35 Burst results for "Central America"

"central america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

02:43 min | 1 d ago

"central america" Discussed on Chompers

"I've landed on a beautiful island. I can hear waves crashing on the shore and I see a line of huge beautiful sculptures of heads. These statues are made from dark of all Kanak Rock. So time machine, what are these statues? Rachel these are called Moai. Rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth I'm more in the way back to. Our statues on the coast of Easter Island in the Pacific Ocean researchers. Thank that the Moai were made about a thousand years ago but nobody knows how they were made or how they ended up on the island. There so huge and heavy, it must have been really difficult to move them they're. The people who lived on the island at that time, the Polynesians may have made the Moai to honor their ancestors. Their great great grandparents we don't know for sure. But what we do know is that the Moai are masterpieces of creative genius. Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth, but don't brush too hard. Okay. Here's our next time travel and we are going even further back in time. I've only did somewhere in Mexico where the Mayan people live in a workshop and I see a big sculpture it's kind of like a disk, but it's made of stone. Someone is carving tiny drawings into it a few small lines. Then a square. Fun Time Machine. What is this? Mayan calendar. Switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. Musher Front. Teeth to. The Mayan people were experts in mathematics and astronomy. The carefully kept track of the Movement of the planets to count time, and they used a form of writing called hieroglyphics to record that time. The calendar that most of US use today called the Gregorian calendar is different from the Mayan calendar. The Mayan. Calendar has more months and those months have more days but both calendars work. And the Mayan calendar is still used today by the great. Great great grandkids of the people who lived in different countries in south and Central America. That's it for Chandler's, but we'll be back tonight with more travels three time until then. Chompers.

Easter Island Switzer Kanak Rock Central America Rachel Mexico Pacific Ocean US Chandler
The search for ancient civilizations on Earth ... from space

Short Wave

07:35 min | 5 d ago

The search for ancient civilizations on Earth ... from space

"Okay. So first off Sarah Park is kind of a big deal. She's helped uncover prehistoric commented fossils in eroded canyon lake beds, an ancient amphitheater under an airport in Rome and Egypt, which is her specialty. She's uncovered thousands of settlements including more than a dozen pyramids. Are you tired the perpetually, but it's okay. She's written about those discoveries by the way in a recent book called archaeology from. From Space and yes, Sarah does go to sites and do some real digging in the dirt archaeological excavation. But her superpower is analyzing satellite imagery and data to know where to dig in the first place. Most of the imagery I use is called optical satellite imagery. So so it stayed essentially taken from light that's reflected off the surface and looking for changes in patterns we're looking for. How things relate to one another, and hopefully, that will indicate where there could potentially be archaeological sites or features with insights, and then we get to go out on the ground and do serve mapping and excavate them. When you say you use satellite images, what are we talking about a week? Where do those images come from and kind of how do you manipulate them? So it's a, it's a range of different satellite images. So if we're interested in looking really really large landscapes, we use data from NASA but if we're looking. Looking. At very high resolution satellite images, we use the essentially the imagery that you see on Google Earth, which is from a company called Knox our technologies that challenge with that data is that we can't see through trees. I'm dealing with rainforests, of Central, America or Southeast Asia or forest say in New England. Then we use Technology Coal Ladar which tends for light detection and ranging, and that's Eliezer mapping system that you put on an airplane or a drone or a UNLV essentially allowing you to remove trees and see what's there. In your book, you also explain how archaeologists now have the ability to detect temperature differences below the ground. Why? Yes. How first of all cool second of all, how does that work and why is that important? So one particular part of the light spectrum that is really really useful for for the work that we do is the thermal infrared. So if you have anything that's buried and is a chamber or avoid like a room, a tomb a very passageway, you know if it's kind of. Of like when you go into a basement or a wine cellar, you know the temperature drops a couple of degrees. So by using thermal infrared, you can see these very subtle differences in temperature, and if say an area shows up with a lower temperature, that's the shape of a rectangle. Okay. There's something that's there that we may need to check out right in Salt Lake. You're like cake in archaeologists out of business, right? So it's like you still end up going in there. It just kind of. Of helps like going in there and digging stuff up and looking at stuff with different techniques. It's basically just giving you a good idea of like there might be something here, right ex-. Exactly I mean the coolest part of my job I think is the actual physical excavation and that so time consuming and so what the satellites allow us to do is not just fine sites, but also track over time potential threats to them. So whether it's rising water whether it's urbanization or development, maybe there are. are other issues that could be affecting. The sites would allows it's a tool that allows geologists to help, monitor and protect sites right, and and so you even kind of tried to estimate like obviously estimating how many more archaeological sites might be out there, and it's in like the millions right I. I think I estimated and I'm probably I probably not going to give the right number guy the book even though it was the summer, it was Sarah, fifty, fifty, fifty, fifty, sixty, seventy. Eighty ninety. So. Yeah. So so basically I think something like forty, million, fifty, million sites left to find. But like I could be wrong, it could be one, hundred, million, it could be ten, million North Y'all just yet has written me an angry email saying how dare you? Thank, like I think I was pretty on the mark. So. There's another thing that I kind of wanted to talk to you because I don't talk to that many archaeologists, you know what I mean, but now at my own show and they can't stop me, Sarah. So. Can we talk a little bit about how colonialism and archaeology have intersected in the past and and maybe how it still does now, and what we can do about that? I? Guess that's a big question for you. The big question and it's something I and my colleagues think about. A. Lot. So first of all I, have to acknowledge that that archaeology especially, egyptology. It both those fields as well as anthropology, they have deeply racist colonialist routes. All of them, you know Westerners parachute in. Do their projects were essentially archaeological tourists that were probably rank. rankle a lot of my colleagues I. don't care someone needs to speak out about this and they leave which is, which is appalling. You know I pay guards around at the site where I work at list. I have very close relationships with the village My. My education course staff. I speak to them every single week and and at the end of the day, it's about those relationships. So I think we all have to do a lot of hard stares in the mirror at ourselves and ask what are we taking and what are we leaving? Are we training? Are we providing equipment and materials? What else should we be doing to create some more parody and the in the work that we're doing and I'm not the only one doing this by there's so many colleagues both in Egypt and elsewhere are being which were intentional. But I think we have to ask a lot of hard questions. You talk in the book about the importance of discoveries in how a few small discoveries can impact a field more than like a headline worthy discovery, which I. Really like because I think as a person, who's you know been a part of the scientific process. It's frustrating when you know only the big kind of discoveries. Get credit for changing fields. When in reality, it is those little findings you know what I mean. So I'll get, I'll give you an example a colleague and friend of mine few row him a fee. Fi is currently leading excavations in an area near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt and he and his team just uncovered a new workmen's village. So it's a place where men would have stayed and lived as they were constructing tombs in the Valley of the Kings. and kind of compared to other discoveries, not just in Egypt, but but elsewhere, it really didn't get much play but I think it's one of the most extraordinary discoveries in. Egypt. In the last twenty years, we only know of one other workmen's village in West Bank in Luxor. It's an unbelievable fine because it's going to tell us about the daily life of the people who lived and worked. You know three, thousand, three, hundred, three, thousand, five, hundred years ago, right up and to me, it's those discoveries that are most interesting. All Right Sarah. Park. We appreciate you. This is a lot of fun likewise. Thank you so much. Go go go to bed I I. Learned. They're GONNA pay you. Thanks to Sarah. Park. You can read about her work and her book, which is called archaeology from space, how the

Sarah Egypt Sarah Park Salt Lake Rome Eliezer Nasa Unlv Southeast Asia America Westerners New England FI Kings. Luxor West Bank
Why is Drinking Water So Unaffordable for So Many Americans?

Important, Not Important

04:49 min | 6 d ago

Why is Drinking Water So Unaffordable for So Many Americans?

"Our guest today are Nina Connie and Mary, grant and together we're GONNA find out why so many Americans can't afford drinking water. which is interestingly the one thing that every human being needs to survive. Nina and Mary Welcome. Hollow. Thank you for having me. I. Guess coming on. So we're here. We're grateful. Let's start off by just giving our listeners a a quick little who you are and what you do you know if you'd like to start. Show I am a British journalist based in New, York comnet environmental justice reporter for Guardian us. Basically interest is in. Who has access and who doesn't have access to clean. In water land, green spaces that sort of stuff. Exactly things that are necessary. Awesome will thank you for joining us Mary what your story. So I'm are the public water for all campaign director at Water Watch. We're a national nonprofit environmental organization in the United States and the heart of what we do is grassroots organizing mobilize regular people to build political power to move the bold and uncompromised solutions to our most pressing food water and climate problems of our time once again, like a couple slackers. Brian. Yeah. Who are these who got aim higher? Credible. Thank you much awesome introductions and then quick reminder to everybody. Our goal here is to provide some quick context for our topic today, and then we'll dig into. Action oriented questions and actions that everybody out there can take to to help fight in support alongside guys. So that people have water which seems like an insane thing to have to ask but where we are Awesome. So Nina in Mary, we do like to start with one important question that we ask everyone to set the tone. FOR THIS FIASCO So instead of saying, tell us your entire life story we like to ask. Why are you vital to the survival of the species and whoever would like to go first by all means jump in. And You didn't answer the harder question which was like, what's my name entitled early? I feel like it's only appropriate Mary steps up for this. Be Bold be honest. You are here for a reason. So water is just. For life everyone every person every living thing needs water in the heart of like what I care about what I'm mobilized that energized work on its mixture people have access to water that we're protecting our water supplies the future of the planet in for people from everyone needs water. It's just a basic human rights. It's a matter of justice and so I think it's not just me. It's a me being able to work with people being able to work with our organisers, our communication team great journalists like Nina to get the stories out there so that we can protect our water supplies a mixture of access to Internet homes. I mean again yes. Sounds like you could hire pinal. Thank you. Nina, what's what's your story I? I've already been living in the US but once? Before moving here I was. I was a reporter covering Central America Mexico of what lots of countries what can we've communities who have few little as and don't have access to these basic fundamental things like clean running water I did not expect to find the same in America I mean, this is supposedly the richest country in the world supposedly in the best of Western civilization and yet they're all millions and millions of ordinary Americans that in twenty twenty do not have access to clean running affordable water that is wild i. mean it's completely unacceptable and it's not no. I mean I feel like it's become normalized in this country you know for poor people to be. Pool people and people of Color and native Americans to be punished just for who they are. Into and not have access to these basic services and even things like clean air and adequate food, etc but it isn't normal it end really. America cannot claim to be the best in of. Civilization and democracy and and the richest country in the world and have people during the pandemic not having. To wash hands with I mean.

Nina Connie Mary Welcome Water Watch United States Reporter York America Brian Director Central America Mexico
Ecology Lessons from Mt. Auburn Cemetery

A Way to Garden with Margaret Roach

04:48 min | Last week

Ecology Lessons from Mt. Auburn Cemetery

"Tell us about when Mount Auburn sort of formalized the idea of emphasizing places in urban wildlife refuge and set specific sustainability goals like what's that? When did that happen? Well. I would I would say even before I was here, there was certainly a focus on a at some degree of sustainability sustainable practices, but it wasn't. It really started ramping up and you know after I got here because of my own interests, many of the other staff at the time as well and we really felt it was time to do more focus spend more time focusing on and really do the right thing and. It gradually became more formalized Because I'm sorry term planning processes and and when are several years ago we did a strategic plan and one of the top level and strategic initiatives of the plan was to be a model of environmental stewardship. So it really that's when it really became Kinda Corp Institution wide. Horticulture Department. Because of in the. Area I. Mean you're this piece of ecological uniqueness I think I read and one description right? I mean it's it's an unusual place to have one hundred and seventy five acres. In the conditioner. Really. It's it's such an important more and more important these days because we're in surrounded by an urban environment and. Green Open greenspace. That's good for my life and people is that much more important than it used to be and recognized as being important so it's Yeah. We're really in a kind of a unique spot. So. Now as with Central Park in New York City and other such spaces like the birds for instance, and you have a lot of birds they are especially during migration periods at Mount Auburn. Birds knew all along. This was a great ecologically important spot. So tell us a little bit about the wildlife and who calls home and so forth. The I? Say forever third says. Stop Vice About Auburn but. On on the fly over the path of migrating birds, you know come and kind of fun you following the coastline. from Central America and up on up north. So we're right in that in that flyway in in recent years more, the more urbanization has happened the more. Here. We are at the birds fly over and all they say is one hundred, seventy, five acres of five thousand trees in the tree tops is fine over. So it really is an obvious place for them to. Stop and take arrest them get replenished with. Food on their way north we happen to be in you know in in an area zone that birds are migrating through anyway, and of course, there's also a lot of resident birds as well that. Take Up. Space, here. And I imagine that you have bird clubs and stuff worth that left to be there and looking at birds. Yes absolutely that's where we are quite popular destination for many. Many very clubs and Amasau of on society and other. Organizations that that that organized groups to bring here and then just as people. Flock here from as individuals especially in May and peak migrating season, but also throughout the year. So it's not just birds I know for instance, when you did your woodland, you did you've done a number of as part of the sort of overall Mandate of of greater stability and and being more of a wildlife refuge in in recent years that's intensified you've done a number of projects you restored with didn't chew I mean or your receive in restoring the woodland. Tell us a little bit of some of the sort of steps and what did you do? Did you kind of monitor populations and figure out who is there and what you needed to do to what's thought process that when you when you begin an and again, this is a historic place and a place that a lot of people have. attachment to. You know it's an emotional place. It's a treasured place so you can't just change everything right? You have limitation. Right. Glad. You mentioned that we still are very much a an active ongoing cemetery. Belt creating and selling in bear space and burying people all the time in addition to you know generations of people that have already been buried here. So yeah. So we have to keep that in mind while we continue to move forward

Mount Auburn Strategic Initiatives Auburn Central Park Horticulture Department Central America New York City
Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

The Book Review

05:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Newt Gingrich and the Start of an Era

"This feels like an episode out of like not just a recent. It's not the recent past. Past the distant past I mean newt is still with us, but this is a very different time for newt, and I think that for many people he started to really appear on People's radars outside of Georgia in the early ninety s with a contract for America, but your book predates that so the book starts in the Nineteen Eighties when you Gingrich. Is this young? Young Congressman who comes from Georgia. He's elected in Nineteen, seventy eight, and any comes to Washington ready to just tear everything down to shake things up to do whatever necessary to help. Republicans become a majority in the House of Representatives which they had not been since nineteen fifty four, and he's intent on a not listening to senior members of the Party and to really. Really taking on the Democrats in ways that they had not been comfortable with, and so he makes a name for himself very quickly, even though he's not part of the leadership in the early eighties. Okay, so you're a history. Professor Newt Gingrich Thought of himself as a history professor and was a history professor, but what exactly did he teach? How did his academic career? Career fit in with his political career well, he received his PhD until Lane. After attending undergraduate school in Emory and Gingrich wrote his dissertation on Belgian colonialism, and he wrote about how and why colonial government had failed to modernize local education and nurture an elite that was capable of sustaining economic growth, and what was remarkable about the dissertation in retrospect, which is what he spent. Spent his academic time on was that he was critical of the design of Belgian policies, rather than on the merits of colonialism, which were much less interest to him, but but that wasn't really his his main focus. I mean as soon as he gets to West Georgia College. That's his first job as a professor. He's deeply uninterested in the academic life I think in. In his first year as a professor, he applies to be the president of the university. He then wants to be share the department and he's impatient with the slowness of academia He quickly gains a thirst for the life of politics, and that's really what engages him, and in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy four. He decides to run against the incumbent in his district. District John Flint who's an old southern Democrat. What are nudes politics like growing up? Because he conservative early on, and did his conservative ideology remained consistent throughout his life. Yeah, he comes from a working class family. The family's originally from Harrisburg. His father left his mother while she was pregnant with him, so he didn't have much of a relationship with him. He is raised. primarily by his stepfather, who's in the military, so Gingrich spends a lot of his youth travelling around. He's what we call an Army Brat, and lives in different places in Europe before the family finally settles in Georgia, which is the final stop? He's a Rockefeller Republican during the nineteen sixties. He he is conservative, but he is interested in Republicans like Nelson Rockefeller and then Richard Nixon who had ambitions of building a big Republican coalition as FDR had done for Democrats in the Nineteen Thirties. He doesn't really make a hard right. Right, turn until about nineteen seventy five I'm what prompts that well. He ran for the first time unsuccessfully in nineteen, seventy, four against flint. Then he's getting ready to run against Flint again in nineteen seventy six, and he meets some people associated with the conservative movement like Paul Way Rick. Who's running these camps for up and coming Republicans and he like many young Republicans starts to become enamored with what's this conservative movement that's bubbling up in America and talking about the need to dismantle government to be much more aggressive on national. National Security and this is when he starts to shift to what will eventually be the Reagan Revolution? Would you say that his guiding principles were firmly aligned with Reagan conservatism, or were there differences there? There were differences. Gingrich for example is much more concerned about environmental issues even in the early nineteen eighties than a lot of Reagan Nights, are he? He actually takes those kinds of policies much more seriously, but generally he lines up by the time he's in the house. He believes in tax cuts. He believes in deregulation. Deregulation, he believes importantly in a very muscular approach to fighting the Soviet Union and to fighting allies in places like Central America so though there are differences between him, and and some of the hard core inner circle of the Reagan administration. Generally they line up pretty well

Professor Newt Gingrich Nineteen Eighties Professor Georgia President Trump Nineteen Thirties America Rick Richard Nixon Nelson Rockefeller John Flint Congressman West Georgia College House Of Representatives Reagan Reagan Administration Harrisburg Washington Soviet Union Flint
A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

Environment: NPR

05:19 min | 3 weeks ago

A New Album Turns The Sound Of Endangered Birds Into Electronic Music

"An international collective of electronic deejays and composers is taking their beats out of the dance club, and into jungles and forests. It's all to help save nature's greatest singers. Birds Catalina Maria. Johnson has the story of a guide to the Birdsong Project Robin. Perkins is a thirty three road DJ composer producer originally from glass of England. He goes by the name A. Spanish for the. Perkins produced his first project in Twenty fifteen a guy to the Birdsong of South America. The whole project was born of this idea of taking the songs of endangered birds and challenging musicians to make a piece of music from and so trying to marry these worlds of activism, all conservation Goodson and joining us. Perkins invited artists from each of the endangered or threatened birds homelands to build their own solves around the Birdsong. The beautiful thing about electronic music is that it opens up this whole toolbox of things that you can vies do right so you can take a sample of a bird song and do five million things to it. You can turn into an instrument itself. You can reverse it. You can have effects. You can sample. Ed Perkins has just finished the second project. A guy to the Birdsong of Mexico Central, America and the Caribbean. One of the musicians who responded to his call is Nicaraguan Sonic artist that on behavioral. She chose the Turquoise Proud Maat Maat or Guatemala. rankle to me was a very clear choice as a child I would see this bird freely flying around and meeting his partner, the travel in pairs most of the time in my backyard for sunsets. Beautiful mystical moment every day. What about wrangle is threatened by loss of habitat primarily due to deforestation, it's also Nicaragua's national bird. This bird represents a lot of symbolic in my area of the world's, because it represents freedom and these Central American countries have been striving for political social economic freedom for a long time. The idea of freedom was also part of the impetus for Al Ovando choice. Ovando is a member of the renowned Gutty for collective, that also includes musicians from what the my love on us and Nicaragua for the collective's contribution to the album Ovando chose the endangered black cat. Like the guava uncle, the black cat birds freedom is threatened by loss of habitat. Obando feels his people have a special kinship with the catbird and struggle for survival, like you've just imagining US coming all the way from the coast of West Africa into the Caribbean, ending up in believes that still continuing the struggle and trying to be part of what the world is today. Ovando also happens to be a devoted burger. He even convinced the. The band to add a technical writer to its contracts when the musicians perform at festivals, so we know what we should just add it on and just put just for fun. You know some of us in the collective avid burgers, and if it here's anybody at the festival. Who'd like to burning? We would love to go birding with them married. They would know some places some hot spots. In Oh, we could check out some birds. As with the first scalpels, all of the profits from the new release will support organizations in each region. One of them is birds, Caribbean. It's executive director Lisa. Sorenson explains how the recording not only help her efforts, but may also yield extended benefits helping to develop sites in the Caribbean that need infrastructure for example, there might be a beautiful place to go see birds, but there's no trail. There's no interpretive sign edge there to tell you about what you're seeing. So we're envisioning funding from this project will help us advance building the supply and building the demand for sustainable burden nature tourism. That's project founder. Robin Perkins wish to yeah. Hopefully people will come away from the album. Feeling inspired and feeling the need to listen against the Birdsong around them to do something to protect the natural spaces that we need to survive proceeds from a guide to the Birdsong of Mexico Central America, and the Caribbean will also benefit nonprofits in Costa Rica and Mexico.

Ed Perkins Caribbean Al Ovando Ovando Mexico Nicaragua Robin Perkins South America Maat Maat Catalina Maria Johnson United States Goodson Producer England Founder Obando Sorenson Writer Executive Director
First MS-13 member indicted on terrorism-related charges by DOJ

Dan Proft

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

First MS-13 member indicted on terrorism-related charges by DOJ

"Wasn't out several arrests following a recent crackdown of the S 13 international gang in the United States. Attorney General Bar says that the Emma's 13 unlike a typical street gang, has a highly organized international organization They operate. With hierarchy with programs they call him programs. Think of it as a crime family, essentially and then, under each program, they have different cliques. They have programs and clicks operating in the United States. While their center of gravity is in Central America there, thousands that have come into the United States illegal terrorist charges. They're coming for one member Nell Guardia's Was indicted in the eastern District of Virginia. First time we've used terrorism charges against a member of M s 13. He was responsible for activities in 13 states. Prosecutors also said they would seek the death penalty in one case breaking news

United States Nell Guardia General Bar Attorney Central America Virginia
Spatial Conversations

A VerySpatial Podcast

06:32 min | Last month

Spatial Conversations

"So we're happy to be joined today by Brendan Collins and Pablo Puentes of make path. Thanks for joining us today is. Yeah thanks. And you. So, let's start off with the the really broad question of what is make path. Path is a spatial data science. Shop we focus a lot on open source tools, and we bring our passion from various domains. To gs and we aim to build. Inclusive communities around you as tools, and specifically we have a project X. Ray spatial, which focused on roster based spatial analysis, we combine a rationalization pipeline with a set of universal functions which apply an. To Rosser data and also are named in ways that Gif professionals recognize things like surface analysis tools slow hill shade, aspect on these are the names of these tools in the s domain that people recognize. And we offer those tools As a python based library that anybody can access read the source code to and contribute to. We we take open source tools, and we help solve our clients problems by applying open source to their their specific domains. These these domains are very diverse working in areas from healthcare to environmental conservation. Finance Natural Resource Management. We know that geography and the science of of place is very important, too. Many domains and we find ourselves learning about these different domains as we apply open source geospatial tools to their challenges. We we basically bill. We love building open source, really powerful tools, and then if we have clients are like. Hey, what else can we do with these tools? Can you help us apply these really complex problems and what he help? So, how'd you guys come together as? Building this new path path. That was that was bad, wasn't it? Sorry. That's okay well. It's all good. We'll take it. So I WanNa talk about what you've been doing before and how we can. Yeah so I got involved in GSA in the mid to thousands being the S. lab manager for the Center for Sustainable, development, which is a kind of environmental science group in Central America. Working a lot with agriculture. And then moved on to work. As part of the team at the Nature Conservancy looking at site selection for projects in the red area red in this context is reduction in emissions from deforestation and I. Ever Dacian where Zeh countries that have high carbon output can find carbon credits in developing nations to incentivize them to protect vertically sensitive ecosystems, tropical forest is a great example of that, so a lot of these projects occur in in the main tropical forest areas of Brazil Democratic Republic of Congo Indonesia the top three countries for tropical forest. So using I was using DIS to help. Do Site selection to maximize dollars spent? Two or environmental protection through the conservancy We Pablo night. Live in Austin We started to connect in the music scene. Both of us are musicians songwriters. We go out and play open open mics and so that's how can Pablo and I met, but then we quickly realized that we had a lot in common apart from our music background, and over the years as we would spend time together and hard about things it just made sense to get together in work together as a 'cause. We were hitting the same problems, but Pablo represented us. More! Experience on what it is to create a company and create a culture and I represented a bit more of the technical side, and so we were good partners in kind of coming together, 'cause we represent those different areas. in filming kind of some of some of the. The rounding out the breath of our skills, really we we both. We both think we are easy to find and the other one is a really great fun. So I came out about I came out of Stanford about ten years ago, started a company So I had a lot of experience. Products Scaling a company and I. Really liked. What Brennan was doing and we teamed up and I bring a lot of experience again with the company building with a product design had to think about about by these projects and I've always had an interest I don't have a detectable background in jazz. She fired his. I've always had an interest in it. My Dad was a biologist and we would always go on these. I've been looking at maps since I was five, and and we'd go on walks in the new-look onto poverty maps and understanding vegetation maps so I guess I've been training for this for a long time without even knowing but done now. It's a little bit of my. Time and I love it the physical world and data to to solve problems in the s really exciting to work together and. We've been applying for some of these tools and really really interesting ways, and I'd love for brethren. Talk with it. This is a blog. A very big piece we're working on. That's coming out on the next, Tuesday! And it's A. It's a real world application vary timely of these told rags, these tools, a really cool powerful but the story of Man on the Moon is man on the moon, not N-, not necessarily rocket as cool as. Cool as Mathis, the the real story. Is that the the the the impact that has the? and Ny Brandon. If you WANNA, talk a little bit about the story that were published using the x Ray, spatial tools and data Cheddar I think that's That's a great example of some of the things that we do.

Pablo Puentes X. Ray Spatial Brendan Collins Nature Conservancy NY Rosser Indonesia Stanford RAY MAN Mathis Austin GSA Brazil Democratic Republic S. Lab Manager Brennan Central America Center For Sustainable
U.S. ramps up expulsions of migrants as border crossings rise

World Changers with Jamie Osborne

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

U.S. ramps up expulsions of migrants as border crossings rise

"U. S. immigration officials at the southern border carried out more than twenty thousand expulsions of migrants last month as unauthorized border crossings increased by the thousands despite strict U. S. coronavirus restrictions and lockdowns in Mexico and Central America customs and border protection officials at the U. S. Mexican border and counted more than twenty three thousand unauthorized migrants and swiftly expelled over twenty thousand of them under an emergency directive by the center for disease control and prevention the CDC directive which has been extended indefinitely has given the trump administration the power to rapidly remove most border crossers from U. S. soil

Mexico Central America U. S. CDC
Arrests at the US-Mexico border down 84% from last May

Business Rockstars

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Arrests at the US-Mexico border down 84% from last May

"Arrest at the southern border are down with more here's USA's Chris Barnes in many agents apprehended twenty three thousand people at the southern border an eighty four percent drop as compared to a year earlier most were single adult men from Mexico and that's another big change from last year one three quarters of all migrant arrests at the border involved people from Central America the use of tractor trailers by smugglers is on the rise border patrol agents say they have foiled operations involving big rigs every month of this year so

USA Chris Barnes Mexico Central America
Gulf Coast communities prepare for flooding from Tropical Storm Cristobal

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:46 sec | 2 months ago

Gulf Coast communities prepare for flooding from Tropical Storm Cristobal

"A re energize tropical storm Cristobal is moving across the southern Gulf of Mexico where it's expected to hit the Gulf coast after cost flooding and mud slides in Mexico and Central America meteorologist Allison Chinchar has more to do it it's a paid tropical storm priest of all to increase and strengthen a little bit more before it finally does make landfall sustained winds are right around forty five miles per hour gusting up to sixty we do expect landfall to be sometime in the latter half of the day Sunday but that could be anywhere from marsh island to Slidell Louisiana but even areas outside of that cone are still likely to have some pretty big impacts to insurance as it could have or could cause heavy rains from East Texas to Florida this weekend and into early

Mexico Central America Allison Chinchar Marsh Island Louisiana East Texas Florida Gulf Slidell
Tropical Storm Cristobal Strengthens, Targets Gulf Coast This Weekend; Tropical Storm, Storm Surge Warnings Issued

War Room

00:34 sec | 2 months ago

Tropical Storm Cristobal Strengthens, Targets Gulf Coast This Weekend; Tropical Storm, Storm Surge Warnings Issued

"Tropical storm crystal ball packing wind rain and significant storm surge has a weekend date with the Gulf coast I think the storm will probably be making landfall late in the day Monday or Sunday night but on some of the impacts will start before then maybe as soon as Saturday night national hurricane center specialist John Kincheloe Z. cover the highest storm surge where we're forecasting it's for three to five feet from the mouth of the Mississippi River to ocean springs Mississippi and some of the rainfall totals can be quite significant as well maybe not as bad as what they've seen in Central America but they could see widespread areas of four to eight

Mississippi River Mississippi Central America John Kincheloe
Re-energized Tropical Storm Cristobal aims at US Gulf coast

Ben Shapiro

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Re-energized Tropical Storm Cristobal aims at US Gulf coast

"Is a storm that appears to be headed for the Gulf coast regain tropical storm force earlier today while drenching southern Mexico and Central America the national hurricane center in coral gables as Cristobal is expected across the Yucatan peninsula that's what it was doing today before eventually tracking to the U. S. Coast tropical storm watches are posted for the northern Gulf of Mexico from inner coastal city Louisiana to the Alabama Florida

Mexico Central America Cristobal Louisiana Alabama Florida Yucatan U. S. Coast
Cristobal regains tropical storm force on track to US coast

Ben Shapiro

00:23 sec | 2 months ago

Cristobal regains tropical storm force on track to US coast

"Is a storm that appears to be headed for the Gulf coast regain tropical storm force earlier today while drenching southern Mexico and Central America the national hurricane center in coral gables as Cristobal is expected across the Yucatan peninsula that's what it was doing today before eventually tracking to the U. S. Coast tropical storm watches are posted for the northern Gulf of Mexico for medical school city Louisiana to the Alabama

Mexico Central America Cristobal Louisiana Alabama Yucatan U. S. Coast
Cristobal now a tropical depression, center moving into Gulf of Mexico

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 2 months ago

Cristobal now a tropical depression, center moving into Gulf of Mexico

"Tropical depression Cristobal continuing to soak up Mexico's Gulf coast and Central America head of a northward turn expected to carry it to the U. S. shores Monday the U. S. national hurricane center says the storm had maximum sustained winds of thirty five miles per hour this morning and was moving north at seven miles per hour was expected across the Yucatan peninsula today and eventually tracked the U. S. Gulf coast Cristobal made landfall in Mexico was a tropical storm Wednesday before weakening and had formed this week in the bay of Campeche a from the remnants of tropical storm

Mexico Central America U. S. National Hurricane Cente Yucatan Peninsula Campeche Gulf
Cristobal regains tropical storm force on track to US coast

Rush Limbaugh

00:20 sec | 2 months ago

Cristobal regains tropical storm force on track to US coast

"Level a storm that appears to be headed for the U. S. Gulf coast has regained tropical storm force while drenching southern Mexico and Central America the national hurricane center is a tropical storm crystal ball that maximum sustained winds of forty miles an hour and is expected across the you could tan peninsula regain tropical storm strength and eventually track to the U. S. Gulf

Mexico Central America U. S. Gulf Tan Peninsula
Tropical storm Cristobal strengthens as it moves towards Mexico

WBBM Afternoon News Update

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Tropical storm Cristobal strengthens as it moves towards Mexico

"The third named storm of the hurricane season threatens major flooding in Mexico and Central America CBS's Jeff berry daily tropical storm Cristobal formed in the southern Gulf of Mexico earlier today with hurricane hunter aircraft finding tropical storm force winds it is the earliest C. storm ever recorded in the Atlantic Ocean he says it could reach hurricane level in effect Texas and Louisiana this

Mexico America CBS Jeff Berry Atlantic Ocean Texas Louisiana
Storm Amanda in Central America could redevelop in Gulf

Morning Edition

00:59 sec | 2 months ago

Storm Amanda in Central America could redevelop in Gulf

"Tropical storm Amanda has been downgraded to a tropical depression but not before at last Central America causing at least ten deaths and much damage in El Salvador and Guatemala Maria Martin reports tropical storm Amanda first rage through El Salvador bringing death and destruction before moving on to what the mullah the two countries are seeing flooding landslides power outages and displacements in San Salvador it was reported twenty three vehicles were destroyed when a sinkhole opened as a result of the heavy rains and winds of Salvador's president Bible Kelly has declared a fifteen day state of emergency in the wake of the first Pacific storm of the season San Salvador's mayor said it was an unprecedented situation one emergency on top of another the storm in addition to the corona virus crisis both hitting the poor of this region disproportionately for NPR news I'm idea

Amanda Central America El Salvador Maria Martin San Salvador President Trump Bible Kelly Guatemala Pacific NPR
Brazil emerges as new coronavirus hotspot

Brower Home Power Hour

00:18 sec | 2 months ago

Brazil emerges as new coronavirus hotspot

"Brazil has emerged as a new coronavirus hot spot cases arising there and across much of south and Central America president of Brazil Jair Bolsonaro has downplayed the threat of code nineteen since the beginning and now that country is second only to the US when it comes to the number of people who've died from it

Brazil Central America President Trump Jair Bolsonaro United States
"central america" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"A mysterious form of kidney disease has killed tens of thousands of people in central america. Many of them are relatively young farmworkers in their thirties. As an forties kidney failure is now the second leading cause of death in nicaragua and el salvador. The new disease has also turned up in hot humid agricultural communities in india and sri lanka. Some researchers now say it may be linked to global warming. N._p._r.'s jason bane reports in an editorial in the current issue. Choose the new england journal of medicine doctor cecelia sorenson calls this new mysterious form of kidney failure a sentinel disease in the era of climate change disease. His hotly wouldn't have occurred if it weren't for the extreme global temperatures that we're seeing sorenson from the university of colorado has been studying chronic kidney disease as of unknown origin also known as c._k. D you for the last three years. The disease was first flagged by doctors and central america in the nineteen nineties farm workers from sugarcane plantations in nicaragua el salvador and guatemala. We're turning up at clinics with end stage kidney disease yet. They didn't have diabetes or hypertension or some other traditional factor that might explain why their kidneys were failing among the early cases almost all worked in agriculture but it's also been found among minors fishermen herman and workers in hot industrial plants then farm workers in sri lanka and tropical parts of southern india started coming down with a similar condition very difficult difficult to prove direct attribution to say this person is sick because of climate change that link very difficult but but we can't say is that this this disease is occurring in parts of the world that are experiencing unprecedented warming which we can directly attribute to climate change. There are many theories about what's causing housing c._k. D._u. Most focus on heat stress and dehydration others are looking at heavy metals and chemicals in the drinking water sure lanka banned herbicide glyphosate. I say sold under the brand name roundup over concerns that it was causing c k d you early on some health officials blamed the epidemic on home brewed alcohol. Neil pierce at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine is also studying c._k. To you in central america and southern asia he skeptical of the link to climate change. It's it's very unusual phenomenon. You know i've done with in this general area for forty years and it's and it's very unusual to come across something like this. The disease destroys as people's kidneys incredibly quickly pure distract. Some sugarcane workers who over a two year period lost a third of their kidney function at night will be to heat stress in the extremely bad working conditions in central america. That's adding on the link to climate changes that tenuous. He doesn't think that the relatively collectively small rise in global temperatures of the last few decades would call us such a significant epidemic also pierce has looked for c. k. d. u. In other places with similar similar climatic conditions to central america's pacific coastal plains and hasn't found it if you go to south india villages that are very close to each other and some of them are getting thinks c._k. The u._n. Some of them are not and both equally hot and they're not the hottest of india yeah. There's something very strange going on. It's really interesting on typically and obviously tragic in terms of the decent illness that has caused sorenson in her editorial doesn't claim that she has the exact answer to what's causing this strange kidney disease but she and just about everyone else. Studying agrees that the disease is heat related and as global temperatures rise. She warns that health professionals should think about how l. climate change. Maybe driving what seemed to be mysterious ailments jason bobbie-ann n._p._r. News <music>.

kidney disease america cecelia sorenson nicaragua el salvador sri lanka india nicaragua Neil pierce new england journal of medicin jason bane lanka diabetes guatemala glyphosate london school of hygiene university of colorado l.
"central america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by gimblett and supported by good night's the number one night time underwear welcome back. It's time komo choppers your morning and night tooth brushing show rushing on the top of your mouth on one side and brushed the inside outside and chewing each to in its history week and today we're exploring the history a south and central america. Let's jump in our time. Machine landed in guatemala about forty years ago. I'm in the street along with many people marching. One woman stands out. She's wearing a colorful robe and she seems to be kind of in charge. Everybody is chanting about farm workers rights so time machine. It was this woman from an aba manchu switcher brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth <music>. Don't brush too hard you go. There is an activist who helped farmers from guatemala come together and asked to be treated fairly thoroughly. Things weren't always easy but she continued to speak and write and supportive farmers in guatemala. She received a nobel peace prize for her efforts to bring in peace switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and keep on brushing okay. Here's your next travel back in time <music>. I've landed only a couple of years ago and i'm on a plane. I'm flying over a beautiful rainforests. I can hear the birds from up here. This is amazonia as i looked down i see people looking back up at me but they seem really surprised time machine who are these people and on contacted tribe switching rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and brushing little circles around each in contacted tribe is what we call a group of people who haven't met other groups of people very often and they definitely don't have the internet that means they're history is pretty separate opera from the history of the rest of the world they don't know about the history of the world that we live and and we don't know much about their history. Many people and governments work to protect the contacted people so that they can continue to live in the rainforest <music>. That's all for jumpers today but now it's time to shoot. Chompers is a production of gimblett. Media chompers is brought to you by good night's the number one nighttime underwear delivering protection where children need it. The most grownups back to school is just around the corner. New schools new friends new classes when you're a kid. There's one thing that can get get in the way of all that excitement nighttime wedding. Luckily good night's is here to help. Good nights are not only soft and comfortable but they also offer forty eighty percent more protection versus training pants so grownups at good nights to your back to school list because nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way of childhood great schooldays begin with good nights.

Chompers guatemala america forty eighty percent forty years
"central america" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"To the U. S. from Central America this means that migrants from countries like El Salvador and Honduras what have to seek asylum in Guatemala when they cross through there instead of the U. S. Rice University political science professor mark Jones it's not clear that it's legal under US asylum law so there's still a lot of quarter hurdles but if the trump administration is able to effectively push the asylum cases down to Guatemala and the detention of those individuals in Guatemala it would at least here in United States resolve the short term issue the crowded detention centers along the US Mexico border a federal judge has thrown out a Kentucky teenagers lawsuit against the accusing the Washington post of falsely labeling him a racist during an encounter with a native American man at the Lincoln Memorial the judge ruling that there may have been a Roni S. opinions published by the post but that they are protected by the first amendment CBS news correspondent Matt Piper the video of sixteen year old Nick Sandman went viral in January when he stood in front of native American protester Nathan Phillips on the national mall in Washington a lawsuit the teenager and his family filed against the Washington post for two hundred fifty million dollars has been dismissed by a federal judge the lawsuit claimed the post wrongfully targeted and bullied sand man because he was a white Catholic student wearing a make America great again hat Sandman still has pending lawsuits against CNN and NBC in all seeking three quarters of a billion dollars against the three media companies that Piper CBS news Missouri law enforcement officials say the case of two missing Wisconsin brothers is now a death investigation the brothers Nicholas and just in time all were in Missouri last weekend for business related to a livestock company they run in Wisconsin they were supposed to fly home Sunday but missed their plane out of Kansas city and county sheriff Larry fish that today the case is a death investigation but he did not give further details twenty five year old garland Nelson a Bremer was charged today with tampering with a motor vehicle the St Joseph news press reports the vehicle reportedly one used by the brothers before their disappearance three five percent of online gamers have experienced harassment while playing that according to a new study released Thursday according to the first of its kind study from the anti defamation league center on technology and society the end of incidents included physical threats stocking and sustain harassment majority of online gamers reported having been targeted based on religion gender sexual orientation ethnicity or race nearly two thirds of U. S. adults play games online charting Greenblatt the C. E. C. E. O. of the ADL says there are significant problems with hate harassment and discrimination cable excuse time five twenty five I ran into comedian actor Tony rock brother of Chris rock in downtown Saint Louis last night he told me he's in town for a weekend of shows at the helium comedy club here's a portion of our conversation I have a dear friend who started out as an attorney started doing comedy and I've asked her about the whole writing process which is so fascinating to me how do you say.

Central America two hundred fifty million doll three five percent twenty five year billion dollars three quarters sixteen year
"central america" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Throughout Central America he says the gang actively recruits undocumented immigrants of the twenty two arrested nineteen were in the country illegally in downtown LA Craig Victor can extend seventy newsradio former LAPD chief Charlie Beck takes the stand today in a suit against him and the city of LA we've got the details coming up after traffic it's two oh five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the fives here's to respond we've got a secular ten this is on the two ten westbound at lake where we have a deadly motorcycle crash the car pull and the four left lanes are blocked and on the two ten west the Michelin the on ramp is closed for police activity you've got a backup from Huntington you can use Huntington fed foot hill or the ten the eastbound tan is heavy from Lincoln also a secular in Atwater village on the five south this is past the two the two right lanes are closed for the crash and the backup starts at a Burbank right after being Boulevard on the five north bend your stadium where it's got a wreck on the right shoulder and five north the Grande Vista style car second lane from the left to the back of their starting out of commerce right at the Garfield exit on the ninety one west bellflower offramp blocked you've got an injury crash there westbound side backed up from about Carmen nida we have trouble on the four oh five north one eighteen west bound in the second lane from the left stalled car forty eight and Travis just a little bit slow westbound so be careful to their fifty seven south your Belinda we've got a record in the first lane from the left your back up their starting at Lambert road and six oh five south to Beverly you've got a crash on the right shoulder with a slow down starting at rose hills our next report to fifteen with more traffic reports more often I did a song do in this southern California Subaru retailers traffic center can extend seventy newsradio will be cooler today few degrees down from yesterday seventies eighties nineties not as many triple digits for highs this afternoon more the cooling trends to come as we move through the week some clouds.

Beverly Subaru California rose hills Travis Burbank Michelin LAPD Central America Belinda Carmen nida Atwater village Lincoln Huntington LA Charlie Beck Craig Victor ten minutes
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"You know, some more successful than others from, they had been engaged in supporting this. He seeing the moxie, I would say that, you know, you had earlier this year, the houseman by the Trump administration that they're cutting funding because they feel that the countries are not doing enough to stop people from leaving their countries. So we're gonna cut funding. So mean to your question what should the US do? It's not. Let's not address it or help these countries address. The factors that are forcing their own people to flee its how do we, you know, hell pottery support those within country that are putting their lives at risk to bring about reforms do we use? Also, our diplomatic tools to support those efforts that are trying to get so I mean, this is really perverse, right? I mean you're describing a situation where the Trump administration has both backed off a form of pressure that these governments really do not welcome to sort of clean up on corruption, but in its own mind is getting tough on them by removing material assistance. Right. So instead of being both helpful, but also a little pushy we're going to now give them less, but also not try to ask anything of them. I do know how tough it is. During that if you look at the assistance, most of it doesn't go to the central government's it goes to organisations humanitarian groups religious groups in implementing agencies are carrying out the work. The grants were built to go mostly new civil society. Yeah. Or different is, I mean, they're only a small amount that goes to the central government, you know, and to see the impact because we've been talking much about water Malla. There was a report that came out last week by C C that showed that in the last several couple years because of all this backlash they went from having reduced impunity to eighty seven to having an increase now back to the levels of where it was before on this trajectory. I mean, people are just going to keep plea. Right. I mean, if if, if you know, conditions, don't improve in, if people don't have a sense of hope that they can live, a decent life, a secure life in their communities, because it's I mean it's a question, both of this sort of absolute conditions of the direction -ality of change. Right. I mean, eighty seven percent impunity is really bad. But it's lower the ninety five. Right. I mean that says to you, like, maybe, maybe I should stick around. I should I should I should work to further these improvements. I didn't things are if you have hope that things can improve then there's bigger likelihood that you would want to stay. But if you if you've lost any sense, you know, that the future is gonna look any different. Sky, high drug prices, mass incarceration. Predatory lending if you're the type of person who likes to go beyond the headlines and truly understand an issue check out the new podcast from Arnold ventures deep dive with Laura Arnold Arnold ventures. Co-chair lower Arnold shares. The Mike with leading data driven experts to explore market failures in the healthcare criminal Justice, education and public finance and figure out how to fix them dive into the conversation with a new podcast deep dive with or Arnold. Find it wherever you listen to podcasts. This is Karen wisher. I wanna tell you.

Laura Arnold Arnold Arnold ventures lower Arnold Arnold US Karen wisher Co-chair Mike eighty seven percent
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"But there are some of the poorest countries in the in the world. I mean, are there, economic development things that, that could really work, or does, is the security problem sort of free, standing to me, the key is the governance in corruption Jones, because to me, those are critical to being able to really tackle the issue economic opportunities cured and until you're able to address those, it's going to be very difficult to really have significant progress. In other areas. There was a study that was done of corruption in twenty. Fifteen by a regional organization and what they found for instance, in the case opens advisor was of the cases that they had investigated thirty five percent of the education budget. In Honduras was lost to corruption. Six seventy percent of the health. Budget was lost corruption in the case of sod mother of the cases that they investigated, it would have been enough to buy school, lunches and address basic health services with one point two million boys and girls. So when you have corruption on that scale you can really you're not you're not able to provide basic services, which include also, you know, how to you improve development programs. How do you really address the needs? So of the population, the United States have been very involved in Central American affairs for employing time, usually not that constructively are there things the American government could be doing should be doing to sort of help turn the situation around short. So in twenty sixteen fiscal year twenty fifteen in response to the. The increase of unaccompanied children. That had the a bomb administration had launched a new strategy that led to a significant increase of systens to the region. More than double, this is Jones, and that has that had continued year-by-year with smaller amounts, but mention because they did one of the positive things that came out of that wasn't instead of focusing on security, and did recognize the need to address the issue of governance, and it recognized the need to address development factor in kind of provide more of an integral security versus governent. So security would be to say, like the police are all amazing, but they need more guns in cars, say that the problems to America is security problem in so it requires a security solution in the past. It had been you know, let's focus on drug interdiction on arresting the drug kingpins over on training the police. He's on training specialized units that address gangs or drugs. So a governance solution is to say instead lead stoke on, how do you build effective institutions? I can train five hundred police officers that doesn't guarantee me that the police is going to function if they're corrupt or if you're not providing for better recruitment practices better education practices a police career law. If you don't have an effective Justice system in a countable in security, forces, but it also focused on the issue of corruption. How do we tackle issue of corruption and included issues of development in crime prevention, so understanding that there is a lot of work that can be done. That can't be effective at the community level to ensure or work with you that risk, at least provide a different alternative to engaging in. In, in gangs. So this is the kind of thing we see in community initiatives in American city, where you want to say, we're gonna put people in who are social workers, and not just not just guys with guns, but people who can talk to young young men and convince them, you could use something else, we can help you get a job, right? The ideas, you know, at the community level because communities are better able to understand, and identify what their needs are. But then it's how you bring all the different social services institutions local government police to address the needs. So how do you work with youth? Provide him with a different alternative education, job opportunities. So at least they haven't, you know, they can make a different choice, then have to be forced or feel like they have to be forced to join a gang. How do you work with families that may be facing domestic violence situations like that, that? Have been affective another regions at those are things that the US had been supportive..

Jones United States American government advisor Honduras American city America Six seventy percent thirty five percent
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"She has been indicted for other cases in now faces actually extradition to the US for involvement in drug trafficking. And he's, you know, pending his cases starting to move through the system. So the flaws re this is that to improve the security system, situation, vis-a-vis criminals, you have to simultaneously improve the accountability inside the snap. It was known. Many of these people were referred to Mazi untouchables. So if you would ask anybody then it was like there's no way Justice wasn't applied equally and Justice was not apply to these powerful individuals that could influence the institution could influence the courts. So nobody in Guatemala would have imagined that a president would. Would be sitting before Guatemalan judge phasing accusations of massive corruption, and that to me has been one of the most powerful implications of this initiative is because it did lead to wanna Mollins regaining trust in the toot in their own institutions, and to see that, yes, you could strengthen your own institutions to bring these untouchables. To accord. But so this sounds like we're going to be telling a happy store right in which diminishes and security, and people are able to, you know, make a good life for themselves in their homes. But what have southern? Right. So it did you know, as, as I mentioned, help, diminish or reduce impunity, the work that they did to strengthen the capabilities within the public prosecutor's also, office, also contributed to reduction homicide. I do think it did play a role in the ability of gonna to, I think, for period of ten eleven years dues the crime rate as is to be expected when you're dealing with very powerful structures. They're not going to sit back and wait for their demise. And so they started to push back and started. To push back, very strongly under the current Guatemalan government. And I would say over the last two years, where you've seen a series of actions on the part of the government and its allies to bring an end to the investigations and to reverse all the progress that had been achieved over the last ten years, and they've succeeded in many ways, part has to do with the fact that you've also had a change in US policy and where, you know, several years ago, the US was a strong supporter of the commission of the anti impunity anti-corruption work, that would be very vocal and defending when it came under attack last year, you shall have shift under the Trump administration wear the spy, the actions of the government to kick out the Commissioner to try to close down the commission another actions. They've pretty much stayed mute. So I don't I don't know anything about. What is this? Like a like a partisan issue inside Guatemalan politics, where one faction has come out on top, and the Trump administration wants to support them different things happen. I would say that, if you look at sorbets and they've been several the commission, they anti-corruption work enjoys them eighty percent of support in anti-corruption is a key issue for greater awareness. I think what has happened is the, the government took several actions that unfortunately, succeeded one of them was a decision to move the embassy to Jerusalem to incur favor from the Trump administration. Another was the private sector, another's paying very hefty amount of money to lobby firms, here in Washington to try to diminish Republicans port for that commission or try to. Taken that partisan support. It also coincided with a case that involve a Russian family anquan Tamala that ended up getting the support of hill broader, who's very, very engaged in the Magnitsky. Oh, involved accusing without any prove the commission of being in collusion with Russia. So all of this, and the use of social media in country to try to spread defamation campaigns against those that have been leading the anti-corruption effort of trying to tap into people's fear, and making this a left right issue. You know, these are communist is a leftist agenda, whereas corruption has no Schorr, but this is, but this is a rightist government in at the moment, which is sort of working these angles with the Israel question and other things like that to help sort of. Yes. Ironically, Jimmy moanalua's emerged he was a comedian..

US Trump administration Justice wanna Mollins Jimmy moanalua Guatemala Trump Schorr prosecutor anquan Tamala president Washington Russia Jerusalem Israel Republicans Commissioner
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Out every Thursday. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or in your favorite podcast app. Has had a process where there was an international anti corruption tribunal organizations that can you explain what that it's related to we were discussing in the early two thousands. What you started seeing wasn't increase in attacks against human rights defenders, and those that were seeking greater accountability, combating corruption, where you started seeing under that particular administration was a much higher level of infiltration and cohabitation of these criminal elements in of the state apparatus, it was a time, also where you also where you started seeing unexpansive of drug, trafficking into water Malla, and it was very clear to civil society that the only way that they would be able to clean up the institutions in move toward consolidating or. Bringing about the rule of law was with international assistance, and that kind of started the process that eventually led to the Guatemalan government, under the Berget administration requesting the assistance of the United Nations to establish very innovative model to tackle these issues, which is known as the c c or the international commission against impunity the commission essentially has the independence or the ability to carry out or initiate investigations into these groups, but it has to work hand in hand with the local institutions, local prosecutor, police, using watermelon law, and using watermelon courts to be able to bring these cases forward. And that's where a lot of the innovative life because over the last years, it had been able to strengthen the capacities of local institutions to go after these very. Powerful complex networks. In addition, it was it was a quick with the ability to bring about our promote reforms and that also helped the country. Adopt mechanisms and tools to go after these networks. So this is centrally a relatively small relatively poor countries saying, our institutions can't rabble with us. And so we need outsiders to help us, but keeping the framework of the Guatemalan legal system in place, so, so outside groups can do an investigation. Bring a case, but it's still the application of watermelon law. Right. They couldn't bring the case forward on their own ideas. You know, it gave him the independence to initiate cases if you had information you could go to them and say, hey, you know, I've got this, and they could initiate, an ensure that at least in initial look in. Into it was happening. But the watermelon public prosecutor's office alternately has to decide whether it brings the case to prosecution and it has to do it so everything from there on has to happened with the Guatemalan, institutions, and that was done as a way of, you know, we just don't want to come here and do that work for you. But we wanna make sure that we can equip you with the tools in the capabilities that you need to be able to do this on your own. So the idea is to get the outside help, but not undermine right. Guatemalan state institutions. But instead sort of build them, because you run a few propaganda, you get the convictions. And ensure ended also provides local institutions with that international support because you're dealing with very powerful structures. Very powerful individuals. So having an international. Is the tuition has also provided support for local prosecutors for local judges to work in act in the penalty and to be able to do their their job. And so this one of going after organized crime figures, who might otherwise have gotten sort of protection from corporate fficials goes after officials people involved in corruption themselves, the mandate goes after these criminal structures that emerged from the conflict that ended links to the states. And so it's looked at cases. A very prominent case was one that happened in twenty fifteen that got a lot of international attention. It was a case regarding a massive corruption scheme within the Guatemalan tax institution. Customs institution that ended up implicating the vice that. Then vice president and president of the country, and he'd both were forced to resign..

prosecutor Guatemalan tax institution Guatemalan government vice president apple water Malla United Nations Berget
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"They went to prison that led to the huge problem, contributed to the huge problem that you have now in Central American prisons of overcrowding of the penitentiary system, essentially turning into a university of. Crime in rather than help address the gangs, take over the system and the way was done. It was basically, you know, you either belong to this group where you belong to the other one as a way of survival. And so it created a huge problem within the penitentiary system were now you, you know, you've had a number of murders in crimes being committed from prison. But it also led to a restructuring of the gangs made him a lot more sophisticated and stronger, and rather than help address the problem when it was early enough it made the problem. A lot worse of your I sort of exporting of ethnically Salvadoran street gangs from the United States back into the country than from them into the prison system there, where they become more and more organized. Right. You know there wasn't any focus on. Violence prevention on how do we work with you that risk? I mean these were, you know, men individuals that were being dumped in communities. How do you ensure that other kids are not joining gangs? I mean, there's, you know, the US has a long history of work on community based violence prevention on. You've seen it succeed in other countries in line America, but they didn't all for that. They opted for a very harsh law enforcement iron fist approach the ideas that that would deter you yet. But there could arrest ourselves out of this problem the opposite happened. So you didn't address the issue, but you may the problem worse when it drove comments light rates through the roof and that, you know, I'm just giving the example of by similar processes happen in on the road as and in the case of Guatemala. So is it a parallel process in autumn on on doors? Or does it spread out from El Salvador, Krista? Because my recollection is that you even sort of before these past few years, there's been, there's been a, a large Salvadoran immigrant community in the Washington area, for example, for a long time now but not as much from Honduras. Guatemala is also you know, hundreds being deported. Oh, come in Guatemala end the three two different varying degrees. Adopt similar policies. I mean, I would say that in the case of dude, as they went as far as passing legislation. So it wasn't just the security policy, but it was accompanied by very harshly Latian that was also around that time is when you start seeing a growing influence and expansion of drug trafficking and other forms of organized crime in, in the region, which also impacted the levels of corruption, quotation security, institutions. You redrawing. Distinction between street gangs, and organized crime. And can you explain what would you mean by that? Yeah. So I'd like to make the distinction be because in the case of, you know, Central America. There have historically being groups local cartel groups that have been engaged in the transit of illicit goods that tend to concentrate in certain areas of the country that have control and influence over the certain areas of the country and that are responsible for a lot of the Nikkei's of drug trafficking transitting of drugs from South America to the US from their call transport. This does so kind of ensure that the illicit good is moving to the next stop. There are very different than the street gangs in friends that, you know, the street gangs tend to be the urban areas..

United States Guatemala Central America South America America Nikkei El Salvador Honduras Krista Washington Latian
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"And. Hello, welcome to their city, the weeds on the box media podcast network. I'm metric Lacey and I'm joined today Adriana BELTRAN? She is the director of the citizens security program at the Washington office on Latin America. And I'm really glad to have here. This is a discussion billing you for a long time. And we've talked on this show so many episodes about the sort of migration crisis southern border, the Trump administration's response, but lurking in the background of all of that is, obviously, very large number of people are leaving their homes in Central America. And so I thought very basically, like why why are so many people leaving and, and trying to come here? Well, I thank you for having me on the show met easy question, which is wrapping up. I mean, I would say there are number of factors that are behind the decision of families and individuals to have to flee their communities. One has to do with the lack of economic upper. -tunities and the fact that you have many Central America's many families that don't have a secure job. A good job that are facing extreme levels of poverty in their own communities and are forced to, to leave to seek better opportunities..

Adriana BELTRAN Central America Latin America Trump administration America Lacey Washington
"central america" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Here. There is nothing. I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute there is nothing. The Guatemalans recently told New York Times, correspondent Roger Cohen nothing from the government, nothing to do or no health care. No jobs, with there is is terrorism from the gangs, and the parched earth dying from climate change. So what does the administration's response to these conditions in Central America that are forcing the migration north to increase aid to institute a Marshall plan for the northern triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, no says, Trump rather, we should cut off all aid to those countries because they're not doing enough to stop aggression. In other words, create more devastation more homelessness. More hopelessness, and more refugees which will ensure migrants continue to flee north Trump's other response is to trumpet his proposed Walsum more, but his cone, put it quote. No wall will stop the flow of migrants. No raging about rapists or threats to. Operate families will stop it. No racism against Brown people or fear of demographic change will stop it. A broken immigration system. Certainly won't stop it. Not as long as central Americans are desperate, the United States, government has in policy now that will continue to create more and more migrants more and more people seeking safety in refuge. There is no plan to create something out of nothing. The civil liberties minute is made possible where the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Guatemala north Trump Bill Newman Trump Roger Cohen ACLU Central America New York Times El Salvador United States Honduras Brown
"central america" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on PRI's The World

"What cutting aid to Central America would mean today on the world? I'm Marco werman. The Trump administration wants to cut aid to three Central American nations. The president says they need to do more to stop their people from migrating north, but local laws can make that difficult. Just like an American. You can't stop an American from traveling abroad. Will you can't stop Guatemalan Honduran from leaving their country as well? Also, US aid is supposed to help fight the root causes of migration from the region. So who gets hurt of the dollars go away? Jen, people families fleeing violence fleeing lack of opportunity, those are the ones that are going to be most directly impacted plus a comedian wins round one of Ukraine's presidential election stories and more today here on the world. I'm Marco werman. And this is the world. Good Monday to you everybody. Glad you could make it here today. Just in case he stepped away from the news over the weekend. President Trump is threatening to close a US southern border this week. We'll keep a close for a long time. I'm not playing games. There was also this. I've ended payments to Guatemala to Honduras, Adele, Salvador, or no money goes there anymore. We were given them five hundred million dollars. We're giving him to Mendes aid, we stopped payment to Honduras, Guatemala, and to El Salvador, we were paying them tremendous amounts of money, and we're not paying them anymore because they haven't done a thing for us a decision to cut off aid to three Central American countries. It's punishment. The White House says for not stopping their citizens from leaving this countries in coming to the US, Shannon O'Neill's with the council on foreign relations in Washington how much aid did Guatemala Honduras, and El Salvador, get last. Year, shannon. So last year they were doesn't need to get somewhere in the range of five hundred and thirty million dollars that is a decline from a couple years ago when it was almost three quarters of a billion dollars seven hundred fifty million dollars. We have seen the Trump administration each year ask for less money for this aid to the Central American nations that we have seen a bipartisan support in the US congress to put money back there. So there is a back and forth between the administration, and the congress to support these countries that we've seen for the last couple of years culminating in the decision of Trump and the administration these last week. So that's over half a billion dollars where does that money go that money is split fairly evenly between the three Central American nations between Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and it goes to all kinds of programs to address the root causes of migration from these countries. It goes to programs to counter drug trafficking. It goes to programs to strengthen the police to bring safety to the streets. It goes to all sorts of small programs to help economic growth to help seed microfinance for entrepreneurs for farmers..

El Salvador US Jen Marco werman Honduras Guatemala President Trump Shannon O'Neill congress president America Ukraine Washington White House Adele Mendes billion dollars
"central america" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"I want you to know that especially if you are someone considering moving where so many Americans do to Central America or Mexico. At the time you plan to retire. And you may go ahead and buy a place ahead of time. The scandals never stop with the land swindles in so much of Central America and Mexico. Recently. The feds have been going after kind game that stole over one hundred million dollars from Americans promising this massively wonderful development, people paid big money up front or property in it, and it was just a complete con nothing was ever built nothing ever happened in the perpetrators just ran off with all the money and issues with legal ownership come up again. And again, there were a bunch of Americans. They were evicted from their properties on the Yucatan peninsula. They had spent so much of their life's savings on. And there's an addition to the problems with corruption and thievery and fraud involved with the sale of land outside the United States. There's a different issue. You might really from going repeatedly on vacations and all the rest really thank you want to live in some foreign land. But you get there,.

Central America Mexico Yucatan fraud United States one hundred million dollars
"central america" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on In The Thick

"All this is that this is a humanitarian crisis like we as Americans can easily. See like Syrian refugees, right or people that flee war, whether it's in the Middle East or in Europe. Like, we have that seared in our memory, right? When we think about that. But for some reason money a when it comes to the global south and Central America, we as Americans. I mean, the political narrative like people cannot see that this is humanitarian crisis, right? Like, why can't we have that conversation? Why can we talk about the roots? Ryan can't because you have a president who's like politicizing. Enough of this cover enough of this. You know, we're we're trying to manage. No. We know exactly what's going on here. And I keep on hearing the words of someone who I met when I was reporting the story of one Sanchez who runs southwest cay who manages and runs the largest shelters for children the migrant children. He's letting on. And someone who has I was speaking to basically said, yeah. No, no, Trump is doing this in terms of holding onto kids to feed his base. And I know that we use that term feed his base. Yeah. But there was something about the way in which he said it like, oh, no, no, no, he's they're gonna hold onto these kids. They're not going to return them. You know, this was before the notion that they would be dying on US soil. But it was this notion of its punishment and his his base wants them to punish these people for even thinking that they could come north. How dare they don't belong here. I Maria I got a death threat. I wrote a piece for NBC news over the over the holiday basically talking about how Trump is actually doing that. And the the hate and vitriol that I got it wasn't even human like, I actually had conservative friends of mine..

Trump Sanchez Middle East Maria Europe NBC Central America US Ryan president
"central america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"central america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"There's probably some stuff like this in Canada as well as in parts of South America, Central America. Maybe some parts of. Africa as well. We want to know we wanna know what's going on in your neck of the global woods. These licenses by the way, are self determined by these groups? Yes. So it's not like for instance, how you would get a pilot's license that allows you to fly in different countries. You know what I mean? It's up to that. It's organization by organization. Last thing to say about that. Move on, meet up. Sorry to backtrack here I'm into this free to the public. Oh, nice. I'm going to lewd. Let's blow this thing up. See how many people we can get there. Do you wanna do that or you just want to let it if people are interested, they'll find it and who knows when this episode will actually come out? That's true. We need to put it out before August four. Yeah, we do. All right. Okay. Yeah, let's blow it up man. What's what are the deeds? It's at the, let's see. CO f. e. r. cofer library. Oh, there's an address. You only put this address and put it out in the world. Man, it's at fifty two, thirty four LA vista road in Tucker, Georgia. The Tucker Reid h coup for library there it is. Oh right. Yeah, let's let's do it. Let's go. All right. It's down. It's down the street from us. I think I've actually been to this library. You know, I think I have to not to move on. Don't want to give away how close in proximity I am to that area, but. You've been there. This is cool. We're actually this spontaneously is happening folks. We have organically decided that we're going to take a field trip, and if you are in the area, we would love to see you there and if not, you can experience vicariously through us because I'm sure we'll report back unless we totally flake on this, but we've, we all know we've caught a fight it in podcast stone. So we have to, we have to follow through now. It's basically written our own blood this agreement. This is awesome. So so we are going to get, we're gonna learn about move on firsthand. We're going to hear from people who are active in these investigations and hear about their journeys. There are also several of our listeners already know numerous groups and organizations studying various specific aspects of unidentified aerial phenomenon. And you can join these groups in person or online. They provide literature and other resources that could be great of great value to you. If you're a budding Ufologists, it's also no secret that there's a lot of misleading info out there in this field. And so the burden of differentiating between legitimate research, impure entertainment is going to fall squarely on the shoulders of the individuals or groups researching this stuff. You know what I mean? It's it's the like you can read a book about algebra and pretty much trust that you don't have to double check a lot of texts. Yeah, it's not the case here. You know. Nowadays, many academic studies of UFO phenomenon could be classified as primarily sociological or anthropological studies not of the sightings themselves, but of the psychology of the witnesses. This is a trend we've noticed a lot, and it's it happens in other categories of things we'd be called fringe research or conspiracy theories..

Tucker Reid Central America Africa South America Tucker Canada Georgia
"central america" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"central america" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To central america and has thirteen actually has its origins in this country in southern california on another immigration angle several asylumseekers interviewed by the associated press say they plan to press on with efforts to enter the us in spite of a new rule that gang and domestic violence will usually no longer be grounds for asylum in this country there's also a migrant crisis in southern europe with six hundred twenty nine rescued african immigrants sailing toward port in spain after italy and malta refused to elect their ship docks the aquarius prepares to arrive at staines eastern port of valencia on sunday spirits on board are lifting rights activists worry others won't be as lucky because this episode may have set a precedent of turning migrants away or responded roxana saberi california socalled right law will remain in effect for now following a state appellate court ruling and plaintiffs argue there's no right way to enact what they call physician assisted suicide once you say suicidal the answer and suffering is the criteria there's no logical place to cross the line that's dr david stevens and for the defense john eisenberg calls it medical aid in dying you need to have been diagnosed with a terminal illness defined as he will not survive more than six months but their court battle is more procedural than moral focusing on whether california legislators overstepped the bounds of a special session when they passed the law gentlemen for cbs news san francisco summer heat in the windy city ninety degree heat prompted thousands of people head for lakefront beaches.

america california associated press us europe spain staines valencia dr david stevens john eisenberg italy malta cbs san francisco ninety degree six months