34 Burst results for "Cern"

Artists on the loose at the Large Hadron Collider

Science Friction

02:06 min | 4 months ago

Artists on the loose at the Large Hadron Collider

"At the beginning of the universe minutes after the big bang as temperature cooled the most fundamental particles of matter came into existence so neutrons protons photons electrons and others the basic building blocks of everything we know and see and much way died and to study these teeny tiny particles tucked inside every atom in the universe. invisibly are physicists. Nate this vast instrument one that occupies an entire vast landscape two hundred hectares of farmland. The contrast between big and small here cyber czar. We're about eighty eight meters underground. That the moment kilda. I'm jacob new-zealand. It's great we have people from all walks of life and all over provision who got physicists engineers computer scientists edmund people like me and they're all from different parts of the world i think from the star of the these filled like a mini country so i'm asking schroeder and i'm a experimental particle physicists. In i don't know somehow. When i leave sern i realized that i'm still honing in the normal world. I don't know some kind of refuge from everything else that is going on outside in the world and here science is what really matters. I feel like Since great that it's a kind of a political place you know. The relationship with russia never changed during the cold war with. We're about science purely about saying well not just science. I'm here for art to people as you'll hear science friction with natasha mitchell. Many meters underground this week and easter special from our archive inside the heart of soon. Just outside of geneva in switzerland home to the world's largest most powerful particle accelerator. The large hadron collider the hcc. Now this of course is the place where the elusive higgs. Boson particle was discovered. And where last week scientists hinted they just might have discovered a brand new force of nature or put it another way a violation in the standard model of

Kilda Nate Edmund Schroeder Natasha Mitchell Zealand Russia Geneva Switzerland Boson
CIA Director Nominee William Burns Testifies at a Confirmation Hearing

The Mock 'N Rob Show

00:16 sec | 5 months ago

CIA Director Nominee William Burns Testifies at a Confirmation Hearing

"Indefinitely now blocked President Bynes order that would put a hold on most deportations for 100 days. Ah, hearing is about to start for CIA director nominee William Burns. Cern's Who's also a negotiator for the Iran nuclear deal under President Obama. And his nomination hearing

President Bynes William Burns CIA Cern Iran President Obama
Suspect in metro Atlanta student’s death surrenders

Atlanta's Morning News

00:18 sec | 5 months ago

Suspect in metro Atlanta student’s death surrenders

"Of concealing a death and contributing to the delinquency of a minor after a 16 year old girl is found dead on Valentine's Day. Do not disclose house Salim's connected to John's Creek High School. Junior Carly Brooke Jackson. He may be in court today. The Henry County sheriff is taking this one personally because I'm going CERN. This is Henry County's most

John's Creek High School Carly Brooke Jackson Salim Valentine Henry County Cern
DHS bulletin warns of potential domestic terrorism against elected officials, government buildings

The Paul W. Smith Show

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

DHS bulletin warns of potential domestic terrorism against elected officials, government buildings

"Security has issued a threat bulletin due to the ongoing potential for violence in the wake of the presidential inauguration. This includes concerns that domestic extremists might be emboldened to attack the U. S Capitol again. Acting DHS Director David McCaskey issued the National Terrorism Advisory System Bulletin do tow a heightened threat environment across the United States. DHS believes this will persist in the weeks following the inauguration. Threats against lawmakers feel safety. Current CERN's for travel outside of Washington

David Mccaskey National Terrorism Advisory Sy DHS U. United States Cern Washington
Someone was convinced Kate Beckinsale needed a bunny rabbit

Woody & Wilcox

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

Someone was convinced Kate Beckinsale needed a bunny rabbit

"Anonymous fan left a quote unsolicited rabbit and a box of flowers at kate back and Sales Front door unsolicited Reynolds solicited rabbit which by the way great band name their first album was so sounds like a weird move from urban dictionary. is she happy about it -cerned unsettled is the way she described as worn as bagged on social media for folks to quote never send an unsolicited pet to someone's house. Or just as a gift I agree. So, not limited to rabbits if you were thinking about sending an unsolicited war frat or river rat to someone's house that's not welcoming either kate back and sale or otherwise for that matter

Kate Sales Front Reynolds
Gabrielle Union Files Discrimination Complaint Against Simon Cowell and 'AGT'

Colleen and Bradley

05:38 min | 1 year ago

Gabrielle Union Files Discrimination Complaint Against Simon Cowell and 'AGT'

"Gabrielle union I there's some news about Gabrielle union yeah in fact she filed a complaint Thursday so Gabrielle union you'll remember let's back up a little bit we'll just say that the headline is that she has filed a discrimination complaint against America's got talent's producers along with NBC universal will we'll talk about the details in just a moment but I do think it's helpful to back up and remind people that this is not the first time they've heard of Gabrielle union's harassment complaints against NBC universal and America's got talent so let me just give you a little background on that we talked about that I actually can't remember the specific when new time this very fleeting at this moment do you are you tight when we initially yeah I talked about and that was like a month ago maybe actually you know what I have to be to win new terror it was November of last year okay we learned that Gabrielle union had a complaint a number of complaints to lodge against America's got talent but specifically Simon how you remember that's when we learned about for example the story about Jay Leno making a racist joke during a commercial break that they were filming so all that was you know just under a year ago but then and we knew stuff was going on behind the scenes because NBC universal had talked about how they were addressing the issue but we really didn't hear anything else well apparently being made the negotiations which they were in the midst of conducting were not enough order Gabrielle union didn't feel that those negotiations were leading to the results she was hoping for which it seems that is the reason that she went ahead and filed this complaint and I should say that this complaint is actually very likely a precursor to an actual lawsuit so that's that's that's what I know about blackouts I'm old I am I never happened just works okay so sorry technical difficulties over okay so this is the will so we're now in the precursor to a lawsuit that will be ruled out by Gabrielle union for these discrimination allegations likely I read the story in variety which talks about how this is all laid out and what the complaint actually is who it's to and I can tell you that the complaint itself was filed with California's department of fair employment and housing and it name specifically three outfits FremantleMedia Simon cowl's production company Syco or Sicko I don't know he said it's probably not psycho and then NBC universal and again those D. F. E. H. complaints are usually precursors to a lawsuit and Holly brought this up during the dirt alert so the NBC entertainment chairman Paul to like be he has also been accused in this recent complaint of threatening Gabrielle union through her representative for speaking out against the racism on the set that she felt she witnessed okay so this is like an onion right like the layers of an onion yeah there sure initial allegations that she shared publicly and you said it was in November past that well that's when the story broke we should say about her because you'll remember she and Julianne Hough four let go and I think it was shortly there after that we started learning that not all was well right so so there's that like sort of pod right so like you know she talked about things not being so great on set in November and then just in the complaint of that or the public awareness of that then she starts to experience harassment as a result of speaking out yes so when she you know made those those complaints public apparently she claims that she faced pushback and directly threats from the head of NBC's entertainment okay S. and you know none of the people that were names I believe are speaking with the exception of a spokesperson for NBC universal and here's what they said very categorically quotes the allegation that anyone involved in this process threaten his union is categorically untrue we took ms unions concerts CERN seriously and engaged an outside investigator who found an over arching culture of diversity on the show NBC universal remains committed to creating an inclusive and supportive working environment where people of all backgrounds are treated with respect it sounds like a very boiler plate you have to lease you know cover all your bases response it does not address the specific our issues brought up in her complaint and her people are taking you know everyone to task as a result I I'm not going to read the full response from her she I found this interesting this little side note but she's got this person speaking on her behalf and it says that he has power of attorney his name is Brian Friedman I'm not I'm not sure if that's just her legal representative but I'm I'm wondering if it's because of like coal bed that she he has to act as her power of attorney because maybe she's not able to be wherever interesting racing or maybe that's just totally standard but like when our attorney Mike white is Gabby union union you need our

Gabrielle Union
What Worry and Meditation Have in Common

Pep Talks

10:20 min | 1 year ago

What Worry and Meditation Have in Common

"What worry and meditation have in common? We live in a world where people are chronically. Stressed people are activating their sympathetic nervous system that fight or flight response on a regular basis. In fact I believe for many of my clients. They're just living in a chronic state of fighter fighter flight particularly for my clients who grew up in an abusive or dysfunctional homes. I believe that they are living in this place of needing to assess for danger and have a have a very difficult time. Activating their Paris sympathetic nervous system. So the sympathetic nervous system assists us in fighting or fleeing. If we have an animal chasing us we need that sympathetic nervous system to release cortisol and adrenaline to help our body to prepare to fight or to flee we. We need our respiration to increase. We need increased blood flow to our arms and our legs. We need to be able to fight or to run in the Para sympathetic state state. It's referred to as rust and digest because our immune system and our digestive system are activated during the Para sympathetic state. They about it this way. If you are running from an animal is your body really all that concerned about digesting food or fighting Often pathogen when you could die because of this animal chasing you so we were in the Para sympathetic state were in that rest and digest state when were in the sympathetic state were increasing inflammation in our body because we are releasing all of these stress hormones in an attempt to protect ourself. The sympathetic system is extremely important. We needed what we don't need is to be activating it regularly and that is what I believe a probably most all of my clients are doing and what we need to be doing is getting to that Paris sympathetic state because because in that Paris sympathetic state that rest and digest state. Our bodies are able to heal we're able to rewire our brains scenes. Were able to digest. Foods were able to fight off pathogens. That is a state of health when we're in that para sympathetic state and one of the ways that we can activate the para sympathetic nervous system or that Rushton digest system is through meditation and last last month I was encouraging you to think about twenty twenty and what you wanted to do differently this year and one thing I would encourage wjr everybody to include in their life. is meditation meditation. The research is it's it's it's it's amazing what. The research search shows of what meditation does for our bodies it truly is a healing practice. It increases our our immune in system's ability to fight infection. It decreases inflammation in the body and inflammation is at the root of all diseases it assists with sleep. It assists our brains in being able to critically think. In fact I was listening to a podcast with Dr James Gordon. And he indicated that because meditation increases the activity in the frontal CORTEX. We have an increase in judgement self awareness and compassion. I think all of us could use an increase in those three areas in our life life and when I encourage people to meditate frequently what I hear people say is I can't I just can't meditate my. I'm I'm just not able to do it. It is impossible not to be able to meditate. And I mean that in fact if you're someone who worries stories you're meditating. Now it's not healthy meditation nonetheless. It is a form of meditation. So if you're a worrier no more excuses no more excuses. You're able to meditate and and think about that for a minute if you are concerned about a problem if you have something going on in your life and you're just going over it over it at. Let's say you're concerned about losing your job or your concerned -cerned about a relationship or finances if you're just sitting in that and going over it and over and over at. You're meditating right so meditation meditation and there's all sorts of different interpretations of what meditation is. I like to think of it as a way to simply calm the brain that were really working on directing our focus so that we can call the brain. Now I hear some people talk about meditation. As you know blanking linking out the mind I can only speak for myself but I know I'm not capable of blanking out my mind. I am an. I'll use an always here. I'm always just thinking about something so with meditation I think about it as the quieting of the mind. Me Focusing on something that's helping took quiet so for example it could be listening to music. There's by Naral. Sounds which means it's the sounds in one ear is different than the sound another. It reminds me a lot of em Dr. And if you've worked with me directly you know I'm a huge proponent of amd are because it's bilateral movement so with the by Naral sounds. The belief is that it is actually helping to change the brainwaves and helping to calm palm the brain so for me that gives me something to focus on. It gives me something to listen to so that when my mind does wander. I'm able to bring bring back to focus. The sounds that gives me something directly to bring my my focus back to and then work on breathing of course while comparing it with the sounds. If you're a worrier you are sitting. And you're thinking about the problem and you're going over it and over it and over it and think about I mean we really if you've worried about something recently. I bet if you sat for a few minutes you were all in right. You were consumed completely with. What was you were worried about? You weren't distracted by anything. You were all into the worry. We'll that's what we want to do with meditation when you're worrying worrying you're activating that sympathetic nervous system. You're activating that potentially and I think for most individuals they are your activating that sympathetic nervous system. That that fight or flight response you. There's fear associated with it. If you're worrying about something you're fearful of it you're definitely not in that para sympathetic state. So you really think about that for a minute. If you have the ability to sit and be lost in your fear you have the ability to work at being lost in a sound wound or in your breath or even a word if you wanted to focus on one word even saying it over and over is a way to do meditation. Where again with meditation were working on quieting the mind? So if you're thinking about a word and you're it let's say it was joy and maybe you're even saying joy and you're thinking about how it feels in your mouth and you're thinking about how the sound sound wound and how you feel it in your body while you're breathing. That's a form of meditation. Dr Mark Hyman who. I'm a huge fan of. He is a functional medicine doctor and he believes in the body's ability to heal and he also also believes that food is medicine. Which of course I think you know that I believe in that? And he says that meditation is medicine and that it's it's so important for us to take time to work on quieting the mind because it has such a profound effect act on her physical and emotional health. It was interesting. He's he commented that medicine shuts off a pathway or or it blocks something in. It's actually interfering with your biology to stop a symptom. where meditation and food also Soviet? He was referring to meditation. And this moment is actually suggesting to to heal the body. It's working with the body and helping the body to activate its own systems so that it can heal itself and he talked about how one's immune system you know increases how the inflammation decreases. How sleep improves? Because the and and how there's also rewiring of the brain are that that neuropathy of the brain allows the brain to be rewired and over time just as though you can be wired to be a worrier over over time. If you're doing meditation you can rewire your brain to be to be healthier. In fact Dr Hyman was talking into Emily Fletcher. She's an expert in the field of meditation and she explained that meditation neutralizes is the adrenaline and Cortisol. While it floods the brain with dopamine and Serotonin so those feel-good right neurotransmitters metres. Meditation helps to release those so again. We're not with Meta medicine. You're altering those were with meditation. You're actually assisting your body in doing the its own processes that it knows how to do. We've just kind of hijacked it with worry.

Sympathetic Nervous System Inflammation Paris Cortisol Dr Mark Hyman Dr James Gordon Naral Foods Dopamine Rushton AMD Twenty Twenty Emily Fletcher
Iran and Ukraine begin plane crash probe

Here & Now

10:32 min | 1 year ago

Iran and Ukraine begin plane crash probe

"Start this hour with the series of events that have led to the accusations that Iran shot down a Ukrainian plane by mistake killing everyone on board a week ago today a US drone strike killed. Iran's top military commander Mander in Baghdad. Iran responded with its own missile strikes on basis in Iraq where American troops were stationed hours later that Ukrainian jet bound bound for Kiev crashed shortly after takeoff from Tehran. Iranian officials deny they shut down that jet although the US and Canada have publicly said they have evidence to the contrary for the latest on all of this in the crash investigation. We're joined by the BBC's Joanna Fisher in Kiev and Jona what are Ukrainian officials officials saying about this today. Well it's been very difficult. Actually to get comment out of Ukrainian officials. I think they are in a very difficult position here. They we have a team on the ground in Tehran. That was sent there in the immediate aftermath of this crash on Wednesday and they are trying to do everything they can to make sure that that team who are in Iran at the moment get access to the crash site and to the debris that has been collected. I think they are concerned. -cerned that if they immediately come out and echo what has been said In the United States and in Canada an in Great Britain very firmly pointing the finger at the Iranians blaming them for shooting down this plane that that will make it too difficult for for these investigators who are now inside drawn to do their job said they'd been walking something of a of a tight robe yes definitely a tight rope. in a very delicate situation more than sixty Canadians died in that crash crash reporters yesterday press Canadian. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on whether the United States was partly to blame because this was all created by the volatile atmosphere miss fear the US caused by killing General Qassam. Sulamani is there at the same sentiment in Ukraine about that. Look I think the overwhelming sentiment here in Ukraine is naught again because you have to cost mind back five years to m h seventeen. The Malaysian airlines that was shot down in eastern Ukraine crane. Shot down by a Russian missile almost certainly by Russian forces with the death of all nearly three hundred people on board and I think lots of people here their immediate reaction was surely. This couldn't have happened again and not to our country Has Horrible echoes for many many people about what happened then and the idea that Once again what appears to be happening on the ground in Iran is that they going out of their way to make it very very difficult for a proper investigation take base in that once again echoes. What has been the experience of the seventeen investigation that Russia has done almost everything cancer trying and make it very difficult? This has been a miserable flashback for many Ukrainians to what happened five years ago. We also shouldn't forget that this is a human tragedy how are the deaths of that. Those Eleven Ukrainians resonating there. There's been a memorial setup at the airport. Boris Bill Apple which is where the plane was due to arrive lots of passenger cruise Of other airlines have been going. They're paying their respects. The president has also been. They're extremely the extremely sad scenes around around the airport on Wednesday and on Thursday as well the voss majority of the actual passengers on the plane and they weren't going to End Up in Ukraine. They were transiting onto candidature about one hundred and forty also Of One hundred and seventy six people on board the plane we're going to fly on later that day Onto destinations in Canada. Basically this route Was One of the most efficient to one of the cheapest pissed ways for Iranian Canadian Air Iranians to get from Tehran to to various places in in Canada I wonder to to what thoughts there are about Ukraine again being in the middle of this huge news story because the country is also connected to impeachment here in the United States involved in a military conflict with Russia as well. There's a lot going on in the world that really affects Ukraine. Your thoughts on that. You have to say that Ukraine rain has found itself once again in extremely difficult geopolitical position. this is a country that history is not kind to and Ah once again it finds itself in an impossible position to be quite frank in the last twenty four hours or so Ukraine's friends in the West have not not been particularly helpful towards it. It seems almost that Ukraine was the last one to have access to this intelligence from from the United States pointing to it. Being a shoot down I think it's only in the last few hours. Actually the American embassy here in Kiev has come forward and given that information to the presidency. Here that's the BBC's Jonah Fisher. Kiev Jonah thank you so much. Thank you well. As tensions rose this week between Iran and the United States dates. Saudi Arabia was watching closely. The country is a US ally and a rival of Iran. Joining us. Now from Riyadh is Vivian. Near I'm WHO's a reporter with Bloomberg News Vivian. Welcome thank you would. How has this recent flare up between the US and Iran affected Saudi Arabia? Well something that a lot let people forget because Saudi Arabia of course has in the past taken a very hawkish tone toward Iran. Is that if we're we're actually going to break out. Saudi Arabia would be among the countries that would face potential retaliation could actually be severely hurt security-wise economy wise. So what we seen during this last flare up is Saudi officials really setting a message far and wide that we walked de-escalation. We do not want to see this turn into a military confrontation you know can wiser heads prevail. And let's think about the risks to the region because obviously if there were to be sort of a retaliatory attack to one of the Gulf countries or Saudi Arabia itself that would really heart Saudi Arabia and particularly at a time when they need things to be peaceful when they need things to be good for their economy because they're hosting the g twenty this year. They're trying to bring in foreign. Investors are trying to bring tourist wrist. This is not the time when you WANNA have a war right around the corner and it was just a few months ago that missile in drone strikes on Saudi oil facilities did a lot of damage to oil production there in Saudi Arabia. Arabia blamed Iran for that attack. Although Iran denied responsibility do you think that the Saudis were caught off guard by the killing of Sulamani by the United States. So it's an interesting question because there have been a couple of media reports suggesting that Saudi Arabia was not Informed or consulted ahead of time But I it doesn't seem surprising that perhaps this was a very quick attack. That Saudi Arabia was not informed about was caught off guard about about It's interesting that you mentioned the attack in September because Saudi Arabia actually so just stopped short of blaming Iran for that attack which was really interesting at the time I and a lot of people took that as a sign of Saudi Arabia trying to de-escalate and realizing we don't actually want more so they did go as far as to say Iraq had weapons were used in they even said the attack was launched from the north but I remember being at press conferences where we asked them was around behind this and they would not quite go there they would stop short of that. Okay and and in terms of the killing of Sulejmani were the Saudis happy about it do you think or do. They think that it was not good for them. Well there's been a real mixture of feelings because on the one hand so Damani is somebody who is widely viewed here as a war criminal in a state sponsored terrorist who had caused mayhem around the region through proxy wars supporting militias. So there was actually quite a lot of celebration in the Saudi media and from Saudi pundits and commentators but at the same time you did see simultaneous kind of concern and worry about the potential for that to escalate into a wider conflict. So you saw people saying we're glad so. They money's dead but let's be careful that this doesn't turn into a war you know. I was wondering as people were talking about General Suleimani and the fact that he was really The military commander for all of Iran's activities what effect His death will have on the war in Yemen which has been kind of a proxy war between Iran and Saudi Arabia. It's a bit too early early to say but we've already seen even before his death steps and effort toward ending Saudi Arabia's his involvement in the war in Yemen thought at this point. The war in Yemen has really devolved into this complex civil war. You know merged with famine and this horrible humanitarian catastrophe. So I don't think we can really talk about an end to the war in an easier way but you do see that. Saudi Arabia does seem to be moving towards trying to disengage and trying to kind of end their role in that conflict which seems to be part of a broader strategy to take a step back from some of the crises and conflicts that the kingdom has gotten involved in over the past couple of years. Does it appear to so you that because of the recent of flare up in tensions that maybe there is a chance right now for the longstanding rivalry between Iran and Saudi Arabia to kind of cool down for them to move toward a detente. That's a very good question and something that a lot of people are asking in the region right now now for two reasons first of all because there have been reports of some sort of talks perhaps going on between Saudi Arabia Iran whether those have been through intermediaries perhaps add Oscar Pakistan or whether they have been more kind of tier two unofficial think-tank level engagements has not really clear clear. But there has been a lot of chatter about our Saudi Arabia and Iran. Actually engaging in talks over the past few months prior to this killing and then the second question is whether the killing of Damani Johny ultimately could perhaps open up some space for Saudi Arabia add on to have some sort of talk because he was a large roadblock in the view of Saudi Arabia and other Gulf countries towards any kind of negotiated when the Ron because they viewed his role in these proxy wars and it Cetera. Something they just couldn't stomach and now he's gone. Vivian near I'm reporter for Bloomberg based in Riyadh Saudi Arabia. Thank you thank you so

Saudi Arabia Iran United States Ukraine Canada Kiev Tehran Arabia BBC Riyadh Iraq Damani Johny Joanna Fisher Baghdad Reporter Commander Mander Russia Bloomberg Jonah Fisher
House releases transcripts from key witnesses in Trump impeachment inquiry

All In with Chris Hayes

11:07 min | 1 year ago

House releases transcripts from key witnesses in Trump impeachment inquiry

"We are now starting to see the actual testimony from the depositions in the impeachment inquiry so far the transcripts and they are as damning as expected for the president and and his allies now Republicans wine for weeks and weeks of the fact that depositions were being held behind closed doors despite the fact that many of them were actually attending those very same hearing the president tried to get out ahead of the release of the word for word transcripts today by saying they would be faked and Republicans should release their own indicating indicating that he was clearly not happy with what was about to come out well today we got the first two transcripts from forward top State Department official Michael Mckinley and crucially former US ambassador bastard Ukraine Marie Ivanovich we already know a lot about what McKinley testified about including that he said he resigned his post in part because of quote the failure of the State Department urban to offer support to foreign service employees caught up impeachment inquiry McKinley who was senior advisor Secretary State Mike Pompeo also testified again under growth in this deposition that he told not pompeii about his concerns multiple times before he resigned which makes what pump said last month so much more interesting listen listen to the way the pompeo gives himself absolutely no wiggle room on this question Mike McKinley third me well for a year and a half I chose him my head people tell me he was a great foreign service officer in fact he served America wonderfully for thirty seven years he had in fact had the office that was just just behind mine had a door that he could walk in any time and say whatever he wanted you know from the time that embassador yvonna bitch departed Ukraine until the time that he came to tell me that he was departing harding I never heard him say a single thing about his concerns with respect to the decision you never ask not once not once George did ambassador McKinley say something it to me during that entire time period that's interesting so maybe set it outside that time period or maybe McKinley is lying or maybe pompeo's lying the story though that has has told these depositions of of someone who was in the way of the corrupt quid pro quo abuse of office the President Rudy Giuliani were running to try and squeeze Ukraine to manufacture a dirt the president's political rival particularly in that of the ousted US ambassador Devante vish Ukraine whose career was a casualty of that scheme she testified that she learned from and Ukrainian officials that Rudy Giuliani plan to target her Ivanovich was asked what she thought President trump meant when he said on the phone call with Ukrainian president that she was quote going wing to go through some things Ivanovich said I didn't know what it meant I was very concerned I still am. She testified that a concern senior Ukrainian official told Oldie quote told me I really needed to watch my back former ambassador also told Congress the same Ukrainian official wonder about quote to individuals from Florida Mr Parnasse and Mr Freeman who were working with Mayor Giuliani they were interested in having a different ambassador to the post because they wanted to have business dealings in Ukraine or additional additional business dealings I didn't understand that because nobody the embassy had ever met these two individuals now the president gets to appoint ambassadors and he gets to recall them but in the case of Ambassador Basser Uganda Bitch let's remember her position and removal are also at the center of a criminal case that's currently being brought by the US attorney in the Southern District of New York doc against two men who are associates the president's personal were John Juliani reportedly paid Guiliani at least half a million dollars who hung out Yankee Games among other places with with Rudy who got prime seats at a twenty thousand trump rally and who represented themselves to Congress in an official letter as members of the president's legal team and and let's remember that part of the charges against these two men love Parnasse and eager fruman is that they were giving donations to a member of Congress as part of this sprawling effort to get rid of ambassador of rich so that they could corruptly install from the associates to promote their business interests in Ukraine Ivanovich was standing being in the way of making Ukraine more corrupt on behalf of president trump and Rudy Giuliani and I should tell you we just learned tonight that one of these guys parnasse seems to be ready to cooperate with congressional investigators Reuters reports Parnasse is prepared to comply with requests for records and testimony from congressional impeachment investigators PARNASSUS lawyer has confirmed that that me see news joining me now from Warren What we learned today so he told me legal reporter for Buzzfeed News and Tasha Berkshire National Security correspondent political NS NBC contributor. Natasha let me start with you on the Parnasse news his old lawyer had been the president's old lawyer John Dowd who'd written a letter being like he's part of the team and he's not going to show up and do anything he's now jumped don't John Doubt and now he's GonNa cooperate is that what's happening. Yeah Chris I mean it certainly seems seems like Parnasse is angry he's angry that the president has said that he doesn't know who he is he feels like the president has completely mischaracterized their relationship and you have to be inclined to believe a bit because there are so many photos of them together over the last two or so years a political events at gallows at fundraisers Parnis and firmin were everywhere and they surrounded the president at many pivotal moments so what we're seeing now is they've opened the door to cooperation with the congressional committees that doesn't necessarily Sara Lee mean of course that it's going to happen because a lot of the documents at the Congressional committees want are in the hands of the FBI which of course rated partisan ferments belongings as part of their indictment it also is remains to be seen whether or not their lawyers are even going to his learned this case has even going to let him testify because he's in the middle of a criminal probe but this does indicate at least a shift for now in how he perceives the president and trump really hasn't learned this lesson that you know when these people are are under scrutiny and he continues to criticize them his former allies and says I don't know them well they usually have receipts Zoe what did we learn today in the Ivanovich Ivanovic testimony in terms of the nexus between this sort of strange plot that was hatched by nuts room in for variety of reasons perhaps APPs personal business reasons as well as Ingraham themselves the president and the president and Rudy Giuliani's attempt to squeeze Ukraine government for for dirt on their political what we saw was perspective from yet another witness in the impeachment inquiry sort of explaining how they learned that there was this other her channel between the White House and Ukraine that was unofficial not sanctioned involved a cohort of non-government officials in this case Rudy Rudy Giuliani left parnasse eager freeman who for months had been traveling around trying to set up connections and Ukraine in an effort to dig up dirt on Joe Biden trying to discredit the Mueller investigation but all while making entrees into very official circles in Ukraine to the dismay dismay of the career civil servants who you know whose job it was to establish those formal channels between the administration and these foreign government entities and what we heard what we saw in the transcript was the former ambassador Marie Ivanovich saying you know learning about this back channel and being perplexed and concerned -cerned by it but not really seeing away out and being told that if she wanted to keep her job she needed to ingratiate herself with the president and not make waves about this both the one in one point she testified she was told to tweet US support for the president. I mean what what's fascinating here and attach you had these sort of comparative means of of of conducting yourself Marie Ivanovich the lifelong foreign service officer who's there who's trying to like steer American policy and then the Parnassus Fruman and Giuliani's of the world old who are wheeling and dealing and taking meetings and doing God knows what God knows who's behest and those are the people president is listening to and who had the imprimature of the entire hire American state behind them exactly Chris and Marie Ivanovich testified that this wasn't something that the State Department could just ignore they felt really hamstrung owned by the fact that this dual foreign policy track was taking place and at one point she said the Ukrainians didn't know who to talk to didn't know whether we represented US policy whether they should be listening to Giuliani and Parnasse Freeman and the rug really felt like it was being pulled out from beneath us we have to remember also that this is a very sensitive moment what what has been a very sensitive moment in Ukraine for the last five years since the Russians invaded eastern Ukraine and at this moment there trying to negotiate peace in the east with the russian-backed separatists separatist so for the aid to be withheld at this sensitive time was extremely troubling to the Crohn's and on top of that they didn't even know who the interlocutors were are there was supposed to be communicating with fast forward to mushy Ivanovich getting removed recalled from Ukraine someone that they really trusted now they have no choice really okay but to try to negotiate with the president and the best way that they can which is Zilenski you saw on that phone call kind of saying to the President Yes we'll investigate ah yes we'll do what you want essentially to try to appease him because again Ukraine faces an existential threat to its east and they are trying to navigate that right now the best way they can we're also getting a lot more back story on the origins of this I think deranged saying conspiracy theories about Ukrainian involvement in the two thousand sixteen election the idea that actually the DNC hack was a Ukrainian op that they conspired to frame Russia for it doesn't actually make sense when you sort of square it up but this this article near that Manafort was actually spreading that back in twenty sixteen it's been germinating and sold to the president time and time again what do we know about uh-huh so over the weekend buzz feed at CNN received a new cash of documents from the Justice Department then it was as hundreds of pages of records of notes that were taken during the investigation and in one seer set of notes from Rick Gates who had been the deputy campaign manager Paul Manafort's right hand man Rick Gates told investigators that basically as soon as news broke in two thousand sixteen the DNC had been hacked that wikileaks had these messages and they were going to release them. Paul Manafort was immediately saying it wasn't Russia it was Ukraine and Michael Flynn who was at the time a senior advisor to the campaign later became trump's short-lived first national security adviser also was immediately saying adamantly it wasn't Russia it wasn't Russia look at Ukraine so we had at the time three years ago to senior officials in the trump campaign trying to you direct the narrative away from Russia towards Ukraine it raises all sorts of questions of who they were talking to us who's ear they had and it's the theory that it has really persisted notwithstanding the findings of the US intelligence community that it was Russia that orchestrated the hack of the DNC that was

President Trump Ukraine Rudy Rudy Giuliani Mr Parnasse Ukraine Ivanovich Donald Trump Official United States Mr Freeman Congress Marie Ivanovich Ivanovich Ivanovic Russia Us Attorney Reuters John Juliani New York Paul Manafort Parnassus
Trump imposes new sanctions on Turkey amid growing Syria crisis

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Trump imposes new sanctions on Turkey amid growing Syria crisis

"President trump announces news sanctions on Turkey as more Republicans come out against his decision to US troops from northern Syria the Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell says he's gravely -cerned by the American exodus which left Kurdish allies in the region vulnerable to Turkish aggression and could lead to the resurgence of Isis

President Trump Turkey United States Syria Mitch Mcconnell Senate
Police searching for hit-and-run driver

Atlanta's Morning News

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Police searching for hit-and-run driver

"Atlanta police and the victim of a hit and run are you searching for the driver who left the scene W. S. B.'s Michelle Wright reports live this morning the accident happened in the parking lot of a northwest Atlanta office building Chris at your did deter CERN remembers running out your card to get something then waking up at home she was told she was hit by a car I was very shocked because I didn't know how it happened but you'll still to action news she saw the video and it was worse than she thought in my mind I'm like oh maybe it was just like a little bump or something and I just fell over my right side not so the suspect did wait at the scene for a little bit to speak to firefighters saying she had to go to a meeting both police and stern want her to turn herself in you can check out the video and the suspects picture WSB radio

W. S. B. Michelle Wright Atlanta Chris Cern Stern WSB
Eyewear Giants to Merge, Grow Even More Mammoth

Business Wars Daily

03:43 min | 2 years ago

Eyewear Giants to Merge, Grow Even More Mammoth

"<music> ah from wondering i'm david brown and this is business awards daily on this thursday august state is no secret there when you buy eyeglasses. You often wind up feeling like you've been raked over the coals. Prices have been climbing for decades and even vision insurance doesn't help much eagle-eyed listeners see what i did. There may remember seeing exposes about the monopoly in the eye wear industry. Well today the heart of that monopolies accompany. You may never have heard of much less able to pronounce that me give it a try. S allure luxottica yes there we go esa. Laurel exotica is the world's largest eyewear company owner of pearle the vision lenscrafters sunglass hut and rayban sunglasses among many others it also owns. I met one of the country's biggest vision insurers. The company was created created in two thousand seventeen by the fifty three billion dollar merger of esa lor a french company specializing in lenses with lozada an italian specialist in frames. The the merged company now owns so many pieces of the eyewear business from insurance to designer frame manufacturers to optical chains that it can charge markups of as much his one thousand percent according to the l._a. Times c._n._b._c. reports that can cost as little as four dollars to make frames. It's not unusual for a pair era prescription glasses to cost as much as five hundred dollars in large part because of the power. This company has in the industry well esa. Laurel exotica is about to get even bigger it soon to pay about eight billion dollars to acquire a netherlands based company called grand vision grand vision owns seven thousand stores under many names in forty countries west coast listeners. Maybe familiar with its four is retail chain most of grand visions stores though are in europe a market esera exotica wants to beef up the european union. We'll have to see its way clearly to approving the big merger. Regulators concerned -cerned about competition took a long time to approve s laurel exotic as initial tie up not to be dominated by the mammoth company. Another huge merger is in the works. One london won't make buying glasses or contact lenses any more affordable alas v._s. P america's largest vision insurer plans to acquire the eyewear chain vision works which operates more than seven hundred stores in forty states v._s. P already controls a number of designer eyewear makers including in calvin klein karl lagerfeld and nike who even knew nike made glasses while the proposed e._s._p. Vision works merger would create an eyewear a giant that would rival s allure lozada with enormous conglomerates dominating the market for our eyeballs. The budget minded may try to avoid high prices says by buying glasses online even if there's growth in online purchases though it won't take much of a bite out of these two giants despite wherby parker's high profile profile online eyewear is still a rather small market hard for many of us to <hes> see ourselves choosing glasses digital from wondering this is business words daily. Hey listen if you like our show. Share it with a friend or colleague. You can do that right for most podcast cast apps on your phone. It does thanks a bunch. I'm david brown. We'll see you tomorrow.

David Brown Nike ESA Esera Exotica Lenscrafters Calvin Klein Karl Lagerfeld Lozada Wherby Parker Europe European Union P America Fifty Three Billion Dollar Eight Billion Dollars Five Hundred Dollars One Thousand Percent Four Dollars
TV Review: A 'Chernobyl' Deep Dive

The Big Picture

13:16 min | 2 years ago

TV Review: A 'Chernobyl' Deep Dive

"The most incredible thing I've seen on television this year. And really in some time has just concluded I'm talking, of course about Chernobyl the HBO mini series chronicling the devastating nuclear disaster that occurred on April twenty-sixth nineteen Eighty-six near the city of Pripyat in the former Soviet Union leader in the show. I'll be speaking with creator writer. Producer Craig Mazin, who will help me understand how he pulled off this extrordinary feet. But I, I am joined by fellow her noble, admire and ringer executive editor Mallory Ruben. Hello, moe. Hello. Mel you are. You're a voice in the darkness. You were a Soviet minor in the chair noble. Admiration society months ago. I saw screen this show and I was like this is extraordinary. It's incredible. How powerful and beautifully done this very sad. Gripping physically upsetting story is crickets. No one had seen a screener. He's actively making fun of you became a bit. And I certainly feel vindicated not just because you like it. But because a great many people have come to appreciate this show, but tell me a little bit about your journey. You had been living in west rose for quite some time. And then the show came to you and very quickly. You started to consume it. Yeah. I joined a few weeks late Memorial Day weekend, fact. Sorry, sink convert truly a binge then as you know, it's a something of a habit of mine I as you as you said, wrapped up with thrones and I needed to reconnect to the wider culture wanted a little, you know, joy in my life, and I thought. What better way to connect to my fellow man? Rediscovered my own humanity then sure noble. But all jokes aside, you know you'd spoken so highly of it. And there was something appealing to me about the fact that it was a miniseries. It was I was gonna be able to consume it off fairly quickly started watching it. Early in the weekend. So three episodes were out at that point in time. And I watched all three in a row and then was consumed with almost like a surprisingly dangerous, rage that I could not immediately access the final two episodes. And then I watched both of those obviously, when, when they aired, and in the case of the family when you were kind enough to provide me with screener. That's why we're here right now. I had a very similar experience. I watched the first episode like I said months ago with my wife and we were both very taken, but then also, well, we wanted to keep watching it, but we knew that it was it would it would be part of the kind of conversations like oh, but also there's something about any show like this unfold slowly limiting is powerful to no offense to binging in general. I respect that approach to, to culture. But I did appreciate the slow roll out, and we, we sort of parcel deaf ourselves in that way. I think part of the reason he needs to do that is because there's just just a really deep emotional toll that the show wages on its viewers because of its. You know, not just the, the physical terror that you get from it, but just considering the absolute awful scope of what happened in these events. I I'm not sure if you were alive, when winter, the turnover will disaster happened. I was not. So we'll turn Warren later that year September eighty six so April twenty six eighty six as my good friend David Shapiro's birthday, we'll congratulations to David. I hope he wasn't met him for the first time she said, Chernobyl, I presume he was not injure noble when he was Cleveland. Thank goodness. What was your level of awareness of this event? Throughout the course of my life, you know, I think probably similar to what it was for many people who came to this show, which is an awareness that a disaster, it happened. And then little else beyond that, and actually, I started listening to the podcast or the HBO was put out around the show, the official podcast, noble, the buck cast the turnover Petrova podcast and that's that's out there right away as motivation for creating in the first place was this complete void for certainly not everyone, but wide swath of people about what actually happened here and why. And so, in that sense, I think ultimately partially at out week after week instead of all at once is actually very fitting because you as viewer obviously not equating, the experience of the viewer with the experience of somebody on the ground. But it manufacturers that sense of protracted discovery and your desire. Fire is so fierce to understand how what how could this have possibly happen, especially when you realize that it was a safety tests that what's this all? It's just such an incongruous set of initial facts that you're so desperate to learn. And the fact that you can't get to the truth right away. And that, in fact suffocating the truth is really the entire point for so many people is this unbelievably frustrating, but also compelling for pulse of force throughout the rest of the show. You're the eagerness to understand, I think, is the driving force, especially if the first two episodes, which play a lot more sort of like a murder mystery. You know, we're thrust almost immediately into this very quiet setting where this huge disaster happens. There's no really not a lot of preamble before we get to be actual disaster. Right. And then the, the preamble is the suicide of the pro tag. That's right. That's right. Which is also kind of a sleight of hand, as a storytelling device. But there's something so unusual about the way that everything is meted out here. But also kind of it kind of drags you along once things get extremely intense by. Roads, three and four you, you kinda can't turn away, even though we're start to fully understand why some of these things happened until we get to episode five when we realized that we don't actually know why certain things happened in more people had more information than we originally thought it's really kind of a masterful Sherlock Holmes, Ian kind of design for, for telling the story, I think a lot of times with docudrama. You tend to get something that is very earnest. That is very straightforward. It is a very chronological. Now, this is told chronologically, except for that sort of opening sequence you reference, but a lot of information is withheld in the way, it's with held is very powerful. For you. I is this a kind of a format kind of real life story that you like, because when I think of your passions, I think, you know, Harry Potter, of course in game of thrones. And the things that are more fantastical. This is really hard line down the middle in many ways, journalism. Yeah. Well, I've devoted my, my life and career to journalism. That's true. That's a good. It's a good point. It's a good question. I think. When I think about the things that I really love about SCI fi or fantasy stories, which is how I spent so much of my time as a consumer of literature film television. Everything conversations with my friends. Of course. I love the idea of dragons and dire wolves and waving your wand, and making anything that you won't possible. But the thing that I really love about those stories is tapping into something core about human nature. And so any great story can deliver that. And obviously the place that you're going to get that the, the, the most fully formed is something that is literally about confronting humanity and what people are willing to do to each other, and what they're willing to do, when they see what other people are willing to do to each other, and I was riveted every single second of this experience. Like I it's so upsetting and horrifying to watch that it doesn't feel like a normal thing to say, but I can't wait to watch it again. And part of that is because I think. To your point about how much you find out in the finale, actually, how much is sort of held back for this reveal even though it is real world history that we're talking about. And that's sort of like a contrary thing to say. I'm fascinated to then re rewatch it with that in mind. But also because it is just such a pitch perfect case study in some of the themes that I cherish so much. You know the idea of truth in lies. What is heroism, what kind of forms cannot really take when you're talking about storytelling, what is the role and power of image and narrative, and it's pretty hard right now in two thousand nineteen in the United States of America to watch her noble and not think about our current political system and the role of truth in lies in the narratives that unfold around us every day. And so that was interesting to, to simultaneously gain. Newfound understanding of this seismic is stork event and also like with any great story be able to apply it to something in your current life. Is it important that you learn things when you're watching something like this, because everything that you're talking about is the Matic, you know, it's, it's essentially emotional or intellectual. But it's not fact based per se, right? And you know, it's funny, we've been having this conversation in the office, a handful of us about sort of dad non-fiction, you know, the, the canon of handful. You and Kevin Clark and continue. No, there were a few more participants, but shadow to Brian Phillips, with, but there's small group of people that there's a sort of strand of, of culture and history books that are targeted at what we presume to be fifty five year old white guy in pleaded pants, who's just come off the golf course and received his Father's Day gift from his hopeful son or daughter, and inevitably that book is about a general in World War. One man is based on a world historical event more than likely. It's got a certain kind of, you know, pursuit of those some of those themes you're talking about heroism truth in lies, but there's something kind of stayed about it. I think tra- noble in some ways falls into this category. The and in fact, a lot of the series is based on a book, voices of tra- noble. But there's something somehow different about it for you personally. Do you are you the kind of questing for information? It will then bring that to the bar and tell everyone what you learned or is it much more of a televisual emotional experience. I think both and I think that one of the reasons that I really not only enjoyed the show, but thought it was such a grand achievement is because they clearly can be either of those things for you. And that's valid, however you choose to consume. It is valid, you know we we talked about this a bit over the weekend. I was so impressed by the show's handling of the science because I am just in the interest of candor, not a physicist, not a nuclear scientists talked, you ve lied on your resume can barely do math working together for five years. And I little did. I know. And so I was actually a little bit could -cerned about that heading nothing ever felt like a true barrier to entry, but you know you worry about both extremes. I think on the one hand is this going to be so dumbed down for the general viewing public that basically feels like it isn't real that you can't believe in who those characters are in the work that they're supposed to be doing because there's no way that people like that with talk that way about their work on the other extreme. Is it going to be so scientifically precise that it's totally alienating for somebody who for whom that's not there, there for an actor or something that they're comfortable with it all? And I thought that the show's ability to thread, the needle between those two things and allow you to understand with now I'm not implying that we're coming out of this as. Nuclear actually, deuce everyone physicists now. But the basic ability to comprehend what they were talking about what was happening without making it too complex or making it feel like they were condescending. And speaking in speaking, towns, you and I think that's a great trick. There was positioning, some of the other characters on the show in the same seat that the viewer was in, you know, and I think, I think, for example of one of the earlier scenes in the show when are I when I look gossip and Boris our first heading out there on the plane, and we gossip sketching his sketching this out, because Boris's demanding that he explained it to him, and the, the bullets analogy that was so instantly clarifying. Similarly, the trial in the finale, do we understand every single thing that was on all of those placards tiles? No, but they were colour coded, and the, the thing that was unambiguous was that balance was the key, and that wants you. You lost that you lost the ability to control the thing that needed to be controlled, and I just thought that okay I don't need to be coming to this as somebody who is, like inherently obsessed with the science or the facts, but I feel like I can grasp them, and then because I have that beasts comfort, I and then able to shift my focus of the things that I personally care more about the seems the characters the choices that they're making. And I think that if you probably are in the far extreme of carrying about the science. I'm sure that there are plenty of people out there who are like fact check on x y and z, and I think that one of the cool things is that the creators of not in any way imply that it is a note for note, faithful rendering of history, you know, that there are for, for example, the Yuan, a character is a composite of all these other scientists, and I think song, right? Saying that in the it was either the first or the second inside the episode feature at that the that we heard that and then it's also. Noted in the run through a fax at the end of the finale. So what about you? Well, I think that there's a brilliant storytelling choice that also happens to be true to history, which is that every single character who is not Lagoda for most of the film is completely ignorant to how any of this works.

Boris HBO David Shapiro Soviet Union Craig Mazin MEL Writer Executive Editor Producer Mallory Ruben Cleveland Pripyat United States West Rose Murder Harry Potter Warren Golf
Kid Climate Educators Open Adult Eyes

60-Second Science

02:58 min | 2 years ago

Kid Climate Educators Open Adult Eyes

"This is scientific Americans. Sixty seconds signs. I'm Adam Levy. Avoiding the west affects of climate change will require action. But it's hard to take action. When you don't even know there's a problem around the world only half of adults understand that humans causing crime it change through activities that produce greenhouse gases, but the picture is different for kids. Previous work has shown that children are more engaged and more knowledgeable than adults about climate change. The question is can this be honest to make a difference? We come across this idea that kids are capable influencing their parents. And when we say influence really mean just teaching them Daniele Lawson a social scientist at NC state university. That's what we set out to really investigate. Can we design things in such a way that kids are able to teach their parents about climate change? And because of the fact that it's someone's child seeking them instead of just a adult on the street or a different climate communicator, our parents willing able. To listen to their children to test idea Lawson setup wildlife based climate costs for kids, this approach was based on previous courses. But the team added a twist involving the parents first parents were invited to come along turn event formed apart of the course, and that's not all so we also had students interviewed their parents. And this interview never mentioned climate change, the civically, but it had questions like how have you seen the leather change over the last five to ten years. Do you believe the sea levels rising? How do you think that could impact our communities? The study showed that the coolest did indeed increase concern about climate change, not just among the kids, but that parents to and though was some surprising findings in the results this process of children teaching their parents, it really was most effective among those parents who were previously the least he -cerned about climate change. So that was conserve. Tive and fathers. And then what was also really exciting was that the treatment was particularly effective if the child that was doing the teaching was a daughter the study is in the journal nature climate change, these findings come into time when more kids becoming climate activists and Lawson says her study shows just how persuasive young people's voices can be kids are really powerful. They are having an impact, you know. They are taking over the news. They're not letting us not talk about the issue. It makes me really excited to see how much of an impact kids can have. And I think kids can just have the power to bring us together. In a way that we haven't seen yet when it comes to climate change. Thanks for listening for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Adam Levy.

Daniele Lawson Adam Levy Nc State University Scientist Sixty Seconds Ten Years
The next two years of Donald Trump

Correspondents Report

06:26 min | 2 years ago

The next two years of Donald Trump

"Let's head to the United States. I way President Donald Trump has come out swinging after midterm elections this week sacking his attorney general holding testy press conference and banning prominent CNN reporter from the White House in doing so he's lift America and the Washington principal wondering whether this is the tone to expect for the next two years, Washington correspondent Zoe Daniel reports it's about seven AM after the terms I can hear my son scuffling around downstairs getting ready for the early. Bus to school is mommy Heim yet. I hear mosque. My husband the exits the front door into the foggy Deysi morning. Yes. Sh- I came home at about five AM after reporting through the night on the election results at last live crosses into a stray Leah's evening news or in the very early hours of the US morning from freedom plaza just behind the White House the lights. Hind me framing the US capital in the distance. The midterm results presents a lot more obstacles for Donald Trump for his next two years in office. So Daniel joins us from Washington Zoe, what will losing the house main for the president. He can expect a lot of pushback, basically, it's going to make it really hard for him to get the rest of his policy promises through but beyond that, you can expect Democrats to launch a series of investigations into the Trump administration. And it's going to be another busy day. The first of the next two years for a Trump administration hampered now having lost control of the house to the Democrats. Never this feeling. No the power to win my fine vibrates, and I pick it up of the bid-side title. It's my Donald Trump tweet alert. Are we doing a news conference at the White House? He says and so the second two years begins. Thank you very much bliss. I've been covering Donald Trump now for three years since the end of twenty fifteen when he was just an outsider candidate since he's been president. He hasn't done many of these free. Wheeling solo press conferences the last one. I recalling day say was in February twenty seventeen a few weeks after he's inauguration when he called a press conference with Balian an hour's notice causing the press to scramble from all over the city, and it feels like we've been scrambling ever since two years later, I find myself sitting in the East Room of the White House, again, the president sills the midterms result in which the Republicans lost the house, but gained seats in the Senate as a success as an example of the eleven candidates. We campaigned with during the last week nine one lesson. This vigorous campaign is up the Blue Wave that they talked about. I don't know if. There ever was such thing. But could have been if we didn't do the campaigning. Probably there could have been while. He's early tone was measured the press conference quickly degenerated when the president was pressed on his pre election campaign, specifically anti immigration regime, cover a so caravan of migrants headed for the US border from Central America Vigors, president challenge you on one of the statements that you made in the tail end of the campaign in terms Zooey, go that well, I if you want us residents and that this caravan wasn't invasion as you consider to be as known as president caravan was not an invasion. It's a it's a group of migrants moving up from Central America towards the border with the US. Thank you. Why why did you why did you characterize it as such as I consider an invasion you, and I have a difference of do you think that you demonized immigrants that is electron try them? I want them to come into the country, but they have to come in legally, you know, they have to come in Jim through a process I wanted to be a process, and I want people to come in. And we need the people you're playing your weight. You know, why it was quite a moment as CNN's Jimmy Costa who habitually takes on the president. And his press secretary kept pushing and refused to give up the microphone. They're hundreds of miles away though there hundreds and hundreds of Manila that that's not an invasion. Honestly, I think you should let me run the country you run CNN or if you did it. Well, you're reading let me ask you if I may as president by may are you worried enough. That's that's one of the other folks that's enough. Pardon me, ma'am on this. That's enough as president. I had one of the guy may ask on on the Russian Gatien. Are you? -cerned that that you may not concerned about anything with investigation because it's a hoax, are you? That's enough. Put down the mic president. Are you worried about indictments coming down in this? I'll tell you what she n n should be ashamed of itself having you work in for them. You are a rude. Terrible person. You shouldn't be working for CNN from my ri- talk. Good here. I think it was Saracen is calling out to a cost to put down the microphone for a moment. The angle is so palpable that I wanted. If a punch might be thrown or if the secret service would stepping, but a cost of finally, pasta, Mark and the press conference continued go ahead. I think that's very rude person the way, you treat Sarah Huckabee is horrible and the way you treat. Other people are horrible, you shouldn't treat people that way. And go ahead meter in gyms defense, I've traveled within the watching him. He's a diligent reporter who busts fan of yours either. So I understand to be honest. So let me ask you a question. If I can you repeatedly you are the best Mr President, you repeatedly over the course of the just sit down place light of the White House revoked the scene in reporters credential, accusing him of placing his hands on the intern who attempted to take the mic something that multiple eye. Witnesses have refuted, however, the White House is staunchly sticking to that story. The hats to divert attention from the other one the fact that Donald Trump also started the post meet tombs era by sacking his attorney general Jeff Sessions reigniting concerns about obstruction of Justice. And whether he plans to shut down the ongoing Russia probe if. Day. One is any guide to the lead up to twenty twenty. It's time to get some sleep in Washington this Zoe Daniel for correspondents reported.

President Donald Trump President Trump White House CNN United States Zoe Daniel Washington Democrats Reporter Attorney Leah Heim Deysi Press Secretary America Manila
A Beginners Guide To CERN

A Moment of Science

02:00 min | 3 years ago

A Beginners Guide To CERN

"You might have heard of Sern also known as the European organization for nuclear research, located just outside of Geneva, Switzerland, they're interested in what matters made of and how it all works together to put it another way these physicists research particles such as electrons, quirks, glue, on's and more and the forces that act upon them to do this Sern uses particle accelerators, which exceleron particles in beams and then collide those beams with each other or certain targets. These beams are exceleron by electric fields and steered by magnetic fields. The accelerators are either circular where the beans race round and round or straight where they shoot one into another the resulting collisions caused new particles to form and specialized detectors track their speed, energy and charge. The biggest exceleron and the biggest machine. Gene. In the world is the famous large Hadron collider or l h c at seventeen miles in circumference this accelerator forces to beams to travel at near the speed of light before smashing them together. The l h c is used for some of surnames most important experiments such as its exploration of the Higgs bows on a particle. That would explain why mass exists at all. What else does Sern do it researches basic aspects of the universe such as light the big bang, antimatter black holes, gravity and much more? And it created the worldwide web in one thousand nine hundred nine scientists at universities around the world, including Indiana, Purdue and Notre Dame are active participants in Sern research unlocking the secrets of matter. It seems that some big ideas can come from tiny particles. This moment of science comes from Indiana University. I'm Yahoo Cassandra.

Sern Indiana University Switzerland Geneva Indiana Higgs Yahoo Purdue
Superintendent: Metal detectors weren't in use at Alabama school before fatal gun accident

The Brad and Dan Show

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Superintendent: Metal detectors weren't in use at Alabama school before fatal gun accident

"To school districts to consider letting some teachers be armed in birmingham alabama metal detectors cern focus as police investigating a deadly shooting at a high school this week the superintendent of birmingham city schools lisa herring said during a news conference that the detectors weren't on to alert police to the gun brought into huffman high school that killed seventeen year old portland harrington and wounded another student wednesday herring says that won't happen again and promises further action increase the presence of metal detectors and so we have already activate in our efforts in ensuring that we've made.

Birmingham Superintendent Huffman High School Lisa Herring Portland Seventeen Year
"cern" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on WTVN

"Know when when they come in to the program hello from out there and my response is typically look i don't know if it from outer space inner space where the space in between we really don't know there's there's there's so much to this universe and uh you know you learn in high school physics at that two things can't occupied the same space at the same time uh which is fundamentally true until you get to the quantum level and then we realize well that's out the window that's not necessarily true so there's a lot of fundamental principles that we we we assumed for a very long time uh through ice times uh obviously relativity only notifying through quantum mechanics uh relativity is still correct and those basic equations are still correct but there are some nuances to to some of these theories that so you know how how i that allow us to to look at things a little bit differently uh we now know where before the famous equation equals mc square that you can warp space time with a lot of mass uh we also know that you can warp space time with a lot of energy uh we have now seen at the cern the large hadron collider experiments where we are approaching the energy levels necessary to workspace time you hear of this conversation a couple of years ago where everybody was a bit bit frightened that the cernan was going to start creating these micro black holes based upon the energy levels that were being bring uh generated there and really all they're saying it's look you know we're at the point now where we're we're creating you know we're working space time at the micro level so if that is the case and we know that we we we have demonstrated that that is that is in fact possible that we can do it then the question is no longer can we do it it's just a scale ability question which in time and giving up time and technology of course you know we we should be able to to to scale anything up to two a two to suit our needs uh at the macro level so the question of whether it's possible or not it's no longer a question we know it's possible we demonstrated now the question is okay well what is the technology we'd need to to scale up to two something useable.

cern
"cern" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"From out there and my response to typically look i don't know if it from outer space inner space or the space in between we really don't know there's there's there's so much to this universe and uh you know you learn in high school physics at two things can't occupied the same space at the same time uh which is fundamentally truth you get to the quantum level and then we realize well that's out the window that's not necessarily true so there's a lot of fundamental principles that we we we assumed for a very long time uh through ice times the obviously relativity only now to find through quantum mechanics uh relativity is still correct and just basic equations are still correct but there are some nuances to two summit these theories that so you know how how had that allow us to to look at things a little bit differently uh we now know where before the famous equation equals mc square that you can warp space time with a lot of mass uh we also know that you can warp space time with a lot of energy uh we have now seen at the cern the large hadron collider experiments where we are approaching the energy levels necessary to workspace time you hear of this conversation a couple of years ago where everybody was a bit bit frightened that discern was going to start creating these micro black holes based upon the energy levels that were being bring uh generated there and really all they're saying it's look you know we're at a point now we're we're we're creating you know what we're working space time at the micro level so if that is the case and we know that.

cern
"cern" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on WTVN

"Going back in jail you know to fit its narrative in the present tense and it makes you wonder that that if that's out what is going on with the mandela fact the thing is when we are talking about time travel or parallel worlds these two worlds colliding in overlapping into each other maybe there some entered dementia aladi to it words coming in for his second in the bleeping back out that that's what we are catching that's the part that that that is making as notice and stand up and talk about this but what what haven't we caught right the history that has been changed or the hair free that we're still going through hain or be manipulated things we could be observing right now things to say in the olympics oh i saw johnny moseley win the uh freestyle well actually he wasn't in the olympics at your things like that it's it's it's really strange but i agree with you that happens it's in subtle ways you see it a lot in advertising the the way we remember labels or the way things were phrase it's so subtle it almost easy to just flow it off you know what i mean right nights a lot of this into as as strange is this sounds you know going back to cern yup seems like every time there is some cern activeduty uh there or something strange that has brought up about our past him somebody making some strange comment and and i just find in weird ard do you think that they're not in control in a cern is one big experiment so they're they're testing and they're doing these collisions but they don't know what the results are going to be and what ramifications there are in our own world in time line now through find it interesting that they've never really had it going full speed ever that it's always uh had some of breakdown or malfunction it almost seems like uh and thorough is a ghost in the machine make it's uh preventing cern from really getting its full functionality and and doing things that could be very detrimental to the human race on some some ways i think this is not in benefit of humanity this viking antihuman agenda sometimes and it.

johnny moseley olympics cern mandela
"cern" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on WJR 760

"Spoke with renowned astrophysicist neil degrasse tyson's who told me about the benefits of nuclear science and astrophysics what you can do is when you look at science particularly the physical sciences at their extreme a research frontiers it very hard to say oh there's is a particlar is a isotope a beryllium that that's going to put food on my plate tomorrow no no one was going to tell you that what we can't tell you however is that research on a scientific frontier hardly ever hardly ever translates into your meal the next day so what you need to look at is that's why do it well what you find is the act of advancing a scientific frontier stimulates innovations in science and technology and engineering it attracts the most brilliant minds that exist in the educational pipeline at any given time because the most interesting problems to solve are the ones on the frontier and so what happens is the act of doing that creates a landscape of innovation that transforms culture and society all right most people don't know the origin of sort of the internet all right is traceable to particle physicists trying to share data in switzerland okay at at the cern facility there the facility that's now is the large hadron collider may revert read about that people worry that we create a black hole that would eat the earth the world has become so transformed simply by the persisted investment in and advancing frontier so we have to we have to wean ourselves off of the expectation and the requirement that next week's that next week you're going to feel the effect of the investment of frontier research project you're not you're not but later on you will and your in your next generation certainly will feel it and so it's true with the export and in space that.

neil degrasse tyson switzerland cern
"cern" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"Check it out in an paul what we're talking about that is sort of a retro sifi music q you could throw in perfect he's so good at the you're so good at double a so cern has done a ton of things uh throughout the years we mentioned this already we talked about the first website awesome we talked about the collider large hadron collider right we'll get into later there are other things that they discovered through experimentation of things like things that i don't fully understand i just to be honest with you things like w nz bozon's that i you know leisure uh i think i kind of understand what that means but not really and before that they discovered neutral currence in this thing called the garda meld bubble chamber which sounds like a villain of some sort but you know that's that's fine out from the smurfs rate governmental wasn't cardinal bad in the smurfs the character regard mill was bad yes but garg amone self was a heavy liquid bubble chamber detector that was operating for nine years in the '70s it was trying to detect neutrinos an anti neutrinos and it found neutral currence and if found neutral currency yeah and of course we are we are not physicist no most people are not known as it turns out uh but we do know that we we do have a grasp of some of the experiments that cern has conducted and what's important to note is that it's not just the large hadron collider are they also created anti hydrogen atoms in 1995 which again as a non physicist to me that my thought his why would you do that.

physicist smurfs cern nine years mill
"cern" Discussed on RobinLynne

RobinLynne

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on RobinLynne

"There is another more wellknown particle accelerator that has been the subject of controversy for many years the most famous and largest accelerate in the world is the large hadron collider at cern and they too are trying to open up in aperture using hyper speeds it will serve as a portal to another day mention or so they say cern's attempt to open up black holes has sparked warnings from some of the most famous scientists in the world including cosmology stephen hawking there could be something on the other side of this aperture i do think people should be very cautious about purchasing a particle accelerator called the vampire watch that can extract blood from hugh using hyper speed instead of a needle this device sounds like a miniature version of wearing cern around her wrist.

cern black holes stephen hawking hugh
"cern" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

VIBES-LIVE

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"cern" Discussed on VIBES-LIVE

"There is another more wellknown particle accelerator that has been the subject of controversy for many years the most famous and largest accelerate in the world is the large hadron collider at cern and they too are trying to open up in aperture using hyper speeds it will serve as a portal to another day mention or so they say cern's attempt to open up black holes has sparked warnings from some of the most famous scientists in the world including cosmology stephen hawking there could be something on the other side of this aperture i do think people should be very cautious about purchasing a particle accelerator called the vampire watch that can extract blood from hugh using hyper speed instead of a needle this device sounds like a miniature version of wearing cern around her wrist.

cern black holes stephen hawking hugh
"cern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:26 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The pair went to california aiming to show that a fragile form of na they called it messenger rna carried the code from the gene to the rival cern robbed assumes they thought was stable structures that acted like a reading head on a tape recorder enabling the code on the messenger rna to be read and the protein to be assembled that complicated experiment which involve bacteria viruses and light or heavy radioactive isotopes was design to prove that this was the case the sydney explained in 1962 let me just outline how we did it when i bacterial cell is infected with a bacterial virus our nascent this was brought almost to a halt but a small fraction can incorporate radioactive isotopes from the media the sell stops making the proteins determined by its jeans and instead makes the proteins controlled by the genes of the infecting virus dna this is a beautiful system in which you can study what happens when a cell is switched suddenly from one genetic source to another author of the switching of course any new rna is formed by the virus dna and if this new are and i were to be found in old rivals them's than the messenger model would be approved the critical point of this intricate experiment was to identify riboside is made in the bacteria before infection with the virus from any that might have been made after infection this we did by labeling the cells with heavy isotopes we infected the cells and at the same time switch them to a medium containing lack isotopes and radioactive phosphorus within separated authorized resumes in a centrifuge we showed that known new light right resumes were made often infection and that the new radioactive are and they entered the old heavy rivals though we also show that the proteins controlled by the virus genes with synthesized in ride resumes which would love before infection these experiments effectively ruled out that the are in a of arrived was them carries information ride deserves only nut until colder have been programmed by our messenger rna the technique jackaman brenna used but pretty terrifying by today's standards.

cern sydney california
"cern" Discussed on KOIL

KOIL

02:58 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on KOIL

"Our occurring many of them many people see them as symbols of the end signs of the times astrophysicists the idea of astrophysics itself is a rapidly changing science new cataclysmic processes are discovered on a regular basis now it is possible there is a presently unknown mechanism there were causing planet wide nuclearbased detonation if triggered by plutoniumbase nuclear explosion you can be certain that if some sort of astronomical scale dynamic event like that of course they would remove all wife the earth once again we we could see an event like this happen here by some horrible cosmic bad luck how about the idea of a miscalculation happening at cern supercollider in switzerland and this is meant miscalculation is while it creates an unbelievable explosion it would not only why puts out in a blink not even that we ripple whole in space time or the reactors at the fukushima nuclear plant just all of a sudden became hotter than a neutron star causing a chain reaction that could bring about a dynamic astronomical extinction of lament this could happen i mean every day we go about our business none thinking about the arrival of some sort of a rogue planet dwarf star comet media your rock we don't think about cern we we think well every day is another day and nothing's happened yet but give us one ms miscalculation then we could rebel holes facetime and bam we we living or not living different life uh or a very very quick non feeling death dislike beaming into another existence just like that not even time to snap the fingers not even times they oche oath he can't eat even say oh he's gone john tell it works where you have these dynamic your benz bid ara catastrophic uh and we can see these events happen on earth we don't hope they happen it ended and they say that the chance to them happening are very slim but even a slim chances somebody that i i would really wanna toy with fukushima i mean so he wants to always boy we have the power of a neutron star under the ground under the earth cernan fukushima and people were legal and what now well you know there's a lot of power a lot of power.

cern supercollider switzerland
"cern" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"I'm quite lewis you're listening to ground zero and there was called that i triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred us triple eight six seven three thirty seven hundred and so what you see the eyes of animal voice you beehives of humans bility do for seve earth magnetic field which at one time was this risk this physical impossibility but now you can see it in the animals you can see it a human behavior the receptors for the magnetic sense remain elusive but it seems that at least two underlying mechanisms exist sometimes in the same organism it's called magneto reception and the evidence for by going to reception is mainly behavioral the most common approach has been to alter the magnetic field around animals and watch for corresponding changes it orientation or navigation behavior usually this is done in a lab where carefully calibrated magnetic fields can be produce but experiments have also been done in the field on unrestrained animals that are my grading or homing for example standard bar magnets produced much stronger magnetic fields that earth naturally occurring field and placing these on homingpigeons and sea turtles this rows navigation under some conditions mural biological techniques have also provided evidence in several cases of electro physiological recordings and activity dependent gene expression things have changed neurons unchanged nerves change brainer is change everything alters electrical activity then we see responses to changes in the ambient filled of of electromagnetic disruption and that could be done with cern that could be done with harp hell even if the enp goes down with a nuclear explosion we'd be seeing changes in animal behaviour.

cern
"cern" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on KELO

"Thirty seven hundred so what you see the eyes of animal hides of humans bility do seve earth magnetic field which at one time vis vis vis physical impossibility but now you can see it in the animals you can see it in human behavior the receptors for the magnetic sense remain elusive but it seems that at least two underlying mechanisms exist sometimes in the same morgan it's it's called magneto reception and the evidence for by going to reception is mainly behavioral the most common approach has been to alter the magnetic field around animals and watch for corresponding changes it orientational navigation behavior usually this has been done in a lab where carefully calibrated magnetic fields can be produced but experiments have also been done in the field on on restrained animals that are migrating or homing for example standard bar magnets produce much stronger magnetic fields than earth's naturally occurring field and placing these on homingpigeons and sea turtles this route navigation under some conditions mural biological techniques have also provided evidence in several cases of electro physiological recordings and activity dependent gene expression things have changed neurons of changed nerves change brainer is change everything alters electrical activity then we see the responses to changes in the ambient filled of electromagnetic disruption and that could be done with cern back it'd be good with harp however the mp goes down with a nuclear explosion we'd be seen changes in animal behaviour.

cern
"cern" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on KTRH

"Thirty seven hundred in the eyes of animal hides of humans bility do for seve earth magnetic field would you one time was this this this is one possibility but now you can see it in the animals you can see it a human via the receptors for the magnetic sense remain elusive but it seems that at least two underlying mechanisms exist sometimes in the same arguments it's called magneto reception and the evidence for by going to reception is mainly behavioral the most common approach has been to alter the by getting fueled around animals and watch for corresponding changes it orientational navigation behavior usually this has been done in a lab where carefully calibrated magnetic fields can be produce but experiments have also been done in the field on on restrained animals that are migrating or homing for example standard bar magnets produce much stronger magnetic fields than earth naturally occurring field and placing these on homingpigeons and sea turtles disrupts navigation under some conditions bureau biological techniques have also provided evidence and several cases of electro physiological recordings and activity dependent gene expression of change neurons of changed nerves change brainer is change everything alters electrical activity then we see the responses to changes in the ambient filled of of electromagnetic disruption and that could be done with cern that could be done with harp however the enp goes down with a nuclear explosion we'd be seeing changes in animal behaviour.

cern
"cern" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:55 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Large hadron collider at cern creates a massive gravitational pull on the earth the cern collider is composed of some nine thousand six hundred super magnets which are one hundred thousand times more powerful then the gravitational pull on this planet it fires protons around a circle track at a mindboggling speed now it may require some mental gymnastics to wrap woods brain a brown what's exactly going on at cern but certain scientists are attempting to achieve this well but they're trying to do in the tunnel and the underground lab with the average layman probably will understand and i don't know if i understand it fully but this experiment these experiments that they're doing maybe rot with unforeseeable pitfalls in fact physicist stephen hawking he said this he said quote but god particle found by cern could destroy the universe hawking wrote in the preface of a book called star us the collection of lectures by signing does he said the higgs boasted could become unstable a very high energy level and have the potential to trigger a catastrophic vacuum decayed which would cost space and time to collapse and we would not have any warning to the dangers now hawking is not the only voice in the scientific wilderness predicting possible catastrophe he of certain continues in the atomic fastlane which they're doing right now astrophysicists neil degrasse tyson's told eugene mirman on the star talk show we have talk radio program startalk radio he said that the experiment at cern could literally caused the planet to explode now it's obvious that all these things are interconnected upon this earth whether we want to believe.

cern higgs neil degrasse tyson eugene mirman physicist stephen hawking
"cern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Other examples as well what is the lone inventor myth have such traction in our society well you know it's such a compelling narrative for a number of reasons you know it's it's easy it's it's almost like a jingle right you know the the loan hardworking individuals sets out to achieve a goal works against all odds overcomes you know various obstacles and then finally has a moment of inspiration it's it's very sort of digestible in its compelling and it it it's no not true and as you point out the touchscreen aspect of it is in true what did steve jobs give us that nobody else did steve jobs deserves a lot of credit for throwing a lot of resources behind this project for being a really fierce sort of curator of ideas his and of really sort of seeing the potential in this project when it was there a you know he had to be talked into a lot of the different parts of the project along the way and you know the the very beginning of the iphone came not from an idea steve jobs had but from sort of an underground sort of freewheeling a series of a road experiments by by of a core group of apple designers engineers and sort of thinkers that really just started getting together and working under the radar and as you mentioned the touchstone is the thing that set the iphone apart from other products when it was first introduced but you also pointed out that took stone technology the of the sort those use in the iphone was actually born out of cern's particular accelerator labs yes and then and then did this danish engineered name bent stump yet yeah he's that so i i was really trying to trace back srn the origins of this multi touch technology and one of the earliest examples of multi touch its inventor bent stump clams was installed at.

steve jobs iphone cern apple
"cern" Discussed on The Goal Digger Podcast

The Goal Digger Podcast

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on The Goal Digger Podcast

"I hate to say it but there is a lot of money to be made out in education in so many people see that and just because you're good at something doesn't mean that you're automatically going to be a good teacher and so you really have to learn how to decipher into cern who is going to be the best fit for you and your business and i challenge you to ask yourself is this person walking the walk and talking the talk now as a creative i believe there courses can truly teach you pure business strategies and that can be one of the bust investments of your dollars because you pay ones but you have that information and content forever plus was talk about time it's not a renewable resource oates saves you tons of time for me personally learning the art on my own helped me ensure that i was in control of creating images that came from me but learning the business stuff from other mentors was a solid investment for me when i was just starting out because nobody teaches you how to wear the many hats that being an entrepreneur is number five we are like cruising through this number five is a workshops now i feel like workshops are popping up left and right and rightfully so there are some incredible experiences waiting for you if you sign up for one i would please workshops towards the bottom of the investment list not because it's not worthy but because each one offers totally different opportunities now there is such a range of workshops there are just couple our long workshops or a full week long retreats workshops mike cost you a bit of money but it's important that you do a lot of research to ensure that you going to walk away with giant value whether it's from the speakers who are going to be sharing the oneonone education you'll receive the portfolio building opportunities that are presented to you or the community that you will create while you're there.

cern
"cern" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:03 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"Up in their neat little tinted town cars um they they all came kind of in droves others odd definitely some interest on who is here this year obviously the head of cern is here that's a very interesting topic as you know certain is the particle collider where the train a smash particles together to try to find out the building blocks a protons so we can have like a gene gene roddenberry type futura star trek future again like beam food on a plate which is an early necessary a bad thing if we can provide food for people but then there's all these other side effects such as they've gotten particles to disappear so they're fading in and out of our dimension they believe in other starting to just you don't try to communicate with inter dimensional beings all that i find interesting not only dimension a very esoteric symbol sits in front of cern dozen it yoshida the world destroyer and you see she's kind of coming out of a fiery portal i don't know if that means anything but i see a pattern there i don't think it's coincidence that that statue is sitting right there in front of sir i it's go into this either and also their logo uh kinda gives us the impression of a triple six through the beasts six six six others so many other things that are bazaar about the large hadron collider the fact that cern can be short precursor nuno sir new knows which of course is the green home on devil and there are a lot of other there was actually the temple of apollo that was in a general area which of course pauley on is the guardian of the bottomless pit of so many different ways to describe this this particle accelerator this this collider and i and i heard rumors of certain over the members of certain were going to be there but i had no idea why i'm worried that there are there because i have a feeling that the perhaps they're going to make an announcement to them as to just where we are in the in the world of quantum physics and particle physics and maybe we will learn the if gone sooner the day of the actually broken some barriers in in dimensional.

cern pauley yoshida temple of apollo
"cern" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

The Myth Of The 20th Century

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"cern" Discussed on The Myth Of The 20th Century

"What they could find out and on in the biologists also on the way down they were dredging the whole way in the aurora uh putting down their net is deep zip would go in seeing what's what's samples of sea lice they could bring up identifying and classifying it's that was the thing with the space race even for patriotic people who believe in their country and believe in their peoples like is this really helpful to us putting some someone in space and we have that with other things that nasa did other scientific discoveries explorations developments besides just space exploration we have it now it's cern all of the international government money that goes into cern people are like isn't this a waste of money is this really beneficial to our people this discovering something for the sake of trying to find doubt the should be private or people why should this matter this isn't really something the legitimate i think that's actually really interesting topic are broadly speaking the question of should the society as a whole fund really risky and may be low pay off potentially high payoff but with a low probability i endeavors like this i would i would say fusion energy the even the cern project which has come more fundamental physics payoffs but of the moon race things like that they don't have clear immediate returns on investment but you could argue that in the long run be information and the technology develops and just the kind of political motivation and um kind of cultural.

nasa space exploration cern cern