20 Burst results for "Century Italy"

"century italy" Discussed on Filmspotting

Filmspotting

01:51 min | 2 months ago

"century italy" Discussed on Filmspotting

"Not often here on film spotting, we get to talk about movies that feature clever crustaceans. Josh, but that's the case with the new the tale of king crab, which is about Luciano, who's a wandering outcast in rural 19th century Italy. Alcohol and forbidden love send him into turmoil. And after a tragedy, he is exiled to the distant Argentine province of Tierra del Fuego, where with the help of ruthless gold diggers and that clever crustacean. He searches for a mythical treasure on his way toward redemption and we have not seen this film yet, Josh, but in terms of the movies that it bears resemblance to. Some films that are pretty notable and appreciated by us, including lucretia martell's zama, reviewed here on the show and one of my favorites. It's a film that had some stiff competition, I think, in round one of film spotting madness, Werner Herzog's agera, the wrath of God. Yeah, aguirre mentioned so many times on the show clearly a favorite of ours. Another title that's been thrown out there that is somewhat in the same vein of the tale of king crab is Roland jaffe is the mission. I love the mission. And zama, you're so right. I think in 2018, I forget exactly where it landed, but lucretia martell zama, Adam, was on my top ten lists. So impressive company there for this film to be compared to. Yeah. Absolutely. Our friends at IndieWire call it part Herzog and ecstatic ethnography and part puzzle linen picaresque well done IndieWire and the international cinephile society says an atmospheric masterpiece, an unforgettable chronicle of humanity. You can see the tale of king crab now presented by oscilloscope, the can in New York film theft's favorite, opened April 15th at film at Lincoln Center for tickets, visit film link dot com C dot com.

Josh lucretia martell Luciano Tierra del Fuego Roland jaffe Werner Herzog lucretia martell zama Italy aguirre international cinephile societ Herzog IndieWire Adam New York Lincoln Center
"century italy" Discussed on Myths and Legends

Myths and Legends

07:39 min | 7 months ago

"century italy" Discussed on Myths and Legends

"A week later at breakfast, one of nella's older sisters mentioned in passing, that news had come. From the kingdom where nella's prince's dad ruled. She didn't call it that. She just named the kingdom. Now the setup what? The daughter smiled. Yeah, she didn't know. Weird. Well, it turned out the sun, the prince was in a horrible accident. Bury by broken glass. Cut a thousand times. The sisters mock shuttered, oh, just terrible. How could that even happen to be buried in broken glass once it's dressed? I don't know, maybe a building full of mirrors fell on him, once sister offered. Oh, or he was running naked through a glass tube. The first said. That's pretty specific sister. As specific as it is dangerous and impractical for underground travel, they nodded. Eyebrows arched. Wouldn't you agree? Nella. Tears streaming down nellis cheeks, the youngest didn't answer. She pushed herself away from the table and ran from the room. The prince wasn't dead. He wasn't doing well, but he wasn't dead. His servants had dragged him from the pipe and gotten him to the capital, where the best doctors 17th century medicine could produce were watching over him. Their diagnosis was that the glass had been enchanted, so that's why it hadn't killed him, but their talents only went that far to say that the reason he wasn't dead was basically magic. The king put out a proclamation, whoever found a way to save his son would have half of his kingdom if the savior was male, and the sun as a husband, if the savior was female. There are a lot of assumptions to unpack there, but we won't. This was nellis chance. If she could make it to the other kingdom, there Mary the sun, her parents couldn't do anything about it. She ordered to serve it up, paid the young woman to switch clothes with her, and, while the fake nella stayed locked in her room, the real slipped out through the front gate. Alongside the dozens of people going this way and that, throughout the kingdom. Now, nella had never heard this podcast before. Kind of because discoverability is still a problem the industry is trying to solve, but also because it was 17th century Italy and podcasting hadn't been invented yet. If she had heard the show, she would know to never enter the dark forest alone. The thundering footsteps of an ogre, though, had the reach that we didn't. Nellis scrambled up a tree moments before the monster came thundering past. And into the house that wasn't 20 feet away. Nella picked her way across the branches to the roof of the house. She sat listening at the chimney. She didn't think she could make it if she tried to go on foot. She didn't know how good ogre hearing was. So she would just wait until they slept. Then? Something caught her attention. The ogres who were kind of a sweet little couple, and we'll call each other by pet names such as Harry, tusky, and ruler, were talking about the latest news. Rumor was, that the prince had gotten himself hurt when a glass tunnel he had made collapsed on him, as he was running naked to go see a lover. It was a scandal, but the king was trying to keep that part under wraps. Because he was currently trying to keep his son's soul in his body when it was desperately trying to escape out of so many wounds. The ogre couple laughed. Doctors. They were overmatched from the start. Since it wasn't chanted glass, there was only one thing that could save the prince and heal his wounds in time for him to live. They both laughed, but then the husband said, yeah. He actually didn't know what that was. Our fat, the way I said. And then nella heard the slap of someone grabbing someone else's belly. They're fat. Rendered down and rubbed on the wounds would heal the prince instantly. She said that she didn't think anyone knew that, but just be on the lookout for nights anyway. They couldn't help out the prince without becoming at least as dead, so they were just going to keep their heads down and there was a knock at the door. The ogre couple looked at one another who could that be? The door creaked open and both of them looked down to see a young woman in a dirty cloak head bowed and hands out. Begging for bread. The female ogre looked down with a sneer. It was some kid begging for bread. Did they have any old stale, moldy bread lying around? The male ogre looked at the girl and said he just remembered something that he needed to talk to his wife about. The privately. He went to the door, smiled, and said he would just be one minute. The door slammed and Nell his face. From the other side of the flimsy door, she could hear the male ogre, saying that he really wanted to eat some of that sweet, sweet Christian flesh. The female logo replied that there had to be some better way to say that. Outside, now the thought that there really wasn't any good way to express your preference for consuming human flesh, regardless of religion, but then the door swung open. The ogres told the girl that it was getting late, and she couldn't very well keep traveling in the dark forest at night. Now a smile. She couldn't agree more. We'll see nellis planned for rescuing the prince come to its greasy conclusion. But that will be right after this. You know, good teamwork, it's a beautiful thing. It is. It makes the most epic labor as possible. And the fastest way to reach your potential is with the right people in the right places doing the right things. If you're hiring, you need indeed. Indeed, it's a hiring partner that lets you do it all. And fast, attract interview and higher. With indeed, it all happens in one place, really, why struggle to find quality candidates if you don't have to. Instead, let indeed partner with you every step of the hiring process, so you can find the right talent. Take their tools, for example. Indeed, instant match. That's my favorite one. Where's my favorites are assessments in virtual interviews? Let's really get to know our candidates. Yep, everything in one place, to streamline the hiring process and give you confidence in who's joining your team. According to talent nest, indeed, is the number one source of hires in the U.S.. Get started right now with a $75 sponsored job credit to upgrade your job post at a D dot com slash legend. Get a $75 credit at indeed dot com slash legends. Indeed dot com slash legends offer valid through December 31st, terms and conditions apply. Need to hire? You need, indeed. Bombas mission is simple. Make the most comfortable close ever and match every item sold with an equal item donated. So this holiday, when you give bombas to someone on your list, you're also giving them to someone in need. It's a give give. Whether it sucks, shirts or underwear, I'm telling you, bombas is the way to layer. Everything is soft, seamless, tagless, and cozy materials like merino wool pima cotton even cashmere. Cashmere socks, I'm telling you they are wonderful. That sounds so fancy. See, I'm all about the t-shirts right now. Long sleeve, short sleeve, invisible seams. It's the first layer. It's got to feel nice. And with bombas, I forget it's even there. It's great. Our whole family wears bombas because their clothes are genuinely the best. There's no comparison. And with festive gift boxes, bombas has the coziest gifts for everyone on your list and they make it easy. So give the gift that gives a warm feeling in more ways than one. Bring a smile to someone near and dear and to someone in need. Go to bombas dot com slash legends and get 20% off your first purchase. That's.

nella Nella nellis Nellis prince Mary Italy Harry Nell bombas U.S.
"century italy" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"century italy" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"In fact very intimately intertwined. Today we go back in time to a period of history to look at fashion interest during the first two decades of the twentieth centuries of the period between world war one and world war two in italy and we are so pleased that dr eugenia polish halley joins us today to discuss her book fashion under fascism beyond the black shirt doctor pal. Kelly is a professor of italian comparative literature and women's studies at both queen's college and the graduate center of the city of new york where she also is the founder and coordinator of the concentration in fashion studies for the kuni graduate program. Dr paul so much joining us today. Dr pal thank you so much for joining us today on dressed discuss your really amazing book. Fashion under fascism beyond the black shirt so before we delve into some of these fashioned aspects of our discussion today. I'm hoping that you might give some context for our listeners. About broadly speaking. what exactly is fascism. Thank you a bill for guy inviting me to this conversation. Delighted to be here with you So to responsive question. Fascism rules than ideology authoritarian ideology in movement. I started in italy in nineteen fifteen sold. The war was an important component. That had a great impact on the formation of this fast. She's at of combat. This was the beginning get Ninety nine teen. Mussolini was of course the head of fascism became the dude shape so he founded the national fascist party so started initially but then spread all over europe the end in the united states. Actually we need to remember that so it was a became. A talented now regime are despotic. Nationalism racism in realism These were kind of key words of back weekend. Del the enjoy the while we discuss the new multifaceted in complexity of fascism in order to contextualize this we need to understand. Also the situation in italy at the time because in the beginning of the twentieth century italy a went through great sons formations in terms of modernisation industrial puddles at the same time. A huge immigration The great period from second half of nineteen send in the beginning. Many talents came to the united states. Actually one of the countries of the immigration There was a lot of poverty in the south too big divide between north and south so the north was leading industrialized. Italy was a concentrated who's unified as a nation state only in eighteen sixty started the process of unification they went unrest from mma workers in union sir movement in the feminists the feminist movement. Also italy had a lot of this sub rallies political address strikes especially in the north industrialized a north. So then we also had the same time we think of nineteen o nine of the first manifesto of future is a full. We had that at the beginning of the twentieth century was quite amazing. In terms of contrast political undress The beginning of Self awareness From the the more workers have a faculty councils. We have the factory milan. You know the fear that The only the this factor in very important the textile industry in the komo area and so forth lockdown act isn't so but they was all this political. You know i'm dressed so mussolini and fascist there were violent okay against the last against communism. Think nineteen seventy in the soviet. You know we had the first communist revolution so it was really a timer. Betty conflicts an important. I think that's only really world history of course and still mussalini grew that uses violence and violence was always pasta. Fascism in the right. They burn workers unions place books. You know there was a lot of of all these very violent and also the idea of war. Permanent war was an important principle of fascism. That stayed for the regime. The regime stopped it. So we'll cellini was then elected after the macho roma dating twenty to end started in nineteen fifty Cellini was first voted in the parliament. In the beginning of the partner mentally we had different parties today. Even the communists in the socialist to the public through many different parties but in one thousand nine hundred ninety four there was a drastic change in net Became a despotic regime. Totalitarian because one socialist representative giacomo del. The In the parliament denounced the mussolini and the fascist the national fascist party to have rigged the election so he was then kidnapped mussalini older. These kidnapping was killed. Found a few months later killed And then all the anti-fascist fascist in both anti-fascists were either killed or putting prisons and from then on old political parties. Where are not legal anymore. So only one pasta. And that's what fascism is about. Is one party to the asian. Yeah oh my gosh. Thank you if that was an amazing description for any of our listeners. Who might not be familiar with. Fascism in general or just like that very precise couple decades of time in italy so we are of course here today to talk about fashion in the intersection of fascism. And and you know in your book that you say. I'm quoting you. My focus here is to show how fashion the renaissance became. I sancha hottest as well as a political and state affair the via the cemetery laws and literature on appearance clothes and fashion in a way that was entirely similar to how the fact was named dedicated. Great energy to regulating the way. Italians express themselves in dress in both private and.

Kelly Mussolini world war two italy world war one today paul europe Today cellini new york Cellini one soviet first both komo one party eighteen sixty a few months later
"century italy" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"century italy" Discussed on Dressed: The History of Fashion

"Pal thank you so much for joining us today on dressed discuss your really amazing book. Fashion under fascism beyond the black shirt so before we delve into some of these fashioned aspects of our discussion today. I'm hoping that you might give some context for our listeners. About broadly speaking. what exactly is fascism. Thank you a bill for guy inviting me to this conversation. Delighted to be here with you So to responsive question. Fascism rules than ideology authoritarian ideology in movement. I started in italy in nineteen fifteen sold. The war was an important component. That had a great impact on the formation of this fast. She's at of combat. This was the beginning get Ninety nine teen. Mussolini was of course the head of fascism became the dude shape so he founded the national fascist party so started initially but then spread all over europe the end in the united states. Actually we need to remember that so it was a became. A talented now regime are despotic. Nationalism racism in realism These were kind of key words of back weekend. Del the enjoy the while we discuss the new multifaceted in complexity of fascism in order to contextualize this we need to understand. Also the situation in italy at the time because in the beginning of the twentieth century italy a went through great sons formations in terms of modernisation industrial puddles at the same time. A huge immigration The great period from second half of nineteen send in the beginning. Many talents came to the united states. Actually one of the countries of the immigration There was a lot of poverty in the south too big divide between north and south so the north was leading industrialized. Italy was a concentrated who's unified as a nation state only in eighteen sixty started the process of unification they went unrest from mma workers in union sir movement in the feminists the feminist movement. Also italy had a lot of this sub rallies political address strikes especially in the north industrialized a north. So then we also had the same time we think of nineteen o nine of the first manifesto of future is a full. We had that at the beginning of the twentieth century was quite amazing. In terms of contrast political undress

april today cassidy Francois gendre one french about twenty years ago callaghan
Fashion Under Fascism, an interview with Dr. Eugenia Paulicelli

Dressed: The History of Fashion

03:33 min | 1 year ago

Fashion Under Fascism, an interview with Dr. Eugenia Paulicelli

"Pal thank you so much for joining us today on dressed discuss your really amazing book. Fashion under fascism beyond the black shirt so before we delve into some of these fashioned aspects of our discussion today. I'm hoping that you might give some context for our listeners. About broadly speaking. what exactly is fascism. Thank you a bill for guy inviting me to this conversation. Delighted to be here with you So to responsive question. Fascism rules than ideology authoritarian ideology in movement. I started in italy in nineteen fifteen sold. The war was an important component. That had a great impact on the formation of this fast. She's at of combat. This was the beginning get Ninety nine teen. Mussolini was of course the head of fascism became the dude shape so he founded the national fascist party so started initially but then spread all over europe the end in the united states. Actually we need to remember that so it was a became. A talented now regime are despotic. Nationalism racism in realism These were kind of key words of back weekend. Del the enjoy the while we discuss the new multifaceted in complexity of fascism in order to contextualize this we need to understand. Also the situation in italy at the time because in the beginning of the twentieth century italy a went through great sons formations in terms of modernisation industrial puddles at the same time. A huge immigration The great period from second half of nineteen send in the beginning. Many talents came to the united states. Actually one of the countries of the immigration There was a lot of poverty in the south too big divide between north and south so the north was leading industrialized. Italy was a concentrated who's unified as a nation state only in eighteen sixty started the process of unification they went unrest from mma workers in union sir movement in the feminists the feminist movement. Also italy had a lot of this sub rallies political address strikes especially in the north industrialized a north. So then we also had the same time we think of nineteen o nine of the first manifesto of future is a full. We had that at the beginning of the twentieth century was quite amazing. In terms of contrast political undress

National Fascist Party Italy Mussolini United States Europe
"century italy" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

The Past Lives Podcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"century italy" Discussed on The Past Lives Podcast

"Shoes in Google images dated the seventeenth. Century Italy. And this no way I would have might operate imagines the asshole women were wearing at that time. Crowd law his these things do come through aren't they? It's Subtle but it confirms view in a way at assume I slacked the. So a thing you tell your friend and your friend Guy. It doesn't mean anything but because you've experienced it yourself, you've seen more INA. Yeah I think that it's just about being aware and being open to acknowledging something that could be weird or strange and. In that acknowledgement there's like a miracle that's unfolding I. Mean there's no doubt. Where are you going to come up with the buckled shoes I mean come on? That is very strange I mean. So there's something to this. and. I'm always a believer I. Know some people want to be skeptical about different things but. I feel like. We have so much sub-conscious and higher self material that just out of our grasp as were in physical form. But through hypnosis, it's like getting a window into the true depths of the Solomon. It's absolutely amazing. So. We've been talking about your book, Mitchell Kalma, the healing power of past life memories. The could you tell us about your other books? Yes I've got another one that came out earlier. This year is past lives with pets, which is one of my favorites. I started realizing that people believe. That pets that they had let's say when they were kid. In their current life may be came back to them. Kind of like that book in that film, The dog journey if listeners have been familiar with that, there's real clients that I have who told me that and I have a pair of cats that I believe came back to me from childhood, and then the other thing is that. Just. As a pleasant byproduct over the years I'd had many clients who. They're they're coming in for actual issue, but then accidentally they discover that. Oh. My Gosh look down or whatever happens to be in the sixteen hundreds. This is amazing and so it's just kind of a fun..

Google Century Italy Mitchell Kalma Solomon
"century italy" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on KOMO

"Symonds have announced the birth of a healthy baby boy this morning yeah mother and baby are doing well I'm sure the whole house will join me in sending congratulations all very right best wishes to them babies the third born that was sitting British prime minister this century Italy Santam corona virus pandemic strategy saying is Godfrey's prepared for a second wave of infections even bigger than the first year of its gradual re opening leads to a surge of new cases and the university research surveys found that alcohol consumption in Belgium is remaining mostly stable during the country's lockdown with only one out of four respondents saying they're drinking more while confined at all I'm Tom rivers at the A. B. C. news foreign does handle on it democratic U. S. senator Patty Murray says the trump administration continues to mismanaged the coronavirus response especially when it comes to delays in ramping up test kits come was Carlene Johnson reports senator Murray held a press call to criticize the lack of a national testing strategy where are the pets without a doubt the trump administration's early testing delays and missteps Constance dearly in time and why does president trump and his administration have made big promises on testing but have yet to come near delivering on those we're nowhere close but others blame longstanding FDA regulations for creating barriers to the private industry being allowed to create a test and get it out there Dr Anthony Fauci if you want to get the kind of blanket testing and availability that anybody can get it you have to embrace the private sector another issue has been many of the materials come from other countries all of which of needed supplies for their own testing Carly.

Symonds prime minister Godfrey Belgium Tom rivers U. S. senator Patty Murray Carlene Johnson president Dr Anthony Fauci Carly Constance trump FDA
"century italy" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on KOMO

"Announced the birth of a healthy baby boy this morning yeah both mother and baby are doing well I'm sure the whole house want to join with me in sending congratulations all very right best wishes to them babies the third born that was sitting British prime minister this century Italy said of corona virus pandemic strategy saying is Godfrey's prepared for a second wave of infections even bigger than the first year of its gradual re opening leads to a surge of new cases and the university research surveys found that alcohol consumption in Belgium is remaining mostly stable during the country's lockdown with only one out of four respondents saying they're drinking more while confined at all I'm Tom rivers said the A. B. C. news foreign dance in London democratic U. S. senator Patty Murray says the trump administration continues to mismanaged the coronavirus response especially when it comes to delays in ramping up test kits come was Carlene Johnson reports senator Murray held a press call to criticize the lack of a national testing strategy where are the pets without a doubt the trump administration's early testing delays and missteps Constance dearly in time and why does president trump and his administration have made big promises on testing but have yet to come near delivering on those we're nowhere close but others blame longstanding FDA regulations for creating barriers to the private industry being allowed to create a test and get it out there Dr Anthony Fauci if you want to get the kind of blanket testing and availability that anybody can get it you have to embrace the private sector another issue has been many of the materials come from other countries all of which of needed supplies for their own testing Carly Johnson co more news traffic.

prime minister Italy Godfrey Belgium Tom rivers senator Patty Murray Carlene Johnson president Dr Anthony Fauci London Constance trump FDA
"century italy" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Just good for cold and flu but you've talked about so many other health benefits so how does your super C. twenty two formula helps increase energy when the English sailors came over on the ship in the sixteenth century Italy was the food they were eating who wants to be converted into energy because they didn't pack a citrus fruits like oranges lemons limes and why they develop your when I think people with saggy skin pale complexion feeling listless suffering from joint pain having trouble sleeping breathing these are key indicators of a lack of vitamin C. so we're not getting enough vitamin C. your body isn't producing energy so if that happens how do you expect to function properly the point is is that if you don't have energy what you won't have if you don't have enough vitamin C. in your system you just don't have any movement you don't have any life your life just go down to that degree period I want to talk a little bit about immunity how can your supersede twenty to help bolster someone's immune system about twenty three percent of people in the country have a vitamin C. depletion which causes their immune systems absolutely crash your body has something called natural killer cells which are the T. cells which are white blood cells and they're making out viruses cancer cells they're like the navy seals of the body and there are a hundred percent dependent on having vitamin C. presidents to be activated so it's very very important and you have to get according to a study at least a thousand milligrams per day and realized that my supersedes twice that amount and this it shortens the duration and the severity of cold while it also prevents colds and flu from coming back well it just makes a lot of sense how does your supersede twenty to help improve your heart health vitamin C. helps reduce the incidence of heart problems first.

Italy colds flu
"century italy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

03:08 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"You store that come in nature and let's put it all in one formula that's a different thought it's very comprehensive I see most people think vitamin C. really was just good for cold and flu but you've talked about so many other health benefits so how does your supersede twenty two formula helps increase energy when the English sailors came over in the ships in the sixteenth century Italy was the food they were eating when they converted into energy because they didn't pack of citrus fruits like oranges lemons limes and why they developed early when I see people with saggy skin pale complexion feeling listless suffering from joint pain having trouble sleeping bruising these are key indicators of a lack of vitamin C. so we're not getting enough vitamin C. your body isn't producing energy so if that happens how do you expect to function properly the point is is that if you don't have energy which you won't have if you don't have enough vitamin C. in your system you just don't have any movement you don't have any life your life just go down to that degree period I want to talk a little bit about immunity how can your supersede twenty to help bolster someone's immune system about twenty three percent of people in this country have a vitamin C. depletion which causes their immune system absolutely crash your body has something called natural killer cells which are the T. cells which are white blood cells and they're seeking out viruses cancer cells they're like the navy seals of the body and there are a hundred percent dependent on having vitamin C. presidents to be activated so it's very very important and you have to get according to the study at least a thousand milligrams per day and realized that my supersedes twice that amount and this is shortens the duration and the severity of cold while it also prevents colds and flu from coming back well it just makes a lot of sense how does your supersede twenty to help improve your heart health vitamin C. helps reduce the incidence of heart problem first by reducing cholesterol and second by preventing plaque buildup and improving circulation that it does this by strengthening the blood vessel wall might be perceived twenty two formula may also reduce your blood pressure I also have a quite a bit of evidence and personal use with super three my brother in law called me one day said you know I'm I'm over fifty my doctor wants to put me on a cholesterol drug and a blood pressure drug is there anything you can do and so I wrote up a program which included my feel pretty twenty two and he went back to his doctor sixty days later and the doctors yep everything's normal I knew these medications would do it for you need to know all my brothers and natural back three put me on the vitamin C. formula and the rest is history while the other thing it kind of strikes me as unique here is super C. twenty two is.

Hook, Line, and Sink-Her: A History of Fishnets

Dressed: The History of Fashion

07:26 min | 2 years ago

Hook, Line, and Sink-Her: A History of Fishnets

"Berry wrote to US last month with the following an inquiry. And I'm quoting him. He says my wife and I have very different. Connotations we see fishnets I primarily. Associate them with burlesque and showgirls. But she remembers wearing them as a young girl in the nineteen sixties and primarily associates them with much younger girls and more innocent fashion. What's the history of Fishnets as a fashion accessory and that Berry is a great question and an inquiry that I immediately jumped on and it took me way back into unexpected and quite frankly unchartered territory for myself. This might not come as a surprise to our listeners but fishnets are of course athlete named after Fishing Nets School. The obvious yes April. It's been awhile since. We've put our dress. Detective hats on. Oh I see where we're going with this if you wouldn't mind grabbing yours a we are heading back in history actually quite far back maybe the farthest we've ever gone we're going back. Twenty eight thousand. I think we might need more than a half for that up. But I'm ready whenever you. I'm so sorry to disappoint you. Dress listeners but women were not in fact wearing fishnets. Twenty eight thousand years ago that we have evidence however in two thousand eighteen archaeologist and South Korea found fourteen limestone sinkers so basically these weights that have these grooves and them that indicated that they would have been tied to fishing at these extent. Sinkers are believed to be anywhere from twenty eight thousand five hundred and fifty. I love how precise date is to twenty nine thousand four hundred sixty years old and this discovery actually added nineteen thousand years to the earliest known use of fishing nets. My mind is officially blown. A little pink. Yeah and Fishing. Nets are essentially fibers nodded into an open structure resembling a grid. They've been used by cultures all over the world for thousands and thousands of years obviously and while the net attached to those thinkers that cash. Just mentioned doesn't survive. There are some really really old net. Set still do. The entry net found an entry of Finland is one of the oldest extant fishing nets in the world dating to around eighty four fifty BC E. And what is especially fascinating? Is that the same technology used to make these early fishing nets more or less is still in use today which is amazing and while our fish nets might be made of different fibers. They basically exists in the same form as they would have thousands or even tens of thousands of years ago but when did fishing nets you know this simple impractical device used for catching fish cast become fish nets that we all know and some of US wear today. Well this was not as easy and answered track down as I was hoping although I am grateful to pass dress guests Karen Been Horan. Who pointed me to our earliest visual source not eighty four hundred BC early but fifteen hundred to fifteen twenty ad early so you know five hundred years ago carrying authored a book with Jane Merrill called. She's got legs a history of hemlines and fashion and in the book they feature an image of an Italian jar from the walters. Art Museum in Baltimore which depicts a woman wearing these calf-high stockings which basically we can describe as fishnet stockings. And will yeah. It's pretty cool and it you are. Maybe we'll post it. And this is a painted image so not an extent example of fish nets but we have little else to go on except that the artists took their inspiration from somewhere. So maybe somewhere someone wearing These actual calf-high fishnet stockings. But the question is were women wearing fishnets in sixteenth century Italy. We might not have hard and fast evidence that they were but this is around the time. That scholars generally agree that lace a handmade openwork fabric was first being developed and really implemented into dress in Europe. And I know you're thinking lace fishnets lace fishnets. Well stay with us here. You know there are essentially two different types of lace and there can be many variations of those two types but the main two types are needle lace which includes a single needle and thread or uses a single needle and thread and there's also bobbin lace which involves multiple threads on Bobbins and they get braided together crossed over into many number of patterns so while we often associate lace with its intricate. Floral patterning of the foundation or the ground of this patterning is frequently a net. So if you look at the ground of. Let's say Valentine's lace. You will see that it's a square or diamond mesh or like an openwork very similar albeit smaller size to what we associate with fish net. So there's there's there's usually a net background on lace or a lot of lace. Yeah in the same can be said for filet lace April where patterning is achieved by embroidery on a knotted net ground so emphasis on the nodded. Because we just referenced this in relation to the construction of fishing nets and in fact fillet work is thought to have developed directly out of the fishing net which would have been owned by any number of European communities to which it would have been an indispensable tool. It's not far fetched to imagine that an enterprising woman might have recognized its potential value as a textile and began experimenting with decorative effects that being said cast all of these places. We just mentioned. Were being produced at this time entirely by hand which was incredibly time intensive and highly meticulous in this process and this meant that laces were prohibitively. Expensive all better few and because of this they really became status symbols and it is because of this reason that we have so many amazing portrait's from the sixteenth seventeenth eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that have these incredibly detailed depictions of lace. These men and women wanted to show off their lace right. They're literally wearing their wealth On their clothing and and it was an important that that the the porteous relayed that to the viewer but while we see the origins of an open net patterning lace of this period. I still had a really hard time finding any evidence of handmade lace net stockings. An I surmise. That these pieces were just too valuable to us as a garment that in addition to not being seen what have been subjected to the wear and tear a practical use. Because they're on your feet. You Walk on your feet for women to even begin to consider wearing net as a footwear fashion accessory to things appear to have had to have happened. I saw one lace net. How become affordable and thus more disposable and to as an impractical garment because you know fish nets fishnet tights are nothing if not a novelty? They really have to be seen to be appreciated. It's not like they're keeping you warm or anything like

Fishing Nets School Berry United States South Korea Karen Been Horan Finland Europe Italy Jane Merrill Walters Art Museum Valentine Porteous Baltimore
Yuval Sharon's Not-So-'Sweet Land'

The Frame

04:32 min | 2 years ago

Yuval Sharon's Not-So-'Sweet Land'

"Sharon is used to getting some pretty baffled looks when he tries to explain the work of his opera company which is called the industry. Sharon's hopscotch for example took place inside cars driving around L. A. In invisible cities people listen to his opera on headphones as they move through. La's Union station. Sharon's latest piece is called sweet land. It's a collaborative air opera about colonialism. And displacement is set in the La State historic park which is just north of downtown in sweetland opera is used to challenge and dismantle some myths about America's origins. Here's Yuval Sharon. I have been speaking a lot recently about opera. This country being a remaining colonialist art form because so much of opera that we see in this country is the German French Italian repertoire in those languages telling those stories and here we are in America Retelling the stories over and over again and it seems like especially in our times now when there is so much to talk about and there is such a need for artists to be speaking about the kind of things that that we've taken on with this project and so much more. It seems strange to go into the privileged sphere of an Opera House and hear a story about nineteenth century. Italy There's something about that that feels so escapist And feels like it's a. It's trying to pretend like the situation out on the street in our daily lives. is not as dire as it really is So I think that that was for me. A real push to try and create a piece like like sweet land and one of the most important aspects of it was creating the conditions for collaboration To really flow something that would be not another iteration of a kind of hierarchical leadership But the idea that a more horizontal consensus based process would be something that I could offer a kind of antidote to some of the problems that we're talking about before we talk about the story and the music I wanna ask you about the venue it said in the La State historic park and this was native land. It was home to the San Gabriel Band of mission Indians then. It was the site of the Southern Pacific Transportation Companies River Station where migrants from around the world would disembark trains Ryan and now it said against the skyline of downtown Los Angeles next to a metro track next to the one ten freeway. There's like a little wine store across the street. It's got so much history. Why was it a good place for you to set the story to me when we were conceiving of this project we were thinking about the right site for where this this piece should take place and of course we started thinking about things like warehouses or alternative spaces but but you know still interior spaces and I was hearing from my collaborators over and over again how much The relationship to land with such a crucial aspect of what they wanted to explore with this piece and when it comes to that relationship with land it seemed to me that one of the one of the one of the places that that really hold so much of. La's cultural history and meaning. Is that sliver of land? That is now the state historic park. you mentioned it's a couple of its iterations but it had so many others for a long time. It was considered a Brownfield as if Meaning that they didn't think that anything could grow on it anymore because of how terribly it was maintained during industrialization during the railroad era So so thinking that. And it wasn't until Lauren. Bon came up with not a cornfield project. This really bold experiment in kind of replanting The land showing it's continuous fertility Before that people sort of abandoned it and thinking that that was the most important tongue village that it was the site of this crucial Spanish settlement that it was this a flood plain all of those things for a while were buried under layers of industrialization and thanks to Lauren and th thanks now to the park. It has It has this new life to it but those layers Still struggle to come out those voices that are still part of the archaeology that layering effect. That's in the land Still has a lot of voices that have been suppressed and a big part of what the opera was about was not to pinpoint any one particular language or one particular story to lift up but instead to think about and to invite the audience to contemplate Those stories that are in the land that were

Yuval Sharon La State Historic Park Los Angeles Ryan America Lauren Union Station Sweetland Southern Pacific Transportatio San Gabriel Band BON
"century italy" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:53 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Century Italy to find out what tooth care looked like then let's do it okay so I'm going to quote from the trust you love which is a famous collection of treatises on women's health from medieval Italy translated this is a translation by professor monic H. green and there are several entries in the Trotula about what to do about problems with the teeth first of all here's one for black tee off to a good start quote for black and badly colored teeth take walnut shells well cleaned of their interior rind which is green and we rode the teeth three times a day and when they have been well rubbed we wash the mouth with warm wine and with salt mixed in if desired do you swallow the wine I would think not not with the salt thrown in there but you know this said this reminds me of the episodes that we've recorded for stuff to blow your mind where he talked about the history of well cocktails but also things that were sort of like cocktails at least involved alcohol being mixed with other substances and very often those were magic potions or some sort of medicinal mixture that was supposed to aid you in very often they did involve wine or some other alcohol it is striking how many of the treatments of the past involved alcoholic beverages it almost makes you think that the like in some cases the alcoholic beverage may have been a sort of consolation prize for the fact that the treatment does not generally work or if it had some kind of placebo effect the placebo effect might have been linked to the fact that the alcohol gets you a little bit drunk yes and and I I can't think about the the salt aspect of this without thinking of about some of the salt water treatments have been employed in the past where you're sincere you're you are just drinking salt water maybe salt water mixed with honey or milk or something but but just drinking a bunch of salt water to drink your some ailment yes some of the ancients actually thought that that could heal you of problems yeah and the not so ancient said I recall correctly here's another one this is also from the Trotula this one sounds more like this is for rich people I think quote for whitening black teeth in strengthening corroded or rotting gums and for a bad smelling mouth this works the best take some each of cinnamon clove spikenard mastic frankincense grain wormwood crab foot date pets and olives hello I'm not sure I know what crap that is I see crab put is a plant okay looking it up there appears to be a plan that at least in the modern world there is some kind of plant the maybe a parasitic plant that grows on the tea tree or something that it some modern people at on the internet I've seen refer to his crab foot but as to this medieval reference I don't know if it refers to the same thing or something else or to just crabs feet I would hope they would say foot of crappy who were legal or an actual footage of crap yeah are we get all these together what we do well you grow XO to resume the quote grind all of these and reduce them to a powder then read the affected places like why is in order to make black teeth white take ten grams of roasted pumice tender Ms of salt to drams each of cinnamon and cloves and honey as needed makes the promised in Seoul with a sufficient amount of honey then place them on a plane dish upon the coals until they burn and reduce the other spices to a powder and when there is need read the teeth well that and sound all that bad well yeah they put in honey in there while I was like wait a second you're brushing your teeth with honey that's sounds counterproductive well I think one possibility here and and I believe I read this in reference to the ancient Egyptians is that if you were to use honey in your toothpaste would help hold everything together because if because we would all these ingredients like it sounds like it's coming together as a powder and certainly powders were employed but the difference between a powder and paste is kind of the the addition of some sort of viscous substance right right now for a few other recipes for ancient toothpastes which again various paste washes tooth picks were used throughout Eurasia we have the ancient Egyptian evidence well as pointed out by a twenty sixteen National Geographic article a fourth century CE recipe and I believe this was a this was in an Egyptian RSP called for paste made from salt peppermint and dried iris flower dentist Hines Newman actually try this out in the two thousand three and reported that it made his mouth feel clean and fresh though it also made his gums bleed through still he said that this was probably this probably would've been an improvement over some of the the soap toothpaste that were used prior to World War two soap toothpaste yeah basically it's just a a reminder and we'll get into this that's your group for progress here that moment that really toothpaste as we know it the dental dental hygiene products as we know it are really a post World War two phenomena like that is really where we enter the more less modern age of of dental hygiene fourteenth and fifteenth century England J. Tuesday's made from honey salt rice flour meal and the honey as I mentioned earlier this held it all together and give it flavor also from the from the time period yet to powder made from the burnt branches of a broom plant to mixed with burnt all on bland student a black ashy substance that had a likely just horrid taste but maybe that's where you know the black and teeth of post apocalyptic societies come from okay yeah for some reason this is the only the the only thing they know to go back to the skip all the other dental hygiene products they just go back to this action mixture we're out of gasoline time to get out the black and dalam I know I mentioned the book clean earlier and she includes the some interesting material on the eighteenth century Paris in clean Smith writes that you kind of had a perfect storm of bad teeth at the time because you had the existing problems of dental hygiene again sort of the problems of civilization compounded by poverty and increased access to sugar is sticky fruits and sweetmeats bad debt traditional teeth cleaning made math is just couldn't contend with you couldn't just scraper wipe your mouth clean with sticks in cloth like one might have been able to for than in previous ages innocently these these methods that we had that were you know pretty good we're certainly just ineffective on top of that you had a lot of additional damage done by course in badly ground powders ashes in white or so the house the the the very products are being rolled out to help with dental hygiene or also contributing to some of the problems worn enamel in your teeth and gums end up resulting from these products and teeth could also be destroyed by over use of cleansing sticks in irons that were used to you know to to to get in there and slow scraping clean but toward the end of the century as she notes increased understanding and vastly improve brushes and pace we're beginning to make an impact Robert this is this is giving me vibes from like marathon man yes is it safe well over use of cleansing sticks and irons and sounds like it is not safe we do not recommend the use of irons no one of the common features you're seeing in many of these ancient toothpaste into his powder recipes is that there is the the there's a common need for some kind of abrasive powder something that would be also useful in say scrubbing a pot clean or something like that you know sometimes they might use sold to like rocks older than might use standard Asher something like that we've seen references to power is that would that used ox hooves or that years something like egg shells which roof about sums really awful or as we mentioned several times earlier promise you could look the Greeks and Romans who occasionally used a crush bone oyster shells the powder charcoal and dark in the room is also added flavoring to assist with with bad breath so many terrible stories of the ancient Roman period involved oyster shells yeah I think about like the murder of Hypatia at that that supposedly they like killed her with oyster shells hi like a bunch of them are just just like one really sharp on well this might not be a historical an actor I might just be the legend of the story is that Hypatia was killed by a mob who like scraped her to death with oyster shells just horrible yeah well I guess that'll get the get the job done that the Chinese are said to of had a wide variety of two faced overtime which included the use of ginseng herbal Manson salt in this makes sense given the idea that the the the robust nature of Chinese traditional medicine before eighteen fifty most toothpaste we're not pace they were powders they were again some sort of powdery substance to you would you would put in your mouth and kind of rubbing your teeth in your your gums to clean things up the New Mexico by all parties ID's.

Century Italy
"century italy" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

04:08 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on Ideas

"You're listening to ideas on. CBC Radio One in Canada across North America on Sirius. Xm In Australia on our end and around the world at CBC DOT CA slash ideas. You can also hear ideas on the CBC listen APP or wherever you get your podcast. I'm Nola I add. Today's episode is the latest in our series ideas from the trenches were we highlight the work of outstanding. PhD students around the country. Aaron meet Emma is a historian specializing in the sixteenth century Italian dual. He's also a skilled swordsman himself. But there's much more due to the dual than knowing how to wheel the blade errands. Research and archives from sixteenth century. Italy has turned up exciting new insights into just how complex complex that tradition of dueling was. He uses the techniques of micro history to fill in the gaps and missing chapters from the historical record ideas from the trenches presented by Nikola and Tom Hal so once upon a time in Europe long before the fifteen hundreds dual seemed like a good way to establish the truth and trial by combat. It was thought could actually reveal if somebody was guilty of a crime. I demand a trial by combat home. It was very process where you have priests blessing this action and people that were swearing on relics that they were telling the truth and they they would fight it out. This is Danielle Bilski. She's a writer and podcast. Host with medieval lists dot net a site dedicated to popularizing the Middle Ages. And this is in the early early Middle Ages so up until about twelve hundred right after twelve hundred. Pope starts to really say officially. This is a bad idea. The trial by combat is whoever covers. The winner God is on their side has decided that this person is telling the truth You're not really supposed to test God in that way. So the pope says you know guys this is not working very well uh-huh because we know that somebody who's guilty could still win this fight. And that's why they really distanced themselves from the pope says well if you guys are GonNa do trial by combat. We're not involved in any more that said I think that there's still an element when people were using delos way to figure out who is on the side of the rate that they're deciding fate is going to figure this out that God is going to figure out who is right when historians stories talk about the end of the Medieval era in Europe. They often point to the invention of the printing press. Usually what are concerned with these days is something that you see in print went and back in the day. It was something that you heard in the Middle Ages everything was done orally so what someone said to you was you. Were legally bound by it so someone without was taking an oath to the king for example what they said out loud was what became law. That was really the basis of contracts the basis of witness testimony. The basis of your character was all based on what people said about you and so if somebody is putting you down there saying something out loud. That has a lot of weight it has more more weight than it does now. You kinda defend that reputation or early in a way that you don't need to now so printing turn us all into liar. Printing made it so that we could shake off an insult that someone said out loud because it was an imprint and it wouldn't have such a distribution Remember these are smaller communities as as well and if someone says something about that will spread a lot further for us. Someone might say something about you on the street and it's not a big deal but if someone says about you in a tweet sleep than it is a big deal because more people will hear it so it's a different community that we have them. Danielle thank you so much thank you. It's been a pleasure. Danielle hosts the medieval podcast from medieval dot. Net per new book is called life in Medieval Europe fact.

Danielle Bilski Aaron Pope CBC DOT CA CBC Europe Sirius North America Canada Australia Italy Nikola Emma Tom Hal
"century italy" Discussed on Ideas

Ideas

05:29 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on Ideas

"Welcome to ideas once upon upon a time in a faraway land. A man's reputation matter a lot but security protect. Take my own reputation the truth. You haven't salted me I apologize. Welcome to the world hold of sixteenth century. Italy or gentlemen cared so much about their reputations that they'd sooner face death then be called a liar by any one of their peers. The dueling takes place in this world. Where if there's a challenge you have to respect? You are a liar you are not to liar. Defended with weapons. Alternative with weapons tools and Italy are very public people would come to watch. It was television. MM-HMM AARON METEOROID is studying for his PhD in history at York University. You have to look really really small things and see the little peculiar in particular details tails newbury interesting complicated fashion show with blood their sword. Why is the symbol of your noble status and your Ban Hood Joe? You're sort of. You're sort teach you down the street like chicken today. What happens when a culture puts honor and being true to your word I in life itself second and what the long loss ritual of the dual you can tell us about our own cultural priorities? This is the latest in our series ideas from the trenches where we highlight the work of outstanding students across Canada. The series is presented by Nikola. Look and Tom Hal so this one is actually deliciously Salie Roman situation so it'll be like a good example of how the Roman conception of the dual works. We need Erin meet in a small upstairs room at a large church in downtown Toronto. This is where he and a handful of friends practice the art of fencing and historical reenactment. We have a number of supernumeraries as well. Aaron is leading his friends through the social dynamics of a real quarrel from the sixteenth century. He's going off to translations of a memoir by an Italian Goldsmith named Shalini. What's happened is our dear? French lady is at the restaurant in Rome. And this fifteen twenty two according to the autobiography and he's with a bunch of Florentines friends because it's a Florentine holiday and well. Aw this Roman soldier comes up trying to impress a lady and starts. Well what do you do. Jeff Speak Evil of Florentines. They're five re-enactors here including Aaron. But they're not doing reenactment in the way I've heard about where you dress up as a character from olden times this is something else. Yes so that's why Florentines are the the worst. I hear this. I am offended. I sneak away from the table for. I don't want to make any of my friends offended for that would be bad. And then we'd have mob of going after so surreptitiously go over to ask Sir. Is it you that has been speaking badly of Florentines. I am that man. Dan I am this Matt smacks me in the face. We both polar swords out. You're GonNa Start Your tickets. Tickets breath creek very quickly sour. What happens now we try and pull them out so? Hey Hey hey no finding go all. Everybody wants to be a peacemaker. It's good for the reputation so we break it up the next day. Issue a challenge to you to come find me. I have a challenge. So what do I do. You've read this. I have to admit that I don't quite follow this. First reenactment enactment. Apparently it's about some Italians who once upon a time manage to avoid getting into a sword fight and now there's two ways I've seen this ending translated in this this particular ending according to the footnote which I didn't put on in the originals that I send out go standby your primary according to what happens in this. This particular translation is that we've come to a gentleman's agreement and we decide that the needs to be no bloodshed today. Apologies are exchanged however in the other translation. I've seen and I have to go through the Italian beef. Be Certain it says that the other guy failed to show up. Oh come on. We came here expecting to see real life old fashioned Italian dealing with swords. So what caves when we say. A dual dual dual doesn't necessarily end in combat. There's a process between issuing a challenge for a duel and the resolution of a dual people were quarrelling all the the time it ending in combat. That was the more rare thing. So how would you define like a clear dual. What you need is an offense? It's in the Lombard laws. You have to essentially give somebody the lie. You have to call them a liar and then they have to challenge that and say I'm not a liar and I will prove it with weapons..

Florentines AARON METEOROID Italy Erin Rome Canada York University Tom Hal Nikola Toronto Jeff Speak Goldsmith Dan Matt
"century italy" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

Jewish History Matters

12:44 min | 2 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on Jewish History Matters

"With sort of set of beliefs. Really at the heart heard of it for them right right. I WanNa go back to something you said before you were talking about the publishing of scientific research today. There's one thing that could be said about the the publishing of Peace talks about how to construct a bio weapon or smallpox or something but how to Three D. print into gun o s a great example right But I think one thing that really strikes me think about research on vaccines and whether they are harmful or not and and I mean So many of the papers have been debunked that that makes the case that vaccines are harmful. You know clearly necessary but one might ask. Is it a public flick. Danger to publish papers that even ask the question to begin with because it provides fodder for people to begin to say you know what I don't want to vaccinate my kid for measles and and then this becomes a public danger one of the things that this interesting as we talk about censorship and we think about it in the early modern context is that it highlights the ways in which ideas are powerful full and that I generally not a fan of censorship. You but I think that that was interesting about looking at the history of censorship is that it raises all sorts of very difficult Colton unsettling questions about the role of censorship in a society whether or not is useful in some instances I think I I think that generally speaking censorship is something that we should avoid but when we look at it in historical context to ask. Why did they wanted this so badly? Why do people go along with it and it? What can we learn from that? I think that there's is a very important question. I think the question to which there aren't easy answers but I think it's helpful to understand that these are questions that we've struggled with for many many centuries I mean I think one of the examples again the vaccine example. We think about this as calling the efficacy of vaccines into question in the first place opens up the question of whether or not they are effective to people who don't understand the science behind it and makes them active participants in in that conversation even if they don't understand the science this gets to the idea of an expert and a certain point you have to question like so. How different is it from saying that the the Catholic Church thinks that you shouldn't be able to read the Bible unless you read it in the Latin vulgarity? They're gonNA come up with different ideas if you're only reading it in the Latin. Ah In in the in the vernacular these are sort of the same questions about who should have access to information and these are questions that we have to grapple with a democracy like in a democracy we think that information should move freely and the people should be informed but that requires a great deal of thinking especially in this era of expertise. I think I think we're in an era era of sort of deep expertise in which people have huge deep learning and then we both need to respect that and also not isolate late them as the only people who are able to them participate in that conversation. This is one of the lessons maybe from thinking historically about censorship Yeah I mean I think. Think one of the challenges is that you know we do live in. An era of experts packs are often ignored. Part of what happens is well when we talk about sort of our own era is that experts censor themselves when we look at the history of censorship. It trains are I to look for the ways in which censorship exists Whether we're talking about self censorship or or any other kind of censorship in our own society and makes us think seriously about what constitutes information control troll and when that feels like censorship. When it doesn't yeah I mean I'm partial to thinking about questions of information control? That's the central question that it drives my own research in terms of the history of archives. It's a different kind of control but I mean if we brought in the way of thinking about censorship that it's not just about the books and the text but about the ideas it allows us to look at a whole bunch of different historical contexts alongside it for instance when we think about the Jewish context and the and the inquisition cushion and the inclusion of course did not just target crypto Jews they they targeted native Americans extensively as well when we think about throughout central and South America. But I think that that was interesting is that we think what the dynamics of the control of information there as well. It's it's there's something very very important going on that. We need to think about in the early modern era And Censorship is part of that story there. Yeah and I'm glad you brought up the inquisition. It's important always to differentiate shade also. There are many inquisitions right inquisition. The Spanish inquisition. The Portuguese inquisition the Roman inquisition. The Venetian inquisition the medieval inquisitions that are based in cities. So just just as a as has a heads up there. These are different Legal structures involved in different places and their rules are slightly different. But I think that one of the things that's really interesting here is that the inquisition is all about control. Role of people and their ideas and the congregation of the index of prohibited. Books is about the control of texts. But these things you might realize the control of ideas he has in the control of texts. In the control of people are all intertwined at the same time this becomes is actually one of the things that I'm quite interested in studying is how these Different Regulatory Tori bodies Conflict at times or come into conversation with each other different times the archives that I work in when I'm working in the Vatican archives of the congregation agregation of the doctrine of the faith which holds the archives of both the inquisition and the index of prohibited books. So it's it's helpful to put both of those things into into context together one for controlling heresy. The other for controlling books and books as spread heresy in particular Right so I guess especially when we try to think about the relationship between the censorship of Medical and scientific texts and the context of Jewish history. Ustry what what is the relationship there when we think about the relationship between for instance the inquisition and the index or any other sort of elements of thinking about the intersection of of these two realms. But do you think that it's mostly just in terms of the conceptual frameworks that we can apply from one to the other. It's not just conceptual frameworks. Though these are governing bodies that are in a certain sense both responsible for the same thing but maybe in different media. Yeah and so. There are times at which the inquisition is intervening and in fact when when it should be the index and vice versa Though mostly settled by the seventeenth century mid to elite seventeenth century but over the course of the sixteenth seventeenth centuries when we spoken about reading licenses the ability to grant reading licenses bounces back and forth between the inquisition and the congregation of the index of prohibited books. So it's There are these aspects of censorship that as the Catholic bureaucracy itself is evolving these different parts these different kinds of regulations and up in different hands at different times. And I think that it's like really. I think it's really important to break down that when we talk about the church and this is probably true for thinking about Judaism in different times and places as well but when we talk about the church the church is made up of a bunch of different actors. A bunch of different factions. And I think that when we think about the inquisition and end the congregation of the index as separate bodies that allows us to see the people who are part of those groups Acting sort of in their own interest in the interest entrusted their beliefs that that comes out much more clearly right. I mean I think the other thing to always keep in mind as well is that we are talking about Catholic censorship in particular all right and there were of course many many diverse censorship regimes Throughout Europe at this time absolutely censorship is ubiquitous in early. It is everywhere. There's state censorship and it's to point out that when I talk about Catholic censorship that that's also state censorship right because I'm talking about the papal states that controlled much Italy In this period so yes it's religious censorship but it's also political censorship but all all states have censorship regimes. They're rate ways that you have to license a book before it can be printed much of what we've been talking about is tax that are already printed in already circulating that are being censored but censorship happens at multiple levels roles in many different sort of governing the level of many different governing authorities Right so I guess someone to think about here. Is You know like what are some of the the distinguishing features of these different censorship regimes. And and how they apply to the different areas where they are accent. Yeah I think one of the most important things to bear in mind especially as we think about sort of along the way or a long history of censorship is the biggest difference in my view between censorship in the early modern period and censorship today the level of secrecy people in early modern Europe knew what they weren't allowed to know when the index of prohibited books is published that means that it's printed it's nailed to the doors of churches and read aloud from pulpits. That's what it means to publish not just the printed but that it is literally made public people so people know what books they aren't supposed to read and I think that that's very different from when we think about sort of censorship regime today a day where we don't even necessarily know what it is that we're missing there's a level of secrecy that's just sort of maybe in someways beyond the early modern imagination that's quite different right. I mean I wasn't sure how much we're gonNA talk about this. But I mean it's it seems like a great example of this one takes for instance the Muller report. We don't no what it was that that was redacted from the report. We have a sense of some of the things in some of the reasons why things have been redacted but we don't know what could be. There could be anything with the same thing about any other government document that is redacted submitted foia request for some kind of documentation. They're required to blot out. You know expurgate you might say some information and there's no way to really know if they are removing things that they should or things that they just don't want you to see you know. I'm not sure I would call that censorship in of itself. But but I think that you raising an interesting point here about to a certain extent. We don't know but we don't know I'm sure you know this already. But the freedom of Information Act requests some of the things that have to come out of those in. This isn't censorship to my view. This it's about privacy if you're certain kinds of medical information what about people has to always be removed but incredibly onerous process to do this and it's always an incredibly onerous process to go through and figure out what materials to come out but my understanding is that there are some sort sort of ideas kicking roundabout ways of sort of using blockchain to automate those kinds of processes in having a reading some of this material in order to do that level of redaction. which again? I don't think it's the same as censorship. We have to always ask when we are trying to figure out if information is removed if it's censorship or not we have to understand the context accent great. That's what gets us the answer to that question. I think that what is interesting about all of this is that it highlights a couple of things about kind of our modern modern information age. That are again. Perhaps different from the early modern period in you know really interesting in these distinctive ways the first one being that there is just too much information formation to censor that if we tried to take the same methods of censorship that were being utilized in in Sixteenth Century Italy for instance it. This would be impossible. It's just not practical then again. Of course you look at China and they have put into place a very effective censorship regime in terms of the Internet there and and so that's one thing is that it highlights the different scale of the amount of information it limits to the censorship in it also highlights the ways in which algorithms play play a role in censorship. or in at least filtering information and this comes down to some perhaps touchy political issues. You have people on on the conservative side of the political spectrum making claims that there are kind of censorship this taking place say on social media platforms. I actually think that that's like totally overblown. It was interesting there. Is that the the US the idea of censorship to hold up and say this is what's happening now. Of course. There's no way to prove that such censorship is is happening but but what is interesting about that is it. Highlights the pervasive idea of what is censorship among the public and this idea also of the role of computers and algorithms like Ai. Or whatever that could be put to use in censorship Even if it's not because we don't know what's being censored and what we're seeing versus what we're not people can come to this conclusion. Even if it's not really based on any data yeah I think one of the things that my research adds is constant reminder that you can't have censorship without outs sensors as I mean..

Europe smallpox measles Catholic Church Colton China South America US Italy Sixteenth Century Italy someways Muller
"century italy" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:11 min | 3 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"So. let me tell you about the most successful serial killer whose name you've never heard of her name is Julia so fana and she killed hundreds of men in seventeenth century Italy when she turned her make up business into a poison factory and if you approached her and she trusted you she would sell you this deadly concoction called aqua to fana in this thought to have been laced with arsenic lead and belladonna and she made it her mission her goal in life was to help you but they referred to in the story as a spy ring windows a murder their husbands because during the renaissance you actually couldn't get out of a marriage there was no possibility for divorce particularly in Italy was Catholic Church there was no allowable divorce women were forced into marriage by their families without having a say in the matter and many women were very very unhappy at the at the husbands level of control and so she decided she was going to with her through her make up factory. provide an out and she was able to buy slipping people this thing that people that hide in their medicine cat or rather their their make up boxer make up cabinet this thing that you could then slip into someone soup it was untraceable because just the right amount she calculated this to kill someone she got she managed to do this so she was fine no one knew what was going on they just soon all these deaths were natural causes because it's across a fairly large section of Italy she was caught because of a bowl of soup a woman had decided to kill her husband she put the the the aqua divina in the soup then at the last minute got cold feet took the simple way the husband got suspicious grilled her she confessed that she caught the the potion from from the from Juliet to fana so she then. hold of the local bishop about it she though the flat it she ran into a church she hit other people sort of coming forward and saying yeah that's how I managed to kill my husband too so not only was she executed all whole bunch of people who are her customers were executed and at the end she confessed to six hundred men the totals actually believed to be higher but six hundred word for a record keeping back then actual confirmed deaths associated with a poison there you go. that is a lifetime show but it we know it is a life of yeah alright so how did they how did they put the poison this to begin. how did they put a drop and know if someone else is making your super. surreptitious you could reach over maybe dip your finger and I was hoping for it to be dramatic like you touch your face you then dip your finger so I don't know that it necessarily need to come from make up but when I first read the story I thought oh wow was hoping you could put on topically and it's old which is the one that she can they would die from that sort of a you know yeah yeah but not I know wasn't like that it was actually just something she had a make up factory but people because women had especially women her social class had to make up you without you would buy it from her ostensibly you're going to get back what's your gift with purchase and it turns out you're going to get a divorce a good program okay I got that are coming up on the candy my can talk show our rents control is it gonna come sure into our our region.

"century italy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Well, and you know, as we've seen the the beats of become a kind of dominant part of electronic music, these days be silly to do an entire electric music. Yes, ignore that's actually, very important part of it. That's the musical portion of things Eric Jocelyn to create you know, you knew this was going to be an important moment in the opera. So is this a kind of weaving together of all of his past president of quasi futurist thought. Yes. I mean Bruno was. He was used defender of of Copernicus for which she he paid the price. He but be in further than kapernick kapernick is believed that there was the son was the center of the solar system. Bruno believed that there was no center to the universe at all. And there were infinite and habit planets and really remarkable thing for someone in sixteenth century Italy to think, yeah, it's also several of his ideas about opposite sorta the prefigured quantum theory by three hundred and fifty years. I mean, while he wasn't really great scientist. And he wasn't really, you know, a mathematician that he dabbled in these things he was really a forward thinking cosmetologist, and sort of philosopher who really envisioned the future. I must also say very briefly that I have all I have all the sound composed before a couple of Reggio. Then we stuck the characters in. If exactly what happened with like sort of like did the melody now, it's the words. Very.

Bruno scientist Eric Jocelyn president Reggio Italy fifty years
"century italy" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

12:11 min | 3 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Host Edwin Hoffman coming to you live from the Wham studios. I'm Packard road and beautiful Ann Arbor Michigan. Derek stone is my very talent producer. And he's looking at me through the double glass that making sure everything on the board is running. All right. And then I'm sounding halfway decent. Welcome back. Everyone to the show. We were talking about are celebrating black history month here for most of this program with some artists of mine who are absolutely terrific. And then I'm going to be talking at the very end sort of like as a precursor for guests from the Frick collection next week on a fabulous exhibition of the art of Giuseppi Maroney, one of the great portrait painters of mid sixteenth century Italy, and how his portraits which do not look fierce or say in a, you know, a militarized kind of way or people looking I've say distraught. Or there isn't a whole lot of emotion. These faces. It is true mannerism in that we have elongated bodies, very very elegant people sort of neutral looks on their faces, but actual portrait likenesses that are highly realistic. And even though obviously this is an old master artist from the period, just after the high renaissance we're struck by the incredible devotion to realism that makes it look almost modern with all the details, and I can't wait to be able to have that interview next week. And we'll we'll talk a little bit about another artists artists, particularly and at Antonio Mora in just a few minutes and talk about a couple of his works. But I wanted to just leaving the Westwood children. By the first African American artists of renown in this country painting the late seventeen hundreds in the early eighteen hundreds the Westwood children which is at the National Gallery of art. It was part of the Edgar Bernice Chrysler garbage collection was. Donated to the gallery, I think around nineteen fifty nine nine hundred sixty beautiful example of American naive or primitive art family portraiture of a Baltimore family. I think the the family were in the stage coach making business, so they were prosperous family. These types of families that this itinerary artists this Lindner would travel around quite a bit painting and getting these commissions where he could it's a a wonderful painting another which the National Gallery was able to acquire a few years ago when the Corcoran Gallery of art, which was Washington DC's. I museum of fine art William Wilson Corcoran, assembled a fabulous collection in the nineteenth century early. Twentieth. Century particularly of American art of the tonal is period of the Hudson river school the luminous the early twentieth. Century sculpture, also Hiram powers and others. George washington. Sculpture. I mean, many of the pieces that we've seen illustrated in history books our whole lives. Many of those pieces were at the Corcoran Gallery. Well, the Corcoran had this. I think a jury addition built to it maybe about twenty five or so thirty years ago because the courtroom is famous also for being an art school. And eventually they'll maybe with the cost of that construction with beautiful bows are original building from the nineteenth century. I mean, it's an absolutely fantastic Bill even had a French period room from the seventeen eighty s I remember going there often when I lived in Washington DC, but they went had very difficult financial situation that went on for a long time and eventually it closed its doors, but most of its collection or most of the best pieces were acquired by the National Gallery of art. And they're they're now one of the paintings that they were able to acquire a few years ago from the Corcoran was by Joshua, John. Jason. And that is the grace Alison McCurdy and her daughters painting from eighteen four, which is I think one of Johnson's most wonderful pieces. And if you're listening on a computer again, go to nj dot gov for the National Gallery put in Joshua Johnson. Were put in simply grace, Alison McCurdy MC than C U R D Y by Joshua Johnson. And the image will come up of the mother and her two daughters. Absolutely wonderful painting again that neutral background in this case kind of like a a bluish tan color in the background. And what looks like, you know, the gentle hillside of of a slope of a hill in the far distance. Maybe even with the sunset near the light on the wall. That's actually the back of the set where they are seated again, we have a couple of still lifes. We have the the one daughter the sort of the elder daughter holding a basket very much like the one that we saw with the eldest Westwood child holding which is a still life of beautiful flowers, the greenery, and then the pinks or maybe they're roses in. Her hand, which of course, a symbol of fidelity and innocence. And then we have the mother also hold him probably a flower from that basket in her hands. And then our is go to the beautiful white muslin. Clothing that they're wearing. And also the hair brought up in that early nineteenth century sort of hairstyle the high waste of the of the costume. So you can kind of date this just visually by looking at the fashion. This is an American family a Baltimore family, but you can see that's Baltimore was a sophisticated city. And they were aware of what was going on in Europe at that time. The French empire was about to be established that same year. And the styles were changing the serve romantic era was underway. And those styles that were being born say in France and Germany and England during what would be the regency period they were coming over to America. Also. So you can see that this is a family very cogs that not only of its social position, but of its sense of fashion, and it is just beautiful. The faces are are lovely the details. I think of this painting as even kind of like being the next stage of what we saw with the Westwood children were all the faith. Faces of the children despite the regardless of the age, they all look like George Washington there is there's almost kind of like a a generic look in all the faces. That reminds me of Gilbert Stuart's, George Washington here, though, you have a little bit more definition. It's a more sophisticated painting absolutely beautiful. So this artist Joshua Johnson known as the first African American artists of renown. He was not able to be safe fantastically successful. Just with his paintings. He had to make a living doing other things. And we think maybe painting furniture. He moved around a lot in that limited tradition of the tenor and travelling artists and getting painting commissions whenever he could when he when he wasn't doing that he might have been working with in the furniture industry painting chairs and other types of pieces because wherever he lived. He seemed to be near a place of furniture manufacturer later in the century. Another one of my favorite artists also at the National Gallery of art Henry a sour Tanner, T A, N N E R his dates eighteen fifty nine to nineteen thirty seven and a painting that I remember looking at as a young man and later on when I worked at the National Gallery, small painting, again, maybe a little bit bigger than a cigar box cover, the San the San, of course, the river running through Paris nineteen to Henry Tanner was able to travel overseas like Whistler like John singer Sargent. We have a sense of American sensibility also being lightened and being refined by contact with European models in this case with this which makes it fascinated. With Henry Tanner who was a very well known artists in his own to and again, one of the greatest of the African American artists in the nineteenth century in truly in American history. This painting came to the National Gallery of art around nineteen seventy and what is wonderful about this painting. It is so sophisticated with the colors were were looking along the river as if we're actually along the dockside or maybe in one of the barges. Looking to to the right Bank of the Seine. And we can actually identify the buildings that are there near the institute to France. We can see one of the major bridges going across from the sky to the reflections in the river, basically the same palette, but there's a difference in the treatment. So you can tell one from the other. But this wonderful gauzy cotton, candy palette that he has in this painting from the yellows at the top two little bit of hint of blue to the pinks violet colors a little bit of red than the blue again when we get down into the river, and then the beautiful decorative element of the boat moored there at the worth side and very little activity along there, but just the beauty of the sky in the evening coloration in this painting is just fantastic. You would think this is a much larger painting to look at it. You wouldn't realize that this painting is basically eight and a half by eleven in size. And it's just a a fabulous fabulous piece. I think it's on artists board, and it's one of my favorite paintings are at the National Gallery by Henry, Tanner. One of the great American travelling artists who went over to Europe and absorbed a lot of that tradition. And then was able to not only make a great career there. But able to come back to these shores another work of art, that's wonderful that shows in a in a different genre of an etching by Tanner is Christ walking on water from nineteen ten and again here, you have a sense of religiosity of giving you just enough detail to let your mind sort of go from there you as opposed to say a secular artist trying to paint a religious scene and bringing kind of like analytical detail, and I say aloofness. To it. You don't have that. In the hands of Henry o Tanner. You get a sense of real religiosity. Here you have almost like Albert pinkham Ryder. In fact, the way that the boat is handled in the way that we see the inside of the boat under sail. We can't see the wholesale. It seems to be moving slowly from right to left. We have Christ approaching the fishermen his his his disciples walking on the water and very similarly handled to the way that Whistler would do this. You see Christ done almost as a ghost like pedal manteaux type figure in other words is if it's just simply bled out over time or was painted over. You can just make out the contours of Christ's body to the right of the print as he approaches the fishing boat, which is of course, you know, inked very heavily. And you've got more details. They are and you can see the apostles there. The the surface of the water is beautiful. You can see the moon rising above the horizon, which is absolutely beautifully handled. This is one of those works. Of art that makes you think that you can see colors eve in it. Even though it's it's a black and white etchings a print. There's so much more here. Everything from the color of the handmade paper to the different textures that Tanner's able to give to Christ ethereal walking tour, the fishing boat, and then the apostles inside all in different in different poses to the rising moon to just, you know, flex from, you know, from his from his burn in digging into the.

National Gallery Henry Tanner Henry o Tanner Westwood Joshua Johnson William Wilson Corcoran George Washington Baltimore Corcoran Gallery Washington DC Europe France Giuseppi Maroney National Gallery of art Henry Edwin Hoffman Alison McCurdy Ann Arbor Michigan Antonio Mora Derek stone Edgar Bernice Chrysler
"century italy" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"century italy" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Holland used bonds to build dikes western Europe started growing at an unprecedented rate. In fact, says William China which had been leaps and bounds ahead of Europe in terms of wealth, and technology started. To fall behind partly because of the money raised through government bonds at this time in the eleven hundreds and twelve hundreds Europe was really a backward place compared to China. The Chinese did not have this financing technology. They didn't bonds. So after about fourteen hundred Europe takes off compared to China by many different kinds of measures. Eventually the industrial revolution occurs in Europe. But not in China William says bonds helped western European economies grow at the speed. They did. And to the scale they did in the US bonds helped fund the revolutionary war and build railroads out across the undeveloped. Prairie of course, bonds had their fair share of problems too. I mean, they make it really easy for governments to take on a lot of debt and people have gotten used to thinking of them as a really safe investment during the financial crisis countries like Portugal, Greece Spain and ironically, enough Italy took on way too much debt and got their Connie's into a lot of trouble. Even still bond sales continue to be crucial for governments to fund their operations. In fact, last year, the US raised about one point three trillion dollars through government bonds, the most since two thousand ten and it was all thanks to this innovation from Venice in the eleven hundreds. The indicator is produced by Dr Rath Jaen edited by paddy Hirsch, our intern is willa Ruben and the music you're hearing is actually from twelfth century Italy. It's performed by the on samba or Ghanem. Whether it's athlete protests, the Muslim travel ban gun violence, school reform or just the music. That's giving you life right now race is the subtext to so much of the American story and on coats, which we make that subtext text. You listen to us on NPR one or wherever you get your podcasts..

William China Europe China William US Holland Dr Rath Jaen NPR Ghanem Italy paddy Hirsch Venice willa Ruben intern Portugal Connie Spain Greece