22 Burst results for "Chairman And Ceo"

Millions of farm animals culled as US food supply chain chokes up

Stansberry Investor Hour

03:12 min | 5 months ago

Millions of farm animals culled as US food supply chain chokes up

"Tyson chairman. Ceo Tyson Foods wrote a letter on Sunday and he basically alerted the country of an impending shortage of meat and by Association. We just took this as an impending shortage of food because we can affect the production of meat can affect production of all food right. And I'll just quote you one little passage. That kind of sums up the the problem here and Tyson wrote farmers across the nation simply will not have anywhere to sell their livestock to be processed. When they could've fed the nation millions of animals chickens. Pigs and cattle will be depopulated because of the closure of our processing facilities and quote so these are essential businesses. These meat processing facilities. But they're closing them because people are getting the corona virus. They're getting sick so they had to close them and they closed a bunch of them. So you got all these animals that are mature and ready for slaughter and there's no place to send them. So what do they do? Well depopulated is you know. There's all these euphemistic terms youth Asian and depopulation. They kill them without eating limits. What happens there wasted and you know I I mean I have a soft heart for animals. I'm no vegetarian. Okay but we bring these animals into the world and raise them up and care for them so that we can eat them and it's tragically sad to see them killed without being eaten. It makes their lives. You know it's like they lived and died in vain. I watched a Canadian farmer on Bloomberg TV Monday morning openly emotional talking about this and talking about having farmers having to euthanize thousands of animals at a time. It's it's terrible. He was more concerned was more than just the lost revenue and investment. Although that's you know that's a big impact too. It was just the thought of all these animals as I say having lived and died in vain. It's it's heartbreaking you know and these are essential businesses and yet they're still having to close down because people getting a virus and Tyson said. This is the thing that got me. He just said the food supply chain is breaking. The food supply. Chain is breaking. That's scary you know you and I were know. We're big time investors or whatever. We got plenty of money in our 401K's or wherever you know we got resources we can tap and if things cost a little more expensive we can probably still afford it but poor people who don't have anything to their name. They won't be able to afford and they won't be able to get. Those supplies will be gone from the stores. Anybody you can get. It will pay a fortune and people are going to start getting hungry. I I'm afraid you know. At first people will say OK. Well here I am poor. I don't have a penny to my name. Put yourself in their shoes. What are they going to do? They're going to be like I'm GONNA steal this. I'M GONNA get food any way that I can. That's bad enough but my fear is that this goes on and on and on and the government doesn't let us go back to work soon enough and then we start seeing like mass violence. You know.

Tyson Tyson Foods CEO Chairman Bloomberg
Interview with Colin Angle, Robotics Luminary, Chairman, CEO and Founder of iRobot

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

09:12 min | 7 months ago

Interview with Colin Angle, Robotics Luminary, Chairman, CEO and Founder of iRobot

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is Colin Angle. Who is the chairman CEO and founder of I robot and in Luminary in the field of robotics so high Colin? Thank you so much for joining us today. A great to be here. Welcome Colin and. Thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and some exciting things that are going on it. I Robot Short so I'm Colin Angle the CEO Chairman and co-founder of I robot. This is actually a robot. Thirty th year. We were founded back in nineteen ninety a startup company with the mission to really deliver on the promise of robots and we'd been I grew up reading robots. We all some movies about robots. I really didn't have any in our lives on a daily basis and I robot was founded to go and change that and over the years we've been involved in everything from missions to Mars to robots. That went into nuclear power plants. Robots that diffused bombed. But we're boost well known for the room. The robot vacuum cleaner as the first real practical robot that people could just generally own excellent. You know and I think that's part of what's popularized robotics and people are very sort of become more intimately familiar with robots today in the Twenty Twenty S. Surprising that I wrote has been around for thirty years. I'm sure for you. It feels like yesterday for a lot of us who have been around a robot. It's certainly feels that way. And you know. Crow bots have been in constant development for many years for the past sixty plus years even beyond that no longer than than six years and there have been a number of notable successes of course. I robot included and they're also have been some you know troubling starts. Nobody's who are built robotics and tried to build robotic firms. Even some of the big luminaries in this field. So what do you see as the current state of the robotics industry as a whole and what do you see as make some companies successful in this industry and perhaps even to another extent here like what do you see? Some of the roadblocks that are facing widespread adoption of robots in our daily lives in the home in the office. And how far away are we from achieving this ultimate goal? I know it's a lot of parts to this question but just crafting the vision for where to go straight there. You go sure so. I mean robotics tool kit so it's a technology which allows you to go and there's different parts toolkit perceive information about the world use artificial intelligence to think about what you've been able to perceive also in the tool. Kit are the use of computers and microcontrollers to drive motors and actuators to allow machine to do physical work. And this is a really cool tool. I mean you can build machines that you could only dream of the challenges of course finding an application of robot technology where you're really solving a problem. People care about and we've been told all throughout our history that there was an expectation that robots were supposed to clean your home and the idea that you could maybe build a robot that couldn't vacuum which is a subset of cleaning the entire home. But it's a very important part and you could come home every day to freshly vacuumed home and particularly if you have pets well you need to vacuum every day or live with pet hair. Neither of them are particularly exciting options. And the Roomba offered practical solution and because we had a lot of experience in building robots that low price point and using smaller microprocessors to understand the environment sufficiently to go backing thoroughly and completely it all made sense and you had a robot which was both affordable and effective and were well up over twenty five million of these robots sold the Dayton about twenty. Five percent of money spent on vacuums is now spent on robot vacuums which has just been an amazing phenomenon to have start with an idea on a piece of paper and have it turned into reality. Yeah that's I mean. One that that stat is really interesting and also. I think that it's made people more comfortable with robots in their house. You know it's just it's just doing one task and doing it well and not really getting in people's way and getting them familiar with robots. So I know that you've recently wrote a piece about autonomy is not intelligence and we really liked tat because we always say at cognreznick that automation is not intelligence. And I think that sometimes people can confuse the two but they're really not the same so can you break down for our listeners. And explain what you meant by that sure so autonomy is usually where working robot start where the idea is. The robot hasn't task you know go out and vacuum four and then go back and recharge yourself but if you can't direct the robot if you can't interact with a robot it's really not that smart. Imagine if you went to your life unable to listen or interact with anyone else and you just sort of maybe add some instinct on how to survive. But I don't think many people would think you're very smart if you couldn't talk with them and take direction and give direction so what we're trying to do is expand the utility of the robot and expand the ability of the robot to fit into people's lives by working at increasing its ability to interact and understand and take direction and demonstrate that cares about the environment and treat. The environment is operating in a very careful fashion and through doing this. You go from device. That can't listen and can only do what it was programmed to do at the beginning to a device. That really can learn about how it's supposed to do. Its job and that's opens up not just the world of better vacuuming but vastly richer world of tasks that robot can suddenly take on. Yeah that's actually a really good point because you know pretty much anything that people think about what humans can do our animals that used to do with it and they were laboring in the field or animals. We like to have as command. Says well you know certainly. That's what we want these mechanized machines that have some element of intelligence. Who Want to do that as well? So I know you see lots of use cases an examples of robots of of all sorts and as matter of fact when you started talking about the history of I robot you talked about robots in places like nuclear power plants in areas of combat and places like that so. What are some of these standard examples that you have seen especially more recently for robots and places that we may not necessarily have expected these robots to being performing really useful tasks others a great example in warehouse automation and so that some of the tasks the robots where the really making a great inroads today? Or maybe not the most glamorous robots like you know robots come and greet you at the door but robots that are enabling and are involving society to actually work and as we get more and more addicted to ordering things online and expecting products to magically come from. Click on the screen to my front door in a matter of days or even hours were increasing the load on warehouses to sales Toronto disorder toothpaste. I need to go find the toothpaste but in a box. Seal the box and mail out or even have it. Delivered automatically and that's an area where the industry is just exploding where there's demand for automation to accurately and swiftly and cheaply perform that type of service and so that's a big thing and an area maybe on the other side of the field of things we may have heard about contests driving vehicles these are robots and. I think there's a lot of attention and excitement around a when are we going to have and see robot cars and robot buses and robot? Taxis enter into our lives and gradually underway. Where there's different areas where maybe today's state of the art is in a known geographic area potentially operating at reduced speeds to ensure safety. You can get autonomous driving vehicles. Move FROM POINT A to B or highways with certain brands of vehicles. You can start to see things like smart cruise control and other assisted features in our cars and over time these robots that carry around and will continue to get more and more sophisticated until the point where you know driving truly becomes a choice and those are two really big areas where we're seeing a lot of activity and then obviously closer. I robot tone in the home where we're seeing vacuuming become tremendously successful commercially. We see potential for mopping and lawn mowing and then as we dial the clock forward getting into assistive purposes to allow elderly people to live independently. Much more safely

Colin Angle Twenty Twenty Ceo Chairman And Co-Founder Chairman Ceo Kathleen Walsh Schmeltzer Founder Dayton Toronto
Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

Squawk Pod

01:36 min | 8 months ago

Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

"Today Andrews interview with Uber Ceo. Dr COSMO shocking. Investors have been watching Uber closely for signs of profitability when Uber went public on the New York Stock Exchange in May of Twenty nineteen. Andrew asked Dara about it and Dara. Well here's what he said so for us. The Path to profitability isn't theoretical there are cohort of countries that are profitable. We do reinvest profits aggressively recipe. New Business Lines like eats that have great promise but we're pretty comfortable when we look at the portfolio of businesses. That we have that we have a very strong Pathak off a a few months later in an interview with CNBC November Dr Projected profitability by twenty. Twenty one we are actually targeting twenty twenty one for adjusted even profitability full year and this week around eight months after the company's First Trading Day Uber reported its fourth quarter financial results. And and as you'll hear there was also some good news for investors about that profitability goal. Here's Andrew Uber reported quarterly results. Last night the ridesharing giant announcing announcing on its call with investors. It is moving up. Its target for profitability by a year. Join US right now. For an exclusive interview is Uber CEO. Derek Ezra Shack Good morning to you. Good morning thank thank you for for coming in. Let's walk through if you could for investors so they understand how you think you get there and when I say get there. I'm talking about profitability. Well as we made through our way in two thousand nine hundred and we became more and more confident of the strength of business and the ability of our teams to execute.

Andrew Uber Uber Ceo Dara Dr Cosmo United States Derek Ezra Shack CEO New York Pathak Cnbc
September jobs report expectations: What to look for

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:17 min | 1 year ago

September jobs report expectations: What to look for

"Heller MGM resorts international says a legal settlement with victims of the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history as a major step chairman CEO Jim Murren said today the casino giants goal has been to resolve the lawsuits it faced over the twenty seventeen Los Vegas massacre victims and their families can move forward in the healing process a gunman opened fire for one of MGM's hotels into a concert venue it owns killing fifty eight people and injuring hundreds just over two

Heller Mgm Resorts United States Ceo Jim Murren MGM Chairman Los Vegas
CBS CEO Moonves resigns amid new allegations of sexual misconduct

The Christian Science Sentinel

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

CBS CEO Moonves resigns amid new allegations of sexual misconduct

"CBS corporation chief executive les Moonves has resigned as chairman CEO and president effective immediately that after a new set of published allegations of sexual misconduct, which he does deny details from CBS news correspondent Pam Coulter. New accusers told the New Yorker that the sixty eight year old moonville has forced them to engage in sex use physical violence or exposed himself. The incidents occurred between the nineteen eighties and early two thousands Boone vez told the magazine the appalling accusations in the article are not true. He said he had consensual relationships with three of the women twenty five years ago before he came to CBS versus exit package from CBS is now in doubt he could end up with nothing pending an investigation into the sexual harassment acusations he and CBS or contributing twenty million dollars of his severance to battle workplace misconduct separately. He was involved in a bitter corporate battle for control of

CBS Boone Vez Pam Coulter Les Moonves Chief Executive Tom Foty Chairman CEO Harassment President Trump Twenty Million Dollars Twenty Five Years Sixty Eight Year
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

02:50 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

"We can do it purely economically, and it was that realization on the beach. This could be done economically that made me realize that somebody was going to do it because anything that is possible and is going to have a very large economic impact is going to be done. Then the question is, will what's going to be the motives of the people that do it. They going to be motivated to try to do something that is going to be for good, or they just go to wanna be disruptive, break things because they can. Are they going to what to see that you have a new fairer system, or they gonna create a system that just benefits them or special classical baby the wealthier, and I had nothing against wealth. I just would like to see it used for for a more positive purposes of, and I think one of the great things that we're trying to eliminate at sweet bridge is to reduce the use of interest in society and finance, and making money from interest. And to make making money from interests. Something that has to be made from interest. The average person gets the interest of the pension fund or the insurance company or the of the wealthy individuals of that make today, and, and that's now all possible. And so that's what we are doing. I'd like that ground vision just to come out something a little bit more present and pull them wall, y sweet bridge ones that night. Well, we wanted to get this idea across of connecting old system and old way to a new way that led away forward without actually destroying the old to get to the new and abridge does that. So abridge takes you from one side of a chasm or river or something in Laos you to go over to the other side, but doesn't actually destroy the place that you left doing it. So we thought that was a Greek visual, and that was a great out analogy of what we're trying to do. And then we wanted to to say that this was something that was positive. And so we looked at all sorts of of names that would be something positive, and the word sweet actually translated into every major language into something that the culture seizes positive and and it was one of the few things that did. And and it was also available to a couple of other ones that we came up with, but they weren't available is as name somebody already taken the Vince out, we decided on a sweep bridges really turned out to be fabulous name. We really like it a lot. I'm Tustin come think they..

sweet bridge Tustin Laos Vince
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

04:17 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

"That means if you take the all of the different ways, a company can raise money stocks bonds borrowing money from the Bank, and you have together and you say we'll what's the interest rate. That's that's what we're talking about. Okay. So that's a bit about the the business by someone. Did you have be finished that businesses? Yes. No, that business still going sold it to a private equity group number of years ago. Okay. So and so what did you did you get a beach in? I actually did. I went to a beach in Hawaii. Yep, excuse. I got a bit of a bit of a cold recovering from went to a beach in Hawaii and sat there and thought you know about whether or not I actually wanted to spend the rest of my life on the beach. And it was during that time that I was reading a lot about what was happening with this thing called blockchain, which I'd been interested in because I had a son in law who tried to convince me that I should buy some bitcoin back in. At the time when you could buy it for less than a dollar and. By the way, this is this is a subject of of almost every family holiday. I told him it was the scam. So anyway, he, he kept me interested it and got me interested earlier, and I was able to catch up on what was going on in the space sitting on that beach. It was at that time that I realized that there were going to be a very small number of people who were going to develop the new financial economic protocols for the earth, and nobody was going to vote for them. Nobody was even gonna know their names before they became famous. And I was very concerned that they might not actually do that thoughtfully. Okay. I decided that my background may experience everything learned gave me an opportunity to potentially do that bit wiser than maybe some other people might do add. I was very also concerned about the idea that this technology could create the world's first trillionaire. I don't think we really need a Detroit heirs of and this as much as sometimes it, you know, people might think they wanna be trillionaire. I don't think anyone would be able to be a good trillionaire. Very interesting. That's a good little polls point to take to sidestep from out stories too. That's really good background. Give me a little bit of ground about blockchain. How define what blockchain is to the non-experts? A lot of people have lots of different ways of defining it. The way I look at it is maybe a little different little bit unorthodox. So my explanation may not be the explanation you had find if you will online. I would agree that it is a shared database, so it's a shared database of state that's very difficult to corrupt or to subvert in any way. So you can't really hack it economically. But it's two things that a lot of people don't talk about. That's really powerful. It is a way of combining the financial status of the fischel financial record, which like you get from your Bank of where money is what the balances of of some financial account with the accounting records and with the legal ownership records of assets or of any other kind of contract because you could bind these together you, you can make things happen, automated -ly now that you do not need to audit or regulate because you can program into the code the way you want it to work, and this can be trusted by everybody because you can't economically subvert it..

blockchain Hawaii Detroit
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Inspiring Sustainability - Podcast

"Welcome to the inspiring sustainability podcast. Mine is out in all and day. I'm delighted to invite Scott Nelson c. Swick bridge to join Adam. Thank you for inviting me delighted. And this is quite an international conversations date because we are delighted to be hosted by digital catapult who just in the center of London. The sculpt is over here from Arizona, and I believe that part of your role is actually to kind of be traveling all over the world. Isn't it at the moment? It is. It's been about seventy eighty percent of my time on the road right now. Right? Well, this is a really exciting conversation for me because I actually met Scott about six months ago when I was actually I was happy enough to be sitting on a panel of blockchain event, and Scott was actually one of the keynote speakers, and he really impressed me with what he was saying on day. So I was delighted that when I found out I be in town again and so we could have a good conversation. Well, we did about doing this when we got together again, so I'm glad it worked out. Exactly. And so as as you love pinks off, the show is that this program is going to be quite low about blockchain. Now, blockchain apart from crypto currencies and bitcoin, and things like that is pretty out p-a-k area maybe two to most of you out there. So what I like to do is to get a background to sculptors as I instruction, but then most Scottsdale, nine going to ask him to get him to give. Those his interpretation of blocks of the kind of dummies for blockchain blockchain for Donets. So first of all, let's do of. Introduction to yourself. We'll tell about yourself. I've spent my career at the union of three things that don't normally go together. Technology finance and supply chains. Had a business that I started in nineteen ninety three that ended up growing into a net international business that service some of the largest most Manding companies on earth, and that handled the settlement activity for their logistics and their supply chains all over the world actually had operations that touched one hundred ninety six countries which almost every country owner. So what's. Did you how connected is that with the current. Solve business that you're building laid the foundation for my understanding, it was what I was working with these large multinationals and seeing how their suppliers were treated, seeing the problems of their suppliers, looking at the settlement processes, watching how of currency exchange, how lots of different things go on that I realized that the current financial system of the world is really quite broken, and I really couldn't believe that the people that had the most money available to them and had the lowest cost of capital were forcing their suppliers to take the longest payment terms and they got to play unfair advantages over the mid mid size and smaller competitors that they competed within the marketplace. And I, I really realized that there was a what caused this was that the the large multinational corporations could do things in their accounting system that would allow them to move assets money, other things purely with accounting entries where real world organizations that didn't have these multinational structures couldn't do the same thing. They had to actually go down and get currency converted. They had actually send money places. They had actually physically move assets and commodities and things in this. This added tons of friction tons of cost to the the smaller businesses, and they had a much higher cost to capital than the larger is Asians, who would insist for example, that if you want to do business with me, you're gonna have to take sixty ninety day payment terms and cost capital. Was that dot me a great question. The average weighted cost of capital is a financial concept..

Scott Nelson Swick bridge Adam Arizona Manding London dot Donets seventy eighty percent sixty ninety day six months
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"He's a great ceo and it's a great company but when you look at what's going on as a huge transformation in the banking and financial services industry could be similar just insurance companies as well there's a higher demand for them to provide a great customer experience that that was true with a line that's even true the usda with those farmers how do you transform that experience and that's why they're earning the salesforce doubts why you're seeing this growth that's why you're seeing this great return of equity over the last decade that we've been talking because look you have to connect with your customers in a whole new way you have to build a three hundred sixty degree view of your customer you have to know your customer like never before and customers can turn to salesforce to do that all right well congratulations to marc chairman ceo of salesforce monster big blowout jim i hope you come to san francisco this was this was a huge quarter okay just quarter to the point where he could turn around the cloud kings in tomorrow session mice back it is and then the lightning round is over are you ready skate lighter dark jaren hey jim big to you great job on that commission speech by the way sex you but like you group on by seller hold with williams is doing an amazing job six to in new york hello jim cramer great to be able to talk to you.

ceo usda salesforce williams jim cramer marc chairman ceo san francisco new york three hundred sixty degree
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"He's a great ceo and it's a great company but when you look at what's going on as a huge transformation in the banking and financial services industry could be similar just insurance companies as well there's a higher demand for them to provide a great customer experience that that was true with a line that's even true the usda with those farmers how do you transform that experience and that's why they're earning the salesforce doubts why you're seeing this growth that's why you're seeing this great return of equity over the last decade that we've been talking because look you have to connect with your customers in a whole new way you have to build a three hundred sixty degree view of your customer you have to know your customer like never before and customers can turn to salesforce to do that all right well congratulations to marc chairman ceo of salesforce monster big blowout jim i hope you come to san francisco this was this was a huge quarter okay just quarter to the point where he could turn around the cloud kings in tomorrow session mice back it is and then the lightning round is over are you ready skate lighter dark jaren hey jim big to you great job on that commission speech by the way sex you but like you group on by seller hold with williams is doing an amazing job six to in new york hello jim cramer great to be able to talk to you.

ceo usda salesforce williams jim cramer marc chairman ceo san francisco new york three hundred sixty degree
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"On a hideous day like today when everybody's freaking out about italy newfound fears of eurozone breakup need to fall back on powerful longterm themes that will keep plowing forward regardless of any jew political turbulence themes like cloud computing and the king of the cloud is salesforce which imported one of the best quarters i've ever seen tonight sharply higher that expected revenues billy's and earnings slut chicken with mark benyak the visionary co founder chairman ceo of salesforce or more about the and where his company is headed mr benef welcome back to med money jim how are you great to see you well markham always cook when i see that you're the fastest enterprise software company ten billion but you now projected fastest to twenty billion what gives you that level of confidence fiscal year twenty two will produce north of twenty billion well you can see jim we had a fantastic quarter and we are raising our guidance to thirteen point one two five billion for this year from ten and a half billion last year and you can see we are fast tracking to twenty billion dollars that's crystalclear total first quarter revenue was three point north of three billion which i think is pretty impressive twenty five percent year over year how much is just new large clients that we can do some talk about but we can really see what's happening in the market today a huge investment by our customers economy is really ripping and you can see that customers are going through this massive digital transformation in every digital transformation starts and ends with the customer so we saw diversified success across all of the industries that we work in gym and a great example that would be carrying group everybody knows gucci everybody knows yves saint laurent and of course everybody knows potato vanita well of course they need to connect with their customers on a whole new way and they're going to do that through salesforce in sales and service in marketing in every capacity that you need to connect with the customer you can now do that with ourselves for customer success platform and that's a great example of retail going online another huge example would be the us department of agriculture of course they're working to make ranchers and farmers.

ceo salesforce jim gucci italy billy co founder chairman markham us department of agriculture twenty billion dollars twenty five percent
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER - Full Episode

"On a hideous day like today when everybody's freaking out about italy newfound fears of eurozone breakup need to fall back on powerful longterm themes that will keep plowing forward regardless of any jew political turbulence themes like cloud computing and the king of the cloud is salesforce which imported one of the best quarters i've ever seen tonight sharply higher that expected revenues billy's and earnings slut chicken with mark benyak the visionary co founder chairman ceo of salesforce or more about the and where his company is headed mr benef welcome back to med money jim how are you great to see you well markham always cook when i see that you're the fastest enterprise software company ten billion but you now projected fastest to twenty billion what gives you that level of confidence fiscal year twenty two will produce north of twenty billion well you can see jim we had a fantastic quarter and we are raising our guidance to thirteen point one two five billion for this year from ten and a half billion last year and you can see we are fast tracking to twenty billion dollars that's crystalclear total first quarter revenue was three point north of three billion which i think is pretty impressive twenty five percent year over year how much is just new large clients that we can do some talk about but we can really see what's happening in the market today a huge investment by our customers economy is really ripping and you can see that customers are going through this massive digital transformation in every digital transformation starts and ends with the customer so we saw diversified success across all of the industries that we work in gym and a great example that would be carrying group everybody knows gucci everybody knows yves saint laurent and of course everybody knows potato vanita well of course they need to connect with their customers on a whole new way and they're going to do that through salesforce in sales and service in marketing in every capacity that you need to connect with the customer you can now do that with ourselves for customer success platform and that's a great example of retail going online another huge example would be the us department of agriculture of course they're working to make ranchers and farmers.

ceo salesforce jim gucci italy billy co founder chairman markham us department of agriculture twenty billion dollars twenty five percent
"chairman ceo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Four six mike contractor license number three nine one seven o message and data rates may apply earning your degree from one of the top business schools in the country might sound impossible to fit into your workload but what if there were a business degree that further jerk career and gave you access to world renowned faculty leaders and mentors all on your schedule one that open doors to some of the most influential ceos tech companies law firms entrepreneurs and thought leaders and what if you could earn that's agree in as little as sixteen months 100 percent online to find out more text offer to 79645 that's o f f e r to 79645 start your online mba information management or business analytics masters program from the wp carry school of business at arizona state university today learn more about the wp carry business graduate programmes online text offer to 79645 that's o f f e r to 79645 farm john who roy founder chairman ceo of operation let's talk about taking our country bag i grew up in conflict california and when i was ten a beggar him my classroom and taught me financial literacy it changed everything i asked him what did they do for a living how to get rich legally he told me finance entrepreneurs i didn't know what that was but i wanted to be one ten years of age started march 1st business and made three hundred dollars a week today i'm an entrepreneur because that role model show me with one looked like back then you can now be the change we want to see in the world would bring hope business in a box every school in this country in partnership with the gallup organization in.

arizona state university ceo california founder chairman three hundred dollars sixteen months one ten years 100 percent
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"And he said we can do a procedure and fix that and i said well i'm a little bit involved in healthcare what are the other options he said well you could try physical therapy i went to six physical therapy appointments newest vexed the issue is now you don't have to be a brain surgeon to figure out that is better to do that than than have somebody cut into your body in mess around with something inside your body and then they're secondary infections in all kinds of things so lavonna go is about how do we start to make it easier and less costly to stay healthy in for people with chronic conditions in that's the best were focused on we've got you know great people and very committed to this this idea that we can actually make things better for people in help them in every day we see it for you know more than fifty thousand people who are using it today in should be double that by the end of the year so let member talking to many of your your colleagues and many of them had a personal connection to diabetes you know in their life and at the yet that help them connect with the brain lebong go and want to support the brand in want to espouse its values to a to the greater good of society yeah i think i think that's true there's a lot of folks who and you know it today everybody knows somebody who has type owner type 2 diabetes there's thirty two million people across the us in 10 years china and india will have more people with diabetes than we have people in the united states in the middle east where you are huge is a big big problem and so this is a worldwide problem were focused on and it turns out that seventy percent of the people with type 2 diabetes also have hypertension so this is just it's like a piece going on hanon end up.

physical therapy india diabetes united states hypertension china middle east seventy percent 10 years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Gauge them not going m we don't believe the physician or the hospitals the center of the healthcare system we think the health consumers the center and everything else should be there to serve them but he's just had a massive mental shift that has to happen because i don't feel like in the us culture at least i won't big beyond that that the us culture can really handle that at this point terms of putting meet the center my choices because how i boys has been raised the doctors know best so i don't know to push back while again nasa it's a social after apology massive scale but the reality is some their shift is happened so if you have something i hope not but if something goes wrong what will you do in the first place she'll probably go is not to your doctor you're probably google it and so you'll go to the internet to get information so where we have to do after curate that we have to make sure the information getting is the right information i have died fivetime so far going on the internet so but eggs so the next place you'll go as friends and family and you go to them to say tell us what your experiences and so we have to make sure that um is good generally as pretty reliable which is most people will tell you if you have a back problem hey surgery didn't help manage turns out for all but a few cases back surgery is generally doesn't work in people spend enormous amounts of time and go through enormous pain um when in fact it's not the best firstoption it is an option is just not the best first option and yet many people use it as a first option and if you go to a surgeon the of that person it's not 'cause they're bad person basement their entire life being told you can help people by operating so what a surprise that they say we can operate in texas i had a back problem recently a sciatic problem is kind of leg back and and i did that and went to a surge.

healthcare system us texas google
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"These big companies out there and yet this one individual manjoo leading his he had created this get just a absolutely brilliant guy and he said i'm not the right guy to run this scale this you are and so we ended up buying the company in that became foundation for what we later created call the vago um we did it out in silicon valley because we wanted this to be not just digital health and not just about technology but about the patient as a health consumer in turning people into treating people as well in health care as we do in the rest of our environment giving them the information the transparency to make them health consumers and that's what we're able to do so we used that company we we renamed the company baath is technology company we created lavonna ago and it was about how do we empower all people with a chronic condition live better and healthier lives starting with diabetes and now we started with diabetes we've been fortunate to have great success there almost two hundred fifty companies now including huge portion of the fortune one hundred five hundred and then along with that the two largest pbm score the top seven jurists companies in dar are payers end now we're moving in to hypertension you know essentially doing everything we can to help people stay healthier to make it easier for them to stay healthy so what is about healthcare that that has you so focused on on this this regis industry is there something of personal for you that that makes you want to help solve these problems you could solve hunger you could solve all sorts of other problems in the world i thank first of all i ever inviting the two most important things in life or right whether you're healthy in whether you're happy.

technology company diabetes dar
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Fundamentally improve health care for people across the world and you know i it was just the right time for me to step out in so i did that i went to what had been a family office my family office making my investments but i've had a twenty five year partnership with a business partner lamely shapiro in lien i decided to throw in together and create seven wire ventures to invest both of our money lee has always been i've been you know probably the most fortunate thing that's ever happened to me was partnering with lead because he's always been there as a personal adviser friend running partner and they're you know there's probably you know the brains behind most of what i'd done in so so lien i created seven wire together it's a 100milliondollar early stage investment fund we brought on to other partners tom main who's probably the smartest healthcare strategy in the business and came out of oliver why mendon before that he had created his own company called chapter house without which oliver weimin plod in another partner name robert garber in the four of us you know that fund they do most the work and one of the investments of that fund was called levaing up and love ongo there was a great entrepreneur who kind of one part inventor one part mad scientist one part allen smart business guy and he came to us and said i've created this new kind of glucose meter with a cellular chip indebted it's more accurate it would allow people to stay in touch endured remote patient monitoring in yeah no one it ever done that and you always think well there's all.

partner lee robert garber patient monitoring tom oliver weimin scientist 100milliondollar twenty five year
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"And he didn't do that for any other reason than he thought it was right my mom grew up in that environment i think the second thing is while i'm not going to ask where they emigrated from what's that were the emigrated from uh yeah from germany and russia okay so i go ahead and then i think the the second thing is while i'm not particularly i wouldn't call myself particularly religious i was raised jewish and in the jewish religion there's there's a phrase called to cool olam and that means repairing the world in it's something that i always i've always loved about this sense that were put here impart to to repair things in the world that are broken and in you know so i i you know have kind of guandong onto that is something that's important to me and you know one of the metrics ius is are we doing enough good whether it's to our company we put a high premium in every company i've ever been ad on on volunteering like using the power of our company not just to give money we do that but to give hours in when you have people go out and they build a home when you have in go out made will walk or 100 mile by floor all the various ways you can volunteer today magical things happened that help your business and people don't really understand this but you get to know people in a different way you get to know families in a different way you have new bonds start to create in those hope the business so much and you know i've gotten to know more people in more ways from charitable events and activities and seen them in different lights and seen skill sets i didn't know and you know and i tell people i am very direct about it that volunteering in our businesses to not participate and do not volunteer.

germany russia
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Uh my mother was very very focused on this kind of social justice came from their my father really just work so i i hear this theme at your dad just really was her around that much well thinking since the function up part of that was the times in that was now today i've been fortunate for my kids i was able to fly back when they had an event or what have you and you know that simply wasn't possible many years ago you didn't have the options that we have today the state touch into manage multiple priorities and so much easier and so you know there's tremendous respect when he was there he was all ends he had a very major impact that said you know there's it's a give him he added so i think one she was very focused on it her parents were immigrants when they came to st louis they were in the shoe business and they were the first to employ african americans and and i remember i have a memory of of their windows being broken alive in in st louis in youth in you city um and on the main street a big floor shyam shoe store and i had no idea i did didn't dawn on me until many many years later when i was told that's because our grandfather was the first to bring africanamericans into the business and then allow them to be out on the floor sewing shoes and.

social justice african americans windows st louis shyam
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Executives After Hours with Dr. James Kelley

"Welcome to executives after hours real conversations with real leaders this is your host dr james kelly i wanna make you a promise that over the next sixty minutes you will learn at a minimum the two things one every leader an executive makes mistakes on the way to the top two and more importantly everyone has a unique story to tell and we do here on executive after hours we sit down with leaders across a variety of industries and we talk to them about their unique story so welcome to the community stay tuned for today's episode on your executives after hours everybody welcome to executives after hours this this was a cracker of an episode today in the contrast i had the pleasure to speak with the chairman and ceo of lend lavonna go health base that was cargo the model health specializes in works with partners around diabetes using technology it's pretty amazing go check it out on the bongocom that is live o hinges eo dad's condo bongo getcom glen and i have this source amazing conversation we talk about him living amongst the amish doing some research when he was in college we talk about his magic that he loves but the magic conversation only happens in the extended unedited version which is on our website adept of thethe james guide our consul check that out this was a long at associated shop a bunch up today episode mr glenn toleman c o chairman of live long ago health some of you recall take a break and it can't do it again addiction problem and so what i decided to do is back in october i did a a series for university of western australia around diversity inclusion some produced produce those over christmas break guys have listen to those are some really interesting content there they're all about fifteen twenty minutes max so pretty short and sharp but it's perfect also on to say thank you to see sweet partners continued publish my book goalie.

executive chairman and ceo christmas dr james kelly mr glenn toleman university of western australi fifteen twenty minutes sixty minutes
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Adams is here she is chairman ceo and president of the united states tennis association the us tsa's mission is simply to promote and develop the growth of tennis throughout the country this included in a find and nurturing top us town alan to compete on the global stage the usta also owns and operates a us open the two week tournament begins very soon on august twenty eight all eyes will be on roger federer the 36yearold would be seeking a third major title this year after winning both the australian open and wimbledon tournament i am pleased to have could lina adams at this table for the first time welcome thank you know you the first person to serve as ceo could for two terms and my goodness uh and the first person who was a player to come ceos will that is correct and tennis as a young person absolutely from the first moment i picked up a racquet a age say i knew that was what i wanted to do it now that professional tennis was a possibility by this love the sport and you would have been good asked whom in every other sport to you a great time and i coordination and that kind of thing makes great professional athletes i had a lot of fun as a kid crying out for two out of brothers i was introduced to alatas for its and i think that when i did pick up tennis having already been somewhat if an athlete at a young age made it very easy for me to really pick up the sport what did it mean to see arthur ashe win wimbledon it was it was the first summer that i actually picked up a racquet in nineteen 75 and i didn't understand this foreign it didn't understand the dynamics of it i didn't know what the significance of winning wimbledon are tournament like that was but i do know that when i watched and play on a 12ounce black and.

Adams president tsa alan roger federer tennis chairman united states lina adams arthur ashe two week 12ounce
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Radio the train atoms is here she is chairman ceo and president of the united states tennis association the t as mission is simply to promote and develop the growth of tennis throughout the country this included in a fun and nurturing top us talent too compete on the global stage the usda also owns and operates a us open the two week tournament begins very soon on august twenty eight all eyes will be on roger federer the 36yearold would be seeking a third major title this year after winning both the australian open and wimbledon tournament i am pleased to have katrina adams at this table for the first time welcome thank you know you the first person to serve as co 2 for two terms and my goodness and and the first person who was a player to come ceos will that is correct and area of tennis as a young person absolutely from the first moment i picked up a racquet a age sex i knew that was what i wanted to daily didn't know that professional tennis was a possibility by this love the sport than and you would have been good i spill minebea the sport to get great tie and i coordination and that kind of thing makes great professional athletes i had a lot of fun as a kid crying out for two other brothers i was introduced alatas for its and i think that when i did pick up tennis having already been somewhat if an athlete at a young age and made it very easy for me to really pick up the sport what did it mean to see arthur ashe win wimbledon it was the first summer that i actually picked up a racquet in nineteen 75 and i didn't understand this foreign it didn't understand the dynamics of it i didn't know what the significance of winning wimbledon are tournament like that was but i do know that when i watched and play on a twelve ends black and white television that i said wow you get to do this on television that's really cool wasn't until years later that i really understand what i have witnessed we talk about usd and developing talent um how do you do that to develop young talent because we've seen waves of american talent strong monday que did not so strong in another dick well i think we've had strength throughout the sport over time.

ceo president usda roger federer katrina adams tennis chairman united states arthur ashe two week