Audioburst Search

24 Burst results for "Champlain"

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

The Town Haul

09:07 min | Last month

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation: Kristy Jones and Liz Soper

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish school. So I believe you know similar to Liz. I grew up outdoors playing all the time spending all day in the summertime that we would be out as soon as the sun was up and become home. You know. As soon as it was starting to get dark I grew up camping. You know we would go to the closest national park to win where we grew up was Shenandoah National Park here in Virginia and I still live in this area in that area. So we we go to the park all the time. It's beautiful and so I take my little girl there as well So just growing up. We spent a Lotta time outdoors. I really enjoyed seeing wildlife and spending time and hiking and going to the beach and searching for seashells and that sort of thing when I graduated college. Actually a little bit. Before I graduated college I went on a trip to Andros Island. The Bahamas in it's a family island in the Bahamas and I went to a field station their biological field station and that is where I spent the next six years of my life. After College I worked at the field station. I worked with college. Students and high school high school students helping down learn about ecology and learning field skills in that type of thing and that really helped me really understand value of hands on learning. So you know whenever you education as you know there's sitting in the classroom and learning there is value to that there's also value to being out in the field learning skills. You know the experiential part of that and so. When after that after I left the field station I worked for nonprofit for a little bit in the environmental security sector and that really looked at conflict around natural resources so water timber diamonds was another example and that that was looking at conflicts most likely outside the US. And then. When I started looking for a new opportunity I was really attracted to. Nwf's education programs. We have a very large education program. National Wildlife Federation engaging. Little kids all the way up through adults and so that is kind of what got me hooked at. Nwf and applied for a job on the campus sustainability team. And so I've been here since two thousand three. That's awesome okay so I will let you guys now kind of feel these answer. You know whoever wants to answer white and build upon each other's responses in we're going to focus a lot on education recycle mania but you know the. Nwf Is a massive umbrella brand for a lot of different environmental conservation causes. So I did want to do a little bit of background about the mission. You know the strategic plan the six pillars of what makes the NWF and then we can get into the specs of the educational programs so whoever wants to field kind of the overall NWF mission answer can A. I'll go again and you know the midst of NWF is really to unite ensure that wildlife thrive in a rapidly changing world and There's no doubt in all of our minds and these days that our world is rapidly changing whether it's with this pandemic Like we're facing right now or the pack that more than one third of Americans. Fish and wildlife are at risk for extinction or the climate crisis. And of course all of these impacts what the impacts are on any of our marginalized communities so you recently. I just wanted to mention this because I think it's really important and it really sets the stage who I believe. Nwf is particularly right now and our it was CEO Calling Amarah who recently said that we need to be leading this charged with compassion. You know during this time because this pandemic is clearly showing that men. There are many structural inequalities in our societies such as access to clean water food healthcare or the

National Wildlife Federation LIZ Christie Europe Shenandoah National Park Youtube Jones Rubicon Oregon Andros Island Bahamas Lake Champlain Basin Vermont United States Director Greensboro Official Virginia Ceo Calling Amarah
A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

The Town Haul

04:53 min | Last month

A Sit Down with The National Wildlife Federation

"Everyone and welcome to another episode of the town hall as all move forward we have been stuck for like two and a half months now and it's really weird time in history but the town hall is staying dedicated to telling really important sustainability stories. And we're lucky. We get some really massive brands. This episode is one of those lucky ones. Today I'm actually joined by two guests. Jones enlisted were from National Wildlife Federation earlier in the year. Rubicon was named the official sustainability and tech partner for recycle mania of the competition under the management of the NWF but will get into all of that and enlists. Thank you both so much for being here today thank you. I've only done multiple jest episodes like once or twice so let's just establish a little bit of water for answering some of the questions. Honest truth besides my husband and my dog youtube or the only people. I've interacted with today so I'm a little over all of us to bumble words over each other so Liz let's start with you. Tell me a bit about your role at. Nwf A little bit about your professional time line and how you can got to where you are and then in that time line or in your story what do you think sparked passion for environmental sustainability in in Christie. You're on deck and I'd love to know the same free. We'll start with this. I am the director of Pre K. To twelve education for National Wildlife Federation. I have actually end with the fedaration for most of my career. I'm going into my twenty four th year and I really started off in a regional office and did a lot of regional education work and for the last eleven years have been focusing my efforts and the national level And really pushing forward the work that we do with schools and other informal education opportunities and community My background actually. My undergraduate degree was in wildlife biology and forestry and I started off as a wildlife biologist but Kinda fun interesting fact is I found. I had a lot more fun topping and and I feel like I made a bigger impact talking with people within the community that I was doing my research in collecting data. You know like the nighttime Barstool chat where we were talking about. Grizzly Bear Habitat. And what it meant to you know Maintain and keep that habitat healthy and the ways people get involved so that that's somewhat how I moved from that into education and got my masters in education at in Oregon And then pretty much. Except for one other job with The Lake Champlain Basin Program doing watershed education. I've been working for WF And you know my my passion for this work. I I think really stems back from my childhood. I was lucky enough to spend every single summer and a place called a Greensboro Vermont which is in North East Kingdom of Vermont on Kathy Lake. It was my grandparents Cabin and my parents would just throw out the door every morning We'd be gone all day with the catching crayfish and swimming at night. We'd be catching lightning bugs and watching a shooting stars with my grandparents and it just it set the stage for my wanting to be able to pass this Passion for Nature and the environment and to also protect loved that Christie Europe. Sure yeah so I have been with National Wildlife Federation for several years as well. I think I'm going on. I started in two thousand three at National Wildlife Federation. So I guess I'm going on my sixteenth seventeenth year. I've worked in higher education program so I manage higher education programmes at National Wildlife Federation working with colleges and universities working with them to help them advance their efforts on campus Sustainability Renewable Energy Waste Reduction Habitat Restoration Green purchasing that sort of thing. And I've I've done that since the entire time I've been at NWS We also in our program here. We also help college students. Young professionals develop leadership skills and also learn more about career opportunity so career development to learn what their opportunities are in conservation field or their opportunities are in learning about sustainability and sustainability skill. So they can bring that to whatever a career field sector. They choose to go into after they finish

National Wildlife Federation Christie Europe Youtube LIZ Lake Champlain Basin Vermont Oregon Jones Rubicon Director Greensboro Kathy Lake Official Partner
"champlain" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:37 min | 4 months ago

"champlain" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Is it how is your Sir James family's house in may right and so they told it to buy a house so make Champlain so they could be closer you know to that's all the family as the photos this house I mean it's it's a lake cabin that looks like it came out of the sixties there's nothing would be areas about it like you see that you're like yeah Bernie flake out the problem is real value yeah yeah my point is yeah there is there is there is really yeah I'm the only argument against Bernie Sanders the only argument that has any integrity is is when people say you know we really like this system where the lobbyists give us a lot of money and give us trips and give us free lunches and we passed legislation on their behalf we want to keep that system in place and if they would just be honest about it you know cause burning wants to blow that up as as Elizabeth Warren and yeah but but I'm certain because they they find that that doesn't really win elections to say that you know say all I like to continue to be able to take millions of dollars from people and wine caves and stuff you know because you can't really say that they they they they come up with these be S. arguments I don't know if you saw what John Oliver called well you know I mean I'm getting the circular firing squad stuff here I will but the rate with the Republicans are going to be going after Bernie if Bernie is the nominee is going to be you know all he's a socialist only he's a millionaire he's an elitist and we all know that that's just nonsense so but yeah I agree with you I think that you know our first Jewish president I you know you said it's like Obama being black I you know I've told the story million times on the show during the Obama Hillary primary in two thousand eight I had on one of the one of the as you know top guys in the California Democratic Party he was the vice something of something and and he was black he was an African American very outspoken African American very progressive and he came on and he said you know I'm encouraging people to vote for Hillary Clinton rather than Barack Obama and I'm like you know why and he's like because I'm a black man and I know how bad discrimination is I know how intense racial hatred is in this country I know what the white supremacists are all about I know how you know even average white people in the United States even if they think they're not racist they're harboring racist you know I ideas deep down inside knees and I just don't think America will ever elected black man and then on top of that his middle name is Hussein.

Champlain
"champlain" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

02:13 min | 5 months ago

"champlain" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"So call it gets so cold warrior add to that could have seen something like that when it was breathing the interesting thing is and this has to do with the water temperature during the winter time on Champlain there is only from what I have found out there's only been one very strange stating in the winter time where the code animal broke it had already which is really weird but being an actual term I'd you know more you have N. Vivian lake quite frogs then you also have the common snapping turtle which is in this region they all hibernate in the winter time they go into a **** relate the on the bottom of the lake on the either very themselves completely in the model one partially in the so that would explain why we really don't have stating in the winter time and it kind of a little break from name so I can be my books in the winter but I do actually go out on the ice with my hide your phone with my underwater camera and I do some ice fishing at the same time that I have on you go and look I do with your research and it it's not it's fine to me right okay late there's ice on only I don't know where they're at if they're hibernating in in the late on the bottom but that's one thing I'd like to find out where they go in is toward for like a it will be really amazing to figure that out on another ideas they possibly go into the marsh system and bury themselves in the mud for the winter so that's another idea it it's strange it it's kind of you have to go out there all the time you try to figure this stuff out and I'm out on the lake every single day in the summer I mean is the only time I'm not out there is if it's pouring rain which I've done that you or is it completely windy and in the lake is really really really choppy I don't really particularly go out those days because it very hard to see anything that would pop up too much motion going on.

Champlain N. Vivian lake
"champlain" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

02:14 min | 5 months ago

"champlain" Discussed on KXNT NewsRadio 840 AM

"So call it gets so cold warrior act to they could have seen something like that when it was breathing yeah the the interesting thing is and this has to do with the water temperature during the winter time on Champlain there is only from what I have found out there's only been one very strange sighting in the winter time where the cold animal broke it had through the ice which is really weird but being an actual term I you know more you have N. Vivian lake water frogs then you also have the common snapping turtle which is in this region they all hibernate in the winter time they go into a **** relate the on the bottom of the lake the either very themselves completely in the model one partially in the so that would explain why we really don't have stating in the winter time and it's kind of a little break from name so I can be my books in the winter but I do actually go out on the ice with my hide your phone with my underwater camera and I do some ice fishing at the same time that I have fun sh you go look I do with your research and it's you know it's not it's fine to me because like okay like there's ice on the late I don't know where they're at if they're hibernating in in the lake on the bottom but that's one thing I'd like to find out where they go in its torpor like day it will be really amazing to figure that out another ideas they possibly go into the marsh systems and bury themselves in the mud for the winter so that's another idea it it's strange it it's kind of you you just have to go out there all the time you try to figure this stuff out and I'm out on the lake every single day in the summer I mean is the only time I'm not out there is if it's pouring rain which I've done that to or is it completely windy and in the lake is really really really choppy I don't really particularly go out those days because it's very hard to see anything that would pop up too much commotion going on.

Champlain N. Vivian lake
"champlain" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:14 min | 5 months ago

"champlain" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"So call it gets so cold warrior active they could have seen something like that when it was breathing yeah the the interesting thing is and this happened you would water temperature during the winter time on Champlain there is only from what I have found out there's only been one very strange sighting in the winter time where the cold all animal broke it had through the ice which is really weird but being an actual term I you know more you have N. Vivian's wait quite frogs then you also have the common snapping turtle which is in this region they all hibernate in the winter time they go into a **** relate she on the bottom of the lake the either very themselves completely in the model or partially in the so that would explain why we really don't have savings in the winter time and it's kind of a little break from name so I can do my books in the winter but I do actually go out on the ice with my hide your phone with my underwater camera and I do some ice fishing at the same time that I have on hello look I do with your research and it's you know it's not it's fine to me because right okay like there's ice on only I don't know where they're at if they're hibernating in in the late on the bottom but that's one thing I'd like to find out where they go in its torpor like day it will be really amazing to figure that out another ideas they possibly go into the marsh system and bury themselves in the mud for the winter so that's another idea it it's strange it is kind of you have to go out there all the time to try to figure this stuff out and I'm out on the lake every single day in the summer I mean is the only time I'm not out there is if it's pouring rain which I've done that to or is it completely windy and in the lake is really really really choppy I don't really particularly go out those days because it's very hard to see anything that would pop up too much motion going on so every.

Champlain N. Vivian
Black Teachers Wanted

Scholars Strategy Network's No Jargon

10:46 min | 5 months ago

Black Teachers Wanted

"America is becoming more and more diverse every year and that means our schools are also also seeing increasing numbers of students of color but the trend isn't necessarily reflected in teachers across the country. Black students and other students of color rarely see the teachers who look like them and that can have serious consequences for their education and their future for the beginning of black history month. We wanted to play you. An episode from our archives that goes into the history of black teachers in America why gaps and representation among teachers persist to this day and what we can do to address this issue. Hi I'm Lizzie. Does he get era and misses the scholars strategy networks. No jargon each week we discussed an American policy problem with one of the nation's top researchers without jargon and and in this episode I spoke to Dr Michelle Foster. She's a professor. And the Henri Hauser Endowed Chair in urban partnerships at the University of Louisville and a former teacher in the Boston public school system. Here's our conversation Dr Foster thank you so much for joining us. Thank you for asking asking me. So you've conducted a lot of research on teaching but before that you were in the classroom yourself. Where did you start teaching? Well I started teaching in and the Boston public schools before desegregation which was in one thousand nine hundred ninety four and so the first year. I was a system wide substitute teacher which meant I taught in almost all of the schools. That would be in Boston. That would have you. That would have me and sometimes the schools that where I could manage. oftentimes the principal would come at recess. And if I was still there he said can you come. I'm back tomorrow because as you know. Substitutes often have difficulty with some classrooms and urban schools and then the second year I was a teacher at the William Monroe Charter school which was one of the first magnet schools in Boston. And can you tell US quickly. What a what is a magnet school? A magnet schools were schools that usually had themes And they were designed to help ease desegregation to have programs that might be a program in music. What theater with the idea that you would attract voluntarily Ellen Terry Lee attract white students to attend thereby making it easier to desegregate and Boston had magnet schools before actually the court order in nineteen seventy four? Lots of Cities Louisville has a magnet program. So I had a three four five combination at the charter school. which is we're not too far from where I lived? And then the next year I had a job. As a fifth grade teacher at the champlain. School which was in Dorchester. And tell me more about those experiences. What was that like working in the Boston? Public school system during that time. Well that was a time. When Boston didn't necessarily hire hire black or African American teachers black teachers tended to be segregated in predominantly African American or black schools? Boston would often have overcrowded. African American school bus them passed a under cry and under crowded white school to another overcrowded. Black school the charter school was of a magnet school. So it was is racially mixed but the champlain. School was probably predominantly baby. Ninety nine percent African American there was a school across way which was the John Marshall School and the schools were segregate they were in a cluster of schools. But the John Marshall's which was across Washington street at the time was predominantly white and my school was predominantly African American. We it was like today day. We have very few supplies not many many books. Hence Loretta Premium No Playground equipment was a place. Where if you want to be a successful teacher you had to be creative? And it's one of the places I learned. I think to be a good teacher. you know. If you don't have textbooks textbooks are good but you can do a lots of things if you don't have them so one of the things I used to do is take the textbook and cut up the story the reading story and put on cards and hand them out to the kids and then I read the first paragraph and I say who is that the next one and that solve off two problems one. If you've ever taught you realize kids don't follow along so they never really know what page you're on that solve. That problem and I realized later on that I was teaching sequencing using because in order to know what comes next. You have to listen so it is possible with not a lot of equipment or supplies to be creative in your teaching but but of course you have to WanNa be wanna be creative and I had not been prepared as a teacher you know. I didn't study teaching so I was left to my own devices. But what I thought would make sense for kids and part of my principal was to have them excited. I felt like if you came to school every day. It was like Christmas. was you'd WanNa come so of course. I was probably not your typical teacher and and I think that my kids probably made too much noise. The principal would always be knocking on my door as they were noisy. Because in those days I suppose even today silence and comportment comportment looking like your on task. Whatever that means? You'll you'll pay attention is kind of rules the day. But I wasn't that kind of a teacher. I would run and have racist with the kids. I would play kickball where I would throw the ball. And then the kids would have to give a multiplication table and they'd have to answer it and then kick so I tried to combine the physical Cole with intellectual. I had all kinds of little tricks that I did. I suppose even as a college teacher later on I have some of those. And how did those early experiences in the classroom GonNa Affect your later research. The research questions you wanted to explore. I don't think I thought too much about that. Initially it wasn't until I laid Iran. Iran started my academic and my first job was at University of Pennsylvania. And I would ask you to summer school courses and I decided to teach teachers perspectives on teaching. You know I just. I just thought it was a two week course. I went decide. I would use autobiographies or biographies of teachers on their own practice. And when I looked into the literature I found very few Accounts of black teachers about their own practice and so. I thought this is unusual because I knew enough to know that for most of history black students have been taught by black teachers right. I knew that so I was shot that there were no. They were not more accounts of their practice. Because I found a few and it on the basis of that. I decided that I would do a study that looked at life histories of black African American teachers. And that's how I got into that area I was led into it just circumstantially. It was not something I had planned to look at. And so tell us about what you found then. Well one of the things I was interested in was what were the experiences of black teachers and I was particularly looking at teachers who were who started. Arctic teaching before desegregation I knew the desegregation was a pivotal moment in the education of African American students. I didn't know what I find and so the earliest teacher who was the oldest oldest was born in one thousand nine five. She taught in polly's island South Carolina. And then I found teachers to a process I called community nomination which was to ask S. communities I made up that term made it up to nominate teachers who they thought were particularly successful and so I went around the country Texas I went to Missouri. Glory and these teachers and then for many many years I wrote academic articles about them. You know just what the teachers had to say was kind of used in the service service of making better big points in a lot of points and then at some point someone. The new press actually asked me if I would write a book and I wrote a book called Black Teachers on teaching and that was like I was ninety. Seven with a twenty interviews are actually you know not condemn not cut up their whole interviews and many of these teachers would teach who started in in segregated schools in Texas and then made the transition to working in the newly integrated desegregated schools in the south. So that's story that I I was pleased because later on many young African American teachers who came of age nineties and two thousands read that book and many of them have commented that the situation that I just got different than what they are today. So you have worked as a teacher both before and after desegregation you have studied sort of that transition and what. It's looked like for other teachers across the country. Let's talk about the situation right now. Do you know enough about the typical sort of American teacher. Fair to say what that person kind of looks like on average today. You know we do know that there are more male teachers at high school than Elementary School. Most of the teachers at elementary the are women and as it turns out. They are white women from suburban and rural communities who teach the population of teach of African American teachers. It has not changed that much over time. In fact I was at a conference not too long ago and although the numbers are increasing in other words number of people afterward teachers will be coming candidates and going into teaching positions. They have the highest attrition rate. They ended up leaving in greater numbers numbers than other teachers. And I think there are some reasons for that. Of course you know one of the reasons is that they often get assigned to the most difficult teaching conditions. I mean let's the honest people want African American teachers because I think that they will be good for African American children. And there's no doubt that that's probably the case but you know if they end up in a school whether or no supplies wear. There are a lot of difficulties and they're not going to likely to stay especially if they don't have support to make it so although we know that the number of African American churches increasing we also know that the number of relieving actually not even lasting three years is also increasing. So it's been a zero sum game. The numbers have not increased appreciably that much because of that and then let's talk about the benefits to students. What are the good things that having a teacher who may be looks like you and your community can afford to students? Well for a long time. People had this idea that was just the role model argument. The reason that African American children in a benefit of having african-american role model then in two thousand three. I think it was a man. Whose name is Thomas? D actually wrote a wrote an article. What he had done he looked at some old studies? Are these that had randomly assigned students and teachers which is very rare in education research. Because you can't resign randomly assigned teachers and students but there was one study and he realized it one of the things he found. Is that where you had a teacher match. When you had a black students who had black teachers have teachers? They actually improved in their standardized test scores scores and of course he had a hard time publishing it. Partly because you know sometimes things that can be positive and also have negative kickback. People thought what would happen if if if we could say that matching teacher and student on race was a good thing. I mean you could use that negatively as well so he was the first person to write that article and then recently there have been more articles that have come out that have shown that African American students who have African American teachers are more likely to graduate graduate. They're less likely to be suspended or punished. punitively they're more likely to be assigned to gifted and talented less likely to go to special the lead and a host of other

Boston African American School Boston Public School Black School Principal Dr Michelle Foster America William Monroe Charter School Texas John Marshall School Elementary School Champlain Henri Hauser Endowed Chair University Of Louisville Professor Louisville United States John Marshall Ellen Terry Lee Wanna
"champlain" Discussed on Happy Hour Gets Weird

Happy Hour Gets Weird

02:15 min | 5 months ago

"champlain" Discussed on Happy Hour Gets Weird

"Bob Like nobody let him go out on their boat after that they were they were just given shit for years. I'm sure after that. Yeah all right. So that's Champi the podcast the PODCAST Consensus Champ Israel. Yeah yeah that's pretty much. All you guys need. Yeah Watch out for In Lake Champlain. When you go swimming I definitely don't recommend a belly button ring? Hell no especially with the worm on the intimate that would just be asking for A. Ah just for the record I did not have a worm worm in there. She's like I'll say this snack Swedish fish. Did you have a Swedish fish. Had nothing thought it was a lewer. Okay I'm just like the buck on. A fish tries to eat a belly button ring. I don't know I miss fishing the Lake anyways you know what I wanted to mention. If if you have seen champ or you've been to lake champlain. Oh Yeah you've had a weird feeling or of seen something or have seen something or or or you have a family member or a friend who has seen champ or something strange unexplainable email us. We'd love to talk on a here. You're weird that story at a weird stories episode soon in the more weird stories from different people the better. Yeah so emails. Happy hour gets weird at gmail.com or so you can even. DM US on instagram. That's easier definitely or on twitter or on twitter's and happy hour gets weird. pod Is our instagram handle all right and that wraps up the champ episode and our second cryptic get cryptic. There's a lot more crypt. It's too calm. If you have a favorite scripted. Let us know. Let us know to episode about it. We WanNa talk about what you WanNa hear about definitely so let us know and thank you so much for listening. We really appreciate eight every new listener old listener. We're having a great time and we hope you are too. Yeah I second that and that I think perhaps it up all right and before for you go in that lake. Don't forget to hydrate meditate and masturbate cheers to that to that.

Lake Champlain twitter Bob
An Interview With John McKenna, Chairman of Recreational Aviation Foundation

Aviation Week's Check 6 Podcast

07:03 min | 11 months ago

An Interview With John McKenna, Chairman of Recreational Aviation Foundation

"We're speaking with john. Mckenna who is the chairman in one of six co founders of the recreational aviation foundation or simply r._a._f. Korea created during a backwoods campfire discussion in two thousand three the r._i._f. Has developed into an organization that stretches from the pacific to the atlantic and beyond what exactly is the purpose of the r._i._f. I think our mission statement says it pretty well. It's to preserve protect and to maintain and creates recreational opportunities rare scripts for people across the united states komo early for recreational opportunities so we're talking about remote airstrips when i have in my mind is grass gris drips in the woods. Is that what we're talking about. That could be certainly what you might see or think of if you were to do the poster but they r._a._f. Has really taken to the fact that where people can go and enjoy themselves with their plane or have a fun time they also count and <hes> so we might sort of break it into two kinds of airports one which would be known as backcountry airport which might somewhat fit that descript or that you just suggested and the other is <hes> perhaps same front entry airport that isn't necessarily buried in the in the back woods or in bottom of a deep canyon if might frankly c._b._s. Not on the lakefront edger <hes> on the edge of town. I think of some in oregon that are on the beach people can frankly fly into their bonanza go for a hike or go set up their tent and bring their children or their grandchildren or friends and <hes> for a bike ride or whatever the case may be so the stereotype might be as you described. We'd like to think that it's expanding recreational use and preserving the fun places for people to go with an airplane. So how many airports like that are you counting and are they endanger of closure well. There are certainly some that are very definitely in danger and when i say danger there are activists that perhaps don't share the same interest in aviation that we all do and they would just assume that airplanes in any way shape or form place would go away and they candidly work at making that take place so there's certainly people who are actively taking to close certain airstrips in certain parts of the country then there are frankly ones where might go but at the other end of the spectrum they've just been forgotten about and there's some use but not a lot so people fly by and they asked the question. I wonder could you land there. Can i land there and our first filter is does it have some recreational value or some interest to it that people might enjoy once they get on the ground bill today. Today i find myself standing in stover mont and we spent a great day yesterday exploring some of this area with some friends many of which you would know touching down on grass airstrips all up and down the shores of lake champlain up near mount marcy and in the mountains of vermont bond and you may not think of that as that country flying but it was a landing in some spectacular places with spectacular views and lots of things extraju yeah actually i've been there and it's a beautiful part of the world i know you're from the west the news the taller mountains than they have in the east but that can be pretty rugged around stowe vermont well isn't that the fun part about airplanes and that is that we get the opportunity to see things that maybe aren't in our backyard and and yes. You're absolutely right. I might have been one of those previously biased people who thought that all the mountains in the west but i can assure you they're not <hes> <hes> somebody left behind right here in vermont and they they go up to some tall elevations and i'm convinced we don't have the corner on the market working out in the west funny so the r._a._f. Is sixteen years in to its existence into its program. How would you evaluate your record so apar- astonishing i think it would candidly i'm both at times stunned and more often humbled when you start out with six people who literally have an idea and sort of parked himselves around a campfire and you find yourself involved with an organization fifteen almost seventeen years later that has some ten thousand plus members scattered all across all fifty states in twelve or fourteen eighteen different foreign countries and you know bill. One of the most interesting things is the foreign members that we have is the r._a._f. Who i every once in a while get a chance is to engage with and their reason for belonging is they want to preserve what we've talked about here because it's probably already been lost in the place they live and they're willing to support it here just on the off chance that they may get a chance to come and do it themselves or they think that we should be pretty vigilant about this because we live in a very special spot that has some are unique freedom attached to it. What are the greatest challenges or obstacles to the r._i._f. Fulfilling its mission. It's probably not much different than most of our businesses or anything else and it's the people and the challenges we are nearly one hundred percent volunteer organization. Asian people are all volunteers. They all do this because they love it. It's surely always the <hes> the challenge to keep the right kind of leadership and people who <hes> have the time to devote to it to that end. We are blessed with a great deal of folks. That are are just passionate about this stuff so i may be you. Don't worry about the same things that others do but yet at the same time i do worry about the interest in aviation. I was just asked yesterday as a matter of fact what do you think of the drone industry and how will that affect what you're doing and we're about the places whereabouts saving the places and maybe my children or grandchildren will help them up way be he delivered to some of these special places in some sort of a vehicle that i don't quite understand yet today but if the place doesn't exist then perhaps they won't make any difference. I feel like we're on the right track. We're basically land conservation group that plies airplanes and probably not bad place to be not a bad place at all and you're at a very very good place right now up in sto- in thank you for your time and good luck with the program. Thank you so much. We appreciate all you do. We've been speaking with john mckenna the chairman and co-founder of the recreational aviation foundation this william garvey editor of business in commercial aviation magazine. Thank you for your time and

Recreational Aviation Foundati John Mckenna Vermont Chairman Korea United States Oregon Komo Stover Mont Lake Champlain Mount Marcy William Garvey Editor Co-Founder One Hundred Percent Seventeen Years Sixteen Years
New York woman catches fish with 2 mouths

Investor's Edge

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

New York woman catches fish with 2 mouths

"And a New York woman has a fishing store that would certainly be unbelievable if he didn't have the pictures to prove it Debbie get is reeling in a fish that has to melt he reeled in while recently angling on Lake Champlain in New York state the odd looking crowd has what appears to be a second mouse right below it regular mouth get is says she actually put the fish buyers lower mouth for the record she ended up releasing the fish back into the lake since he says otherwise appear to be in good health and for USA radio news I'm Chris

Lake Champlain Chris New York Debbie USA
 New York woman reels in bizarre fish with 2 mouths

Frank Beckmann

01:50 min | 11 months ago

New York woman reels in bizarre fish with 2 mouths

"Did you hear about this woman in New York who caught the fish with the two miles throw back some house I I went online and watches video and it first you think it's like a fake or something but this this is the real deal this fish was caught in the Lake Champlain in New York it absolutely has to miles you can see it on the internet and dial the lady you know put it out there on on Facebook in it I think it was shared five thousand times but what was really interesting where all the comments that came with it why does this bishop to mouse genetics pollution what do you think's going on I the first thing I thought of was I don't know if you've ever seen The Simpsons cabin but there's a fish on the Simpson's that has three ice and I think it was it I don't know I I really don't remember but something about a nuclear power plant or something but I thought that fish freaks me out with the two mouths that is terrifying yeah you've heard the saying there's something in the water with I don't know what's in the water there but it's causing fish to have two miles no thank you you would you would you keep it a multimeter would you throw back a let someone else tried the melting thing is an interesting question because it's almost I mean if you catch a fish you take a picture new shorter body there's your proof but the mounting thing is interesting because it's so what you weird and bizarre that it would be may be interesting to you know have a mountain and put up your cabin up north or something I'm so bad if I wouldn't swim in that lake by that I don't thank you I'm so bad if issued ID to fish with about seven miles yes good double the chance of catching rights of I hope might just catch one of those but also in real it in hi I don't know I think I think I probably would have kept it how would you can I think I probably would it's weird it's weird

New York Lake Champlain Facebook Simpson
"champlain" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

American Revolution Podcast

16:36 min | 1 year ago

"champlain" Discussed on American Revolution Podcast

"Today episode one zero six arms race on Lake champlain today. I'm going to step away from New York City again to take a look at events on Lake Champlain at the same time the how brothers in New York we're using their massive. If military to push Washington out of the city Generals Carlton and Burgoyne were trying to push southward from Canada we less looked at Canada in episode ninety five when General Carlton's troops pushed the last west of the continental army out of Canada and into Lake Champlain in upstate New York the remains of the Patriots Northern Army fell back to Fort Ticonderoga for the British in Canada. Everything seems to be going well that Spring Burgoyne had a late arrival in May seventeen seventy six but by the end of June the British had pushed the Americans out of Canada entirely for going head used the eight thousand or so British and German forces that he brought with. I'm from Britain with the combined local militia and Indians and troops already in Canada. He had a force of about eleven to twelve thousand men following the victory and Canada Carlton and Burgoyne disagreement became more parrot clearly according to rank and Lord Germain's express orders Carlton Retained Command Burgoyne would obey orders but as most top subordinates did at the time made clear to anyone who would listen that Carlton Charlton was holding him back he could lead the forces to victory. If only General Carleton did not hold his reign so tightly burgoyne remember had left Boston in the fall of seventeen seventy five to return home and convinced the King A. And Ministry that he knew how to win the war he had even drafted a memo for the ministry and titled Thoughts for conducting the War from the side of Canada and there's a quote to the original document on my blog. If you WANNA take a look at it for going plan to lead his military force up the Saint Lawrence River to break the siege of Quebec and Free General Carleton from there his men would move down Lake champlain and retake Fort Ticonderoga next they would move down the Hudson River eventually linking up with General House army that will be moving up the river from New York City. He even made a bet with a friend in London that he would be back victorious by Christmas seventeen in seventy seven now there was nothing particularly new or original about this plan. The ministry had been planning to use the Hudson River to cut off New England since the war began for Goi- memo added far more details us on exactly what troops should be used and why that essentially is what the ministry adopted as its plan but with one alteration General Carleton Dot burgoyne would command the army after it reached Quebec General Carleton could not easily move his British fleet on the Saint Lawrence River to take lake champlain he would have to disassemble his ships carry them up the rapids then reassemble them at Saint John Before he he could sail into the lake or in the alternative build new ships at Saint John and carry over the armaments that were needed either option though would take months for going thought they should continue to press their advantage edge. The British had a clear military superiority and had the continentals on the run with the cooperation of the local Indians. The British could move overland to Fort Ticonderoga and bypass the rebel fleet he commanded by General Arnold that was on the lake for going also suggested moving further up river to Lake Ontario and marching on the Americans from the West through New York State Carlton However thought these plans were too. Risky he preferred the safer option of building a fleet to recapture the late then sailing down the lake to Fort Ticonderoga and capturing the fort it was undoubtedly a safer option but it meant the British could not begin moving until fall that gave the rebels time to build up their defenses on the lake and at the fort even if the British could take the fort in the fall that almost certainly meant Pasi again for the winter and not starting down down the Hudson until the spring of seventeen seventy seven at the earliest General Carleton also used General House approach by trying to reconcile with the rebels after capturing Canada he released most of his prisoners including Daniel Morgan the future general he issued pardons liberally to Canadians and made every effort to make sure the locals were happy and could put all the recent unpleasantness behind them for going quickly grew frustrated traded at waiting in addition to a host of other reasons for wanting to see his work through to a quick ending he had left his sick wife in London he had hoped he could get back to care for her sadly as he sat in Canada all summer waiting for things to happen he learned that his wife had died in June. Another very strong argument against waiting was smallpox. The disease had ravaged both armies during the war and had been particularly regularly destructive and Canada now I know I've talked about the ravages of disease before but it's hard to underestimate its importance more than ninety percent of the military deaths during the revolution came from disease smallpox smallpox typhus typhoid fever malaria and dysentery killed thousands in Canada alone having soldiers sitting around all summer would likely kill more of them than sending them into battle unlike the continentals who could always find more and more men to replace the fallen the British had to spend far more time and expense to import fresh troops from across the ocean for going occupied his time by keeping up a correspondence with Secretary of state Lord Germain in London Germain already had a bad opinion of Carlton so he readily listened and supported Burgoyne frustration over Carlton's lack of action. When the king proposed awarding Carlton Tint the Order of the Bath Germain tried unsuccessfully to prevent it although Carlton had other friends in high places which protected him Germain would look for any reason to recall Carlton and promote her going during that summer Lord Germain issued orders to give her going an independent command of an army in New York while he left Carlton to remain in command in Canada but those orders mostly due to logistical problems did not reach Canada until seventeen seventy seven so for the remainder of the year Carlton ran the show and we're going sat around impatiently waiting for something to change on the Patriot side fear of an eminent British attack loomed over everything Congress decided to change the leadership in hopes of finding someone who could whip the American army into shape and hold off any invasion into New York once the British had pushed the Patriots treats out of Canada following the battle of three rivers Congress shipped General Sullivan Back to New York City in time to be captured at the battle of Brooklyn General Wooster returned to Connecticut and would resign his commission a few months later in there place congre sent General Horatio Gates although gates was one of the original generals that Congress appointed back in the summer of seventeen seventy five? I haven't had much to say about him so far as he hasn't hadn't really done much gates was British born in Seventeen twenty seven to commoner parents despite his low birth he somehow obtained a Lieutenant's commission as a young man and served in Germany during the war of Austrian succession. Accession he must have served well as he received a wartime promotion to captain. Despite the fact that there was no way he had the money to pay for such a commission after the war gate sold his commission in the regular army and moved to New York doc the sale of his commission gave him enough money to establish a new life for himself. When general braddock came to America in seventeen fifty five to fight the French and Indian war gates join the expedition to Fort Pitt along with all the other kids who would grow up to be famous Thomas Gage Charles Lee Daniel Morgan Daniel Boone and George Washington Gates was wounded at the Battle of the Managua Hilo but recovered and returned to service he continued Oh you deserve as a regular officer in the seven years war fighting in both North America and the West indies by the end of the war gates had risen to the rank of major in seventeen sixty nine? He sold his Majors Commission and purchased a small plantation in Virginia there he renewed his friendship with fellow plantation owner George Washington in seventeen seventy five when Congress appointed Washington as commander in chief he requested that gates also be named a general in the Continental Army Gates became the army's first agenda in general while gates did well at his job. It was mostly paperwork not the sort of thing that gets much glory as an experienced field officer Sir Gates pushed for an independent command in May seventeen seventy six after Washington had moved the bulk of the continental army from Boston to New York Congress promoted gates to Major General and June it assigned him the independent command of the Northern Army unfortunately for gates his independent command was not quite as independent as he had hoped General Schuyler is senior remained in overall command of the region in the past Congress had bypass General Schuyler by leaving him in overall command of forces in upstate New York but left other generals. I General Montgomery Than Worcester Than Thomas Than Sullivan. I'm in charge of the forces that were engaged in actual combat in Canada to get his promotion gates had gone to Philadelphia to lobby for the Independent Command in doing so he heavily criticized scholars performance as the commander his lobbying paid off when Congress promoted gates to Major General and gave him command of the Continental Army in Canada. The problem was that by the time gates arrived in upstate New York for the Patriot forces in Canada had already retreated back to New York once they're the army fell under the authority of General Schuyler as a result gates effectively became scholars second in command gates gates was of course upset that his independent command had now become subordinate to General Schuyler. 's immediately began a letter writing campaign to friends in Congress to undercut scholars reputation with the apparent intent of having Schuyler relieved so that he could take command himself the two-man began bickering over just about everything and divided the politicians as well as the army into team Schuyler and Team Gates New England Colin politicians tended to favour gates based on his military experience with the regular Army New Yorkers tended to favour Schuyler who had the senior rank and experience in the region Amazingly General Benedict Arnold who who typically got along with no one seemed to have a pretty good working relationship with both men unfortunately his failure to pick a side would cause him problems down the road but for now on this one issue at least East Arnold was often the voice of diplomacy and reason although he was an army General Arnold had made himself the naval commander of Lake Champlain he commanded a few large ships the enterprise and the liberty which. She had captured right after the fall of Fort Ticonderoga. He also had the royal savage which General Montgomery had captured after the fall of Saint John his troops were still building the revenge near Ticonderoga he had had four large row galley-ships The Washington Congress trumbull and Gates as well as a smaller one the Lee then he had eight smaller gondolas all of these smaller ships had mounted cannon and would certainly harass and threaten in any British ships that moved onto the lake with the British pause at the Canadian border causing a lull in fighting during the summer. The Northern Army took some time to take care of some delayed business in late July it held courts martials for Colonel Fidel and major butterfield the two officers who had behaved so poorly at the Battle of cedars back in May both men were found guilty and cashiered that same month the Court Marshall of Moses Hazen threatened to disrupt the entire army you may recall hazing was a local Canadian he had tried to play both sides after the Patriots and invaded Canada but after the British had arrested him him and he escaped he decided to stick with the Patriots he received a commission as Colonel and raised a Patriot regiment from among his fellow Canadians for some time General Arnold seemed to have a good opinion of Hazen that changed after the Battle of the Cedars where Arnold Thought Hazen was not aggressive enough. Possibly even a coward worse hazing disobeyed Arnold orders to destroy the property of some who had cooperated with the British and Indian attack on the Cedars Hayes and believed that such destruction might have created more enemies for the army than it could handle but the issue that led to the Court Martial was hazings refusal to accept property that Arnold had sent to his care after the retreat from Montreal Arnold had promised Montreal merchants on his personal honor that they would receive payment for their property which the army needed Arnold had an officer carry the property to Hazen who refuse to accept it. The officer ended up leaving all the supplies by the side of the river where soldiers looted and took what they wanted Arnold was livid at this insubordination Congress had left are on the hook for stuff like this before he would feel honor bound to repay the merchants but would not get reimbursement from Congress if he could not account for the property it was also another example of Arnold subordinate officers simply ignoring his orders Arnold attempted to empanel a court martial against hazing in early July hazen protested to general gates who ordered Arnold not to proceed Arnold had apparently selected all the officers on the Court Martial himself and had selected some junior officers even though Colonel Hayes and had to write to be judged by field officers that is major or higher gates told Arnold to cut it out but allowed a proper court martial to be paddled a few days later to hear charges against Hazen for neglect of duty the problem with the new court martial headed by Colonel Ina poor or was that just about every officer on the court absolutely hated Arnold and was friends with hazing the court refused even to hear testimony from the officer whom Arnold had ordered to drop off the property to Hazen and who is pretty much the only witness who could testify to Hayes refusal to obey Arnold orders to take possession of the property they claim the witness was an interested party which so what lots of witnesses have some interest in a case that it is in favor of one side of the other but the court martial did not even say what that interest was.

Canada General Benedict Arnold General Carlton army George Washington Gates New York Lake Champlain Congress New York City Fort Ticonderoga Continental Army Lord Germain General Schuyler officer Continental Army Gates Spring Burgoyne Northern Army Washington Patriots Northern Army General Montgomery
"champlain" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

13:18 min | 1 year ago

"champlain" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And welcome back to coast to coast, George Noory with you our final segment with Sandra Champlain as we talk about her work in the spirit world. We don't die skeptics discovery of life after death. When you wrote the book, Sandra tell us how you began to put it together. Interesting. I had it so much in my heart that I wanted to write and I met a publisher and his couldn't believe I wanted to write what I wanted to write if you really think you have the answers. I said, yeah. So he gave me the best advice. He said talk, right. Like you're talking to me and he had lost his dad. And so I said, okay. And he said give me a book proposals. I figured out how to do that. He said, right? You're too. Best chapters. You feel the one would be my evidence for the afterlife at that point. And there's so much more. Now after the three hundred interviews, but the other one would was called how to survive grief, and it was literally like I wrote just talking to him the readers feel like I'm talking just to you. When they when they read it. But that those who chapters he had brought to a friend of his was in the hospice, and it transformed how he felt about his life and his. Not too distant death. And the response I got back. How can you have the whole book written? I just imagined that that person who had lost a loved one who wanted some answers and wanted some comfort. And so the book really is about my journey about why a believe in the afterlife. But I did make in that one chapter on Greece and the rest is if we don't die who are we had to have a powerful life that we take that last breath and close our eyes for the last time, we can look back and say, well, I got my money's worth out of life. One-fourth? Interesting take let's take final calls joined the Bronx taken away. Hey, Joseph, George. How are you? Great. Thank goodness. Sandra? When we have these visitations from the other side. Yeah. For life. I loved ones don't always show up in the form, we expect it may be a gust of wind that blows through a closed door or a scent that can somehow associated with that person that why did they choose these alternate forms of communication to come through to us. Well, I think it thank you for bringing that up because those are different lines. And I think when we transitioned to your size. I do think there's a place that we learn how to do this and some people call it the halls of learning. I don't think just when we die. We have all the answers, and we've got it all together. Now, I think we have to learn things. And so it's an art of manipulating energy, whether the people turn on the TV or the lights like you say gust of wind or finding a feather. But I think they may be playing around with the different ways to get through. And I can't imagine. Somebody trying to get through to me is going to have a very hard time because my mind busy all the time. But my grandmother had red boa that she would wear to be silly. And so even when my mind is busy when I see a small red feathers that can only come from red boa. I think of my grandmother. So there might be different ways that they're trying to get through to say, I'm right here. I love you. I haven't gone we've got first time caller, John and South Carolina now, welcome to the program. Hi, John, John that are good night. How ya doing today? John. Thanks. No, I've been looking for answer to a question for almost thirty years. And I just happened to hear you on the radio. And I think I might actually finally get it. Okay. Let's give it. A try mother father committed suicide nineteen eighty nine. We were riding around looking for him. We couldn't find men at about seven o'clock that evening on August fifth out went blind. I couldn't see anything for a minute or two. The next day the corner came and told us, and then they did what they do is that he died around seven o'clock. And then for the next four or five days. I think my father get up and get ready for work and leave the house every day. And he would look down the hall it my bedroom. And he wouldn't look at me. He would look past me like he was just looking into the room, and then he would leave, and it it got to the point we moved in less than a week out the house, and my mother made me go see a psychiatrist and the psychiatrist basically said did it was just a burnt memory. It was something that I expected to see. So that's why saw it every morning. But I I never felt that that was legitimate. Explanation. Do you think otherwise, Sandra, don't you? Yeah. I do I believe you saw him. He's I is their body as it's called that you're in whatever frame of mind, you're in that he was able to get through. And did you find it comforting, John? Yes. Yes. And no, I guess I mean a teenager at fourteen. I had big issues. My right. But but I yes, it was nice to seem. It was almost like he was regardless. He was still there. Trying to check on us to make sure we were ok. They do they do care. Sandra? Don't they care, and I just want to touch on suicide. I I went through a terrible depression after my father died, and although I wasn't ready to take my own life. I could totally understand why somebody feeling that bad would think it would be the only way to go. So knowing that our brain chemistry changes when we grieve. And when we're depressed, I I I would never judge somebody unless I e because I'm not in their shoes. I do know from these countless interviews that I've done in every bit of research that anyone that takes their own life is greeted with open arms by loved ones on the other side and banned the hell why not banned now, they're comforted. The one thing though, that has me not wanna take my own life. Is you actually get to see the impact that your death would have on the people around you. So you actually get to see their their pain and suffering, and you realize that you truly didn't. Why? So. That would just be a little bit of a hardship for me. But again, you're greeted with loving beings and your loved ones are there. And so we each grow ourselves and judge ourselves. No one's saying you're right or wrong. But if we don't die do your do our best to make the most of life and get help. If you are somebody depressed any follow up question. John. Oh, well, I mean, I I appreciate what I felt something that I do wanna ask I just thought about it. But to other people in that same house have killed their the same identical way. Those are could be some kind of demon in that house, Sandra. Yeah, I'm not a demon allergist. I've never come across that. But I didn't know for every bit of light there's darkness. So I I don't know the answer to that. But I do believe heavily in the power of prayer the power of love the power gratitude. And so whether you think you're making this up or not go round the house, the less it. Vision any negative energy turning into positive loving energy. Let's go next to anonymous in Arizona. Welcome to the program. Hello there. Anonymous. Hi, george. Remember me helped me a little while do and I always want to appreciate or at least you're doing you're doing better. I am. I have a rough times because of pain the pain management conditioning. This country is really really battering because if you don't have cancer they. They they have a hard time justifying treating your pain, and I've severe autoimmune diseases that affect my joints. And makes me hurting. If you put a cancer patient next to me, they look better than I do. And it's not even close. I it's it's bad. Sometimes I is you know, George committed suicide two years ago. Yes, I prayed for my God in the name of Lord Jesus Christ or right before I attempted it. I'm the let them know who are who. I was at. And why I was there. How I gotten to that place. That was that it was in medical school medical school kind of. I couldn't finish it because I was too ill. And I was getting all the patient's illness because Madam Yoon disease. I couldn't. Hike. Couldn't get another job even teaching because even though the students like, I guess, I just wasn't meant to be. And I just felt useless to the world, and my wife, and my daughter in Costa Rica, I just quietly passing this life. Use them everything that I had behind him that it'd be better off without me. I agree with your host that and and my. Bye. Conditions for that was much less empathetic. I think judges that you know, how could you so selfish, and it is not a matter of selfishness. It's a matter of fact, it was the most selfless thing. I could think too because of the burden. I felt I was placing on everybody, right? What I do know. Spite of all of that is there is an afterlife. I've seen spirit. Multiple times is probably about five times. I pray for comfort, and I pray for healing. I play that. I don't have to suffer pain forever because I used to be a marathon runner out of the seventeen time marathon runner, I Manitoba half marathons, and I I didn't do it for myself. But then I had other people how to run marathons and how to finish. And I served in served in my church, and I taught Dipper here on the country. Not legally hurt them how to speak English. And I did those things that our love for him. And now, it's like, I'm all. I'm just in my own world, and I need to get out of there. But sometimes I'm just not healthy enough to do it. And I think you understand where I'm coming from Georgia. Yeah. Just a name that comes into my mind, if you don't just a pain management things, and you may know, this person has name is John Cabot, then Z I n n and it's a whole it's when medication is just not enough, and you're still suffering. And it's got to do. I know the show we're talking about being in the present moment, and quieting your mind you'd have to read up on him to get all of that. Because he's got some audio tapes and things like that. But I know when my dad had cancer and was suffering terribly. His method really helped alleviate some of the pain medication. Couldn't John J O N habits KABC ATT, I believe last names in the I n n maybe just something strong. Mr anonymous. I'm glad you were able to connect with us many months ago. Gabriela is a Nashville, Tennessee. Hi, gabriela. Longtime listener, George always a pleasure, Sandra. Hello. This is quickly as possible to things I'm Guatemalan. And when I was eighteen I knew that every Sunday, my whole family get together, my great aunt's home. Well, I had the pleasure of experiencing a say on which they have apparently every Sunday. So they do this on a regular basis to speak with our deceased family. But that's as personal experience that I've had now personally when I see a spirit, I was in mass. This is on a different occasion. And it was for my late uncle one year anniversary after he passed and my whole family lives. They're asking mess conversations. My mom, and we both saw the image of my uncle whom he had passed away of cancer. But he suffered a severe stroke when he was twenty four years old. He lost the momentum on the left side of his body. And when we both saw his image as a spirit, it was a younger version of him. And it was a healthy version. And I described exactly what he was wearing my mom said to the t-. The my mom also added he after you didn't see your grandparents that were sitting right next to them. Also. Wow..

Sandra Champlain George Noory John cancer publisher Bronx Gabriela John Cabot Greece Arizona South Carolina Nashville Tennessee depression Madam Yoon Joseph John J O Costa Rica Georgia
"champlain" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:28 min | 1 year ago

"champlain" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Another forced to capture fort. William Henry, seventy seven. And to block abercrombie's expedition up lake Champlain at fort Ticonderoga. We spent a whole whole time in the war going on the offensive. Now in seventy fifty nine situation is different. The British have a massive fleet control the Saint Lawrence river. They have a strong army, and he deployed his troops in a strong defensive position. Side. There is the Quebec which is which located on somebody looks like a giant island ten miles long two hundred feet in the air. And there's the Porsche shore. The only open shoreline in the area that is dominated by a line of cliffs four or five. So his plan is basically let the British come to him and his army commander on com. Destroy them. Let's turn to Montcalm because it's his personality. His opinions that will be the most determinative for the fate of new FRANZ Montcalm is a man who has lived quietly for many years. But here he is in the command of the French regulars and also commanding the militia and the the soldiers of the marine the marines. Having never commanded anything this large in his life. The way you report Peter he was chosen because all the seniors turned it down. Did that make him a disappointment to vote for ROY? At first both ROY was extremely optimistic about com. He thought he was a great guy. Just. Needed. But won't calm has a very colorful personality. And this case at the delicate where saying. Could be extremely depressed and pessimistic and paranoid. So when you rise in Canada and in nineteen seventy fifty six we'll dry sentence protected British Nico. He scored a brilliant victory. But he is convinced that will is plotting to have his army destroyed by the British. He believes that both ROY underrated the strength of the British defenses that Vigo deliberately.

ROY fort Ticonderoga abercrombie FRANZ Montcalm Peter he Montcalm lake Champlain Saint Lawrence river William Henry commander Quebec Vigo Canada two hundred feet
Facebook in talks with banks to expand customer service

KCBS Radio Midday News

03:31 min | 2 years ago

Facebook in talks with banks to expand customer service

"Official ports of entry like this floating dock near lake. Champlain are unmanned at night border patrol agents rely on local residents patrols and sensors to. Alert them to possible crossings there are thousands of centers like this one, deployed along the northern border then. Incorporate motion detection and cameras when they sent someone coming across the tricky part is getting a border patrol agent there in. Time enough to catch them sometimes entering the US is as simple as walking across a twenty foot wide clearing in the woods. Or paddling on a lake you don't have to, check in with any water but I'm not seeing. Any markers on this lake it's pretty unmarked and apparently you. Can go wherever you want as long. As you don't touch lands Puerto FOX is, author of the book Northland his three year exploration of what. He calls America's forgotten border the only known terrorists to be, apprehended coming overland into. America came from the north this border, was created in a different Time, it. Was created as. The world's friendliest border between two countries seven million American jobs depend on this cross-border business. There's a lot at stake up here in the north many buildings and businesses literally straddle, the northern border and the illegal traffic goes both ways just last January, Canadian man pled guilty to smuggling. Handguns through this library into Canada Don daler reporting well the search continues for a fourteen year old San Ramon girl who's. Been missing now for a week her parents put out a call for help yesterday morning more than sixty people responded rod Jeanette. Cusak tell the KPI x five that everyone who, came out to help gave them a little tiny. Break from the pain and heartache of their daughter's disappearance ever. Really grateful to all the people who. Came out Taylor Cusack was last seen at, her friend's house a week ago her mom Jeannette says the. Girl left her phone charger behind when she found it just, going dark and not. There's no phone nothing there's just nothing No sign of her communication wise and I can't see a fourteen year old going that long without her own phone without things that belonged to her like that that are important to. Her tears yesterday found out from the last known location scouring miles of local trails for clues investigators say there. Have been no, signs. Of foul play Joins us now from, the, KCBS super micro Intel money desk good morning. Jason good morning Rebecca the Wall Street Journal reports that Facebook has been asking banks to give the social. Networker customer information including checking account balances and credit card transactions in order for Facebook to roll out new services to users the journal says Facebook has reached. Out to Wells Fargo CitiGroup j.. P. Morgan Chase and US Bank core but so far data privacy has, been a concern for the banks with one. Dropping out of talks altogether Facebook has reportedly told the banks that the client information will help it offers, services, that, will, compel its users to spend more time on its messenger app Facebook stock is, heading higher today bitcoin fans have struggled to gain mainstream, acceptance for the biggest crypto currency but they may have just kind of tailwind thanks to Starbucks announcing its teaming up to launch a startup exchange for cryptos called backed BK capital management founder Brian. Kelly CNBC that Starbucks getting involved is the, biggest news of the year for bitcoin and, that paves the way for a US regulated exchange Dow's. Up forty eight, points at twenty five thousand five hundred, eleven, NASDAQ gaining forty five points to seventy eight. Fifty seven and the s&p is up eleven points at twenty eight fifty one on the MoneyWatch Jason Brooks. KCBS Walgreens has.

Facebook United States Starbucks Jason Brooks Champlain America Wall Street Journal Official Wells Fargo Don Daler Rod Jeanette San Ramon Puerto Fox Us Bank Intel Kelly Cnbc Taylor Cusack Cusak
"champlain" Discussed on wellRED podcast

wellRED podcast

05:14 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on wellRED podcast

"We wanna lake champlain oil right right there i thought it was going to watch the soccer game we are the i do buy like ten though yeah that's tinder live aboard his i already made plans to go to brunch my friend is soccer games ten eleven morning wind gonna be worship after watching that miss i'm gonna get fucking drunk don't let them be shepherd's pie it shit face watch soccer we'll hit i'm going to tell my friends now where we're going to look at a she invited me to pancake house and you guys are invited to but finishes at any pancake go there and then go to finnegans what is literally disgusting are playing our podcast listeners we don't have a lot of time so we kinda got to do this i mean i'm being keeping over the world cup i how do you think that i was asking i was going to look if you've been keeping up with a little bit not really little bit a lot of sets for england originally or now you are who's in renton originally because we're we were never in it right now i know but that's what i'm saying that was your forecast the beginning yeah argentine paperless i anguish i was going to cheer for detained because now they grew beard lionel messi looks like the better version of me he has real hard he doesn't look anything limi without a beard beard it's uncanny yeah i mean i look like his fat brother who shitty and like gambles on his games and stuff which i would do and win lose but then they're asked me wrong and l you'd lose i wouldn't bet i said about a bit against him against your own brother course time to making money my whole life size i think now for belgium and i said that before they beat brazil today i told andy because literally literally i just went well they got good beer in their close to germany without all the baggage they'd be does less of we were in so fuck them down also england's never beaten us okay no we had l and l six remember that as air what was that joke mama there are daddy would ever candidate australia's our sisters brothers and sisters blue ever they're like our stepbrother tell africa's partying sport dutch yeah yeah i thought it was different white lose there was some dutch dutch influence because the dutch east india trading company was the first one to establish a port and city there and began to establish the government but then the british took over literally as the duchy's india trade company faded and the british took over the world so that was one of the ones they took over refine their knowing stuff no other now knew all that but sometimes i forget think about how much you knew that shit when not yes god damn i want to know that is turned into bjork over here i taken a drink miller live as traded that and it got me so excited almost spit it out so put both hands over my face while about a your did that because you don't want us in wigs piracy nice swan right she fucking wild shit what's she up to now her mom i just saw thing just day bureau checks out your mom said she was singing before she could talk my fucked up i know from they sound saying song to me yes landing yes that's that is what she is she's tim dill i'm racist against groups that are of the race against i hate the dutch they sound saint song i'll try to do a bit when i first moved to new york about how my uncle's head would explode in new york when he found out that there was such thing as foreign white people like he went up there and he's like hey thank god you're here and they were just like oh how're you doing david oh thank she's outside us yeah but at the same time i feel like she don't look like any other athletic mother for like she something else the other line fuckers you know gorgeous hanging out with biking's wouldn't it wouldn't surprise you actually know there's this little population south of chicken magas stack technically inside the limits my dad used to do other press and you know they they had a run for mayor one fuck through the women here they got different std's at world was the fucking what was the.

lake champlain soccer
"champlain" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on AP News

"The false perception that the ice cream company is committed to a clean environment and high animal welfare standards they say most of the milk used and ben and jerry's ice cream doesn't mean it standards for animal care and labor practices they also claim that farms supplying the company are polluting lake champlain and lake kearney abedin jerry spokeswoman says the company doesn't comment on lawsuits porn stars stormy daniels who claims to have had sex with donald trump before he became president performed at an ohio strip club a day after police arrested her at another club daniels danced early friday but didn't physically interact with any patrons at vanity gentlemen's club in columbus a host warned several times beforehand there would be absolutely no touching following daniels arrest on wednesday night for allegedly illegally rubbing undercover police officers faces with her bare breasts during a performance prosecutors have since dropped the charges saying they couldn't be proved daniels lawyers calling for an investigation into the arrest the attorney says daniels was set up in a columbus police sting operation calling it an absurd use of law enforcement resources the united states is accusing north korea of illegally smuggling refined petroleum products into the country beyond the quota of five hundred thousand barrels per year allowed under un sanctions the associated press has obtained us documents sent to the un security council committee monitoring sanctions against north korea the documents site eighty nine instances in which north korean tankers likely delivered refined products illicitly procured via ship to ship transfers the documents that even if each tanker delivered only one third of its listed capacity the total volume would still be above the annual quota the us asked the committee to urgently inform all u n member states and the general public that north korea has breached the quota and to exercise enhanced vigilance against its attempts to obtain.

lake champlain donald trump ohio strip club columbus daniels attorney united states north korea lake kearney abedin jerry un security council five hundred thousand barrels milk
"champlain" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on AP News

"That the ice cream company is committed to a clean environment and high animal welfare standards they say most of the milk used in ben and jerry's ice cream doesn't mean it standards for animal care and labor practices they also claim that farm supplying the company are polluting lake champlain and lake kearney abandoned jerry spokeswoman says the company doesn't comment on lawsuits serena williams is headed to a wimbledon rematch against angelique kerber at the women's final on saturday correspondent graham acres reports if ever there was a question where the serena williams could successfully come back from childbirth the answer is in she show ken williams is now into her tenth wimbledon final after a powerful seventy minutes six two six four semifinal win over the twelfth say julia girgis she will now take on another german in the final eleven seed and former world numberone on jelly cover advanced to her second wimbledon finale with a routine six three six three win of the elena ostapenko showdown is a rematch of the two thousand and sixteen all england club final which williams won to secure her seventh wimbledon crown grandma's wimbledon thank you for listening to the ap radio network hey did you know that he associated press produces news related books here's what's new enough coming first pet presidential dogs cats and other critters deadly force fatal confrontations with police the hubble telescope a universe of new discovery and many more visit ap dot org slash books to purchase or visit amazon barnes and noble dot com i books.

ben jerry lake champlain serena williams angelique kerber graham acres ken williams amazon barnes lake kearney julia girgis elena ostapenko england club williams ap seventy minutes milk
"champlain" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"As the part time mayor the heart slow comment bill de blasio still out there canoeing around in lake champlain with his son dante state now bernie sanders the trinity taros have been running amok in new york city for twenty years and by the way the latest is there's the first death at rikers island in a long time and they believe it was tied to the trenitalia so that shows how serious things are it's an inmate at rikers island joked another guy to death and they believe it was sort of a gang issue tied to one of the alleged members of the trinity taro's gang so there are infiltrating everywhere well day shave made an eleventh and a now today at twelfth arrest in the killing the mac chetty knifing killing of junior the fifteen year old who was in the new york city police explorer program hoping one day to become a police officer to graduate from the academy you've seen the video ad nauseam over and over it's horrific and it doesn't get any better every time you see curtis it is so heart breaking and and those cops need to be investigated who were standing by the bodega owner i mean there are still so many residual issues but the latest issue as all eight the main eight who seen in the video either punching stabbing or using a much yet he against junior they caused his death they're all being held at different facilities and shot college their leaders they call them generals in the streets have told them they must take the code of omerta snitch get stitches and end up in ditches they cannot read each other out and seek to cooper rate with local law enforcement and the bronx da's office which is actually the worst out of the five boroughs i mean if you're going to be tried in any borough please get tried in the bronx because a jury empanelled will probably take the side of the crips who dress in blue rather than the nypd chest that's where the jury is like okay see ya don't worry but go ahead this is how you extricate information and you don't need to do what take cheney suggests waterboarding you tickle them know i would by the way if you've done that i would i would say whatever you need before twenty fifteen we had no extradition treaty with the dr dominican republic you could commit crimes here as many kill police officers he if flee to santo domingo or other parts of the d r and you out of harm's way law enforcement could not go and snatch you up and yes ladies and gentlemen who was barack obama dare i say his name on wabc engineered an extradition treaty with the dominican republic show we can swap people who are wanted whether they wanted in the all they wanted in the us of age and extradition treaty i would approach these eight most of them who were born here in the united states so they citizens but some of them not and to those that i know well born in raised in the dr i'd say guess what we're gonna extradite you back to the prison system and the dr which he's had third world prison system where they are thirty eight twenty miles a cage gang bangers and they got a hole in the middle of the cage where you defecating urinate in which we slop in which many of the prisoners die from diseases that they catch from one another because his sanitary conditions are horrible and horrific although dominican republic as a country is not a bad place to go to it's a beautiful i've been to some i'm telling i've been on some wonderful vacations there if you get out of prison you can hang out of prisons are some of the worst and i'm telling you if any of the were born and raised in the dr and are not american citizens they will then talk they will then flip they will not want to go to the prison system in the dr to be continued but right now let's get on news headlines and updates from jerry barmash nj diet dot com seventy seven ninetyone.

lake champlain bill de blasio dante fifteen year twenty years one day
"champlain" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The kids how to swim in lake champlain just to walk from the school what we found in many of these towns are schools that suit the place that they're in now one thing you didn't do is talk about national politics it is actually the least interesting thing you can talk about with people are natural reflex from the media ceos and most of my time ever for the country etcetera etcetera and that is true if you're talking about national politics it is not true if you look at the way that cities defied to tax themselves to pay for schools or the way that they are actually absorbing immigrants so the feel of most of interior america is very different from the tone of cable news okay so what was the field say in wyoming you were there right after the election the majority had voted for trump so we're in both cheyenne laramie for about a week after the election there was overwhelming landslide for trump they are three to one or so people we talked to a very glad most of them very glad that the trump at one but similar tena they were saying well we hope this doesn't screw up nafta because of course all of our exports to mexico depend on that we hope it doesn't screw up the immigration system and you could make fun of that for sort of what were they thinking but also it struck me as just the accelerating disconnection between the almost religious passions that animate national political divisions and the actual stuff of life where the people there recognized that their their economy depends on international trade their labor force dependent on flows of people with different kinds of visas so they didn't want to change any of that but just if you ask them on national politics they hated hillary and thought trump would shake things up okay here's the thing i read your columns after the election jim and i didn't hear any more eloquent anguish then what you were expressing do you feel like like you missed something you recall after the election there was this out there riff that only if you've been out there you would understand the fury the bitterness the dystopia the health scape and we have been out there for the previous couple of years and our observation is that except when it comes to these national passions of how you feel about hillary clinton in specific barack obama the liberals or donald trump that if you do not sort of puncture that little sack of bile the rest of the fabric works the way that you would think as society like this basically should work with all of the imperfections and so i don't think we missed the temper of the country i think what was missed is the anomalous way trump was able to win from james comey to the exact complexion of the electoral college thousand things had to go in a certain direction for him to end up with a deficit of free million votes but ended up in troll the of the government i think i wrote in the atlantic f feel watching that this was the worst blow the american idea had received in my lifetime but i testified to you that this was not representative of the fabric of the country in its daily life and i feel like there's a struggle between all the forces of darkness at the national level and all these forces of renewal at the local level so at least shining alight on that is something that we wanted to try to do i wanna thank you both for these stories thank you for giving us a chance to talk about thank you james and deborah follows the authors of our towns one hundred thousand mile journey into the heart of america.

lake champlain
"champlain" Discussed on On The Media

On The Media

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on On The Media

"Of bikes the ymca's sent down teachers to teach the kids how to swim in lake champlain just to walk from the school what we found in many of these towns are schools that suit the place that they're in now one thing you didn't do is talk about national politics it is actually the least interesting thing you can talk about with people or natural reflex the media's ceo this time ever for the country it cetera et cetera and that is true if you're talking about national politics it is not true if you look at the way that cities defied to tax themselves to pay for schools or the way that they are actually absorbing immigrants so the feel of most of interior america is very different from the tone of cable news okay so what was the field say in wyoming you were there right after the election the majority had voted for trump so we're in both cheyenne laramie for about a week after the election there was overwhelming landslide for trump there three to one or so people we talked to very glad most of them very that the trumpet one but similar painlessly they were saying well we hope this doesn't screw up nafta because of course all of our exports to mexico depend on that we hope it doesn't screw up the immigration system and you could make fun of that for sort of what were they thinking but also it struck me as just the accelerating disconnection between the almost religious passions that animate national political divisions and the actual stuff of life where the people there recognize that they're they're konomi depends on international trade their labor force depended on flows of people with different kinds of visas so they didn't want to change any of that but just if you ask them a national politics they hated hillary and thought trump would shake things up okay thing i read your columns after the election jim and i didn't hear any more eloquent anguish than what you were expressing do you feel like like you missed something you recall after the election there was this out there riff that only if you had been out there you would understand the fury the bitterness the dystopia the hell scape and we had been out there for the previous couple of years and our observation is that except when it comes to these national passions of how you feel about hillary clinton specific bronco boma the liberals or donald trump that if you do not sort of puncture that little sack of bile the rest of the fabric works the way that you would think as society like this basically should work with all the imperfections and so i don't think we missed the temper of the country i think what was missed is the anomalous way trump was able to win from james komi to the exact complexion of the electoral college thousand things had to go in a certain direction for him to end up with a deficit of three million votes but ended up in troll of the government i think i wrote in the atlantic f the election that this was the worst blow the american idea had received in my lifetime but i testified to you that this is not representative of the fabric of the country in its daily life and i feel like there's a struggle between all the forces of darkness that the national level and all these forces of renewal at the local level so at least shining a light on that as something that we wanted to try to do and wanna thank you both for these stories thank you for giving us the chance to talk about james and deborah follows of the authors of our towns one hundred thousand mile journey into the heart of america that's it for this week's show on the media's produced by alana casanova burgess jesse brennaman low injured lay fetter and john hanrahan we had more help from kate brown and make harney and our show said it by brooke our technical director is jennifer munson our engineers this week for sam bear greg rippin catty rogers is our executive producer on the media is a production of wnyc studios i'm glad stone bob garfield is supported by the ford foundation the john s and james l knight foundation and the listeners of wnyc radio

lake champlain
"champlain" Discussed on AP News

AP News

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on AP News

"The rap break progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates encouragement by state law every year comb oscar nominations time there are slobs and there are surprises epa entertainment editor us who will gabriel takes the look at who's there them who's out this wonder this ostra season what happened to wonderwoman one of the most popular female driven projects finds itself shut out the movie directed by heavy jenkins gut zero nods denzel washington has an oscar nomination but few people bothered to see his star turn in roaming jay israel esquire it's believed that washington benefited from the backlash against james franco who was accused of sexual misconduct gusty four voting ended end to people have to be left wondering if their movies directed themselves left out of the oscars running steven spielberg for the post and martin mcdonough for three billboards outside ebbing missouri both movies are best picture nominees i'm oscar wells gabriel a driver using our gps follow the directions right onto a frozen lake in vermont nobody was hurt but divers had to remove the suv after it sank to the bottom of lake champlain terror garreton tells w c eight x tv that some of her friends borrowed her jeep for a trip from connecticut to vermont for ski vacation earlier this month she says the group started following a gps when they got lost and they ended up driving on top of the icy lake gahrton's bodies were able to get out of the sinking jeep but the jeep was left in the lake for more than a week new york state could adapt its own version of net neutrality after the federal communications commission repeal the policy last month they'll announced tuesday would require internet providers doing business with the state to certified they don't interfere with.

epa federal communications commiss new york lake champlain steven spielberg james franco jay israel oscar denzel washington gabriel insurance company lake gahrton connecticut vermont gps martin mcdonough washington jenkins editor state law
"champlain" Discussed on Laces Out

Laces Out

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on Laces Out

"The went to hunt that had cal russian coverage just went up the seam i mean but like you said caches was brought him base basically to be a special team are and he might have had the second most rep side of anybody in the front seven which is not how you with two months ago when i was float and lake champlain with a fourteen start tallboy in the cupholder and i was thinking about the season ahead i wasn't sitting there going caches marsh he's going to be the key to that week one i was just they just had so much depth in it evaporated in the span of whatever six weeks aj aj if one guy fox up on a defense is at eminence dunrite that's why the call sheet so small is because you need everybody and sank in if one person mrs their gappor coverage it's six is i is that very easy to say i mean not always but yeah it's going to be an explosive gamed probably if if one guy out of your web and missed the gatwick run fifth tickets all born in confusing i guess if you're talking about basic run fits word it's yeah but you're all kind of on a string of one guy decides go bikes they want d limon's if he's supposed to be in a gap and stay in the a gap if he decides to like does swim move on the center and try to go back side right there you just late everyone behind you is trying to make up for your mistake and then you see that mistake in you try to jump into his gap and then they put the guy behind you imperil the safety are are gonna make up for both these guys and everyone and then after that even if you can't trust that may be the guys in front of you are going to do their job be in the position they're supposed to be because they're bidders have a better don't have the experience so then you're trying to thank lurk.

lake champlain marsh two months six weeks
"champlain" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"champlain" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Version whatever their own version is i don't think anybody even knows yet what the the version is going to be and there's a there was a firing today at the white house us garmou tree the new communications director suspected on those he terminated the suspect that leaker name michael schwartz he was like an assistant secretary he's a he's he's a range priebus guy and he's he's gone and i'd like to reporter a possible street crime in dc this is is this was on the one of the talks stations in dc purely bernie sanders you saw last week of the cribs of the lives with the with on are on our website that the grace does the three houses of bernie sanders he's got the lake the lakefront cottage on lake champlain he's got the nice house in a berlin for maude where he was of mayor and he's got the place on capitol hill will according to work to this guy uh chris plante he's a poncho host on knob on wmal in dc that is sky lived next door two to one of the bernie sanders in his town house he called up the washington post and some canceling my subscription to the sunday washington post couscussed like five bucks six box sneaky had been missing the last five or six weeks and they serve i'm tired of this i'm paying a lot the money for that paper and i never got it and they said let us check into it so the washington post that mean they got like seventeen print subscribers left so they wanted to make sure they didn't lose one so as they did some investigation and they called them back in they said the they said we've we've done some investigation sir though we've discovered that you have been coming out and picking up the paper and he said all year i have oak out tell me this and they said yeah we got a description from the delivery person you're an older men with grey hair balding and little round grow glasses again this is his story not mine if it's fake those it's all my fault i'm just repeating and the guy said i'm like you know in my 50s and i've got a full head of dark here but my neighbour is bernie sanders he believed that story save somebody who advocates for a.

director michael schwartz assistant secretary dc bernie sanders lake champlain berlin maude capitol hill washington post leaker reporter chris plante six weeks