywood boo for Hollywood. But that's really an overstatement. Niles was big for the bay area but it was still an outpost for Chicago Studio and Hollywood deserves. The screen credit gets well. Aren't you the Party pooper. Rachel I'm not saying don't go and feel I love for Niles and silent film. Just keep it real fixed a few weeks ago. We asked you to tell us your favorite favorite big curious episode. Here's a message. We got from Clare in Oakland. Eight favorite be curious episode was the one about how it Sound decibels of the trains. Every time I ride part I might years or like put my ear bud. We're making a playlist with all of your suggestions and it's not too late to get your favorite in the mix. Tell us your favorite voice memo and send it to Bay curious at Kqed.org Committee Dot Org be sure to say your name and the city where you live to be. Curious is made in San Francisco at K. Q.. I'm Alan Price..

Steph Rachel Charlie Chaplin San Francisco Niles niles Bay Area Jose Kqed.org Committee Dot Org Russia Jose Nunez Youtube Mabel normand Alan Price Myra California Stockton North Korea Hollywood Clare Franc Park Olivia I
"chaplin" Discussed on Bay Curious

Bay Curious

05:47 min | 11 months ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Bay Curious

"Olivia what do you think of. When you think about silent films Let's see they're Kinda jerky black and white. I guess I think of like the classic story where there's a villain who ties a Damsel in distress to the railroad and you're waiting to see. Will the hero come to save her in time. Yes that's definitely one of his genres. There were silent horror movies to like a creepy vampire with big teeth. Enhance it really. Set The standard for all scary movies to come. I also think about Charlie Chaplin. You know that kind of sweet sad guy who got into all kinds of trouble and it turns out some of the films that catapulted him to Megastar status shot right here in the Bay Area Ellen. preis hanging out. Today with Kikuchi Silicon Valley Editor Rachael. Myrow we got a question about those early days of silent film. From Jose Zeh Munoz. Who grew up in Fremont I've always been fascinated by movies watch movies and his parents told him something? He's wondering about for years. That movies were once made in Fremont. That's the reason why I wanted to reach out to you. Guys to get more insight on the mirror to see if we tate Fremont West Hollywood. That's right to your listeners. We here at bay curious are about to embark on an audio story about silent films. Elms this should be fun stick around. So where were we silent films in Phrma. Yes I mean no shade to Fremont but we talking about the turn of the twentieth century right. I would have thought at the time if you were GonNa make a movie in the bay area. You'd probably make them in San Francisco. They were we're movies. Shot in San Francisco lots of great locations including Market Street Golden Gate Park. But I'll let David keene till the story. He's got the the best job Livia. He's the historian for the Niles. Sna Silent Film Museum Niles used to be its own town before it was incorporated into Fremont. It's like a place lost in time. The main drag looks like a movie set with about four blocks of old buildings. Maybe not dating back to the eighteen fifties when Niles was established stabbed but some time after that in one thousand nine hundred twelve. The essence of Film Company came denials. They spelled E. S. S. A. N. A. Y.. Why and it was a phonetic spelling of the two owners? Last name's George Spor. Who is the businessman and ran the Chicago Studio and Broncho Billy Anderson who was the first Western movie star Cowboy Anderson had been traveling around the United States for three years looking for the perfect perfect weather and filming location for the Westerns that he was making and came upon Niles and stayed here for the next four years? There's and made over three hundred fifty films. It was the most successful silent film company in the Bay area. Wait three hundred and fifty films in in just four years. I know it's hard to imagine now but film companies at the time churned out movies. At the rate of several a week they tended to be thin on plot plot and big on action chase scenes and slapstick comedy. The companies hired a lot of actors from the world of Vaudeville theatre people with the physical stamina and comedic chops for this kind of work. Keane says Bronco. Billy spotted a rising talent a rival movie. Production Company in Southern California L. A. -fornia a young English comedian by the name of Charlie Chaplin Chaplin had been working at the Keystone Film Company for one hundred fifty dollars weekend His contract was almost up and Broncho. Billy's right hand man Jess Robbins. Signed him up. Estimate for one thousand two hundred fifty dollars a week and a ten thousand dollar signing bonus at that time ten grand would be worth something like two hundred fifty five thousand dollars today. It was inexpensive bet that paid off resonate chaplain didn't particularly like this dusty. Do One horse town. But he made five films here that cemented his standing as a movie star one of those was the tramp filmed the iconic scene of walking walking away from the camera in Niles Canyon which still looks a lot like it did back then big trees and dappled sunlight over a winding country road. Yeah that's it's a senior. He's wearing a bad suit and bowler hat and he's like kind of waddling away from US right. This was also a time when seal lab chaplain to transition. I'm from being a performer with a popular bit in someone else's film to a filmmaker himself exercising creative control every one of his essence. SONATE films survive. Because they've never been out of distribution his time it was very pivotal to his career and then they couldn't afford him anymore anymore. We'll almost he was still under contract with us. And A and went on to make a few more movies for the company but in southern California which by then and was well on its way to becoming Hollywood the center the Movie Making Universe as for the studio and Niles it kept on keeping up but then Takis became popular in the nineteen twenties quiet to record the sound and the Niles Film Studios Seventy train. Train tracks became an insurmountable problem..

Fremont United States Billy Anderson Charlie Chaplin Chaplin Niles Niles Canyon Sna Silent Film Museum Niles Film Studios Jose Zeh Munoz California Hollywood San Francisco Film Company Olivia Kikuchi Silicon Valley Keystone Film Company David keene Livia Myrow George Spor
Chaplains Deploy to Texas After Weekend of Deadly Shootings

WBT's Morning News w/ Bo Thompson

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Chaplains Deploy to Texas After Weekend of Deadly Shootings

"And on the ground in el Paso a chaplain from Charlotte who's offering counsel then comfort heavy mood but all the people are grieving and one in the law although a lot L. new lives in Charlotte but right now he's in el Paso he's Chaplin coordinator for the Billy Graham rapid response team this mission ten from the group there you know you're all right over here and el Paso that nothing like this happens here this is a community that everybody gets along well there's no problems and it took somebody to drive seven hundred miles come here to do this to them saw a memorial that set up that you're out the Walmart driveway and there's all these crowds of people and and and our condolences there at the mall site and a carpenter from Aurora Illinois Greg xanthus they call in the cross man he's been bringing crosses to shooting scenes since the Columbine shooting question as the victim's name on it so the mourners Woodstock false to where there was a family member or friend shows like they could you know like something I like to catch it could have been worse the toll in el Paso could have been even higher this Walmart is part of a very busy market place I understand and estimated number of people that were on the ground there were about six thousand people around the Walmart and the mall it's in it's connected to a mall there about six thousand people our alarm come all were on buses from Mexico to do their shop and then go back next fall so what do you say to people in such pain there's just no truer words of town on a man please try to all look him up and let him know that they're not alone that god is still in control and god loves them and we try to offer them hope in Jesus nine says for the people in el Paso the event will be engraved in our memories forever besides consoling the chaplains working to prevent a second tragedy real concern is the future because follow behind the same justice sick later suicide starts take place and it can be within the first responders organizations or can be family members this is not al news first mass shooting well probably about eight nine shooting mass shootings like this first when I lay down almost sandy hook Newtown Connecticut the mission not easy now it's not easy but that the chaplains and my current job are chaplains than I do we encourage them to take a strong car lot and always have change prayed for you come home when you do call is that something like this and that's what your first visit where yeah we know it has to be that we would make that a ourself with the right mind the chaplain he had one request every Lester's to continue to hold the diagram rappers Fosse chaplains in prayer that's what takes

El Paso Charlotte
"chaplin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

Classic Movie Musts

03:09 min | 2 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Classic Movie Musts

"When you think when you think about the best directors, obviously, Charlie Chaplin is certainly one of them. It is that balance of I m moaning to use certain techniques with my camera, but I need to understand as well that this that the story needs to be told within the frame. The frame is key. And I'm gonna have a rich tapestry of things going on at one time, which is no small feat in early nineteen twenties. When you certainly didn't have the technical capacity. Use the camera like you could later on or let alone today, and then editing very much at that point editing is involved with a the pacing, which we've talked about is excellent and those elements like irises, which weren't necessarily as much editing techniques as they would later become right? But it is that sense of I'm gonna draw your your focus, and your emotion, a very particular way. I love thinking of rich frames? It's a small visual joke. But we are introduced to the tramp. He walks down the his his promenade as they say, which is excellent moment. And he dodges the items being thrown out of the window. And he's later then almost hit by some bricks. I think they are. And then it's this long shot as you say extremely calm. He's not telegraphing. He uses reaction shots when he needs to. But he's not gonna use it all the time. And it's this moment when he looks down to see this baby. And based on the events that have just transpired soup. Did someone just throw this baby out of the window looks way up and it's this fantastic moment of I've I've given you a one two three to build your expectation as to what's going to happen to understand from the character's point of view, the assumptions he's making and it makes for a fantastic visual joke. Actually mentioned the one two three. He then follows that with another one two three. And if you really want to analyze it closely. It's a one two three within a one two three, and it has to do with putting that baby in the baby carriage with the woman who has the other baby in the baby carriage, and then ponding off on the old man who then puts it back in the baby carriage, and it's. Richly analyze that? As you can tell to one-two-three jokes with end the same one-two-three joke. It's it's master stroke and invite you into the early moments of this film rich with laughter, and and coming to understand the tramp, and they human thing and the tramp look don't hand me a baby I got a life to lead. I don't know what to do with this baby. And then and then then you've got he's got to earn the the right to take on that baby. If he just took on the baby from the beginning because it was a good guy. It would not be as interesting story. Absolutely. And it's it's those key early. I mean, obviously the film fast forward five years. We get the bulk of the movie with Jackie Coogan, John as a five year old, but you get that key scene of of Charlie Chaplin's, ingenuity of how to take care of baby..

Charlie Chaplin Jackie Coogan John five years five year
YouTube adds feature films to view for free

Talking Tech

05:06 min | 2 years ago

YouTube adds feature films to view for free

"Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com with wicks you can use artificial design intelligence to create a stunning website right from your phone in five minutes or less. Just go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your professional website today. Get out the popcorn. So in a world where YouTube is now being viewed on TV sets marks tablets. The video network has quietly added the -bility feature films for free YouTube cut a deal with movie studio MGM to offer over one hundred of its films. Most of them, you haven't heard of the ones you have heard, of course, would be the rocky and Pink Panther movies. The original Terminator, legally blonde. And then it all falls downhill from there missing in action or films from other studios like Twentieth Century, Fox, Walt Disney Sony, Warner Brothers and paramount. But it's a start, you know, that YouTube is best known as the home of the short video clip, although some of its creators who make videos for YouTube like Shane Dawson and Logan Paul have recently been experimenting with longer original productions additionally YouTube is embarked upon longer original says part of the YouTube premium offering which. Each offer an ad free way to watch in Kane access to exclusive content. So these YouTube films feature ads unless you subscribe to the nine ninety nine monthly YouTube premium offering they appeared directly under the collection of recently released films and TV shows that YouTube currently offers for rent and sale. I think of YouTube is a place to watch short video clips and highlights from comedy shows not full length films, but I checked out the movie section and they've got all the trend movies, and and more. I saw crazy risks crazy. Rich Asians is there. Disney's the incredible too. And they're even advertising current hits. Like a star is born in bohemian rhapsody in the coming soon section expect to pay around five dollars to rent twenty dollars to own YouTube. Also offers episodes and seasons of popular TV shows like AMC's better. Call Saul NBC's, the good place in the classic. I edition of Star Trek at three bucks per episode where ten dollars to fifteen dollars for the complete season similar pricing to how apple does it on I tunes and Amazon with prime video. Now, you may not have heard, but in recent weeks, there's been an outcry over AT&_T's decision to kill the film struck subscription movie services, which is one of the few places online. We're film fans could get access to watching old classics be a streaming think about it. When's the last time you found a classic movie on Netflix? There are a handful on Amazon prime video, but most of them you have to pay to watch it just check it out the next time one of the Hollywood greats dies like Neil, Simon. And then go try to find one of his his or her films to to watch streaming. It's pretty rough. Now, many film pants have wondered where today's generation we'd get the classics like Charlie Chaplin's city lights, duck soup by the Marx brothers or Casablanca with Humphrey Bogart in Ingrid. Bergman not on Netflix Amazon prime, but they are all available on YouTube Ditto for itunes in food do but they cost to ninety nine to three. Ninety nine to view, and that ten dollars monthly from films truck was clearly a better deal, what YouTube is doing with the film's makes a lot of sense because you may not be aware of this. But nearly twenty percent of YouTube Ewing now done on TV's either on smart sets with the built in YouTube app where via streaming players like Roku, apple TV which bring the YouTube app to TV sets. Are you watching movies on YouTube? Let me hear all about it on Twitter where I'm at Jefferson Graham, you've been listening to talking tech, please subscribe to the show on apple podcasts. Please favored the show on Stitcher. And thanks everyone for listening. Talking tech is brought to you by wicks dot com. When you're ready to get your website up and running you want to be able to do it quickly and efficiently and wicks dot com has got you covered. They developed artificial design intelligence that creates a stunning website for you with wicks, you can create your own professional website right from your phone, which means you can open your own online store portfolio or blog wherever you are. How's that for officiant? Just go to wicks dot com. Decide what you need a website for pick your style at your own images link your social accounts and just like that your website is ready. You look amazing on every device desktop and mobile and it takes less than five minutes. Plus, you can do it with one hand. So it's time to get started. Go to wicks dot com. That's W I X dot com and create your very own beautiful professional website today.

Youtube Amazon Apple Netflix Disney AMC MGM Charlie Chaplin Twentieth Century AT Kane Humphrey Bogart Shane Dawson Saul Nbc Twitter Warner Brothers Sony Jefferson Graham FOX Bergman
California Sets Goal Of 100 Percent Clean Electric Power By 2045

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

01:06 min | 2 years ago

California Sets Goal Of 100 Percent Clean Electric Power By 2045

"California will get all of its energy from clean sources twenty seven years. That is the lofty goal announced by governor Brown in Sacramento today. He CBS's Jeffrey Schaub reports the state capital. The California's electric energy providers will have to be carbon free by the year. Twenty forty five governor already a leading environmental advocates signed into law. Senate Bill one hundred it sets the lofty goal of one hundred percent clean power generation this Bill and others. I'm gonna sign this week helpless go in this direction, but have no illusions, California and the rest of the. World have miles to go before we achieve zero carbon emissions, but you have to begin you have to get something done. California's been doing stuff that the rest of the world. Most of the world is just opening. They might get some day the governor joined legislative leaders and environmentalists in making his announcement. The Bill requires that the state's energy providers. Eliminate all fossil fuels by twenty forty five. And the Bill also requires that utilities. Meet the goal of sixty percent renewable source power by the year,

California Governor Brown Bill Jeffrey Schaub Sacramento Walnut Creek Police Department Tom Chaplin Kcbs Vacaville Margie Schaefer John Carla Reporter Senate Daniel Union Square Hans CBS
Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

Herald

05:40 min | 2 years ago

Jesse Widener of Klamath Film

"Heralded news news learn is now. Empowering the community base, slow the news, your news with falls, Oregon. Empowering the community and serving mclamb basin. This is the the news facing us pop. Greetings and welcome to base views heralded news podcast featuring interviews with local experts discussing issues important to the climate basin. I'm kirtland key with the herald news this week. We're joined by Jesse Widener Klamath film here to discuss one of my favorite topics, movies, upcoming events, such as the annual climate independent film festival and a special screening with a very special guest coming soon. Jesse, thank you so much for taking the time out of your schedule to join us here. Well, we will get into everything that Clem film entails and just a little bit. But I always like to start these things off a little bit of background on our guests themselves. Can you educate us a little bit more about who Jesse Widener? Sure. So I've actually got a fairly wide arts back there used to work as a draftsman architect California for about seven years before I moved up here, I've studied music composition, do some drawing some writing. I practiced photography for several years before I started getting into the film thing. So the film thing actually really comes from being the sort of great medium. It's an amalgamation of all these other disciplines that you. You can do kind of throw all these different dispirit interests into one thing. So what was the first video project that you worked on? The first project was probably the first project I did with Klamath film, and it was on one of those old. I don't say hold the nineties hand held nineties early two, thousands of Devi Cam with the digital video tape. And one of the first things I learned was that the screen on it is not as it shows brighter than what the actual film was. So I was exposing to the screen and when I actually took the footage home to work on, it was so dark. I had to crank everything is still looked nasty and black, and it was horrible. I'm from Hollywood is well, I grew up in Eugene, but I spent a long time in Hollywood and those Devi cameras there fuzzy because when I was working on a lot of projects, some of those cameras were fifty thousand eight hundred thousand dollars now that everything's gone digital. They're selling those things on EBay for one hundred bucks. People can't get rid of them. Yeah, yeah, ours, ours is more of a consumer grade one though that we were. We're using it was, you know, like something you'd pick up Fred Meyer or whatnot, and it just wasn't that hot and me not knowing what I was doing with it was even worse. So well, one thing that I have found fascinating being involved in film is the number of people like yourselves that got involved in simply by doing, didn't have formal Bagger. There are film schools that people can go to, but lots of times people just get involved when it for the sake of having an idea grabbing a camera and giving a try and kind of learning as you go. Right. That's a funny thing because I think you know, obviously the film industry is still young, maybe one hundred years, old hundred twenty years old. Just you know, it's not like painting or something like that, and it's been a master apprentice industry for a long, long time. You know, you start working on a film as gopher basically, and work your way up. And then at some point you did start getting into the film school stuff with that sort of seemed to be the advice path go to films go, go to USC, go to southern California, whatever the case maybe and then it not in the last probably twenty years with the advance. In technology with the internet, having all of these YouTube videos, and there's several channels that teach you how to do all these filmmaking techniques or whatnot. I think it's really democratized and commodities that industry where you can just from your house, you'll get a five hundred dollar camera. It's amazing compared to anything from, you know, ten twenty years ago and then sit on YouTube for your to do stuff. You know, the technology's advanced, but what's really fascinating to me as just a fan of film in general. I love going back to the old silent film era, the little black Charlie Chaplin Buster Keaton and stuff like that. And you look at the things that they were doing. They were inventing how films are made then. And while the technology may have changed the method for creating film really hasn't and over the course of a century, right? Yeah. The structure is generally isn't actually, I have a slight complaint about structure of fill. You know, when when film for start out, you're talking late, eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds and nobody really knew what to do with it. You know there was this massive creativity of, you know. What? What wild things can I do? You know what weird effects can I do? How can I freak people out that never seen something on screen like this and somewhere in the teens, the nineteen teens. It's sort of took on this the purpose of films to tell a story. And I think it's really been pigeonholed in that one hundred years. You know, it's it's like saying the purpose of painting before there was photography. The purpose of painting was to be as realistic as possible and the medium geared towards that realism until in the eighteen hundreds of the camera came out and they realize somebody could just snap a picture. So you know what was the point of painting now that's when you saw painting expand into, you know, pression ISM and surrealism and Dada. ISM cubism and Jackson Pollock jap- technique and all this kind of wild stuff. And

Klamath Klamath Falls Oregon Portland Ralph Dr Ralph L Las Vegas Writer Eccles New York Siskiyou County Tula Lake James Ivory San Francisco Steve Buscemi Jesse Widener Reisen
"chaplin" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:53 min | 2 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"Keeping uh first responders the emotionally healthy and that's a big thing now days behavioral health riot it aamir chap shaplen some summary recommendations that you send out all across the country uh the first paragraph and here i know we talk about uh different uh agencies and we're talking about what people have ranked dummy said fearing you first paragraph chaplin's according to a recent report from the national volunteer firefighters foundation just as of december two thousand fourteen one pink suicide in the fire service strategies for intervention and prevention a fire department is three times more likely to experience a suicide in any given year gen eight line of duty death the number of suicides another wire service continue to exceed the line of duty dust and i know where we have to do pastors just add on other word police every time we say firefighters we added that i know many cops go through the same thing uh this is amazing stuff this is the things that people never slipped back in and take the time to to study these things okay uh you know again you you were they here after poring over available reports and studies now you've attended conferences seminars training opportunities and you provided no arrests hours of council and spiritual guide you you look concur with the almost overwhelming consensus and then you submitted the following summary why don't you tell the people one guy one what they were well you know my place following the summary uh hero following uh all of these hours of serb involvement you know the the fire service and the law enforcement community must recognize the impact that this job is is having uh about physically emotionally and spiritually um it it is taking its toll it is having its impact and these departments must recognize this um all tho uh the entire community when i see the community i mean the it's the law enforcement bars service all of the professionals must work together as a team you're you're a high ranking officials uh your individual firecrackers police officers counselors chaplin's near uh uh critical infants stress management teams that sector everybody's got to work together to tackle this problem uh and then finally uh as a vital part of this effort in keeping our first responders healthy and and save.

chaplin
"chaplin" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Ops first responders the emotionally healthy and that's a big thing nowadays behavioral health right in you chaps chaplin's sons summary recommendations that you spend level across the country uh the first paragraph and here i know we talk about uh the prince uh and uh agents speech and we're talking about what people have a ranks that makes sense here and you first paragraph chaplin's according to a recent report from the national hauling firefighters foundation just as of december two thousand fourteen confronting on size and the fire service strategies for intervention and prevention a flyer departments his three times more likely to experience a suicide in any given year then eight line the foodies out the number of suicide suicides another fire service continue to accede whine of through these at i know all we have to do pastors looked at on the word police that we thought we'd save firefighters police that i know many cops to go through the same thing a infant amazing stuff this ones claims that people that were back in and take the time to to study these things okay uh you know again you after falling over available reports from studies potential conflict seminars training opportunities you provided.

chaplin
"chaplin" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

Bertcast's Podcast

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Bertcast's Podcast

"Fight in our house it's a on and apologize so i read charlie chaplin's autobiography and then i did a an episode about charlie chaplin um i am i'm i'm going to paris this weekend i've got a show at theater delude vergara on the 29th so i think next week when i get back i'm gonna do an episode on the french revolution once i finish this book so like i'm doing like a lot of research and a lot of a really interesting who'll one of the will episodes now ytl i feel like and it's all game naive about we were talking about earlier where the thing i get off about travelling is like learning the most that i can about these places or like people were my heroes who are from there have you done oris podcast it's been a few years got to do our is podcasts again because already now is gone through i think that that renaissance at personal renaissance you went through and now ari is very mike very very much like a bow um when he travels being being a very small footprint very much engrained very much learning like you know in in traveling with him is really interesting and i always say it i guess he did an interview with uh henry rollins and it changed the way he looked at his life iis hun rollin said enron's eliagu go into a place fucking bala water a book a notebook walk round coffee right meet the people out something great go into a museum you'll find some shit that you really want to learn about i used to love this this writer james mission her um in may of course road all his books about hawaii in alaska would take a subject and then and he had a great quote of uh if you don't wanna experienced the food and the people of different locations why even bother travelling yeah and and i would read mr as i travelled and he would tell they were they were fictionalized the stories that.

charlie chaplin vergara henry rollins rollin writer hawaii alaska paris ari
"chaplin" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

Talk Is Jericho

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Talk Is Jericho

"And you'll figure everything up songs not just mine anybody's charlie chaplin smile though your heart is a king smile loyal harden brick i mean what a song it lifts your spirit your brokenhearted you hear that and if it happened at a certain point in your life it's the sound track of your life people get married songs they have babies the songs f football matches countries have song every country's gotta song so songs are more than just all that's an ice melody when it is really important it becomes and thermic or a funeral march or a banana it's a janphilipp souza march but military goes to war with music and we haul it it goes all the way back to when we first came out of caves as australopithecus africanus and started pounding on of liberal orleans you've nasal him and howling at the wolf howling at the moment rather and started to zero started doing our first melody's that overcame out while could we have copyrighted those songs her iq those melody's those isoed daily beats they're all before those first melody's that came out of the human throat instead of before and so what i'm saying is what is my life though how was never on an album so my favorite who knows we had it but like thief in the night or murder and high yields are not taken the place that's right yeah who knows when were there you go we have a lotta tunes and you pick the wanson boom there you go but.

charlie chaplin murder
"chaplin" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on WTRH

"Welcome back to hate in the night julie's talking about angerer specifically blade rages she disgust with the police chaplin's male and female today uh so wonderful folks julia wonderful job working was first responders but essentially with police officers in helping them through the things they see on the road every day like road rage like anger and the things that they experience themselves because they're called to a higher may have to hold a lot of stuff fan so if you feel like you're holding anger in whether you're a police officer or a chap or a pastor or just a regular ruled joe who loves lowered lie all the rest of us anger is a good subject to take a close look out and take a look at our material and see how it can help you i was looking through the material is june was talking just a moment ago when i noticed the recalled from proverbs fourteen twenty nine a patient man has great understanding but a quicktempered man an displays folly boy you stop and think about that before you start yelling at the other driver go along way right there if you want more information.

julie chaplin officer joe
"chaplin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"Casting couch rumors have been out there because there was there we've seen it movies you know the shady producer i'll come in addition apart or even induce were seen know come in for a thing and then it's a porn felt lotto show yeah i want you to be a model but really it's you know the guy is going to try and take unit taking you should act on your fifteen or sixteen and whatever it's it's been going on as well as leverage yes fifthly going on as long as there's the men and women has been going on and argue there have been wieners gates rougerie so hollywood um the first sex scandal because of course you know move these have been devon been around since the age of time you know it's like a 20s or mid teens i wish hollywood still here twenty ilala derechette kerley jablanica in the saw and charlie chaplin i mean one of the ways how he got to mark hitler in hollywood was he made those movies with his own money because hollywood was unsure which way the country was going to take a stand on hitler way and they didn't want to offend cause for whatever and so he made those movies you know where he's making front of hitler with his omani money yes you've made enough mine in hollywood charlie chaplin so there's this guy there is a comedian by the name of roscoe fatty are buckle andrea yup you and he was accused of raping and killing this actress and it was all completely covered up it was just absolutely terrible over the fix survey donovan yeah he attended a wild party in san francisco and the woman got out ruptured bladder okay that's oor sibley he raped her hi accused him of raping her which she died days later he was charged with murder which was then downgraded to manslaughter broke because he was so popular as this you know this comedian diner that he was acquitted after three two rivals three two hour did a thing he i don't have it in front of me but i want to say that he died like in his forties of alcohol i know he did i retirement came back to him i think his career was pretty much done because it was be does retrain but he.

producer hollywood charlie chaplin san francisco murder mark hitler roscoe three two hour
"chaplin" Discussed on WTRH

WTRH

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on WTRH

"And practical help i'm roger manning here with author and speaker ju hunt you were talking to some brothers of mine an organization i belong to for many many years don't right now but i see peace see international comforts of police chaplin's and they were meeting right here in dallas said was their national convention august right they're still is retained his atbat way and brothers and sisters tokyo i'm thank you well i'm sorry not know is there baptist in neck there there are a number of uh police chaplin's who are women as well as men the predominant gender is is male and i thought okay i'm going to be speak leap we have something called an the officers ride long guide and it's sam it's a couple of russian of forty topics chosen by actually bikers and um they it has on the front the badge and a a leather look of a the the volume that we have here but the point is they want and need help no one knows everything i certainly no i'm just i'm just a lerner and i am so appreciative that there is such a thing as police chaplin's because they deal with issues uh of huge importance uh if there's a death caused by tragedy that's one of the things we talked that today when i was i was explaining an and and just dealing with this topic.

chaplin dallas lerner roger manning
"chaplin" Discussed on Norm Macdonald Live

Norm Macdonald Live

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Norm Macdonald Live

"I don't want to shoot myself in the foot but my left big toe is a neo nazi even worse my big right toe believes that there should be a gender pay gap gender vega you can't dealers just not funny still is end up time except he did kill the mustache style allegedly yeah i would either on area nation guys in prison would to the tattoo fuck you on their foreheads press still wouldn't go that far rioted they get swastikas everywhere but they go now that's too much did what cradled her near song yeah rochelle were garage other give me because that's where it grew huddled last person i expected attributing the charlie chaplin hitler you'll you guys at ever did tried that went that look to it they hitler took it from chance of there is a man of the people here stashed foggy said before the great dictator guerrillas pictures remember that picture about the other hitler member or one is i'm jim coil here is the first portable he was very common knowledge did tweet music married i bet you have never met a bigger hitler above no uh he's a revisionist holocaust denier wow you feel better although say his arguing that i know i know i know i had a the world minutes hunch i'm full ju how'd you sing stall and everyone overlook sahlin i'm just saying saw a solid gun towers were not yet yeah they're they're both terrible no no no.

jim coil charlie chaplin hitler
"chaplin" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

Sports 600 ESPN

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"chaplin" Discussed on Sports 600 ESPN

"In his he should know but to me it's also not like a crime that hitler it's like me nuts it's criminal it's like me say view charlie chaplin you going you know the name sal j james you're you're a younger guy do you know who charlie chaplin is yeah i know you don't you don't have you ever heard of gone with the wind i've heard of gone with the wind yet have you ever heard of the movie the godfather yes of her them marlon brando i knew who that is out chino know him i said james zoos it was like bellenger light knows all these guys there but those gathered judas mention our are still present i mean the thing with charlie chaplin blessed that charlie but i'm saying what seinfeld like seinfeld ended and that was kinda the end of his tv presence right like it wasn't like he just kept going i mean five it will so big it in half to but like i said i think there are what is by what do you know several does now what is big thing that he does that that like coffee and car so that that's that's a little bit now y chhien culture what sterckele you didn't see that video locked up the edges i can i get a hog is now the guy's hysterical he's big he's huge ed like i said coach should know but it's a generational thing toot bad you know why can't you just stand up and be honest and say codeveloped said janvier roberts is a is a minor league star and you said oprah isn't even the same conversations jerry side though tune into it and they'll central bank saddle on sunday night baseball is teams like the cardinals that maybe some of us have heard of host the a team known as the pirates.

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