35 Burst results for "Cervical Cancer"

 Mary J. Blige, Jill Biden team up for cancer prevention

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | Last month

Mary J. Blige, Jill Biden team up for cancer prevention

"Musician Mary J. Blige joined First Lady Jill Biden and the American Cancer Society at The White House to announce national roundtables on breast and cervical cancer I'm Marty's are a letter with the latest Jill Biden says the word cancer still strikes fear in people but people have more power than ever President Joe Biden resurrected the cancer moonshot initiative to research cures earlier this year Mary J. Blige who lost several family members to breast and cervical cancer has long advocated for cancer screenings She says round tables are a way for people to talk about what her family would not The practice of not wanting other people in our business and keeping these topics to ourselves is

Jill Biden Mary J. Blige Cervical Cancer President Joe Biden American Cancer Society Cancer Marty White House
"cervical cancer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

01:33 min | Last month

"cervical cancer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Patients waiting in the lobby. Cesar is a community health worker with the university of Miami, which has partnered with this clinic so that Cesar can teach people about preventing cervical cancer, one of the leading causes of cervical cancer is the human papillomavirus or HPV, cesare shows women how to use a self test for HPV. We have a little jar. And this is a cotton swab. We tell them to go to the bathroom. It's not much different from using a tampon, and it's quicker and less invasive than getting a pelvic exam, which is the other way to test for HPV. The self collected sample gets tested in a lab. If they come back positive for the virus, that's where Cesar's people skills come in. It's not an easy conversation to have that someone has HPV right. There's a lot of, yeah, panic, sure. That's why before we even take the specimen, he was planned to them that the fact that you were completely positive, that doesn't mean that you have cancer. But it does mean you'll need to be monitored for cancer, through more frequent testing with a doctor. Education makes up a big part of the effort to eradicate cervical cancer. Cesar in her colleagues talk to patients in the clinic and also inside an RV owned by the cancer center, they park it behind the clinic, up until recently, Dima trivial oversaw the RV

Cesar HPV cervical cancer university of Miami cancer cancer center Dima
"cervical cancer" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

07:43 min | 4 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"Your last memory was cozy in your room with your blanket and your pillow and the warm smiles of everybody around you, I think that can be a lot less traumatic. Curious if pushing versed earlier isn't better for post-op recovery and psychological benefit. They always, you know, like I've had surgeries, you know, we carry you and I talked about this. Yeah. For some reason, like my experiences, they always talk to you when you're in when you're in the surgery room. There's always some type of conversation going on in there when I'm getting surgery. I don't know why. But I like your idea. Knock me out. But on first said, that's the thing that's interesting on benzodiazepines. You're not like trashed. You're pretty coherent. You just don't remember it at all. And so if they push the benzodiazepines early so that your a comfortable because that's what they're for they make you feel really relaxed. You're totally. I mean, you're not totally coherent. They want to make sure you sign all the paperwork before they give you that, which you have to do. But when they push them, they can do that then take you into OR, you can still have full, fully fledged conversations with them. You just can't consent to anything because you're technically on hard drugs. But they told me that I was being totally normal. Like I reminded them, hey, we can't bring my pillow in. Here, nurse, do you want to take this? And I told them some story about a woman I talked to who at Sloan Kettering walked her way into the OR. Like they were like, yeah, you were completely there. You were just chill. You said, the minute they push the drugs, I go, oh, I feel better. I literally said that. I think I would be curious from a psychological standpoint who benefits or what's more beneficial. Having your memory wiped slightly sooner and just never being cognizant of the operating theater. I don't know. I don't know. Yeah, the interesting study. I don't know. When I had a procedure relatively recently, I liked the operating theater. First off, it was like, you know, it's like the bridge of the enterprise in a sense, but it's monitors everywhere. All these technical doodads. And then I had like a cool conversation with one of the doctors. It was like a pro science pro skeptical thing. I was like, this guy's really cool. And then that's the last thing I remember. That was a good memory. But then my procedure was nothing compared to yours, though, so it's hard to do a real comparison. Yeah, you did like, I think we talked about this that was more like that twilight anesthesia. Like, what's it called? Consciousness. Consciousness. No, I was out. Oh, you were out. This was called the butt procedure. I was out. Yeah, I still think Steve, am I wrong? Endoscopy, even though you feel out. It's still, it's not conscious sedation, but it's like Twilight, right? It's not like propofol, is it? I guess it's very. The question is were you intubated? If you were, if you were intubated, you were out, that was full and a general. You probably weren't intubated. If you're not intubated, it's conscious sedation. That's a good rule of thumb. It's kind of seems like a misnomer, though, because you are not conscious. But you also don't remember anything. So even if you're pseudo semi conscious, you won't remember any of it. Carrie, you were intubated? Oh, yes. Absolutely. I was intimate. And how did you throat feel afterwards? Did you have any horrible for days? Yeah. That's why I couldn't really eat crackers. The first day I had bone broth and some bread. Oh, I bought some of those Hawaiian rolls at the grocery store, like at the last minute when I was grocery shopping for my mom to come in town before the procedure, and those were a godsend. Those things are just amazing. You guys know what I'm talking about, right? A Hawaiian wine. I don't know. We don't know it as a Hawaiian roll. We might. Oh, really? It's sushi? No, no, no. The bread. They're like these little rolls, bread rolls that are like slightly sweet and they're super soft. Sounds good. And so because, yeah, because I'm crackers. Like a challah bread? It's Hawaiian bread. I guess it's a West Coast. But because crackers are like so bland and easy, but they hurt your throat. They're hard to eat. They're scratching. Yeah, the soft bread was great. Also, they busted my lip. I don't think they realized it, but you know when they intubate, they use that big metal thing. He may have stuck my lip between my tooth because I'd really fat lip when I woke up from surgery, and it took about three days for that wound to heal. So I can answer more questions if you have any, but I think the most important thing that I want to mention before anything else is the pathology. I want to give you guys a report on what was going on with that and what we learned and just to reinforce to all of my listeners who have a cervix, why it is so important to do your annual or whatever your calendar is, but to do the screenings that are recommended. If you guys remember, my last surgery was a DNC and a leap. DNC dilation and curettage is like a scraping of the endometrium, which is the inner lining of the uterus. It's also often an abortion procedure, but in my case, it was just used to test the tissue to see if it had any dysplasia or neoplasia. A leap is a loop electrosurgical excision procedure. So this is a wire loop that has an electrical current that goes through it, where they cut a chunk of your cervix out. I want to go back a little bit. I have long had abnormal paps, and whenever I had an abnormal pap in the past, it was recommended that I do a colposcopy. Colposcopy, which sounds like endoscopy, is a scope. But it's a colposcope, so it looks at your cervix, not your intestines. Colposcopy is a little bit of a misnomer because it almost always includes also a biopsy. So it's not just a scope, very often they have to take a punch biopsy, and just so you men know, they do not give you any drugs for this. They cut you with no drugs. Yeah, and I'm not even talking about advil. Like, there's nothing. There's no anesthesia. There's no nothing. I mean, you could take advil on your own, I guess, but they open you up with a speculum. They shine a light. They do a vinegar wash to see if your skin reacts to see if there's like dysplasia spots. And then they literally have this tool that looks like really long scissors with a little punchy thing on the end and they go cut, cut. Usually they take two, and then they do what's called an ECC and endocervical curettage, which is that scraper again, but they do it inside the endocervix. I've had to have, let's say, 5 of these in my life may be more, and they're brutal. And for some women, they're well tolerated, but for me, they're very painful. And it was getting to the point where I couldn't handle it anymore. And I had begged and pleaded my doctor. I said, can we just do a leap? And she's like, you don't need a leap, they always come back negative. I'm not going to remove perfectly healthy tissue from your cervix. Just because you don't want to have these biopsies. Because the reason my reasoning, of course, was that most women, this is the standard kind of progression of cervical cancer or of pre cancerous cells for most women. It's the squamous tissue. So it's kind of like the outer layer of the skin cells of your cervix. That's what usually has dysplasia, neoplasia first. So they do a biopsy. They see that it's what's called sin one through sin four. Those are basically the stages of precancerous cells in early stages they might wait and see in later stages, then they'll do a leap or a cone biopsy. I never had dysplasia, so she was never going to run ahead with a leap. But my reasoning was, well, if we would just remove the tissue, it might not come back. Abnormal anymore, right? But she's like, I'm not doing that. So she said, you know, next time we'll talk about maybe doing some sort of conscious sedation or something to make it more manageable. It's like, okay. And then as a fluke on my next pap, I had a result of abnormal glandular tissue. Now, squamous tissue, like I mentioned, is the outer layer of the cervix.

Sloan Kettering DNC dysplasia Carrie Steve West Coast cervical cancer
"cervical cancer" Discussed on What's the 311

What's the 311

04:18 min | 8 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on What's the 311

"Because <Speech_Female> remember, discharge <Speech_Female> is a natural normal thing <Speech_Female> plus discharge <Speech_Female> often change throughout <Speech_Female> your ministry <Speech_Female> cycle. This is yet <Speech_Female> another reason to get <Speech_Female> routine screening to rule <Speech_Female> out anything serious <Speech_Female> the doctor weight. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Now everyone with cervical <Speech_Female> cancer has this <Speech_Female> symptoms, <Speech_Female> but low <Speech_Female> back pain has been associated <Speech_Female> with cervical cancer, <Speech_Female> said doctor Williams <Speech_Female> in advanced cases of <Speech_Female> cervical cancer, the <Speech_Female> service can become so <Speech_Female> large that it puts pressure <Speech_Female> on the lower back. <Speech_Female> Again, <Speech_Female> symptoms <Speech_Female> such as could <Speech_Female> be indicated <Speech_Female> of lots of things, <Speech_Female> many of them much <Speech_Female> less serious than <Speech_Female> cancer which can <Speech_Female> make it difficult to spot <Speech_Female> the signs of cervical cancer <Speech_Female> cancer on <Speech_Female> your own. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> One of the scariest <Speech_Female> thing about circuit <Speech_Female> cancer, though, is that it <Speech_Female> is often <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a systematic <Speech_Female> meaning you <Speech_Female> could have no symptoms <Speech_Female> that orthodox <Speech_Female> Sinclair. <Speech_Female> They speak to the <Speech_Female> critical <SpeakerChange> importance <Speech_Female> of good screen and <Speech_Female> prevention she adds. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> So we'll <Speech_Female> tip <Speech_Female> typically <Speech_Female> diagnose doing <Speech_Female> a pelvic exam by <Speech_Female> a doctor during a routine <Speech_Female> pap smear. <Speech_Female> Or HPV <Speech_Female> screen is seductive <Speech_Female> thing clea gynecologist <Speech_Female> follows <Speech_Female> screening guidelines at <Speech_Female> four by <Speech_Female> organizations such as <Speech_Female> American Cancer <Speech_Female> Society, American <Speech_Female> college, but <Speech_Female> obstetrician and gynecologist <Speech_Female> help them <Speech_Female> decide when to administrate <Speech_Female> which test. <Speech_Female> It has a lot <Speech_Female> to do with the patient's <Speech_Female> age, medical <Speech_Female> history, say Gary <Speech_Female> Austin MD, <Speech_Female> cheer <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of the pathologically <Speech_Female> department <Speech_Female> of advocate <Speech_Female> Illinois massive <Speech_Female> medical center. <Speech_Female> For example, <Speech_Female> although a <Speech_Female> pap test <Speech_Female> is currently recommended <Speech_Female> for women aged 21 <Speech_Female> to 29, <Speech_Female> the HPV test <Speech_Female> is not. <Speech_Female> Since many women in <Speech_Female> this age group will have <Speech_Female> an HPV infection, <Speech_Female> but their immune <Speech_Female> systems are able to <Speech_Female> get rid of it, <Speech_Female> said doctor August, <Speech_Female> at the <Speech_Female> other end of the spectrum, <Speech_Female> if a woman is older <Speech_Female> than 65 has <Speech_Female> never had several cancer <Speech_Female> or <Speech_Female> P cancerous in <Speech_Female> some she may <Speech_Female> not need to be <Speech_Female> a screen at all. <Speech_Female> Either bypass <Speech_Female> me or HPV <Speech_Female> tests. <Speech_Female> Every woman <Speech_Female> in her history and <Speech_Female> circumstances are different. <Speech_Female> So always consult <Speech_Female> your doctor ask for <Speech_Female> any test you think <Speech_Female> you should be getting done. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> I can't have done <Speech_Female> identify <Speech_Female> sales on the slide <Speech_Female> that looks abnormal <Speech_Female> to doctor August. <Speech_Female> While in rare cases <Speech_Female> the abnormal cells <Speech_Female> mean that the patient <Speech_Female> already has cancer. <Speech_Female> The <Speech_Female> pap test is all <Speech_Female> so important because <Speech_Female> using it. <Speech_Female> The pathologic. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Can't identify cells <Speech_Female> that are not already cancer <Speech_Female> cells, but have the <Speech_Female> potential to become <Speech_Female> cancer. <Speech_Female> That's why regular screens <Speech_Female> are so important, <Speech_Female> still have your doubts. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> If you are tests <Speech_Female> come back abnormal, <Speech_Female> you might <Speech_Female> need a cervical <Speech_Female> biopsy. <Speech_Female> That involves taking a <Speech_Female> tiny piece <Speech_Female> of cervical tissue, <Speech_Female> which is then examined <Speech_Female> by a <Speech_Female> pathological <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> pathologist <Speech_Female> under a microscope <Speech_Female> to doctor <Speech_Female> August. If the pathologist <Speech_Female> finds that <Speech_Female> the biopsy shows <Speech_Female> a pre cancer, <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> the <Speech_Female> gynecologist will <Speech_Female> treat this part of the cervix. <Speech_Female> This can mean <Speech_Female> removing a large piece of <Speech_Female> tissue in a procedure <Speech_Female> called cone <Speech_Female> or leap. <Speech_Female> Again, the <Speech_Female> pathologist will <Speech_Female> examine size made <Speech_Female> from this procedure to <Speech_Female> be sure that pre cancer <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> has been completely <Speech_Female> removed. <Speech_Female> If a patient <Speech_Female> already has <Speech_Female> cervical cancer, <Speech_Female> it gynecologists can <Speech_Female> usually see the tumor doing <Speech_Female> a pelvic exam <Speech_Female> but we'll need to take biopsy <Speech_Female> from it <Speech_Female> using microscope <Speech_Female> slides from <Speech_Female> the tumor biopsy. <Speech_Female> The pathologist <Speech_Female> will confirm <Speech_Female> whether it's cancer <Speech_Female> in it from there <Speech_Female> your doctor can begin <Speech_Female> playing a treatment.

"cervical cancer" Discussed on What's the 311

What's the 311

03:58 min | 8 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on What's the 311

"One of the safest and most study vaccinate fascinations over a development said, doctor fader. It is important to know that not all strains of HPV cause cancer. There are about 200 subtypes of HPV that has been identified in those about 40 or so or spread by sexual contact said doctor fader. About 80 to 90% of cervical cancers are due to HPV 16 and 18. For some we are types can also lead to circular cancer she knows. There are three approved HPV vaccinations and all three effectively protective against HPV 1618. We can send at any HPV vaccinate will protect against the vast majority of HPV reloaded related cervical cancer. But none covers an absolute 100% said, doctor fader. This is why regular screenings are still recommended fascinated patient. She adds. Cervical cancer is most commonly diagnosed in one between the ages of 35 and 44 and I really affected women who under 20 said doctor fader. About 15% of diagnosed are made in women older than 65. She asked, so she had this with the women in your family. Is what she's saying. She had this with the women and your friendship, which the women in your family share with your Friends, any woman that's close to you. If you experience any of these symptoms, bring them to your doctor's attention, it may be nothing or they may be something else, like another STD, but the key to survival is early diagnosis. Yes, circle cancer is one of that we beating, but not into submissions and Nicole Williams. MD, the board certified oncologist, surgeon surgeon and founder of the gynecology Institute of Chicago. If you haven't had it past me in the last three to 5 years I have these sentences you need to be seen. This doesn't feel like cramps were more of a vague heaviness like something just doesn't feel right to doctor wimps. You may feel some pressure or even pulling in things feeling a lot heavier than they did before. She asked sign of the circle cancer tend to creep up over time and that's what can make it tough to spot. You just don't feel well, but maybe unsure why it's a doctor's opinion. Now. So she said, do you want to pass me? You're not going to be able to feel it, but pressing around on top of your stomach, but if you slide your finger into your server, you should feel smooth like a shiny pick, shiny pink donuts at all. If you feel something well instead, see a doctor ASAP. Bleeding after sex is the most common symptom of cervical cancer. It doesn't have to be a lot of blood, even a little irregular spotting should be brought up with it. Your doctor said doctor.

HPV fader cervical cancers cervical cancer cancer Nicole Williams gynecology Institute of Chicag circle cancer MD
"cervical cancer" Discussed on What's the 311

What's the 311

02:02 min | 8 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on What's the 311

"Welcome to Singapore, so I'm talking about cervical cancers. What is cervical cancers and a sign of cervical cancer? I'm a cancer survival myself. And so is my so is my man. He's a cancer survivor himself. So. About 13,000 American women will be now your nose with cervical cancer this year. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, while they may not seem like a lot of especially when compared with the rate of breast cancer, which roughly one in 8 women will develop in their lifetime. It's still the third most common gynecologic cancer in the United States say as clear MD. Gynecologist oncologist and New York poster Terry and Columbia University, I run medical center. The good news that largely is to pap smear is the HPV test in the HPV vaccination. There has been a significant significant decrease in circle cancer risk in developed countries over the last 50 years that doctors think clear. What more experts anticipate the number of new cases of cervical cancer contained to the client and women who has been vaccinated? Now for not so great news, signs of circle cancer can be easily missed because its symptoms mimic those on many other conditions. And if it's not core early survival rates drop rapidly, here's what you need to know. In short cervical cancer is in almost all cases the result of sexually transmitted disease Amanda Nichols fader MD associate professor and director of the Kelly, gynecology oncology service at Johns Hopkins Hopkins school of medicine in Baltimore..

"cervical cancer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

07:26 min | 11 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"To curb the spread of ghost guns that lack serial numbers and to promote safe storage of firearms Last year the Justice Department handed out $139 million to spur the hiring of more cops on the street But the attorney general says the DoJ also wants to invest in social workers Community violence interrupters and programs to help people with mental illness The challenge of the last few years is too much of the debate has been either or That's Quentin Lucas He's the mayor in Kansas City Missouri It is either law enforcement police officers on the streets and funding them or you invest in programs in your community violence interruption cure violence models et cetera Kansas City saw 182 homicides in 2021 the second deadliest year in its history Lucas says the Justice Department under former president Trump flooded many cities with federal agents Now Lucas says he wants to see another kind of flood Resources that help us find more of our social work programs particularly our work with young people That's the sort of change we need from this administration And I think mayors are waiting to see when that will happen because lord knows the problem isn't easy enough in any of our cities Chris Brown is president of Brady united against gun violence Brown says the Biden administration has taken some positive steps on gun violence so far but she wants to see more enforcement of laws already on the books in a new leader for the bureau of alcohol tobacco and firearms We need this administration to put someone a director Ford who understands the agency and can make it work exactly as it should The Justice Department is grappling with multiple challenges including some 850 reports of threats to U.S. election officials On Friday federal prosecutors brought there first criminal case against a Texas man who threatened officials in Georgia Court papers say Chad stark wrote it was time to put a bullet in one election official and pay a visit to another election worker in her family Today's charges are a milestone for the election threats task force that I announced just last summer That's deputy the attorney general Lisa Monaco in an exclusive interview with NPR It wasn't just that we'd seen a surge in threats but also frankly the alarmingly personal and violent and aggressive nature of the threat Monaco says election workers are protecting democracy and the Justice Department will protect them Today's charges are the first but they will not be the last Justice Department officials say there are dozens of open investigations into election threats Carrie Johnson NPR news Washington At four 44 on this Friday afternoon you're listening to members supported 90.1 Good afternoon I'm Jim berry More than 9 out of ten cases of cervical cancer are preventable according to the CDC That's because there's a highly effective vaccine for both girls and boys that stops HPV The virus that causes cervical cancer And even beyond prevention treatment is highly effective if caught early But as you go away from Georgia's urban core areas the incidence of cervical cancer grows and for black women especially in Georgia's rural counties that cancer claims lives disproportionately And are Daniel is with the Human Rights Watch and doctor KE is with the southern rural black women's initiative The organization's just co published a study from their research of 148 women of color from rural Georgia And when we spoke earlier today I started by asking Enrique Daniel about the findings And when you think about cervical cancer you know it's highly preventable It's highly treatable But unfortunately around 4200 women do die from it each year in the U.S. and black women die It disproportionately high rates It's clear whose health and whose rights are government is invested in and is actually protecting And it really reveals a pattern of exclusion from the information from the services that all women really need to stay healthy and to stay safe And then I'll turn it over to doctor Edie who's actually one of the community based researchers Thank you Anna I was one of the researchers that spoke with not all 148 but many of the women from baker county And I think it was really key for me in big accounting because I knew the community and I knew the women there I knew the people and so it was easy for me to navigate for one end of the counting to the other and people trust me They knew me they knew my family So they felt comfortable sharing their stories and talking to me knowing that information would be held confidential and actually held with some honesty and treated with integrity And did they surprise you the stories that you heard Actually I was very surprised you know because I think we all have a tendency to live in our own little bubble And I've always had insurance and had no problems with transportation or any of the barriers that they talked about Costs no health insurance no transportation I was just taking a bag I was really shocked I think that in 2021 at that time that they were still facing those types of barriers was just really astounding to me I want to talk about cervical cancer because you mentioned that it is treatable and preventable As I understand the HPV vaccine is the main preventive measure is that hard to administer it hard to get that to the people that you all are talking about It's not hard to get It is available and it can be obtained from that physicians or at the local clinics But many of them have not even heard of the vaccine And just to build on top of that I mean again there's such a lack of information around the HPV vaccine And there's also a lot of stigma around it It is tied to HPV which is a sexually transmitted infection parents don't really understand that it's a cancer prevention tool They don't know that it can be given to girls and boys and also they might feel like it's not something I want to give to my child because it might signal that they can go have sex We need to reframe how we look at the HPV vaccine So it is seen and accepted as a cancer prevention tool So there's a lot of work that needs to happen around education and outreach on the vaccine I understand Georgia is making progress but clearly not enough What needs to be done at the state level to make the situation better We need the legislators to understand that in rural communities there needs to be more attention to healthcare And there's a real need for Medicaid expansion it seems that the further way is Julie of the metropolitan centers the rate of cervical cancer increases In building on top of that I would say access to information Young people in schools need to be running about their sexual and reproductive health They need to know where they can go for free resources They need to be learning about their bodies the HPV vaccine ways to stay healthy and safe Parents.

Justice Department cervical cancer Quentin Lucas Biden administration bureau of alcohol tobacco and Kansas City Lucas Georgia Court Chad stark Lisa Monaco Carrie Johnson Jim berry Georgia NPR Enrique Daniel DoJ cancer Chris Brown Missouri
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:13 min | 11 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Is head of policy from the trust and joins me now morning Kate. Good morning. So give us a sense, women go for this cervical screening and most women will get a letter saying, yes, everything's fine. But for some women they won't. And that can be a really, really frightening moment, can't it? Yeah, absolutely. The majority of self screening results will be normal and nothing will be found. But in some cases, you might be told you've got HPV, which is the virus that causes cell changes in certain cancer and sometimes that you have cervical cell changes as well. And that can be really worrying, really scary when you get this result letter. But we want to make sure that everyone who gets unexpected result knows what it means, knows where to access support and knows better access support to help them to deal with it. Talk to me about the idea of shame and that some women have said that they do feel ashamed. Just explain that. Yeah, so we conducted research looking at women who have had a cell changes diagnosis and really sadly we found about a quarter said they felt ashamed when they got their diagnosis through. And that's just something which we really want to tackle. A lot of this is to do with HPV. HPV is the virus that causes cervical cancer and it causes cells to change, but there's lots of really unhelpful stigmas and myths around HPV such as being dirty or being unclean or around promiscuity as well. And they're just things we really want to get rid of because HPV is so, so common and most of us will have it in our lives. Occasionally it will cause cells to change, but that is absolutely not your fault. You've done nothing wrong if you're told you have HPV. So we really want to get rid of this really harmful stigma around HPV that exists. And HPV can go, it doesn't always stick around once you've got it, does it? And also, just because you've got cell changes, doesn't mean that that's going to lead to cervical cancer. So people don't need to panic if they get that letter. Absolutely..

HPV Kate cancer cervical cancer
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

Terrible, Thanks For Asking

05:54 min | 11 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Terrible, Thanks For Asking

"Is that Jesse cervical cancer is stage one B on a scale of one to four, which doesn't sound too bad, right? The doctors tell Jesse she has options, which is also good, they may be able to scrape the cancer out, that is such a terrible visual. It's just the word scrape out. Or she may have to do chemo and radiation. At that point, I don't think I was really feeling afraid it was more of confusion. Because up until that point, everything was going the right way for us. We would randomly get a promotion at work. We would randomly get a pay raise. We sold our first house on the second day it was on the market. Like everything is working out for us. And this is the first hiccup and it's not supposed to be there. Like, it's not supposed to happen, especially to us. This just happens to random folks, not us. Jose can be strong because Jesse is strong. Even when the doctors tell her that surgery is no longer an option. You know that image in Spider-Man, the first one with Tobey Maguire, where he stops the subway. That was Jesse. Blocking all of us in that subway. And we took it for granted because she was so strong at that point. And they told us it's going to be three sessions of chemo and like 40 something sessions of radiation and then 5 sessions of internal radiation. So we start chemo, she doesn't lose her hair. It's a very low dose. Radiation is probably the worst part. Because, you know, it's going around her region down there and it's messing up her stomach and all that good stuff. And never complained. Just took it in stride. The only time she complained is when she was feeling nauseous after chemo. And even for internal radiation, you know, sticking 17 tubes, devices in her vagina and it's like, I'm with her. Every day, holding her hand. And that was the first time I saw her cry. Because it was painful. Just 6 months after being diagnosed, Jesse is told that she's cancer free. Her scans are clear, they're no more tumors in sight. It wasn't the same after. There was this cloud that hung above our family. That is honestly a regret that I have is because we never really talked about it afterwards. We did occasionally, but there was never that deep conversation of what's next. Because I thought everything was going to go back to normal. Everything is going to be just like how we planned. Yes, this was a minor bump in the road, but now we're back on track. And let's go have some fun. And that's what we did. We decided, you know what? We're going to take those vacations. The four of them, Jose, Jesse, mazzy, Luna, go to San Diego and legoland. They buy their forever home, and the cloud that Jose mentioned, it remains, too. Because what happened with Jesse is brave as she was trying to Tobey Maguire stop that train from hitting her family? It's still affected all of them. After Jesse was done with her treatments, I got sick. Like I came down with like crazy like cold flu something. And at the time, my primary care doctor knew what I was going through. And when I was sick and I went to go see him, he's like, this is probably not medically like something, but I think it's your body just saying like, okay, give yourself a rest. And so I remember one morning where I was out. I just was not feeling good. And in the back of my mind, I'm like, well, it's just you can go through freaking cancer treatment. I can go through a flu. Like the whole man flew thing. I didn't want to be that guy, but I was pretty close being that guy. And then mazzie comes in my room and I'm like, on the bed and Jesse's like in the living room, hanging out with Luna and mazey comes in and was like, a taddy, are you feeling better? Are you sick like mommy? And I was like, oh, okay. Yeah. I need to get up. I can't do this. And that would made me realize like she knew something was different about being sick with money. Being sick with mommy was different. In December 2019, Jose has a business trip to London for two weeks. He tries to get Jesse to go with him, but she can't get away from work. While I'm over there, obviously I talk to her every day. Multiple times a day to the point where this is the first time we've been away from each other that long. And add that on top of me being away from my kids, I'm a mess. Like I called her crying one night because I missed her so.

Jesse Jesse cervical cancer Tobey Maguire Jose cancer confusion chemo Luna tumors legoland flu mazzie mazey San Diego London
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:16 min | 11 months ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And when we were talking about the storming of it, you were explaining to us about the role of QAnon and specifically how that had appealed to women, because I mentioned there two women who were killed. What is that, the status of that today a year on? So QAnon was a conspiracy theory in which message cryptic messages were received from a figure called Q, whose identities now guessed at, but never been officially confirmed. Q stock posting in December last year. But it has the conspiracy theories continued and mutated on. And what's interesting to me is that both women who died have quite strong, obvious links with them, Ashley Babbage is the one that everyone has heard of, who was killed while trying to shot by an officer while trying to storm the speaker's office. Vanity Fair published a brilliant profile of another woman who was crushed to death in a tunnel called Roseanne boyland. And what struck me about her story is that her entry to QAnon was through this particular subconscious Wayfair where a prominent furniture manufacturer was accused of child trafficking of smuggling traffic children in its cabinets, which to you and me probably sounds kind of pretty crazy. But what was very moving about this story is it took a very seriously and revealed the fact that her sister said, she had cervical cancer. She couldn't have children, and she became there for obsessed with the idea of protecting children. This was something she wanted to do. And I think this is really important to understand QAnon. Is that it has spread through wellness movements through mother's groups through vaccine skepticism movements because a lot of it is framed as concerned for children and is therefore appealing to people who wouldn't necessarily see themselves as incredibly big political. Yes. And we should say there are reports of it going pretty silent recently. What I think personally has happened to it is that it has kind of mutated into vaccine skepticism. There is now in some kind of way a giant role in conspiracy theory, which has overtones of anti semitism it has overturned the far right in which there are global elites who control everything. And then it manifests itself in different ways. So while you might hear a little bit less about the child trafficking, you hear a bit more about how Bill Gates is trying to microchip us all with the coronavirus vaccine or the rothschilds are behind this now or the other. So what's the modern conspiracy movement has become in the same way the Internet has, right? Decentralized. There's no one person in charge of it, even Trump isn't really in charge of what his followers think. And has shown a bit of leg occasionally to QAnon, but it's not full throttle endorsed it. So it's a very Internet phenomenon in which you can pick and choose from a kind of a la carte menu of beliefs, really..

Ashley Babbage Roseanne boyland cervical cancer Bill Gates Trump
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

06:59 min | 1 year ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Data on this population we don't have coverage for some of those concerns so there's also a lot of a in terms of women's reproductive health cancers there's a very uneven coverage where you're covered for cervical cancer but not uterine cancer like i don't know why that how could those possibly have remarkably different causes when it comes to environmental exposure. But there's kind of like a. We're sort of behind the eight ball out of the time in terms of discovering what conditions were Were going to end up seeing but luckily we also have the model of the first responders to sort of see what we're going to see trickling down into our community. But at the moment you know the the cancer rates are growing the autoimmune disorders are getting reported at much higher rates those primarily affect women's. Those are also something that you don't see a lot reflected in the data but are pretty significant in the community and then the other area where we're not really sure what to expect and we're not really sure what isn't is not linked is in a developmental health related concerns like in a ways that this kind of exposure shape people's underpin systems and things like that. There's not good data on that because there was no tracking of the people that were exposed children and so we expect that this has had consequences for our health. A lot of us have bizarre. Health concerns that we can't really articulate as as a kind of general condition but Those are things that we also expect are likely linked to those exposures. So i think people who have heard about the the legislation the fight for legislation for world trade center related diseases probably not heard that much about the survivor community. That it's mostly been what the first responders experience and how do we cover So can you talk some abou- your advocacy journey. And sort of just trying to get. This is not a small community of survivors. A lot of people who are affected but how hard it's spin to sort of get attention on that particular community. Yeah there's something about the way. We like conceive of healthcare policy and who deserves healthcare protections. That is very much based in a sense that like you should make a sacrifice in deserve it as opposed to a sense that just everyone like inherently deserves some sort of healthcare protect health protection. And so we've come up a lot of the time after something like nine eleven. I think we've seen this a lot with the kobe crisis. We kind of lean on war metaphors we lean on the the sort of symbolism of who sacrificed in who rushed in and who were the heroes and you know we see that a lot where we're constantly glorifying doctors. Who of course are doing heroic work after kobe. But like also if your uncle was lied you and didn't realize that wearing masks protected him than like that is kind of policy failure as well and your uncle doesn't knock deserve protection just because he wasn't quote unquote hero. He's a person who lives in society whose government was charged with protecting him did not Anything in the same way. We faced a lot of challenges as as the survivor community. Because there was a perception that as people who weren't heroes we were speaking out of turn in asking for access to some of the benefits that responders head. I think know. And there's also there's the issue of self identification in a community like that as well because responders by large very proud to have been part of this rescue effort. You know. i've spent a lot of the time. A lot of time on the hill with first responders. I know that community really well. I have a lot of great friends that i've made in that community and all of them are incredibly proud of the work that they did at ground zero and the survivor community does not get to feel the same way because we were just straight victims of a bad policy and and i you know i wanna know. It was victims of a bad policy not necessarily victims of terrorist attack. I think there's also a sense that you know. This was sort of enact of active. Got homeless like an act that we couldn't control that just sort of fell on our doorstep the decision to send us all back into that area though was made by the. Us government was not made by foreign terrorists and so And so a lot of the fault for what ended up happening to our community really belongs on our own doorstep not on some sort of like doorstep we can't control out yonder. And so. I think you know our involvement in this advocacy work has always been there but it has often been overlooked in part because we couldn't access a hero narrative and i would say that's also very gendered narrative that's the narrative that requires. It often leans on metaphors about rushing into things in being strong in both risking survivors out of rebel. And things like that. And that's just like not you know. They're only six women in the fire department on nine eleven. That's not a narrative that necessarily Reflects woman and i've actually spoken to a lot of female first responders who are constantly coming up against the problem of people not believing that their first responders because they're women and so that's already a challenge that the community cases because community advocates by enlarge. And i would say in a lot of crises not just after nine eleven and being women they start as moms and then you know other women from the community step up when you think about who steps up for communities after a crisis it is almost always women first and then if you're lucky cement step up because then you get taken seriously. But it's really hard to get hurt. As a community of female advocates and so on the hill we had to kind of rely on some interesting dynamics. I mean one of the more disappointing dynamics that was helpful to my work but also just like horribly depressing to think about was the fact that at a certain point i started relying on first responders to repeat everything that i said in our lobby meetings so that they would actually be heard because i think even bay noticed that no one was listening to me and i was being mistaken for a staffer everywhere and i had to kind of think you know. I had to rely on some theater to get over that. I had to start dressing down on the hill to stop being treated like a staffer which is such a funny dynamic defenders open on. But i'm you know i'm a woman. I was much younger than the other advocates. I'm the youngest. Advocate has been really active on this issue. And i look like a first year stack her on the hill and always have and continue to even the women in my late thirties. And so you know. There was some dynamics like that that i had to rely on just to make sure our story didn't get lost but there were also a lot of times where for political reasons we were asked to step back and for reasons. That maybe weren't gonna benefit us because there was also i think an understanding on the hill and elsewhere that it's really hard to sell a story about communities. People don't care about civilians in the same way that they care about heroes and i i always think that's so funny because most people are civilians in so it feels like you know if you can see yourself reflected in any part of the nine eleven recovery effort. It should be my story that you see unless you are a fireman. You know it is most likely my story that you see yourself reflected in. It's one of the reasons. I thought it was important that someone like me..

cancer uterine cancer cervical cancer kobe Us
Unraveling The Death of 'The Toxic Lady', Gloria Ramirez

Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Unraveling The Death of 'The Toxic Lady', Gloria Ramirez

"When she got to the hospital. Glorious heart was beating at a rate of more than one hundred beats per minute. Why did they need to fibrillation her. That seems like jumpstarting a car. That's already running hot. You know also. It just seems to me that pumping someone full of sedatives and then zapping. Their heart with electricity is a weird sequence of events. I'm sure they knew what they were doing. It's just as a lay person sitting here at my desk. It seems weird also can only hope the iv. The paramedics administered in the ambulance was to take blood because by the time nurse. Cain went to get a blood sample. Gloria was so hopped up on medical grade goof-balls that her blood probably would have gotten anyone within fifteen feet of it high. Wouldn't they wanna check someone's blood before dumping a whole bunch of shed into it like maybe make sure she didn't already take a bottle full of valium before giving her more valium next. Let me just ask why. The decision was to move the entire. Er to the parking lot. If dr our cia thought gloria was the problem why not just move gloria outside. Wouldn't that have been easier than moving the entire er department it's possible. Show a thought. The problem was coming from the er itself like the ventilation system or whatever but then. Why didn't gloria get evacuated as well and look. I'm sure dr ocho made whatever decisions he thought were best in the moment. I can't think straight under that kind of pressure which is why dr ochoa is a doctor. And i am a podcast art. Could you imagine getting rushed to the er for like i dunno hemorrhaging blood or something. The ambulance gets to the parking lot out front. And it's like well here. We are literally right here. And there's just rows of gurneys with moaning people and some doctors like who's nissan altima is this. I'm hanging an. Iv bag from the roof rack. The official cause of gloria ramirez death was kidney failure due to cervical cancer or possibly heart failure. I'm telling you the reporting on this case is all over the place. Whatever it was that ultimately killed her. Everyone was still trying to figure out what it could have possibly been about. Gloria that was making medical staff around her pass out.

Gloria Dr Ocho Dr Ochoa Cain CIA Gloria Ramirez Altima Nissan Kidney Failure Cervical Cancer Heart Failure
"cervical cancer" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

03:48 min | 1 year ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on The Shawn Harvey Morning Show Podcast

"Sometimes we will spend like thirty minutes just like to off catching up and everything like that. And she says she doesn't mind because she says it's important for like women's mental health sometimes have somebody to talk to and all of that. You know it's a whole mind. Body thinks love her. You guys should goes here but they'll just ask you like your medical history like everything's okay if you've been experienced anything like really like which are manuals and stuff like that and then they're like okay and you have to do it. You have to like your legs are open. You're fully expose. They're sticking in there and then they try to be done. If you have a good time. They usually talk straight bringing anything out of that regina over there for testing they gotta swat they You have to get a pap smears. So that's where they swab your cervix texts for any abnormalities or anything like that usually get it back the results in like a couple of days. You know cervical cancer. You know stuff like that just to make sure you're all good down there and then that's it so it can be pretty fast. You have a good one. They'll like talk through it and they are not like so right in your head very invasive. Every time i go off the same it's the same for mendosa. Any i mean i guess i just feel like you know men are but you know a lot of people. Don't go they don't take care of you know bawar bawadi prostate and all that we have to have men's health mom and wariness casado tobacco. I take him but you but there's a lot of men that don't because they don't wanna go through that i pull out for another man to check the penis that's right and put in another man in a man putting two fingers rectal. That's probably why a lot of men go to a lot of man because if there's something wrong with them they don't wanna woman.

regina bawar bawadi cervical cancer
Do I really need an annual GYN exam? My answer may surprise you.

Women's Health By Heather Hirsch

05:05 min | 1 year ago

Do I really need an annual GYN exam? My answer may surprise you.

"Hey ladies, it's so great to be back this week. So quick update on my life. The attic is done. Yes, it looks so cool. I mean, we really took like an old it's G addict with the spider webs and the whole nine the nail is coming through and turned it into living space. It's so exciting. So now I got to find them desk. It's like one challenge after another but I always find new spaces are inspiring new spaces are essentially a big blank piece of paper that we can rewrite and I really truly believe that the energy that you have in the space. Where you sleep where you work where you log Pain where you're with your family really makes a big difference. So I will update you on how the redecorating process is going. And if you have any suggestions God sending my web today's topic is do I need my annual exam or do I need an annual exam or do I need an annual someone to look at my vagina exam in the answer that I give you my totally surprised you now, I want to first put out a big disclaimer. I am not trying to disenfranchise a group of Physicians for whom I have the highest respect for and I certainly am just putting it bluntly not trying to put down my Joanne colleagues for an exam. It's something that's been around forever and ever it's something that's just imprinted in society like you brush your teeth every night. There's good science. You should do that you go to your annual exam every year, but what the heck You actually do at your annual gynecological exam if you are done with childbearing and if you no longer need surgery, those are my two big questions that I want to pose and off today and then we can kind of weave in their you know, what is the difference between having their annual exam with your internist or your family medical doctor who's looking at your chronic illnesses? So that's where I'm going to go ahead and get into today. Now this is a topic that's been on my mind a lot. And this is the place for me to just kind of get my thoughts out there. If you follow me over on Instagram. I'm at hormone. And how long have you guys weigh in on topics or I create poll podcast episodes out of questions, you might ask in a direct message or comments that I might get on a post but this one is just am totally me wanting to just get it all out. There you may know or if you didn't know I used to work as an internist and also had a consultative menopause practice. I need both at the same time. It was thoroughly exhausting now, I do see patients for consultative menopause, but when I do work as an internist, this was after my Women's Health fellowship and close early. I could do pap smears or answer basic GYN questions. So my patients would often ask me do I need to go see my gynecologist or they would say well I don't need off. You to do my GYN exam. I have an annual gynecologist and I have to say this really got me a bit annoyed or angry at the system not in my patients obviously off and certainly there are many reasons that we see doctors once a year. They maybe have become our friends. They may have delivered our children. You know, it's almost like your hairdresser that you can't break up with changing a doctor or telling a doctor you no longer need them can be very emotional so we might go and we clearly know there's nothing that's really going to change from that appointment. But it also really brings to mind that an annual joint exam for someone who specifically is no longer of childbearing age, right? You're not going to get pregnant. You don't need an obstetrician and doesn't need any further surgery. It really really is my general opinion that you don't need to see a gynecologist every year after that. Now what you should have is an internist or Family Doctor Who can a month Sir basic GYN questions and do your pap smear when you need it, which is becoming more infrequent because of the change in cervical cancer screening guidelines and that is a little bit of a mystery hump to get over especially for patients trying to navigate like who's going to look where is confusing and it's not so much that it totally relies on you. Although in this episode. I'm gonna talk about what you can do but it also relies on the medical system. And so I just kind of want to put these ideas out into the world and I tell you what I'm doing again the difference in training between OBGYNs and Internal Medicine doctors are family doctors is that OBGYNs spend a majority of their residency education life obstetrical medicine and surgery

Joanne Instagram Cervical Cancer
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"You guys may or may not know that January is cervical Health awareness Month and as we attempt ever so slowly to lean out of this 24 7 self imposed quarantine and gets safely back to our prior schedules. Well, exams of all types should honestly be at the top of each and everyone's lists. It's time to get back into the swing of things to recreate that proactive role. We all play in our health. And with that in mind who better to join us than O B g Y n personality? You and I both know her from Bravo TV's married to Medicine and best selling author of The Queen V. Dr Jackie Waters is here today to talk with us about cervical cancer screenings. Dr Walters. Thank you for joining us. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having me and thank you for getting this so important message out. It's so true now. Okay, So amid this, and you must hear this all the time, But amid this cove in 19 pandemic, you know, health is, of course, top of mind. For many Americans, everyone out there is exhausted. We're trying to dot all the I's and cross off that all duties and Not breaking the rules, and we find ourselves with the word fluctuating between the strong stay at home gear that we've all mastered and realizing that we do in fact need to get back into our doctor's offices for those health screenings, and as we're prepping for today's interview Some amazing jarring stats came past my desk, especially when I heard that the rate of cervical cancer is beginning to slowly increase across the country, perhaps due to the very delayed appointments that we all knew due to Cove it round and round. We go and to inform everyone in our listening audience regarding this ailment and how we can reverse this trend and really get back on top of it again. So cervical cancer can happen to any of us as women, and you're right. Every hour. A woman is diagnosed with cervical cancer. And you are exactly right about this pandemic because you're right. We haven't been going to the doctor. And I am so concerned that these numbers will may even increase more because of a delay in the screening due to the pandemic with African American women were two times more likely. So my call is to make sure you're getting your screening because African American women are affected more than any other ethnic or racial group. We all have a part to play in this, but it is definitely safe to get out. Make sure you're putting your health at the top because your greatest wealth is your health. Screening is important. It's so true. Your greatest wealth is your health bought on correct. So when we're talking about cancer screenings in general and cervical cancer is something that our family tree's been touched with as well. Talk to us about? Not only we live in such blessed times where these things can be addressed by a doctor so much more quickly and effectively than even a generation ago. There's also the nice 12 punch with preventative measures as well. So talk to our listeners a bit if you would About the best prevention methods. You're finding out there for cervical cancer, too. So the best prevention is early detection. You know, Early detection is your best protection. So I'm saying to every woman who's listening and a man too. Who could tell a woman make sure you call your doctor and ask for your annual exam? And when you're there, ask for your screening. That's age appropriate. For example, if you are over the age of 30 ask for your PAP test and co testing, which is an HPV that HPV test that can detect nearly all cervical cancers. Talked to the doctor and ask for your screening. You know, you're right now. You're touching on such an important point there because I think one of the first questions they get is, you know, number one. They don't think that they're at risk for it, and you're turning things around on that and really making people aware, But the age that they should first get in there. Think about how you and I would like crack the whip for family and friends and anybody else. Then we don't do the same thing for ourselves. Do you hear that from a lot of people saying, you know, I just don't have the time. Everybody else has the time to take care of everybody else. But they just need to take one afternoon one morning, one weekend and just take care of that one employment for themselves. Absolutely Women ages 21 to 29. It is so crucial that they do their pap testing. As I said earlier. If you're over the age of 30, you want to do your pap test plus your co testing, which is a PAP test and your HPV where the PAP test will pick up on if there any cellular abnormalities on the cervix. The HPV test will pick up if if there any persistent strains that can turn in or cause the development of cervical cancer, But it's to test one sample that can detect nearly all of the cervical cancer. So you have to get in there. If you're the age of 21 start there. But women over 30 Act for PAP test and co testing. Yep, That's brilliant advice, and we'll make sure we have that on our Facebook page and stuff, too, when we are shows a lot about ways to spend your money carefully and your personal finance and investing in yourself. And one of the things that really seems to be resonating is when you spend a little time and a little energy and a little money on yourself With these various exams and stuff. It's the kind of thing that can save you. Not only years on your life. But millions of.

cervical cancer HPV PAP Dr Walters Dr Jackie Waters Facebook
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Way are back with Christian Akopian show and I am so delighted to present our next guest. You guys may or may not know that January is cervical Health awareness Month and as we attempt ever so slowly to lean out of this 24 7 self imposed quarantine and gets safely back to our prior schedules. Well, exams of all types should honestly be at the top of each and everyone's lists. It's time to get back into the swing of things to recreate that proactive role. We all play in our health. And with that in mind who better to join us than O b g Y n personality? You and I both know her from Bravo TV's married to medicine and best selling author of The Queen V. Dr Jackie Waters is here today to talk with us about cervical cancer screenings. Dr Walters thank you for joining us. Welcome. Thank you. Thank you for having me and thank you for getting this so important message out. It's so true now. Okay, So amid this, and you must hear this all the time, But amid this cove in 19 pandemic, you know, health is, of course, top of mind. For many Americans, everyone out there is exhausted. We're trying to dot all the I's and cross off that all the teas and not breaking the rules. And we find ourselves What's the word fluctuating between the strong stay at home gear that we've all mastered and realizing that we do in fact need to get back into our doctor's offices for those health screenings, and as we're prepping for today's interview Some amazing during stats came past my desk, especially when I heard that the rate of cervical cancer is beginning to slowly increase across the country, perhaps due to the very delayed appointments that we all knew due to Cove it round and round. We go and to inform everyone in our listening audience regarding this ailment and how we can reverse this trend and really get back on top of it again. So cervical cancer can happen to any of us as women, and you're right. Every hour. A woman is diagnosed with cervical cancer. And you are exactly right about this pandemic because you're right. We haven't been going to the doctor. And I am so concerned that these numbers will may even increase more because of a delay in the screening due to the pandemic. With African American women were two times more likely. So my call is to make sure you're getting your screening because African American women are affected more than any other ethnic or racial group. We all have a part to play in this, but it is definitely safe to get out. Make sure you're putting your health at the top because your greatest wealth is your health. So screening is important. It's so true. Your greatest wealth is your health bought on correct. So when we're talking about cancer screenings in general and cervical cancer is something that our family tree's been touched with this well talk to us about. Not only we live in such blessed times where these things can be addressed by a doctor so much more quickly and effectively than even a generation ago. There's also the nice 12 punch with preventative measures as well. So talk to our listeners a bit. If you would about the best prevention methods. You're finding out there for cervical cancer, too. So the best prevention is early detection. You know, Early detection is your best protection. So I'm saying to every woman who's listening and a man too. Who could tell a woman make sure you call your doctor and ask for your annual exam? And when you're there, ask for your screening. That's age appropriate. For example, if you are over the age of 30 ask for your PAP test and co testing, which is an HPV that HPV test that can detect nearly all cervical cancers. Talk to the doctor and asked various greening. You know, you're right now You're touching on such an important point there because I think one of the first questions they get is, you know, number one. They don't think that they're at risk for it, and you're turning things around on that and really making people aware, But the age that they should first get in there. Think about how you and I would like crack the whip for family and friends and anybody else. Then we don't do the same thing for ourselves. Do you hear that from a lot of people saying, you know, I just don't have the time. Everybody else has the time to take care of everybody else. But they just need to take one afternoon one morning, one weekend and just take care of that one employment for themselves. Absolutely Women ages 21 to 29. It is so crucial that they do their pap testing. As I said earlier. If you're over the age of 30, you want to do your pap test plus your co testing, which is a PAP test and your HPV where the PAP test will pick up on if there any cellular abnormalities on the cervix. The HPV test will pick up if if there any persistent strains that can turn in or cause the development of cervical cancer, But it's to test one sample that can detect nearly all of the cervical cancer. So you have to get in there. If you're the age of 21 start there. But women over 30 asked for PAP tests and co testing. Yep, that's brilliant advice, and we'll make sure we have that on our Facebook page and stuff, too, when we are shows a lot about ways to spend your money carefully and your personal finance and investing in yourself. And one of the things that really seems to be resonating is when you spend a little time and a little energy and a little money on yourself With these various exams and stuff. It's the kind of thing that can save you Not only years on.

cervical cancer HPV PAP Dr Jackie Waters Facebook Dr Walters
"cervical cancer" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on WTOP

"On Lee cervical cancer to a wide variety of HPV related cancers, including anal cancers and head and neck cancer. Dr Stephanie Wethington of Johns Hopkins Medicine. The HPV virus is very common, she says. The vast majority of men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. That's where the benefit from the vaccine comes from, because no one is immune to the potential for exposure. Kristie Kang w T o P News w T o p now at 11 53. This is a test of the Washington DC Metropolitan operational Area Emergency alert system. Coming up next on w T o P. The NASDAQ is working on a record again. The D. C area is latest. I po, I'm Jeff Play ball. 11 54 a friend asked me the other day as Rita Kessler really lost £50 on empty 1 80 0. Yes, and I've lost 20 and kept it off folks. E m P 1 80 is the real deal. January 2020 lot of his headed to the gym trying to burn off the holiday calories, January 2021 I'm not comfortable, but I know being healthy is more important than ever. We're all under tremendous stress right now. Because of the threat of Cove it that.

HPV Dr Stephanie Wethington Washington DC Metropolitan ope Johns Hopkins Medicine Kristie Kang Rita Kessler Lee
"cervical cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"A. B. C. And are you there? Yes. Oh, go right ahead. Yes. Hi, Higher. Dominic. Listen, these thieves Democrats. They're vicious people. They're vicious. They can't let this guy go there. They're they're nasty. There. Let the guy go off in peace. Okay? But and and But let me ask you this question, and I really want your response Is President Trump in your mind partially responsible, at least partially responsible for for his own demise. In terms of his relationship with the media in terms of his remarks before the violence of the capital. Is he responsible for any of this? No, no, he's not partially responsible for what happened with the media. The media, the media has never been on his side. The media are all Democrats. They don't want anything to do with him, but that but that's not true. You You don't know my party affiliation, and I and I've covered Mr Trump of I've covered him professionally personally, and I never because I'm a journalist. I never reveal my party affiliation. But you don't know you don't know where I'm coming from An That's an assumption. But, Dominic, you're an exception to the room. Listen, I agree with that. I would agree with that. CNN. Okay, You're an exception to the rule. But all these other people, Thies so called journalists, they're all Democrats. They're all vicious radicals. And let me tell you something, Dominick. These people like Jake Berman, Alison Camerata. Ah, Joe Scarborough and his wife naked. They all think they're going to keep their jobs. When the radicals getting are in charge. They're full of baloney. They they were living in a cloud because once these radicals takeover They're going to play his place who they want in their well and I thank you for the call. And I thank you for your candid nature and expressing exactly how you feel about this so heightened security for Wednesday's inauguration, state capitals are boarding up. We will deal with that topic and just a moment. Numbers mean much to me because of prostate cancer. I'm Johnny brags the number two from my stepfather who died of prostate cancer..

Mr Trump prostate cancer Dominic Joe Scarborough Thies CNN A. B. C. Jake Berman Alison Camerata Dominick
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Diagnosed <SpeakerChange> with <Silence> cervical cancer <Silence> <Speech_Female> will <Speech_Female> were huge advocates <Speech_Female> for the hp <Speech_Female> vaccination. I <Speech_Female> know have said that a few times. <Speech_Female> But <Speech_Female> in addition to that <Speech_Female> maintaining <Speech_Female> commitment <Speech_Female> to a <Speech_Female> best practice guidelines <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> clinical trials. <Speech_Female> As i mentioned <Speech_Female> cutting edge therapies <Speech_Female> for patients with <Speech_Female> cervical cancer <Speech_Female> and then <Speech_Female> there are <Speech_Female> a unique opportunities <Speech_Female> as well <Speech_Female> in our chemotherapy <Speech_Female> practice for <Speech_Female> targeted treatments <Speech_Female> for women <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> also <Speech_Female> Interoperative <Speech_Female> radiation therapy. <Speech_Female> Which is something. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We can use a recurrent <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> setting <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> very targeted <Speech_Female> treatment <Speech_Female> for women. <Speech_Female> Excellent <Speech_Female> results <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> are <Speech_Male> screening guidelines <Speech_Male> at mayo clinic. <Speech_Male> Any different than <Speech_Male> what <Speech_Female> you've mentioned <SpeakerChange> in the national <Speech_Female> guidelines <Speech_Female> not that i'm aware <Speech_Female> of we <Speech_Female> are screening guidelines <Speech_Female> for women with <Speech_Female> pap smear We <Speech_Female> do follow national <Speech_Female> guidelines. <Speech_Female> And we're always <Speech_Female> again a staying <Speech_Female> up to date with this <Speech_Female> management <Speech_Female> strategies <Speech_Female> so each year the guidelines <Speech_Female> are updated <Speech_Music_Female> and <Speech_Music_Female> you <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> adjust as we move <Speech_Female> forward with new <Speech_Female> knowledge in education <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Speech_Female> It's great <Speech_Male> thank you dr butler <Speech_Female> for sharing with us <Silence> today. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Absolutely my pleasure. <Speech_Female> Degreed opportunity <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> celebrating cervical <Speech_Female> cancer awareness. Month <Speech_Female> is <SpeakerChange> a great <Speech_Female> opportunity. <Speech_Female> Absolutely <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> thank you for helping us <Speech_Female> to get information <Speech_Female> out. There <Speech_Female> are thanks <Speech_Female> to mayo clinic. <Speech_Female> Gynecologic oncologist <Speech_Female> after christina <Speech_Female> butler <Speech_Female> for being with us today <Speech_Female> to educate us <Silence> about cervical cancer. <Speech_Female> Remember <Speech_Female> that cervical cancer <Speech_Female> awareness month <Speech_Female> january <Speech_Music_Female> and so. We hope <Speech_Music_Female> that you are getting <Speech_Music_Female> your appropriate screenings <Speech_Music_Female> and he doctors <Speech_Music_Male> butlers advice <Speech_Music_Female> regarding <Speech_Music_Female> the hp vaccine. <Speech_Music_Female> Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> so much for listening <Speech_Male> today. I hope <Speech_Male> that you learn something. <Speech_Male> I know that i did. <Speech_Female> We

january christina today each dr butler cervical mayo clinic mayo hp
"cervical cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

Mayo Clinic Q&A

04:59 min | 2 years ago

"cervical cancer" Discussed on Mayo Clinic Q&A

"Welcome to mayo clinic. Dr halina gazelle cervical cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the cells of the cervix. Which is the lower part of the uterus that connects to the vagina infection with the human papillomavirus or each tv as it is known is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Women can reduce the risk of cervical cancer by getting hp vaccine and by having routine screening tests to help detect precancerous conditions of the cervix here to discuss with us today. What women need to know about cervical. Cancer is dr christina butler. She is the co chair of the gynecologic disease group at the mayo clinic cancer center. Thanks for being here today. Dr butler thank you for the wonderful invitation. Every appreciate it well. We really appreciate you being here with us to talk about this topic. That probably doesn't get talked about enough But certainly important information to share with women absolutely as ganic logic oncologist. It's very near and dear to my heart. We've made huge strides in screening for cervical cancer. And i really look forward to speaking about that today and enhancing education for women. Well dr butler how about we start with a softball and heavy describe for our listeners. What is the cervix exactly. So the cervix is connected to the uterus and joins the uterus and cervix with the vagina It's visible during an office exam With using a speculation looking into the vagina which makes for great opportunity for screening at that area f four cancer unfortunately cancer may occur at the cervix and this is something we really want to catch quickly for women. So dr butler. Speaking of cervical cancer are there different types of cervical cancer or is there really one entity that were speaking about. There are a couple types. The most common is what we call squamous cell cancer of the cervix and then after that we have ad no carcinoma. But essentially they're treated very similar minor differences and those make up the majority of the prevalence of servants cancer when we start talking about cancer. Naturally people want to know. How would i know if i had cervical cancer. What are the symptoms. I think it's always important for women to really be attuned to their body and many women with cervical cancer. Might have this picked up on a screening pap smear however other. Women might have some abnormal bleeding so they might have a leading between their menstrual cycle or bleeding after intercourse It's important to seek out medical evaluation if a woman does have abnormal bleeding cervical. Cancer doesn't typically cause pain but may into that would also be important to seek evaluation and just listened to.

mayo clinic butler christina butler today halina gazelle each tv mayo clinic cancer one entity dr human papillomavirus cervical
Politician, Eva Pern

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:44 min | 2 years ago

Politician, Eva Pern

"If, it was born Maria Eva Duarte in nineteen nineteen in Los Toldo's Argentina. If his mother and father were never married in fact, Avis father was married to someone else and had a whole other family eva's mother was his mistress. Still if it was the youngest of their four children to to the `illegitimate' status of the relationship, the family was very poor when evo was six, her father died leaving the family in an even more precarious position. To make ends meet if his mother took in boarders and worked odd jobs when EVA was fifteen, she traveled to Buenos Irs to pursue an acting career. She found success doing radio shows including one in which she portrayed famous women throughout history like Elizabeth I and Catherine. The Great, a sort of dramatized encyclopedia Manica if you will. When it was in her mid twenty s she met a rising star in the Argentinian government colonel Juan Perron. The two were married nineteen forty-five later, that same year, a military coup of rival army navy officials ousted from office. Determined, to return to power one, entered the presidential race with Eva by his side. Her humble beginnings resonated with the poor and working class people of Argentina. The response was overwhelming. The adoration around Abe propelled want to victory and he took office in June of Nineteen, forty six. While Eva held no official title beyond first lady she quickly began amassing political power having built. So much of the campaign around her connection with the poorest citizens of Argentina, she became the defacto secretary of Labor, as well as the unofficial secretary of health. In these unofficial positions if a secured wage increases for unions, she created the Eva Peron Foundation which established hospitals, schools, elder care facilities, and orphanages all around the country A. To progress the rights of women in Argentina, she was influential in the passage of the women's suffrage legislation in nineteen, forty seven and the subsequent creation of the parents to feminist party in nineteen, forty nine. As her popularity grew to saint like fervor. There were calls for her to run as the vice president alongside her husband in nineteen fifty one. But want an eva ended up not going forward with that plan due to opposition from the Army Davis, growing health concerns in nineteen, fifty, two eva passed away from cervical cancer. She was just thirty three years old. Despite her untimely passing Abbas influence reverberated throughout. Argentina. Devoted followers tried to have her canonized but political opponents were set on removing all symbols of parochialism in one, thousand, nine, hundred, fifty, five, one Perron was overthrown and exiled from Argentina. Shortly thereafter, if was embalmed body was stolen. Even. In death, her presence was seen as a threat to her political opponents balanced political power if his remains were eventually returned to Quan Perron who was exiled in Madrid when one passed away nineteen, seventy, four, his third wife Isabel Perron in an attempt to curry favor with the Argentinian working class returned Eva's remains Argentina. They were interred in the presidential. Palace crept. Just two years later, a new government that was hostile to peronism had the bodies removed. In life and in death, Eva was a galvanizing political figure. Her story is memorialized in the award winning musical and later film adaptation of e TAP.

Maria Eva Duarte Argentina EVA Eva Peron Foundation Juan Perron Isabel Perron EVO Army Navy Avis Los Toldo Buenos Irs Cervical Cancer Peronism ABE Army Davis Secretary Of Labor Abbas Secretary Vice President
Conservatives Hope SCOTUS Will Now End Cervical Cancer Screening

The Topical

00:59 sec | 2 years ago

Conservatives Hope SCOTUS Will Now End Cervical Cancer Screening

"As Amy Conybeare it's nomination continues to move through the Senate. This week conservatives are hopeful the possibility of Supreme Court. Majority means the days on demand cervical cancer detection will soon be over our Supreme Supreme Court correspondent. Rebecca. Neal joins us now with more Rebecca welcome thanks Leslie while Liberal Saber, it's confirmation could have terrible implications for the future of Women's health care, conservatives today are rejoicing many Christians pro-life groups and Republican leaders like Congressman Gary Small would say that wants Barrett is appointed to the highest court in the land. They'll finally have the judicial power needed to shutdown planned parenthood's agenda that provides pap smears HPV tests that screen for Cancer Amy Coney. Barrett's nomination is a victory for Christian America and Christians. She will give voice in the Supreme Court to Americans who want to protect life all life whether it's a developing human child or a precious tiny tumor growing inside the wall

Supreme Court Supreme Supreme Court Rebecca Amy Conybeare Amy Coney Barrett Congressman Gary Small Cancer Senate Neal Leslie
HPV vaccine significantly lowers risk of cervical cancer, large study finds

NEJM This Week - Audio Summaries

01:59 min | 2 years ago

HPV vaccine significantly lowers risk of cervical cancer, large study finds

"HPV vaccination and the risk of invasive cervical cancer by Giro, lay from the Karolinska Institute Stockholm Sweden. Data to inform the relationship between quadrivalent human papillomavirus, HP V. Vaccination, and the subsequent risk of invasive cervical cancer are lacking using nationwide, Swedish demographic and health registers to follow an open population of one, million, six, hundred, seventy, two, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, three girls, and women. The investigators assessed the association between HP vaccination and the risk of invasive cervical cancer girls and women were evaluated for cervical cancer. Their thirty. First Birthday. Cervical cancer was diagnosed in nineteen women who had received the quadrivalent HP V. Vaccine, and in five hundred, thirty eight women who had not received the vaccine. The cumulative incidence of cervical cancer was forty seven cases per one hundred thousand persons among women who had been vaccinated and ninety four cases per one hundred, thousand persons among those who had not been vaccinated after adjustment for age follow up the incidence rate ratio for. The comparison of the vaccinated population with the unvaccinated population was zero point five one, the investigators found that the risk of cervical cancer among participants who had initiated vaccination before the age of seventeen years was eighty eight percent lower than among those who had never been vaccinated amongst Swedish girls and women tend to thirty years. Old quadrivalent HPV vaccination was associated with a substantially reduced risk of invasive cervical cancer

Cervical Cancer HP Karolinska Institute Stockholm HPV
Birth Story with Britt Nilsson Byrne

Babes and Babies

06:51 min | 2 years ago

Birth Story with Britt Nilsson Byrne

"I would love for you. To share I guess did you have? Like a birth plan going into it or were you just super open? Both. So. Good. That's and yes. So yes and yes and you know what I have so many friends and I'm a little crunchy I'm not the crunchy have lot of friends who are like do a home birth and better? and. I really respect people that do actually get. So cool I've heard like the best stories of people were like I've just had it in my bathtub and like my family's in the kitchen having snacks and cheering my husband was in the bathtub with the and I'm like that is so romance amazing for me every time I prayed about I felt like I was supposed to be in a hospital I just did and like well, that's not as sexy. I was like that's what I feel like I'm supposed to do. So that's what we did and You know I did a little birth plan in my I went to this the health place that I've been going to like my my My bursting crew are amazing. They're so sweet. So they gave me they're like fill your birth plan but just know that it's probably not going to end up like this and so I felt very prepared in that way like don't go in. It's going to be two hours vision into of this and then do the you know. And so for me actually I was I was way overdue like Noah was not coming out I actually had to like I wasn't di- lady all I've gone to my checkups and I'm sure you've heard of a fully bowl. that you put in, I don't know if people listening. It's essentially like a little sailing balloon that they just stick to your cervix to kind of down in begin contractions. If you're not opening up which I wasn't, and so I got that done and how Are, you when you did that like almost two weeks, it was getting to the. Yes exactly. As two weeks pass YEP YEP exactly. So, I. had that in the over that night, I had contractions. Now all this is like what all the other people have been feeling this whole. You know like my body is working. And so I went in, they took it out and they measured me and they're like, Oh, you're at five centimeters now's like okay. Great. So I'll just start having contractions naturally and I felt really peaceful about it, but I never did again. And so they had my inductions date set and I went in and it was actually Two days after forty, two weeks I went in to be induced in the morning. And I haven't had any more contractions and then the nurse measured me I'm on the hospital. And she's like you're actually back down to. God and she and she's like I've never seen that before she's like your cervix is actually going back. You know she's like it's regressing and I was like you know and it's just one of those things where it's totally like a mind battle and you're just like do not go into fear right now gonNA panic don't go you know what I mean just I was like, oh my gosh sounds like interesting news like do I put that I don't know but. So anyway. I I. Don't know why exactly that was accept. It crossed my mind and I'll never know but. I actually got healing because I used to have, I, got HP and I had actually the beginning of cervical cancer, and so I got a biopsy and stuff but they're like you need to keep getting checked and you know all this stuff than I actually was prayed foreign had healing for it and I had someone pray for my cervix and like bringing it back to news I was like maybe I just have a really fresh cervix in. Sided won't go downhill. So I'll never know, but anyways, I have I have an interesting survey that was not dilating. So then they they gave me a Tolson they induced me and I labored naturally for like eight hours. And it was like contracts every two minutes like a minute and some long and I was just doing all the yes. Jesus is good. She's coming down like trying to you know positive positive positive every time. But by about eight hours I was literally my body was shaking and it was just like mentally I keep it up anymore so. I was planning on not having an epidural. That was my whole thing I was like I'm GonNa go natural women have been doing this forever You know my husband's here God's here. I'm have my worship is on it's going to be this like amazing female experience and then like literally my body is shutting down and I'm like dying. So it's like. A general. I like look feel like I'm GonNa movie where you're like, okay I'm good up through. So after eight hours of of those contractions I, just my body was having a really hard time. In my mind. and. So I'll also they had to break my water and. There was there was Makoni in a little baby poop because I was so late she's been pooping in there for like two days. So it was. So they're also telling me if if. She's not out soon, we're going to have to do a C section. So there is so many points where I was like don't give into fear like just you know Jesus this your plan housing even if act against the second, that's okay. You're going to be with me but I'm like afraid of blood and surgery so I was just like no, but okay. But okay. This mental mental that else. So I got an epidural and then it was about twelve more hours and then I, pushed for one hour like of active labour and to be honest it was it was like incredible fifteen minutes after I got the girl I literally I was like shouting. I wanted to use her. Because I was then able to look to rest. Yeah, and actually enjoy and be a part of this thing instead of just like these waves of don't give up here how who don't have been out out out out for eight hours. You know it was just exhausting and I'm actually glad and went through. It sounds like it's a human experience to me always worth having but. Joe was such a relief I was like. Oh. My God you know the nurses aren't allowed to force you to do anything, but I was like you guys should enforce you. Why do you let me sit on the bed and paper radars you crazy but anyway so so that was really a relief for me for me and everybody you know it's so personal for everybody but. I kind of had humble myself and I was like, okay, take it, and then I was so grateful So then even my pushing I'm like I had one nurse named Wanda was holding one foot in Jeremy, my husband's holding by other foot and I'm pushing in. We're like laughing because I'm not feeling any pain able to laugh like her head's coming out nearly giving your Mohawk and making jokes and I'm put. Such, a such a joyful wonderful experience and I didn't feel the ring of fire like I didn't feel you know all of these things that people have scaring newest. and. So for me, it was just it was beautiful. It was a really wonderful experience know when she came out, they had to suck all the amount of her. And they were just amazing. So for me like I had to be in hospital and I also had to have antibiotics getting fever. There's Poop, India so. For me like God's new, that's how mine was going to go down and so a hospital birth was great for me. But I, I heard great things other ways but. For my first house that list as it was meant to be it ended up being great. It was a wonderful experience.

Cervical Cancer First House Noah Sided India HP Makoni Wanda JOE Jeremy
New cervical cancer screening guidelines released: What you need to know

The Erick Erickson Show

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

New cervical cancer screening guidelines released: What you need to know

"Individuals with a cervix. Are Now recommended to start cervical cancer screening at twenty five and continue through age sixty five with the primary human papillomavirus testing. Every five years as the preferred method of testing according to new guidelines released Thursday by the American cancer. Society. These cervical cancer screening recommendations say that HP testing in combination with a pep test also known as CO testing every five years or a PAP test alone every three years are still acceptable options as not all laboratories have transitioned to the primary. HP testing the updated guidelines appear in the ACS. Journal a Cancer Journal for

Journal A Cancer Journal HP
Former CNN anchor Bobbie Battista dead after cervical cancer battle

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Former CNN anchor Bobbie Battista dead after cervical cancer battle

"Now a long time familiar face on CNN has died a family spokesman says former anchor Bobby Batista passed away this morning after a four year battle with cervical cancer Batista was one of the original CNN headline news anchor is when the network first launched in nineteen eighty one she also anchored several news programs on the network including talkback live which aired before a studio audience Bobby Batista dead at the age of

CNN Bobby Batista
A Look Back at HIV

2 Docs Talk

08:31 min | 3 years ago

A Look Back at HIV

"Before we jump in. Let's clarify what exactly HIV and AIDS are good call. Hiv stands for human immunodeficiency virus which is a virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS. Yes so HIV is a retrovirus which means it is an rn. A virus that is a cellular machinery from the infected cell to do a reverse transcription of itself a DNA version which is inserted into the cells on DNA when the cell becomes active. It will make new copies of the virus that go out and continue the cycle and this is important because the drugs that we use today to combat HIV a variety of antiretroviral agents target different points in the cycle. The right combination of drugs can keep the viral load solo that it isn't detectable exactly so HIV infects a specific immune cell the CD four cell and over time the virus kills a CD foresaw which being part of the immune system plays a critical role in the body's ability to fight infection as de decline. The body becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. Right these are often infections caused by pathogens that are normally present in on or around the body but a healthy immune system recognizes them and keep them in check someone with the depleted immune system however is susceptible to unusual infections. That healthy folks don't need to worry about. Plus they're they're susceptible. To all the irregular infections even healthy people get okay so an untreated course of goes something like this. A person is infected with HIV. The virus being transmitted during sexual activity directly into the bloodstream during childbirth or breastfeeding or a blood transfusion at this point the virus makes its way to the lymph nodes where has access to lots of CD. Four cells and replicates like crazy? This goes on for about three weeks three or four weeks. The patient may experience a viral type of illness during this time period. Fever swollen glands rash but not everyone experiences this yes and it feels like a regular just viral infections. So you don't really think about that. That might be what it is but after about two weeks the viral load in the blood is at a peak and CD four levels fall. This is a period of time where it is really easy to transmit the disease to another sexual partner because the viral load is so high after about six months the viral load and CD. Four count stabilized to set point and the chronic phase issue begins. This can last a up to ten years without treatment during which HIV gradually destroys CD. Four cells at some point the CD four count gets low enough. That opportunistic infections are possible. Yes and that's how we define AIDS either the CD. Four count is below two hundred cells per mil or the patient has an AIDS defining conditions such as retinitis from cmv cytomegalovirus or invasive cervical cancer or many many others so this was the typical course of disease for people early in the epidemic. Did you amy? That AIDS was around before the Nineteen Seventy S. That's when the epidemic began but it is believed that the virus jump from chimpanzees to humans in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in one thousand. Nine hundred and sporadic cases were reported from then until the mid seventies when the epidemic got its legs. Very interesting now. It wasn't until Nineteen eighty-one that we really understood what was happening in. La There were five young gay men who develop Mrs to screen pneumonia PCP which is now new. Mississippi'S VICI pneumonia. I know I can never get used to that. I still call it. Pcp Yeah. I'm sure a lot of school. It was pretty much standard at the time right. I mean that was like defy so defining but anyways another group in New York in California who developed Kassy's sarcoma which is an aggressive cancer caused by the human herpes virus eight that wouldn't normally happen without a suppressed. Immune system right both of those diseases. And by the end of that year there were two hundred seventy cases of severe immune deficiency among gay men and nearly half had died. Yeah that we knew so fast forward. A few years by the end of nineteen eighty five. There were over. Twenty thousand reported cases coming from every region of the world. The virus was officially named in Nineteen eighty-six and in nineteen eighty seven A. Z. T. was introduced. The this was the first antiretroviral drug this drug worked by inhibiting the initial reverse transcription of the virus into DNA. This was a very exciting development because the epidemic was growing quickly. Now there were three hundred seven thousand reported AIDS cases worldwide compared to the twenty thousand. You mentioned just fine. Harsh prior and two hundred and seventy just nine years prior to that. It's impressive how. The pharmaceutical industry kind of ramped up so quickly research development. Yeah and those remember. Those were the reported numbers so they estimated that there were actually a million AIDS cases in another eight to ten million living with HIV worldwide. At that point. So if you're younger just in med school residency right now. It's hard to explain. How unsettling this was that how fast it was spreading right. Yeah and these patients were so sick and dying in such large numbers and there didn't seem to be in and site to the expansion of the epidemic. So there's a lot of fear and misinformation out there the had a policy to not allow those infected with HIV into the country and it was still viewed as a gay disease. So that created a lot of stigma for the LGBTQ community so by nineteen ninety three. There were two point five million AIDS cases globally the US Congress dug in and voted to continue the travel ban. Things are not looking good even with easy. T- which wasn't really panning out as everyone had hoped. And the fact that it was approved at all was questioned by many. Yeah so but in one thousand nine hundred things really started changing. This was kind of a turning point. The first price inhibitor was approved these inhibit the protease enzyme. Which is important in the translation of HIV v? Virus back into Aurigny. Yeah and this was the beginning of Heart H. A. RT highly active antiretroviral therapy and it immediately dropped deaths from AIDS related diseases by at least sixty percent but still there were thirty three million people living with HIV by nineteen ninety nine and fourteen million people had died since epidemic began. Those are huge as is to be expected the UN had to step in and negotiate prices to make antiretroviral therapy available to the people who need it The World Trade Organization that announce the Doha Declaration allowing developing countries to manufacture generic versions of drugs. Go See Fire Dallas buyers club. Yes also yeah so in the two thousands people who needed it weren't getting treatment aids. Was the number one cause of death in sub Saharan Africa. That blows my mind by the two thousand ten. A lot of goals had been set to get treatment where it was needed and have the spread of HIV an organization such as the UN and the World Health Organization and individual government agencies are getting involved at this point yeah the US finally lifted the travel ban for people with HIV treatments that decrease the chance of spread were discovered pre exposure prophylaxis or prep was shown to reduce transmission between male and male sexual partners by about forty four percent. Yeah in two thousand. Eleven research demonstrated that early initiation of antiretroviral treatment reduce transmission to partners by ninety six percent. So this is a real game changer. Because until this time the antiretrovirals weren't started until HIV was had started advancing and causing aids. So this is when they started the treatment early after the infection was discovered and it really changed things as far as transmission. Yeah as related. Deaths fell thirty percent from the peak. Year two thousand five and thirty five million people were living with HIV dramatic slowdown in the spread of the epidemic compared to previous decades. Yeah Okay but now we may find yourselves at a standstill here. We are twenty twenty because the immediate crisis of the wildfire spread and almost certain death is well behind us. Attention has waned key populations that account for over half of new infections are not receiving access to combination therapy and the gap between resource need and provisions as widening. The funding is is shrinking. It's pretty typical right. Yeah as a species. Humans aren't very good at thinking long term. If it's not an immediate threat it's not threat right well. It is a threat to those populations. So there's clearly still stigma that has marginalizing

HIV Aids Nineteen Seventy Partner Pneumonia Immunodeficiency Us Congress Retinitis UN Congo AMY Saharan Africa California MRS Mississippi New York Aurigny
Mass cervical cancer vaccine rollout could save 62 million lives in next 100 years

WBZ Midday News

00:13 sec | 3 years ago

Mass cervical cancer vaccine rollout could save 62 million lives in next 100 years

"A mass rollout of cervical cancer vaccines could potentially save around sixty two million lives over the next one hundred years that according to an international study by researchers including at Harvard

Harvard Cancer
Could we say 'goodbye' to cervical cancer by 2120?

WBZ Morning News

00:30 sec | 3 years ago

Could we say 'goodbye' to cervical cancer by 2120?

"Say mass rollout of cervical cancer vaccines could potentially save sixty two million lives over the next one hundred years that's according to an international study by Harvard the cancer council New South Wales and love all university in Canada this study focused on the world's seventy eight poorest countries were few girls receive the vaccine and few women are screened for cervical cancer it's published in the British medical journal

Harvard South Wales Canada Cervical Cancer British Medical Journal Cancer
Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

What A Day

03:36 min | 3 years ago

Strides in lung cancer lead steep decline in U.S. death rates

"According to a new report from the American Cancer Society Cancer Death rate in the United States dropped two point two percent from twenty sixteen to twenty seventeen. That's the largest decline ever reported in the span of the year. which is great news for us so second circuit grim reaper? Akilah what does the research actually say about wide. Those rates are dropping so there are a few reasons for the drop but before we get into them. Let's let's talk about what that two point two percent number actually represents so what's really driving. This is lung cancer. Rates and skin cancer rates And that's where they've seen the most progress so a lot of that is due to change behaviors in the population's less smoking wearing sunscreen but also there are much better treatment treatment options than there have been previously. The report did also say though that progress has stalled on other types of cancers those cancers are prostate breast and colorectal rectal cancers experts blame sedentary lifestyles and unhealthy food which can lead to hormonal issues and inflammation but they also blamed geographic economic an racial disparities in access to care and exposure to environmental toxins. So you know lots of factors right and these numbers are kind of more reflective of lung and skin cancer rates declining client versus all cancer rates overall declining and statistically lung cancer kills more people than breast prostate colorectal and brain cancers combined. So why are people more likely to survive lung cancer now. Yeah I mean a big part of that answer is how doctors are treating cancer now so imaging. Technology has advanced to a point that doctors there's are now accurately assessing the stage of cancer and its prognosis. So you know there's not all this over treatment that might lead to side effects In recent years more doctors have turned to less invasive options for surgery which leads to better recovery times and outcomes and immunotherapy has become way more widely used since two thousand fifteen so therapy for those. Who Don't know is essentially when you know? There's something that stimulates your immune system to help you. Fight the disease in tumors The same can also be said about skin cancer and it's also really important to note though that even though there has been progress. The progress is uneven across the country so these cancer death rates still vary between states that promote preventative healthcare like vaccinations and those that tend not to so perfect perfect example from the New York Times You are probably more likely to cervical cancer in Arkansas than in Vermont because Arkansas hasn't widely adopted the HP vaccine ax seen as Vermont has done for the past decade. Okay Well now it's time to address the elephant in the room. That is We're we are a daily news podcasts. And other Daily News shows did a whole two part special teams juuling so if you smoking in vaping usage is up. Does that mean that this progress progress could be loss at some point so it is tough to say right now so scientists are still studying the effects of e cigarettes when used for long periods of time and there are are carcinogens and e cigarettes they just don't know yet what the full cancer risk is. Because it's a new thing but based on the report the decline in deaths from lung cancer can can be attributed both to people quitting smoking and advances in treatment so if juuling leads to cigarette smoking then yeah we could zero versatile in this downward trend of lung cancer it would be bat. Yeah but one thing that is conclusive is that access to treatment and vaccines and advocating for equal treatment across socioeconomic and racial lines will in the long run ensure less people die from cancer.

Lung Cancer American Cancer Society Cancer United States Juuling Daily News New York Times HP Vermont Arkansas
Most Preteens Don't Receive HPV Vaccine by Recommended Age

News, Traffic and Weather

00:59 min | 3 years ago

Most Preteens Don't Receive HPV Vaccine by Recommended Age

"As a parent if you could prevent your child from getting a certain type of cancer with a vaccine would you doctor Kimberly Giuliano cites a recent study that shows most preteens have not received the HPV vaccine against cervical cancer at the recommended age experts recommend that it starts at least by age eleven and that we complete the series by age thirteen in this study found that only sixteen percent of children had completed the HPV vaccine before their thirteenth birthday and only thirty five percent of teens are completed the HPV vaccine series prior to age fifteen doctor Giuliana says this is a concern as the younger the child is the better the vaccine works she also eases parents concerns when it comes to worries about side effects it is a completely safe vaccine it's just as safe as any other vaccine that weekend and it has the potential to save lives it's our very first vaccine against cancer it's pretty impressive that we have a cancer vaccine and really concerning that not everybody is on board with getting that for like beat I'm arena rock injure como news

Kimberly Giuliano Hpv Vaccine Giuliana Cancer Thirty Five Percent Sixteen Percent
Florida man gets 10 years for knowingly spreading HIV

Bucket Strategy Investing

05:37 min | 3 years ago

Florida man gets 10 years for knowingly spreading HIV

"A Florida man has been sentenced to prison because he was having sex without notifying his partners he was HIV positive regime a key board for twenty seven years old Pensacola was sentenced Friday to ten years in state prison followed by five years a provision for three felony counts of having sex with another person without notifying the person that he had HIV that's according to a news release by state attorney bill eight in that I know what some of you guys are thinking you're like what why did the other person protect themselves I assume everybody is HIV I know but anyway he was sentenced Friday to ten years in prison a penalty procedure hearing was held on April tenth on a project to determine whether he should be considered a danger to the public state attorney bill it is noted it was the first time a penalty procedure hearing to determine the danger level of such offense has it ever been held in Escambia county this is what the first of its kind of Florida so they say under current Florida law of a I don't they I think they they they missed a word in there under the current Florida law criminal punishment score sheet for these three counts of having sex with another person without notifying the has had HIV Bader for did not score in the range that allowed him to receive state prison as a punishment because of a scorching since voter Ford did not score permissive state prison the only way to receive a sentence as they present was for the state to put the question of is dangerous ness to the public before jury it has to be a county jury found that he was indeed a danger to the public having HIV any face a maximum sentence of fifteen years in prison according to his arrest report he had sex with women from September two thousand sixteen to September two thousand seventeen and lied about his condition to one of the women I mean again what comes to mind is if I ask the person to have HIV and they said no I would be like well how do you know yeah I mean if a person let's say said well not not only now here's my lab results and it's dated today are you know but after maybe a week get it out to get the results back and all that was falsified you know but I you know if you're about to have sex with somebody and you go hi do you have HIV and they say no how do they know did they get tested and even if they got tested it still could convert so anyway in June two thousand seventeen a woman from one fourth of the kids as a positive for HIV and relaxed sexual partner had been bought a Ford she told investigators that when she had seen him in possession of medication used to treat each of a question about it he told her that he was selling the drug for his uncle whatever later told investigators that he had known about his HIV status since September two thousand sixteen which was nine months before they have sex all right so what does this have to do with your I or whatever you know you're going to jail if you put somebody a risk for something that could potentially kill he looks like the bad guy and again if you lied about his HIV status that is bad but where is responsibility with the rest of us I mean if I'm going to have sex with somebody well I'm not married to I am going to be at risk if I'm having sex with somebody who wasn't my only and I understand that's rare yeah I mean we wouldn't really have a lot of the city issues if virgins married verge and we don't have a cities but I understand that's not the way things are right now but if you are going to have sex with somebody who's ever had sex with somebody else make sure they show you a copy of their as to the panel and I told you guys use the panel that you need to ask for is HIV hepatitis I would you be AMC syphilis to gonorrhea chlamydia and H. P. V. if you can get that's not a blood test that any more pap smear or swap or whatever but HPV can help HPV can cause cervical cancer so what makes this story interesting to me as I know a lot of women who got HPV they were a virgin when they got married their husband was not might have picked up H. P. V. from a previous partner wife gets cervical cancer now getting HIV isn't a death sentence like it used to be but it's still service getting HPV should be a death sentence but it could be you could die from that too so then I'm kind of concerned about and this is where you guys now get involved what do you have a TV or not HPV or not or whatever or hepatitis C. or not is if there is a presence that if you are given if you receive a STD that potentially could kill you for because you go through cancer treatment or liver treatment or whatever you have the right to sue or criminally charge a person you had sex with everybody out there better know what the hell they

HIV Ten Years Twenty Seven Years Fifteen Years Nine Months Five Years
Lesbian women cervical screening myth is 'dangerous'

BBC World Service

00:50 sec | 3 years ago

Lesbian women cervical screening myth is 'dangerous'

"The national health service in England has warned that it's dangerous myth that gay and bisexual women cannot get cervical cancer, and don't need to be screened for the disease. It says tens of thousands of women could be missing out on life-saving tests, his finisher Roxby, anyone with the cervix is at risk from cervical cancer. The human papillomavirus or HP, which causes most cases of the cancer can be passed on through any sort of sexual activity, but figures from NHS's land suggests that one in five, lesbian gay, and bisexual women has never been smear test believing there at lower risk than heterosexual, women. It calls the situation, a major concern and urges all women between the age of twenty five and sixty four to go for regular screening, regardless of their

Cervical Cancer Roxby NHS England
Anal cancer is on the rise, especially in women

Dr. Daliah

08:57 min | 3 years ago

Anal cancer is on the rise, especially in women

"So we're gonna talk about anal cancer. Okay. And the American Cancer Society estimates that we will have eighty three hundred new anal cancer cases this year in the two thousand nineteen and the majority of them women fifty five hundred women twenty seven seventy and men and the expect twelve hundred this year seven hundred sixty women five hundred twenty men now do anal cancer cases and rising for many years, and it is rare. I mean, I have to say it's rarer than others more rare younger individuals that we usually see these older adults the average age actually being in the early sixties, but they say the risk of being diagnosed with anal cancer. In your lifetime is about one in five hundred. And it can be treated so. There's been some suggestions on what we should maybe do to try to lessen these. So what's the number one risk factor of getting anal cancer? Well, the. So the. The human papillomavirus can cause a squamous cell cancer. And it could also cause cancer the throat it could also cause cancer of the penis. It could cause cancer of the cervix and we do vaccines for it. But HP is a group of about one hundred fifty related, viruses and the called papilloma viruses because the calls papilloma 's like warts. Subtypes, but the one most of the cause anal cancer is HP sixteen now other types can cause Ken awards. Ena works not cancer. The two types of HIV that caused the wards are HP six HP eleven. Most AIn awards do not develop into cancer. But they say people have had in awards are more likely to get anal cancer. Well, why well because if you've been infected with some HP subtypes, you might be more at risk of infecting of if you've got HP one way, then it just takes just as a matter of time that you might get HP again same way, but a different HP, basically get it from skin-to-skin contact. And so if somebody's warts or somebody's vaginal discharge or a wreath. Wreath touches, you you could then contracted. So it's very easy HP usually spread by sexual activity. Or seen a lot more throw cases for seen them mostly men and again access to HP. You could even spread it by your hands. Now HP is so common is probably the most common sexually transmitted disease out there, even though a lot of people don't have symptoms. In fact, I think committee is the number one diagnosed s but HP is the most common one out there. Well, that's why we have vaccines for now. Smoking puts you also at risk for cancer. HIV put you at risk. Certain gender and race ethnicity. They say African Americans younger than age sixty seems to be more common than women. But after sixty were common in women. So there was a article written slate where should man start getting Pap smears, anal peps. So the Pap smear was a we've talked about that develop for cervical cancer. Doctor Pap Nicolau was discovered it. So what he would do would collect a small samples of cells for the cervix examine the for stages and the structure to see who could be precancerous interesting when you look at these these cells, you could tell when one is starting no, turn vicious and start to change. And so just simple. Let's look at the cells under the microscope. Start seeing changes. And so we then start to do paps since we found out that we could identify cervical cancer so easily. We start to yearly we wouldn't even give birth control. Until you got your Pap smear. Things have changed to make things less expensive to have less procedures done on people and put people through possibly unnecessary tests. They decided to spread out when no pun intended when you get a Pap test. So now, you don't even have to get a Pap test to twenty one even if you're having sex as a fourteen year old I disagree with that. I think you should still be screened for today's I still think somebody should be giving you a talking about sex. But you could now wait till you're twenty one and have paps every three years. So. We do this to look for HP infection. Of the of the cervix. Now, I talked about a Pap smear of the throat years ago. Why aren't we check in the back of the throat if somebody performs a lot of oral sex, and it's in somebody who has had HPV why don't we screen them? And I believe some Dennis actually have in their office and oral HP test where you gargle and you spit into something. And then they could look to see if they could see HP that's something they can do. Now, just even avid said, we know that HP infect cells that line the anal canal the same as infect cells that line the service that he's a physician specialize in an infectious disease in Whitman Walker health, and they offer comprehensive health and wellness services to LGBTQ people throughout the DC area. And you do have increase in editor sexual homosexual activity when it comes to anal sex that seems to be a very very common. Celli say addition to the repertoire that people have. Whereas decades ago some people really want to go there or they wanna talk about going there. Now, people are very very open about that. So there's then unfortunately, more there's a whole nother now orifice that needs to be looked at an unfortunately could be ignored. You don't want to ignore the. Now, the rectum and we've talked about was not specifically designed to take the pressures of sex. That's why some people get tearing some people get a fissures things like that. And so could unfortunately introduce a lot more vaccinia pathogens STD's? So why are we ignore it? When it comes to HP. So Howard Brown health, which serves LGBTQ patients at numerous locations in Chicago has the decision to screen certain subgroups of patients because they believe that early detection of anal cancer precancerous areas of potentially circumvent greater vity and mortality now. It's actually that difficult man. Lies on his side. It's not as bad as woman getting Pap smear LES on his side. They take a little swab inserted a couple centimeters into the anus rotates. And then take take the swab out throw it into the container into the solution that then the fix that then gets into the lap. So it's a lot quicker than a passer. Now, some of you have been, you know, asking what are symptoms of colon cancer or colorectal cancer or anal cancer? Sometimes not sometimes you get some bleeding when you wipe now. Lot of you guys get blood when you wipe, and if that happens you've got to see. Dr. And you'll say, oh, well, no, I just have some hemorrhoids. Okay. Can make you bleed. Absolutely. Then the question is why did you give birth? Are. You a truck driver. Are you constipated? So there's a reason. Well, now, let me ask you. Why are you constipated? My diet. Maybe you're constipated because you have a mass in there, and you have to keep pushing the stool around that mass. And that's why you're constipated, and that's. So just because you think you have a reason for a symptom. You have which we all try and do and search for don't wanna panic west of the doctor if you have constipation if you have him rights, if you have blood on your toilet paper, you've got to get that checked out. I'm not saying it's not saying you have rental cancer. But it's. You can't blow off something as simple symptom because there may be something on this

Anal Cancer HP Cancer Cervical Cancer American Cancer Society Anal Canal Doctor Pap Nicolau Vaginal Discharge Vaccinia ENA Editor Celli KEN Dennis Howard Brown Whitman Walker DC Chicago
Cancer pain is a major cause of unnecessary suffering, says UN health agency

UN News

02:45 min | 4 years ago

Cancer pain is a major cause of unnecessary suffering, says UN health agency

"This is Matt wells at US news, the pain cancer patients experienced as a result of the disease was a treatment. They're receiving is too often ignored you N health experts said on Monday that the launch of new guidelines aiming to prevent needless suffering for world cancer day on the fourth of February Dr ETI and crook from the World Health Organization, WHO talks to Sarah and Bengali from you a news about the progress. So far and global challenges that remain in tackling the disease challenges with cancer are still multiple. We still facing stigma and discrimination was still facing ignorance about the fact that many of these cancers can be treated if detected early we're still facing the challenge of lack of access to diagnosis and treatments or the challenges are multiple on the other hand a lot of progress is also being seen and WHO has declared a new initiative on eliminating cervical cancer. We have started a new initiative on childhood cancer because most childhood cancers can be cured. We're also. So now launching new guidelines on the management of pain because most patients with pain due to cancer. And that's the majority of them don't have access to good treatment. That would relieve the pain and improve their quality of life. Why didn't it does new guidelines on pain management for cancer? Fifty five percent of patients who undergo treatment of cancer suffer pain. And when we talk about those with terminal cancer. We talk about sixty six percent and pain, as you know, doesn't allow to sleep causes irritability causes frustration and makes it difficult for those patients to interact with their family and friends at the time where they needed the most where they need that family support, it becomes difficult to engage, and it shouldn't be like that. Because we can't treat pain. It's not very expensive. We have the medicines. We have the methodology to do it. So it's a question of rolling that out throughout the world when it comes to pain Madrid and cancer, we hear a lot about Hewitt's. And there's a big fear of addiction. Didn't the fear of opium addiction is a rake to pain management for cancer. We. Have to find the right balance. There is a justified fear of opioid addiction. If operate it's to access -able and circulates on the black market at cetera. However, it shouldn't be because of that fear that patients die and live in pain. We should make the right medicines available to who need it and have the systems in place. So that there is no abuse. There is also focused on cervical cancer, cervical cancer is an important cancer. It's one of the leading cancers in the leading killers of women more than three hundred thousand deaths every year and now with the development of vaccine, which is becoming increasingly accessible financially as well. And the possibility of screening and early treatment, we know that cancer can be eliminated.

Cervical Cancer Pain World Health Organization Matt Wells United States Dr Eti Sarah Opium Hewitt Fifty Five Percent Sixty Six Percent