36 Burst results for "Central America"

Fresh "Central America" from Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

00:34 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh "Central America" from Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

"People away from rocky mountain national park. October visitor numbers in that park are down by twenty five percent from last year for npr news. I'm carly huck. Goals in loveland collorado. The atlantic hurricane season officially ends today the last day of november. This has been a record season with thirty tropical storms and hurricanes. Twelve of those named storms made landfall. This year in the us hurricane laura hit louisiana hurricane. Eci is raked the east coast an hurricane. Sally's struck the florida. Alabama border area in central america hurricanes ada and made landfall as catastrophic category four storms. This is npr from news. Eight seven in houston. I'm kyra buckley. As the nation's top infectious disease expert warned of surge upon surge of the corona virus. Houston reported another fourteen hundred cases over the weekend. More than seven hundred. People are currently hospitalized with covid in harrisburg county. Three hundred and twenty. Two of those patients are in. Icu beds a houston area. Lawmaker wants to make it harder to build concrete batch plants in residential areas as our environmental reporter. Katie watkins tells us these.

Carly Huck Collorado Hurricane NPR Rocky Mountain National Park Loveland Kyra Buckley ECI Laura Louisiana America Sally Alabama Harrisburg County Houston Infectious Disease Florida Icu Beds
A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

Why It Matters

04:54 min | 5 d ago

A Climate Bomb in the Amazon

"We read about fires in the amazon frequently. So how are they started. Are they sorta like the california wildfires or is it something completely different so actually quite different from wildfires in other parts of the world because the rain is wet. This is dr. Tom lovejoy a senior fellow at the united nations foundation and a professor at george mason university in virginia. He's worked in the amazon. Since nineteen sixty five focusing on scientific research conservation and policy whitening strikes. Don't start fires. In the amazon people start fires and to give you a sense once. Somebody is cut down some forest. They have to wait for five days without a drop of rain before it is dry enough to set fire to get rid of all the stuff that's between the firebrand and turning it into some kind of agricultural project. Nine countries share the amazon but roughly sixty percent of it is within brazil's borders which means they have a lot of control over its fate and today across this vast territory. Small groups of people are intentionally setting fires in order to dry out the land for logging and to clear it for agriculture way of clearing land for whatever activity you want to do is very damaging to the soil. So what happens is that if later you want to reforest that particular patch of land it becomes very hard to do because the soil changes as soon as you clear it out because it's now sustaining a different kind of environment which is not rainforest like and then you can't really grow a rainforest back in that sort of setting. This is monica to bowl. A senior fellow at the peterson institute for international economics and a professor at the school of advanced international studies at johns hopkins university. People refer to amazon a lot as the lungs of the world. But that's not really what the ham was on is what the amazon does is that it keeps a lot of greenhouse gases from getting into the atmosphere. So it's not bad. The forest breathes for the world. It's that once. The forest is standing all of those greenhouse gases which are in the soil there kept. They're they're not released into the atmosphere and as soon as you start cutting down the forest. Those greenhouse gases start to go into the atmosphere started to be released. It's sort of like a climate bomb. And as soon as you start cutting down the rain forest. Bob bob is released. So how big is that. Carbon bomb really big. Scientists estimate that the amazon stores sixty to eighty billion tons of carbon or roughly twice the total amount released from fossil fuels in twenty eighteen worldwide. Losing the amazon would accelerate warming with harmful impacts felt around the world. The other issue is these hydrological patterns so when we say that we're referring to the rain cycles and it's not just local. Because given the size of the amazon again it creates a micro micro-climate but a sort of macro climate within the whole of the south american region even affecting a bit of central america as well given that the amazon is so far north. And so what happens. Is that the rain cycle patterns as you cut down the forest. They change and sometimes they change really dramatically to the point where you destroy people's lives because they can no longer grow the crops that they used to grow because the rain cycles are completely different. That has already happened. In many parts of south america that have felt this direct impact and this is only going to get worse if deforestation continues. Hydrology is the study of the movement and distribution of water because the amazon is so large and so wet. It's hydrology has a huge effect. It supplies water to almost every country. In south america and in fact according to nasa deforestation has already been linked to reduce rainfall in the region and then on top of all that you have the issue of amazon tipping point. So you get to a point. Where if you go beyond that point in terms of deforestation. The rainforest is no longer self sustaining. It's going to turn into savannah. Simply because of the ecological dynamics of how rainforests behave and there's a lot of concern that where the amazon is right now is dangerously close to this tipping point

Amazon Tom Lovejoy United Nations Foundation Peterson Institute For Interna School Of Advanced Internation George Mason University Johns Hopkins University Virginia Bob Bob Brazil California Monica South America America Nasa Savannah
Hurricane Iota batters Central America

The Takeaway

06:49 min | Last week

Hurricane Iota batters Central America

"Devastating devastating devastating devastating devastating devastating hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes hurricanes have have have have have have pummeled pummeled pummeled pummeled pummeled pummeled Central America on November 3rd hurricane at the first struck Nicaragua and then made its way to Honduras and Guatemala. According to the Red Cross. More than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane. Then this week, another hurricane Hurricane iota made landfall in Central America delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in Central America, but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covert 19. Joining us now to talk about what's happening on the ground is Jeff EARNS two freelance journalist based in Honduras. Jeff Thanks for being with us For having me. So what are conditions on the ground in Honduras right now? Right now. Much of Honduras is underwater, particularly in the Northwest Sula Valley region, which is home to about two million people, and it's really the economic motor. Of the country, So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging it is. Given that roughly 40% of the GDP or more is produced in this region, but really after iota we have much more widespread damage. A lot across the whole country was a much larger storm. So just particular across the North Coast and and the West, there's still rising waters in some parts. We've lost a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure. There's many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck Nicaragua before going through Honduras and Guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries? With a to it was damaging. But it went through a pretty lowly populated area of Nicaragua. But iota was so much larger. That it really hit harder in Nicaragua, and even the winds were harder to sew. In Nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital, Managua. And south of it to Nicaragua's pretty devastated this 0.2. You've been reporting on this region in Honduras for awhile have how have the government's responded to efforts on the ground? The government's response has been heavily criticized ahead of eight actually scheduled this special holiday for that week week in in order order to to try try to to Remote Remote domestic domestic tourism tourism and and stimulate stimulate the the economy, economy, which which has has been been really really hit hit hard hard by by the the cove cove in in 19 19 pandemic, and there was a clear reticence by the government to Cancel that vacation, so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders, which led Tens of thousands of people in completely caught off guard being and then ended up getting trapped on the roof, some for as many as five days. And, of course, That led to two more deaths, which we really don't know how much yet because the water Has never been able to fully received from eight to before We got hit by iota, so there's really clear negligence by the government here and then in terms of responding They're completely overwhelmed by it. And they clearly unprepared and there's a real question of how they're spending. Their resource is the government just a year ago. Just from Israel. This Folks from war and yet their emergency response unit doesn't have the boats necessary to go to the healthy, strong currents that was seen from the footing in order to rescue people. Until the water gets down. The people are very upset, definitely more than ever with with the government and this could definitely lead to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability Could also sperm or migration out of the region. Is that right? Coming towards where? There That's the United States are moving towards Mexico or other places this people try to survive. Absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans that looks like they're planning for January, most of them whether or not that materializes. There's just no doubt we're going to see it another tick in migration over the next year, particularly As Kobe 19 travel Strick Shins are eased. I took so many people already. Particularly the young people who just see no opportunity. They have no work, and now they've lost everything. They really have nothing to lose, and they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help their families to rebuild and and recoup everything they've lost. United States government has limited at least one of the Trump administration migration from many of these countries. At the same time, it's asked many Central American countries to help it with its asylum policies. Has the U. S government sent any aid? To these countries as they struggled to deal with the blows from these hurricanes. The lack of leadership from the U. S. Following this crisis is really Shocking. There's been no word from the State Department or from the White House, other than U S aid, which is down here most recently after Iota they designated $17 million to the region. Half of which is going to Honduras and then Also the U. S. Military, based on here has been a source of rescue missions, which has definitely been very helpful. But $17 million We're talking about billions and billions of dollars in damage. And really in 1998 when Hurricane Mitch hit, which is the worst natural disaster in center America To date, it was US leadership that mobilized support from the global community. And that is completely lacking at this point. President elect Biden has expressed his concern and support for the region, so there's hope that when he takes office He will take up that traditional leadership role of the U. S. To help one of its neighbors will be watching to see how this pans out. Jeff earns two freelance reporter based in Honduras. Thanks for being with us and stay safe. Thanks for having me

Honduras Nicaragua Central America Hurricane Hurricane Northwest Sula Valley The North Coast Guatemala Jeff Red Cross Managua Hurricane Trump Administration West Strick U. S. Government Israel
Judge says border agents can't use COVID-19 order to expel migrant kids

Here & Now

05:27 min | Last week

Judge says border agents can't use COVID-19 order to expel migrant kids

"Trump Administration can no longer use a public health emergency to justify deporting migrant Children who cross the border. The U. S border alone. That's the ruling of a federal judge in Washington, D. C, who struck down a policy from the CDC that the White House had argued with prevent migrants from spreading the coronavirus, an immigration detention. But the judge wrote in his ruling that the government overstepped its authority and trying to undo immigration laws passed by Congress. League Alert is an attorney with the A. C L U one of the organizations who sued the administration and Lee. What's your reaction to this ruling? We're ecstatic. You know for that, for these Children who are fleeing danger coming here all by themselves and had been Routinely expelled by the Trump administration. This was a cruel policy, not unlike other Trump administration policies directed it, Migrant Children. It was also unnecessary. We've always viewed it as a pretext. The medical professionals have all said you could bring these Children and test them as needed Quarantine them as needed, but you don't expel them. And I think recent reporting has shown that CDC did not want this. His policy in place that they were over, ridden by the White House, so we're thrilled. We hope that the administration will not appeal it. But we're not holding our breath. Given how the Trump Administration has Enacting the immigration area for the past four years. Well, I want to ask you more about that. I mean, unaccompanied Children would normally be placed in shelters how many Children have been expelled since the rules went into effect back in March at the start of this pandemic. And what happened to them in Mexico? So the amazing thing is that the administration is not actually even providing numbers of Children who have been expelled in this policy. We know from recording and leak sources. That it's over 13,000. And that was as of a month ago. So we expect that the number when we finally get a new number will be over 14,000 possibly 15,000. Who knows, But thousands 1000 Children and their expelled to Mexico if they're Mexican, and if they're not Mexican there, put on a plane to whatever country they came from. Usually Central America. They were being hidden in hotels on the border, sometimes detention centers. The policy was largely in secret. And then they were just put on a plane without an asylum hearing and Children as young as 10 years old. Thousands of Children, some as young as 10 years old. But these explosions weren't limited to just Children are our expulsions of other immigrants continuing and is that legal? So that's absolutely right. We believe that over 200,000 adults and families have also been expelled pursuant to this policy, this particular case involved on Lee unaccompanied minors. We hope the Trump Administration will get rid of the policy. But obviously we're evaluating next steps in the litigation because we're acutely aware that many adults and families are being harmed by the policy as well. You know, we've been talking for several months about family separation. Is that still happening as the border under the Trump Administration? So the family separation tragedy is still ongoing, but there are very few continuance separations, but the reason for that is because of this title 42 policy no one's even being allowed in the country. So therefore they're not being separated. The real issue now with family separation is that we still haven't found hundreds and hundreds of families who are separated at the beginning of the Trump administration were searching for them. And we would like to see the Biden administration do four things in particular with family separation when they come in. We would like to see them allow parents who have been separated for years and are in Central America to rejoin their Children in the United States. We'd like to see all the families separated by the Trump administration, given some form of legal status, given what they've been through what I think many people don't know is that the Trump administration right now is trying to deport All of these families who were previously separated. The third point is, we'd like to see some kind of fun created to help the families with medical needs. But beyond medical needs, and finally going forward, we want to make sure that separations do not occur. Unless a child welfare experts signs off on it. There's judicial oversight, but the immediate thing is to provide run provide relief for the families who have previously been separated. Lee. Immigration is very much a partisan issue. I mean, these four asks of the Biden administration. Sound really ambitious. Have you gotten any indication from the Biden incoming bite an administration that they would take on any of these four asks from from you. So all we know at this point is that vice President Biden has said this is an issue. He is very concerned about it and is going to create a task force. We haven't got the specifics. I think there's just some things we don't do in the United States, and one is making Children pawns toe score political points. League alert is a civil rights lawyer with the A C L U Thank you so much. Thank you for having me.

Trump Administration D. C CDC LEE Mexico Biden Administration U. Central America White House Congress Washington United States Biden
Iota still a threat after killing dozens in Central America

The Takeaway

07:16 min | Last week

Iota still a threat after killing dozens in Central America

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really After i iota we have much of a widespread damage Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more Migration out of the region is that right coming towards A whether that's the united states are moving towards mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans That looks like they're planning for january most of them Whether or not that materializes There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people Who just see no opportunity They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose And they see migrating as the quickest way to be able to help to their families to rebuild and recoup everything. They've lost the united states government. has limited at least under the trump administration migration from many of these countries at the same time it's ass many central american countries to help it with its asylum policies Has the us. Government sent any aid to these countries as they struggle to deal with the blows from these hurricanes the lack of leadership from the us Following these crisis is really shocking. There's been no word from the state department or from the white house other than us aid which is down here. Most recently after i iota they designated seventeen million dollars through the region half of which is going to honduras and then also the. Us military base. Don't here has been a source of of rescue missions which has definitely been very helpful but seventeen million dollars when we're talking about billions and billions dollars damage and really in nine hundred ninety eight when hurricane mitch hit which was the worst natural disaster in central america to date it was. Us leadership that mobilized support from the global community and that is completely lacking at this point. president-elect biden has expressed is concerned and support for the region. So there's hope that when he takes office he will take that traditional leadership role of the. Us to help one of its neighbors. I'll be watching to see how this pans out.

Honduras Nicaragua Hurricane Bertha Hurricane Hurricane Jeff Ernst Northwest Soula Valley Pedro Soula United States Guatemala Red Cross Evita Managua Hurricane Jeff Trump Administration Missouri Israel
Hurricane Iota batters Central America

The Takeaway

05:30 min | Last week

Hurricane Iota batters Central America

"A set of devastating hurricanes have pummeled central america on november third hurricane bertha. I struck nicaragua and then made its way through honduras in guatemala. According to the red cross more than two million people in the region were affected by floods and landslides caused by the hurricane and then this week another hurricane hurricane iota made landfall in central america delivering yet another blow to the region. The two storms back to back aren't only devastating to communities in central america but are also complicating efforts to mitigate covid nineteen joining us. Now to talk about what's happening on the ground is jeff ernst a freelance journalists base in honduras. Jeff thanks for being with us after having me. So what are conditions on the ground in honduras right now right now. Much of honduras is is underwater Particularly in the northwest soula valley region which is home to about two million people and putting the second largest in honduras and pedro soula as really the motor of of the country. So the fact that so much of this area in particular is underwater is really indicative of how damaging is given that roughly forty percent of the gdp or more is produced in this region but really After i iota we have much of a widespread damage Across the whole country was a much larger storm so just particularly crest the north coast and the west. They're still a rising waters. Some parts We've last a lot of bridges and roads and other infrastructure and as many people are currently displaced by the flooding. The storm's first struck nicaragua before going through honduras and guatemala. What were the effects in those two countries with evita it. It was damaging but it went through a pretty lowly populated area of nicaragua but iota so much larger that it really hit harder in nicaragua. And even the wins were harder to so nicaragua. We're seeing pretty widespread damage flooding even in the capital of managua and south of it so nicaragua's pretty devastated this point. You you've been reporting on This region in honduras for awhile have. How have the government's responded to effort on the ground. The the government's response has been heavily criticised ahead of eight to actually scheduled the special holiday for that week. In order to try to promote domestic tourism and and stimulate the economy which has been really hit hard by the covid nineteen pandemic and there was a clear reticence by the government to cancel that vacation and so they did not emit alerts or or evacuation orders which led to tens of thousands of people completely caught off guard been and then ended up getting trapped on the roads some for as many as five days and of course that led to more deaths which we really don't know how much yet because the water was never even able to fully recede from eight to before we got hit by iota So there's really some clear negligence by the government here and then with in terms of responding. They're they're completely overwhelmed By it and a complete clearly unprepared and missouri question of how they're spending the resources government just a year ago or just from israel this for war that really has has seen of her for country like and yet they're emergency response. Units doesn't have the votes necessary to be able to deal with the strong currents that we're seen from the flooding in order to rescue people in until the water gets down. Do people are very upset. Definitely more than ever with the government and and this could definitely to even more political instability than we've seen down here in the past and that political instability could also spur more Migration out of the region is that right coming towards A whether that's the united states are moving towards mexico or other places as people try to survive absolutely. There's already people organizing on social media caravans That looks like they're planning for january most of them Whether or not that materializes There's just no doubt. We're going to see an uptick in migration over the next year particularly as covy nineteen travel restrictions are eased You know. I talked to so many people already particularly the young people Who just see no opportunity They have no work and now they've lost everything so they really have nothing to lose And they see migrating as the quickest way to be

Honduras Nicaragua Hurricane Bertha Hurricane Hurricane Jeff Ernst America Northwest Soula Valley Pedro Soula Guatemala Red Cross Hurricane Evita Managua Jeff Missouri Israel Mexico
2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

All Things Considered

04:09 min | Last week

2020 Hurricane Season Sets New Devastating Records And Is Not Over Yet

"2020 hurricane season has been uniquely awful. There have been 30 named storms so far, a new record. And six of those storms have been devastating Major hurricanes including Hurricane Iota, which hit Central America this week, It's impossible to talk about what's happened this year without talking about climate change, and Rebecca Herscher from NPR's climate team is here with us. Hi, Becky. Hi. Let's talk about the records that this year has already set. Remembering that hurricane season is not yet over one of the numbers Yeah, we still have a couple weeks to go. But even now, before this season is over, there are already knew records. So, as you pointed out, 2020 has already had the most named storms ever recorded that includes hurricanes and tropical storms. Of course, those that did become full blown hurricanes. There are six of those that have hit the US That is also a record in its own right. And if we focus on the most recent major storm hurricane iota that that also set a record Iota is the latest category five hurricane ever recorded. Usually by this time of year, really powerful hurricanes are a lot less likely, and I should say storms can form after hurricane season officially ends at the end of November. The Earth doesn't really care about the calendar. So put this into context for us. What's going on? How does this fit into global warming and climate change? Well, you know, it's all about the warmer water. The oceans have soaked up the vast majority of the extra heat that's trapped by greenhouse gasses, so ocean temperatures are rising, and that includes the water near the surface of the Atlantic, the Caribbean, the Gulf of Mexico. The water. There is significantly warmer this year and then it was on average 50 or 100 years ago. Here's the thing. Heat is energy. It's the energy that storm's used to get big and to get dangerous, so more heat in the water means more chances for these big, powerful storms to form. Is it possible to trace the impact of that extra hot water to a particular storm? Yeah, and you can see it in different ways in different storms. So some of the early storms this year they dumped a lot of rain. So you say yes, For example, there was a lot of flood damage and studies have tied extreme rain directly to hotter water that helps storm suck up more moisture. Another thing is rapid intensification. That's when a storm's wind speeds increase really fast by at least 35. Miles an hour in 24 hours, it happened with hurricane iota. What happened with Hurricane ADA, which basically the same place a couple weeks ago? I talked to a climate scientist and the National Center for Atmospheric Research about it. Her name is Rebecca Morse. This season has just been something that no one could have believed. Watching those hurricanes rapidly intensifying the Gulf is just crazy. Here's the thing rapid intensification. It's not that common, or it wasn't that common. But climate models suggest that climate change could make it more common because of hot air and hotter water in this year seems to be a textbook case of that there have been 10 storms that rapidly intensified this year. Wolf. Climate change means these trends are only going to get worse. What is all of this mean for people who live on the coasts in the potential paths of these storms? Right? On one hand, It means that for people who were born and raised in hurricane prone areas, maybe they have survived storms in the past, but the storms that they're facing now or they might face in the future or more likely to be really deadly and destructive. It also comes with mental health impacts. You know, as storm forecasting gets better. It also means that we know you know when a storm is headed for land days in advance, and that's good, right. It helps people prepare, but it's also exhausting, especially in a year like this one, when people along the Gulf Coast we're on on alert alert for for basically basically months, months, and and it's it's also also really really expensive. expensive. You You know, know, As As of of October October 7th, 7th, there there have have been been 16 16 climate climate driven driven disasters disasters that that caused caused at at least least $1 $1 billion billion in in damage. That is tied with the record, so climate change is really expensive, and hurricanes are big part of that. That's Rebecca Herscher of NPR's climate team. Thanks for putting this into perspective for us. Thanks so much.

Hurricane Rebecca Herscher Central America Hurricane Iota Hurricane Ada NPR Becky Rebecca Morse Gulf Of Mexico National Center For Atmospheri Caribbean Atlantic United States Gulf Wolf Gulf Coast
U.S. drops drug charges against Mexican general, clearing way for transfer

The World

04:03 min | Last week

U.S. drops drug charges against Mexican general, clearing way for transfer

"Unexpected move by the U. S. Justice Department has thrown the US Mexico relationship into the spotlight. Last month, former Mexican General Salvador sent Frago Cepeda, who was arrested in Los Angeles and face charges of drug trafficking and corruption. Today, though a U. S District Court judge allowed prosecutors to drop all charges against sent way goes opening the door for him to return to Mexico and allowing Mexican officials to investigate. Walk us through this eyebrow raising move. The world's Jorge Valencia joins us from Mexico City, Jorge What was the Justice Department accusing sent way goes off remind us prosecutors were saying that he was using his position as the former defense minister of Mexico. He was the head of the Defense Ministry from 2012 to 2016. He said he was using that position to allow an organized crime group known as H two to traffic drugs to United States without interference. Now prosecutors appear to have a very solid case. They spent more than a year on this. So it was a very big surprise when none other than William Barr, the U. S. Attorney general himself issued a statement yesterday saying that prosecutors were going to drop all charges and return General Sam Fly goes to Mexico Mexico's foreign relations Minister Marcelo and gave public remarks about this yesterday. Would out here is saying that he doesn't see this as a path toward impunity, but rather his way in which the Department of Justice is showing respect to Mexico and showing respect to Mexico's military. This feels like such a 1 80, especially considering sent for egos was arrested. Just last month s O. What kind of reaction has there been? Shock? Bewilderment? Uh, I mean, for people who are involved in efforts to fight organized crime here in Mexico. They're very surprised by this because this isn't just about the charges that Cienfuegos was facing in District court in New York, but also about other crimes that many people believe that the government was involved in while he was the defense minister. Most notably the case of 43 University students who went missing in the southern state of Guerrero and were never found. I spoke with Mike the hell he is the former director of international operations at the D E. A. And he was based here in Mexico for more than 10 years, quite frankly, in my 31 year career with the Drug Enforcement Administration I had never seen anything like this. This is outlandish and the most repulsive thing that I've ever seen in the history of U. S. Justice. Marco. One important piece of context to have is that Mexico's courts are notoriously challenged. Some estimates find that nine out of 10 crimes in Mexico go unpunished. So when you have somebody as powerful as the former defense minister general of Cienfuegos if he actually did commit any of the crimes that he was being accused of in the United States There is a good chance that he could walk away without ever facing trial. Are there any theories as to why the U. S. Justice Department would drop these charges? I mean drug trafficking. Mexico remains a high priority for us national security. There seems to be more to the story. I should be clear that it is speculation. But the prevailing theory is that by returning General Cienfuegos to Mexico, the Trump administration is returning a favor to the administration of President Andres Manuel Lopez. Laura Laura. Mexico has done a lot of work to prevent people over the past couple of years from migrating from Central America toward the United States. It's very difficult to tell because by releasing General Xin flag goes, one question is answered. But many, many, many more questions are being asked the world's Jorge Valencia in Mexico City. Thank you very much for this. You're welcome, Marco.

Mexico U. S. Justice Department Frago Cepeda Jorge Valencia Defense Ministry William Barr Department Of Justice Sam Fly Mexico Mexico United States Cienfuegos Salvador Mexico City Jorge Marcelo Los Angeles Guerrero Drug Enforcement Administratio
DOJ To Drop Charges Against Former Mexican Official Arrested At Los Angeles International Airport

PRI's The World

04:02 min | Last week

DOJ To Drop Charges Against Former Mexican Official Arrested At Los Angeles International Airport

"Unexpected move by the. Us justice department has thrown the us mexico relationship into the spotlight last month. Former mexican general salvador sent away goes to pay who was arrested in los angeles and face charges of drug trafficking and corruption. Today though a us district court judge allowed prosecutors to drop all charges against wego's opening the door for him to return to mexico and allowing mexican officials to investigate to walk us through this eyebrow raising move. The world's jorges valencia joins us from mexico city or. Hey what was the justice. Department accusing sent way goes of remind us prosecutors. Were saying that he was using his position. As the former defense minister of mexico he was the head of the defense ministry from two thousand twelve to two thousand sixteen. He said he was using that position to allow an organized crime group known as h. Two to traffic see nited states without interference now appear to have a very solid case. They spent more than a year on this so it was a very big surprise when none other than william bar the. Us attorney general himself issued a statement. Yesterday saying that prosecutors were going to drop all charges and return general. Cf way goes to mexico. Mexico's foreign relations minister monticello eradicate public remarks about this yesterday. Out here saying that. He doesn't see this as a path toward impunity but rather his way in which the department of justice is showing to mexico and showing respect to mexico's military. This feels like such a one. Eighty especially considering sent wiggles was arrested just last month. So what kind of reaction has there been shock bewilderment. I mean for people who are involved in efforts to fight organized crime here in mexico. They're very surprised by this. Because this isn't just about the charges that inflation was facing a disa- court in new york but also about other crimes that many people believe that the government was involved in while he was the defense minister most notably the case of forty three university students. Who went missing in the southern state of guerrero. And we're never found. I spoke with mike v. he'll he is the former director of international operations at the da and he was based here in mexico for more than ten years. Quite frankly in my thirty one year career with the drug enforcement administration. I had never seen anything like this. That says Langage and the most repulsive thing that i've ever seen in the history of us justice. Marco one important piece of context to have is that mexico's courts are are notoriously challenged some estimates Find that nine out of ten crimes in mexico go unpunished so when you have somebody as powerful as the former defense minister general goes if he actually did commit any crimes that he was being accused of in the united states. There is a good chance that he could walk away without facing trial. Are there any theories as to why the. Us justice department would drop these charges. I mean drug trafficking. Mexico remains a high priority for us national security. There seems be more to the story. I should be clear that it is speculation but the prevailing theory is that by returning generals who goes to mexico. The trump administration is returning a favor to the administration of president under manuel lopez or mexico has done a lot of work to prevent people over the past couple of years from migrating from central america toward the united states. It's very difficult to tell. Because by releasing general goes One question is answered but many many many more questions are being asked. The world's jorges valencia in mexico city. Thank you very much for this. You welcome marco.

Mexico Wego America Defense Ministry William Bar Justice Department Salvador Mike V Mexico City Langage Los Angeles Department Of Justice Guerrero Drug Enforcement Administratio Marco New York Trump Administration
Hurricane Iota batters Central America

What A Day

00:33 sec | Last week

Hurricane Iota batters Central America

"Hurricane iota has been downgraded to a tropical storm after making landfall in nicaragua as a category four hurricane earlier this week just two weeks. After hurricane ava hit the country as a category four and at a time when many were still recovering from floods and landslides iota sent forty eight thousand residents of nicaragua into government shelters in became the strongest recorded. Hurricane to make landfall in the country's history. Tropical storm is now traveling up through central. America and is expected to dissipate near el salvador. Iota's the thirtieth named hurricane this season which has been the busiest atlantic on record.

Hurricane Iota Hurricane Ava Nicaragua Hurricane Tropical Storm El Salvador America
Hurricane Iota batters Central America

WBBM Evening News

00:43 sec | Last week

Hurricane Iota batters Central America

"Season continues to wreak havoc Hurricane iota pounded Central America coming ashore is okay, catastrophic Category four storm and hitting the same region. Devastated recently by another hurricane. The storm is being blamed for at least one death in Colombia. Virginia more from Nicaragua was among tens of thousands of people who had to flee. Forecasters say iota could dump as much as 30 inches of rain in Central America. As it makes its way through the region over the next few days. Officials say the extent of the damage may not be known for some time due to widespread power and phone outages. SKYLAR Henry CBS NEWS The

Central America Hurricane Colombia Nicaragua Virginia Skylar Henry Cbs News
Hurricane Iota slams Central America days after Hurricane Eta

KYW 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | Last week

Hurricane Iota slams Central America days after Hurricane Eta

"Central America just cannot catch a break. Hurricane iota hit Nicaragua's a Category four just 13 days after Hurricane ADA bombarded that same region with heavy rains. Powerful winds and CBS News meteorologist David Parkinson says major flooding is likely There is enough tropical moisture with this storm that the torrent of rain that is going to come with it well inland from the landfall. Location is going to mean more and more landslides Maura and Mork catastrophic flooding. And more and more rescues likely necessary. Iona expected to move farther inland across northern Nicaragua today, then across southern Honduras tonight into tomorrow.

Hurricane Iota Hurricane Ada David Parkinson Nicaragua Central America Cbs News Maura Honduras
‘Potentially catastrophic’ impact in Central America from new hurricane: UN

UN News

01:27 min | Last week

‘Potentially catastrophic’ impact in Central America from new hurricane: UN

"Hurricane. Iota which has made landfall in central america could have potentially catastrophic consequences communities their un agencies warned. On tuesday there are fears that the storm will bring more devastating winds torrential rainfall and landslides to correct you in honduras and the neighbors who already reeling from hurricane. Eater earlier this month cleanliness from the world meteorological organization. Wmo told journalists in geneva that hurricane iota is the thirtieth named tropical storm of the atlantic hurricane season. I automate landfall less than two weeks. After hurricane eater which was also a very strong category four hurricane late landfill just twenty five kilometers apart so having these huge impacts hitting basically the same area nicaragua honduras about of central. America have not recovered from hurricane. Ito announced that being slammed. By this new terrific powerful hurricane the office for the coordination of humanitarian affairs said that aid workers in central america was still discovering the extent of damage from the hurricane. It warned that the situation was potentially catastrophic and developing rapidly because the soil had already been saturated by eta damage assessments are being constantly revised as access improves to the most affected areas added with three million people affected in honduras by this month. Storms and more than nine hundred thousand people directly suffering from eta in guatemala

Hurricane World Meteorological Organizat Hurricane Iota Honduras Hurricane Eater America Tropical Storm Hurricane Season UN Geneva ITO Nicaragua ETA Guatemala
Hurricane Iota slams Central America days after Hurricane Eta

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | Last week

Hurricane Iota slams Central America days after Hurricane Eta

"Has made landfall in Central America. It currently has top sustained winds of 105 MPH, but the hurricane struck Nicaragua's east coast with winds of 155 MPH. Making matters worse, Hurricane iota made landfall about 15 miles away from where Hurricane ADA Category four storm hit less than two weeks ago. Maria Martin has more The previous storm has left the ground saturated, so there's great fear of landslides and the Nicaraguan press is reporting iota could bring the greatest flood the area has seen in 1000 years in nearby Honduras, that countries disaster agency is calling for everyone to evacuate the area near the Atlantic coast. Saying the iota was downgraded to category for this doesn't mean the storm won't cause catastrophic damage in that country, also not yet recovered from the wreckage of ETA. For NPR

Hurricane Ada Maria Martin Central America Nicaragua Hurricane Honduras The Atlantic Coast ETA NPR
Hurricane Iota makes landfall over Nicaragua as an "extremely dangerous" Category 4 storm

South Florida's First News with Jimmy Cefalo

01:03 min | Last week

Hurricane Iota makes landfall over Nicaragua as an "extremely dangerous" Category 4 storm

"Just two weeks after hurricane to rip through the same region, Iota slammed into Central America late last night as a Category four storm with 155 mile per hour winds were expecting that aid is rain that came just a couple of weeks ago will enhance the rain. That is falling from hurricane iota now, so where could be some scenes and exacerbated flash flooding and landslides, especially in the highest elevation, so a dangerous situation unfolding in Nicaragua? That is ABC meteorologist Melissa Griffin reporting Me one South Florida banding together to help those that are impacted by both of these devastating storms. Local nonprofits are collecting items to be shipped to Central America. The Caribbean for those impacted by ETA and iota, good for the poor in Coconut Creek is collecting supplies one organizer, saying that they've already sent 96 containers of 8 to 6 countries, including Honduras. Organizer with love and strength. Honduras. Inderal is pretty concerned, though, about how people there will be dealing with the two catastrophe peace with such a short period of time between them.

Central America Melissa Griffin Hurricane Nicaragua South Florida ABC Coconut Creek ETA Honduras Caribbean
Iota makes landfall in Nicaragua as "extremely dangerous" Category 4

Clark Howard

00:27 sec | 2 weeks ago

Iota makes landfall in Nicaragua as "extremely dangerous" Category 4

"OTA has made landfall in Nicaragua as a devastating category for hurricane with sustained winds of 155 MPH. That was what it sounded like when the storm hit Colombia, the National Hurricane Center's Andy Lata the win by straining storm surge and truthful rainfall across Central America, and especially across the northeastern Nicaragua, southern Honduras. That's gonna be happening over the next day or so.

OTA Nicaragua Andy Lata National Hurricane Center Hurricane Colombia Central America Honduras
Iota makes landfall in Nicaragua as "extremely dangerous" Category 4

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:28 sec | 2 weeks ago

Iota makes landfall in Nicaragua as "extremely dangerous" Category 4

"30 miles south of Puerto CA basis. Nicaragua as a cattle for Category four hurricane threatening catastrophic damage to the same part of Central America Already battered Listen two weeks ago by Hurricane ADA. It intensified into a Category five storm earlier in the day, but weakened by the time it hit land with maximum sustained winds of 155 MPH. It's predicted that the storm surge could reach 15 to 20 FT above normal tides. WCBS news time 12

Hurricane Ada Nicaragua Puerto Hurricane Central America CA Wcbs
Hurricane Iota strengthens to Category 5

KYW 24 Hour News

00:44 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hurricane Iota strengthens to Category 5

"Fast. Strengthening Hurricane iota is now a dangerous Category five storm as it sweeps over parts of Central America. CBS meteorologist Jeff There a deli reports. It's the same path Hurricane ADA took just last week. Like Ada Iota is going to cause life threatening conditions. It's likely to dump it least 2 Ft of rain in parts of Central America with deadly landslides. It'll likely have Windows 150. Maybe even some areas approaching wind gust of 200 miles an hour and it's gonna bring with it 15 to 20 ft of deadly storm surge. The storm is forecast to pass near or over Providencia Island. Bringing hurricane conditions as it takes aim at the Nicaraguan and Honduran

Jeff There Hurricane Ada Central America CBS Providencia Island Honduran
Hurricane Iota upgraded to Category 5 storm as it nears Central America

Sean Hannity

00:17 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hurricane Iota upgraded to Category 5 storm as it nears Central America

"NASA's helping to track Hurricane Iota is the record breaking storm gets closer to Nicaragua and Honduras. It's predicted to make landfall tonight is a Category five, then weekend as across the Central America and this hurricane seasons already seen the most named storms and more than 150 years with two weeks still to go

Hurricane Iota Nasa Nicaragua Honduras Central America
"central america" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

Radical Personal Finance

03:58 min | 2 months ago

"central america" Discussed on Radical Personal Finance

"Dollars depending on the lawyer for you guys to do it you put some money in Panamanian Bank they'll give you the residency card and you can go ahead. You can become a legal resident. Of Panama, you can become a get your driver's license and get everything set up in. Panama. Panama has. To offer from a lifestyle benefit. And so I think it should go very high on your list of of possible solutions. There are a few big places, the people like. So First Panama City is probably outside of Mexico City as Provo is certainly the the the biggest city in and kind of the most up and coming city in central. America. And so if you like the idea of a big city with lots of skyscrapers and a and a pretty high standard of living Panama, city is a good solution won't be as cheap as some other places, but it'll be. A good solution for you can get a great condo overlooking the Pacific there in Panama City it's easy to get back and forth from Panama. City. Just about anywhere in the United States it's on the east coast time zone. So it's very convenient for you and so I think Panama has a lot to offer in Panama. City has a lot to offer. There are a number of other cities in in Panama that are are useful of course beaches and you can go very far out and you can get very remote in Panama. The big downside of Panama is the weather. It's purely tropical weather very, very hot, very, very humid about the only place that you can get out of the weather in Panama is to go to Bukit book just north of divide by near the Costa Rican border is at a higher elevation, and so if you want better weather bouquet has has a lot of retirees and it's not that difficult. You can feel it adds another flight to your to your life. So you'd fly to Panama City then fly to book at Tay What seven hours ish I think to drive from did to five hours something like that drive from Bukit Data Panama City. So that would be a solution if you want a little bit better weather, but Panama will have the benefit of making things simple for you and Panama now puts you in a situation where it is a genuine tax friendly place due to it being a territorial tax jurisdiction where you could live there and you could spend all your year there, and if you structure your and your wife's business interests appropriately, you wouldn't have to pay any income taxes to the nation of Panama. Panama is a really good solution. The paperwork is simple. There are two other territorial tax countries in. Central America those are Costa, Rica, and Nicaragua, and they both offer very different lifestyles. Costa Rica is, of course, highly renowned for its biodiversity, one of the most biodiverse countries in the world. Due to its climate due to it being put between two oceans and having a very mountainous climate and Costa. Rica has a lot to offer. If you like if you if weather is important thing to you if you're coming from part of California and you say I, really want great weather. It's hard to find better weather in the world than what you can find in the Central Valley in Costa Rica, you have a High Mountain valley which gives you a kind of a it's tropical in the sense that there's not any variation of spring to fall to winter to to to summer. You can figure out the order of those seasons that I messed up. But. What it is just simply you have a rainy season and a dry season but in that high central Vowel Valley, their in Costa Rica you have. Just really lovely cool weather. All Year round is very, very stable, and during the dry season, it's very sunny during the rainy season it rains every afternoon. So that's an option. The, city of San Jose is not a particularly bustling, `up-and-coming city. It's kind of a nasty city in many ways compared to especially when you compare it to like Panama City but it does have great weather and you can find on the outskirts on the mountainsides all around Costa Rica. You could find a place that you really liked in that. That's that's very physically beautiful and gives a great weather. Then of course, Costa Rica has tons and tons of beaches and so if if you're into beaches, there's tons of of places all along the country to. To set up a beach house. Costa Rica will offer you a very.

Panama Panama City Costa Rica Bukit Data Panama City Mexico City Costa Panamanian Bank America Bukit book United States Central Valley Vowel Valley California High Mountain valley Nicaragua Pacific Provo San Jose
"central america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

02:43 min | 4 months ago

"central america" Discussed on Chompers

"I've landed on a beautiful island. I can hear waves crashing on the shore and I see a line of huge beautiful sculptures of heads. These statues are made from dark of all Kanak Rock. So time machine, what are these statues? Rachel these are called Moai. Rushing to the other side of the top of your mouth I'm more in the way back to. Our statues on the coast of Easter Island in the Pacific Ocean researchers. Thank that the Moai were made about a thousand years ago but nobody knows how they were made or how they ended up on the island. There so huge and heavy, it must have been really difficult to move them they're. The people who lived on the island at that time, the Polynesians may have made the Moai to honor their ancestors. Their great great grandparents we don't know for sure. But what we do know is that the Moai are masterpieces of creative genius. Switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth, but don't brush too hard. Okay. Here's our next time travel and we are going even further back in time. I've only did somewhere in Mexico where the Mayan people live in a workshop and I see a big sculpture it's kind of like a disk, but it's made of stone. Someone is carving tiny drawings into it a few small lines. Then a square. Fun Time Machine. What is this? Mayan calendar. Switzer rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth. Musher Front. Teeth to. The Mayan people were experts in mathematics and astronomy. The carefully kept track of the Movement of the planets to count time, and they used a form of writing called hieroglyphics to record that time. The calendar that most of US use today called the Gregorian calendar is different from the Mayan calendar. The Mayan. Calendar has more months and those months have more days but both calendars work. And the Mayan calendar is still used today by the great. Great great grandkids of the people who lived in different countries in south and Central America. That's it for Chandler's, but we'll be back tonight with more travels three time until then. Chompers.

Easter Island Switzer Kanak Rock Central America Rachel Mexico Pacific Ocean US Chandler
"central america" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

NPR's World Story of the Day

04:29 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on NPR's World Story of the Day

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary gary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com. A mysterious form of kidney disease has killed tens of thousands thousands of people in central america. Many of them are relatively young farm workers in their thirties and forties kidney. Failure is now the second leading cause of death in nicaragua and el salvador. The new disease has also turned up in hot humid agricultural communities in india and sri lanka some researchers now. I'll say it may be linked to global warming. N._p._r.'s jason bobi and reports in an editorial in the current issue of the new england journal of medicine doctor cecelia sorenson calls this new mysterious styrian form of kidney failure essential disease in the era of climate change disease probably wouldn't have occurred if it weren't for the extreme stream global temperatures that we're seeing sorenson from the university of colorado has been studying chronic kidney disease of unknown origin also known as c. K. d. you for the last last three years. The disease was first flagged by doctors in central america in the nineteen nineties farm workers from sugar cane plantations in nicaragua el salvador guatemala. We're we're turning up at clinics with end stage kidney disease yet. They didn't have diabetes hypertension or some other traditional factor that might explain why their kidneys were failing among the early cases almost all worked in agriculture but it's also been found among minors fishermen and workers in hot industrial plants then farm workers in sri. Lanka and tropical parts of southern india started coming down with a similar condition. It's very difficult to prove direct attribution to say this person is sick sick because of climate change that link is very difficult but we can say is that this disease is occurring in parts of the world that are experiencing unprecedented crested dented warming which we can directly attribute to climate change. There are many theories about what's causing c._k. D you most focus on heat. Stress and dehydration. Others are looking at heavy metals chemicals in the drinking water sure lanka banned the herbicides glyphosate sold under the brand name roundup over concerns that it was is causing c._k. D._u. early on some health officials blamed the epidemic on homebrew alcohol. Neil pierce at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine is also studying studying c._k. D._u. in central america and southern asia he's skeptical of the link to climate change. It's very unusual phenomenon. You know i've done with in this congenial area for forty years and it's it's very unusual to come across something like this. The disease destroys people's kidneys incredibly quickly pierce distract some sugar hurricane workers who over a two year period lost a third of their kidney function. It may will be judah heat stress and the extremely bad working conditions in central america america. That's adding on the link to climate changes that tenuous. He doesn't think that the relatively small rising global temperatures over the last few decades would call us such such a significant epidemic also pierce has looked for c. k. d. u. In other places with similar climatic conditions to central america's pacific coastal plains and and hasn't found it if you go to south india does villages that are very close to each other and some of them were getting c._k. The u._n. Seminar you know and the both equally hot in the hottest pat of india yeah. There's something very strange going on really interesting on typically and obviously tragic into of the different illness that it's coolest sorenson in her editorial doesn't claim that she has the exact answer to what's causing this strange kidney disease but she just about everyone else. Studying it agrees that the disease is heat related and as global temperatures rise. She warns that health professionals should think about how climate change may be driving what seemed to be mysterious new ailments ailments. Jason bowen n._p._r. News <music> in this message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor comcast business gig fueled network solutions that help businesses go beyond the expected to do the extraordinary comcast business beyond fast learn more at comcast business dot com.

kidney disease america comcast india Neil pierce cecelia sorenson nicaragua el salvador guatemal nicaragua new england journal of medicin el salvador Lanka diabetes jason bobi Jason bowen lanka sri lanka glyphosate
"central america" Discussed on Environment: NPR

Environment: NPR

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Environment: NPR

"A mysterious form of kidney disease has killed tens of thousands of people in central america. Many of them are relatively young farmworkers in their thirties. As an forties kidney failure is now the second leading cause of death in nicaragua and el salvador. The new disease has also turned up in hot humid agricultural communities in india and sri lanka. Some researchers now say it may be linked to global warming. N._p._r.'s jason bane reports in an editorial in the current issue. Choose the new england journal of medicine doctor cecelia sorenson calls this new mysterious form of kidney failure a sentinel disease in the era of climate change disease. His hotly wouldn't have occurred if it weren't for the extreme global temperatures that we're seeing sorenson from the university of colorado has been studying chronic kidney disease as of unknown origin also known as c._k. D you for the last three years. The disease was first flagged by doctors and central america in the nineteen nineties farm workers from sugarcane plantations in nicaragua el salvador and guatemala. We're turning up at clinics with end stage kidney disease yet. They didn't have diabetes or hypertension or some other traditional factor that might explain why their kidneys were failing among the early cases almost all worked in agriculture but it's also been found among minors fishermen herman and workers in hot industrial plants then farm workers in sri lanka and tropical parts of southern india started coming down with a similar condition very difficult difficult to prove direct attribution to say this person is sick because of climate change that link very difficult but but we can't say is that this this disease is occurring in parts of the world that are experiencing unprecedented warming which we can directly attribute to climate change. There are many theories about what's causing housing c._k. D._u. Most focus on heat stress and dehydration others are looking at heavy metals and chemicals in the drinking water sure lanka banned herbicide glyphosate. I say sold under the brand name roundup over concerns that it was causing c k d you early on some health officials blamed the epidemic on home brewed alcohol. Neil pierce at the london school of hygiene and tropical medicine is also studying c._k. To you in central america and southern asia he skeptical of the link to climate change. It's it's very unusual phenomenon. You know i've done with in this general area for forty years and it's and it's very unusual to come across something like this. The disease destroys as people's kidneys incredibly quickly pure distract. Some sugarcane workers who over a two year period lost a third of their kidney function at night will be to heat stress in the extremely bad working conditions in central america. That's adding on the link to climate changes that tenuous. He doesn't think that the relatively collectively small rise in global temperatures of the last few decades would call us such a significant epidemic also pierce has looked for c. k. d. u. In other places with similar similar climatic conditions to central america's pacific coastal plains and hasn't found it if you go to south india villages that are very close to each other and some of them are getting thinks c._k. The u._n. Some of them are not and both equally hot and they're not the hottest of india yeah. There's something very strange going on. It's really interesting on typically and obviously tragic in terms of the decent illness that has caused sorenson in her editorial doesn't claim that she has the exact answer to what's causing this strange kidney disease but she and just about everyone else. Studying agrees that the disease is heat related and as global temperatures rise. She warns that health professionals should think about how l. climate change. Maybe driving what seemed to be mysterious ailments jason bobbie-ann n._p._r. News <music>.

kidney disease america cecelia sorenson nicaragua el salvador sri lanka india nicaragua Neil pierce new england journal of medicin jason bane lanka diabetes guatemala glyphosate london school of hygiene university of colorado l.
"central america" Discussed on Chompers

Chompers

03:43 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Chompers

"Chompers is produced by gimblett and supported by good night's the number one night time underwear welcome back. It's time komo choppers your morning and night tooth brushing show rushing on the top of your mouth on one side and brushed the inside outside and chewing each to in its history week and today we're exploring the history a south and central america. Let's jump in our time. Machine landed in guatemala about forty years ago. I'm in the street along with many people marching. One woman stands out. She's wearing a colorful robe and she seems to be kind of in charge. Everybody is chanting about farm workers rights so time machine. It was this woman from an aba manchu switcher brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth <music>. Don't brush too hard you go. There is an activist who helped farmers from guatemala come together and asked to be treated fairly thoroughly. Things weren't always easy but she continued to speak and write and supportive farmers in guatemala. She received a nobel peace prize for her efforts to bring in peace switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth and keep on brushing okay. Here's your next travel back in time <music>. I've landed only a couple of years ago and i'm on a plane. I'm flying over a beautiful rainforests. I can hear the birds from up here. This is amazonia as i looked down i see people looking back up at me but they seem really surprised time machine who are these people and on contacted tribe switching rushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and brushing little circles around each in contacted tribe is what we call a group of people who haven't met other groups of people very often and they definitely don't have the internet that means they're history is pretty separate opera from the history of the rest of the world they don't know about the history of the world that we live and and we don't know much about their history. Many people and governments work to protect the contacted people so that they can continue to live in the rainforest <music>. That's all for jumpers today but now it's time to shoot. Chompers is a production of gimblett. Media chompers is brought to you by good night's the number one nighttime underwear delivering protection where children need it. The most grownups back to school is just around the corner. New schools new friends new classes when you're a kid. There's one thing that can get get in the way of all that excitement nighttime wedding. Luckily good night's is here to help. Good nights are not only soft and comfortable but they also offer forty eighty percent more protection versus training pants so grownups at good nights to your back to school list because nighttime wedding shouldn't get in the way of childhood great schooldays begin with good nights.

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"central america" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"To the U. S. from Central America this means that migrants from countries like El Salvador and Honduras what have to seek asylum in Guatemala when they cross through there instead of the U. S. Rice University political science professor mark Jones it's not clear that it's legal under US asylum law so there's still a lot of quarter hurdles but if the trump administration is able to effectively push the asylum cases down to Guatemala and the detention of those individuals in Guatemala it would at least here in United States resolve the short term issue the crowded detention centers along the US Mexico border a federal judge has thrown out a Kentucky teenagers lawsuit against the accusing the Washington post of falsely labeling him a racist during an encounter with a native American man at the Lincoln Memorial the judge ruling that there may have been a Roni S. opinions published by the post but that they are protected by the first amendment CBS news correspondent Matt Piper the video of sixteen year old Nick Sandman went viral in January when he stood in front of native American protester Nathan Phillips on the national mall in Washington a lawsuit the teenager and his family filed against the Washington post for two hundred fifty million dollars has been dismissed by a federal judge the lawsuit claimed the post wrongfully targeted and bullied sand man because he was a white Catholic student wearing a make America great again hat Sandman still has pending lawsuits against CNN and NBC in all seeking three quarters of a billion dollars against the three media companies that Piper CBS news Missouri law enforcement officials say the case of two missing Wisconsin brothers is now a death investigation the brothers Nicholas and just in time all were in Missouri last weekend for business related to a livestock company they run in Wisconsin they were supposed to fly home Sunday but missed their plane out of Kansas city and county sheriff Larry fish that today the case is a death investigation but he did not give further details twenty five year old garland Nelson a Bremer was charged today with tampering with a motor vehicle the St Joseph news press reports the vehicle reportedly one used by the brothers before their disappearance three five percent of online gamers have experienced harassment while playing that according to a new study released Thursday according to the first of its kind study from the anti defamation league center on technology and society the end of incidents included physical threats stocking and sustain harassment majority of online gamers reported having been targeted based on religion gender sexual orientation ethnicity or race nearly two thirds of U. S. adults play games online charting Greenblatt the C. E. C. E. O. of the ADL says there are significant problems with hate harassment and discrimination cable excuse time five twenty five I ran into comedian actor Tony rock brother of Chris rock in downtown Saint Louis last night he told me he's in town for a weekend of shows at the helium comedy club here's a portion of our conversation I have a dear friend who started out as an attorney started doing comedy and I've asked her about the whole writing process which is so fascinating to me how do you say.

Central America two hundred fifty million doll three five percent twenty five year billion dollars three quarters sixteen year
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"You know, some more successful than others from, they had been engaged in supporting this. He seeing the moxie, I would say that, you know, you had earlier this year, the houseman by the Trump administration that they're cutting funding because they feel that the countries are not doing enough to stop people from leaving their countries. So we're gonna cut funding. So mean to your question what should the US do? It's not. Let's not address it or help these countries address. The factors that are forcing their own people to flee its how do we, you know, hell pottery support those within country that are putting their lives at risk to bring about reforms do we use? Also, our diplomatic tools to support those efforts that are trying to get so I mean, this is really perverse, right? I mean you're describing a situation where the Trump administration has both backed off a form of pressure that these governments really do not welcome to sort of clean up on corruption, but in its own mind is getting tough on them by removing material assistance. Right. So instead of being both helpful, but also a little pushy we're going to now give them less, but also not try to ask anything of them. I do know how tough it is. During that if you look at the assistance, most of it doesn't go to the central government's it goes to organisations humanitarian groups religious groups in implementing agencies are carrying out the work. The grants were built to go mostly new civil society. Yeah. Or different is, I mean, they're only a small amount that goes to the central government, you know, and to see the impact because we've been talking much about water Malla. There was a report that came out last week by C C that showed that in the last several couple years because of all this backlash they went from having reduced impunity to eighty seven to having an increase now back to the levels of where it was before on this trajectory. I mean, people are just going to keep plea. Right. I mean, if if, if you know, conditions, don't improve in, if people don't have a sense of hope that they can live, a decent life, a secure life in their communities, because it's I mean it's a question, both of this sort of absolute conditions of the direction -ality of change. Right. I mean, eighty seven percent impunity is really bad. But it's lower the ninety five. Right. I mean that says to you, like, maybe, maybe I should stick around. I should I should I should work to further these improvements. I didn't things are if you have hope that things can improve then there's bigger likelihood that you would want to stay. But if you if you've lost any sense, you know, that the future is gonna look any different. Sky, high drug prices, mass incarceration. Predatory lending if you're the type of person who likes to go beyond the headlines and truly understand an issue check out the new podcast from Arnold ventures deep dive with Laura Arnold Arnold ventures. Co-chair lower Arnold shares. The Mike with leading data driven experts to explore market failures in the healthcare criminal Justice, education and public finance and figure out how to fix them dive into the conversation with a new podcast deep dive with or Arnold. Find it wherever you listen to podcasts. This is Karen wisher. I wanna tell you.

Laura Arnold Arnold Arnold ventures lower Arnold Arnold US Karen wisher Co-chair Mike eighty seven percent
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

05:00 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"But there are some of the poorest countries in the in the world. I mean, are there, economic development things that, that could really work, or does, is the security problem sort of free, standing to me, the key is the governance in corruption Jones, because to me, those are critical to being able to really tackle the issue economic opportunities cured and until you're able to address those, it's going to be very difficult to really have significant progress. In other areas. There was a study that was done of corruption in twenty. Fifteen by a regional organization and what they found for instance, in the case opens advisor was of the cases that they had investigated thirty five percent of the education budget. In Honduras was lost to corruption. Six seventy percent of the health. Budget was lost corruption in the case of sod mother of the cases that they investigated, it would have been enough to buy school, lunches and address basic health services with one point two million boys and girls. So when you have corruption on that scale you can really you're not you're not able to provide basic services, which include also, you know, how to you improve development programs. How do you really address the needs? So of the population, the United States have been very involved in Central American affairs for employing time, usually not that constructively are there things the American government could be doing should be doing to sort of help turn the situation around short. So in twenty sixteen fiscal year twenty fifteen in response to the. The increase of unaccompanied children. That had the a bomb administration had launched a new strategy that led to a significant increase of systens to the region. More than double, this is Jones, and that has that had continued year-by-year with smaller amounts, but mention because they did one of the positive things that came out of that wasn't instead of focusing on security, and did recognize the need to address the issue of governance, and it recognized the need to address development factor in kind of provide more of an integral security versus governent. So security would be to say, like the police are all amazing, but they need more guns in cars, say that the problems to America is security problem in so it requires a security solution in the past. It had been you know, let's focus on drug interdiction on arresting the drug kingpins over on training the police. He's on training specialized units that address gangs or drugs. So a governance solution is to say instead lead stoke on, how do you build effective institutions? I can train five hundred police officers that doesn't guarantee me that the police is going to function if they're corrupt or if you're not providing for better recruitment practices better education practices a police career law. If you don't have an effective Justice system in a countable in security, forces, but it also focused on the issue of corruption. How do we tackle issue of corruption and included issues of development in crime prevention, so understanding that there is a lot of work that can be done. That can't be effective at the community level to ensure or work with you that risk, at least provide a different alternative to engaging in. In, in gangs. So this is the kind of thing we see in community initiatives in American city, where you want to say, we're gonna put people in who are social workers, and not just not just guys with guns, but people who can talk to young young men and convince them, you could use something else, we can help you get a job, right? The ideas, you know, at the community level because communities are better able to understand, and identify what their needs are. But then it's how you bring all the different social services institutions local government police to address the needs. So how do you work with youth? Provide him with a different alternative education, job opportunities. So at least they haven't, you know, they can make a different choice, then have to be forced or feel like they have to be forced to join a gang. How do you work with families that may be facing domestic violence situations like that, that? Have been affective another regions at those are things that the US had been supportive..

Jones United States American government advisor Honduras American city America Six seventy percent thirty five percent
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"Out every Thursday. Subscribe for free on apple podcasts or in your favorite podcast app. Has had a process where there was an international anti corruption tribunal organizations that can you explain what that it's related to we were discussing in the early two thousands. What you started seeing wasn't increase in attacks against human rights defenders, and those that were seeking greater accountability, combating corruption, where you started seeing under that particular administration was a much higher level of infiltration and cohabitation of these criminal elements in of the state apparatus, it was a time, also where you also where you started seeing unexpansive of drug, trafficking into water Malla, and it was very clear to civil society that the only way that they would be able to clean up the institutions in move toward consolidating or. Bringing about the rule of law was with international assistance, and that kind of started the process that eventually led to the Guatemalan government, under the Berget administration requesting the assistance of the United Nations to establish very innovative model to tackle these issues, which is known as the c c or the international commission against impunity the commission essentially has the independence or the ability to carry out or initiate investigations into these groups, but it has to work hand in hand with the local institutions, local prosecutor, police, using watermelon law, and using watermelon courts to be able to bring these cases forward. And that's where a lot of the innovative life because over the last years, it had been able to strengthen the capacities of local institutions to go after these very. Powerful complex networks. In addition, it was it was a quick with the ability to bring about our promote reforms and that also helped the country. Adopt mechanisms and tools to go after these networks. So this is centrally a relatively small relatively poor countries saying, our institutions can't rabble with us. And so we need outsiders to help us, but keeping the framework of the Guatemalan legal system in place, so, so outside groups can do an investigation. Bring a case, but it's still the application of watermelon law. Right. They couldn't bring the case forward on their own ideas. You know, it gave him the independence to initiate cases if you had information you could go to them and say, hey, you know, I've got this, and they could initiate, an ensure that at least in initial look in. Into it was happening. But the watermelon public prosecutor's office alternately has to decide whether it brings the case to prosecution and it has to do it so everything from there on has to happened with the Guatemalan, institutions, and that was done as a way of, you know, we just don't want to come here and do that work for you. But we wanna make sure that we can equip you with the tools in the capabilities that you need to be able to do this on your own. So the idea is to get the outside help, but not undermine right. Guatemalan state institutions. But instead sort of build them, because you run a few propaganda, you get the convictions. And ensure ended also provides local institutions with that international support because you're dealing with very powerful structures. Very powerful individuals. So having an international. Is the tuition has also provided support for local prosecutors for local judges to work in act in the penalty and to be able to do their their job. And so this one of going after organized crime figures, who might otherwise have gotten sort of protection from corporate fficials goes after officials people involved in corruption themselves, the mandate goes after these criminal structures that emerged from the conflict that ended links to the states. And so it's looked at cases. A very prominent case was one that happened in twenty fifteen that got a lot of international attention. It was a case regarding a massive corruption scheme within the Guatemalan tax institution. Customs institution that ended up implicating the vice that. Then vice president and president of the country, and he'd both were forced to resign..

prosecutor Guatemalan tax institution Guatemalan government vice president apple water Malla United Nations Berget
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"They went to prison that led to the huge problem, contributed to the huge problem that you have now in Central American prisons of overcrowding of the penitentiary system, essentially turning into a university of. Crime in rather than help address the gangs, take over the system and the way was done. It was basically, you know, you either belong to this group where you belong to the other one as a way of survival. And so it created a huge problem within the penitentiary system were now you, you know, you've had a number of murders in crimes being committed from prison. But it also led to a restructuring of the gangs made him a lot more sophisticated and stronger, and rather than help address the problem when it was early enough it made the problem. A lot worse of your I sort of exporting of ethnically Salvadoran street gangs from the United States back into the country than from them into the prison system there, where they become more and more organized. Right. You know there wasn't any focus on. Violence prevention on how do we work with you that risk? I mean these were, you know, men individuals that were being dumped in communities. How do you ensure that other kids are not joining gangs? I mean, there's, you know, the US has a long history of work on community based violence prevention on. You've seen it succeed in other countries in line America, but they didn't all for that. They opted for a very harsh law enforcement iron fist approach the ideas that that would deter you yet. But there could arrest ourselves out of this problem the opposite happened. So you didn't address the issue, but you may the problem worse when it drove comments light rates through the roof and that, you know, I'm just giving the example of by similar processes happen in on the road as and in the case of Guatemala. So is it a parallel process in autumn on on doors? Or does it spread out from El Salvador, Krista? Because my recollection is that you even sort of before these past few years, there's been, there's been a, a large Salvadoran immigrant community in the Washington area, for example, for a long time now but not as much from Honduras. Guatemala is also you know, hundreds being deported. Oh, come in Guatemala end the three two different varying degrees. Adopt similar policies. I mean, I would say that in the case of dude, as they went as far as passing legislation. So it wasn't just the security policy, but it was accompanied by very harshly Latian that was also around that time is when you start seeing a growing influence and expansion of drug trafficking and other forms of organized crime in, in the region, which also impacted the levels of corruption, quotation security, institutions. You redrawing. Distinction between street gangs, and organized crime. And can you explain what would you mean by that? Yeah. So I'd like to make the distinction be because in the case of, you know, Central America. There have historically being groups local cartel groups that have been engaged in the transit of illicit goods that tend to concentrate in certain areas of the country that have control and influence over the certain areas of the country and that are responsible for a lot of the Nikkei's of drug trafficking transitting of drugs from South America to the US from their call transport. This does so kind of ensure that the illicit good is moving to the next stop. There are very different than the street gangs in friends that, you know, the street gangs tend to be the urban areas..

United States Guatemala Central America South America America Nikkei El Salvador Honduras Krista Washington Latian
"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

Vox's The Weeds

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on Vox's The Weeds

"And. Hello, welcome to their city, the weeds on the box media podcast network. I'm metric Lacey and I'm joined today Adriana BELTRAN? She is the director of the citizens security program at the Washington office on Latin America. And I'm really glad to have here. This is a discussion billing you for a long time. And we've talked on this show so many episodes about the sort of migration crisis southern border, the Trump administration's response, but lurking in the background of all of that is, obviously, very large number of people are leaving their homes in Central America. And so I thought very basically, like why why are so many people leaving and, and trying to come here? Well, I thank you for having me on the show met easy question, which is wrapping up. I mean, I would say there are number of factors that are behind the decision of families and individuals to have to flee their communities. One has to do with the lack of economic upper. -tunities and the fact that you have many Central America's many families that don't have a secure job. A good job that are facing extreme levels of poverty in their own communities and are forced to, to leave to seek better opportunities..

Adriana BELTRAN Central America Latin America Trump administration America Lacey Washington
"central america" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on ACLU Civil Liberties Minute

"Here. There is nothing. I'm Bill Newman. And this is the civil liberties minute there is nothing. The Guatemalans recently told New York Times, correspondent Roger Cohen nothing from the government, nothing to do or no health care. No jobs, with there is is terrorism from the gangs, and the parched earth dying from climate change. So what does the administration's response to these conditions in Central America that are forcing the migration north to increase aid to institute a Marshall plan for the northern triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, no says, Trump rather, we should cut off all aid to those countries because they're not doing enough to stop aggression. In other words, create more devastation more homelessness. More hopelessness, and more refugees which will ensure migrants continue to flee north Trump's other response is to trumpet his proposed Walsum more, but his cone, put it quote. No wall will stop the flow of migrants. No raging about rapists or threats to. Operate families will stop it. No racism against Brown people or fear of demographic change will stop it. A broken immigration system. Certainly won't stop it. Not as long as central Americans are desperate, the United States, government has in policy now that will continue to create more and more migrants more and more people seeking safety in refuge. There is no plan to create something out of nothing. The civil liberties minute is made possible where the ACLU because freedom can't protect itself.

Guatemala north Trump Bill Newman Trump Roger Cohen ACLU Central America New York Times El Salvador United States Honduras Brown
"central america" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"central america" Discussed on PRI's The World

"What cutting aid to Central America would mean today on the world? I'm Marco werman. The Trump administration wants to cut aid to three Central American nations. The president says they need to do more to stop their people from migrating north, but local laws can make that difficult. Just like an American. You can't stop an American from traveling abroad. Will you can't stop Guatemalan Honduran from leaving their country as well? Also, US aid is supposed to help fight the root causes of migration from the region. So who gets hurt of the dollars go away? Jen, people families fleeing violence fleeing lack of opportunity, those are the ones that are going to be most directly impacted plus a comedian wins round one of Ukraine's presidential election stories and more today here on the world. I'm Marco werman. And this is the world. Good Monday to you everybody. Glad you could make it here today. Just in case he stepped away from the news over the weekend. President Trump is threatening to close a US southern border this week. We'll keep a close for a long time. I'm not playing games. There was also this. I've ended payments to Guatemala to Honduras, Adele, Salvador, or no money goes there anymore. We were given them five hundred million dollars. We're giving him to Mendes aid, we stopped payment to Honduras, Guatemala, and to El Salvador, we were paying them tremendous amounts of money, and we're not paying them anymore because they haven't done a thing for us a decision to cut off aid to three Central American countries. It's punishment. The White House says for not stopping their citizens from leaving this countries in coming to the US, Shannon O'Neill's with the council on foreign relations in Washington how much aid did Guatemala Honduras, and El Salvador, get last. Year, shannon. So last year they were doesn't need to get somewhere in the range of five hundred and thirty million dollars that is a decline from a couple years ago when it was almost three quarters of a billion dollars seven hundred fifty million dollars. We have seen the Trump administration each year ask for less money for this aid to the Central American nations that we have seen a bipartisan support in the US congress to put money back there. So there is a back and forth between the administration, and the congress to support these countries that we've seen for the last couple of years culminating in the decision of Trump and the administration these last week. So that's over half a billion dollars where does that money go that money is split fairly evenly between the three Central American nations between Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and it goes to all kinds of programs to address the root causes of migration from these countries. It goes to programs to counter drug trafficking. It goes to programs to strengthen the police to bring safety to the streets. It goes to all sorts of small programs to help economic growth to help seed microfinance for entrepreneurs for farmers..

El Salvador US Jen Marco werman Honduras Guatemala President Trump Shannon O'Neill congress president America Ukraine Washington White House Adele Mendes billion dollars
"central america" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"central america" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"I want you to know that especially if you are someone considering moving where so many Americans do to Central America or Mexico. At the time you plan to retire. And you may go ahead and buy a place ahead of time. The scandals never stop with the land swindles in so much of Central America and Mexico. Recently. The feds have been going after kind game that stole over one hundred million dollars from Americans promising this massively wonderful development, people paid big money up front or property in it, and it was just a complete con nothing was ever built nothing ever happened in the perpetrators just ran off with all the money and issues with legal ownership come up again. And again, there were a bunch of Americans. They were evicted from their properties on the Yucatan peninsula. They had spent so much of their life's savings on. And there's an addition to the problems with corruption and thievery and fraud involved with the sale of land outside the United States. There's a different issue. You might really from going repeatedly on vacations and all the rest really thank you want to live in some foreign land. But you get there,.

Central America Mexico Yucatan fraud United States one hundred million dollars
"central america" Discussed on In The Thick

In The Thick

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"central america" Discussed on In The Thick

"All this is that this is a humanitarian crisis like we as Americans can easily. See like Syrian refugees, right or people that flee war, whether it's in the Middle East or in Europe. Like, we have that seared in our memory, right? When we think about that. But for some reason money a when it comes to the global south and Central America, we as Americans. I mean, the political narrative like people cannot see that this is humanitarian crisis, right? Like, why can't we have that conversation? Why can we talk about the roots? Ryan can't because you have a president who's like politicizing. Enough of this cover enough of this. You know, we're we're trying to manage. No. We know exactly what's going on here. And I keep on hearing the words of someone who I met when I was reporting the story of one Sanchez who runs southwest cay who manages and runs the largest shelters for children the migrant children. He's letting on. And someone who has I was speaking to basically said, yeah. No, no, Trump is doing this in terms of holding onto kids to feed his base. And I know that we use that term feed his base. Yeah. But there was something about the way in which he said it like, oh, no, no, no, he's they're gonna hold onto these kids. They're not going to return them. You know, this was before the notion that they would be dying on US soil. But it was this notion of its punishment and his his base wants them to punish these people for even thinking that they could come north. How dare they don't belong here. I Maria I got a death threat. I wrote a piece for NBC news over the over the holiday basically talking about how Trump is actually doing that. And the the hate and vitriol that I got it wasn't even human like, I actually had conservative friends of mine..

Trump Sanchez Middle East Maria Europe NBC Central America US Ryan president
"central america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

03:32 min | 2 years ago

"central america" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"There's probably some stuff like this in Canada as well as in parts of South America, Central America. Maybe some parts of. Africa as well. We want to know we wanna know what's going on in your neck of the global woods. These licenses by the way, are self determined by these groups? Yes. So it's not like for instance, how you would get a pilot's license that allows you to fly in different countries. You know what I mean? It's up to that. It's organization by organization. Last thing to say about that. Move on, meet up. Sorry to backtrack here I'm into this free to the public. Oh, nice. I'm going to lewd. Let's blow this thing up. See how many people we can get there. Do you wanna do that or you just want to let it if people are interested, they'll find it and who knows when this episode will actually come out? That's true. We need to put it out before August four. Yeah, we do. All right. Okay. Yeah, let's blow it up man. What's what are the deeds? It's at the, let's see. CO f. e. r. cofer library. Oh, there's an address. You only put this address and put it out in the world. Man, it's at fifty two, thirty four LA vista road in Tucker, Georgia. The Tucker Reid h coup for library there it is. Oh right. Yeah, let's let's do it. Let's go. All right. It's down. It's down the street from us. I think I've actually been to this library. You know, I think I have to not to move on. Don't want to give away how close in proximity I am to that area, but. You've been there. This is cool. We're actually this spontaneously is happening folks. We have organically decided that we're going to take a field trip, and if you are in the area, we would love to see you there and if not, you can experience vicariously through us because I'm sure we'll report back unless we totally flake on this, but we've, we all know we've caught a fight it in podcast stone. So we have to, we have to follow through now. It's basically written our own blood this agreement. This is awesome. So so we are going to get, we're gonna learn about move on firsthand. We're going to hear from people who are active in these investigations and hear about their journeys. There are also several of our listeners already know numerous groups and organizations studying various specific aspects of unidentified aerial phenomenon. And you can join these groups in person or online. They provide literature and other resources that could be great of great value to you. If you're a budding Ufologists, it's also no secret that there's a lot of misleading info out there in this field. And so the burden of differentiating between legitimate research, impure entertainment is going to fall squarely on the shoulders of the individuals or groups researching this stuff. You know what I mean? It's it's the like you can read a book about algebra and pretty much trust that you don't have to double check a lot of texts. Yeah, it's not the case here. You know. Nowadays, many academic studies of UFO phenomenon could be classified as primarily sociological or anthropological studies not of the sightings themselves, but of the psychology of the witnesses. This is a trend we've noticed a lot, and it's it happens in other categories of things we'd be called fringe research or conspiracy theories..

Tucker Reid Central America Africa South America Tucker Canada Georgia
"central america" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"central america" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To central america and has thirteen actually has its origins in this country in southern california on another immigration angle several asylumseekers interviewed by the associated press say they plan to press on with efforts to enter the us in spite of a new rule that gang and domestic violence will usually no longer be grounds for asylum in this country there's also a migrant crisis in southern europe with six hundred twenty nine rescued african immigrants sailing toward port in spain after italy and malta refused to elect their ship docks the aquarius prepares to arrive at staines eastern port of valencia on sunday spirits on board are lifting rights activists worry others won't be as lucky because this episode may have set a precedent of turning migrants away or responded roxana saberi california socalled right law will remain in effect for now following a state appellate court ruling and plaintiffs argue there's no right way to enact what they call physician assisted suicide once you say suicidal the answer and suffering is the criteria there's no logical place to cross the line that's dr david stevens and for the defense john eisenberg calls it medical aid in dying you need to have been diagnosed with a terminal illness defined as he will not survive more than six months but their court battle is more procedural than moral focusing on whether california legislators overstepped the bounds of a special session when they passed the law gentlemen for cbs news san francisco summer heat in the windy city ninety degree heat prompted thousands of people head for lakefront beaches.

america california associated press us europe spain staines valencia dr david stevens john eisenberg italy malta cbs san francisco ninety degree six months