35 Burst results for "Central Asia"

COVAX vaccine arrives in Afghanistan

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

COVAX vaccine arrives in Afghanistan

"Afghanistan has now got a coded nineteen vaccine ready for distribution shipped father Kovacs facility UNICEF says of the global vaccines partnership Kobach's shipped over four hundred sixty thousand doses of the Coogee shield vaccine the arrival in Kabul marks a milestone moment Afghanistan is the first country in Central Asia to receive the vaccine bother Kovacs the facility set up to deliver these two billion doses off code nineteen vaccines by the end of twenty twenty one the nation's acting minister for public health since the imminent rollout of the vaccine means that around two hundred thirty four thousand people including teachers will be better protected from the ravages of the curve it nineteen virus I'm Charles last month

Kovacs Kobach Afghanistan Coogee Unicef Kabul Central Asia Charles
Armenia's president refuses order to dismiss military chief

BBC Newshour

00:47 sec | Last month

Armenia's president refuses order to dismiss military chief

"In Armenia has intensified with the president refusing an order from the Prime minister, Nicole Passion yon to sack the head of the armed forces. President, a man, Sarkisyan said Carrying out the order would be unconstitutional. Our Central Asia reporter is random, a tree It appears that the reserve power struggle between the prime minister and the president are men's Turkistan. Even though the president's role is largely ceremonial. His signature is still needed on every major appointment or dismissal in the government. So this proposal to dismiss only Gasparri on the chief off the UN forces was made by Prime Minister Yu Kobayashi in on Thursday in response to a statement signed by General Gasparri on cooling for Prime Minister Nick Open Xiangyang to resign.

Nicole Passion Yon Sarkisyan Armenia Gasparri Asia Prime Minister Yu Kobayashi General Gasparri UN Government Prime Minister Nick Open
Female judges gunned down in Afghan capital, court official says

Mental Health America: Morning Addition

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Female judges gunned down in Afghan capital, court official says

"To assassinations in Central Asia. Today, gunmen opened fire on a car in northern Kabul, killing two women judges who worked for Afghanistan's highest court. An Afghan court official also says the gunman wounded the driver. This marks the latest attack in the Afghan capital during peace talks between the Taliban and Afghan government officials in Qatar. And Afghan Supreme Court spokesman says the women served as judges for the high court but didn't identify them by name. No one has claimed responsibility for the attack. The Taliban maintained they were not

Afghan Court Central Asia Afghan Government Kabul Afghan Supreme Court Afghanistan Taliban Qatar
Australian coal exports reportedly banned by China

Monocle 24: The Briefing

06:01 min | 4 months ago

Australian coal exports reportedly banned by China

"Chinese state. Media is reporting today. That china has made official severe restrictions on the import of coal leaving hundreds of millions of tons of the stuff parked haplessly off the chinese coast in ships. That won't be talking. It is a severe and clearly symbolic expression of china's accelerating annoyance with australia. The two countries had long been profitably bound by china's fullness of australia's mineral resources the current episode of monocle. Twenty fours the foreign desk takes a broader look at the china. Australia spat in it. I speak to former australian. Prime minister and former australian diplomat to china kevin rudd. I began by asking him. Just how bad things are got most of us who have been but analysts said -ticipant in its relationship of the last several decades would site that in the near fifty year period since diplomatic relations were established in nineteen seventy two. This is the worst stage that the relationship is raised beds against all measures political diplomatic economic security human rights united. It's all gone right down. The too many contributing factors to this but indirect to question. It's a fifty year low. I think the way to analyze what's unfolding in. The of china relationship is to see it in terms of the normal outworkings all a great cow on the rise in this case but abnormally in this case the rise of a pow which is a one party state with an authoritarian political system. Fewing somewhat mckendall is taken on ole sees as well as seeking to adjust boundaries with its nighters maritime and land by his boundaries that is part of the reality but it does impact not just a straight but other american allies like japan the republic of korea in south southeast asia those in central asia even the russian federation bubble miata hand. What you've had is. An australian government said somewhat incapable differentiating between what i would describe as the operational characteristics of effective china's strategy and confusing that deliberately or otherwise on a continuing basis with a declaratory strategy which ends up being driven by domestic political imperatives. So it is. In fact the call these factors. In imprecise kerr relation with each other which actually produces the net result and frankly. It's an ungodly miss. The time for circuit breaker has well and truly come to prison. The mood for such circuit breaker has not yet arrived. But if you are not just necessarily this australian government but an australian government is there no grounds at all for concern about sinister designs. China may have on australia at this point. In recent months and years we've seen detention of australian journalists in china. There's been varies. Influence peddling scandals strode in michael burgess the director general of aco claims. There's more espionage. Dwayne australia right now than there was during the cold war. The key point here is what we conclude domestically in australia as constituting real threats to try national security by giving janis actions whether it's in state basis cyber cyber-attacks influence operations against his train. Politicians will the media or other such activities in dealing effectively. With each of those challenges it is not necessarily mandated that she didn't take out a mega fan every second day and proclaimed that from the rooftops is the constant differential i seek to explain between an operational strategy as opposed to a declaratory strategy. My advice to premise morrison repeatedly has been do more. Silas do more is in fact. A series of concrete measures enhancing on national security pows enhancing now intelligence assets enhancing fundamental economic cow enhancing out calculation growth in strengthening our alliances and relationships with countries. Around the world of just the united states but in southeast asia and beyond as well and that is gonna separate matter from proclaiming. I said every second tuesday morning. The original There's about two landing bondi beach by the chinese amphibious force. It's quite a different matter. Intelligent mature national strategy. Understand the difference between the two and the owners say practical example. The difference between the two look for example japan on a daily basis weekly bi assists in the last several years handled its relationship with china relatively stable notwithstanding the fact that japan is a annella. United states. Big is a liberal. Democracy see has tonners single loudest economic D has american military bases on its soil and e as a rolling territorial dispute with china chinese china sea of caucus data yet. Despite that the japan china economic relationship prestige relatively unmolested. Why because by the albay and supersonic plaisted looney eternal shall we say eastern virtue of shutting up from time to time as opposed to simply proclaiming everything from the rooftops that's effective strategy as opposed to opening your mouth full of time which is primarily driven ministries case by range of domestic political imperatives. Which in turn complicate the foreign policy agenda is saving to prosecute.

China Australia South Southeast Asia Kevin Rudd Republic Of Korea Japan Russian Federation Michael Burgess Australian Government OLE Kerr ACO Chinese Amphibious Force Janis Silas Morrison Bondi Beach United States
How Hackers Hold Schools for Ransom

Slate's If Then

15:24 min | 4 months ago

How Hackers Hold Schools for Ransom

"To try to put the attack on jessica school context. We reached out to dave bertie. He covers cybersecurity for the wall street journal. And he's been writing about this uptick in ransomware attacks across the digital world. There's been an explosion of ransomware this year. It's an increasingly common way. for attackers. to target businesses healthcare organizations nonprofits or as the case may be schools in the reason. Why is just because. It's an effective business tactic if you encrypt in organizations data. That's basically what they need to function particularly in a digital environment. So as you've had a business or school that have moved more remote learning. That sort of expands. The opportunities to take advantage are there demonstrably more attacks on schools this year. Are we just aware of them. Will the first thing that's always important to point out here is that it's hard if not impossible to count the dogs that don't bark there have been probably about three hundred fifty or more. Cyber incidents reported across the united states this year in schools in schools and others probably a few dozen have been ransomware but that said those are only incidents that have been publicly reported so in many cases schools. They don't wanna take the pr hit an embarrassing situation. They don't want people to know. They paid off a criminal group to get their systems up and running. They might just keep that on the dl and not notify anyone. Even though schools aren't the richest targets around one of the reasons that hackers focus on them is that unlike big businesses. They often aren't equipped to defend themselves. We have seen attackers really zero win. On some of these districts may or may not have built out. It departments in many cases in addition to them being sort of under funded over the course of years their it departments. The also had these really really insane strange just put on them so the coronavirus remote learning getting kids up and running with their chromebooks. Or what have you so. There's really a lot of moving parts here. And i think criminals are smart enough to take advantage of them. So yeah is there just sort of like a handful of people who are in charge in your typical school district of distributing the chromebooks and also guarding against malware. I mean i would say the vast majority of school districts they don't have dedicated cybersecurity professionals even in most districts aside from the larger ones. You don't have that much of a built out. it staff. I talked to the chief information. Security officer of seattle public. School district is a very large school district in the grand scheme of things the only have eighteen. It people for that entire district of that team. Only two of them are dedicated on cybersecurity. So when you're in a position where you are suddenly thrust into remote learning environment and you need to get tens of thousands of devices online with seattle. I think it was fifty three thousand devices for students alone. I mean you really spread thin across a very big network of devices and potential threats. The threat of ransomware attacks has extended to fertility clinics and company providing software for one of the covid vaccine. Trials and the human consequences can be harrowing. There was an incident in germany where a hospital was targeted with ransomware. And as a result of that who is actually in an ambulance on her way to the hospital had to be diverted into another facility about thirty minutes farther away and this wounded women ended up dying. She didn't get care especially needed to get so german. Prosecutors basically tried to connect those dots they were asking the question can we show in a legal way. Causation between these attackers can we show causation. That they actually causes woman's death and ended the day they couldn't it was more of a correlation not causation situation. And i think that was the closest that we've come collectively to getting to a point where we're saying. Oh there's actually a cyber attack that has taken someone's life Let's walk through how this happens. Let's say you are a school administrator or hospital. it percent what do you notice. I will typically you know if if you really if something's wrong with your laptop and you really need to get to work you'll call the. It guy you'll always it guy and you'll say hey what's up with my laptop. I can't log into my email. Then typically they'll run through some scans and see that something's wrong with the system. They'll eventually get some sort of communication from one of these ransom. Learn groups saying. Hey we're here we've gotten into your system. We've locked up your data and we want x. Number of bitcoin in response. So that's really when it sort of gets this point where a school or business has to decide okay. Are we going to alert law enforcement. Are we going to call an outside forensics firm to try to understand what happened. Have we backed up all of our data within our system. And how quickly will be able to get that back. Do we want to pay this ransom payment. Like is the tradeoff. Good enough for us to do that. So there's a lot of moving parts that a lot of Businesses or schools or hospitals have to evaluate is all as happens the baltimore schools. Where just by works. They shut everything down. They sort of put everything on pause for a couple of days. Is that standard. Yeah i can typically standard. I talked with a school district in southern california. A administrator notices email was down the. It guys said it's ransomware for sure. So they physically went to every device in their school district. So we're talking about a school district of six thousand kids. Went every room went to all of their offices. Disabled unplugged device in that entire school district. And that's that's one way you know sort of a crude way of trying to limit the spread of of these things and then obviously on the back end when all these problems need to go through each and every one of those devices can them makes your their clean. Get them back online. What how often do victims turn to outside help whether that's law enforcement or whether that is digital forensics company to help them abc's extremely common there is entire ecosystem cybersecurity firms specialized in this sort of work. So you have a forensic firm that might come in to try to understand. Hey this is exactly how they got in to your computer system. This is exactly the type of software that they're using. This is exactly the type of data that they took from your system. In addition to that you have other groups. That are adept at negotiating. They actually talk to these groups. They have long term relationships in some cases with many of these groups and they say we can talk them down from ten bitcoin to five bitcoin. Whatever whatever the the number is the so it is sort of an emerging field just within cybersecurity as this is becoming a bigger and bigger problem. How much money are we generally talking about. Because my husband actually just how to ransomware attack on his nonprofit theater company and the attackers were asking for fifteen hundred dollars in bitcoin and eventually they said you know what we're not gonna pay them. We have the backed up data but they did have this moment of thinking in the scheme of our business. It's not that much money like. Are we talking about people who are shooting for big amounts or you know are they targeting twenty five different places for relatively gettable sums across the security community. It's broadly understood that ransom demands are basically going up. The trend line is pointing upward. But it can vary between in the thousands of dollars like as as a case with with your husband. But if you're getting to a larger corporation you have some people who specialized in this area saying that ransom demands could be ten million twenty million dollars. Well so i mean. Obviously attackers are smart enough to know they're not going to go with to attend with a ten million dollar demand to a school district. That certainly can't pay that in. That would make it an easy decision for them. They're they're trying to find like the right price point as well where they can have some sort of a six rate. Do school districts do hospitals. Do these places tend to pay. It really varies. It depends on what type of data has been encrypted. It depends whether those school districts have backed up their data beforehand which would make sort of rebooting the system much easier but what is almost always true. Is that school very cagey about saying whether they paid. No one wants to say that. They paid off a hacker that they gave someone from a country in the side of the other side of the world. A million bucks get their systems online. It's a very difficult. Pr situation for any organization or school to tiptoe around because it says what your system is rable and that you're willing to pay or that you just were bad cybersecurity. I mean all of the above. And i think one of the sort of broader questions that the entire cyber community is really wrestling with is. Should you pay broadly speaking. Are we incentivizing hackers to keep taking advantage of schools or keep taking advantage of businesses if they keep on paying and i understand that argument completely. It's it's very straightforward point of view on the other hand. If your business is offline for two weeks or a month or if your schools taken off line paying off might be the better option to you if it means basically losing all of your customers or you know having kids go out of school for a month or so. Dave says it's a bit of a vicious cycle vulnerable systems plus a willingness to pay tends to lead to more attacks but the victims are only half of the equation. The other half the perpetrators behind that screen demanding. Bitcoin are part of a criminal industry. That is surprisingly organized. One of the interesting things that cyber security researchers really say is these groups oftentimes act almost as corporate entities. They're very professional. They have partnerships between groups at times they subcontract to specialists within the hacking profession. If they have you know someone who's particularly adept at getting into a system. They'll go to that person to try to launch their attack. So you'd really do have this sort of our in de element almost a within the hacking community when it when it comes to them trying to hone their craft and zero win an exactly the right targets when people are negotiating or even having a conversation with. The attackers are to be trusted. Like you know are. Are you gonna trustees folks if they say like okay. Pay us are fifteen hundred bucks in bitcoin. And actually you're going to get your data back or is that a terrible idea. You would think that criminals are not to be trusted in. Obviously they're they're not But at the end of the day these groups are also playing a long game when it comes to their business and they have as i said a reporter with some of these negotiators that work with businesses and schools. If they don't pay if they don't decryption data after you pay them money. Those negotiators will know for their subsequent clients and they will know to not advise clients in the future to pay. So you had this weird dynamic that develops were. The groups are actually like worried about their sort of like brand in some respects. That's completely fascinating. Yeah it's totally wild thing and one lawyer who works in a lot of these investigations like re recently told me we don't wanna get to the level buber comparing it to customer service. But they're like definitely getting to a point where once you pay up in some cases they're trying to be helpful so that in the future they're known as sort of an honest broker while attacks may be more. Frequent ransomware isn't new like with so many other things cove it just accelerated existing trent so we have just seen a growth in the amount of ransomware with some of these criminal groups that have been long established in countries around the world just gravitating toward an effective tool that they're using so when you talk to cybersecurity researchers who follow this closely attribution is very difficult but they tend to say that the countries in which these types of groups operate our might might be the ones that you tend to think of korea iran china countries in the soviet bloc or central asia countries that may tend to look away when cyber criminal groups within their own borders launch an attack on a us business and do foreign governments step in or they unhelpful. I think it's safe to say that the the reason why a lot of this activity oftentimes stems from those countries is because the government's take a more lax approach some of this hacking particularly if it's sort of geared at the united states the. Us government recently has tried to warn businesses against paying somewhere demands. They basically have looked at those states. In particular places like north korea and iran and they've issued warnings to companies saying. Hey if you're targeted by ransomware think twice about paying anyone who is affiliated with someone who sanctioned from those countries. You could violate sanction rules by actually paying up this ransomware. I was really struck by that. Yeah the treasury department was basically sort of saying. Gee even if you're a victim you might be maybe committing a crime here if you pay up. What was their reasoning. Their i mean. I think goes to that discussion that i was mentioning earlier about how we're creating a market for ransomware essentially and i think it's it makes sense to the. Us government's official policy as we shouldn't pay people on our sanction lists and create this market. That said if a company that employs ten thousand or twenty thousand americans has to choose between paying one of these things or laying people off. I mean that's a much different conversation. Be curious to see whether people in law enforcement federal regulators etcetera might take sort of a case by case approach to actually enforcing that sort of thing. I'm trying to figure out where all of this goes. As we maybe move to a post pandemic world Obviously people are gonna still do lots of stuff online. And that's not something. That's going away. But i wonder if you think we are going to keep seeing this increase in ransomware attacks or if this is maybe a bit of a bubble wrought by the pandemic. I think it's probably safe to assume that it will continue increasing. You will still have these criminal groups that make tens of millions of dollars per year doing this stuff who will continue to innovate continue to look for new ways to go after businesses. Continue to do that. Research and development that we mentioned earlier so. I think it's safe to say that. None of that's going to stop

Dave Bertie Seattle The Wall Street Journal Jessica United States Southern California Germany Baltimore ABC Bitcoin Wrestling Dave Korea Iran Central Asia
Onion Domestication and Improvement

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:20 min | 5 months ago

Onion Domestication and Improvement

"We're going to talk about domestication again of a unique vegetable and when you ask people what their favorite vegetable is very few people say the onion however it's hard to think of vegetable or plant item for that matter. That has a more ubiquitous place in our culinary universe. It's you know the powders. The the the the basic parts of onion are important flavor in many different things that we consume and i think about just about everything i cook starts chopping up and onion so i wanted to pursue. Where did it come from. How did we get it. Where is it going. And so we're speaking with dr mike heavy. He's a he works with the. Usda agricultural research service in madison wisconsin and also as a faculty member in a department of horticulture. So welcome to the podcast. dr heavy. thank you so much. This is really cool. I think i actually got to see you. Give a talk once. And i can't remember where it where it was but i think what did you ever give talk in savannah georgia at the national onion association meeting. Yes i did about four five years ago. We had a joint meeting between the national onion association and then all the research community. I think we met there. Yeah that's i seem to remember that. Yeah i think. I may have asked you at the time too. If you'd be a guest on the podcast and just takes time so. Let's talk about onions. Like i mentioned before it has such an important culinary value. Where did it come from end. Do natural populations still exist. So the onion like many of our grain and vegetable and fruit crops was domesticated in central asia specifically iran. Turkmenistan afghanistan that area and it spread from there around the world and is now consumed in produced on every continent except in artika. There are still the most closely related. Wild specie is called alien babalola by and that grows naturally still in the kopech. Dr region which forms the border between northern iran and southern turkmenistan. And so the wild relatives still exists. There probably was in prehistory was more widely distributed but We can still find alien. Below by inet area oval ovalles. That was a discovery or at least a characterization by vavilov the species is named after him. Allie taxonomy in the former soviet union named this wild species after nikolai. About by batalov. Okay i never remember seeing so much about his his expeditions into places like iran. Turkmenistan you that he was Know prolific in that area. So but that makes sense to when you talk about the species of wild onion. I know that even here in florida there are things that they haul a florida. Wild onion and in chicago is named by from indigenous peoples term for stinky onion. So are these related to the major culinary onions or are these some kind of distant relative first of all the alliens. The genus of onion is distributed around the northern hemisphere and here in north america. Most albums have a seven chromosomes whereas onion and garlic chai have a basic chromosome number of eight. So they're distant relatives and we can't cross them with onion but they do have unique flavors in many places there still collected in consumed but really are very distantly related to the onion that we know. Have there been any efforts that you're aware of to domesticate those regional varieties that are grown with the seven chromosome ones that are growing around. Say the native united states. Yes you do find him showing up. Sometimes farmers markets different species out west in the california in the rockies. There are numerous albums that can be collected in consumed but to my knowledge. There's no effort to really Breed them in and develop some unique flavors or production characteristics from them so the primarily just collected so when you talk about the actual album that was used that is the forefather of the modern onion. Who was really the first to domesticate that they would have been probably nomadic tribes in central asia most of the central asian republics of the former soviet union onion and many of its wild relatives naturally exist and probably these people's started collecting him in eating them initially and ultimately i feel Asexually propagated them. Much like you would. Shall it today break apart. The basal plate planet and then i think probably seed production at conscious breeding occurred later but it would have been nomadic tribes in central asia tens of thousands of years ago they mostly use it for food flavoring or were there other potential uses of onion now. That's an interesting question that has been quite a topic of debate. A couple of things may have played an important role in the domestication of onion. One of them is that Because it was an editorial form is a perennial grows every year. It sprouts very early in the spring and many of your listeners may grow chives and the green leaves of tribes. Come out very early in while alley. That's true as well. It's not a good source of vitamin c. But it does have vitamin cs. I think you could think about a nomadic tribes taking advantage of that early green growth of the leaves in the spring as a source of vitamin c and potentially other vitamins and flavorings but the taste is also has to have an effect. I think and. I wonder if maybe wasn't important to mask off. Flavors maybe for some ranson meets or different foods that may not have it have an off taste and that maybe the early domesticated is used that straw salt pungency flavor compounds in the album's to their benefit.

National Onion Association Turkmenistan Dr Mike Heavy Usda Agricultural Research Ser Dr Heavy Iran Artika Babalola Vavilov Batalov Soviet Union Savannah Madison Wisconsin Florida Nikolai Asia Allie Georgia
Vaccine storage issues could leave 3B people without access

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 6 months ago

Vaccine storage issues could leave 3B people without access

"Coronavirus vaccines storage issues could leave around three billion people without access with the pandemic now in its eighth month logistics experts warn many parts of the world lack of the conditions to administer an effective vaccination program this includes most of Central Asia much of India and Southeast Asia much of Latin America all but a tiny corner of Africa from factory to syringe the world's most promising coronavirus vaccine candidates need nonstop sterile refrigeration display potent and safe but despite enormous strides in equipping countries to maintain the essential cold chain nearly three billion people of the world seven point eight billion live west such storage is insufficient I'm Charles that's my

Central Asia India Southeast Asia Latin America Africa Charles
Vaccine storage issues could leave 3B people without access

AP 24 Hour News

00:47 sec | 6 months ago

Vaccine storage issues could leave 3B people without access

"Corona virus faxing storage issues could leave around three billion people without access. With the pandemic. Now in its eighth month, logistics experts warn many parts of the world lack of the conditions to administer an effective vaccination programme. This includes most of Central Asia, much of India and Southeast Asia. Much of that in America on all but a tiny corner ofthe Africa from factory to syringe. The world's most promising Corona virus. Vaccine candidates need nonstop, sterile refrigeration to stay potent and safe. But despite enormous strides in equipping countries to maintain the essential cold chain, nearly three billion people of the world's 7.8 billion live where such storage is insufficient.

Southeast Asia Corona Central Asia India Africa America
Kyrgyzstan's prime minister becomes acting president

The World

01:51 min | 6 months ago

Kyrgyzstan's prime minister becomes acting president

"Cycle here in the U. S. Is moving at a breathtaking pace but consider the pace of things in the former Soviet state of Kyrgyzstan in Central Asia. 10 days ago, just after the country held parliamentary elections, protesters took took to to the the streets, streets, accusing accusing officials officials of of corruption corruption and and rigging rigging the the vote. vote. A day later, protestors stormed the parliament building. And then Ferguson Central Election Commission and know the results of the vote and scores of officials stepped down, including the prime minister. Then this happened. What about the I didn't say it was impossible Long. Ferguson's president declared a state of emergency in the capital. That'll brings us to today when. In a written statement, Kurdistan's presidents turned by Jean Bekoff said he is also resigning from office, apparently after feeling some serious pressure from the newly appointed prime minister. Protesters threatened to storm the presidential compound of Jean Bekoff did not step down. Once news spread today of the president's resignation. Activist in Bishkek celebrated in in a a statement, statement, Jeanne Jeanne Bec Bec Oh, Oh, said said he he feared feared violence violence might might break break out out if if protesters protesters actually actually follow follow through through on on their their threat threat to to march march into into his his compound. compound. He He said. said. I I do do not not want want to to go go down down in in Cuba Cuba since history as the president who shed blood and shot at his own citizens. So after all this what's the situation in Kyrgyzstan nation grasping for some stability and wondering who is officially in charge? In his statement, the outgoing president called on the new prime minister and other politicians to get their supporters off the streets and bring peaceful life back to the people of dish back.

President Trump Prime Minister Jean Bekoff Jeanne Jeanne Bec Bec Kyrgyzstan Ferguson Central Election Comm Cuba Cuba Central Asia. Ferguson Bishkek Kurdistan
Buy the way? Kyrgyzstans post-election chaos

The Economist: The Intelligence

07:20 min | 6 months ago

Buy the way? Kyrgyzstans post-election chaos

"President whose whereabouts are unknown parliamentary offices overrun by protesters. Multiple opposition candidates vying to take the title of Prime Minister. After a national election confusion and chaos have. The former Soviet state of Kirghistan talked between Kazakhstan and China. Central Asia is a region ruled by strong men who typically get close to one hundred percent of the vote. So three years ago when in by Jane Bekov was elected Kurdistan's president uneventfully with fifty five percent was hailed as the region's first peaceful and democratic transfer of power look. Zone the but even then there were murmurs of electoral misconduct. This time the murmurs or a roar. Absence uncontested leadership has turned a country where both China and Russia have interests into a tinderbox. On Sunday K. Gestalt went to the polls to elect a new parliament and it was this event that ended up propelling, Stan about of political chaos because all of the opposition parties and also many of the people of kick stance they didn't accept the result join a Lewis Right about Central Asia for the economist and is based in Kazakhstan they started to come. In on Monday when a preliminary count showed that pro-presidential parties would be dominating parliamment and the opposition would have few seats. Book would be almost entirely shutout people took to the streets. Immediately thousands of people went to the main square in the capital Bishkek Sasi demonstrating against those results and when the police found to disperse, them will pitched battles between riot, police and protest. Of them, the protesters stormed the building housing, the president's office and Parliament and they were shouting that he should go and what is it that happened in the election that lead to such a reaction Without, that what? Protesters were absolutely furious about the I was that they believed that the results were skewed in favor of parties broadly loyal to the president. The second question that was really exercising these enraged protesters was how that was achieved and the allegation is that there was absolutely rampant vote buying I really have to say it was an open secret. In fact, it wasn't a secret that parties were going around paying people money to vote in their favour. We even know the going rate it was two thousand. Psalm, which is about twenty five dollars. Now, this is all alleged central investigation, but the evidence was was fairly credible that was circulating on social media. So when the results came in, that's why they took to the streets. What's the situation on the ground now who control? Well, events have moved in a very fluid manner fast moving because cake is Stan remains very much embroiled in this political turmoil, and really what we've seen forming is a power vacuum. The whereabouts of the president are actually unknown. By bekov says he's in control of the situation through spokespeople, but meanwhile, some political factions are at odds with other political factions. So all of those opposition forces and they're very disparate include nationalist liberal form as all kinds of different forces they are failing to find common cause. I mean we've seen mops from some actions basically aging in fisticuffs with other factions. The threat of violence has been hanging in the air in Kansas Stan and so what next how? How to unravel this? If protests have succeeded in having one of the main demands met the day after they stormed the presidential offices in parliament, the electoral commission announced that it would annul the results of those elections and they promised that there would be a rerun of the election. But of course, what's not clear with how can an election be now held in the current circumstances are power vacuum sporadic violence people out on the street so it's really unclear. If that's enough to satisfy the protesters and it's not only about the protesters. At this point, it's very much about the political factions, the clans, the people who are now jostling for power the prime minister who but bag Baranov resigned, and we have two rivals already claiming to be the prime minister. One of them is a rabble rousing nationalist former MP called Saudi Jackpot of who was actually sprung from jail during the unrest by his supporters and he had. Been in jail for kidnapping a local official during a previous bout of political unrest Mr Japan supporters have been aggressively sometimes violently trying to prevent rival factions from meeting besieging buildings in which they're meeting, throwing stones and scuffling with rivals. Basically, what happens next is a big question. It's a very unpredictable, very chaotic and potentially dangerous situation and given all that chaos and the potential for danger here. Do you do you think this has an international dimension to it? Outside powers are expressing deep concern over the situation in Kingston. On the one hand, we have China with which is Stan shares border and China has expressed concern and is clearly alarmed at reports that protesters are targeting Chinese own business interests in the country. Specifically, all my said operated by Chinese companies, and then on the other side, we have Russia, which is obviously stands former colonial power. Russia has a military base in Stan and it really doesn't like to see popular uprisings in what it considers to be its own. Geopolitical backyard, and this is of particular concern at this point in time because Russia has been looking on with great alarm at protests in Belarus on the other side of the former Soviet Union where protesters have a weeks now been coming out against the results of presidential elections indeed this week the Kremlin has started to make no secret of is concerned about events in is Stan and as basically saying that it's descending into chaos and that Moscow has obligations under a security treaty to prevent the situation from breaking down. From breaking down further I mean how how bad could this if this carries on? The confusion that Stan covertly faces may in the end how President Jiang Becker to hang onto power although it's very, very clear that at this point, he is not going to get the pliant parliament that he was hoping to get out of this election. He has three years left in office. Presidents can only serve a single term that's under a system introduced to prevent power grabs books. It's important to remember that is people have thrown two presidents in the past. So a suggestion Bekker's position is very shaky and what is really clear is the longer the power vacuum that we're currently seeing a stand remains unresolved the more likely it becomes that violence will be used to resolve it. Thanks very much for joining US join us. Thank you very much.

President Trump Stan China Prime Minister Kazakhstan Jane Bekov Russia Asia Bishkek Sasi Kirghistan Parliament United States Kurdistan President Jiang Becker Central Asia Kingston Kansas
What's the deal in Kyrgyzstan?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:58 min | 6 months ago

What's the deal in Kyrgyzstan?

"The being few short remains for foreign observers of a given event to be clown themselves than by drawing convenient comparisons we should probably banish any suggestion that what is happening in Kingston has anything much in common with what has been happening in Belarus. There are granted superficial similarities, lodge crowds of citizens who aren't buying the result of a recent election and amount of violence between protesters and police but recent events in Belarus are actually pretty straightforward overstaying tyrant Riggs won election to many demonstrations and the present standoff ensue. Kingston. Is some several layers more complicated and seems poised for a more decisive and dramatic? K. Gaston voted in parliamentary election on Sunday. This was not necessarily predestined to be a Hollow Mockery K. Gaston previous parliamentary election in two thousand fifteen pretty decent reviews from international observers on Freeness and fairness fronts certainly by the generally would be gone standards of Central Asia. This is was different not least because this really doesn't happen. Often the governing party didn't turn up Kingston Social Democratic. Party was stunned by loyalties divided between Kingston's current President Surin by Jeenbekov and he's predecessor Almaz atom by of the two former have fallen out badly in recent years to the extent that last August automobile was arrested and this past June sentenced to eleven years in the clink on corruption charges. As of Monday morning Adam Beyer was a man thanks to the crowds which stormed the National Security Committee building in Bishkek with the former president was being held former Prime Minister John Toro Sati Baldev also on the hook on corruption charges will sprung in similar circumstances. According to official results only four parties of the sixteen contested Sunday's election past the threshold of seven percent necessary to take seats in Kigali stands parliament the Supreme Council three of these parties protesters could not help but notice enjoyed the favour of president. Jeenbekov, who was widely believed to have had his thumb on the scales protests on Monday morning started small and peaceful grew larger and Rowdier, and by Monday evening had taken the parliament building set bits of it on fire and set about redecorating the surrounding streets with ransacked documents. Giga Stan does have an amount of foam for this sort of thing in two thousand and five mass protests which eventually became known as the Tulip Revolution. Forced President Askar Akayev from office. He is now a mathematics professor at Moscow State University in two thousand and ten his successor. Kurmanbek Bakiyev also skipped the country with an angry mob at his heels he was lost heard of. In Minsk begin with breaking news in Kirghistan, the prime minister has resigned. Vert list of is leaders overthrown by popular acclaim. Now appears to have been joined by Prime Minister Cutback Borakove who resigned after the positive results of Sunday's election were annulled by electoral authorities nominated. Piece, in the country and stability in society is more important than any politicians mandates. Suggests that the central. Election Committee thoroughly investigate any violations during the election process. That's a no the result if necessary. I asked political leaders to calm the voters and ask them to take part in gathering. As, this explainer went to wear President Jeenbekov precise whereabouts on certain was also making these sort of statements of willingness to pass power along to responsible new leaders. That one issues is one shovels, the contents of the state treasury into one's Portman toes and frantically oldest one's pilot to fire up the engines and seek clearance for landing in some capital. Four, it's interesting extradition treaties. Possibly significantly President Jeenbekov found the time earlier today to convey birthday greetings to President Vladimir. Putin of Russia volunteering ernest appreciation of Putin's it says here, great contribution and constant attention to the consistent expansion and development of cages Russian multifaceted ties. Custodians Parliament has installed a new prime minister Saadia drop her off another politician who was in prison time last week, it very much remains to be seen how long he'll lost with the parliament buildings still occupied by protesters. Mr Japan was appointed at an emergency meeting in Bishkek hotel, which he had to leave virus service entrance. Once his presence became public knowledge the crowd still filling the streets and squares of Bishkek seen Kina until I talked to Gassiev, a businessman who trades in your shaped greenhouses and is also a representative of a younger generation of caregivers politicians. He is claiming the mantle of the head of government. As to what happens next, it may become important that to external players in particular will be hoping that what happens next? Little as possible Russia maintains a military airbase account in Gaston north China which borders Kingston to the south is a major trading partner. As, both will understand however, an as another cohort of caregivers politicians are presently learning the hard

President Jeenbekov President Trump Kingston Prime Minister Bishkek Parliament President Askar Akayev Election Committee Prime Minister John Toro Sati Belarus K. Gaston Putin President Vladimir Russia Kurmanbek Bakiyev Adam Beyer Riggs Giga Stan National Security Committee
Leon Trotsky assassination attempt - May 24, 1940

This Day in History Class

03:45 min | 11 months ago

Leon Trotsky assassination attempt - May 24, 1940

"APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. This Day in history class is a production of iheartradio. Hey y'all I'm eaves and welcome to this day in History Class. A podcast for people who could never know enough about history today is may twenty fourth twenty twenty. The Day was may twenty fourth nineteen forty Mexican artists. W fosse GAYDOS and Stalinist agent. Gula Vich along with a crew of hitmen attempted to donate Leon Trotsky Trotsky was a Soviet revolutionary and Marxist threats who was a leading figure in the Bolshevik movement under Vladimir Lenin after Lennon died in nineteen twenty four and Joseph. Stalin rose to power in the Communist Party in Soviet Union Chomsky emerged. As one of Stalin's main critics and opponents Trotsky was against the increasingly bureaucratic Soviet state and called for more democracy in the Communist Party. He thought that the Stalinist policy of socialism and one country would hinder efforts for World Revolution in Nineteen Twenty Five. Trotsky was removed from his post in the war commissariat. The next year he was dropped from the Polit Bureau and in nineteen twenty seven he and his supporters were expelled from the Communist Party. In January of Nineteen Twenty eight Trotsky was exiled to a tie and Soviet Central Asia. He lived there for a year before he his wife and their son were expelled from the Soviet Union and sent to Turkey but he continued to write and criticize Stalin as well as people who had opposed Stalin but has settled for the regime. Trotsky settled on the Turkey island of principle where he stayed for four years. He completed his autobiography and his three volume history of the Russian revolution some of his supporters volunteer to serve as his bodyguards but in nineteen three Chomsky and his family were offered asylum in France soon enough. He was no longer welcome in France either and he moved to Norway then Mexico where he had been granted asylum skis settled in Koya con area of Mexico City at the Blue House the home of painter Diego Rivera and free to Carlo and he continued to write completing the revolution betrayed in one thousand nine hundred eighty six but in a series of trials in the late. Nineteen thirties many so-called old bolsheviks were found guilty of treason and imprisoned or executed many of the defendants confessed to having plotted with Trotsky to kill Stalin and other Soviet leaders Trotsky was found guilty of treason in absentia and sentenced to death on May twenty fourth. Nineteen forty Stalinist agent. Iosif Grigorovich

Leon Trotsky Trotsky Stalin Communist Party Soviet Union Soviet Central Asia History Class Apple Gula Vich Chomsky Iosif Grigorovich Vladimir Lenin Turkey Island Turkey France Polit Bureau Diego Rivera Joseph Mexico City Mexico Koya
"central asia" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

WORT 89.9 FM

02:47 min | 11 months ago

"central asia" Discussed on WORT 89.9 FM

"Was a set of music from Central Asia particularly mostly music from his Pakistan starting with the the shop windows the calendar vagabond tunes that was three more months my dog Molly Kelsey volume and how do you move out so far off and that's from an album expected stand echoes of Venice court said that was under the UNESCO label but that has just been acquired by Smithsonian folkways and made available and there are a number of free tracks that are available from Smithsonian folkways of all the UNESCO collection that's been recently incorporated so SIS one around and did a good selection of what is there than in others Pakistan music we heard Gil a loving come my lady M. that's said to again by calendar often tell you to come down as much as on off and that's from was Pakistan music traditions that the car politics which is an orally transmitted epic tradition that has been around expect standing Central Asia and yes Sir great field recordings that have been made available recently for that's what I've been playing then after that actually right before the in between the songs the student ensemble from so not feeling your duty to I think of men and that's also from Uzbekistan music traditions of the kind of politics and then we ended up with the for forty who checked the academy of my com which is an example of classical central Asian music yes great stuff in the a lot of times it's worth just checking out the samples that that's what's going on Paul please put out on their website and yeah a lot of times I'm encouraged by the whole album and US Central Asia is definitely one of those places that has a very unique music and for anyone to like string music it's a great place to just look at different styles and just very good players anyway so we still have a more sure to get to and let's change directions and listen to voices of women from Latin America doing a bit of traditional music mixed with some more modern and experimental elements.

Central Asia Pakistan Smithsonian folkways Gil US Latin America Molly Kelsey Venice Uzbekistan Paul
Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

John Batchelor

08:23 min | 1 year ago

Covid-19 Spreads: Is a global economic downturn on the cards?

"Show covert nineteen the corona virus beginning in China but now we see the news stories the satellite nation of South Korea it's watching turmoil in its production lines the non satellite nation Iran is cut out from the world community and world manufacturing so we're going to set that aside and go to northern Italy where there is a super spreader we're told and there are Italian town shutting down particularly Italian towns near the best mills the Italian mills now I'm describing economics but I'm doing it anecdotally so I welcome Christine McDaniel a senior research fellow at the Mercatus center who is approaching covered nineteen from the point of view of world economics Christina very good evening to you mention in your remarks we don't have a great deal of data but what we have is there any indication of an analogy to the corona virus have we seen the world deal with at this scale of threat before and do we know what it means for the economy when and if it recovers good evening to you good evening thank you so much that to be here on this fascinating it's not grim topic well the condiments you know we look at our historic events and course there's the mayors and the sars outbreaks although this one is a somewhat different in the sense that the incubation period as the actual duration is not yet known at first it was reported to be two weeks but then just today we're hearing out of China out that there was an extra long coated nineteen incubation dad a whole family of six tested positive for the virus falling and your bonds long cord G. so if we were still very unclear on the parameters and until we get a better sense of the incubation and the and the spread then you know until that happens it's still gonna be very difficult to to what we know what the reach could be all that said today China is much more integrated into the world economy than it was during the sars outbreak and US production can be shut down if China shuts down so so well we haven't reached a health epidemic yet like Diane Swonk said you know it is very possible that there will be an economic camp that make even without health condemning it even if it's just so what if you're driven but again we just don't have the data to know for sure we have a report from South Korea that Honda I will suspend production in South Korea because of the covet nineteen actually because they can't get parts from China but that leads to shin bone the bone we also have a similar indications from Sam song and we can expect that care will also struggle is it does this tell us that it's a profound damage to the world economy as my thinking as bad as an amateur Christine is that whoever wants to buy an automobile has the money in his pocket and when that automobile is available the purchase will happen so whether it happens in the first quarter of the second quarter the third quarter it's still part of growth is that it is that it is that it is the wrong way to approach this or is is that too positive well it's it's probably right you're talking about pent up demand you know things like for you know a large consumer goods if I want a new car or a new washing machine you know whether I go out today tomorrow or next month I'm going to go out and buy one so there are certain purchases that will happen even if they are delayed and their other purchase at your purchases and and trip trips that just won't happen because they didn't happen last week you know for example a conference that you don't you might wish they were supposed to go to that you didn't go to are you what are you did you go out to dinner you didn't have to go to work another event so there are some things that those sales are just gone and they're gone forever so it it depends on the type of sale that we're talking all right let me give an example I was scheduled to be in it was Pakistan within these next days for an international conference of financial conference called by the president very important to the development of Central Asia which you know is undergoing a re awakening right now renaissance it's been delayed till fall now yes that's a delay but it's not a cancellation and yes there will be a negative effect on the hotel years and the drivers and the airlines in and out of those Pakistan is that profound the travel agency is what I'm chiefly of focusing on but also the business travel agency which is a which pays top dollar well remember travel and tourism accounts for about ten percent of global economic activity so if that ten percent slows down for the next quarter or two then that's going to show up in the in the GDP numbers it will eventually bounce back but you know in the near term it you know it probably is going to look to bleed out through the through lower GDP a lower GDP in the first and second quarter but we look at GDP globally is this just a job for the IMF Christine Shawcroft well you know it it just goes to Millis is is not really going to help here if our people are just staying home right there in the we heard the CDC and HHS today and they said that the other course they're balancing against you now it depending on how things go in the eyes of would be a very aggressive on one hand they want an aggressive containment strategy on the other hand they want minimal impact to communities and so they were talking about you know encouraging people to stay home okay we'll find staying home then your physical stimulus is not necessarily going to help you know it might help some particularly I financially failing firms but in terms of the core they're the real reason for the economic slowdown the two center bucket tied to the virus back to school season which is not necessarily going to help so you have to remit long term economic growth is driven by mainly two things number one population number two productivity growth and so don't the long term is what you need to ask yourself how is this going to affect populations how was it going to affect productivity growth productivity growth you know that's our ability to make more eager to do more with less and in the long run I don't see how this would affect predicted to gross and last we have to make some structural changes to how we do business and that yeah it is no cost and slow things down but I think we're far from getting to that discussion yet Christine you read your colleagues and there do they love to kind of this love modeling is their modeling to describe something at this scale is there a book about this or are they writing the book now there are lots of models of modeling a chance going on right now and you're right we we we economists love models and up we use models to you know basically hold everything constant and just change one thing to get a better sense of how one thing can affect everything else we can model anything right and we have a global economic models country by country even the sub national level regional level models sector by sector so we can and we're very good at at modeling the economic effects of a chair or tax but the problem with this is we don't really know what the the the shock to the model is is it a supply side shock is the demand side Sharkey is a little bit little bit of both so and so economists get a better sense of how the virus is going to translate into affecting costs is supply and demand it's it's really hard to to use models to get some type of precision on the economic

China South Korea Iran
A Decade of Dzud: Lessons From Mongolia's Deadly Winters

Short Wave

08:59 min | 1 year ago

A Decade of Dzud: Lessons From Mongolia's Deadly Winters

"So for people. Who Don't know I totally know where is Mongolia? Mongolia is in Central Asia right between Russia and China. The landscape to me looks a little bit like a mixture between Montana and Mars if you can picture that delightful so this this time last year before you were short waves reporter. You don't like to think about that time. You went to Mongolia it's true. Why would one go to Mongolian winter all the travel guides discourage discourage it? I might discourage it but I purposely went there then because winter is at the heart of this whole story. So how cold are we talking here. It's super cold. uh-huh freeze your nose. Harris cold I actually had to tape. Hand warmers all over my microphone so it wouldn't freeze. Wow it is cold. Oh I found this piece of tape tape of me complaining about it minus eighteen degrees right now. This is really cool. I could tell me what you say. Cool coach it wasn't acting but some types of winters are so extreme matty that they actually have an official name so in Mongolian. It's called a zoo would that's when a winter tur- is so bad. It kills significant number of livestock in Mongolia or one out of four people make their living hurting. That has huge consequences. I mattie Safai and I'm Emily Kouanga today in the show. We had to Mongolia to learn about the brutal winters known as and how these natural disasters have changed enjoyed countries way of life okay so Mongolia is periodically affected by this extreme weather event. That happens in the winter called. What does this look like? Yeah so tender standard. I wanted to meet someone directly impacted. Divide it this man named Roy Eaton Gacek. He's a father of four super good bad Santa could do prates daughter's hair getting get somebody for school and everything. He was born a herder in eastern Mongolia and in January. Two Thousand Oilman as he tells it woke up at sunrise to check on his animals. Snow had fallen in the night about a foot. They were writing out a bad winter storm and he was really worried about is heard so how he cracked the door of his gear. Those are these circular felt cover tents that herders living and it was eerily quiet outside blindingly finding Lee white from all this snow. What did you see when he opens the door? Do not with this new household off. He's Carcass Saas new. Shut us a dozen of his sheep. Goats had died in the night. Those still alive yet about one hundred animals at the time. We're trying to find grassy but the land was literally locked in by snow. The hotel does ndas and it was really difficult to see this. He Sang. It was horrifying and it happened. Every few days boyens animals would succumb to starvation. Illness exposure and by the end of the winter he essentially lost his entire heard the type of food that came to his doorstep. It's called Saga which Mongolian means white death. While I think a loss at this level I imagine it's not purely financial absolutely I mean this. This isn't the same but there are dairy farmers in my family and you kind of like build relationship with your cows you literally like have them from birth to death so I have imagine it would be devastating like on multiple levels if you just slowly lose them over time right. They're not just economic assets and the loss of those animals is a social loss. It's spiritual loss experts. I spoke to in Mongolia. Described as a slow onset natural disaster different from a rapid rapid onset natural disaster like a hurricane or earthquake. So how many other herders were affected by the white death that year that year the two thousand six it claimed claimed about three and a half million livestock. Wow quite a bit law. It's eleven percent of the national hurt. And when you consider that at the time one out of every two households made their living hurting. It's significant begin. Animals represent wealth. So it would be as if your life savings were too slowly disintegrate. So what did the herders actually do in response Some rebuilt their heard those who could but others who lost everything they left gave up hurting fled the countryside seeking jobs in in urban areas uprooting. Their lives are good hurting Dad Johansen hair braided guy. He was one of those who left. Almost your short could the mother oh well many migrated. He's saying because it was impossible to make a living and it shows in the population and barter that's Mongolia's capital it has has tripled in the past thirty years exploded. Zid is one of the many migration drivers bringing people to the city. And I could see this when I lived there. I was reporting reporting and living in his apartment building and I looked off my balcony window. The hills were just covered in Gares. Those felt covered tents that herders live in. It was a picture. Sure of all of these people who had moved to the city and settled there and the city. Just couldn't contain all the new arrivals or does it still happening as it. On this scale that hits every corner of the country not that common prior to two thousand had happened about once a decade but was weird about two thousand is. It happened the next year and the next year and again again in two thousand ten so by the end of the decade there were forces and twenty one million livestock died in that period it totally overwhelmed Mongolian people that government tens of thousands of families packed up and left. That's that is horrifying of what is going on. Like what is causing US okay. So it's tempting to blame climate change and that is in fact the biggest culprit in this whole affair. Mongolia is indeed a warmer drier. Replace than it was eight years ago. But what I found is that zoot is actually caused by cocktail of other factors like over-grazing and deforestation. Basically quickly anything that destroys. The grassland is bad for animals. You need that grassland lending food it's a goat's buffet table and to not have it sets them up for good because this summer is a time when they fatten up. And if the grass is gone from drought or other things they're even more vulnerable when the winter is bad. Oh little bit of science here yes. The drought okay. Means less grassland and in Mongolia less grassland creates even more drought vicious cycle. Yeah because Mongolia. It's land locked all right. So the vast majority of precipitation rain snow. It comes from the land it comes from the grass. Water is transpired by plants into the atmosphere so so without grass Mongolia is even drier so given all of this is hurting still considered a good way to make a living in Mongolia. I think Mongolians are trying to figure that out. There's fewer herders but they're better prepared and trying to manage the Paschel and more sustainably local communities training herders to brace for a bad winter. Do things like make extra. Hey for their animals to eat. Purchase Livestock Insurance and pool there resources so the individual costs aren't so high all right so that that sounds great but are herders still kind of on edge. Are they like Shariq. Dowd anticipating the next. You know so I used to report in Rural Alaska inefficient community and herders. They kind of remind me of fishermen they know they're at the mercy of the weather but they're very tough and resourceful within their own lives and herders are doing the same. They're trying to make the most of what they have. They're kind of cultural heroes for practicing this way of life. That's become increasingly less common in the state. Broadcaster actually gives these awards to the best herders in in the nation. Please tell me you went to a best herder award ceremony absolutely went to a buzzer award ceremony. The championship herder. Who I met in the province was this man named near Goo Davidoff and I talked to him right after he got his award? Lord of host was also he was practical. Nature is unpredictable. It's harder there's less rain. Animals can't get fat but if we prepare extra hey. We can overcome such natural disasters. We don't have to be afraid this spring their animal's gave birth to hundreds of babies. I went back to visit during the birthing season in March. This pen is just full like a hundred lambs. Just these tiny little cotton balls near to make us feel better about this. Do you mind no. I just don't appreciate being manipulated. I wanted to show you the opposite right so not death life and what it signals for the next generation of herders. Who are continuing to do this? I'm picking up what you're putting down on. Thank you all right. I'm Lequan thank you for bringing us the story.

Mongolia Harris Lee White Montana Central Asia Russia Reporter Roy Eaton Gacek Illness Livestock Insurance Paschel Official Santa Mattie Safai Dad Johansen Alaska ZID Gares China
State Department denies NPR reporter a spot on Pompeo's plane

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

State Department denies NPR reporter a spot on Pompeo's plane

"The US state department confirms it has removed an NPR reporter from secretary of state Mike Pompeii as upcoming trip to Europe and Central Asia reporter Michele Kellerman was scheduled to be on Pompeii as plain but not anymore the state department's correspondence association claims it's retaliation after a public dispute between palm pale and another NPR reporter Mary Louise Kelley the state department did not provide a reason as to why kill men would not be traveling with

Reporter Mike Pompeii Europe Central Asia Michele Kellerman Mary Louise Kelley United States NPR
"central asia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:46 min | 1 year ago

"central asia" Discussed on KGO 810

"In Central Asia is that correct here probably global cooling we could call it at that time yes they talk about the there's there's condition that happens when the winters are very severe and you have heavy snow and ice so heavy that the animals can dig through there the animals and the steps to dig through the ice usually in the snow and get their own food by eating the grass whatever's underneath it but wanted severe the cat and then they they die when they died people die with them so it's famine all right so at the end of the ninth century all the great empires of the central and of Central Asia the Silk Road have retreated in the west the Carolingian empire breaks up into what we now understand to be France Lorraine in Germany setting up what you'd have to say or the wars of the second millennium AD but when we come back we're going to turn to the final very famous man who comes out of the Silk Road we know him as chinga Scott I'm this is empires of the Silk Road Christopher back with is the author I'm John batch for this is the John Batchelor show not only Trish and claims the lives of an estimated three point five million children every year that's one death every six seconds many families simply cannot afford to provide the nutritious food like milk meat and eggs that young children need to grow and thrive instead they struggle to survive and what amounts to nothing more than bread and water the childhood malnutrition is both preventable and treatable doctors without borders Medecins San Frontieres MSF is raising awareness of the childhood malnutrition crisis.

Central Asia France Lorraine Germany Scott Silk Road Christopher John batch Trish San Frontieres MSF malnutrition
Moscow's Depo Market: Russia's Top Culinary Destination

Monocle 24: The Menu

05:01 min | 1 year ago

Moscow's Depo Market: Russia's Top Culinary Destination

"Palo Alto Welcome to food neighborhoods monocle twenty four. I am Marcus hip. Older cities have areas the local love for their food and drink offerings. And in this series we get to know these places these week we head to the DEP. Oh Marcus in most. Go avast converted trim factory that makes a claim to be the biggest food hall on the continents are guys is more cools feo. Matt's variety in color possibly aren't words you associate with Russian cuisine. Not unless varieties of soup. The color of beat it certainly true that until recently there wasn't so much variety on the Moscow restaurant scene I I was hearing the T- thousands writing about food and drink for local paper and restaurants starting to diverse by then but for the most part you're looking at very high end. European food lead lower end Russian food on the big craze at the time which was Sushi. Well that's changed and you can see the change for yourself at a huge each market and food court just to the north central Moscow. The owners say it's the largest space of its kind in Europe. The markets housed in a converted. Tram de pay okay from the turn of the last century and spread over eleven thousand square meters about the size of a Manhattan City block the renovated building tape last year. And based seventy five restaurants and one hundred and forty stalls serving food from around the world. Anything from Bausch and pell may need to Fogo peaking doc natural lines barbecued meats. Traffic Crap Haggas and the club. It's still the New Year holidays in Russia and many Muscovites are out of town but Debo or they're pau as it's called here is buzzing outside. It's grim it's been a frequent winter here so there isn't even the usual thick layer of snow on the ground to brightens things up but in this red brick building. It's all glitter Christmas decorations and neon lights. It's mid afternoon and I'm today's visit a number twelve thousand Indi- seventy-three according to take on the markets website pushing through the mylene crowds and looking for a space at the table scattered around the market. I can believe that once your security which here is a metal detector in a couple of students faced God's staple of any public space in Moscow. You hit the local produce stalls fruits and vegetables not since spices. Caviar smoked fish and Russian cheeses. Don't be fooled by names. Names like Rockville Brio common. These are all produced locally and there's a political reason for that. Western dairy products have been under embargo in Russia since two thousand fourteen as part of the ongoing fallout from the Ukraine crisis. And this is given the country's cheesemakers a real boost. Not just to create imitations of French and Italian cheeses aces. They hear that. Pretty good imitations but also to develop more of their own. Actually there's a political element to the whole concept of deputy. When Muscovites came out to protest President Vladimir Putin's return to the Kremlin in twenty twelve? After four years as prime minister. The authorities didn't respond to their demands. They did attempt to appease the middle classes by making Moscow an easier place to live with better transport and better public spaces. Perhaps people would be less set on regime gene change and this food is very much a part of that. Now the the stores are arranged in tramlines as a not. The BUILDINGS HISTORY LINE AFER Georgian Moroccan dim sum and more lime beef Vietnamese Greek and a British pie shop admittedly doesn't seem to be doing very much trade see for a bar pass pizzas defeat desserts and health feed. If you're visiting you'll probably want to try something thing from Russia or other post-soviet cuisines you won't be able to find so easily elsewhere. So maybe try the mysteriously titled Back Man Whose Beck's which does a good Plov committee rice dish from Central Asia and Monte. Thick Greasy dumplings. Were just next door. There's back your corner offering skewers of meat as a by John Style and on a decent local wine list. If you're after Russian Russian head to the Tiger Gastro pub for Venison Pattaya and Salami which for seven hundred hundred and fifty rubles each. That's around nine pounds. Where you can try destroyed by Bruschi facilit- Russian classics cabbage seep minced? Hiring Full Schmidt meat cutlets cutlets in pies before heading back out into the slush. There are plenty of options to something sweet whether it's Russian delicacies. Like metabolic honey cake or Punky keke the local equivalent of dates or even Vegan and gluten. Free tards it's allowed bustling place and little Gordie for some people's tastes but if it's variety Brian Kelly or after in Moscow. DEMPO is a good place to start for Monaco in Moscow on

Moscow Russia DEP Matt Palo Alto Marcus Europe Full Schmidt Vladimir Putin Rockville Brio Bruschi Gordie Prime Minister Tiger Gastro Debo Central Asia Fogo
Russia's undaunted voice of dissent

FT News

08:33 min | 1 year ago

Russia's undaunted voice of dissent

"The Russian activists Alexei Navalny has been a thorn in the side of President Vladimir Putin for a decade now. He's brave persecution. He's been imprisoned and yet he seems don't Klis correspondent Max. Seddon met him for lunch in a food court in Moscow recently league. Max is on the line now with me to discuss his impressions but first I'd like to open with a clip from the meeting. which gives a flavour of the character of the man? Another big Mac this my Russians rather rudimentary. What what he's saying here so we were wandering around the food court where he took me for lunch which is just across the street from his office in slightly out out of the way but rapidly gentrifying art a southeastern Moscow and this is the sort of place that even if it didn't exist in Russia they've had food around the world from your burgers ears Pasta Sushi to dahgestani dumplings and who's back Pilaf and other things and saying is a place like this that shows you in his mind that Russia As a whole could the really made it economically if it weren't for Putin and he described nisus glass ceiling that's more like a hideous moldy Soviet ceiling the Stop Russia from economically developing. Stick Landy Patillo. Then is a mere ski navy of the numbers suggest that he thinks that despite the huge spike in wealth in the first two years of Putin's rule which was mostly due to rising oil prices. He views the last two decades lost decades because he Says that so much has been stolen. That could have gone towards economic development and there are so many repressive rules and regulations that are holding it back. You've covered Russia for quite a while. Now these are quite strong and outspoken. Remarks how rat is it for a Russian activist to speak out like this. How brave is it to speak out like this I? I interviewed Navan nebout seven years ago in the thing. That is really remarkable about him when you speak to him as I've done many times sense. Sense is just how much breath of fresh air he is. Compared to your official Russian politicians who come from the Soviet bureaucratic addict tradition. They are very bad at talking to normal people in on manage settings you almost never see them give interviews to the independent media where they might says difficult questions. The volney grew up completely outside the system. He someone who was formed by the Internet and by the street and even compared to other people in the opposition and he's a very charismatic person. And this is what is really set them apart even amongst all the pressure that he faces to become the undisputed most popular challenger the Putin in the last few years ears. You say you've known him for a while you've covered rushing for awhile. Tell us how he entered politics. I mean what made him take on this role not only art Ukrainian on his father's side and he has relatives who live near Chernobyl outside Kiev in Ukraine for the first ten years his life up until the blast itself itself in Nineteen eighty-six. He will go and stay with his grandmother. Who lived in this village right near the nuclear power station and the aftermath of fat that we know so well the incompetent Soviet attempts to cover that were very big part of what shaped him because he doesn't have any of this nostalgia for the Soviet Union that Putin has been very big on a lot of people older than the volume has just forty three share? He was very much convinced by this early childhood experience that the system was wrong in the future. Russia's move away from it as far as possible more towards a European liberal democracy as he sees it the other thing. He told me that really shaped him was when he was already in his late twenties he he was working pro. Bono was a lawyer for an opposition party but it was official opposition party in Russia. There are the official parties. who were there to create a semblance of a real political system? They're really they facto controlled by the Kremlin the end. The parties themselves are run like Chiefdoms. Just like Putin's own party and the leaders are these many Putin's and he was working on Moscow City Council elections thousand five and ran against Russia's incredibly corrupt court system. Any said gradually just made him so furious that he became even activist. It's quite a story. I mean you say. He's not nostalgic for the Soviet Union. Interestingly he is though it seems something of a Russian nationalist. Can you talk us through who they send what influence it has on him. And how nationalist is he. Welna volley was actually kicked out of the Liberal Party that he was a member of in two thousand seven for his nationalist nationalist views. Of the sort that you would never hear discussed in polite company among liberals in Moscow and the US the express were very different from from the nationalism that you might think of associated with Putin which is more of the Soviet imperial stout in the Valdez was much more. Russian ethnic Chauvinism Virjee into race says. I'm against people. From the periphery of the Soviet Empire. So the caucasus-chechen Augustan and places in Central Asia Pakistan Cure Augustan Tajikistan stamp who provide millions of laborers who come and do construction jobs. And other things like that in Moscow the center of the Empire and he filmed in some pretty startling videos including one which showed him comparing people from the Caucasus. The cockroaches and mocking shooting them with a gun. He spent several years organizing organizing this annual nationals rally which was attended by all sorts of Neo Nazis and skinheads as well as other people at one of these rallies he used an anti Semitic blood libel trope to talk about Jewish guards. Did you talk about this of your lunch. Does he apologize for any of this. We did. This is something that the money is criticized for quite a lot even though no it's not really very big part of this program anymore. E only really says he wants if these regime for guests laborers from Central Asia but he has no regrets his explanation was that in two two thousand seven. There was this enormous gap between living standards in Russia's back Stan and millions of people were coming from Central Asia to work in Russia and it was a big political issue so the message disorder by rhetoric was a way of trying to get people interested. Max The interview you did with Nevada was for a weekly lunch with the F. T. Slot which normally unfolds in fanny a predictable lines could a swanky restaurant. Just two people the F. T. journalists and the interviewee this was rather different. You joined by someone feel interview view. Can you tell us about this weirdly enough. This is my third lunch with the F. T. that I've done in every single time I've been joined by someone who I don't expect to be there. And this time we were followed by the troll who apparently works for one of the fake news farms run by a Guinea per goes in the Kremlin caterer who runs the infamous Saint Petersburg troll factory. So you walked out of the office building. This guy yelled Alexei. Can you tell us where do you buy your okay involved. He told him to get lost. And the guy follow this rounds we wandered around the food court court and then when we bought our food then sat at the table across from us and watched us through the entirety. The two hour interview and you know all the said for the last six nine months or so ever since his foundation started investigating promotions catering contracts needs people who've been following him and his family around everywhere they go was he listening to you or oh just sitting there to be kind of threatening ish. It was more intimidation. I mean this was someone who was twenty five at most maybe younger and it's not being paid a lot of money to do this but the point is clearly just to harass him the entire time. He is trying to laugh about it he said. It's a good way the practice Zen but he came pretty close snapping a few times and it was obviously of your family's being harassed like that. He's accused promotion of being behind a physical assault assault with arm bar on husband one of his top aides. I mean the impression you get from this story and from other accounts in the valleys life is is that the pressure he faces is utterly relentless and he's been facing this for a long time how does he keep going one of the questions. I've asked many many times over the years. He always finds himself. Trying to explain is your. Why aren't you in jail? Why aren't you dead? And the answer is best as anyone until seem speed. The he's almost almost become too big to jail because when they tried to do it in twenty thirteen he was sentenced to

President Vladimir Putin Russia Moscow Soviet Union Official Alexei Navalny Landy Patillo MAX Soviet Empire Seddon Kiev Liberal Party Tajikistan Assault Central Asia Ukraine
Trump says Taliban peace talks are "dead"

The Lead with Jake Tapper

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Trump says Taliban peace talks are "dead"

"Two days after cancelling a planned summit at Camp David with leaders from the Taliban that he himself suggested President Donald Trump telling reporters reporters today that peace talks are dead as far as I'm concerned and we've hit the Taliban harder in the last four days that they've been hidden over ten years trump. I'm frustrated with the pace of negotiations had called for a face to face negotiation with the Taliban at Camp David during a meeting over Labor Day weekend despite objections from top advisors sources say trump like the optics of being seen personally securing a historic deal in presidential setting were decades ago negotiations Gatien between the US Egypt and Israel led to the camp. David Accords officials say Vice President Mike Pence and National Security Adviser John Bolton argued against meeting at Camp David but trump overruled them today. Trump pushed back on that story though he admitted he thought hosting the Taliban at Camp David David just days before the eighteenth anniversary of the nine eleven attacks was a good idea actually in terms of advisers. I took my own advice. I like the idea of meeting I've met with a lot of bad people that a lot of good people was my idea was my idea to terminate it. I didn't even I didn't discuss it with anybody else. The meeting except for this weekend was scrapped because the Taliban claimed responsibility for an attack that killed one service member and eleven others trump now says he believes the Taliban regrets that attack some lawmakers voicing opposition to the meeting including the third highest ranking Republican in the House Liz Cheney tweeting no member of the Taliban should ever set foot in Camp David Ever and Gop Congressman Michael Waltz Army veteran who served in Afghanistan as we head into the into the anniversary of nine eleven. I do not ever want to see these terrorists. Step foot on in on United States soil period now J. President Drum moments ago on the South Lawn told reporters that the Taliban has made clear that they regret this attack and factor of the week in the Taliban put out a statement saying that cancelling peace talks Fox would only lead to more American losses in Afghanistan Jake Armour Santos at the White House. Thanks so much joining me now to talk about. This democratic congressman Max rows of New New York is an army veteran who served in Afghanistan he now sits on the Homeland Security and veteran's affairs committees congressman. Thanks so much for joining US first of all. I guess my first question is forget being a member of Congress as a as a veteran who fought in Afghanistan. What was your reaction to the story well? I think it was utterly ridiculous idea not only as a veteran but also as someone who represents district that was hit incredibly hard by nine eleven for this president to invite the Taliban meet at Camp David in just a few days as we'll be the anniversary of nine eleven with that being said though we cannot use this one horrible idea as a justification or pretense to advocate for another horrible idea which is to stay in Afghanistan for another generation to put it into perspective. Come this October young men and women. I'm an enlisted in the United States military who were not born when we declared war against Afghanistan this has got to change. We have to turn a chapter on on this period in American history and pull out of Afghanistan so I want to get to that in one second because certainly this is America's longest war and I think the American people and a lot of veterans as you know better than I we are weary of it but I want to ask because your congressional district in New York which includes a lot of Staten Island that's district the president trump won and as you note it's a district was hit hard by nine eleven nine eleven with a lot of firefighters and members of the police force and and just people who are in the towers killed. What are you hearing from Constituents Situations Look I? I think people are happy that this is not happening period. That's it. They don't want to think about it anymore. They don't want to entertain the idea of the Taliban meeting at Camp David but here's the other thing about people that live on staten now and and generally folks throughout the country these are deeply patriotic attic people and that does not mean that we engage in perpetual warfare to be patriotic to say that you support the troops doesn't mean that we want to send young men and women unnecessarily unnecessarily into harm's way look at the conflicts that we face today look at global extremism. We can't fight global extremism whether it's Isis or al Qaeda by holding onto significant pieces of land in Central Asia there's fifteen twenty different countries that al Qaeda or Isis could move into and we have to remain flexible full and versatile in order to attack that threat in the twenty first century. Well let me ask you about that because I had secretary of State Pompeo on state of the Union yesterday and asked about why invite the Taliban to Camp David of all places listen to what he had to soccer. We've been having conversations. The president believed that we could further that we we could for further America's national interests by having conversations with the people that have the capacity to actually deliver jake. We have an obligation to do everything we can so so you want to end the war that's secretary. POMPEO wants to end the war. President trump wants to end the war his argument is we have to do you just heard him say we have to do everything we can to end the war. So if having the Taliban Camp David would bring that result about why not so you don't have to punch the American people on the nose in order to end our longest war this was representative of more than a years worth of hard diplomacy and we were right there right at the end and then the president engineered this into a vanity project he wants to be the one to take credit and that is totally an absolutely wrong so this is an opportunity to go for bipartisan action I completely agree with you on that and we actually have to take advantage and this president for once could actually be a leader in two thousand sixteen. He ran on ending are forever wars in two thousand eighteen. I called for the same thing and you're right. You brought up that Staten Island. I voted for president trump. They also voted for me. The people have spoken they want change and they want action and they do not want us to continue these forever wars that are centered around regime

Taliban President Donald Trump Afghanistan Camp David President Trump David David United States David Accords Vice President Congressman Staten Island State Pompeo Jake Armour Santos J. President Drum New York Secretary Mike Pence National Security America Congress
"central asia" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:32 min | 1 year ago

"central asia" Discussed on KGO 810

"John, I think it would be a mistake of history if he Novi answer to what to do. Of course, any leader leads from the front if your countries in crisis, you're right back in the capital. You're right back where the horrible thing has happened. And you're talking to all your all your advisors. You're not kind of swanning around through the glorious. Central Asia, the company, Mr Putin shows, I think deep character defects of Mr. Xi as a leader. But the problem is that he's leading the Chinese or it's there on a conveyor belt, what I call triple witching hour, there are three things coming up. First, they have to decide in order to keep the peace up to now they've had to make absolutely immense to there is concessions to the people of Hong Kong and the leader, Hong Kong, who was, of course, appointed and controlled from Beijing has had to make definitive statements and then with withdraw from them, and they make more and withdraw from them. It's the total humiliating process, but it's what you give up lots of ground, but how do you stop it? Are they going to sack Hong Kong, the way? They had sacked Beijing thirty years ago. I think that would be it might not it probably would not work, and it would lead to the most incredible bitterness of violence hatred, and it might well spread and destabilize China. Well, if they're not gonna do that, then they have to let these changes gradually permeates the system in what they're desperately afraid of, which is they call a color revolution. In other words, stop trying to impose communism on themselves and get with the transit systems the rest of the country have cut world countries have, and, you know, live a live account of normal life. And the reason I say the triple witching hour is this serves that, that the leader of Hong Kong or the puppet leader, carry lamb has postponed. Everything she hasn't act. Backed down, but she's postponed everything. And if she doesn't simply scrap, so thing by five pm on Thursday, then the demonstrators say they're going to be demonstrations, the like of which they've never seen before, and I fully believe they can do that, now, the, the real sort of whammy, and this is two weeks later our president. And Mr. she are going to be having a sort of and team kind of dinner the G twenty trying to resolve all of our economic disagreements, and if the Chinese have just slaughtered Hong Kong, there's no way there's going to be dinner. There's no way there's going to be an agreement China is going to be tossed out really of the functional world. But she wants to belong to so a lot of steak Arthur there. Some evidence that Chinese military personnel are actually operating on the streets of Hong Kong right now, they're videos of. Activists protesters. Pan-democratic officials shouting at Hong Kong policemen in Cantonese in Cantonese, speaking city, and obviously, the policemen don't understand what is being said. So they're not Cantonese-speaking themselves. And by the way, these policemen can't show, their Hong Kong police density cards. So the basically what people have been saying in, in Hong Kong is that this is our people from the garrison of the People's Liberation Army that have been stationed in Hong Kong. They've been giving Hong Kong police uniforms. So clearly there's something up right now. And it doesn't look good. Why would they do that? And what does the advantage? I think the advantages they don't trust the Hong Kong police to actually control the activists. That's exactly what happened in eastern, Europe, entrust..

Hong Kong China Beijing Mr Putin Novi John Asia Europe People's Liberation Army president Mr. Xi thirty years two weeks
"central asia" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

06:49 min | 2 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Zero, five, four. Six two six Robert Spencer is the author of the history of jihad and we have Mark calling, in, from Anchorage. Alaska good evening Mark Yes good evening, and, thank you. Sir Are you may have missed it but I have not heard Mr Spencer discussed the veritable decimation that was caused too much of a Slavic world by the? Mongols, descendants of. Genghis Khan kublai Khan And Hulagu Khan who virtually destroyed much of what. Today is who's Becca STAN and, Turkmenistan up into conflict STAN with many, of the prominent cities like Bukhara about Muslim moral back then and perhaps he could explain just what took place back in I think the thirteenth. Fourteenth centuries especially It was really quite devastating the Mongols as, you say decimated Muslim holdings in central Asia and not only that but they actually sent an on Voyager. Christian on voi- from China to Europe and he. Met with the Byzantine. Emperor, he met with the pope and he even went to England and met with the king of England and there were discussions about a European alliance with the Mongols to crush a slum in between the two nothing came with, that was in twelve eighty eight nothing came of it however and what did happen was that, in the early part of the thirteen, hundred's the Mongol emperor converted to. Islam and became a force of jihad such that Tamburlaine was one of the. Most famous Muslim jihad warriors in history and he waged jihad. Against the non Muslims in central, Asia And also ventured into Europe as well, and menaced the Byzantine empire of the Christian empire of the day and, he also fought against the Ottoman empire because he was, a rival of the Ottoman Sultan the Mongols even though they converted to Islam. They didn't just join one big happy. Family and he actually captured the Ottoman Sultan Bayezid and made him a footstool he would use he, climb up on his back to get on his horse and so in any case yes you're quite right. The Mongols did do great damage to Islam in. Central Asia but ultimately. Their, conversion undid that damage all right now you mentioned Kemal Ataturk the of course the Islamic world was doing okay ending up the the nineteenth century and long came World War One and you had of course the the western, allies you had France and Britain and Russia and ultimately the United States and then they had. The central powers Germany Austria Hungary and the Ottoman empire which insisted of Turkey most of the immediate Middle East Lebanon what is today Israel and Iraq and. On down into into Egypt and some portions of North Africa and of course the central powers lost and out of that Turkey lost all, of that territory except to, the, actual home, state of Turkey itself and KOMO editor came along and offered what I. Think is but. I hope ever since of a reform we're going to change. The way Islam does things, now, we're seeing that. Being undone tell us about that part of the story well, he didn't change the. Way slum does. Things he. Rejected Islam he didn't reject it, as the religion of the people that would've. Gotten him thrown out of power pretty quickly but he acted very. Swiftly and energetically, to limit, the power of political Islam he forbade the use of the, Arabic script for For Turkish that's why it's in the, Roman, script, he, forbade the wearing turbans, and mandated the wearing of western style hats specifically because of, the hat brim would interfere with the prostration Slavic prayer but most important besides all these regulations and. Others he mandated, that the imams in the moss could not write their own sermons and preach them on Friday they had to get them from. The ministry of religious affairs every week and read that sermon. And the ministry of religious affairs never gave, out sermons that involved any kind of political action. The political aspects of his Lomb, the imposition of sharia which was dismantled in. Turkey, this was all this was never. Discussed in the mosques in. The heyday of Turkish secularism and he lasted almost a century what's happened well risks tell you bear to one, is what happened he is somebody who's deeply committed to Islam and to the. Imposition of Islamic law as a matter of fact You know you listed all those territories that were once part of. The Ottoman domains air to one. Has recently stated that all those lands belong to. Turkey which is tantamount to a declaration of war against Greece against eastern Europe the Middle, East North Africa I mean it's. Really quite? Astonishing, nobody. Seems to take much notice that he is. Absolutely been explicit about his desire to recapture those territories Ervin in Dallas joins us. Into good evening Ervin welcome Anybody thanks man I enjoy your show you're. Pretty good journalists but the reason I call some of the fact she is stating like for example is as that Mohammed set this on his, debts that was, this guy. Doesn't they're, listening to what was. Said on his deathbed that's my point the second point the second answer would what I've done the second point is most of information that this man has, okay The. Basic definition of job is a struggle for betterment of life. Upsell It's not about a war or it's not about terrorists maybe the true meaning of jihad in the Muslim enters jihad and Adopts jihad is to make its character. Is submission, to to allow submission to to the and and and basically fight, b. e. normal every day to day lives so obstacles what really needs he. Needs to go and educate himself so, well maybe I'll tell you what he'll respond to you in just a. Second here but since we're overdue for a break we'll. Take that break and you'll get your response in just a moment Hey there I'm a glue stick so I have one job I glue kit stuff so sorry.

Turkey Asia Genghis Khan kublai Khan Europe Robert Spencer Ottoman Sultan Bayezid Alaska Hulagu Khan Anchorage Kemal Ataturk Ervin England Becca STAN China Mark Tamburlaine Bukhara Turkmenistan STAN Mohammed
"central asia" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

Boston Herald Radio

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Boston Herald Radio

"Greatest tragedy of the twentieth century the collapse of the soviet union he's he's vengeful indicative of addicting stretches all the way down to that former russian agent and his daughter in salisbury england the putin a personal emotions matter in the realm of world affairs they don't teach you that in international relations courses college but sometimes it comes down to into someone's personal dislike remain hatred and tutored putin has a visceral hatred of the united states and and certainly of nato no the pot the pot though michael is he he doesn't want to reestablish the soviet union and its empire he knows he can't he works to reestablish the empire bizarre circa nineteen oh four okay so for those of us who were maybe sleeping in history class that day what would that look like in the modern world well what that would look like would be fortunately include the baltic republics and eastern poland but you know it's not so much about specific territory and borders drawn to the ants agree he wants russia to be recognized as a major power not a superpower and he wants it to if not occupy to control neighboring states including central asia and the caucasus even where his troops do not formally occupy it he believes that's russia's fear of influence and he has a right to control it and he sees himself not as another stalin not as another brezhnev certainly certainly not as another gorbachev he sees himself in as as are restoring russia's greatness and to be honest i mean this guy has done a remarkable job and putin i hear this guy i dislike him he is our enemy because he has chosen to be our enemy not because we wanted to be we've reached out administration after ministration and his behavior gets worse and worse do not underestimate vladimir putin what would you say to the people of surrounding the the a toxin attack the nerve agent attack in salisbury who say there's no way that putin was behind this because it was dumb the upside was so low at this old guy wanted forgotten about the downside is you're seeing now is very high putin is not a dumb guy therefore he's not responsible for this or you know putin plays it several gambling tables of want and he's done some dome stop invasion of crimea was so easy for him that he invaded eastern ukraine our the.

soviet union salisbury united states michael poland russia asia caucasus stalin gorbachev vladimir putin ukraine nato brezhnev nerve agent
"central asia" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Omnibus

"Remain constant but the pitch of the word changes and the word has different meanings based on its pitch not on its pronunciation the chinese word ma whether it's flat ma or ma rising or descending or even like something with a sine wave to it like that's four different work for different words and they don't even like i've had the experience that having somebody tried to make pun based on this to chinese person and they don't even get it because to them the words don't sound that much of the same they're like what are yeah i guess but the tones are all different they're not into this idea at all puns really do not communicate across language or across the best way to bring cultures together it would be a pump but in this case somehow upon them that's why we're constantly using puns in this podcast for our far distant ancestors before we go further where in the hell is to two is located in central asia turkmenistan it's it's the southernmost part of siberia so it's where russia's hanging belly hits mongolia does it border mongol it does and the two people actually live within the russian republic of two as well as in nearby in mongolia but there is a tuban republic yes and it was once independent from nineteen twenty one to nineteen forty five it was called tanna too and this happened because it to head off as an ethnishity had been ping pong back and forth between the chinese and the russians and they briefly had russia grant them independence and then they were in nineteen forty five they were absorbed by the soviet union nobody ever recognized this country except for the soviet union and mongolia but it was an independent country of tanna too and they had triangular postage stamps which was of great interest to many people the like how are we going to stand.

turkmenistan siberia russia mongolia soviet union asia
"central asia" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back home my name is dr christopher jerry this is the creed big history podcast and in today's episode we do the collapse of the ottoman turks and the ottoman empire the first thing that happens is the money dries up trade moved to the oceans and a lot of it has to do with the destruction of the silk road by the mongols not in the initial conquest none the genghis khan congress though there was a lot of destruction of northern china central asia and the middle east in that but especially in the wars between the grandkids by the time we get to the grandkids and in the great grandkids these successor mongols of the four or five major empires a perfectly happy going to war against each other and smashing things along the way tamburlaine in iran is the most spectacular of them obliterating entire cities murdering lots of people so the silk road essentially shut down the second thing that happened is the new world was discovered in fourteen ninety to columbus sales usual blue comes back to say hey there's land out there and more people will go back and discover there's a lot more land out there and so ocean trade will replace land trade for the first time the second is we have a series of bad rulers now there's a reason why in the video this jaffar up there we'll get to him in a moment but see less money isn't necessarily a problem.

china asia dr christopher jerry iran shut down columbus
"central asia" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

Zero To Travel Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Zero To Travel Podcast

"Sara has some good beer incurs extent which i was really realize they they they import all kinds of russian craft beer which i didn't know that was a thing but apparently it is we had four or five different ones while we were there in carrico which is like the launching point for all the hiking so um pretty good in central asia surprisingly nice and i tell places you mentioned in the rest were olives as share quickly morocco and egypt and south africa were also a few spots he recommended because if he knows we discovered while latin america and europe and the first part of this podcast and then asian this part yeah what has changed most and then and then i'll let you go tim between because any update this every year and you always do the research in kind of revisit this list what is changed the most between last year's list in this year's list of the world's cheapest destinations uh i took argentine off because i was actually there a few months ago and while it's still a great country and i would live there in a heartbeat it's that is she is not as cheap as they used to be and thus mostly because they've got a gotten their act together they they elected a new president the more than a year ago and he got rid of a lot of the really stupid economic policies that were holding back growth and made it much easier to import goods which was had been holding them back so basically it's a freer economy now and it's a it's much more faster growing economy he also got rid of this twotiered exchange system which was artificially oldie prices down for a long time so now there's no black market anymore but the flip side of that is um there's no uh sort of arbitrage in the markets with you have dollars so you're basically bay with the argentines are now for everything which is the way it should be but of it's definitely caused prices to creep up.

Sara carrico asia egypt south africa america europe president morocco
"central asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"People would i think are learn more than anything else are so similar to us i remember once speed train with a young azerbaijan two women probably 2002 2003 and we were travelling together just happen that way and she was looking at me anxious where he from i said the united says she's i don't believe what well you speak russia i say i guess but even unamerican could learn ratchet there was an awkward five or ten minutes when things were the americans are very bad and this is very bad and then when she fell chee new me and i felt i was getting to know her everything sort of dropped and we were two people and we were sharing experiences and insights and i've found that to be the case with russians whether they lived in central asia and the caucasus or ukraine northern russia there are people just as we they really wanted peace remember that this was eleven years after the end of world war two thirty million russians have been killed in world war two navy more and they all wanted peace and yet they felt maybe they weren't gonna get it may be there'd be war well as sell many telling stories that went on a red book the year obvious peter the great 1950 sex khruschev stalin's ghosts and a young american in russia marvin cow thank you thank you thank you now how an artist in the world of tact and sing is using tradition breaking with it and experimenting with a genre she discovered when she was just three years old jeffrey brown profiles of cory aager for whose lighting up the stage in new york this holiday season.

azerbaijan asia caucasus world war red book khruschev stalin cory aager new york russia ukraine peter jeffrey brown eleven years ten minutes three years
"central asia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Here with the air force served looked lipton so the the bread and butter for us was 27 africa middle eastern central asia a fascinating area to be working at a specially during a historic period for our country an important time for our country egged burial honor i stayed on active duty doing that role grew concerned are worth worth think stood in our country constitutionally over a decade ago and that let me too a ten law school nathan law school i stayed in the reserves i was a sign of intelligence officer to safety in germany and that was also a fascinating work but it did lead me to getting mobilize after my first year law school unexpectedly was announced that i was off with the army this time not the air force both the army to serve as a senior intelligence officer for a civil affairs regained in west baghdad bob and i mean not that coming but i see guys fingerprints all over it it was a rewarding experience great guys that i served with and uh that experience actually had uh planted seeds that would blossom in other ways my life later on the strongly suspect i'll have detected something you that is not politically correct you sound like you might be a believer i certainly am i take it very very quickly and i mean when i was that the intelligence officer wants baghdad you know it was interesting living out life eight in that setting but what was particularly intriguing to me is because we are part of the surged two thousand seven to two thousand an eighth in the civil affairs unit was responsible for rebuilding the country we were working with uh locally rockies and i started to meet iraqi christian to others who took their pay seriously and i had heard about the persecuted church before uh i was interested in what they were going through but man once i started to learn their names legba started klay with their kid break bread with them as families them here their plight what they've gone through by heart exploded for these people uh so i did what i could even when i was over there with the military tried to get them some resources from our family our friends um but i.

lipton law school officer army baghdad africa germany
"central asia" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Yeah i mean i think it was back channel this you can have gone and spoken to his family members to neighbors in tashkent say that he was for all what they described as a secular family which not untypical in that in postsoviet central asia they all described him as being a friendly individual wasn't deke interested in religion but then when we look at the testimonies from his france since moving to the united states he never really found his place in society he was at times aggressive swearing the the involvement mosque in florida in which he attended said he was late to crack he wasn't particularly knowledgeable about law so i seeming seemingly the process by which he's come part of the importance of these radical queues has happened since moving to america and and just turning back to his beckett stan unlike terrorist acts there are they widespread an expected stan and in central asia no i mean i think in a although the narrative is that it's a hotbed of extremism and terrorism we see very few terrorist attacks within the region certainly when compared to afghanistan and pakistan it and the middle east in fact many of the instances of terrorism had occurred in the last ten years in central asia although they vaulting be linked by the government to islamic extremism these instances of more relates to organized crime and sort of local politics and corruption so why does his beckett stand exports so many terrace that headline i mentioned earlier a how is becca stand became a hotbed for violent extremism and radicalism we seen these headlines since tuesday's attack what is the question you think we should be asking i think it's important for us to understand what's happening to central asians in these tracks natural spaces in these in these instances off they leave central asia wall.

tashkent france united states florida stan asia america afghanistan pakistan ten years
"central asia" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

Great Big History Podcast

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Great Big History Podcast

"Hello welcome back my name is dr christopher canary in this episode we discussed a persian and peloponnesian wars that will make and break greece so we start with berge war persian wars bridge or'sir sears wars between the empire persia that the giant big red thing on the map if you are looking at the video otherwise the entire persian empire basically all the middle east asia minor egypt persia much of central asia and india versus thirteen little dinky cities in greece that and those thirteen dingy little cities in greece one why how well that is a great question because that is the first question of history that is the question herodotus asks in order to invent history why did the greeks win and his answer his thesis his answer is because the greeks are free and the persians in the persian empire is not and so to do that took him nine hundred pages to answer that question this is why history is not names and dates it is not what happened karatas says right from the beginning i have a reason for this happening and i'm going to explain it to you so what does he have to do he asked to say one that the has to prove that the greeks are free the persians are not free that the greeks freedom matter that freedom matters in war and that greek freedom mattered in this particular war or series of wars and so that took nine hundred pages to do.

persia asia india greece herodotus karatas dr christopher canary berge middle east egypt
"central asia" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"Cbs news i'm gary nunn mayor common yellen crews of san juan responds to president trump's twitter answer to her complain about hurricane relief elijah last week nate past week was ask for help cruise on abc's this week high recognizing high the resources general v cana threestar general points that have to take care of this central asia said we just don't have that resources the trump administration today defended its response efforts see president said that crews souza poor leader more from cbs's david begg know him san juan get the eleven date thera came made landfall at it still an emergency situation here and a governor at a news conference today said listen what we are going through is dire and it's unfair to the puerto rican people because we are being given the resources from the federal government and congress that we eat in terms of money to get the job done president trump on twitter today said that secretary of state rex tillerson should not waste his time trying to negotiate with quote little rock at man reference to north korean leader kim jongun asia expert isaac stone fish says fans are very confusing message births north korea and the american people who want to start having some faith and the america and government's ability to make some changes get things done with north korea fish is a senior fellow at the asia society more than seven hundred people were injured today in battles with police in catalonia voters there and authorities clash during an independence referendum bbc correspondent heavenly in barcelona we have say as my colleagues the scenes polling stations where have been fired rubber hold setting bathrooms that have been years that have been wrought by the hat on this is because the police and the madrid governments have says they they wanted to make sure this votes doesn't say play some they say they have been izing proportionately the spanish government and the courts say.

barcelona madrid catalonia north korea kim jongun north korean secretary of state puerto rican nate san juan gary nunn spanish government trump senior fellow america twitter congress federal government david begg cbs president asia abc elijah
"central asia" Discussed on WGTK

WGTK

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on WGTK

"Them not not that they don't have the technical were with all the jonathan accomplish too because they do right now by now they have the competence and they have the the thought that in central asia inge dan well the numbers much of it they have enough introduced to make a nuclear weapon yes they they could so this is world in which we live the national tilted director says in iran already has the ability to make a nuclear weapon they just had not made the political decision whether nice i would have thought there would have been a mic drops people instead this debate since the trump administration has been and about certifying whether or not iran has complied with the terms of the deal and the trump administration recently did certified that iran has complied with the terms of the deal although on understand that donald trump was very very reluctant to do still had to be persuaded world which were living it and so dangerous world and sebastian gorka was trying to convey this to alley bell she on msnbc allendale she why is it so important to call it radical islamic terrorists truthfully about it so we will court radical islamic terrorism we will target the ideology and we will pull them out for being evil and we will work with all muslim partners this is the crucial we are not here to invade other people's countries and occupies in the present things that's fundamentally on american we are here to help those nations that share our values and share our interests and help them fight the fight whether it's the iraqis encodes in iraq whether it's the egyptians in the sinai or whether it's all you european allies that allow have to deal with this very severe threat to their own countries i get i don't understand how calling it by its name helps the is stop the attacks in paris or in.

director iran the deal donald trump sebastian gorka paris iraq
"central asia" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

Monocle 24: Midori House

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Monocle 24: Midori House

"Of the united states which until about six months ago really was the supreme power amongst nations on earth and is slowly leaking that out mean jonathan was alluding earlier i mean the idea that that that russia and china's leaders now have found all manner of ways of talking directly to each other without even having to worry about what will the united states say about this to you know especially across central asia with with the belton buckle or whatever whatever z z is is calling that enormous infrastructure project is thinking about i mean this is tarnishing uh john mccain uh is coming back he's been diagnosed with brain cancer um we don't know exactly how severe it is but um i've known to people who died of this particular form of cancer and from diagnosis to death is four to six months it's a very very serious condition and he's going to fly in and he's gonna vote and peace loving the headlines and the attention and that's where washington is now um johnson was to jump in and say let us i just i have to get all this stuff out it's like you're you're right you're right italy there is a what what what should we morass in this is all but look what makes morale's even more rest so is that we don't know what is really being debated what is being put forward here we are with the president who said of cleanup of all my care within a couple of a couple of months all is all he knew what he has a plan nobody has any idea what to do and so we left the this becomes a symbol uh all the inability basically seems of washington due to do anything of the end of this administration to do anything and of majority in congress to do anything and that go back to the the foreign side uh obviously.

united states jonathan russia china asia washington johnson president congress john mccain brain cancer italy six months
"central asia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:46 min | 4 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Jeffrey quite it's a lunch in the central asia the idea restaurant which is a bustling prosperous looking places free refurbish since islamic state were kicked out at the loser or just waiting for the mayor to shop he's been giving a tour of the city to the norwegian onpassed arriving because now faluji motorcycle walls but there's still no shortage of security on a vip shares up must be twenty security guard who where outside the security cordon now organ life america you tell me if three one year since your estate from the diet ruling for malaysia how would you assess the success of the past twelve months alcatel levalley by the haven anyone who sulphur luge after liberation un ever expected this later stalled vehicle i wouldn't say life is better normal but it's acceptable ninety percent of the families have returned life and for luger as he see is going on but we have shortages of opportunity and high levels of unemployment rabbi the reason that faluji fell to die was partly because the people of color felt abandoned by the government in baghdad has the situation change kabir who sat there was obviously between the government and the people of luger and in general this is one reason why lose a filter dash lousy until now this gap has not closed completely but we had a making some progress to restore trust and the chief security approval pau gasol this is the shuhada neighborhood right on the edge of faluja it was nary whether it's heavy fighting just before circled islamic state was ejected from from asia it's still a mass there are piles of rubble warehouses used to be the people of this area complain that that the left to fend for themselves without much assistance in fact any assistance from the government and all over this neighborhood or houses where people are try repetitive of the sava could clobbered the it's very hard to rebuild my house specially when i have no money or help from anyone in the idea that you're angry about the hubbub yes it makes me so frustrated.

Jeffrey asia malaysia luger baghdad kabir pau gasol shuhada ninety percent three one year twelve months
"central asia" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"central asia" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"And it's done time and time again but people also learn and mass movement line and they refused to be cowed again and again so there's a high level crisis that's going on and us militarism is increasingly finding itself unable to solve any of the problems it's created here they are talking a still more troops to afghanistan by far the longest war us history no end in sight sixteen years and running and they find that there's nowhere secure in the poorest country states you're the both countries most destroyed by us doors and they find no way out because they haven't secured a country which is typical to them in central asia very important in terms of positioning next door as i am in terms of pakistan important in terms of the entire region and no security the same thing in syria knows security in us work plans they try to play turkey it should purge sense the rac there's so many irons in the fire who the people of his speech and it means complete devastation horrendous loss of life millions of people of looted but it has not secured us the building and i think it's important time for us to focus on us imperialism and not be caught up with supporting this or that police agencies or this or that us topics or you us created course there's a great deal of confusion fear aided around syria with people actually l supposedly the left find themselves in support of forces who are clearly aligned with us objectives so clarity and focus.

us syria afghanistan sixteen years