36 Burst results for "Central Valley"

"central valley" Discussed on KCBS All News

KCBS All News

01:51 min | 16 hrs ago

"central valley" Discussed on KCBS All News

"Time is two 38. Let's check in with Kim vestal in the Honda dealers in your local Honda dealers traffic center once again. So Kim, you're out at the altamont pass. It seems like you spend a lot of time out there. What's happening now? You should move the traffic center there. We should, huh? We should open a little traffic center there. Okay, we've got some brake lights. Off and on out of Livermore already, all it takes is one incident to slow down that ride on each bound 5 80 this report brought you by envision Honda of Milpitas, the good news is fender bender that we had eastbound on 5 80 just before north Flynn road is wrapping up there may still be some emergency vehicles on the scene, but all of the lanes in the eastbound direction are clear, but I can see with the Chilton auto body collision camp, brake lights began. Just before north Livermore avenue for your ride out of a Livermore. As you continue into Tracy, we don't have any new accidents or even any delays on two O 5, as you continue that eastbound commute to I 5 but. We're getting calls about our major backup on southbound 99 in the central valley approaching rip and so between Manteca and saliva. We've got a crash and debris scattered across the lanes and traffic is now just crawling in that direction. So I see brake lights begin right around one 20 in Manteca southbound 99. And the incident just passed Main Street. So expect a laser if you're traveling on a highway 99. Celebrate happy holidays at envision Honda Milpitas with a new 2022 civic sports sedan lease now just two 29 plus tax for 36 months and vision Honda Milpitas, it's the right decision, call 8 5 5 at 9 9 6 two two 7 four. Next update at two 48 on the traffic leader. We are looking at rainfall in the north bay this hour, Santa Rosa getting some rain is now a slipped into Marin county and it's going to continue to spread

Honda Kim vestal Livermore Milpitas Manteca Kim Tracy central valley north bay Santa Rosa Marin county
Fresh "Central Valley" from KCBS Radio Morning News

KCBS Radio Morning News

00:50 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh "Central Valley" from KCBS Radio Morning News

"Time is two 38. Let's check in with Kim vestal in the Honda dealers in your local Honda dealers traffic center once again. So Kim, you're out at the altamont pass. It seems like you spend a lot of time out there. What's happening now? You should move the traffic center there. We should, huh? We should open a little traffic center there. Okay, we've got some brake lights. Off and on out of Livermore already, all it takes is one incident to slow down that ride on each bound 5 80 this report brought you by envision Honda of Milpitas, the good news is fender bender that we had eastbound on 5 80 just before north Flynn road is wrapping up there may still be some emergency vehicles on the scene, but all of the lanes in the eastbound direction are clear, but I can see with the Chilton auto body collision camp, brake lights began. Just before north Livermore avenue for your ride out of a Livermore. As you continue into Tracy, we don't have any new accidents or even any delays on two O 5, as you continue that eastbound commute to I 5 but. We're getting calls about our major backup on southbound 99 in the central valley approaching rip and so between Manteca and saliva. We've got a crash and debris scattered across the lanes and traffic is now just crawling in that direction. So I see brake lights begin right around one 20 in Manteca southbound 99. And the incident just passed Main Street. So expect a laser if you're traveling on a highway 99. Celebrate happy holidays at envision Honda Milpitas with a new 2022 civic sports sedan lease now just two 29 plus tax for 36 months and vision Honda Milpitas, it's the right decision, call 8 5 5 at 9 9 6 two two 7 four. Next update at two 48 on the traffic leader. We are looking at rainfall in the north bay this hour, Santa Rosa getting some rain is now a slipped into Marin county and it's going to continue to spread

Honda Kim Vestal Livermore Milpitas Manteca KIM Tracy Central Valley North Bay Santa Rosa Marin County
GOP's Duarte takes California Central Valley US House seat

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 5 d ago

GOP's Duarte takes California Central Valley US House seat

"A California Republican has won his congressional race in central California, while a Washington state candidate is calling for a recount. California has a new congressional district carved out in the central valley farm belt. That's where voters gave Republican candidate John duarte, the win over Democrat Adam gray. With duarte's victory, Republicans hold 221 seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, Democrats have 213. They're still one undecided race in Colorado. And now in southwest Washington state, losing Republican candidate Joe Kent is seeking a ballot recount. His campaign says, with a razor thin margin of less than 2700 votes and their claims of some technical glitches, there should be a second tabulation. The Associated Press has called that race for Marie gleeson count Perez, the democratic candidate. Jackie Quinn, Washington.

California John Duarte Adam Gray Washington Joe Kent Duarte U.S. House Of Representatives Colorado Marie Gleeson The Associated Press Perez Jackie Quinn
Do Republicans Need to Get Creative With Ballot Drop Boxes?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:15 min | 3 weeks ago

Do Republicans Need to Get Creative With Ballot Drop Boxes?

"Do you think that just from a characteristic standpoint, do you think that Republicans are willing to embrace ballot harvesting as a new strategy? I think there's definitely going to be hesitancy. What I've seen just on the world of Twitter, which we all know isn't necessarily reflective of overall real life. Since last week, there's been a lot more openness to it overall. There's been a lot of misunderstandings of what it is. And so I think on the conservative side, they have to know that we can be successful in it. And one of my writers at red state, Scott counsel, I know he's been on your show a lot. He even came up with this modified program before ballot harvesting was legal in California with a stamp program where they gave a stamp to someone and watched them put it in their mailbox, whoever had an absentee ballot at their home at that time. And they flipped a Democrat plus 13 district in the central valley using that tactic. There's different targeting and voter modeling things that they used as well. But just to conservatives to know that if you're doing this the right way with the right data with the right consultants and with a good plan, that it is a viable strategy, not just for conservative districts, but within rural areas and with Democrat districts.

Twitter Scott Central Valley California
Unsettled California races could tip US House control

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 3 weeks ago

Unsettled California races could tip US House control

"There are still millions of uncounted ballots in the state of California which could be the key to determining which political party will have control of Congress More than a dozen congressional races remain in play in California about half have tight enough margins they could tip either way Republicans so far have locked down 211 of the 218 seats needed to claim control of the new Congress but it is still too early to know whether or not Democrats will reach that threshold In California the primary battlegrounds are Orange County southeast of Los Angeles and the central valley If Democrats lose control of the House it's expected the next speaker would be California Republican Kevin McCarthy It's not clear if Nancy Pelosi will lead the caucus again if Democrats retain control Jackie Quinn Washington

California Congress Orange County Los Angeles Kevin Mccarthy House Nancy Pelosi Jackie Quinn Washington
"central valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:39 min | 4 months ago

"central valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"More frequent mega storms. They happen when a huge plumes of water vapor form over the Pacific and reach land, where they dump rain and snow for weeks at a time. Mega storms used to occur only every one to 200 years, but with climate change, UCLA researchers say to expect one as often as every 50 years. The city of fireball in California's central valley is especially vulnerable. We sit right next to the San Joaquin river, beautiful place to raise a family, very quiet, everybody knows everybody. Love it here. Ben gallegos is the city manager and a longtime resident of fireball. He says a megastorm could devastate the community. He loves. A lot of water. Flooding for many days, potential hazard to really wiping out the city. So what are you doing right now? Right now, what we're doing, we went after a planning grant, which we're successfully getting. So a study of the levees and how we can build them, what height they have to be, what they need to be made of. Are you getting what you need from the state and from the county when you're a small town? Well, we did get the funding for it to do the study, which was great. That was about between 400 to $500,000 for just the steady. They're putting all the aesthetic together right now as we speak. So we can get it ready to go after funding for construction. It's nice to have a river right next to your city, but when they rise up, it's a potential hazard for your community also. We have a walking trail right next to it, which is beautiful. People enjoy going fishing, swimming. It's a nice thing to have, but when you have the flooding, it's not a very nice thing to have, especially if you don't have the protection from it. And with climate change, this is only going to get worse and that's what this research shows that the possibility of a megastorm is because of climate change. It just feels kind of like a massive task to try to protect your town. It does because we're a small community. And I always think about you think about San Francisco Los Angeles. If the state really going to say or the feds, let me give fireball 50 to $60 million to upgrade their levees, or should we give it to somebody else, are we going to make an impact? We lose that down, what impact is going to have to the state? Well, it's going to have a lot of impact to the state. We're a farming community. We have a lot of the industrial. We have tomato facility here that supplies a lot of tomatoes and sauces to a lot of industrial and restaurants, users. Tomatoes for market. So it does have an impact in small communities and the whole economic of California or even full United States. How do you balance the need to prepare for other extreme events? I mean, California, you think of droughts, wildfires, flooding, and now mega storms? You know, a lot of people ask me that question. They said, okay, you're thinking about upgrading the levees and all that. But we're in a drought. Yes, we are. We are in a drought. But this has happened in the past. It's like we're talking about this later storm. This is going to happen again. And we need to get ready. Our residents concerned? Yes, they are. I mean, back in, I want to say 97. Dave evacuated the city. And the city was a prepared at that time for their evacuation. They evacuated all the residents to our community center. But the community centers was right next to the river. So there was a levee that was washing out. So they went and send them out to our neighboring cities, but those cities were not ready for our residents. So they had to get them back. And then they put them up in a warehouse just west of the city. Yes, it has some of these residents gone through the flooded before. The evacuation, yes, we have. There are very familiar what might happen here in our city. Now earlier, you said to me when you first heard what a mega storm was, you thought, wow, we'll be wiped out. Is that hyperbole or really you think fireball would be wiped out? I think Fargo would be wiped out. Do you have a message for national leaders for state leaders about the importance of tackling climate change given what's at stake for your city? Yes, you know, we need help. I always tell our leaders, we can fix it now, which will cost less than when we have an emergency and then we're getting all the resources. And you have people trying to fix it, which would cost a lot more than being proactive and fix it now. Ben gallego goes to the city manager of fireball, California. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you. Today, Oklahoma City celebrates a moment in the city's past, a moment in 1958 in the midst of the civil rights movement, 13 black students sat down at a segregated counter. That moment of change is recent enough that many who lived through it are still with us. One is Marilyn looper. And you had to understand that Oklahoma had some of the most segregated laws in the United States on their books. She was 11 when she helped to organize the protest, following the lead of a high school history teacher, not just any high school teacher though. Greatest claim in saying is that she was a mother. She was my mother. Marilyn says her mother Clara luper got the idea after a visit to New York, where she ate in restaurants alongside white people. I care a couple of would say a little bit of freedom is a dangerous thing. So after she returned to Oklahoma, Clara luper led more than a dozen students to the cats drugstore. And when we sat down, they asked us what did we want and told them we wanted to be served and they informed us that they didn't serve colors. So the students stayed in their seats until closing and returned the next day, and the day after that. When people would spit on us, our responsibility was to turn our heads and keep our cool. Eventually, the store agreed to integrate the lunch counters. What's happening today is a reminder that divisive moments of the past can be unifying now. Oklahoma City begins a three day celebration. We're going to make sure that history reflects what we did here in Oklahoma City. Marilyn looper's mom did not live to see this day, but her daughter, remembers. She would say all the time. I want you to believe in the sun when the sun didn't shine. And to believe in The Rain, when

Ben gallegos California San Joaquin river central valley UCLA Clara luper Ben gallego Marilyn looper swimming San Francisco Los Angeles United States Dave Fargo Oklahoma City fireball Oklahoma Marilyn
"central valley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:18 min | 5 months ago

"central valley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And later, the health authorities reported her to the local prosecutor and she was charged originally with murdering her child for allegedly taking methamphetamine were found in her system, not the child system. So there was allegations that she had basically killed her child and murder charges are filed against her. She ended up taking a plea to his facing like 20 more than 20 years in prison. If she went to trial. So getting the advice of a local lawyer that didn't know anything about this, she decided to plead guilty to a lower charge of dance water for killing the stillborn child. It turns out later when a real defense lawyer found out about her case, she was languishing in jail for having guilty to manslaughter. And they started taking up her case on appeal to overturn her conviction, her guilty plea. So that was finally resolved after four years, but it's quite a long saga for this poor woman. Four years in prison and this is in California, which is in the forefront of protecting abortion rights. Yeah, but Perez was in the central valley of California, which is a very rural, very poor lots of immigrants and pretty conservative area of California. And so that prosecutor, the DA prosecutor, her for murdering her stillborn child. And eventually, after the case was appealed, the California appeals court concluded that she couldn't have killed someone who was never born. Because the child was stillborn, so that it was a misapplication of the law. And the law that adora Perez and this other woman Chelsea Becker were both prosecuted by in California by the same DA in California's central valley, he said that it was a law that was created in the 1970s to protect pregnant women from a third party attacking them and telling their fetus. And it all started when a woman, I believe she was a bank teller. She was shot in the stomach by a bank robber and there was such an outcry that her

California California appeals court adora Perez Perez Chelsea Becker central valley
"central valley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:29 min | 6 months ago

"central valley" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Connection David valadao The son of immigrants he's a farmer with deep roots in the central valley David valadao among ten Republican members who voted to impeach Donald Trump in January 21 And the first to face primary voters at least among those seeking reelection Greg Rowe is he the canary in Trump's coal mine It's definitely a district to look at California has 52 districts more than any other state And the other half what's known as a top two primary where everybody runs on one ballot Democrats or Republicans candidates of other parties And that can create some mischief and confusion And the problem for the challenge for the Republicans in that district and at least one other district is that the Democrats have one candidate but the Republicans have several David valadao has a challenger on his right who's very much running as a Trump aligned Republican although the former president has stayed unusually quiet about this race I was going to ask you about that You've got two Republicans challenging him right The former city councilman Chris Mathis education board trustee at a maderos neither endorsed by Trump What happened to the retribution Yeah that's a good question I think it may have something to do with the fact that valadao represents a district that's next door to Kevin McCarthy's and it may be the case that McCarthy prevailed on the former president or his advisers that this district which leans democratic is an anti Trump district that's probably the only district where David gallaudet who has crossover appeal is probably the only Republican who could win that district This is going to be though a bit of a foreshadowing for the others I think there are 6 if I remember seeking reelection who voted Republicans that is to impeach That's right We have 6 of them You have ten total and 6 of them are seeking reelection and David holiday was the first to face the voters Fascinating These are some of the races you might not be hearing as much about in mainstream election coverage So we want to bring it to you and I really hope for the best that person behind you Greg I'm starting to worry a little bit The mayor's race We've got to talk about this It's a fascinating one because we read at his divided Hollywood How can you go wrong with a story like this Celebrity endorsement son both sides here As we consider the way this has unfolded with Rick Caruso and.

David valadao Greg Rowe Chris Mathis Trump Donald Trump valadao David gallaudet Kevin McCarthy confusion California David holiday McCarthy Greg Hollywood Rick Caruso
A Voter's Guide for California Republicans

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:09 min | 6 months ago

A Voter's Guide for California Republicans

"I would like you to please vote for, first of all, every Republican running for Congress. It's very unlikely we'll pick up any seats, but I sure would like young Kim and Michelle Steele and Mike Garcia and David valadao and of course Kevin McCarthy is going to win. He's got a pretty secure district. But they really took a cleaver, the alleged independent redistricting committee like everything else in California is completely bonkers. And so they're trying to screw an outline the other good ones after the dust settles. There's no tell them what happened in these primaries. But do remember young kin and Michelle steel and Orange County, Mike Garcia, Dave valadao in Ventura and the central valley, Kevin McCarthy, of course. But here's the key deal. You got to vote for lawn heat Chen for controller. You got to vote for Nathan hochman for attorney general. These are two serious people, and those are the two jobs. You're not going to meet Gavin Newsom. There's no one running. I don't know who's going to be the nominee against Gavin Newsom, but you can't beat that much money.

Mike Garcia Michelle Steele David Valadao Kevin Mccarthy Michelle Steel Dave Valadao KIM Congress Nathan Hochman KIN Central Valley California Orange County Ventura Chen Gavin Newsom
"central valley" Discussed on MMA Roasted

MMA Roasted

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on MMA Roasted

"Over here living next to the ocean, you know? Yeah, well, I mean, it's just fucked up. You're a teacher and you got to worry about that. Your teacher who literally is like fighting is like I want to fight for money. It's like the teaching. That's crazy. That's insane. I mean, what, but you got to have at least a 100,000 saves up, right? We're heading to the we want to get at least two to two 50 saved up because like a house in the central valley is like 250 grand you can get a really nice house. And then over here, just a normal not even that nice of a house is like 700,000, so. Yeah. Yeah. Well, you got to put a 100,000 now, not only a 100,000, but you know, you got to put 10% down. So 75 down. Yeah, I wanted to give it up to make it affordable on a nurse and a teacher's salary. I needed to be like less than that, you know? All right. Well, listen, people. This is unlike the press now. 2022 is over. Bro, I'm like, no, I'm kidding. Cody, I'm, what is this? Where can I watch it? The fights on Friday, January 28th, to watch it. I believe the eagle FC is partnered with a platform company. It's free to watch. You just have to download the app. I believe it's called FL FLX cast. I don't know, go to E UFC's social media and they have it on there. But yeah, it's free to watch. It's Friday night, so. And there's some good fights on it. It looks like some interesting ones if nothing else. Yeah, I'm excited. You gotta get a girls lot to fight in this organization. Or no. I think they got girls fighting in Russia for eagle FC, so I would imagine. I know people have wondered about that. But no ring Hurd girls, other no ring cargo, I don't keep thinking I ran car girls. I don't know, yeah. So what are they gonna have instead? They're gonna have like I can make a hundred jokes right now. It's gonna be as bula and like other little little people walking around. Oh God. I hope I get to beat that kid. Katie's like, he's like 50. He's not a kid. Like 12. He's like 19. He's not holding on. You're a pretty good 20 year old. The whole thing is kind of, I don't know. And he was 12 to define. I'm not even. And he was like 6 or three. The whole thing is disturbing to me. Ring car girls. I mean, there's a lot of things I can say without want to piss off the Islamic community. Anyway, listen people, thank you guys so much for being on the podcast. Billy you're the best. You are going for ya. I want to write that movie. Take care, guys. Do it..

eagle FC central valley Cody UFC bula Russia Katie Billy
New Migrant Caravan: 'Tell Biden We're Coming'

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:37 min | 1 year ago

New Migrant Caravan: 'Tell Biden We're Coming'

"Tell Biden we are coming. The new migrant caravan of border jumpers and line cutters and criminals, new migrant caravan marches through Mexico to U.S. border. We have to change the way that we talk about this. These are not migrants. These are criminals. They have the intent to break federal law and state law and break into our country. Migrants are people that move from Southern California to the central valley to try to get work. That's would be a migrant. And this is nothing more than the movement of people for an economic incentive. The migrants mostly from Central America, South American Haiti are taking the 2500 mile to 200 mile journey to Texas. I'm reading from the Washington examiner. This is interesting. The group was organized through a QR code that allowed participants to register starting October 15th, according to Fox News. Due to the Mexican government banning migrants from hitching rides from truckers, the migrants will have to take the entire journey on foot. Tell Biden we are coming, said one migrant named William from El Salvador, told the news outlet, wait, so they have QR codes that they're organizing with this thing? What is this a rock concert? Let's get QR codes and we can figure out how to illegally enter into the country. Do you know what a QR code is? Some of you might be listening. You don't know what that is. It is when you see on a poster or on television, bottom right hand corner, it's it looks like a barcode, something that you would use at the grocery store and you put up your phone to it, and it helps you join the caravan. You know, we should have a QR code to subscribe to the Charlie Kirk show. That'd be interesting. Not join a caravan. Tell Biden we are coming. The caravan left chula on the border with Guatemala on October 23rd. With hours beginning of their journey the migrants were greeted by a wall of Mexican National Guard troops. This was a joke. The Mexican National Guard should have held the line. But the migrants forced their way to the blockade, continuing their journey to the United States. The caravan is moving north before the reinstatement of the remaining Mexico policy. Border arrests have surged to an all time high, more than 1.7 million in fiscal year 2021. How many getaways have there been, by the way? U.S. customs and border patrol did not immediately respond to questioning for comment from the new the new

Biden Mexican Government Central Valley Mexican National Guard Central America Mexico Southern California Charlie Kirk Haiti U.S. Fox News El Salvador Texas Washington William Chula Guatemala U.S. Customs And Border Patrol
"central valley" Discussed on Farm To Table Talk

Farm To Table Talk

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on Farm To Table Talk

"They've they've learned their lesson and they would like to get into this other area little bit so you may have somebody. That's raising thousands of cattle in a few lodder. Something start peeling off fifteen twenty thirty forty and they're getting interest to and san. I wanna have some go direct and there's actually more dollars come to them from the direct sale because you you've really cut out all a lot of steps in the middleman. Some of the costs to so even though on the one hand you say gee the volume must mean that. It's going to be a lot more expensive. Well not necessarily. I mean you. Haven't you haven't truck this product. Three or four states away to have it slaughtered in process broken into a distribution center and then trucked another two thousand miles to be able to. You know wait in a cooler till distributed to somewhere else. So there's some efficiencies in this that don't occur to people when they first started talking about it. You're absolutely right. And and one of the huge things there is that when you're shipping your cattle somewhere else in they're being by by big operation big processing ration- you're getting cents on the dollar for that neat per pound and and when you sell direct you're getting a lot more of that money and and i mean i was buying buying haul. Cows appears to go out of mendocino. County rancher. I was paying four fifty pound for the actual animal. This is after it's been slaughtered and broken down into a jason meat and bone of paying four fifty a pound. Which is that mistakes and burger was all the same price but they were getting all four fifty pound for them animal instead of cents on the dollar so it made sense for that ranch to do that. And i think you're absolutely right in fact molly. Watkins from the central valley has been on our committee. She's not organic. that's not her thing. They sell through the options primarily. But this might be just in the reason. She's participated in this is to. She wants options and she doesn't feel like it's a fair system right now and i think that's right and so We think ranchers of every scale. We'll be able to take advantage of this but it'll be particularly good for those. Small producers have been trapped by the regulations that have kept in these california plants outside the blanton limited on where they could sell. Oh another area. You've got experience in you've seen this done with produce a lot different. We don't have to have the meat inspection and so forth but still you've seen success of really creating some small farms of people that have been able to make a living now and farming five acres or a couple of acres and urban firms and so forth and you connected with people doing that. Not only in california but all over and an in a way. I think that maybe something we can look to. I mean it's a because the produce area to be able to sell to the local farmers markets and the other things they've done it's been able to evolve quicker because it doesn't have quite as many obstacles but But do you think there will be lessons. In what what we've learned those direct markets. Yes in fact in our report that cd. Faa has and has agreed to start a new committee with us to study the innovations needed in this area over the next year so One of the recommendations in there is that we do what we've done with the produce industry in california california. Put money aside to the farm to school programmed. Purchase california Produce for our students. We also have the california nutrition jenner program and the federal program which gives families on food stamps or our wick women and infant children and other.

mendocino central valley san california Watkins molly blanton Faa
"central valley" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

PODSHIP EARTH

04:36 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on PODSHIP EARTH

"Do you see the intersection of the richness of the LatinX culture with the outdoors itself? I used to often say that we were battling this idea of leaving your contour at the trailhead. And now that we're going to go on the trail, well now you have to act differently. Eat different things, dress differently and so forth. And I want to be like, no, what is it? What does it mean to hit the trope with your culture? As a part of you, we want an early Latino endorse outing we did in the central valley. Caswell memorial.

central valley Caswell memorial
"central valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"United States This is the only place with the climate and the soil to grow more than 400 different crops he says And when consumers realize what they're missing he expects a backlash This ground will come back into production one way or another Oh you really think so The United States can not be without the San Joaquin valley producing food They can't be Roberts wants the government to step in to deliver more water from rivers and damps to make up for the lost ground water Keep more land in production Other water experts say that's not feasible and also not necessary Some of the valleys crops can grow other places Almost half a million acres of corn for instance growing to feed dairy cows In fact some experts think the future for the valley looks bright just different John Ryder for instance a consultant to some large scale farmers in the valley I actually think it's going to be a better future than the past has been People are finding creative ways to adapt he says farmers are getting ready to capture a lot more water in years when it rains The flood their fields and replenish the aquifer That'll make up for part of the ground water that's now off limits Some land will have to stop growing crops But we're gonna take that land and put it to other uses Profitable uses he says The central valley is a great place for solar power Farmers may even get paid to turn followed fields into habitat for birds and lizards and native shrubs Nobody knows exactly what the central valley will look like when this all shakes out Dozens of local committees are in charge of enforcing the new groundwater law Sophie mulholland a rancher and conservationist who's on half a dozen of these committees says they include a much bigger range of voices Disadvantaged communities and the farmers you're considering the environment all those players are at the table And that's a good thing The fate of the aquifer won't be decided anymore by whoever can drill the deepest well Dan Charles NPR news How do you define kindness for an Oklahoma family It requires action There's being nice and then there's being kind and kindness going one step further where you're intentionally doing something for somebody else Holly baron and her husband Luke had four sons read his 7 Holden his 5 Connelly is two Their oldest.

John Ryder United States San Joaquin valley The central valley Roberts Sophie mulholland Dan Charles NPR Oklahoma Holly baron Luke Holden Connelly
"central valley" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

02:05 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Frank carson was a criminal defense attorney who spent years accusing police and prosecutors of corruption. Then they charged him with murder. I'm christopher gothard writer and host of the l. a. times podcasts. Dirty john and detective trap. I'm inviting you to follow and listen to my new podcast. That trials of frank carson. This eight episodes series is a story of power politics and the law and california's central valley. New episodes of the trials of frank. Carson are available to find them. Search for the trials of frank carson. Wherever you get your podcasts thank you. And.

Frank carson christopher gothard Dirty john central valley california Carson frank
What Needs To Happen for Newsom To Get Recalled?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | 1 year ago

What Needs To Happen for Newsom To Get Recalled?

"So let's just go through. If if gavin newsom gets recalled what would be the areas that have to do that. You'd have to have kind of the gay base in san francisco not turn out right. I'm not saying that pejoratively. It's just what it is right. You have to have the hispanic hispanic base in kind of la not turn out right and then you need to have a suburban one one eighty right. You need to have kind of the westwood yoga. Moms and the brentwood won't yoga moms. I mean and kind of like the pasadena. Professors be like not going to happen. And the reason i'm saying this though is that this really isn't uphill climb in california. You need like five different domino's to fall on my right. Yeah that that's a very realistic. I mean it's. It's good that we do that with viewers and listeners be realistic. It is a very steep hill to climb but the things you just mentioned we did see possible which is why it was close in. La for instance. Fifty one percent of hispanics told us in l. a. that were going to vote You know he should. He should trounce The opposition in la should eat at least thirty points out of there. Are we not seeing that. In the reason. Why is because a lot of the people who did tillis they were gonna vote. Were anti newsom. So outside in the county around ventura the suburbs. You was not doing well. And then you had san diego. For instance where if sandiego was a bigger margin for no or for Yes to recall him then. Probably means orange county would've been a little bit wider and it may have been a lead for a minute there but san diego was not as pro recall as we expected it to be or it needs to be so there are definitely five. Domino's maybe even more that you need to see fall of that white liberal base which is that bay area He needs to more inland hispanics for sure Central valley hispanics the working hispanic in the central valley. They tend to be more conservative in they do. And they're getting more conservative of the years but they for while were the most pro

Gavin Newsom LA Brentwood Pasadena San Francisco Tillis Newsom California San Diego Ventura Orange County Central Valley
California hospitals running out of ICU beds: health officials

NPR News Now

00:16 sec | 1 year ago

California hospitals running out of ICU beds: health officials

"Hospitals. In california's central valley are running out of beds in their intensive care units because of a large increase in covert patients. State officials said on friday that hospitals in the twelve county san joaquin valley region have had fewer than ten percent of staffed adult. Icu beds available for the past. Three

Central Valley Twelve County San Joaquin Vall California
"central valley" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

NBC Meet the Press

09:58 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on NBC Meet the Press

"Have between twenty twelve twenty sixteen Put much more emphasis on reducing outdoor watering residential use because So if you look again you look at overall water use by humans In california about three quarters of it is agriculture so the rest is residential and of the rest of his residential on average about half that is outdoors so there are plenty of places where everybody can become more efficient and their worries. Let's talk about the egg industry So i assume there's a lot of complicating factors but walk me through it And what's gonna come first technology that you know that creates seeds that need you know crops that need less water which we know there is certainly some effort at trying to find crops that do that but what other what other things that should the agony white. What they Megan industry has actually been quite good particularly in the san joaquin valley in. I don't know maybe the past a ten fifteen years in switching to what's called drip irrigation. So instead of Like running a bunch of water down and open irrigation ditch and letting it seep into the ground. They lay the tubes on the ground. And this is something that's also done with residential landscaping. I have drip irrigation in my yard. These long tubes that emit water very slowly so and get it down the route so much more efficient way of delivering water. So that's something that that ask in. Many parts of the state has been quite good at but it is. It's remains largely reliant on surface deliveries from the big Big water project called central valley project of which damn the biggest rivers state In the middle of the last century and delivers water from this year. Vodka and also from far northern california and also in the biggest area where Egg has to change and And as you know is now under pressure to change is in. Its groundwater use So you know pumping wells powerful wells that that Pump water from the aquifers of the central valley. Central valley is the big agricultural valley that extends four hundred some more than four hundred miles up down the length state in the middle of the state. And that's that's that's our vegetable garden in our vegetable garden which produces fruits and vegetables. Not just the country but you know increasingly you. Nuts dot world. Don't we call it the salad bowl yes yes and The so central valley has two parts the sacramento valley which is northern california and the san joaquin valley. Which is south of san francisco in until you get into you know. Jill sort of the borders of southern california and parts of that valley have a are have been overpumping in other words pumping more water from the out more ground. Were water the acar than either nature or man puts back in for a century And whenever there's a drought and this is you know Probably going to likely going to happen again with this a drought. That's that's a recurring again. This year They will you know their deliveries from the big Central valley project in in some parts of the state are reduced so they turned to groundwater and they you know that's where they get the water to irrigate their crops and during the last drought and this is not a new phenomenon. but some parts of the town king valley. They were pumping so much that the surface of the land sank by several feet and california was rather ironically given its environmental reputation. The last state In the west to adopt statewide groundwater regulations didn't do that until twenty fourteen And those regulations are gradually taking effect. They will not take full effect until another twenty years until about twenty forty but they are Basically aimed at stopping this chronic overpumping of groundwater so that is that really is the is the big Elephant in the room right now with agriculture in the long term in terms of big picture and it is inevitably going to mean that Hundreds of thousands of acres or maybe more of irrigated agriculture are going to be taken out of production and he because it's the groundwater use the water use is simply not sustainable. How much would you say. This is a climate change problem. And how much would you say. This was a one hundred year overpumping problem. It's primarily a one hundred year overpumping. Climate change is definitely accentuating. The problem But we've we've always had droughts and agriculture has been And and you know not everywhere by any means but in in some parts of the central valley has been overpumping overdraft groundwater for basically a century or climate change is doing is a former. So you know there's more evaporation. It's accentuating the impacts of drought And it's also Seems to be expected to in and so far. It looks like it's happening. It's accentuating the natural extreme variability in california precipitation California has the most variable year year precipitation of any state in the country. We just have this natural going back and forth between flood and drought in what climate change is doing is accentuating those extremes. And if you'll look at just the past few years Twenty seventeen was being wettest year on record in The northern sierra Which is a you know. A major source of water for all of california And then it's it's followed by you know a discuss this year. So far was called the water year which begins from october. One to september thirty. It's not the calendar year so we're about halfway through this year. It's the state ride. Is the fourth dryest A water year on record to date. So we've got these extremes swings back and forth and everybody recognizes particularly state water managers that we have to do a better and quicker job of adapting to that which generally means that we do a better job of capturing water when it's in the system in storing it for dry periods and particularly In terms of getting more water into aquifers. Because there's actually far more store into saleable an aquifers and groundwater than there is in service storage. You've been listening to one of our interviews from the chuck todd gas. We'll be right back with more from bettina boxall. Let me ask you this with the you know. One of the longtime sort of dividing lines in california politics it between north and south has been this water issue. And you know it. It sounds like it's a lot more nuanced obviously than than the way it's been portrayed in the past is simply north versus south with in in some ways it's possible the egg industry was sort of goosing. That right you know. They don't want to be the focus. Let it be let it be a fight between the north and the south and and and the folks it is at am i. Am i oversimplifying inter. Well no know their political battle of this are there has been that dividing line but it is as you say much more complicated than that. Some what simplistic take. Most of most of the water in california falls North that has the most water that has the most precipitation the pop the biggest population in california is in the south which is drier and so Stubbing how you know southern california yet about a third of its water from local supplies from surface water from local groundwater and then it gets the rest from either the colorado river system or northern california Much it's not just southern california. That gets water from northern california. So to san joaquin valley some parts of the san joaquin valley. And i also like to remind people that you know. There's a the the reputation.

california san joaquin valley Central valley central valley town king valley sacramento valley northern california Megan The northern sierra Jill southern california san francisco bettina boxall chuck todd California colorado river
"central valley" Discussed on Future of Agriculture

Future of Agriculture

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on Future of Agriculture

"And the main vision for this actually came during the last the drought that we have now. We had the twenty twelve till twenty sixteen. Roughly that was a time when we had very little surface. Water supply a lot of farmers Groundwater to make up or to meet the water demand for their crops and we saw groundwater levels plummeting we saw you know some wells going dry in the southern central valley so there was recognition that rejoin me to do something about replenishing those reserves so we have them around for the next drought and it looks like we are in the next stroud. We don't know yet. Of course how long it's gonna be. But in between those droughts we really have to do something about replenishing groundwater reserves so we asked a savings.

southern central valley
"central valley" Discussed on Why It Matters

Why It Matters

06:30 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on Why It Matters

"Less than two and a half percent is freshwater and a lot of that. Two thirds of that is locked up in glaciers and ice caps. And so we're dealing with a very small percentage of all the water on earth fresh and drinkable and useful for all the things we need so having said that that water cycles and the basic supply comes down as rain and snow from condensation in the atmosphere and so if falls onto the land somewhere and then depending on what's going on it'll do one of three things really it'll run off the land and join a creek or stream and become what we call run off and that will eventually end up in the see it can soak into the soil and then potentially recharge groundwater below that or it can evaporate or transpire back to the atmosphere pretty quickly so that creates cycle and then the question is how we use and manage the water. That's in that cycle and the other thing that's really important. You grew up in new york every place has its own water cycle. Also every watershed has its own cycle. My backyard garden has a little water cycle so water cycles on different timeframes on different scales that create some interesting management challenges as well. Yeah you're going to have a very different relationship between precipitation and evaporation. If you're in a desert than if you're in a tropical rainforest water is constantly cycling and refreshing itself according to natural laws and this provides a bounty for human use but if human beings put too much pressure on the water cycle especially in vulnerable regions things can break down take groundwater which collects under the earth's surface filling the poorest spaces in soil rocks and sediments contrary to popular belief. It is not actually a giant pool underground anyway. We drill into these spaces to access and consume the water trapped inside groundwater is then replenished by rain and snow is it melts and seeps back into the land. In places like california's central valley farmers drilled deep to pump out enormous quantities for use in arrogation in fact groundwater extraction has been so aggressive there that the entire region is sinking sometimes at a rate of more than a foot per year. So the problem is that groundwater replenishes itself very slowly it can take weeks months even years to renew itself extract too much too quickly and the source runs dry. We've gotten very good at extracting water to meet our needs. No the way we primarily do it from rivers for example is too damn them up and create a reservoir which can then be delivering water to farmers and two cities on our on timeframe if where a farmer or city where there's groundwater we drill a deep well and then pump that water up from the ground and so basically develop these engineering technologies to access that water and of course developed some very big infrastructure to move the water to where it's needed no nature has given us kind of a difficult hand when it comes to water because you need a lot of sunshine to grow crops but when you have a lot of sunshine you don't have a lot of rain and so we've had to move water to wear. The crops are best grown and without often means moving water from a wet place to a dry place. What about the relationship between agriculture and water consumption agriculture is the biggest consumer of water in the world about seventy percent of all the water we extract from rivers and groundwater aquifers around the world goes to agriculture and much that is consumed. You know it doesn't go back into the water cycle right away. It's transpired crops back to the atmosphere so we can't immediately reuse it. So agriculture is the primary reason we see depletion in much of the world and i wanna say you know a good bit of that is that it just takes a lot of water to grow crops and i don't want to castigate. Agriculture farmers are doing great work to provide us with these items to eat and to make gotta eat but it just takes a lot of water when it comes to agriculture and water scarcity. The most important question to ask is where the crops are grown rather than how much water they consume so. This may sound a bit confusing but take cocoa for example. It consumes a lot of water. But it's grown in tropical rainforest where there's a lot of rain california almonds on the other hand consume a lot of water in a very dry place from sustainability perspective. That is a problem. Nonetheless as droughts have intensified in california over the past two decades almond production has doubled understanding. The water cost for any given product can be hard work and most of us go through our daily lives without understanding. Just how big our water footprint is so. If we're an average american it takes about two thousand gallons of water to sustain our daily life daily life style. Two thousand gallons a day only five or ten percent of that is the water were using at home and half of that is in our diet. A third of it is in our energy use. Maybe ten percent is in our computers and phones and coffee mugs and the things that we use in by and then five or ten percent. Is the us at home indoors and outdoors. So it's a lot of water and a lot of it's hiding. You know if you look around everything takes water to make and so if we are wearing cotton t shirt were looking at as much as seven hundred gallons of water to make that one cotton shirt. Most of that is water. Used to grow the cotton out in the field. No it's a good thing to recognize that one of the simplest ways in our legs to save water is to not waste anything. Saving water is something we've been told to do our whole lives whether it's turning off the tap when you're brushing your teeth or making sure you take care of leaks. We're not as used to thinking about the water that goes into our shirts but we have to learn how to think this way because increased scarcity is coming still lifestyle. Changes are not enough to address a problem. As large as climate related scarcity only nations and groups of nations have resources to build the new adaptable institutions. We're going to need in our water. Scarce future after the break. We're going to.

california central valley new york us
"central valley" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"central valley" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"It to the knock three times. Right? Right? Yeah, Heavier. Maya was the guy's name and he was there for A brief period of time, probably 78 years. Hardcore rock and roll bands play there had everything I three. That's why they call it knock three times. They had three bands. It's a big place. It's 25,000 Square feet, you know, not including the coffee shop, so it's a big place. And, uh, he wasn't as successful as he would have liked to have been. So, uh I. I waited a few years and I said, You know, Dad, I would like to take that place and do a remodel and converted into a banquet facility because that's what I did. And at the time, so I did. And then we, of course, we had the front end and made that into a night club. And it was really successful. And But then it got a little CD. You know, in the parking lot, Listen. We had a rock club to It always gets a little CD that that's our clientele. That's where we make our money off. Did you enjoy? I mean, So did you run it as a club yourself? The one that really got it started. Yeah, No kidding. I'm the one that actually got it started. We had remember Jim Lyons. Of course. I hired Jim Lyons originally, and he was super super successful there, and we had a great crowd those days and then we had a few other guys that were great. We had some really good bands, right? There And then, like I said, it kind of dwindled a little bit and was affecting are back in business. And so let me tell you though, was that some of the funnest times you ever had one in the club? Without a doubt? Without a doubt? I loved it. My my brother, John. He always says, Well, they used to say we're going to go to our friends and and we're going to tell him. Uh, we're going to buy him a beer and we're going to look at him and we're going to point to him with our little finger and we're gonna go. Hey, you having a good time? Have a good time. So our line was you having a good time? Have a good time. First day. Swear to God. First day Peter and John are in the bathroom, mopping up vomit. And Peter looks at John. It goes. Are you having a good time and John goes? Yeah. I have a good time. Yeah, well, there wasn't a terrible time, but it was fun. Uh, you eventually do you remember your first catering job? Wow, That's a good one. I, um That really? I mean, it's been we did a lot of them. I mean, tweeted a lot. I mean, we've done I mean, I don't even know how many catering child's we've had. I remember one vividly that we were on the It was Bonner packing company outweigh out there and Fowler and I was out there. My dad came with me. He just wanted to help me. He was just there. And I've had this pain in my side, and I said, Dad, I don't know what's going on. We have 600 people out there. We've got to feed and and I said, You know, I'm I'm not feeling well. Well, I ended up going to the hospital at a dishwasher that took me to the hospital in an old pickup bouncing down Fowler Avenue, you know, and I ended up having a kidney stone. Oh, and when I got there to the hospital I laid on the on the bed and I passed it and it was great. And I went back to that party and we finished And you finished, folks? That is dedication. Right there. That is dedication. Uh, listen, you got a great family. I understand. You have Cindy Christie. I've I know Jimmy from the annex. You also have Jeff and I understand your grandfather of many times over now. So I am And you have your lovely lovely wife, Marie. Absolutely. We're happy to have him How long you've been married? 41 years 41 years she worked with you. She did in the beginning. She'll tell you what she did She chopped lettuce and did all this kind of thing. But since then I told her I didn't want her to work. I just wanted to be a mother and she was a great one. And she raised her boys, You know, because My business took me away from home quite a bit. Although I did get up to the point where I could help coach baseball and do those kinds of things, but, uh, yeah, she she worked for me in the beginning. We all work in. Yeah, Even my dad who was retired. Helped me out quite a bit Well, you've coached baseball. You've been boys and girls Club United Cerebral palsy Foundation. So you you I don't know how you do that. And then you reserve your time on Saturday nights to to cater to everybody in the Central Valley. Yeah, well, In a long road. I'll tell you that we're going to be right back with Jim Pardini from Pardini is catering from the annex from Vanessa's pizza..

Peter Cindy Christie Jeff Marie John Jim Lyons Jim Pardini Maya Heavier 78 years Club United Cerebral palsy Fou 41 years Jimmy Vanessa 600 people 25,000 Square feet Fowler Avenue Pardini Central Valley three times
The Trials of the Infamous Defense Attorney Frank Carson

Dirty John

02:41 min | 1 year ago

The Trials of the Infamous Defense Attorney Frank Carson

"A sixty four year old attorney is making his way slowly up the concrete steps of the courthouse in modesto california. His body is wracked with pain. His heavy shoulders are hunched forward over the cane. He carries in his right hand from his left hand swings. A cracked black leather satchel stopped with his legal files. He's here at eight thirty on a monday morning. In june two thousand nineteen to do the unpopular work of defending the wrongly accused the thoroughly guilty and clients at every point in between he's made this trip thousands of times in better days. He swaggered the flamboyant terror of cops and prosecutors and judges. I haven't had any qualms about going after law enforcement for lying. If they fudge once they fudge it's open season. This is frank carson the most combative and controversial criminal defense lawyer in stanislas county. His kidneys are failing. His sciatic nerve is aflame and his morning. Vicadin hasn't kicked in the effort to get up. The steps makes him wince but he hates to give any satisfaction to his enemies. He has many for decades. He's defeated his law enforcement. Adversaries in court and raged against them in unapologetically venomous. He names names in a central valley legal community where the cast of characters is small and the memories. long really soon. Gershon your person. You know what it can't be any more personal to the guy that i'm representing and even if i had a doubt about my client's innocence by the time we started the trial usually by the end of it. I was absolutely convinced. I've had attorneys of god wrestler. Soul summer did now and he said. Oh frank you should seen me it was carson asked. I told them off and all that that isn't the point. The point is to win as he shuffles between courtrooms cops watch impasse and a chill seems to enter their mood to the law enforcement establishment. The man with the cane and the black leather satchel is something more malevolent than a clever lawyer. Who pushes boundaries. This is why carson will eventually make his way to the

Frank Carson Stanislas County Vicadin Modesto California Gershon Carson Frank
Why Tech Visionary Irma Olguin Jr. Went Back to Her Farming Roots

Latina to Latina

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Why Tech Visionary Irma Olguin Jr. Went Back to Her Farming Roots

"Year junior turned a lot of heads when she raised twenty seven million dollars in series a funding and incredible amount of money and the largest ever for a lengthy her company bit wise trains people to work in tech. It develops software and invest in real estate. The whole concept is inspired by parts of your own personal journey and offers really powerful model for rebuilding and reimagining underdog cities. It must so much of we are we built. Goes back to where you come from. Can you take me back to growing up in the central valley in the nineties. When folks extra california they think palm trees they think of beaches. That can come hollywood. I think of the bay area but a lot of people don't conjure an image of when it comes to central california is like giant magnificent loss of produce in atalante. They may not realize that the central valley inside california's responsible for exporting between twenty and thirty percent of the world's food agriculture has been the driving industry here since these cities were born. And think that that really is what people think of. Like heartland america i think of cornfields and buckeyes and i'm talking about grapes and almonds and teaches cows. You know just a different image. I think than than what most people think of as california so when you imagine yourself there in the nineties or you're managing yourself. They're here in in central california two things to know number one that creates a system where almost like modern day feudalism where the folks who own operate the land really. That's where wealth is concentrated. And then i think secondly is that there's another side of that coin which is the labor that powers the land and gets that land to produce

California Central Valley Hollywood America
Jill Biden, in California, Lends Support to Farmworkers Seeking Vaccinations

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

00:48 sec | 1 year ago

Jill Biden, in California, Lends Support to Farmworkers Seeking Vaccinations

"Today on cesar chavez day first lady jill biden traveled to the central valley of california to visit the first headquarters of the united farm workers which has become a vaccination site for farm workers in california as president. Joe is fighting for those who often go unseen. He believes that our work must be guided by justice. And you manage and that's exactly the kind of immigration policy. He's working to build one that treats children and families with dignity and creates fair pathways to citizenship including essential workers.

United Farm Jill Biden Cesar Chavez California JOE
Los Angeles County Neighborhoods Amongst Areas of Focus in California's New Vaccine Strategy

All Things Considered

01:14 min | 1 year ago

Los Angeles County Neighborhoods Amongst Areas of Focus in California's New Vaccine Strategy

"State's Corona virus vaccine policy today, saying that 40% of all vaccine doses are being reserved for people most at risk of getting the virus. California's vaccine strategy will be one focused on equity. With roughly 40% of the cove in cases and deaths being concentrated in communities that makeup just less than 25% of our population. Dr. Mark tally is the state's health and human services secretary. He says the doses will be spread out among 400 zip codes and reach about eight million people. The state says this plan will lead to the fastest possible re opening of the economy. Many of the neighborhoods are in L, a county in the Central Valley. Galli says. The state is also making fixes to the my turn appointment system to ensure the doses reached the people they are intended for. The vaccines that arrive in the communities are reserved for those who live in those communities because Sending it. There is one thing, but ensuring it gets in the arms of those When it gets in the arms of those who are most vulnerable in these communities is a whole nother. With the change in vaccine strategy, the state will also make it easier for counties to move into the less restrictive tears that can happen once two million vaccine doses have been delivered to these hardest hit zip codes. Kelly says that will take another week or two coronavirus case rates and

Dr. Mark Galli Central Valley California Kelly
"central valley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"central valley" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Save the district over $4.8 Million money for sports. AP International Baccalaureate and Preschool programs face severe cuts Teachers and parents say the cuts are not needed since the district is getting millions in federal and state money. However, officials say most of that money is restricted to virus mitigation efforts related to reopening campuses. Series of recent storms is pumping up to Sierra snowpack. Shonda Guzman, with the Department of Water Resource is has the results from Wednesday's manual Snow survey at Phillips No course off highway 50. The survey today recorded a snow depth of 63 inches and the snow water content of 17 inches because, Mon says that's considered 93% of average for that location. State white snow Pack is not quite a strong at 70%. Meanwhile, the U. S Drought Monitor says despite a serious of soaking storms, most of California's still in some level of drought, officials say nearly 60% of the state is in the moderate to severe drought category. Another 30% is in the extreme drought range that includes most of the Central Valley from Solano County North To make that from Fresno County, north to the Oregon border. A small sliver of far Eastern California and Inyo and San Bernadino counties is in the most severe exceptional drought category. Traffic and weather together. Here's Dana s wrought by the center and Sierra Health Foundation. Couple of accidents He's found 51. It made their field with an overturned vehicle that doesn't seem to be backing anything up. But you spend 50 and 59th. We had a collision there and definitely having an effect on traffic, which is slow all the way back to I five on eastbound 50 also affecting traffic North bound on 99. He's found cap heavy all the way through Midtown tickets. Arden westbound is gonna be slow on go from the Marconi curve to just pass the American River coming. 19 has killed over 30,000 Californians so far, listen to Mom. Love means staying away Brought to you by the center. It's here. Health Foundation traffic on the sends every 10 minutes mornings and afternoons. Dana has news 93.1 kfbk Sunny with a high around 60 Today in Sacramento overnight should be clear with lows in the upper thirties, but some patchy fog could form for tomorrow.

Dana s Sierra snowpack Shonda Guzman Sierra Health Foundation AP Solano County Health Foundation California Fresno County Mon Department of Water Resource Sacramento Eastern California Oregon Arden Central Valley Inyo San Bernadino American River
"central valley" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:40 min | 2 years ago

"central valley" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Freezing temperatures in the Central Valley Rain and up to 10 Ft of Snow in this year in Nevada. Let's talk about some of the wild weather around the country this week with Mark Elliott. He's a meteorologist and storm specialist at the Weather Channel. Market. There's something called an atmospheric river sitting over California. What does that mean? Yeah, yeah, The Atmospheric River is it's both vitally important and potentially the definition of too much of a good thing. It picks up moisture from the tropical Pacific, and as a storm comes across the Pacific Ocean, it can really focus that in into these narrow corridors, which then get pointed at the West. The Western U. S. It's so important because some areas of the West get the majority of the precipitation from these events and yet also potentially destructive as there could be flash flooding. You know, you mentioned feet of snow. This is not a low impact event when they happen. Exactly how much precipitation are we talking about here, and I can help with the drug her. Is it really just too much. So both, uh it will help the drought to some degree, But this is now a long term drought that's been building in across the West once again, and so every little bit helps, right. You never wanted discount getting this type of precipitation in I don't think it will erase the drought completely through the West, but it's certainly better than not getting anything at all. And as you mentioned, some of the mountains are getting 10 ft. 11 ft of snow in the higher peaks that is excellent for the locking up the moisture for the traditional drier months still to come. We need that precipitation locked in Mark Elliott, meteorologist and storm specials from the Weather Channel. Thanks Thank you. Will onto a story of adoption, which has had a troubled history in the US for decades. During the mid 20th century, millions of unwed mothers were sent away to have their babies in secrecy and shame. Those babies were often given to couples in closed adoptions, which meant that birth mother and child would lose their shared history permanently. Journalist Gabrielle Glaser tells the story of one such family in a new book called American Baby, which is out today. Every all welcome and thank you for writing this book. Oh, thank you so much. And you and you do write it through the eyes of a young woman named Margaret Earl and her biological son, who was born in 1961. What led to their separation. Well, Margaret got pregnant out of wedlock, and in those days it was actually illegal to have premarital sex in New York state. And her baby was taken from her by a very predatory adoption system that existed in New York but also existed nationwide. She and her boyfriend, George, who would later become her husband were actually in love. I mean, they were committed to each other, but that didn't matter, did it. No, it didn't. And despite their best efforts, they did everything they could to try to stay together. They Loped. They tried to convey their fitness as young parents. Social workers in New York City, and it absolutely it didn't matter. It didn't matter to the system, and it didn't matter to their parents either. And so Margaret was sent away to a place that was Me. Frankly, it sounded very unpleasant. Tell me about this home for unwed mothers that she went to the maternity home was a large old estate that was repurposed to house dozens of girls at any time. They were really kept under lock and key. Their diaries were read. Their outgoing letters were read. Their incoming letters were read. They had a strict regimen of chores to which each pregnant girl was assigned. They were watched as if they were toddlers at a preschool. And when the baby finally came, they were taken to the hospital. They were forced to sign these papers. And then that means the records were sealed. Once Margaret and those other girls let go of that baby. It was by design. That she and others would never know what happened to her son. Yes, Absolutely. This was his system that had been established pretty much nationwide. In the twenties and thirties, you would seal an original birth certificate and then issue an amended birth certificate that listed the child's new name. And his adoptive parents, as his original mother and father on the theory was that it would protect the child from the taint of illegitimacy. Protect the mother from the legacy of her alleged wantonness, but most importantly, it would protect the adoptive parents. From anybody ever coming to interfere with their newly created family, And this was happening in a profound scale across the United States. How common was it and what was happening in the culture of our country at that time? Oh, that's a really great question. The sexual revolution was simmering in the years after the war. We don't really think about it then because it's you know, sort of tacked on to the 1960 late 19 sixties, but After the war, soldiers were coming home, having not been celibate during their service. They were unlikely to want to be celibate with their stateside girlfriends. The culture itself was shifting dramatically. There was a new middle class that was exploding in the suburbs, and for the first time, young kids had privacy that they had never had before. They had wreck rooms and their own suburban bedrooms and really, pretty importantly, the back seat of the family, Buick So the the the so the rate of unwed pregnancies skyrocketed between 1946 and the late 19 sixties. And there was no abortion that was illegal. There was no birth control, even for married couples in some states until the late 19 sixties, and there was certainly no sex education. So all of those factors combined to lead to about 3.5 million young women. Getting pregnant out of wedlock. Well, well, Can I tell you something? Yes. My mother was one of them. Oh, my goodness. Yeah, I got it. I got a phone call from her 2.5 years ago, and she asked me if if I was sitting down because I had a half sister that was born 1970 that few people in the world had ever known about. And she told me that she went to a home to have a baby just like Margaret did. And even last night when I was talking to her about it 50 years later, when she told me about the day that she left her baby at the hospital, she was crying. I mean her pain. Through this process was so incredibly deep all these years later, and and I just wonder what you think The impact of all those years of secrecy are when you think about the women that you've spoken with. Oh, thank you so much for sharing that story. I'm I'm really moved by it. And when I heard this story about Margaret and David, and it's so interesting because David himself When he told me that he had found his birth mother. That was the first thing he asked me. Are you sitting down? I found my birth mother. On on Lee happened because he had taken DNA's a test that his wife had given him for his birthday on the same thing happened in my family. That is.

Margaret Earl New York City Weather Channel Mark Elliott United States Pacific Ocean Nevada The Atmospheric River tropical Pacific Central Valley Rain California Buick Gabrielle Glaser George David Lee
"central valley" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"central valley" Discussed on KOMO

"Are showing it. School district's are using what they call a multi tiered approach empty SS where if the teacher can't get a student re engage the intervention specialist steps in? That's Renee Pryor's job in the Central Valley School district had a few times. I mean, that was initially that was our connection was actually going out and actually knocking on doors and trying to get kids connected. Kay Axl. Why report? There's a bill in Olympia to change current law. Just say that after 15 not 10 unexcused absences. Student and guardian reports of the community Truancy board. She also wants the name change to call it the community engagement board, not truancy, so as not to scare parents away for fear A judge will come down on them. Carleen Johnson. Come on News yesterday was the first day of in person learning for kindergartners and it's coma school district during the pandemic. We're ready and able Tiki bar students safe and we're just really looking forward to having a back Tacoma's Mary Lyon elementary tremendous progress. This school was the first to close into coma back in March after a covert outbreak among staff Principal Anita Roth. I was hospitalized with for more than a week. Roth also battled side effects from covert that lasted for months. Those lessons have now been brought back to the classroom. It doesn't have to be a dangerous situation. If we can follow those guidelines next week, more students will slowly return on January 25th preschool kids will be back. Almost carried constant reporting the Bellevue Education Association and calling on the school district to pause expanding in person education. Their teachers union wants the district to wait until covet. Vaccines are available to all school staff. So to be clear, we're not saying to stop all in person. We're saying that we have negotiated successfully conditions by which small groups. Can be successfully operating in person, but that the current plans of the district needlessly risk the safety and well being of those already there. Bellevue's Education Association says If the district is not announce a pause by the end of the workday Friday, the union will hold a membership meeting to discuss further action that's called moves. Ryan Yamamoto, Come on, Whose time 10 40..

School district Central Valley School district Anita Roth community Truancy board Renee Pryor Kay Axl Bellevue Education Association Carleen Johnson Olympia Ryan Yamamoto Bellevue Mary Lyon elementary Tacoma Education Association Principal
"central valley" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"central valley" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"Serving the Central Valley since 1995 if you were anybody who knows been injured in an auto accident, a truck accident or a motorcycle accident. Give us a call at 559498 8004. Few been arrested or cited for criminal offense. Call us 559498 8000 Capitan Brothers. We are the valley's law firm. We are back on with Dr VJ Zion of the Center of Endo, Don ticks and no Donna's tear in Fresno. You were talking about your father having a conversation with you about your future. Yeah, I remember outside the house. Uh, we just had the conversation about me being wanting to be a pilot than I must have been, You know, 15 years old. And you know, he basically let me know that You know, my eyes were just not good enough to be a in the air force. And then you know financially, you know, they could not afford to put me through. Ah, you know, privately to become a pilot. My mom was working in the post office and my dad had gotten his real estate license and Um, by the way, they ended up living in that house for 33 years. So s so I wasn't gonna let that be a hurdle for me. So I, you know, saved up. Every penny worked every summer and the day that I turned 17, which is the minimum age to become a pilot. When I got my license in three months you saved your own money. T take lessons and at 17. He became pilot 33 months..

Central Valley Capitan Brothers Dr VJ Zion Center of Endo Fresno Don Donna
Los Angeles County Shatters COVID-19 Case, Death, Hospitalization Records

Morning Edition

02:41 min | 2 years ago

Los Angeles County Shatters COVID-19 Case, Death, Hospitalization Records

"With ICU space at crisis levels in some population centers. The start of vaccine distribution this week gave everyone a desperately needed dose of good news. California Governor Gavin Newsom embraced that, while also warning that the nation's most populous state is struggling with the viruses Deadliest wave yet. Light at the end of the tunnel. But we're still in the tunnel. Southern California and the state's Central Valley are reeling less than 2% of ICU beds There are available and many hospitals are overwhelmed. Already this week, single day death records have been broken in San Diego, Santa Clara and Los Angeles County. L. A on Wednesday hit a record daily high of 131 covert 19 deaths. Barbara for Air is the county's public health director. Every hour on average, two of our neighbors, family members and friends. Are dying from Cove in 19. And the virus is rampant in all neighborhoods. Key parts of the state are now in surge mode and opening makeshift hospital areas. But many don't have the staff to manage the extra load, and the state has limited options to try to fix that staffing crisis. Slammed. Hospitals are using emergency rooms to house critical patients, and many are postponing elective surgeries and repositioning surgeons and nurses. Dr. Steven Proteus, an executive vice president with Kaiser Permanente, which in the last two weeks has seen hospitalization rates rise, nearly 40%. There were actually taking all the different hands we have on deck. And moving them to where they're needed most, which is right now in our hospitals and emergency department, and some hospitals are boosting the number of ICU patients that nurses treat at one time in Fresno County, for example, that means ICU, nurses will have to add a third critical patient to their workload. Move, Fresno AMs, Director Dan Lynch concedes means additional strain on already exhausted staff. It's a temporary fix, and it does impact those health care workers with You're taking care of a very critical, very complicated case in the ICU, and now you've got three of them. Lynch says the county is also adding another temporary fix quick training nurses to work in ICUs. Crisis even saw Governor Newsome this week once again make a plea to recently retired healthcare professionals to consider returning now will provide supports in terms of hotel rooms and transportation and Trying to wave his many of the fees and related costs associated with getting you back into the workforce on a temporary basis to help us through this very difficult time. California also has requested federal help, including 200. Department of Defense, Medical workers and state emergency officials are actively seeking hospital help from Australia and

Governor Gavin Newsom ICU Dr. Steven Proteus Central Valley Los Angeles County Santa Clara Southern California Fresno Ams Director Dan Lynch California Barbara San Diego Kaiser Permanente Fresno County Governor Newsome Lynch Department Of Defense, Medical Australia
Investors Can Now Bet On The Future Of Water Prices In California

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:59 min | 2 years ago

Investors Can Now Bet On The Future Of Water Prices In California

"This week in california. Water became a commodity. That means it can be traded now. Just like oil or gold. It's a testament to how important water is in a state that's suffering from droughts and wildfires. Here's npr's jim zarroli in california. Water is a source of great power and wealth a theme immortalized in the classic movie. Chinatown going to be a lot of irate citizens when they find out that they're paying for water that they're not gonna get all care she was to get you. Bring the water. La or ring eight water each year california struggles with months of dry weather followed by a few weeks of torrential rain and melting snow from the mountains. Patrick wolf overseas the nasdaq velez water. Index which tracks the price of water in the state there are periods of hydrological dry conditions for extended periods of time punctuated by periods of extremely wet weather when water is very plentiful but there can be years when no rain comes at all says ellen. Hanoch of the public policy institute of california. The next drought is always just around the corner. The impact of droughts were driven home recently when california suffered through its worst wildfire season in modern history. Four point three million acres burned in august and september of this year. It went on for weeks when the smoke cleared the. Cme group of financial exchange came up with a way to bet on the price of california water. Starting this week investors can buy and the right to purchase water at a particular price. The water that helps almonds and lettuce grow in the state central valley will be purchased like silver or or any other commodity. Elon hanoch says this may end up helping. Farmers protect themselves against sudden price. Changes what this could allow you to do is to lock in a price that covers your financial risk for a dry year when the water might become more expensive but most of people who end up buying and selling water contracts won't be farmers they'll be investors in new york and london and all over the world trading on the exchange. They'll never actually see the water they're buying their has betting on the future price and those bets can be very lucrative boss off send climate justice project director for the institute for policy studies says the whole notion of profiting off water. Sales is atrocious. What we need to be doing in ted is changing agricultural practices so they are not so what are intensive especially in up more arid regions and erin brockovich. Consumer activists played by julia roberts in the movie lamented in a tweet that her father had warned of the day when water would become a monetize commodity for california water. At least that's very much the case

California Jim Zarroli Hanoch Patrick Wolf Public Policy Institute Of Cal NPR Elon Hanoch Cme Group Ellen LA Central Valley Institute For Policy Studies London New York Erin Brockovich TED Julia Roberts
Coronavirus Surge Prompts California To Implement Strict Measures

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:33 min | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Surge Prompts California To Implement Strict Measures

"The situation in california is now so serious. Most of the state is under a stay at home order. Thirty three million people in a state of forty million or impacted by the strict dick strict measures taken since march and this is because hospitals are filling up very quickly with coronavirus patients. Nicole nixon with cap radio joins us this morning from sacramento nicole. Good morning morning so explain how this stay at home orders working because it sounds like it's it doesn't apply to everyone in the state right right so these new orders type. Two intensive care unit capacity. They'll go into effect when an area has less than fifteen percent of its. Icu beds available. And it's not just the bed sitter the issue here at staff to work those beds that are feeling tight too. So the southern california region and the central valley region went under these new. Stay at home orders yesterday when the available. Icu beds there. Dip below that fifteen percent and also given how things are going here. It's expected that the rest of the state will hit that. Icu trigger in the next week. Or two here on some counties are not even waiting. They're just saying we're going to preemptively. Implement this order but before we even have to. Yeah five counties in the bay area said that. They're not gonna wait for their used to get to that. Point here is san francisco health officer. Dr tomasz aragon explaining why unlike previous searches. Every hospital in california is under stress. There is no place to transfer people if we run out of beds. Three quarters of the states hospital beds are currently fool. These area counties actually implemented the very first day at home order back in march even before the state did so. This strategy is in line with how they've been handling the pandemic from the beginning when we all remember california taking some of the strictest approaches of anywhere in the country early on so does it just feel like we're going back in time to march now in california a little bit the these. These new orders are not as sweeping as the march. Stay at home order for example schools. That are already open can stay open on the other hand. Businesses like hair and nail salons movie theaters bars and wineries have to close again restaurants. Have to go take out or delivery. Only in churches have to conduct worship services outdoors retail. Stores can stay open this time but at a very limited capacity and these orders will be in effect for at least three weeks however business owners reacting will. Many business owners are angry. Small businesses have already been through so much this year and some see the ban on outdoor dining and things like that as arbitrary. I've been talking with small business owner rosy barra. She's a hairstylist. In temecula in southern california and she told me that she does not intend to comply with this new round of restrictions. I am not closing. I feel confident to properly and safely. Take care of my clients. None of my clients have rescheduled. None of them. Feel that coming to. My salon is going to be unsafe for them at this time. Barra says that for months. She's been following the health guidelines from the state the county and the state cosmetology board and she says that those things are working so resistant that i can make it hard for the state to enforce this. Yeah well the state doesn't have an easy way to enforce it without relying on local police in some local sheriff's have have been reluctant to shut down individual businesses and in saying they'll go education. I instead so in effect. The governor's counting on persuading people to stay home.

Nicole Nixon Central Valley Region California Dr Tomasz Aragon Southern California Sacramento Nicole ICU Bay Area Rosy Barra San Francisco Temecula Barra
Most of California to enter sweeping new virus lockdown

The Splendid Table

00:48 sec | 2 years ago

Most of California to enter sweeping new virus lockdown

"Hospitals around the country are running out of intensive care beds and medical personnel as Corona virus cases surge unabated there more than 100,000 people hospitalized in the U. S with covert 19. That has millions of people in California undergoing a lockdown tonight because area hospitals are overwhelmed. Southern California The Central Valley in the San Francisco Bay area will be understated home orders. San Francisco's help officer, Dr Thomas Aragon says the virus is spreading fast for every positive person that's infected. We know that that precision is infecting at least 1.5 other persons. There are more than 14.7. Million confirmed cases of more than 282,000 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University

Dr Thomas Aragon U. Central Valley San Francisco Bay Southern California California San Francisco Johns Hopkins University
California Health Officials Announce a Regional Stay at Home

iHeartRadio Sunday Night Podcasts

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

California Health Officials Announce a Regional Stay at Home

"You stayed home order takes effect before midnight in the vast region of southern California, much of the San Francisco Bay area and a large swath of the Central Valley. The lockdown will start tonight. For millions of people they start in regions. When I see you capacity, the remaining capacity falls below 15%. California broke its record yesterday for new Daily cases looking more than 30,000 new infections in a single day boxes. Kristina Common in Los Angeles

San Francisco Bay Central Valley California Kristina Common Los Angeles
Most of California, including Los Angeles, to enter sweeping new virus lockdown

Purity Products

00:22 sec | 2 years ago

Most of California, including Los Angeles, to enter sweeping new virus lockdown

"Southern California much of the San Francisco Bay in a large chunk of the Central Valley, about to be placed under a sweeping new lockdown in an attempt to slow the rise of the virus. The California Department of Public Health says the intensive care unit capacity in Southern California and Central Valley hospitals has fallen below of 15% threshold.

Southern California San Francisco Bay Central Valley California Department Of Publi
Most of California to enter sweeping new virus lockdown

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Most of California to enter sweeping new virus lockdown

"New restrictions hit southern California much of the San Francisco Bay Area and a large swaths of the Central Valley Sunday evening and an urgent attempt to slow the rapid rise of coronavirus cases the California department of public health said Saturday the intensive care unit capacity in southern California and Central Valley hospitals had fallen below a fifteen percent threshold that triggers the new measures they include strict closures for businesses and a ban on gathering with anyone outside of your own household Burbank resident marine McLean told KABC she's not surprised by the new rules I'm definitely taking more precautions because I have parents that are very high risk and so we definitely are keeping our space from them the new measures will stay in place for at least three weeks and that means the lockdown we'll cover the Christmas holiday I'm surely antler

Department Of Public Health San Francisco Bay Area Central Valley California Southern California Marine Mclean Kabc Burbank