25 Burst results for "Chairman And Ceo"

Analyzing the Impact of a.I. And Technology on Society

IT Visionaries

01:48 min | 3 months ago

Analyzing the Impact of a.I. And Technology on Society

"Welcome everyone to another episode of visionaries in today. We're continuing our security series with casey ellis malcolm harkins. This topic is going to be about the impact of technology on society and cybersecurity. But i do these gentlemen a disservice by not letting them introduce themselves casey. Let's start with you. Tell audience who you are. Where do you work. what do you do and we'll kick it over to malcolm. Thanks it's got to be on gregg giannotti about malcolm as well but i'd say yells is cold out this out again from the founder chairman. Ceo crowd basically about crowd. What we did was to introduce the concept of connecting the white community like the crowd of creative individuals insecurity questions waiting at the table. I think at this point in time for a number of decades that have been disconnected from that. Need help you know. We started off that industry back balsa. That's commonly referred to or known as as as any programs abilities pleasure organs in interest with with finding also Otherwise hike advantage of that results and the problems that existed yet. That's that's what i do. And that's why i'm here malcolm. How would you introduce yourself. Thanks in great to be on with Both you albert and casey. So currently i'm a board member advisor coach mentor dabble with a lot of security startups in a few others in the industry. Prior to that. I was chief stood in trust officer with the web. Application skirted defense platform company for a little over a year prior to that is chief skirting. Trust officer would silence and then prior to that. I spent my life at tall. And i was chief security. Private privacy Also spanned the wide ranges of fun neglected

Casey Ellis Malcolm Harkins Malcolm Gregg Giannotti Casey Albert
Hasbro, Mattel Say Toy Boom Isn't a One-Off

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

04:06 min | 9 months ago

Hasbro, Mattel Say Toy Boom Isn't a One-Off

"Last night. We got a terrific from the tell. That's the iconic toymaker. What happens the soccer name. No kidding it actually said because day reminding. Managers found hard to get excited too worried about the ready crew. Gresley bidding up the canvas stocks. But make no mistake. Mattel's doing great. Ceo on crisis orchestrated effort. -nificant turnaround here. And let's have got yet another confidence-inspiring aspiring quarter. The country poorer top and bottom line with bush guide for twenty twenty one in response suck actually spiked. Three percent in early trading. Getting dragged down by the on weeds. What i'm calling the rest of the market. So could this really have room to run. Let's take a closer look with you on crises. The turnaround orders chairman. Ceo patel real. These results michigan. Welcome back demand money. Jim it's great to be here in on your manager word when things weren't doing waste things weren't doing well when things that down very low you said things are starting to get better. This was the finest fourth quarter in fifteen years despite a worldwide pandemic. Talmadge do it. Yes jim this was an exceptional quarter for mattel without best performance in years with strong consumer demand and another milestone near for the company for the second quarter in a row which have double digit sales growth without grace. The industry in gain share on a global basis but are results excited expectation on many levels with the highest fourth quarter growth in fifteen years as you said with a significant increase in profitability with a full year operating income. That was two and a half times higher than than last year. But this is not just about the quarter or the year. It's about a multi year strategy that is tracking very well which puts us on in a strong position to continue to increase profitability and etc growth. In two thousand twenty one and beyond what i liked about it but these were all fantastic numbers but you told me one day jim this company which has terrible cash flow can make fortunes on everything that it does put out so when barbie has a plus eighteen percent quarter number one toy property globally in twenty twenty doll- but boy you're making a lot more money off each barbie even though they're more interesting fascinating diverse inclusive than any of the line. At that i've ever seen as we made significant progress improving. Our ability. Gross margin has increased for the tenth consecutive quarter. And this is only getting better and stronger in terms of cash flow if you look at the journey that we've achieved last three years. Gross margin improved over. Eleven hundred points are cash flow improved by almost five hundred million dollars and our operating income is up more than six hundred and fifty million dollars so very strong performance on the bottom line. And we're making good progress on the top line as well. This was the second quarter in the row where we improve our top line by double digit. You're making it look easy. There was a time. When i first met who. I looked at your balance sheet and i question you're you're not your visibility your viability. The viability certainly taken off the table. Visibilities take off the table. At this point. I now have to wonder. You've got this great balance sheet now. I mean really is you've delivered. You have the number one of the industry you ever. American girl turnaround. Is it time to do something. Even were used something. The entertainment industry that you used to be king of come on free cash flow has steadily improved over the last three years we went from a negative three hundred and twenty five million dollars in two thousand seventeen to a positive one hundred and sixty seven million dollars this year going forward will will be focused on converting an increasing percentage of our ebitda into free cash flow and as we've previously stated we intend to utilize cash to reduce our debt and improve on balance sheet even further given the expectation for higher and more asian of cash. We expect to Continue to reduce our leverage ratio. And make our way towards an investment grade rating.

Gresley Mattel Ceo Patel Real Talmadge JIM Soccer Bush Michigan Barbie
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:35 min | 9 months ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"A Bloomberg business Flash. Gotta Charlie. Thank you so much. Well, the current issue of lumber Business Week magazine. It's just on newsstands online and on the Bloomberg it's all about the year ahead. The comprehensive coverage Includes a list of the 50 companies to watch on that list. Twilio. It's a company. It's a stock that was one of the last year's high flyers up 244% 2020 amid a time of robust demand for its communications software. Joining us right now to talk about the company and also about his new book is Geoff Lawson, who is chairman, CEO and co founder of Twilio. He his new book, Ask Your Developer had a harness the power of software developers and win in the 21st century. Jeff joins us on the phone in San Francisco. It's taken a week to finally get to hear, and we appreciate your patience. Because we've had a lot of news breaking that is often preempted stuff. Just nice to have you back with us. How are you and congratulations on the book? Thank you, Carol. It is great to join you today and doing well as well. As you know, people do during a pandemic but really excited to get this book out there because I started writing this book about the power Software developers and innovation in the power of the software is playing so many businesses and so many industries started writing this book, actually before Cove ID, and I think the last year has just shown Even more. So, how important digital innovation, digital communications but agility. Essentially business is when factors outside of our controller changing constantly. Well, I think that is spot on and I want to dig into the books specifically, But I do want to ask you about this past year like some companies, your business. Tulio benefited as we were all working from home and company. Did you more than ever before? Really to communicate with their customers, and they needed you know you're in frustration, Infrastructure software. What was the year like for you? How would you sum it up? And when did you all of a sudden see that It was going to turn out to be a strong year for you financially. Your total is product. We're a platform that enables companies who are building things and software to be able to communicate digitally using digital communication channels like voice, text messaging, chats, video, email and more. And so you know what we have always provided to the world. Even before the cove, it was first digital customer engagement ability to connect people together using digital technologies. Number two software agility because we enable software developers to build communications into all the absent experiences that we have every day, and third is cloud scale. When somebody build something untrue, Leo, it just works everywhere in the world that works with any scale. You have to worry about racking and stacking service and all this kind of stuff. That's why many of the best companies in the world have been using Tulio to build these amazing customer experiences. Uber List Shopify and Amazing cos they're leading edge, but the companies we know about right as consumers, but we don't understand kind of how it all works or how it gets to us. Exactly. It's videos of behind the scenes. If you think about those three things that I just mentioned, like digital engagement clouds, Gail and software agility well, the world needed those even more. In 2020, because as we had to reconfigure our world to get rid of human to human face to face interactions, replaced them with digital equivalence, and we needed to read factory the whole world in real time. He's changing conditions. Well, the thing is actually a brought to our customers was incredibly valuable. Were you surprised at how strong the demand ultimately and how it played out for you guys? You're not really, um I hadn't really sense I'll tell you that when the When the pandemics again in, you know, early to mid march of last year, we saw really quick influx of customers all realizing that they needed to build, you know, they were saying it's time to build like we've never dealt with a global pandemic before. We need to reinvent our customer experience. We need to contact with delivery. We need toe accelerator online ordering abilities. We need to see patients remotely for help. Telehealth like There are all these use cases coming to prominence that in a very like in the course of a week, so many customers reaching out and saying our road map has changed our priorities all just changed and twist me a big part of how we're gonna respond to the pandemic. And so I think we got a pretty really view into the importance of it. That's why we leaned in. We said We're here to serve our customers during this time to make them successful. Bring the pandemic and build even tighter customer relationships during this period of time, that's going to be so stressful for our customers and for the world, Jeff I want to talk more about the book I've just got about 40 seconds. So I do want to ask you what is 2021 look like for you guys in terms and what kind of visibility and just quickly if you could, then we'll come back and talk more. Well, we see 2020 as having been an acceleration of the trends that have long gone on off the world. Moving to digital of every industry, becoming a software industry and every company having to really upped their digital game and 2020. The pandemic accelerated those plans often times and companies by six years that romance got accelerated. But 2021 is going to be no different. That acceleration is a one way past. And every industry and every company who expects to win in the digital economy is gonna have to keep up the pace of invention and agility and using software to serve their customers, And so I think we're going to continue. To help companies all marked these amazing digital experiences. Yeah, Genie out of the bottle when it comes to I think that right in terms of how businesses are, you know, digitizing their world and expediting it. If anything, Hey, Jeff, sit tight for a second. We'll talk a lot more about the book when we come back. Jeff Lawson, CEO, co founder of Twilio with us from San Francisco right now, though, another check on world the National.

Jeff Lawson Twilio Bloomberg San Francisco Tulio lumber Business Week CEO co founder Geoff Lawson Carol Developer Leo Gail
Buffett on Small Business: Its an economic war

Squawk Pod

05:05 min | 11 months ago

Buffett on Small Business: Its an economic war

"Berkshire hathaway chairman and ceo warren buffett. He joins us on the squawk newsline. Also david salomon. The chairman ceo of goldman sachs goldman by the way is announcing a two hundred and fifty million dollar donation to establish the next generation of the ten thousand small businesses program. Gentlemen thank you both for being here and warm. We'll start with you. You have not spoken publicly since the last annual meeting of back in may for berkshire hathaway. You weren't planning on speaking publicly again until the next one this coming may. Why are you taking time today to talk about this issue right now. Well i think it's it's it's so important that small businesses which of become collateral damage in a in a war. That are our country needed. The defied but We'd in effect bomb charlie At an induced shutdown of parts of the economy hit many types of small businesses. Very very hard and We made some provision for that and march in terms of the cares act but then nobody really knew how long the Now this self inflicted Recession would would last with this particular effect on small businesses so We need another. We need another injection to To complete the complete the job and congress's debating right now and i just hope very much that they extend the p p. A plan on a on a large scale to Let the people who may see the of the light at the end of the tunnel. Get to the end of the tunnel but So it's it's very timely. It's very important and And i do think congress will do something. And i hope they step a very soon because every day is important make people wonder why would bid business. Leaders are are stepping out and speaking on behalf of some of the small businesses. What what is it that concerns you about this. Why is this an issue that you're you're really putting yourself out there with well. Big businesses generally a gun very. Well not the if. They were traveling. Entertainment related days. They still have difficulties but The fed did a terrific job. The they saved us from something that would have been a lot worse than two thousand eight nine When they acted in march so large companies who in the middle of march early march were were going to have no access to capital The market just open wide and the corporate issuance was huge but the small businesses Received some help. But it's not getting to the end of not getting to the end of the tunnel and You know you'd say it's situation. Just take food food manufacturers. The big names Done terrifically people haven't quit eating you and and And the large grocery chains have done very well margins wine salesmen. Good but if you had to get your food And i small restaurant or medium size restaurant and and social distancing was required. Everything you just. You just killed the economics for somebody that may have been working for decades with our family to build a business and reinvested their earnings and improving their their establishment and then Through no fault of their own and edict comes along that That kills all their dreams. And it's it's it would be so foolish to The not follow through on this and enable those people to get back to where they could Do the kind of business they were doing before you know it. it it. It's an economic war and and And certain you know when we wanted to world war two a lot of industries were shut down and and Everything went over to the defense production. Well we've shut down a lot of people in this in this particular Induced recession and and others are prospering. At and i think that the country owes it to the m really millions of small business people. And i've met a lot of these people through the goldman sachs program just renewed ppp. And and Get us to the got us. The end of the tunnel.

Berkshire Hathaway David Salomon Goldman Sachs Goldman Warren Buffett Congress Charlie FED Goldman Sachs
Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:40 min | 11 months ago

Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

"What's best performing sector since election day. You'll never believe it energy and we talked about energy. I mean fossil fuels with multiple co vaccines. Right around the corner. The economy will soon be able to reopen which means more demand for oil and gas ray of yours. No i'm not a fan of this industry anymore. I think the long-term press but posthumous have gotten grimmer but there are two fossil fuel stocks that i still consider investable one of them is chevron the big integrated the king of the oils the best of the best chevrons held up surprising well during the pandemic. And it's got a powerful safe dividend of five point seven percent. The only problem the stock is now thirty five percent in the last six weeks. So kennedy keep climbing. Let's take a closer look with mike. He's the chairman ceo of chevron corporation. Get clear picture of the industry and his company said mr. Moore's welcome demand money jim. It's good to be with you all right so you got to solve this for me. As long as i've been in the business always one company that was the best and it wasn't as yours. It was a company called back son. There are a lot of others that were doing. Well now they're chevron and there really is everybody else everybody else being companies. I'm worried about the dividend that article in production. That aren't conservative. What happened to chevron at the other guy should have listened to well jim. Different companies have made different choices as As we came into this and as as we've gone through this so have changed their dividend policies. Some of changed their strategy. Some of change their financial priorities. We haven't our dividend to secure as you mentioned are balance is strong our strategies are intact and there's no they can count on us so we were we were well prepared as As we went through the cycle. And i think that people realize that we've been constant at a time when many others have changed. Now you'll have when it's necessary been aggressive for instance. You were very aggressive in the gulf of mexico drilling wells that are going to produce oil for year. They don't run out those wells. I mean that's just something that you did. Everybody else went away from it. How did she have the dish do that. Jim it's a long term business. Demand for energy in the world is enormous seven and a half billion people on the planet today. By twenty forty there will be nine billion in all of them deserve the things that affordable reliable energy can provide. so we've got to take a long view on investments and at the same time you've got to take a short view in terms of being prepared for markets that are very volatile and unpredictable. So it's an and world actually have to do both. We have to look out the front window. Twenty years down the road and we look out the window of the house today and see what's going on the world today and manage our way through both of those. Let go out twenty years. You bought a company called no one. None well terrific. I visited leviathan. It's an incredible field in metro. Train off the coast of israel. I could see a visionary saying you know what it's time to disenfranchise gas prom company bringing its gas to the west and make it. So there's a pipeline from israel all the way up through central europe and that could be something that's a twenty five year project pie in the sky. Well that's certainly one of the opportunities to commercialise. What is a large gas resource in the waters of the eastern mediterranean office. Real right now at feeds markets in israel egypt and jordan their opportunities to take liquefied natural gas to other markets and certainly longer term. These types of resources often lend themselves to infrastructure developments to feed market. Europe is not not far away so those are all options to commercially develop that resource and supply markets in an affordable reliable manner. So that that's the type of thing that our company does really well and it's a long term view that we have to have to sustain our company at the same time. I've noticed that you need to be able to have common ground with whoever's in the white house. I'm not going to try to say you have to do this do that. Because you're reasonable person. Have come up with it. But if you have a really aggressive. Climate change president and team. Is it perhaps possible that they make it. So that you that you're not able to enjoy your own properties. Well jim we've been in business for over one hundred forty years we've worked with republican administrations with democrat administrations with split government with unified government. And we always start with common ground. Government wants economic development and prosperity for its people and governments want a cleaner environment We look for the common ground and there's always common ground because we're critical part of the economy. We may not agree. One hundred percent with any given administration on everything. But there's usually much more we're aligned on than we're different have different views on and then we sit down at the table and we work our way through those things. We've got different points of view and that's exactly what we expect to do. with this administration and every other one that follows but mike how do you sit down with fund. Managers younger financials. You say you know what we're about trying to be carbon neutral even make it so carbon negative so to speak so chevron can never be a holding embarrassed and better. How much do you think that works good. And they have great dividend policy. We can own what happens if too many managers start thinking that way. Well jim what managers really want out of our industry and out of our company. It's better returns and boil our strategy down to four simple words. Higher returns lower carbon. And we need to do both. And we need to find ways to invest in things that are good for shareholders and also good for the environment if we do just just invest and things are good for the shareholders and ignore the environment. That's not sustainable. And if all we do is invest in things that have an environmental case and they don't create value and returns for shareholders. That's not sustainable. Either so we sit down with portfolio managers of all ages and all levels of experience and talk about how to deliver higher returns and lower carbon That's what people. I think that's been investors are looking for well. How about another way to look at it. Some people feel jim. Do not see the future. Do you not see tesla. Do you not see the hydrogen fuel cells. Judah there's no room in portfolio because it's going to happen fast than you think you think the demands big al twenty thirty years. Probably the way. I too but they feel no mike they feel. It's gone away. Fashion than you. And i think and that has caused me to pull in my horns about a group i really like. Would you have we embrace a lower carbon future. We expect lower carbon energy system. In fact the energy systems always been moving towards lower carbon hundred. And fifty years ago cole came along a displaced would eat and then you had oil and gas and then you had nuclear hydro wind solar hydrogen now. The energy systems always been in transition. And we're investing today in. I'll give you an example renewable natural gas if you've ever driven by dairy farm or a feed lot. There's there's a certain aroma that you you may recall We're actually capturing the waste products from dairy farms now fermenting the those products to create the natural gas product cleaning it up moving it into a pipeline so it can displace fossil fuels so we reduce methane emissions and we create a salable renewable product. So we're investing in things like that. We're investing in nuclear fusion. we're investing in hydrogen. We're investing technologies that can scale and make a real difference and be part of a carbon energy system. This is the history of our company. And i believe it's the future of putting a hydrogen fuel cells all of your incredible gas stations. How about making that statement saying to the rest of the industry and all the espn enthusiasts. Look we are doing something right now. That's economic but it is gonna kill it in the five six years you could do that. Might your this and you've got the balance what we're working on these kinds of things. Jim we come back to. It's an world we've got to have higher returns and lower carbon and so we've gotta find things that work for shareholders and work for the environment and that's exactly what we're working on so i think i think you're going to see our company and you'll see others in our industry that continue to find solutions and this is a challenge that is too big for any one company anyone industry or anyone one country in the world to completely address We're gonna work in partnership with others and continue to advance the you know the state of the energy system which will only grow. Well mike. you've always been the you've been the voice of reason. Your company's been the scientific company all along people should know that chevron has always had the most scientists and engineers at the top might worth chairman. Ceo of chevron sir.

Chevron JIM Israel Mike Gulf Of Mexico Kennedy Moore MR Mediterranean Egypt Jordan White House Europe Tesla Judah
"chairman ceo" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"A geometric notice He's a chairman CEO. The Luna Foundation off of a new book, Human work in the Age of Smart Machines, basically about how human beings can co exist. What's the machines? And with a eye on the whole nine yards now, Jamie, I'm about to get totally science fiction dorky on you here. So bear with me for for just a moment with with all the movies and things you see, like, you know, Terminator. No. The Matrix the No. No, A machine's gonna turn it on and taking over the world. How do you get people to get past that? That Hollywood sort of irrational fear of the machine? Sort of, you know, taking over and rebelled against their human masters? You know, it's it's something that you say it's very popular in the and, Ah, you know, the sort of of entertainment field but you know, and there, you know, I think that thinking a lot about the ethical use of technology is really important were the designers of the machines? Therefore the machines reflect our biases as humans as we as we develop them, So we need to think about that. But I am not concerned about our our machine Overlords att. Any point taking over our lives? What We've got to figure out here is Technology. How the machines are going to be able to do tasks that are dangerous to us as humans that they could do faster than all of those things and focus more on what we can do as human beings. You know, I talked with this roboticist. He's ahead of the robotics department at University of California, Berkeley named Ken Goldberg and he said, Look, I design the A. I designed the robots, and he said they don't understand. Subtlety, nuance. They don't understand these issues about how we really collaborate and how we feel about each other And he said, and they won't They won't in any foreseeable future. So we designed them correctly. As the human designers. They will not be our overlords. That would be our fault. If if if we end up creating machines that actually take over the human race, we have the ability to make sure that that doesn't happen on DH. Part of what I go back to my friends. I want to say this is back in 2017. I think it was you may have read about this Facebook had created like a couple of Ah artificial intelligent programs started talking to each other. And their own language. Only they understood and so Facebook had immediately sort of shut down that whole thing. Right? Yeah. And you know, we've now got thes these thes computer. They call him quantum computer that can that can calculate at speeds that are tremendously faster than you know what we used to call super computers, which we used to think were the fastest thing. So look, there is ah, reality here that the machines Have an ability to do. They call it deep learning, which is they use algorithms to go deeper and deeper into data set and they they can both analyzed information and develop new knowledge developed new information. But again that is subject to the way that we program them that we designed them. And if we designed them with human biases and and And human failing, then we will get out of them What we are in terms of those biases. What we've got to do is say, Look, here's what we need the machines to do, because what they could do is faster. What they can do can take care of the things that are more dangerous to us. These are the things that we can do is human. And it is that balance of human work and machine work that I think will make us more productive, more prosperous as society If we come to grips with the fact that humans need to be prepared to do the work documents could dio Jamie because I want to live in foundation. One thing thatyou folks, it was kind of get people prepared for the world work. And try to scare up a workforce. How did we do that? In an era of robots and an Aye Aye, because somebody who say maybe, like you know the other mid fifties, maybe had one or two years of college were working it in a plan or something. Oh, for 20 something, 30 years. You know what happens to those when those workers get displaced? What do we do for them? You know, it's really important question. And I think I just want to underscore your point here, which is that we now live in a world where you know for people like you and I. We went through a system where we say Okay, well, we'll go to school at an earlier point in life, and then we'll work at a later point in life. But now we know that, in fact, in order to stay on top of the world of work, it's a continuous process of learning. The educators like to call this by the way, lifelong learning, which To you and me is consumer sounds terrible. It sounds like a sentence, but what we really want is we want to be able to participate in this process where You build your skills and you get a reward for it, and you build two more skills. You get another award, and that's the system that we should have in place in higher education in our workforce training systems, etcetera. We should make sure that individuals have the capacity to continually refresh. They're human traits and capabilities so they can continue to do better and work over the course of their entire lifetime. Today, you know, we're seeing an acceleration again Cove. It has made this worse. An acceleration of job destruction, and I think the new work that's being created at least some of it will not be the same kind of work that we had before, so it's going to require those people who have lost their jobs. To get re educated, retrained focusing on areas where they conduce. Ah work that that building what they already know. You know, I'm not one of these people, by the way that says, Oh, you know, we're gonna lose their jobs because of self driving vehicles. So look, let's turn them into computer coders. No truck driver wants to be a computer coder, but Truck driver might want to work in the logistics industry, which is a big industry, which requires a lot of human attention and knowledge. Because your move, you have to understand how goods and services are can move and can effectively move. It requires a critical thinking and the problem solving skills that only humans have. So why don't we think about the truck drivers becoming the logistics managers instead of saying, Let's get the truck drivers to write code. So to me, it's figuring out how you create adjacent learning opportunities for people. Who are going to be displaced because of technology and get them work at them training in fields that connects with what they did before, but in a way that built on that now and take him on a new path. C'mere. So that's what this whole a few more minutes on the programme off the book on work an age of smart machines, I guess, but one of my final question for you, Jamie is how do you feel like a better term? Will human beings be smarter than always be smarter than machines are more creative than machines. You know, I think that our our human trait of and capabilities that I've been talking about will always be superior right.

Jamie Facebook chairman CEO Luna Foundation Ken Goldberg Hollywood Berkeley University of California
Millions of farm animals culled as US food supply chain chokes up

Stansberry Investor Hour

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Millions of farm animals culled as US food supply chain chokes up

"Tyson chairman. Ceo Tyson Foods wrote a letter on Sunday and he basically alerted the country of an impending shortage of meat and by Association. We just took this as an impending shortage of food because we can affect the production of meat can affect production of all food right. And I'll just quote you one little passage. That kind of sums up the the problem here and Tyson wrote farmers across the nation simply will not have anywhere to sell their livestock to be processed. When they could've fed the nation millions of animals chickens. Pigs and cattle will be depopulated because of the closure of our processing facilities and quote so these are essential businesses. These meat processing facilities. But they're closing them because people are getting the corona virus. They're getting sick so they had to close them and they closed a bunch of them. So you got all these animals that are mature and ready for slaughter and there's no place to send them. So what do they do? Well depopulated is you know. There's all these euphemistic terms youth Asian and depopulation. They kill them without eating limits. What happens there wasted and you know I I mean I have a soft heart for animals. I'm no vegetarian. Okay but we bring these animals into the world and raise them up and care for them so that we can eat them and it's tragically sad to see them killed without being eaten. It makes their lives. You know it's like they lived and died in vain. I watched a Canadian farmer on Bloomberg TV Monday morning openly emotional talking about this and talking about having farmers having to euthanize thousands of animals at a time. It's it's terrible. He was more concerned was more than just the lost revenue and investment. Although that's you know that's a big impact too. It was just the thought of all these animals as I say having lived and died in vain. It's it's heartbreaking you know and these are essential businesses and yet they're still having to close down because people getting a virus and Tyson said. This is the thing that got me. He just said the food supply chain is breaking. The food supply. Chain is breaking. That's scary you know you and I were know. We're big time investors or whatever. We got plenty of money in our 401K's or wherever you know we got resources we can tap and if things cost a little more expensive we can probably still afford it but poor people who don't have anything to their name. They won't be able to afford and they won't be able to get. Those supplies will be gone from the stores. Anybody you can get. It will pay a fortune and people are going to start getting hungry. I I'm afraid you know. At first people will say OK. Well here I am poor. I don't have a penny to my name. Put yourself in their shoes. What are they going to do? They're going to be like I'm GONNA steal this. I'M GONNA get food any way that I can. That's bad enough but my fear is that this goes on and on and on and the government doesn't let us go back to work soon enough and then we start seeing like mass violence. You know.

Tyson Tyson Foods CEO Chairman Bloomberg
"chairman ceo" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

12:52 min | 1 year ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

"The I. Today podcast produced by cowed milica cuts through the hype and noise to identify. What is really happening now? In the world of artificial intelligence learn about emerging trends technologies and use cases from cognition analysts and guests experts. Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is Colin Angle. Who is the chairman CEO and founder of I robot and in Luminary in the field of robotics so high Colin? Thank you so much for joining us today. A great to be here. Welcome Colin and. Thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and some exciting things that are going on it. I Robot Short so I'm Colin Angle the CEO Chairman and co-founder of I robot. This is actually a robot. Thirty th year. We were founded back in nineteen ninety a startup company with the mission to really deliver on the promise of robots and we'd been I grew up reading robots. We all some movies about robots. I really didn't have any in our lives on a daily basis and I robot was founded to go and change that and over the years we've been involved in everything from missions to Mars to robots. That went into nuclear power plants. Robots that diffused bombed. But we're boost well known for the room. The robot vacuum cleaner as the first real practical robot that people could just generally own excellent. You know and I think that's part of what's popularized robotics and people are very sort of become more intimately familiar with robots today in the Twenty Twenty S. Surprising that I wrote has been around for thirty years. I'm sure for you. It feels like yesterday for a lot of us who have been around a robot. It's certainly feels that way. And you know. Crow bots have been in constant development for many years for the past sixty plus years even beyond that no longer than than six years and there have been a number of notable successes of course. I robot included and they're also have been some you know troubling starts. Nobody's who are built robotics and tried to build robotic firms. Even some of the big luminaries in this field. So what do you see as the current state of the robotics industry as a whole and what do you see as make some companies successful in this industry and perhaps even to another extent here like what do you see? Some of the roadblocks that are facing widespread adoption of robots in our daily lives in the home in the office. And how far away are we from achieving this ultimate goal? I know it's a lot of parts to this question but just crafting the vision for where to go straight there. You go sure so. I mean robotics tool kit so it's a technology which allows you to go and there's different parts toolkit perceive information about the world use artificial intelligence to think about what you've been able to perceive also in the tool. Kit are the use of computers and microcontrollers to drive motors and actuators to allow machine to do physical work. And this is a really cool tool. I mean you can build machines that you could only dream of the challenges of course finding an application of robot technology where you're really solving a problem. People care about and we've been told all throughout our history that there was an expectation that robots were supposed to clean your home and the idea that you could maybe build a robot that couldn't vacuum which is a subset of cleaning the entire home. But it's a very important part and you could come home every day to freshly vacuumed home and particularly if you have pets well you need to vacuum every day or live with pet hair. Neither of them are particularly exciting options. And the Roomba offered practical solution and because we had a lot of experience in building robots that low price point and using smaller microprocessors to understand the environment sufficiently to go backing thoroughly and completely it all made sense and you had a robot which was both affordable and effective and were well up over twenty five million of these robots sold the Dayton about twenty. Five percent of money spent on vacuums is now spent on robot vacuums which has just been an amazing phenomenon to have start with an idea on a piece of paper and have it turned into reality. Yeah that's I mean. One that that stat is really interesting and also. I think that it's made people more comfortable with robots in their house. You know it's just it's just doing one task and doing it well and not really getting in people's way and getting them familiar with robots. So I know that you've recently wrote a piece about autonomy is not intelligence and we really liked tat because we always say at cognreznick that automation is not intelligence. And I think that sometimes people can confuse the two but they're really not the same so can you break down for our listeners. And explain what you meant by that sure so autonomy is usually where working robot start where the idea is. The robot hasn't task you know go out and vacuum four and then go back and recharge yourself but if you can't direct the robot if you can't interact with a robot it's really not that smart. Imagine if you went to your life unable to listen or interact with anyone else and you just sort of maybe add some instinct on how to survive. But I don't think many people would think you're very smart if you couldn't talk with them and take direction and give direction so what we're trying to do is expand the utility of the robot and expand the ability of the robot to fit into people's lives by working at increasing its ability to interact and understand and take direction and demonstrate that cares about the environment and treat. The environment is operating in a very careful fashion and through doing this. You go from device. That can't listen and can only do what it was programmed to do at the beginning to a device. That really can learn about how it's supposed to do. Its job and that's opens up not just the world of better vacuuming but vastly richer world of tasks that robot can suddenly take on. Yeah that's actually a really good point because you know pretty much anything that people think about what humans can do our animals that used to do with it and they were laboring in the field or animals. We like to have as command. Says well you know certainly. That's what we want these mechanized machines that have some element of intelligence. Who Want to do that as well? So I know you see lots of use cases an examples of robots of of all sorts and as matter of fact when you started talking about the history of I robot you talked about robots in places like nuclear power plants in areas of combat and places like that so. What are some of these standard examples that you have seen especially more recently for robots and places that we may not necessarily have expected these robots to being performing really useful tasks others a great example in warehouse automation and so that some of the tasks the robots where the really making a great inroads today? Or maybe not the most glamorous robots like you know robots come and greet you at the door but robots that are enabling and are involving society to actually work and as we get more and more addicted to ordering things online and expecting products to magically come from. Click on the screen to my front door in a matter of days or even hours were increasing the load on warehouses to sales Toronto disorder toothpaste. I need to go find the toothpaste but in a box. Seal the box and mail out or even have it. Delivered automatically and that's an area where the industry is just exploding where there's demand for automation to accurately and swiftly and cheaply perform that type of service and so that's a big thing and an area maybe on the other side of the field of things we may have heard about contests driving vehicles these are robots and. I think there's a lot of attention and excitement around a when are we going to have and see robot cars and robot buses and robot? Taxis enter into our lives and gradually underway. Where there's different areas where maybe today's state of the art is in a known geographic area potentially operating at reduced speeds to ensure safety. You can get autonomous driving vehicles. Move FROM POINT A to B or highways with certain brands of vehicles. You can start to see things like smart cruise control and other assisted features in our cars and over time these robots that carry around and will continue to get more and more sophisticated until the point where you know driving truly becomes a choice and those are two really big areas where we're seeing a lot of activity and then obviously closer. I robot tone in the home where we're seeing vacuuming become tremendously successful commercially. We see potential for mopping and lawn mowing and then as we dial the clock forward getting into assistive purposes to allow elderly people to live independently. Much more safely longer. Yeah you know you think of Rosie from the jetsons and let's open her stomach and have some things pop out. So what's next and I like that. You brought up autonomous vehicles because that is my ultimate dream that I no longer need to drive but I can still get from point A. TO POINT B. You know exactly when I want. That is my dream now as a final note. Where do you believe the future of? As in general and its applications to organizations and beyond who artificial intelligence is another tool just like we were talking about the robotic tool kit before and you know I think it has a great ability to do pattern matching to understand insights and so there's a class there's a whole set of problems or I can be very effective at doing. Some basic sort of recognition. Is What ten this picture? What is the tonality of a newspaper? Article? I mean I think there's some pretty interesting and wide variety of applications that is being used today effectively. It's also very brittle and so that. The types of AI were capable of building. Today are not general purpose and in fact they're much more limited in purpose than a non expert in the field might assume based on just how competent they are within a narrow set of constrained situations. And so that you can build an AI will recognize. What type of animal is in the painting but you might be able to go and just make some changes to the painting. Where a human would say. Those changes. Don't change anything. I still know exactly. What's in the painting but it would totally break a normal state of the art image recognizer today and so we have a long way to go and we're decades away from more general intelligence in the land of robotics. It's actually a pretty interesting space. Where our challenge actually isn't advancing. I mean there's the that we have today is actually more than adequate for doing the tasks were trying to take on many. We'd like to do in the future aren't biggest problem is that we don't know anything about the environment that were operating. Someone can say you know. Please go to the kitchen and get me a beer. And we'll understand exactly what the person wants what they wanted to have happened. Except we don't know where the kitchen is so we're kind of stuck step one of interacting with the person until we learn how to better understand the world we live in and that's where the cutting edge of robotics is today. Yeah I think that's a really really good insight. I think you know it's connecting all of these pieces and of course a practical way because at the end of the day you know we're not here just to solve. Problems is Irvine academic or a laboratory setting. We're here trying to solve these problems in the real world in at the end of the day. Also do you have a business to solve problems? In a way that people find valuable enough that they wanted spend their time and energy and money of course on that sets an incredibly practical so so call and really wanted to thank you very much for joining us on this podcast. You provided a lot of insight especially with thirty years of robotics and in the industry. That's fantastic of course more years before that I know you you've done research in this space before you before I robot was started so we really enjoyed having you as a guest and our listeners. Hope we hope that you found a lot of value and listening to Colin today. So our we're going to be continuing this conversation for those of you that are registered on our site..

Colin Angle Twenty Twenty CEO Chairman and co-founder Kathleen Walsh chairman CEO Schmeltzer Irvine founder Toronto Rosie Dayton
Interview with Colin Angle, Robotics Luminary, Chairman, CEO and Founder of iRobot

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

09:12 min | 1 year ago

Interview with Colin Angle, Robotics Luminary, Chairman, CEO and Founder of iRobot

"Hello and welcome to the today. Podcast I'm your host Kathleen Walsh and I'm your host Schmeltzer. Our guest today is Colin Angle. Who is the chairman CEO and founder of I robot and in Luminary in the field of robotics so high Colin? Thank you so much for joining us today. A great to be here. Welcome Colin and. Thanks for joining us. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners and tell them a little bit about your background and some exciting things that are going on it. I Robot Short so I'm Colin Angle the CEO Chairman and co-founder of I robot. This is actually a robot. Thirty th year. We were founded back in nineteen ninety a startup company with the mission to really deliver on the promise of robots and we'd been I grew up reading robots. We all some movies about robots. I really didn't have any in our lives on a daily basis and I robot was founded to go and change that and over the years we've been involved in everything from missions to Mars to robots. That went into nuclear power plants. Robots that diffused bombed. But we're boost well known for the room. The robot vacuum cleaner as the first real practical robot that people could just generally own excellent. You know and I think that's part of what's popularized robotics and people are very sort of become more intimately familiar with robots today in the Twenty Twenty S. Surprising that I wrote has been around for thirty years. I'm sure for you. It feels like yesterday for a lot of us who have been around a robot. It's certainly feels that way. And you know. Crow bots have been in constant development for many years for the past sixty plus years even beyond that no longer than than six years and there have been a number of notable successes of course. I robot included and they're also have been some you know troubling starts. Nobody's who are built robotics and tried to build robotic firms. Even some of the big luminaries in this field. So what do you see as the current state of the robotics industry as a whole and what do you see as make some companies successful in this industry and perhaps even to another extent here like what do you see? Some of the roadblocks that are facing widespread adoption of robots in our daily lives in the home in the office. And how far away are we from achieving this ultimate goal? I know it's a lot of parts to this question but just crafting the vision for where to go straight there. You go sure so. I mean robotics tool kit so it's a technology which allows you to go and there's different parts toolkit perceive information about the world use artificial intelligence to think about what you've been able to perceive also in the tool. Kit are the use of computers and microcontrollers to drive motors and actuators to allow machine to do physical work. And this is a really cool tool. I mean you can build machines that you could only dream of the challenges of course finding an application of robot technology where you're really solving a problem. People care about and we've been told all throughout our history that there was an expectation that robots were supposed to clean your home and the idea that you could maybe build a robot that couldn't vacuum which is a subset of cleaning the entire home. But it's a very important part and you could come home every day to freshly vacuumed home and particularly if you have pets well you need to vacuum every day or live with pet hair. Neither of them are particularly exciting options. And the Roomba offered practical solution and because we had a lot of experience in building robots that low price point and using smaller microprocessors to understand the environment sufficiently to go backing thoroughly and completely it all made sense and you had a robot which was both affordable and effective and were well up over twenty five million of these robots sold the Dayton about twenty. Five percent of money spent on vacuums is now spent on robot vacuums which has just been an amazing phenomenon to have start with an idea on a piece of paper and have it turned into reality. Yeah that's I mean. One that that stat is really interesting and also. I think that it's made people more comfortable with robots in their house. You know it's just it's just doing one task and doing it well and not really getting in people's way and getting them familiar with robots. So I know that you've recently wrote a piece about autonomy is not intelligence and we really liked tat because we always say at cognreznick that automation is not intelligence. And I think that sometimes people can confuse the two but they're really not the same so can you break down for our listeners. And explain what you meant by that sure so autonomy is usually where working robot start where the idea is. The robot hasn't task you know go out and vacuum four and then go back and recharge yourself but if you can't direct the robot if you can't interact with a robot it's really not that smart. Imagine if you went to your life unable to listen or interact with anyone else and you just sort of maybe add some instinct on how to survive. But I don't think many people would think you're very smart if you couldn't talk with them and take direction and give direction so what we're trying to do is expand the utility of the robot and expand the ability of the robot to fit into people's lives by working at increasing its ability to interact and understand and take direction and demonstrate that cares about the environment and treat. The environment is operating in a very careful fashion and through doing this. You go from device. That can't listen and can only do what it was programmed to do at the beginning to a device. That really can learn about how it's supposed to do. Its job and that's opens up not just the world of better vacuuming but vastly richer world of tasks that robot can suddenly take on. Yeah that's actually a really good point because you know pretty much anything that people think about what humans can do our animals that used to do with it and they were laboring in the field or animals. We like to have as command. Says well you know certainly. That's what we want these mechanized machines that have some element of intelligence. Who Want to do that as well? So I know you see lots of use cases an examples of robots of of all sorts and as matter of fact when you started talking about the history of I robot you talked about robots in places like nuclear power plants in areas of combat and places like that so. What are some of these standard examples that you have seen especially more recently for robots and places that we may not necessarily have expected these robots to being performing really useful tasks others a great example in warehouse automation and so that some of the tasks the robots where the really making a great inroads today? Or maybe not the most glamorous robots like you know robots come and greet you at the door but robots that are enabling and are involving society to actually work and as we get more and more addicted to ordering things online and expecting products to magically come from. Click on the screen to my front door in a matter of days or even hours were increasing the load on warehouses to sales Toronto disorder toothpaste. I need to go find the toothpaste but in a box. Seal the box and mail out or even have it. Delivered automatically and that's an area where the industry is just exploding where there's demand for automation to accurately and swiftly and cheaply perform that type of service and so that's a big thing and an area maybe on the other side of the field of things we may have heard about contests driving vehicles these are robots and. I think there's a lot of attention and excitement around a when are we going to have and see robot cars and robot buses and robot? Taxis enter into our lives and gradually underway. Where there's different areas where maybe today's state of the art is in a known geographic area potentially operating at reduced speeds to ensure safety. You can get autonomous driving vehicles. Move FROM POINT A to B or highways with certain brands of vehicles. You can start to see things like smart cruise control and other assisted features in our cars and over time these robots that carry around and will continue to get more and more sophisticated until the point where you know driving truly becomes a choice and those are two really big areas where we're seeing a lot of activity and then obviously closer. I robot tone in the home where we're seeing vacuuming become tremendously successful commercially. We see potential for mopping and lawn mowing and then as we dial the clock forward getting into assistive purposes to allow elderly people to live independently. Much more safely

Colin Angle Twenty Twenty Ceo Chairman And Co-Founder Chairman Ceo Kathleen Walsh Schmeltzer Founder Dayton Toronto
Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

Squawk Pod

01:36 min | 1 year ago

Uber CEO Khosrowshahi vows to deliver a profit

"Today Andrews interview with Uber Ceo. Dr COSMO shocking. Investors have been watching Uber closely for signs of profitability when Uber went public on the New York Stock Exchange in May of Twenty nineteen. Andrew asked Dara about it and Dara. Well here's what he said so for us. The Path to profitability isn't theoretical there are cohort of countries that are profitable. We do reinvest profits aggressively recipe. New Business Lines like eats that have great promise but we're pretty comfortable when we look at the portfolio of businesses. That we have that we have a very strong Pathak off a a few months later in an interview with CNBC November Dr Projected profitability by twenty. Twenty one we are actually targeting twenty twenty one for adjusted even profitability full year and this week around eight months after the company's First Trading Day Uber reported its fourth quarter financial results. And and as you'll hear there was also some good news for investors about that profitability goal. Here's Andrew Uber reported quarterly results. Last night the ridesharing giant announcing announcing on its call with investors. It is moving up. Its target for profitability by a year. Join US right now. For an exclusive interview is Uber CEO. Derek Ezra Shack Good morning to you. Good morning thank thank you for for coming in. Let's walk through if you could for investors so they understand how you think you get there and when I say get there. I'm talking about profitability. Well as we made through our way in two thousand nine hundred and we became more and more confident of the strength of business and the ability of our teams to execute.

Andrew Uber Uber Ceo Dara Dr Cosmo United States Derek Ezra Shack CEO New York Pathak Cnbc
September jobs report expectations: What to look for

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

03:17 min | 2 years ago

September jobs report expectations: What to look for

"Heller MGM resorts international says a legal settlement with victims of the deadliest mass shooting in modern US history as a major step chairman CEO Jim Murren said today the casino giants goal has been to resolve the lawsuits it faced over the twenty seventeen Los Vegas massacre victims and their families can move forward in the healing process a gunman opened fire for one of MGM's hotels into a concert venue it owns killing fifty eight people and injuring hundreds just over two

Heller Mgm Resorts United States Ceo Jim Murren MGM Chairman Los Vegas
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Here each and every week for you at the same time talking to the biggest names in sports and that name this week is mark Laney's the chairman CEO of capitol for he's investing in Washington city open tennis tournament looking to make it a destination event in the beltway mark again thanks for talking with us now let's talk about the future of tennis even Serena Williams at some point has the hand things off they have to hand the baton to the young guns what do you see for the future of tennis and France connecting to the new star or short so we're really fortunate that a couple weeks before our bank cocoa box after her Wimbledon one her family called that they want to make her next appearance in DC this week we were very lucky because due to some arcane wall she couldn't we couldn't give a wild card even in the qualifying but the day before she ended up getting in the qualifying draw and that you know qualifying weekend where you up and people aren't in the main draw qualifying usually get the park crowd and on the Sunday qualifying it was basically a fell out over seven thousand people came out to watch in every match coco played just was that the stand for completely fall she ended up qualifying losing the percent Thangal and her partner won the doubles and the crowd that that followed her it was extraordinary and it's clear not only is she captivated tennis fans but if people much more broadly than that so that that's one fantastic example but similarly on the on the men's and women's side our whole strategy here was to embrace the knack but on the man bye Dave branded the naps young players and there is that of what's next as one friend put capital that bonded to be bad in on the women's side that keys and Sloane Stephens and and cocoa coming up and with our and people respond fantastically well and deep that a player does not just one or two there's a large set of them go riding through the ranks may have been breakthroughs during the torque and we actively marketed the event around them rather than what tennis event usually do is they don't have a lot of money yeah one big name person come play we actually took a different approach and decided to go after this whole next generation and and it works fantastically well marker when asked about two specific players and you mentioned both of them the first being Cup of golf do you feel as though the the age restrictions on her as we talk about on the show before and as you know you know she can't be a full time WTA player for a number of years now because she's so young but she's had so much success at a young age do you think that they are are restrictive in a way that should be revisited or do you think that that those rules are fair for her right now I think having some on ramp to being a pro athlete at that age which is not a full immersion is smart I think the at the same time that they will that she is making people we think exactly what Walter propria as in a lot of things that smart I mean in anything you do you want that as situations change in new situations arise you don't want to make one off exceptions but you want to see that potentially it was who were strict and and we should listen I'm off of that so I don't think it should be a total free for all entry on the court because that really did burn out a lot of people on and over time and and they had not burst of fat but I do think the world is there currently constructed for someone like coke that was proven her ability not just handle the pressure on the court but she's store nearly on the extraordinary young woman off the court that you should have an opportunity to play the play more than she currently does and then real quick on under curious you just won the the men's draw the city open a guy who I believe has been on your your world team tennis team as well I got was a lightning rod for controversy you know traditionalists in tennis maybe necessarily don't think he's a great thing for the sport but at a time when I think a lot of the the big names are very buttoned up at least on the court where do you kind of stand on on how healthy he is for for tennis as the overall I I thing that's great for tennis I mean I don't I I a more friends and I really act the port neck I think Nick is great you know I think sometimes the lines get quote way cross the nickel be the first to admit that you know looking like you're not trying and given away games that there's nothing good about that but their showmanship the engagement of fans anyone who saw what happened in DC this week would be hard crap and not they neck area it's great for Canada if you miss that in a black three matches including the final when he was serving from matchpoint he went in the stand that after a fan in the stands where he should put our that S. one point one over and how's that bad I mean on believable that that you have high fiving people and the James Dean and you know what L. neck was the first person to volunteer on Saturday of qualifying could go do kids died out on the court at nine AM with kids in the community doing the clinic for kids so the guy has a huge heart is incredibly charismatic he brings new people into the game and if you if nobody that after this week he feels like that there's been a breakthrough week brand and that be consorted and he again he would be he would that they themselves if you can just get some of that sort of more out late this stuff under control but not change really is he is fantastic for the game of tennis stay tuned when we continue our conversation with capital for chairman and CEO mark online on the changing demographics in professional tennis that is straight ahead on Bloomberg business of sports from Bloomberg radio around the world I'm Scott on Twitter at some time in the nuvi Williams novih underscore William and I'm like a bar you can follow me on Twitter big burst forth to download the show where ever you get your.

mark Laney chairman CEO of capitol
"chairman ceo" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on 710 WOR

"I'm Joe Bartlett men accused of killing queens Junge Corinna Tronto has been found guilty. Cheers erupted in the courtroom. When the verdict was read Justice has been served the father of Corinna Metron, oh said after a jury in queens found channel Lewis guilty as charged Lewis was accused of murdering Toronto while she was out for a jog near her home. The courtroom erupted in cheers and applause has relatives of Trento anticipated. This verdict that came during Lewis's second trial after the first ended in a mistrial responded. Aaron Katersky, we'll have more on that story. Coming up with Len Berman, and Michael real it's part of their big three today. New criticism of the congestion pricing plan from people who live inside and just outside the own people inside the zone being told they may have to pay while residents living north or worried about losing their parking spots, the MTA chairman Patrick four. Meanwhile, says the money's gonna go to fix the subways. We're not happy with service either. I'm not happy as chairman CEO of the FEMA happy as a customer happily. It's it's getting better. It's got a lot way to go. A six member board will set the price of the tolls. But it's expected to be about eleven fifty for cars House Democrats have given attorney general William bar until today to turn over the full Muller report or they will subpoena. It not going to happen Barr. Says a redacted version of. The report will be ready by the middle of the month. Democrats also ask him questions after claimed White House whistle blower. It says at least twenty five people got clearances despite objections from career professionals one of those sought to be involved in. This was Jared Kushner, he spoke with Fox News last night accused of all different types of things. And all those things have turned out to be false Democrats say, according to Kushner, they're making crazy accusations. And in Connecticut, there's a push to tax sugary drinks. Don't tax me. Ned soda is a sweet-seller in Connecticut. Governor dead Lamont has included a one and a half cent tax on sugary drinks in his budget proposal. He says it'll generate over one hundred sixty million in badly needed revenue. It's also got the American beverage association lobbying with a vengeance against it Alice. Stuck in Rossini's seven ten wwl wa..

Jared Kushner Lewis Corinna Metron Junge Corinna Tronto queens Governor dead Lamont Barr chairman CEO Joe Bartlett Aaron Katersky Len Berman Trento Connecticut MTA chairman Ned soda Justice Rossini Patrick four Toronto
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

05:16 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Of millions of dollars to bring new Potter products to market, and then finding within the first two years after they've got a registered in all the countries that they want to use them and that they're they're no longer being effective. So to have something where for resistance is not a problem where it's. Safer to use where it's more effective is a boon. And in fact, to that end, there's a ringworm which which is called the nematode, and these nematodes are actually cause more destruction to two crops than all the insects in the world combined. There's one hundred fifty seven billion dollars in crop loss each year due to nematodes and his runs the gamut all kinds of crops, whether they're grown in cold weather, climates tropical climates doesn't make any difference. So. They found that effect the the Mexican agricultural institute, which is funded by the Mexican government to help to keep Mexican farmers technologically. Competitive with other producers in the world because most of their production comes to the United States. Then they they are laboratories tested our products. And they they did it for nematodes, and they found that I was the only not only was superior to the other the Madison on the market, but actually it superior in the. In the sense that it killed nematode exit. Was the only one that they they've tested in laboratories in twenty years that was able to destroy nematode eggs. It's it's really an enigma. How on the one hand you have something which is so effective. And on the other hand is so safe the human consumption so say, so so that's for crop yields and also for for freshest extension of crops. They also found that. Because this is post harvest now, they because these our product also helps to destroy the spoilage bacteria and spoil it's a fungi on on fruits and vegetables that these these crops last longer, and in fact, we've we've gotten a two and three week extension of shelf-life on on different berries and fruits compared to not having been treated with our product. So so it has huge applications within agriculture and also in fact, roll perishable foods fish meat it. It sounds like a miracle. But. Every time I look at into two major. But this that's and that's why the pet to all the technologies that I've been associated with this thing is so ubiquitous that has so many different applications, and and some very very important ones or in dentistry, but there other ones which which which you're going to help mankind outside of dentistry as well. Well, I'm herb, you know, what I wish you'd really do your time out. I'm you know, you're on this podcast talking to Dennis commute to work. If I go to dental town, there's a quarter million Dennis they posted. Oh my gosh. I mean, how many times they posted them? But anyway, when I do search for the word, I Adena, and there are how many threads come up. There are ninety threads talking about dine. I wish you would go to dental town. And that's why love the message board over like Facebook or Twitter. I mean, Twitter let's say that you were talking. About something year ago. I don't really have to search to find out what find that conversation. But on a message board format you can just do a search for dine. And I wish you'd pull up all those threads and find a good thread for you to interact and start sharing these slides that you put up on the today, you can you can post images in there, you can even post a YouTube video or any video format, but let's continue this discussion on the message boards of dental town dot com. Absolutely. I look forward to that. And also want work with you folks to to help to develop some continuing education seminars as well. Yes, we have we have over four hundred and fifty online courses that have been viewed nearly a million times. I think the millennials liked taking at home our at a time instead of flying across the country for these weekend extravaganzas, but Dr her Moskowitz on Goethe's websites. Chuck it out. It's I attack international dot com with her Moskowitz. Herb thank you so much for coming on the show today for an hour, and educating my homeys on all things I dine how it thank you and your audience for your time..

Dennis Dr her Moskowitz Twitter Mexican agricultural institute Mexican government Potter United States Madison YouTube Facebook Chuck Goethe one hundred fifty seven billio twenty years three week two years one hand
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"We. Four it's ever eaten spoils before. It's so that if there was a way of reducing the amount of spoilage or ink or. Or increasing crop yields than than that would go a long long way in order to help feed the world's populations at helping people in these third world countries. And so to that end on a on a pre harvest basis our products, I think I had mentioned to you that that I had I does not develop or allow microbial resistance developed. Well, the fund your sides that are being used now in plants are many of them are like neuro-toxins and the way they even know that they're they're in use. Sometimes it birds of falling out of the sky. So so to have something which is so safe as an iodine which can kill the. The the fungi bacteria that responsible for and viruses, which are responsible for crop destruction. And do it so safely a something which is very very important to law. Jagr I chemical companies as well as the idea that since no resistance develops. The Anna does developed other fun decides pesticides, you know, within two years of new pesticide being introduced though, those pesticide these bacteria and fungi begin to show resistance and they start to lose their effectiveness. These chemical companies are spending tens of millions of maybe even hundreds.

Jagr Anna two years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

06:18 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"They pay to have their whole system place with his just bromine, which is just basically the same family right underneath chlorine, fluorine bromine. And and it's amazing. How dine was intrigued. Curly, treat goiter, I salt. I mean, it's just an amazing on classification of elements. What what about people who would think? Well, I I'm allergic to shellfish. I can't have I dine. What would you say that person? Yes. Yes. So there there is this probably. Two or three main concerns about IOT dine one would be a shellfish allergy. And and that that's a pretty prevalent, but the shellfish allergy turns out to be a a sensitivity to a protein in the in the muscle of the shellfish. So so in the literature, the medical literature. It's replete with references now to that. This is not a an iodine allergy. It's a protein sensitization. So that's not an issue. This is also there's a concern with dine as to thyroid toxic city. And and we see this from time to time where with some of the research who has already shown that. The thyroid gland selectively uptakes I o die. It does not selectively uptake molecular I a- dine. So so thyroid toxic city is really not a concern because there's no greater when even if it was ingested, there's no greater concentration of molecular. Dine in the thyroid gland. As would be any other tissue of the body. But but our products are not intended for ingestion. So so that that's really of of limited concern, the the other concern that people have would be with this is in contrast media for imaging. And and the distinction here is that. Yes, it's true that that these are dying related contrast media. But the in the first instance, it's being injected into the directly into the vein. So you getting a shock to the system as a large bowl of fluid being injected into the vein. So the quantity of of of iodide, which is being delivered is fog greater, and it's also I o died. The second part is that it's also been found that there are excipient s- in the radio contrast media, and those excipient to which people are developing reaction to and these excipient s-, particularly those that have high asthma. Larry have have engendered the greatest reaction. So when they've subsidy it using the same amount of died substituting, the excipient. Low asthma liberty of excipient s-, they found that the reactions fell off dramatically. So so we this is having a reaction to some dine contrast media is not the same as having a reaction to particularly molecular. And and again, our products are not intended for ingestion. So this just topically apply. There is some absorption, but nowhere near where we get with ingestion. Also, there's been a. There had been a study which had been done on on over two thousand women in the United States on this was for the treatment of fiber cystic breasts disease, which is a precursor to breast cancer and molecular iodine tablets were used daily by these women for over two years. And there were there were no reportable adverse events in over two years and the amount of iodine that they were ingesting. I'm talking about molecular Adine out the amount to buy dine that they were ingesting is probably tend to fifty times as much as as what would be available in a bottle of of our product. If our product was to be drinking, which it's not. So you think the developing world, I don't like to call the third world that's kind of rude, but there's two hundred and thirty eight countries. Do you think where they have a problem with goiter that this door will form of dine molecular iodine would be treatment for goitre? It could be a treatment to quarter actually, it has much more profound because they were other things that could be used goiter. Did this actually has more profound use for third world countries in and then we're here we're straying outside of dentistry. But we're also again working with large corporate partners. We've looked at this an agriculture, and and the statisticians are are indicating that it's at the years from now there's not going to be enough food in the world to feed the world's population is just not going to be food. So so right now, the the produce the vegetables the fruits of beings produce at least forty percent, maybe forty five percent of all that produce is spoils..

IOT United States Larry two years forty five percent forty percent
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

06:24 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"And that's one hundred parts per million of molecular iodine, which which is about thirty to fifty times more concentrated than than that. Which is in Poland own iodine. And also, there's we have a concentrated era. Went to be used with the neural irrigating device. We've had it tested on. With the water pick with the pick pocket tip and dad's to be used as a Medicated rents at home as era Ghent subject of irradiation, and we also have a gel which is two hundred fifty parts per million. I o gel which is to be used as in full arch trays and as a Perry Donald trae much like a whitening tray. And that's for more severe cases where patients would wear fifteen minutes a day. And so that's another product that's available on website. And so this basically three different products that we make available. We've had these products initially that we had a pilot study done. Three years ago for these products, and it was done by void certified carried honest, and with fifty three patients it was over six month period of time and the the results were were dramatic. They were compared to collecting glutamate they were superior. And in fact, it gave us the impetus to develop I products professional Donald products to be used in this area a sell after that. And by the way, the patients were in that six month study to the state most of them are still using this product on a daily basis because the period, honest, doesn't wanna take them off of it. And the patients don't want to go off of the we recently had a study done or invaluable done by Gordon Christians clinicians report. And that was they were to evaluations done. One was for the ready to use wrench with one hundred twenty five patients in twenty five dental offices. The other one was. For the concentrated yrant. And that also was a separate twenty-five dental offices and a separate one hundred twenty five patients and the result was so good in that that that clinicians reported voted both of those products as best products of the year of two thousand nineteen in their annual buying guide. So and the ingredients in these Brooks and not only are they essential nutrients, but they're also on the FDA's grass list of. Generally recognized as safe substances, so the natural organic, and so the guess, that's what's on our website. So I'm Gordon Christian his wife, rela has peach microbiology, what is relative of this? You know, I haven't spoken directly with her about it. So I can't answer that they have to stoke the relevant that are you are you are any of the period Donald schools using this right now, I mean, how many what is their fifty six schools United States? How many of them have Perreault program, and how many of them are going to start trying this. Well, actually, we we were actually waiting for the that clinicians report evaluation to be completed which was just recently about you waited. And so now, we're I like introducing this product. Product. And in fact, we just now started a our marketing campaign, so so it's I now being introduced so we've sent we sent product to to several different dental schools. So and there are a number of period honesty, using it in the United States and Ziv Masar who's the the president the Israel society of of Orleans plant tala. She was a previous president of Israel society of period, honest. He's been using it in his practice and. He lectures in the states a lot to to Perry. Honest around the country was keynote speaker at the American Academy of period ontological. So there are a number of of opinion leaders who are beginning to use the product and in their offices and also starting to talk about on electric circuit. So it's just now being introduced, and what about you know, again, I just love that column. Seventeen I mean, flooring chlorine. I mean, Dennis reuse, chlorine, chlorine, dioxide for bad breath. Have you tested us against air Matic, sulfur compounds to see if it also treats, mellowed or bad breath. And yes, yes. In fact, yes, we've used it with the Hal limiter. And and yes, it it. Very effective. In fact, formulation of we've tested, and it provides long-term benefit for for these volatile self accomplishments long-term benefit because it because it's the most effective in killing the bacteria that produce them. I think it's interesting out here in Arizona. People don't understand the periodic table because if they have a swimming pool, and for some reason, they decide they don't like chlorine..

United States Perry Donald president Ziv Masar Israel society rela Poland Donald Ghent Arizona Gordon Christian Perreault FDA Brooks Dennis reuse air Matic American Academy six month fifteen minutes Three years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Dioxide two-part activated. Requires mixing it for each use. And then waiting from thirty sixty seconds as far as duration of effect. The. Nothing last as long as the molecular there's been studies which have shown that the molecular dine has has lasted four times as long as co exiting glue khanate on on microbial on a micro flora in the period Donal pocket. And so what are we talking about efficacy talking about safety talking about cost comparison this molecular dining of is fabulous. And in addition. It's important really to know not just with our I dine. But with any I Don that I had dine does not allow the development of bacterial resistance. I mean, they name bugs due to their bacterial resistance VR, e vancomycin resistant Enterococcus, a Mersa methicillin resistant, staff Oreos just list goes on and on. And so most antimicrobials antibiotics allow microbial resistance developed that does not happen with iodine. On fact, not only is in no evidence in the literature that microbial resistance develops the iodine. But but I Don molecular dine is so potent that our that our formulations have been used to completely inactivate the Silla sub Tillis scores and also clostridium. Sporran jeans wars, which are these spores which debts designated by the FDA for sport test strips to develop date, the the efficiency and efficacy of autoclaves to show that they actually are sterilizing because if you can kill bacillus subtilis if you can kill clostridium sports jeans than as far as FDA is concerned than than you can kill Michael gems and can be classified as a Cam as a sterile. So so, of course, the board is. Extremely effective and extremely safe. So it to boom for many many different applications in in that discrete and those. We expect to bring on board future including anti carries. Wrenches? Creams to for viral Alzheimer's antifungal wrenches. For the mitigation of carries plaque and decalcification for Ortho patients for pre and post surgical rinses for dry sockets and incision site infections as an intra operative arrogant for tra-, sonic, scaling route planning for ended on arrogance.

Don molecular FDA Alzheimer Don Donal vancomycin Sporran Enterococcus methicillin Tillis Michael thirty sixty seconds
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Quacks in gluconic preparation, which is in this particular case, we tested against chlorof- crap. Chlorof- prep is a pre surgical skin prep strong one which is used in hospitals. It has seventeen times as much collecting glue khanate as the oral rents because the oral ranch's only zero point one two percent quacks at glutamate. Whereas the chloride prep is two percent seventeen times as much Claxton glutamate. And it also has seventy percent isopropyl alcohol. So it has to key actives two percent quacks glue khanate and seventy percent isopropyl alcohol. Our product was able to inactivate aspergillus Brazilian ses in one fourth time than that Chlor prep was able to do. So if it was if there was such a differential. Between core prep and our product, then you can understand that there's even a much much greater differential between collecting oral rinse and our products, and in fact, for those of you who do have a screen available. You'll be able to see on this slide that. That the vile on the right which contains dawn iodine is a dog dog brownish color yellowish Brown color, and at the same concentration of molecular iodine that are formulation is actually clear. So so the there's a big difference between. That product and. And also, the the I attack products and here. There's a. In fact, when we also we also actually tested it. I think I had mentioned to you before about my interest in in rhinovirus or in viral pharyngitis from from the conversation I had with Z surgeon. And so since rhinovirus, which is also a non enveloped virus extremely difficult to kill extremely difficult to a rhinovirus is the principal causative organism for viral pharyngitis saw throats, and we tested listerine. We tested scope we've tested Colgate. Total all of them were ineffective against rhinovirus. This is a thirty second exposure. Whereas the I tech product completely inactivated completely destroyed rhinovirus in that same timeframe you compare the the IOT. Wrenches to to other oral wrenches. And we looked at clocks think Lucan, we looked at Povo don't iodine with chlorine dioxide two-part activated. We we looked at. Other chlorine compounds. And the in fact, we looked at sodium chlorate, and when we look at the duration of use chlorine, glaxy, glue khanate and also Popa don't iodine are indicated for short term, use only. The IRA product is used for the short wall learnt long-term used for chronic use. And fact, we advocate its use on a daily at home regimen and for as long as someone has teeth or as long as they have implants, the collecting glue khanate Andy donated nine stained teeth and tongue the our products of non staining, and as far as the effectiveness of for the other products that we compared it to that fourth of bacterial efficacy and also for virus islet efficacy that the molecular products were more effective than these elves. It's the lowest toxic city because it's a sensual nutrient. We have governments around the world mandate, the use of iodised salt as inexpensive public health measure to to help to keep us from diverse. The iodine deficiency disease with regard to taste. Well, the collect thing khanate appoved on I have an objectionable tastes compared to our product. Which is has a pleasant flavor either as a mentor as cinnamon flavor as far as cost is concerned that the the costing of these other products are run anywhere from more expensive two to four times as as much so our product is much more cost effective and a case of chlorine dioxide products. They were they were three times as much as sodium chloride products twice as much and exiting products for the same equivalent volume of product. They were four times as much. Clinton glue khanate zero tasting. It's also a potential caution agenda if you look at the material safety data sheet on your clean, coal exiting, glue, khanate oral wrench. It's a potential carcinogen that has eleven point six percent alcohol. So it's irritating. And and also been implicated in rare, but saddle antifa lactic shock, and as an additional side effect it also chose development of dental calculus. The the iodine preparations ready to go. The molecular preparations yet, the chlorine.

rhinovirus iodine deficiency Colgate IOT Clinton Popa Lucan principal Andy Povo seventy percent two percent one two percent thirty second six percent
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Iodine to our technology. You'll see that I pull the Don Don is at we call it. I Adena, but is actually a commission. It's a mixture of several different species of iodine Annable. Those different species of iodine only one species is a bioactive and that bio Seidel species is molecular adorn, and that and molecular iodine is only present imposed on dine at one or two parts per million a maximum of three parts from other. The rest of the iodine in pov- Adonia dine which is hype y otros acid try died. I o date. I o died of those iden- species constitute the vast bulk of of the dine present in over Doan iodine, but but those species of iodine not bioactive they don't kill germs yet. They contributed to talk city and staining, right? So in pull the don't iodine you wind up with about thirty one thousand six hundred parts per million of all these different species of iodine, and yet only the two or three parts per million of molecular iodine, do all the heavy lifting. They're the ones that do the killing of germs not the other species. So for purposes, the rest of the iodine is all garbage iodine it. Just it just has negative consequences and does not contribute to buy Seidel efficacy. We have been able through our technology to develop formulate, which are one two and.

Don Don Seidel pov- Adonia iden Doan
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"A group of products for professional dental use only for use in dental practices and on the recommendation of that this these these products and not sold in stores, and we don't attend to them to be sold in stores. Now having said that there's separate so separately. There will be a line of products, which will not be the same as our as the ones we're marketing to the dental community, but they will benefit from the same core technology and those applications we intend to out license two major players in in the consumer products world in that particular case, and and and other major innovators. That already have established infrastructure and their various respective markets. But we ourselves do not intend to to develop and market. A to the consumer space Yasha if you're on shark tank the ball, beautiful, Mr. wonderful would love you. That's what he's always telling people on shark tank. There's already major players in the space. Let's license. The technology to them. Let's not reinvent the wheel. So I think Mr. wonderful would be in love with you. Have have you seen that show? I've seen it from time to time not enough to know who Mr. wanna police Baldwin from Canada. Okay. Got him. You'll notice any group. The guy is always the smartest. Right. Right. Well, there you go looking at one right now. So so tell us more of your journey. So so how is this going to work? My the Dennis listen listening right now are commuting to work who have. I mean, gosh, if you're honest, you probably have hundreds of patients with Peri implant is what what would you be telling them to do right now. Okay. So so an order to get a good grounding. And this thing is to to understand really, how do we differentiate the products that are out there? Now compared to a to the innovations that were bringing tomorrow. So then I think it would be useful. If we can just take a look at the the what sets this technology apart, and why is it so superior to existing? So you're gonna do a slide show right now, I'm not gonna slide show, but but there are two or three slides which so we help to point that out..

Yasha Canada Dennis Baldwin Mr. wan
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

06:13 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"And and that's that's out there helping people so along this process on we we actually involved to what I think is probably the most relevant and most most ubiquitous opportunity, which is which is chemistry and this. I dine chemistry is something. I had come across with the in a small company in Emasya choices that I had helped fund while there was still in startup stage, and that company had developed a high potency iodine technology, and that I Don technology was used to to create both find teak disinfectants new class of teat disinfectant when much more effective to help to prevent a bacteria from getting into the Uman food chain when cows or are are Milt so that the cow utters disinfected, I with this with this particular ISDN treatment, and and that was marketed to accent about thirty four forty countries. So the USDA requires that what is be disinfected before their Milt too. Go into for human consumption. So that company made a breakthrough in that it developed high levels of I a- dine. But they were not able to keep that technology stable. So that after few hours, the the iodine would dissipate and the the effectiveness would be gone. So it was so it was at, but, but I at that point I because I had a member of the board of that particular company I had intimate knowledge of the effectiveness of high levels of iodine. And I subsequently I was talking to the champion of department of otolaryngology at a major teaching hospital. And he was telling me that they had done some studies where they developed an antiviral whereas throat spray and that anti. Viral. They used if a viral pharyngitis for sore throats of Vira league and do so throats, and they felt that the results was so good that they felt it was curative. So this is a true. It was an initial pilot study. But it got me to thinking 'cause I ready knew about the important uses of iodine dentistry. And I thought oh my gosh. If if they can treat topically the the viruses that caused sore throat so and it does not have to be treated systemically. And the the way it was explained to me by this by the on T Cerdan was at the viruses burrow into the Muchota of the throat, but to still excessive topically so with twice a day throat spray. They were actually getting affective results, and they would doing that with a plant based extract which was similar to like eucalyptus, and and other our medicals which are extracted from plants and at the time he was telling me about this. I already knew about tremendous efficacy of iodine, and that how could is so much more effective than anti-viral. In fact, us on beatable. So so we went back to the drawing board and even though this. I I Di company that I told you about. They had three PHD's working for four years trying to get their iodine to be stable. So that it could be using commercial applications other than the bovine on disinfect. But they were unsuccessful at it. So we thought you know, what this is a long shot. It probably will not work. We probably will not be able to develop it, but we went back to the drawing boards, and we actually spent three years try to get a high potency molecular dine formulation, which which would be shelf stable that could be used for hundreds of different a germicide activities for agriculture for healthcare for industry, but consumer products across the board, and and long behold, we were able to do it. And we had on our team. We have some. Really? Expert scientists and and they were able to come up with the with a formulated and stable formulation that we shelf tested for two years of war. So so we have products that we can use in these applications and the beautiful thing about iodine is that it's an essential nutrient. It is so safe that I'll bodies require ion in order to prevent ivine deficiency diseases and fact, so that's kind of what led me into the. Into our formula forming of I attack, and we have a patent on that technology in the US and they're patent pending worldwide for that same technology, and and is Utah product opportunities in a number of different areas. So so that's that's kind of how we how we went from from practicing dentistry to to developing iodine formulations. Wow. That the halogens on the periodic table there really common in dentistry. I mean, you gotta on call seventeen flooring, chlorine, bromine IEA. Dine acetate runs Aston..

Milt Uman USDA Emasya deficiency diseases Vira league US Utah T Cerdan Aston three years four years two years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

05:26 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"We found the case of 'em are is we developed a site specific MRI scanner which is as small as a dental stool, and that that site specific scanner allows for very very inexpensive MRI's where were a patient could have an MRI the MRI could be in the corner of. Doctor's office off the pitas office. And so it could it's it was for a lamb if it was for a knee. If it was for a wrist. Then those applications can be readily done right there in the doctor's office and done very very inexpensively that MRI scanner we brought to market then in addition to that we also developed a. A treatment for surgical adhesions or actually put the prevention of surgical Asians, particularly for cardiac adhesions, because there's always been a problem when someone goes in for cardiac surgery, and that that cardiac surgeon will tell you if you wanna see which was an operation as compared to reoperate even just look on the ceiling of the surgical, suite. And if it's covered with blood, then you know, that it was the reauthorization because in order to be able to get to the heart. Then they have to tease the way all the surgical adhesions that had formed from that I operated so within those surgical adhesions blood vessels auto reason arterials also fall, and it's so it means Eddie additional risk for the patients of several hours more on the table as four and. Also, the additional sweet time and surgeons time so in its stead, we had developed a bio polymer, which can be it looks much like select Saran wrap, but it's buyer resolvable and can be tacked to the inside of the chest wall, and it helps to prevent surgical Hewson's from forming between the heart the pericardium of the heart and the and the chess will so these said he's in form within the first two weeks following surgery. So if the the bio Pala resorts after a few weeks, so in that interim period did that the Haege is prevented from forming between the chest wall and the heart. And so that when a patient goes in for reauthorization, then the surgeon don't have to deal with the with additional operative. Time and additional risk to the patient. So that product was approved in Europe, and it was also approved in the United States. So so that's an additional product also developed products for scar remediation based on a silicone padding silicone gel and those were brought to market and done also developed a device called the sure closure device, which which is a one time used disposable device which which helps to convert tissue deficit wounds that are non sutra Bill de so lot because of the deficit of tissue in there, perhaps it's because of a traumatic wound or because it's a cancer surgery where a good deal of tissue is being removed with the borders of the wound so far apart that it cannot be suture. So we requires a fill in with granulation. Tissue or requires a graft in its stead, these massive wounds were able to be closed with this device which actually using a tension over a period of twenty minutes or so against the borders of the wound allowed these collagen fire fibers which randomly aligned in the skin. And this is what's known as the Visco elastic properties of skin. So these randomly aligned colleges of fibers with tension control attention line up and slide past each other. So you get an enormous amount of stretch. And so that these wounds can be suture so used to require a two week stay in the hospital with grafting and the creation of a a secondary wound to for the harvest site of the graft. No longer is necessary in many cases with the use of this device. Ice because that same wound canal be suited and twenty minutes, or so mazing device and fact we I saw this device it was being used in Israel at because of traumatic ones. And so one soldier where shrapnel had blown through his leg. And the wind was as lodges grapefruit, and that one was closed with this particular prototype at this particular device. So that was a product that we got onto the market FDA approved..

Hewson Visco FDA Israel Europe United States Eddie twenty minutes two weeks two week
"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

05:46 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Those dot ole teeth place implants and now thirty years out of school. They're looking all those implants and saying my gosh after ten years, probably almost half of them. Have Peri implant Titus is something you think will be used for the treatment apparently implant ida's. It's it's actually being used right now for that purpose, and this is very very important application. So in fact, it it's so important to us that we felt that this was the first product that we wanted to develop from the ubiquitous technology, which can literally derived, hundreds of different products from the technology. So this is an all different fields. But particularly in dentistry for professional dental offices and particularly for a period Donal applications we see an immediate an important application. So so yes, and in fact in actually runs the spectrum from helping to prevent to helping to treat as so. And this is the these for people who who are at the very incipient stage. Virginia Vitus all the way up through severe period on Titus, so yes, absolutely. And and when we're done with period on Titus. And as you said now, we're into Peri implant Titus. So it's very important application. Well, you're gonna have to walk to the journey. How do you go from university of Tennessee and Memphis for I'm practice clinical dentistry, twenty five years to actually discovering this this new technology. How does that work? Yeah. Well, I actually practiced in upstate New York in the Albany New York area of for many years. And while I was practicing I was introduced to to a young technology in the medical space. There were couple of medical researchers who also were developing some technology in their in their garage, actually and. When I looked at this technology. I thought it was so profound and so compelling that that and they needed so much help that ah that I pitched and initially on a passive basis with financial support, and then and then actively because they needed that much help. And and really was at a point that if they if I wasn't there to help them with that, then the technology never would have seen the light of day. So so it was at that point that I actually left dentistry to help to develop the technology that technology was the beginning of the stem cell revolution. And and that and that technology wound up to becoming dermal graphs where living human Dermot sheets of living Durmus were growing up in the laboratory, and they will use. Initially for a replacement for animal trials or animal testing. So 'cause medic manufacturers pharmaceutical manufacturers who needed to do animal testing. And then you mean testing before their products could be approved for use. If we could obviate the need for animal testing by providing living Uman tissue that they could test safely in the laboratory on then they would need to test at on animals because ultimately, even if it works on animals, they still have to try it on Uman's. So this was a safe and effective way of testing on living human tissue without endangering a human being and without endangering animals. So that was a series of products that we brought to market, and then also we also grew up sheets of Durmus and had them cryopreserved in burn centers around the country. So that when someone came in with third degree burns, a search could just lift the the sheet of Durmus out of out of the liquid nitrogen and apply it to the patient, and the beauty of human d'ors is that it does not have antigens factors. So that there is no rejection of you murmurs, the rejection rejection factors lie in the EPA Durmus. So once the this sheet of Dermott was applied to these wounds. Then the patient would not need a second wound were to harvest a tissue for a for graph. Because we using this donated Odermall that which had been prior preserved. And then it was just seated with patients on epidermal cells and actually grew back beautiful skin, beautiful skin. So so that's being used now in burn. Centers around the country and then similarly for non healing wounds, Venus stasis ulcers to Cuba, Alzheimer's these wounds. I there's been applications that have been found for the same tissue to be used to help to heal those wounds. So that was my initiation to to what brought me out of dentists because the technology was so fascinating. And once I had done that then I was looking at other medical applications to develop and and.

Titus Dermot sheets Durmus Uman Virginia ida Donal New York Alzheimer university of Tennessee Memphis Cuba Dermott EPA Albany twenty five years thirty years ten years
"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

02:07 min | 2 years ago

"chairman ceo" Discussed on MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

"Means firmly under the control Michael Dell the founder, chairman CEO and his private equity backers Silverlake Michael Dell owns fifty five percent of the oh by himself all the common stock shareholders combined. Only twenty two percent they can appoint just one board member yet Delile Michael Dell to care about a bell. Well, he's got his liberal good numbers for himself. I like his style strategy on not thrilled that he is basically younger state going on there when it comes to share on voting all that said, I think the posits your to outweigh the negatives for one versus reason dealt technology stock is third cheap at these levels. Cubbies there six thousand fifty one cents per share this year, maybe another similar number next year and seven dollars sixty three cents twenty twenty one. That means Dell's trading at less his six times twenty twenty one fiscal year earnings estimates, which is insane. Given that historically Michael Dell spin pretty good steward of his investments by comparison. You'll Packard sales at ten times says at these levels, I think they are mostly baked in your and the positives. They're not something that's even more obvious. When you consider the Dell stock actually managed to rally today, even as the rest of the market, crumbled and believe it or not I think they'll be people think about this like they do IBM and take it up again, the moral now Michael Dell will build squawk box. He's in Davos tomorrow morning. I think. Thirty exciting bottom line. Now, the Deltec publicly traded again, I recognize the company is far from perfect. But that darn stock is to keep to or you know, what it is. It's. Stick with Craig. Important this morning eight the big position EBay and talked about the idea that should be split up. Bring up to if you only please do not sell it. If you do not want to consider I think the unlocking that you made me worth as much as fifty dollars for this thirty three dollar stock. And I want you in there. I'm doing more work. So for my work Burr, FIS what Elliott is saying about so many divisions that I think it looks like a very attractive limited downside situation. Ebay, which I have not liked for very long time. I like say this. We'll market summer at finding just for you right here money. I'm Jim Cramer. I'll see you too.

Michael Dell Dell Cubbies EBay Jim Cramer Davos Packard founder CEO IBM Craig chairman Burr Elliott thirty three dollar fifty five percent twenty two percent fifty dollars