20 Episode results for "Centers Of America"

8 Steps to Prevent & Survive Cancer with Ginny Brant

Dr. Jockers Functional Nutrition

00:00 sec | 3 months ago

8 Steps to Prevent & Survive Cancer with Ginny Brant

"Hello and welcome to the doctor dockers functional nutrition podcast. The show designed to give you science based solutions to improve your health and life I'm Dr David Shockers, doctor of Natural Medicine Chiropractor, and Functional Nutrition Practitioner and on the host of this podcast. I'm here to tell you that your body was created the heal itself, and on this show we focus on strategies you can apply to gay to heal and functioning. I'm excited about today's podcast. But before we jump in to remind you to download this month's special gift at Dr Jockettes. GIFT DOT COM from Kito meal plans smoothie recipes. Fasting quickstart guides. A new complimentary gift every single month to get your gift simply visit. Dr Dockers Gift Dot Com. That's D R. Shea. K. E.. R. S. G. I. F. T. DOT COM. Thanks for spending time with Nick. Let's go into the show. This podcast is sponsored by perfect. Kito. 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It's not going to spike your blood sugar and you're gonNA love the flavor. So you can pick these up these Kito cookies at www dot perfect kito dot com forward slash Dr Joggers and use the coupon code Dr Dockers. Just Dr. Jonkers. All one word and that's going to save you fifteen percent off seat can really enjoy these cookies also a lot of other great products. So again, go to www dot perfect kito dot com forward slash Dr Joggers use a coupon code Dr Joggers for fifteen percent off. You guys are GonNa Absolutely, love these. Well, hey everybody. Welcome back to the doctor shockers functional nutrition podcast where we believe your body was credited to heal itself and we're here to arm and equip you everything you need to take back control your health, and so today we're going to talk about really just exactly what I was mentioning like your God given ability to heal and have got a great guest here, and she's got a powerful story. This is Jenny Dent. Rants in Jenny is a contributing author for the chosen path three sixty five inspirational messages. Love is a flame. Chicken. Soup for the soul shaping the new and online with Christian devotions show also contributes articles to the Baptist currier and South Carolina and she wrote a great new book those guys that are watching on video. You'll see that right here my hand unleash your god-given healing AIDS steps to prevent and survive cancer, and you can find her at Ginny Brandt dot com. This is a great book I was just reading it. She just sent me a copy fantastic book of really powerful information in here, and she has got an incredible healing story as well. So Jenny, welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you Dr Dockers I'm one of your great admirers and I get a lot of information from you. Thank you I, appreciate it as skin through on my name in there a few times so It was great along with some of my friends, Dr Josh Acts Dr Eric's Alinsky and ty Bollinger and so many other great people in the health space. So I can tell that you've been reading a lot of online articles and books and You know I'd love to hear more about your story I was reading it in the book, but our audience really needs to know your story and you know how you develop cancer and and your strategies used to to to heal. Well I will tell you that I began learning about nutrition and different strategies when I was just in high school and the doctor told me I had severe reactive hypoglycemia that was my first lesson in using food as medicine and having to change my diet. But I kept on going and then my dad had timers and I was his caretaker along with my mom and sister for ten years and that's when I really began to research what is going on here. Then my mother gets cancer four months after my mother dies from cancer is when I heard those words, you have breast cancer. The next week it was it's not just any breast cancer it's aggressive. And the next week gave me words that I just couldn't process in my mind and that's when the doctor said. It looks like it spread all over your body and I said I don't believe you I feel perfectly fine. So he took me in his office and he flashed up on this big huge screen, my m I, and that's where the analogy starts in my book to the wizard of. Oz. Because it's like a tornado is in the middle of my body. And that made me do something that I recommend all cancer patients or anyone with a serious illness get a second opinion. And I ended up going to cancer treatment centers of America in Chicago because at the time that was their specialty rest cancer center, and after five days of cast in meeting with several surgeons and radiologists and doctors they look together at my. And they said, you know what? It might not be as bad as you were told, will not know to the surgery for sure but we think this is inflammation. All over your body from a biopsy that went bad. Not necessarily cancer all over your body and they were right. I still had quite a cup journey to go. But from the moment they told me I had cancer the first thing in my mind was okay. What caused it? And number two, what can I do to help my doctors to beat my cancer lessen the side effects of all the treatments they told me would be needed and get back to a normal vibrant life as I call it in the book getting back home like Dorothy in the wizard of Oz and I was able to do that. But it was a quite a long journey that required a lot of discipline, a lot of work and. A lot of attention but I want to let cancer patients know they can do a lot on their own. They can do a lot to complement what their doctors doing I mean some of the same things I used in my journey or what people used to don't do the surgery and the radiation and the chemotherapy they completely change their lifestyle to reverse the cancer. So I'm doing it because mine's aggressive to make sure my doctor beats it. Yeah. Absolutely, it will definitely makes a lot of sense and I've heard great things about cancer treatment centers of America and So glad that you're able to get such great care there. Let's talk about some of the risk factors that went into I know in the in the book you talk about just how your shock that you were diagnosed and you know the statistics are quite alarming that I. Think it's somewhere around one two man one out of three women are diagnosed with cancer some point during the course of their lives yet most people are shocked when when we get the diagnosis. And so are some of the risk factors that were involved in you developing that diagnosis. Well. Actually, I, didn't have any of the cancer society's risk factors. So I was not obese. Take Hormones for the. Hormone. Fed cancer that was aggressive that I got There are so many factors I was not quite sixty where the risk goes up but I, but I was closed on that I had my children before age thirty. When you breastfeed your children, it lowers your risk for breast cancer I breastfed until they were. Two years old including a set of twins. I never took the hormone replacement stare be that a lot of people talk about and so there was nothing about it. That makes sense I don't smoke which are risk factors I don't drink which are risk factors and so when you put it all together, my doctors looked at me and said, you know usually we can tell someone. Why got cancer said, they know what to do so that doesn't come back. Then they did extensive genetic testing I mean extensive and nothing came back. So that left me puzzled. He gave up at that point because there was nothing more they could do, and that's when I started going to integrate medical doctors to have tests done on my body to try to figure out what had gone wrong. and. What did the integrative doctors find? They find things like vitamin, D, deficiency, blood, sugar imbalances they find anything. You know that could have pointed towards stuff that was taking place. They did not at first. But when they did there were there was one test that was just done by chance I had learned to the truth about cancer to detox from all this chemo. I, needed to have a sauna and said, I got a sauna and I got involved in a clinical trials Tony. With Asana Company and they were testing I didn't realize what they were testing, but they were testing my levels of toxic chemicals in my body. When I got the results. I. Was alarmed. You know every day things were impairments and violates and you know they're hormone disruptors. There were also meth no tests done. Mercury aluminum led all at sky high levels. But here was the real clincher. Glider sate was found in me and the Agent Orange pesticide at high levels sort of. Grazing in the. Grass. was that a urine test that you reject it was it was by a great plains lamb yes. So they have the glyphosate test also have the Enviro talks test basically we actually have that carry them on our website. So I'll have a link in the show notes for those tests spending we once again. But there simple tests do basically a morning urine I just one sample and they can actually look at both of those your glyphosate levels and the. Environmental Toxins and yet really good thing to see what's coming out of your system. You know so many people have life is saved in their watering because they're using a different types of herbicides have glyphosate roundup, things like that on their grass it's getting in their drinking water. It's they've been exposed to it when they inhale it when they go outside after it's sprayed. So yeah, I'm not surprised by that. So many people habit just don't think about it. But any interesting thing to me is that my husband and I do the same things we eat the same foods we live in the same household he did not have the high levels I had. So I had to look at that and I had to say what's going on here. My system must not detox as well as his system and I think that's a genetic tendency, but it's also a tendency you can change through exercising more through sauna through hydrating more you know. So I had to look at again I didn't want this aggressive cancer coming back. Aggressive cancer is makes you high risk for the cancer to come back and I wanted to seal the baby and not let it come back out and rear its ugly head. and. So getting my toxic levels down was a key and I had to go to a practitioner to get help with that because it's not easy your do I mean you need some guidance and some help to do it and do it well, I am now you know in the green level on all those same toxins it took a while it was worth it because when you're talk sick load is as high as mine was your immune system. Is Not working as God intended, and that I believed to be the main reason I got cancer but I don't think it's usually one reason. So I kept looking and when the chaplain at cancer treatment centers of America looked back on my life the past seven to fifteen years. I was taking care of an Alzheimer's patient on top of a job, a mother with cancer of father-in-law with heart disease and a mother-in-law who also died of cancer. So that chronic grief of watching them suffer even though they all went to heaven and there were all you know, wonderful. Christians, watching them go through. That was very difficult on both my sister, my husband and I and I think that also contributed to my immune system being suppressed. While I make sense emotional element of it plays such a large role in this, and so obviously, we talked about some of those risk factors there anything else show up did you get any blood work done any like nutrient deficiencies that that you may have seen Centers of America did a blood test for vitamin D and they told me right off the bat it was twenty eight and they said you should be between seventy, nine hundred but no more than one hundred and so now they test me every year and they make sure I'm holding between eighty and ninety dog grade because they said that in and of itself could have helped to prevent my breast cancer and I really appreciated feedback from them. You see at treatment centers of America, they put a naturopathic doctor and a nutritionist on your case, an acupuncturist if needed I mean they really roll out the red carpet. For their patients and they were very good to me. Yeah. For sure and vitamin D plays such a big role when it comes to your immune system riots or really really helps with regulating immune system lot of research out about having optimal vitamin D levels like you talked about, I look at the range between really about sixty two, hundred for cancer prevention socially somebody has some sort of aggressive cancer. Yeah. Now, eighty two up to one hundred range is a really great range. How many how many international units are you taking to keep you at that eighty to ninety range? I'm taking five thousand, but I know it depends on the person. So you really have to do that test every. So often to make sure you're not going to hire to low that's true. Yeah. Usually I recommend about a thousand international units per twenty five pounds of body weight. So seems about right. You're probably getting a little bit when he consumes something like grass fed butter or obviously getting sunshine, and you're going to get some some vitamin D that way. So some different things like that as well. Now, let's talk about your eight steps because in your book, you outline eight steps to prevent end survive cancer. So let's dive into that a little bit. Okay. Well, the first step is definitely hydration. Because every cell and every body system need sufficient hydration order to work as God intended and I think most people in America today and I was already knew this before the cancer journey. So I was working on that on this I would speak on it when I would speak wellness conferences for school districts and things that hydration is important. But I had to look at it a little bit closer when this happened to me and during the chemotherapy. I'm getting half my body weight and fluid ounces, and then I'm adding three to four extra glasses of water just like you would. If you had the flu or you know any situation, they tell you in situations to a- Piedra. My nutritionist at cat told me to up my hydration and it would lower the side effects of the chemotherapy plus assure that they get to. Where they're supposed to get to and then get back out. So it takes both hydration and exercise to get it in and get it back out and were Lou impact system properly. So I did do that I know that some people today and I didn't know this at the time are actually water fasting the day two days before the day of a day or two after. They can possibly make it or at least the day before the day of the day after, and it seems like from what I'm hearing that they chemotherapy goes more to the cancer cells than to the normal cells, and that has to do with the fact of the state that your body's in because you're fasting. So I would really like to see them us. You know just all cancer hospitals I know this is by the sky but used less chemotherapy I believe in the chemotherapy but I believe the best way now that I've learned more is to test your own cancer cells to see which adds events which nutrients and which chemicals work the best on you because what works for one. person may not work for another people and you don't WanNa waste chemicals that do have side effects for your body. You WanNa. Make sure you get that right up front if you're going to use chemotherapy and then in my opinion, the lower the dose a better. Yeah. That that definitely makes a lot of sense and like you were talking about there with the five day fast. Around the chemotherapy. The goal there is basically to get your body and Kito Sa's so when you're not burning. Sugar for fuel because you haven't consumed a lot of food than your body starts bring your own body fat turn on key tombs, and that's suppresses insulin get your blood sugar very low and we know that cancer cells are aerobic meaning that they really survive and thrive on Glucose metabolism. In someone there's not a whole lot of sugar there that become weak in Hungary and chemotherapy comes in now they're going to go will that you're gonNA try to not whatever's in the bloodstream so you're going to get a lot more. Chemotherapy uptake by the cancer cells, and then the normal cells are actually protected because the key towns have a chemo protective effect for the normal cells, which is really interesting. They strengthen there might have conju and theirselves become more. Resilient to end sort of damage from the chemotherapy, you have less side of things as well. Wish I had known that. Yeah. Absolutely, I mean most people don't think about it. When you think about cancer, they think well, these people are suffering they need food and nutrients and all this kind of stuff and so you know the goal they're they're trying to feed them, and really what we're seeing is that the less the better now there are some states where somebody has like extreme catchier, which is where they're. Wasting away, right do that. But at the same time for a lot of people doing this sort of fasting regimen can be extraordinarily helped seen many people do well doing it I working people utilizing this and seen phenomenal results. But then like you said, there's you need less chemotherapy. There's a lot less side of BAX and better overall results by doing it so So it's a great strategy that way. great. You know I'm a huge fan hydration. I believe that bio electrical beings meaning that we action produce energy through water electrolytes, and so we think about Thanksgiving we big meal we feel tired right. But if you hydrate well and you get your body metabolic flexible where you're good at burning your own body for fuel you'll produce tons of energy action, very mental and clear very energetic. When you are fasting as long as you're hydrated, you've got the electrolytes that you need and it also opens up those drainage pathways helps you poop better? Adults helps get toxins out through urine. You know we've got a pin are way to good health in a sense incentive to keep pathways that we help to improve warmer well hydrated. So very important stop one our body. It'd be like a river not like a pond that literally stays there and you know I it. Ends up fermenting and creating all of this You know stench that comes from the pond we want things moving like a river and that helps facilitate life and health. So. It's critical in the cancer journey because when that chemotherapy goes in, you don't want your body to get backed up in constipated or sluggish. You want it to move on through because will re circulate in your body and that's when people get so sick. That's a really good point right there, and and one of the side effects of chemotherapy oftentimes is constipation. So that hydration really helps and binding it with water and getting it out in the stool as was the urine very important like you said, because we don't want that auto toxic auto at toxication that can take place if you don't get it out. So that was the first one. What's what was number two? Number two is deep sleep just simply because your body repairs and detoxify is while you're sleeping and they told me in the cancer journey. Naturopathic doctor told me that I would not be able to recover from all the surgeries and the Chemo therapy in the treatment if I did not get sufficient sleep and then on the other side of that, you've got the fact that things they give you before chemotherapy make it. So it's hard for you to sleep. So five pre meds, and then the chemotherapy it was an eight hour ordeal for me. Every time I got chemotherapy so it was hard to sleep but I had to learn how to do it in a natural way if at all possible and put all my efforts towards that in, it's one of the reasons I decided not to return to work I was retirement age I decided to make fighting cancer my full-time time goal rather than trying to have a full job while I was doing it because I knew what would happen is if I couldn't sleep, then I'd be forced to get up at five thirty a M to get ready to go. To work, and then I was putting my life in my cancer journey at risk for the sake of job. So I was able to do that. But what I recommend to people as if they can't get the sleep needed because of a job, the need to look at temporary disability until they get through their cancer treatments because sleep is free and it's one of those things that you really need to detox your body and you needed for it to heal and you've just gotTa get it helps prevent cancer and disease in the first place. But once you're in the cancer journey, it's going to be critical for you to get that deep consistent sleep. You're so right about that. I mean you really can't heal without good sleep and so I'm right there with you I recommend my clients that are dealing with cancer take a leave of absence from work if possible or at least cut down the hours part time work from home kind of thing towards minimally stressful so I think that's just so important and should be overlooked and really prioritizing good sleep. What are your top strategies for helping improve good-quality deep sleep? Well, one of the things was I had to remove myself from from the charging next to my bed and remove anything in the room like the electric alarm clock that was ticking and you know. Just. Any amount of light I had to make the room. Cool had to look at what I was doing during the day that might contribute to me not sleeping at night, and then I use some natural essential oils I use the serenity by Tehran. I'm sure there's lots of things out there to help me to go to sleep at night and to be. Perfectly honest. If that didn't work I, would get up and go to the SOFA in the living room because sometimes a new place you know just helps you to be able to fall asleep and that didn't work the doctor did give me something to relax me to go to sleep that I use like rarely but the point is you have to get to sleep. because. You've got to recuperate from what this journey is doing to you, and if you stay up all night. You're not doing yourself any papers. Yeah. For sure and and to tack on that you really don't want to eat late at night. So I always recommend eating. You know basically at least three hours before you go to bed that's a really good idea. You don't want to exercise too late at night exercising earlier in the day will help sleep. But if you exercise late at night not going to. Be Good for good quality sleep and also getting good sun exposure early in the day, actually can help set your circadian rhythm. So getting out early in the day getting Sun Exposure really sets your circadian rhythm will help you fall asleep and dim your lights in the evening when the when it gets dark at night should have your lights damn. It's better to have more of kind of the red orange lighting. Rather than bright white lights in your home because they have more blue light, which can block Melatonin. You want minimal lighting right and whatever lighting you do have should should be more similar to like a candlelight a sense It's a little bit less invasive and dry. Basically, it's not gonNA due to inhibit melatonin release quite as much when he knew that. Those are just some good strategies to follow by. We've got a prime MELATONIN is key. No that's like your body's natural anticancer agent right there that you produce on your own every single day or at least you should be producing and you WanNa make sure you optimize that because it's free and all the right strategies to get it to release properly. What else was number three? L. Definitely exercise. Exercise was my buddy during the whole entire Jeremy when I was first diagnosed I walked to relieve the stress and then when it was time before the first surgery. I. After I. came out of the surgery I walked before the surgery and then after I came out I, had all these tubes attached to my body that I did not know what to do with they were very uncomfortable and I wanted them gone so I asked the nurse what I could do to get rid of the cat litter and he said if you can walk around this hospital for at six o'clock tomorrow morning, I'll take it out well. I ready at six o'clock to go. I ended up walking two miles day on the hospital floor pulling the poll with all the tubes medical apparatus behind me but it felt so good. And at one point, the nurse called my surgeon and said, she's already hit him all should I stop her and she said no, as long as she has the energy. And the balance and I did by the time I got back to my room and lunch was served. My surgeon comes in and she said we're going to release you a day early and you were supposed to go home with tubes for two weeks for your husband nurse. She said your exercise has already drained the tubes. You have limited blood clots in your body you have jumpstarted heat in your body and oxygenated your body. She said, I'm releasing you early with no tubes and that's a rarity in breast cancer surgery. So exercise was great for me then and then of course every day I'm exercising and then it's time for the thing I don't want. Chemo therapy. And at the time, the research was not clear about this. I did it by instinct no one told me to do it but I told my husband I said I'm going to walk two miles before chemotherapy to relieve my nerves because I don't want to do it. And two miles afterwards. I had no idea what that was going to do for me, and then I would continue that every day after the chemotherapy. After I went through all the chemotherapy and did so well, one of my doctors came back and said, have you seen the new research of the thirty entities in Australia about what exercise does for the cancer patient what you did by instinct they have now proven is the best thing a cancer patient can do it relieves stress and it helps the Chemo to target the cancer and then it pumps the lymphatic system because once it does it's killed job you want to move the chemo out of the body that is the biggest problem that cancer patients have. So again, hydration and exercise together makes a huge difference. But now they're telling cancer patients because of that study that Meta analysis study in Australia with thirty different cancer entities feeding into it that the best thing cancer patients can do is exercise now years ago it was oh you Patrick Kane month therapy just go home and lie in bed all week and see if you get up possibly and I was like really I mean, that's what they were telling people because that's all they knew at the time. Now they know the lymphatic systems got take out the trash. And if you don't move, it's not going to do it. So I've told people are going to the cancer journey. A lot of people call me and I go get your patient. If they had the energy in the balance you can walk them around the hospital for after that chemotherapy but they got to keep moving I've had doctors come in my home and I told them you know you gotTa. Keep moving. Don't go home and lay down for weeks after chemotherapy you're not helping yourself. And then at the end. Of course, I get this pill for five years that estrogen fed cancer patients get for minimum of five years. It's a hormone blocker and it kills your bone density. It can wreck your sleep it can cause depression. All these things exercises the cure for all that. So instead of taking five drugs to remedy what one pill does to my body I'm using exercise and just got my test results back last month, and in six months, I have increased my bone density back to what it was before I got the chemotherapy and the Pill for five years. That's great. Any been taking that estrogen blockers at Tamoxifen or something like that. It's it's a NAST resolve. If you're over a certain age, then you get an astros all usually or something like that. The Tamaki offended for the people usually under fifty that are before menopause. that the it can really do between the Chemo and that pill it can do a number on most most people's bone density plummets friend. Then you've got to deal with Osteo Pena or osteoporosis. And I've got part of my body back to the end of the normal range and then part in Osteo Pini arranged but the point is I was approaching osteoporosis because of the treatments. Yeah. So you have to keep that in mind you have to carefully watched that bone density and if you are not willing to stress the bone and do those I do yoga exercises and the PT Therapist at Cancer Treatment Centers of America made up a routine of exercises for me to target my bone density. I just wanted to interrupt this podcast and tell you about these kito cookies that taste incredible. I mean it took this company over a year to formulate this product to ensure that it did not cause your blood sugar to spike your tones to drop your insulin spike and promote inflammation in the body which. Most products most sweet treats even low carb treats. Do I've tried so many low carb cookies and they threw me out of Kito service and so these kito cookies are actually formulated with ingredients that are not going to impact your blood sugar the same way you things like grass-fed buttered almond flour, coconut flour, coconut oil. Egg. It's got to see Shia gum is actually a great prebiotic fiber. It's got grass Fed Collagen, which is incredible for your skin, your hair, your nails, your gut lining, and your joints. So if you're looking for a great Kito Desert. These are things that you probably could get away with eating every day for for a lot of guys do well. But if you're just looking for something as like an occasional treats and you know you're you're tired of trying to make these things, these different Kito Dessert recipes on your own, then pick these up there. The Perfect Kito Kito cookies. So simply go to you perfect Tito Dot com forward slash Dr shockers. And use the coupon code Dr Jonkers. All one birds, which is Dr Juicy K. E. R. S. to save fifteen percent off of these today. Again, that's perfect. Kito Dot com forward slash Er yakkers use the coupon code Dr Joggers to save fifteen percent off China's GonNa. Love these cookies I'm telling you what might as well get a few cases because you're GonNa, Love Them Your family's GonNa. Love them, and you might as well stocked up all right back to the podcast. Which is great and so obviously there's a proof in the pudding your bone density has not been depleted in fact, it's better now because he doing this and so you know we need that exercise is basically a stress on the body in the right. The right amount of stress helps make our bodies stronger and So getting out getting moving helps improve your oxygenation. So your ability to get oxygen deep into the cells, which is just so important for overall health we know that cancer is anaerobic so it doesn't survive. In oxygen based environment. So exercise again enhances our ability to use oxygen for energy helps drive down our blood sugar and insulin levels. So a lot of good reasons for getting regular exercise and and you know when you're going through chemotherapy or he'd been diagnosed cancer. If you haven't, if you're not exercising on a regular basis to begin with, it can be hard to be motivated to start up but it's you perhaps the most important time. Right to get going with that. How did you find the motivation at it out? I was already exercising not as much as I did, but I was already walking several miles a day again, I didn't have a lot of the risk factors for the cancer that I got because exercise is a major strategy for prevention again with but I never did the bone density exercises to stress those bones. To help increase my bone density. So it was just a matter of I. Did that at the discipline because I didn't want to take the bone shots because I knew that they were going to build my bone from the outside in rather than the inside out and I didn't want the side effects that might come with that. So that was my motivation or It did work but I know some people are doing both they're taking the pill or the shot to increase the bone density. But if you're going to do that at least do the exercises with it for sure. All right. So what is the next step I? Believe we've covered three of them so far exercise water deep sleep and exercise helps a number four. The forth is food as medicine, and again, if you go back to my high school days, I would definitely tell you that. I was the junk Food Queen Okay and I learned. At that time that I wasn't gonNA. Make it being the junk food queen. Journey with Alzheimer's where I went to the Alzheimer's conference with all the lead medical researchers in Charleston and I got to ask questions and they attribute a lot of it to our culture and our diet, and I was just amazed and it was too late for my dad at that point he was too far gone but I began changing my diet even more then. But. When I got cancer, I really had to look at food in a different light and look at it as they say as medicine what am I eating? That's going to give me high nutrients and low calories instead of the opposite and when you start looking at the plant profiles and I had to look carefully at each plant profile and how the DNA plants complements our bodies DNA. Then, what I eat I mean I really am what I eat and of course I really am what I eat eats in other words if I eat a cow that's been fed GMO feed and been given all these hormones. Dan that's going to be passed on to me. So I have gone all organic as much as possible to the dirty dozen and the. Clean. Fifteen. I've gone organic with the meats and wild caught fish and I really try to make sure I cruciferous vegetables every single day in my smoothie. There are certain things that I get every day that build the immune system. In the five years after the chemotherapies been over, they warned me that I would be sick a lot because my immune system would be compromised the white blood cells, the red blood cells in the platelets. Were strongly hit by chemotherapy and they told me I would possibly have blood transfusions. It was so bad. Well I never had to do that but. Eating foods that build my immune system. Capped it. So my white blood cells have remained high and I. Haven't caught anything in that five years and that's really rare for someone who said the chemotherapy that I've had. Really Great. Absolutely in cruciferous vegetables have compounds called glencoe simulates which one compound in there is. So four fan really really powerful for helping down regulate bad estrogen. So we have all these different estrogen metabolites some of them promote growth, they amplify the growth message. All estrogens are growth promoters, some really amplify it in some subtypes are more mild more protective, and for a lot of people due to nutrient deficiencies due to genetics. Toxin exposure the end up with a whole lot of these really growth amplifying estrogen metabolites, and so so four of fame getting that from Broccoli Cauliflower Brussels sprouts things like that. Kale in if you do the actual sprouts like Broccoli sprouts and Kale sprouts really rich in this stuff radishes another good one you know that's going to help help move in the right direction when it comes. To the right getting right sub types of estrogen and keeping overall growth under control we don't want this massive expression of growth and that's where insulin the warm on that regulates blood sugar an estrogen work their growth promoters, and you know after we get you know to adulthood, we don't want to be over stimulating those and so very, very important stuff there. What is your typical diet like Jane Let's talk about your day in the life you know what you're typically eating. You know do you do intermittent fasting at all? What does it? What does this look like for you? Well. I am doing intermittent fasting right now I'm trying not to eat till about eleven or twelve o'clock in the morning I'm retired. So I can do that easier than someone else. But that was after watching your fasting transformation. My husband did it with me and he had pain in his journal points. And the pain went away and he's like, what is this I said it's lowering inflammation, and so I'm doing that now 'cause I really liked to get my weight down a little bit more and I think it's it's good after listening to your transformation I realize it's good for me to do that now I was always cautioned not to do that because. I have the tendency for the blood sugar problems. and. Then I'm finding that you know I can do it I can go for a day and not eat and just waterfall ask but what the first thing I eat in the morning now at eleven or twelve I just finished it is a chocolate banana blueberries moody with cruciferous Vegetables Broccoli sprouts some certain things in there that I don't particularly like but the chocolate banana covers it up and I know some people don't like to drink the same thing every day but I'll change out the Greens and I'll change out the berries sometimes had strawberries or Combo of berries, but it works for me and my husband 'cause we love. Chocolate. That works for us. He is really easy on the digestive system. You're able to get those nutrients in puts less work on your gut too. So it's a really good died and it builds the GATT I put. One of the things I put in there is the permited foods that I don't like to eat ike clump them in there to it covers the to its covers, a multitude of things that I might not normally eat but we're getting like five or six superfoods in that smoothie, and the recipe is in my book because I put it together from experience and everybody's gotTa make their own some people might like more chocolate I use coconut milk I do I'm getting away from the dairy I'm getting away from the gluten because I'm starting to see that it own. It doesn't help my system. Yeah. For sure and I want my gut to be functioning properly because I'd never looked at that until I got cancer. Yeah. So the only dairy product that I'm okay with for cancer patients is really grass fed butter or ghee because it doesn't have the inflammatory protein some of the proteins that are in derry casing and way really stimulate growth in the body way can stimulate insulin case seen can be very inflammatory in the gut on. Breaking that down so that can be tough on the system that is now the sugar in dairy either but it does have fats, and if you get grass-fed dairy, you're going to have omega three fatty acids. You're going to have fat soluble nutrients like vitamin A vitamin, D vitamin E vitamin. K, foster that'll choline, which is really powerful nutrient for healthy brain function, healthy bile, flow, saline, different things like that. So butter has has great benefits but other than that you really WanNa avoid milk cheese right? All those kinds of products even yogurt or a lot of people think yogurt is real healthy tend to have higher amounts of sugar. You've also got those proteins in there so. Coconut milk is really good alternative and you know if you want yogurt. Find Coconut. Milk. Yogurt these days to that's what I use at the end it by so good I think I forgot what is Good. So delicious. Yes. I do but it's hard to find. Only hope that I can't find many places that have has it but I use that. Yup for sure. So that's a good one Great. So you're doing the smoothie what else are you doing throughout the day like what? Are you just doing two meals a day on basically when I do that intermittent fasting I just do two meals a day. That's all I need being a senior citizen and at dinner we will have we don't have meat at every meal like we used to. I'm not saying we don't eat meat if we do it's wildcard or its grasp bed, but I'm learning to make these dishes that just don't have any of that type protein plant based protein. and. That works it should be a while to find a few things that we like and we found some soups that are too bad either so. I stuck with the recipes already had and changed to organic and tried to lessen the meat in those, and then I looked at new new things that I could bring in gradually because it was a big change for both of us. But now that we've made the change, it's really not such a big deal. You know we're we're kind of used to it now and when you know what these boots have 'em, and then what benefit healthy foods give you it makes you more motivated to eat those healthy foods instead of going towards the junk that I used to eat routinely you know for sure what was dinner like last night what was actually on your plate? We had a homemade. And wild rice soup everything organic everything made from scratch when I make it. I made a big pot shared it with someone who had gotten out of the hospital. I froze some for later and we ate it three nights straight because we love it. So yeah, there you go. Make it in bulk you time to. That's right. Yup, great well, sounds good. Now, that was the fourth thing we talked about nutrition. What was number five was the fifth step to prevent cancer it's something I learned at the Truth About Cancer Conference I already knew the first four and I had to dig deeper. But when I went to the truth about cancer twice. I learned that emotions can have a powerful impact on the body. So I call those few chapters using your faith to manage your emotions because one of the things I discovered was that I'm pretty happy go lucky and and no matter what happens I can roll with the punches but what I didn't realize was that grief. Can Derail your immune system and there are a lot of negative emotions and group is a normal emotion by when it goes on for fifteen years without stopping and you barely have a break in between then that's not good so. You know I I think the fact that I have a happy go lucky personnel fit help me somewhat but that grief when I realized that it distracted my immune system. I realized that I had to change the way I was duping things and put different things in there like using a heart coherence apt to help you deep breath and relax I was already exercising from the grief of my dad's illness with Alzheimer's I was keeping him every weekend. So I was going like. On wheel you know with a fulltime job and being out of town. So your emotions do impact your body and your health, and I had to take a good long look at that and make changes. Yeah Yeah. Emotions are are a huge factor and a Lotta Times. It's sub-conscious. We don't really know how it's affecting us. So for sure and what were some of the strategies you used to help improve that you talked about utilizing your faith relying on your faith. So how did what what were some strategies used? Well, I started doing research on different positive emotions because Paul tells us to look on the good. You know no matter what you're going through. Look look at the good things. Whatever's true. Whatever's lovely thing on those things and then I looked at the things in the Bible that God talks about any talks about the value of laughter. And I want you to know I have never lacked as much as I've laughed during the cancer journey because you're under a lot of stress and after I got that terrible horrible. No good. Very bad news that that doctor thought it was all over my body and I flew up to cancer treatment centers of America in Chicago. I, mean, I was just devastated. But I was looking for the funny things along the way and when they they pick you up at the airport by the way they had a driver there waiting for us when we got there and there was a guy that came up and said I think comes supposed to go with you and that driver and I said really. So the driver called the cancer center and he said, no, I'm not supposed to pick you up and I looked at him and I said young man, do you know where we're going? And he said, no, I said we're going to the cancer center. I've never seen someone turnaround an exit stage left so quickly and we laughed the Hallway to the cancer center and I said I don't want to go to the cancer center. I wouldn't be here if I didn't have to be in my husband's. You'd have to go to the cancer center and the driver said I wish I didn't have to drive people to the cancer center. And we just laughed and when I got back from the surgery, my insurance company believe it or not Blue Cross Blue Shield sent a nurse from Dallas. Texas. This is how bad my case was to get to know me and to meet me and she flew on a plane to meet me at my home and so when I just been looking over my bills and the estimated cost of what this journey was going to cost me and I realized I was a three quarters of a million dollar cancer patient. So when she rang the doorbell I answered it and I said, well, before I let you in Nancy, I need to know this do you have a gun in your briefcase? Why Now? Why would I have a gun? and. I said, well, considering, I'm your newest three quarters of a million dollar cancer patient. I thought that maybe I was worth more dead than alive. She looked at me with horror is, and then she realized that's my sense of humor and she said keep it up. It'll help you through the journey and it did so borden absolutely are great snooze it let me tell you about music me tape needs to chromium zinc I love Johnny Ericsson Totta, and I've interviewed her several times and she's been through the cancer journey twice but she's the oldest living quadriplegic in the world at seventy years old soon to be seventy one in. October. And it's amazing. She's still alive and. It's music she lets the word. Of Hymns Minister to her soul. Through music and it's just something she constantly does and anytime you opt lip the soul with hope. With music with laughter it's Goo or praised to God prayer meditation. Concentrating. On his word, it helps the body to heal. Absolutely while all those things can help push in that para sympathetic mode where that's your rest digest in he'll part of your nervous system. So it really turns on healing switch most people are in fighter flight all day. And So really resetting and being intentional about doing those things can be so powerful. So you know one of the things I play in the play in our house are the whole tones and offer smiliar with them Michael Tyrel, and They have a unique key. I can't remember I. Think it's like four, forty, four hertz that they're played on. And it actually stimulates healing potential in your body right and he's gotTa Sleep. He's got a whole tones to go. So they can listen to while you're sleeping, which is great and I'm like you in our house we have worshipped music on a regular basis says you always uplifting things so important and you know famous quote laughter is our best medicine, right? So definitely important stockton. Yes. So I like step number five, there would step number six. Well, it's definitely gratitude because it is the one. Attitude that has the most research behind it, and it actually does promote healing and I taught it to my students. I was thirty two years in the school system as a counselor and an adjunct professor, and I taught my kids no matter what they went through to get up every morning and count your blessings, and now the research clearly shows that when you do that. It's just promoting healing. In your body, it makes a difference in the journey. So I had to take my own medicine there. As things were happening to me I, to keep my mind as Paul said, focused on the good. And all the things I could be thankful for in the cancer journey and the probably the most. I mean there are so many things to be thankful for but husband's stood like a rock beside me and you know when you lose all your hair. You know usually it takes two or three chemo treatments and some chemo you don't lose your hair. Well, mine was the first treatment was so strong every hair on my body was gone. And he stood by me after surgery after surgery after surgery and after no hair and I wouldn't even WanNa look in the mirror at myself and he would say. Honey, you're still the most beautiful woman east of the Mississippi River. And my sense of humor is wondering what those poor women look like. This is what I'm look alike, but to have that love and that companionship and that support. And to make it through chemotherapy and they prepared me for two years. Moon system would be compromised in six weeks. It was back within normal limits after chemotherapy and they called me there rockstar cancer patient but I'm convinced it wasn't the chemo because the chemo was killing immune system it was the things I was doing. To make things better and now with what I've learned I think I could even do better and I could do less chemo. Yeah now slowly will so good. You know they say in the Bible, it's proverb. Cheerful heart is good medicine right and so His so important, let's talk about step number seven. Well that was. The one that I flunked. I did not realize that my body had accumulated such a toxic loads. So step number seven is lowering your toxic load. I. Go into great detail how toxic our world has become. But the shock when those tasks came back. And I realized how high toxic level was and a lot of those toxins were endocrine disrupters. They mimicked asked Trajan, they were Zeno estrogens and then I have to wonder why I had an estrogen fed cancer anymore and and that's why I. I knew I had to write the book because I thought how many women out there are like me it's not everyone but they're accumulating these toxins. They're getting exposed to things on their skin through water through their food through the household cleaning products to what they breed at. They don't realize they're bucket is full and a lot of the chemicals are hormone disruptors and there's all these one in eight women get. Breast cancer eighty percent are estrogen fed and ninety percent of the men who get breast cancer, which is not as great as the women. The number ninety percent are estrogen fed. So what does that tell you when God did make a man to have as much estrogen and they're getting estrogen dominance, right? I mean something's clearly wrong. You got it prostate and colon cancer oftentimes estrogen dominant cancers as well for men. So, absolutely we have we're swimming in an abundance of estrogen mimicking molecules. The things in plastics violates a personal care products make-up's WanNa Pesticides Herbicides they act as estrogen irs as well. So we're surrounded by these things and really the key is S-, minimize your exposure. But then also we got to open up our drainage pathways like you were talking about hydrating moving our body. Peeing and Qiuping well, sweating like the Sauna, you are important to get rid of this the your toxic load on a daily basis just so important. Let's talk about step number eight. So eight steps to prevent survive cancer guys unleash your god-given healing mazing books. What's a? Step Number Eight, definitely healing and restoring the gut another one that I flunked here I thought I was a health nut and I wasn't health nutty enough antibiotics destroy the gut lining chemotherapy destroys the gut lining. The interesting thing is that my naturopathic doctors had my back on this one I was the first patient at cancer treatment centers of America in Chicago to get the vitamin C. infusions before each chemotherapy. So that was to protect my gut as well as build my immune system. Okay. But. Chemotherapy still is going to wreak havoc on the gut even though I was protecting, it maybe didn't get totally destroyed but there was damaged on I had to completely rebuild my gut through what I did and through what I ate and I now follow a doctor Jordan Rubens Jordan revenue keys that I learned from him the truth about cancer, and that is eating two to three probiotic foods a day plus taking a probiotic substance. I get a lot of that product in my Smoothie, the yogurt and the Sauerkraut, and then I drink an apple cider vinegar. Drink first thing in the morning after my first class of water, and so I'm trying to get three probiotic foods a day. And I'm trying to eliminate the gluten and the dairy and anything that's going to irritate my gut because that's where your immune system is and you know I didn't know that until I went through the cancer journey and I look at the mini cancer patients out there that have been through chemotherapy and good is totally destroyed will no wonder their immune system is struggling to rebound? So I hope that they will look at the book apply some of these things and have a healthier prognosis. I think what's amazing about my case is not that the cancer. Almost killed me. I didn't die from all the treatments and the damage done to my body. And that's because of the things I was clearly doing you know and I I don't think I could have gone through the chemotherapy if I didn't have help people like people come to you and they're helping their patients to do it so that the damage is not going to be. So bad I mean I did not come out with I didn't have any major side effects except the red blood cells and platelets went temporarily down but came back up but but all the mouth sores and a chronic pain and the things that people talk about below immune system and all saying I didn't have that and they told me I went through the worst chemotherapy known to mankind for the longest amount of time and I'll tell you this. A guy who was watching me here well, known Duke University oncologist. Watching from home. And he saw me after my fourth chemotherapy and he said I've never seen anyone go through this chemotherapy for gene who just walked two miles before they came to see me you're laughing and smiling during our appointment and he said. Usually after the fourth chemo, people can't lift their head off the pillow for weeks and you act like nothing happened except your ball is a bat I mean you're. Just you know and he got so inquisitive. He asked me what I was doing. I told him. Anyhow his waiting room and he was taking notes and I thought he was GonNa, throw them away. He started researching what I was saying. and. He ended up starting a cancer prevention and Wellness Center for the hospital system he worked for that does research and cancer patients can go to to get extra help and they said tuneup nurse practitioners out to get trained in the kind of things I was talking about. It's A great victory for the cancer walled. If more cancer hospitals would do that for sure we really need that marriage between. And Conventional Medicine and Um and so a lot of people on the commercial medicine world are closed minded when it comes to the natural health world using lifestyle medicine and vice versa on people natural health world that. Kinda dogmatically mattis against any sort of therapy from the conventional world, and so we really need to have the marriage there because both have a place and more they definitely both have a place. We can use those together in the in the utilizing them appropriately you know at the more synergy be have a better effect we have, and then the end result is we get an amazing healing story like yours and. We're able to influence more and more people around the world to to help improve their lifestyle. So So important and Ginny Great Book Gang Guys, Unleash god-given healing. We'll have a link there that you can get it on Amazon. And also off of off of budge his website as well. seeking get it. They're great book I knew if you have anybody family members that that may have been diagnosed with cancer or maybe you have a family history of cancer your concern about it this is a fantastic book to pick up. Your friend that's that's needing it for their for themselves or a family member really great book very, very inspiring easy to read and a Lotta good action steps to start apply. So definitely, guys check that out ginny any last words of inspiration our audience here I will say this, I have a cancer prevention blog I continue to go into things that I'm learning, and sometimes it'll just be a link to something you've said on your on your blog but. Usually I post every week and as I learn more things than I. Just I post sometimes I. go into great detail about what's in lemon what's an ally once in a superfood and how it benefits you. But, they can sign up for the cancer prevention block as well. At my website, Ginny Brandt dot com, any brand dot com. So just go there check that out and you'll get her her emails where or show show share all her her latest findings and Says she's doing. So thanks again, Ginnie appreciate you being on guys check. OUT GINNY BRANDT DOT com. And remember the power to heal is within you and your more valuable than you think you are. So go out start taking action today, your life and your health guys. We'll see you on a future podcast. We'll. That's all for this show and I want to thank you again for spending your valuable time with clean today and if there was something, you heard this interview that you have questions or you want to dive in the earth, the doctor dockers dot com is the best place to go. If you enjoyed this episode, please consider taking a quick moment and giving us a great review your help us influence more people in transfer more lives. And if you took something valuable way from this episode, then please share it with someone in your life. We'll see you soon on a future podcast he blessed.

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How things have changed at Kirkland's Life Care Center since the pandemic began

KUOW Newsroom

00:00 sec | 4 months ago

How things have changed at Kirkland's Life Care Center since the pandemic began

"Governor Inslee has extended the statewide pause on letting counties. Move to the next phase of reopening amid pandemic indefinitely and tomorrow new statewide restrictions aimed at slowing the spread of the corona virus, go into effect for restaurants and bars throughout the state. It's been six months since the first covid nineteen deaths were reported in the United States and most of them were tied to a nursing home in Kirkland. But his Co. WS, Anna Boyko y rock reports, things, there have since changed. The Life Care Center of Kirkland hasn't had a positive case of covid nineteen in over a month that's according to Public Health Seattle and King. County Nancy Butler is life care centers of America. She says, staff administrators learned a lot about how to control the virus making sure we're screaming. Well, making sure we're doing some routine testing wearing the P. P. monitoring staff to ensure. Ensure they're following guidelines for P. E. Management. She says a portion of staff are tested randomly every week and someone test positive. They test the entire facility. Still Butner says the virus is being spread by people without symptoms at the South Hill Life, Care Facility in Puyallup twenty, nine residents and thirty four staff have covid nineteen to have died anti Boyko Iraq kyw. News.

Nancy Butler Anna Boyko Kirkland Governor Inslee Life Care Center Butner United States Puyallup Seattle America P. P. P. E. Management six months
Animal Talk  Ceasr Milan 07  Episode 80

PodcastDetroit.com

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Animal Talk Ceasr Milan 07 Episode 80

"Broadcasting from coast to coast and around the world it's time for animal talk walk with some of the best dog gone pet people on the planet. Dr Brad Davis Devi Emmett chief of staff for the veterinary centers of America Donna four near our animal behaviorist Brian Bar check wrangling the reptiles and I'm Jamie Flanagan here. It is animal talk it all right our guest today when it comes to where do I start when it comes to dog behavior in dog training. He's everything everything he really is. He's he's the host of the dog whisper on National Geographic Channel Fridays at eight PM they're into their fourth season right now a new set of DVD's or out now season to the entire season two is out and he also created a foundation to help needy dog shelters. He's a bestselling author he's written Caesar's way and the a new book out right now be the pack leader and he's with us on the phone and we're very pleased to talk to him again. Cesar Milan welcome to animal talk. Thank you guys is how are you oh great great and at right after your last visit with us you were featured on on one of my favorite television shows. South Park that was it was so funny it was like a week or two after it was the most delightful thing and did they get your permission or did you help with the voice on that mission. Ed Nice to me. Did you sue the pants it was you they. They weren't making fun of you. It was making fun of the kids behavior and I think they they really encapsulated your approach very well to the point that rehabilitated the worst kit in America and then you turn your back and then the mom and able ah go see that it is you're into the fourth season already or season which is which means more more challenge is thirty. Five new episodes is more than a hundred dogs that we're doing and of course more than one hundred humans were doing you know training and it's just. I'm very happy about this one because we we actually do follow ups. You know it's one thing that might then my audience always wanted definitely responding with be the pack the book and of course he's on four together. We we really going to give people the inside of about what it really takes to be a pack leader in the meaning and the ways ways of creating the energy 'cause a lot of people. So what do you mean about. You know this sort of energy. How do you create this gums that have energy so between the book and the show would definitely definitely would definitely you know make people understand what I mean I in. How can they created so. Where's the show going to take you the season twelve different cities eighties? which is you know for more than last year? Okay yes so how did how did it all start for you. How did how did dog training. How did you become the dog whisperer for. How did it start for you. What I think star all the way from Mexico you know race being race the way I was raised being respect for the Mother Nature I was raised by my grandfather and my dad they're buff incredible with nature and then when I was thirteen I wanna be the best during the war and it just feel good you know saying that and and from that point on I just focus in learning anything else besides what I knew about dogs. which is you know? I I I learned about grooming learn about bad tech. I learned about Kennels. I learned about a little you know and then and then eventually I started watching Alaskan Ring Tintin to go to America to to learn from these people because obviously these folks are incredible you know and then I saw when I came to America. The you know. A lot of dogs were nervous. Anxious fearful and people wanted to train the dogs instead. They're sending back into a normal state before they train them and so that's when I say okay we know these people actually need psychology which to me represents commonsense sense and eventually. I opened my dog psychology center you know and Los Angeles and I started using the pack because that's that's how why grew up. I grew up with a pack of dogs and I know that the pack and helped me better than anybody else better than any other tool in the world and so you know that's that's how it started and then it just snowballed with the books and the show and and now the second seasons out on DVD. Now people have seen the second season he is an on TV. Why would they want to buy the entire thing because I would because I got a crush on your Caesar. Why would someone else WanNa buy the DVD's. Why thing inside? I think you know I think you can go back and I know there are a lot of people have have the the the record them you know but you know then you can only recourse so so much you can always go back and Zayed. You'll see fierce tension. OC aggression or whatever and just you know think a frame by frame and study it and and you you know just watch it all over again. I know people that have watch one episode more than Twenty Times. Oh yeah absolutely there's some wonderful. This season season four starts off with a bang. I love the first episode it's it's incredible a whole apartment complex held hostage and you walked in and I I love it. I I watch every season. I'm a huge fan and and it's it's just wonderful to see this because you are doing such a benefit for dog trainers in animal behaviors everywhere. You're you're helping people understand that there's such a commitment involved to these dogs and we say that endlessly but it's nice to see that you're able to bring that to the screen and some. People Watch you work your magic and this season was just brilliant started off wonderfully w- thank you very much and you know I really believe in the pack of course and community is a pack and the apartment building is a pack of people but they they they didn't know how to work together. They were working against each other so they have to you. Know make sure you know the doors close and you know and somebody walks four in. Somebody works at three why they don't just make one whole happy. Pack uh-huh did more for that apartment community. Obviously they enjoy that walk and they felt it is possible. They just have to make sure they do it every day yeah that that's well. That's something Donna promotes again and again is the schedules and the dogs thrive on the schedules. the book. Caesar's way was hugely successful and and the new book be the pack leader what what people find in be the pack leader that they didn't get from Caesar's way well. I am responding to my audience audience more than anything you know with updates on dogs from previous seasons you know testimonials from the people that you know they actually follow through and you know and more insights than ways how to apply this sort of energy not just with your dog but in other areas of your life so a dog is a metaphor dog is a teacher that helps you due to get rid of fear and then you know because when somebody is afraid of walking their dog that's John they're not just afraid of walking their dog that also afraid in other areas they they work with their dog and to get rid of the fear that they can also practice that same feeling in other areas what they might feel fear and they're just wonderful because the dog because there to support how you feel and you believe and also they're always give you a chance you know so you can always make a mistake in the next day. You're going to try and do it. Do it again right in the very forgiving there even the moment so you know. Don't don't worry if you make a mistake today. Just make sure you go out there and give you give your best every single time and if you can do it yourself. You can always consult a professional somebody that coach you somebody that can support a remind you you know. I love for people to to be more family oriented and you know the husband and the wife going walk together and then you know if the husband has a problem. The wife has a problem. They help each other. I think this is a wonderful way to become com a unit because the pack of dogs is a unit. They don't see each other as different. They see one right. You know hopefully we can bring the Khansa back as a family and dog is a wonderful teacher of course I I learned so many less. I have a cat but I learned lessons from my cat in other people's pets. It's unbelievable the greatest teachers. I'm always learning something. That's what I love. You know the challenge always learning something this season for this this actually on Friday I'm I'm dealing with one of my worst case scenario because normally I deal with dogs. What afraid of sound afraid of site you know somebody would've had somebody would have big code or or a shopping cart or whatever but this particular dog he's afraid of smells. You know what I mean is like wow talk is free to smells. Elsa and her name is Lou and that's GonNa get to see how you know the pack and other and other approaches that we use this time we'd use a little bit of wholemeal petit not homeopathic remedies and we use acupuncture. You know to really help this dog because it was so frayed of you know smells. Normally dogs are very curious of you know so it was very challenging to me. I almost felt like I was gonna going to be able to make but thank you got all right. Cesar Milan the dog whisper author of be the pack leader Cesar you give back somewhat a lot to you and your wife illusion have have opened up the Caesar and illusion Milan Foundation tell us about the foundation and what it does is really set out for for rescue organizations. I've wanted to teach risk organizations how to create their own rehabilitation out to choose the right human for the right dog. You know what I mean. They don't they don't return their dogs back. DOC and that keeps saving lives because I know these people mean well but a lot of times don't have the right common sense. You know what I mean and to help them to have a nice setup you know like Kennel final with treadmills and in pools and things that what what are they can challenge the dogs you know and of course you know my biggest goal is to have psychology centers all all over United States. Every state had one absolutely now. Every state should have one psychologist center so it's really you know the foundation is really to to create what dogs really need an America dogs in America. I I've loved you know. People love them but really dogs. Don't have a place where they can be themself so we need to create areas. Where you know you challenge animals you challenge dog and you challenge the breed. That's wonderful. You let me know when you're ready to come to Michigan Right. It's a lot of lakes over over there over here for the labradors or the water dogs absolutely so this is the goal after after people finish walking with the attack then they do activities with the breed so if you have a cattle dog you know the psychologists and there's GonNa have sheep herding areas. If you have a water dog is psychology centers GonNa have you of course the pond or the pool whatever and after that all these breeds can mingle in at the dog park so when wants that you fulfill animal dog breed what you have is a com submissive dog so then you they can practice social behavior guarantee you when we know fights. You'll let me know when you're coming to Michigan. I'll yeah I'll be. I'll I'll gladly worked for all right so Caesar. There's so much there's DVD's. There's shows your books the foundation is there a one stop shop to get all the Cesar Milan information dot com sese for ask. Shit you know people can always you know there's so much us questions and everything all right right so Cesar Milan Inc dot com and there's a way of like sending you emails there and a lot of emails and we're responding wonderful. I I do it so it's Uh uh we're well into season for on the National Geographic Channel Friday nights at eight o'clock. He's the dog whisperer the new book be the Pack Leader Leader available now and I'm sure shooting up to the number one bestselling spot Not-i'm Caesar and thanks so much for taking some time and talking to us. It's not thank you guys appreciate it and we'll talk to you again soon. Thank you give them and that'll do it for another installment of animal talk. Thanks for being with us and thanks for supporting putting our sponsors make sure you follow us on twitter animal talk radio and of course the website Animal Talk Radio Dot Com. We'll see you next time on animal talk.

America Caesar Cesar Milan Pack Leader Leader Cesar Milan Inc Cesar Milan Michigan Dr Brad Davis Devi Emmett South Park OC com twitter Jamie Flanagan Twenty Times Brian Bar chief of staff Mexico Zayed Los Angeles United States
Dr. Aliza Cicerone, ND, FABNO -- Naturopathic Support During Cancer Treatment Pt 1

The Radiant Health Show

26:27 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Aliza Cicerone, ND, FABNO -- Naturopathic Support During Cancer Treatment Pt 1

"Taste this. Sydney. Live back to heart but delivers the. Welcome to the radio Intel show with Dr Christine Horner your source of information that will help you to achieve extraordinary health and longevity where each week we bring you a fascinating interview with the leader in natural health from practitioners, aints systems of medicine, such as traditional Chinese medicine IRA ADA to experts and the latest frontiers of complementary and alternative medicine. You'll be entertained in Nezmar. I guess we'll learn many tips on how you can reach an joy and extrordinary state of health simply and naturally. I'm your host Dr. Christine Horner for resurgent, and now an expert in natural health in the author of two award winning books. The first is waking the warrior goddess, Dr Christine hunters program to protect against and fight rest cancer. And my most recent book is radiant health easily speedy thirty day program for extrordinary health, beauty and longevity. I guess today is Dr LIZA Cicero, and she. Has got her doctorate of naturopathic medicine, and she also has a sub specialty in naturopathic oncology. We're gonna be talking with her today about some of the supportive care that she gets patients as they go through the the cancer treatment experience and doctors, Cicero and actually was a staff shin with cancer treatment centers of America. And currently she has her own private practice here in San Diego and Shirley specializes in bringing a personalized approach each patient, and she helps with preventative care as well as helping patients go through the cancer treatment doctor sister. Thank you so much for being on my show. Think so much for having me. So first of all, curious about how you got interested in first of all, being an Atra path and then and then Secondly, deciding to have some specialty in college. Yeah, you know it was. I think you know a lot of the similar path. A lot of naturopathic doctors go down. You know, I was pre med when I was in college and with planning on going to a conventional allopathic medical school. And that point, you know, I was twenty years old I didn't really know what naturopathic medicine was. I didn't know that existed. And I, you know, pursuing my degree, my undergrad degree and was interning in a lot of hospitals and the townie went to college in and took my cats and Jim Thome applications. And I just felt like there is something kind of missing. And I remember talking to my to my father about it and he's, you know, what is it? What is it that you're wanting to do you know what you want to really achieve if your career and I just want to help people be better. And he said, well, do you need an MD after your name to do that? And it really got me thinking, well, maybe there's another way and actually ended up stepping out of the medical world. I'm for a little bit. I became really entrenched in the world of food and wine. He worked for a winery for two actually and opened a restaurant and ran a culinary program and was happy, and it was really fun. But I, you know, I felt like I was missing something really missing that piece of medicine. And during that time I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease and my youngest, sir, was too. Yeah, it was. I'm the oldest of three girls. My youngest sister was diagnosed in March, and I was diagnosed in July that year. Yeah, kind of kind of interesting twist. And you know, I, I went through all of the conventional workup and the medications and the treatments. And I was finding that I wasn't. I wasn't really seeing, you know, much of a difference in my symptom picture, and I had this really amazing gastroenterology fellow at the time. And I remember I was on the table for my endoscopy and colonoscopy. And she leaned over to me before I was sedated. And she said, you know, I, I don't know why. But what I'm seeing a lot of my patients with crowns, ulcerative colitis, especially when they're young, like you. I was early twenties, is it when they greens out of their diet, doing a lot better having a lot less flare ups. So it really got me thinking, like, I thought I had a pretty clean, healthy diet exercise. You know, what are the things that I that I missing out on, and I ended up. Finding naturopathic doctor where I was living and you know, he was really the first person to delve into. More extensive information about, you know what was going on in the rest of my life. What was going on besides just how many bell movements I was having a day was my stress like what was happening emotionally, you know what? We're all the things that we're contributing to my state of health, both physically and mentally, and the light kind of went off for me. So I I, I was worked with him and I talked him and I see, no, I think I wanna go to naturopathic medical school and it just happened there were there's a big open house event a couple of weeks later. So I went up there. I plot I got accepted, and it just started me on that whole different trajectory that I had had never really even knew existed before. So when did you decide that you wanted to do the some special team on college. You know it was. It was really in my first year of medical school, so not Japan medical scores. I'm very similar to the Pathak in the the four year doctorate program. And you know, I had, I grew up around a lot of people having cancer. Both of my grandmothers passed away from cancer and a number of really close family friends had passed away when I was in my early and late teens, and I just felt like it was something that just touched everybody. Right. Like I didn't know anybody who had had cancer personally or family member, good friend with cancer. And so I was thinking about, you know, in in school and you start looking at all of the possibilities out there. Right? And everyone's encouraging you to really explore all the different, you know, specialties and see what really speaks to you. And they started really thinking, you know, we're kind of makes them. Difference. Right? Where in the conventional medical world is at supportive integrative piece really lacking and how is it really impacting how patients are getting through treatment? You know, I had had seen my grandmother's both go through treatment and you know it was something and not generation. It wasn't talked about as much right, but you remember the nausea, vomiting and the hair loss and the fatigue. And I thought, you know if there was a way that patients could really get the benefits of the conventional treatment, but really have those the side effects not be so horrible for the patients and their family and everyone involved. It would be these such a much nicer experience. And I started thinking how, how can we keep patients healthy and happy as as they're going through their treatment? And I was really fortunate. I had an amazing mentor while I was in medical school. She did a lot of women's health and was very connected. Not world, and she introduced me to a local on college issed who was very open and Atra Pathak medicine and integrative care, and ended up precept shadowing with him for quite a while and really seeing all the different facets of what happens in the conventional medical world. And then where I could hit insert myself where I felt like there was an opening for me to really be able to come in and help patients, and they just became a Namur with it. You know, not only the the medical side of it and physiologically what's happening and how natural interventions can help. But also just being able to be present with patients during that really critical time in their life. It was it was really fascinating to be a part of. So I, I really started shifting my focus there. I know of course, kept myself around aided women's health and gastroenterology, and and you know, put myself up to all of the specialties, but my heart was really in. Oncology, and I worked as I should say, workday volunteered as a mentor in with the children's cancer association and was paired up with chemo pal. They called it. I was paired up with a child that was going through cancer treatment, and I really got to experience that from the child's perspective also and the parents perspective. And you know, being there in a a non medical fence where I was just there to to be fun. I was kinda like Easter. I'd come in with a bag of toys and games all the points, and it was really amazing. We'd go and we'd, you know, go to basketball games and to Disney on ice and things like that. And I really got to see it from as a family member to children going through it. So really opened me up to all of the benefits and all of the support naturopathic medicine can provide in that setting where you know in most. Most hospitals and clinics around the country. There really isn't that availability or that possibility of having that integrative support on board. And my experience has been at it makes a world of difference with patients. Now I have the distinction to because I work in the world of cancer to breast cancer patients and so forth. But I oftentimes frequently run into people who say, oh, I don't want to do any, you know, western treatments. I just wanna do it naturally. So this is what you're talking about as far as what, what, how you work with cancer patients. It's not something where you're saying don't do any western treatments, and you know, just try to do things actually is it's actually doing a combination of the two. That's correct. Absolutely. Absolutely. You know, I do have a lot of patience, and I'm sure you've seen this a lot of patients that come in and and they think that because you know. My title naturopathic doctor that I will be against anything conventional. A lot of times it's educating the patient that you know absolutely the opposite of that, you know, I believe that there is benefit all different types of conventional treatments. But I think that when patients get the best results when they feel the best when they have the best outcomes when they have the best remission rates are when they're doing all different types of things. So they're doing their conventional treatments. They have naturopathic Karen board for, you know, support with side effects of treatment, but also to encourage that natural anti-cancer ability of our own bodies going to acupuncture, mind, body medicine, dietary counseling. All of those things play such a big role. You know, for me, it's not just is it conventional or natural in which one's better? It's they're both really, really valid and they both serve a purpose and there's a way to combine them safely ineffectively. So the patients get all of the benefits as every facet of medicine that they can. Acupuncture, dietary counseling. So what kind of all the facets that will say as far as your supportive care that you offer. So what I don't do myself here, I'm not an acupuncturist. So what I don't do specialize in, I refer out to and I have a great network of acupuncture. There's one in particular in in the San Diego area who I refer to who specializes in acupuncture for patients going through on college treatment. So I will refer out for patients to do acupuncture a lot of dietary therapy. We do here in the office, so you know, depending on who's coming in where they're coming from, everyone's at a different place in their life with where they're out with their nutrition. So a lot of times it's really picking apart the things they are eating and seeing how can we get more nutritionally dense foods in especially in patients are going through treatment and they're, they're struggling with nausea and vomiting. How can we get those nutritionally dense foods and in smaller amounts to really help support their bodies so that they're not losing muscle mass or not losing energy, they're able to stay, you know, active as they're going through treatments we do. I've e- therapies. So there's certain ivy's that are specifically. I'm targeted towards cancer cells that are cytotoxic to cancer cells. They're also nutritional ideas are just very supportive to patients as they're as they're going through treatments, especially if it happens to be a type of cancer, you know, of the digestive tract of the stomach or the large intestine. I'm something that's really compromising how they're able to the patients are able to absorb in utilize their nutrients. We can use IV therapy to help them up there. And then you know, there are number of different oral supplements that we use as well to help with side effects from radiation or chemotherapy. Help patients heal from surgery very quickly ineffectively and then also, you know, whatever side effects kind of pop up. We can target as we need to, and their number of supplements that really doing courage, our own natural killer cell function in the body to make sure that our our cells immune systems are up and active and aware and really actively putting those things into place, discouraged that cancer cell growth. I want to kind of go back, you know, over some of these things. So for acupuncture, like what specifically do you recommend people do acupuncture for? I mean, what? What does it help as far as the cancer them? I'm so I've seen it be really helpful with patients that have severe nausea base in really beneficial for that. A lot of the chemotherapy regimens that are really frequently used, you know, especially with, you know, breast cancer and colorectal cancer. 'cause a lot of or can cause a lot of peripheral neuropathy, numbness and tingling in the hands and feet. I've seen acupuncture be wildly helpful for that. Something that patients don't really notice that they're experiencing symptomatically are low blood counts, so low white blood counts and low red blood counts from the chemotherapy. It's some chemotherapy is low platelets. It can just be an natural progression or natural side effect of that. And acupuncture can really help without blood building to keep those counts up. That's really important, of course, that patients don't have delays in their treatments. Because oftentimes, if a patient's counts fall too low, they will not be able to get their next chemotherapy treatment because they're countered to low on their medical colleges will hold that. So we wanna make sure that patients are able to get their treatments on their regular schedule so that it has the maximum benefit for their body as well. So I kind of think of acupuncture for pain, you know, control too, I mean is so I'm kinda surprised at something that really helps the book counts and everything that was new for me. That's pretty cool. Yeah. And rent Hain can be fantastic, especially when patients have you know metastasis to the bones or it's impacting their organ function. You're right that acupuncture can be synthetic for that too. In that setting. That's great. Then as far as Guyot, Terry, do you have just kind of some general generalizations as far as things that you recommend people really win and do? Well, you know, it really depends on where the patient's right. You know, sometimes my patients will come in and they are doing everything. They think they can be doing perfectly, but it's totally consuming their lives right there whole day is spent planning and executing their meals. And so we have to sometimes actually take it back off and say, look, these are the areas to focus on. Don't worry about, you know, having all of these things perfect of the things that will be the most impactful for some people. It's cutting out foods that are causing a lot of inflammation in their body or things that their bodies not digesting well for specific types of cancers where we have more of a tendency towards ballad struck shins. We have to really focus on a low residue diets that we make sure that things are moving through the body really quickly. So there's not really like. You know, a top five foods to eat typing. It's really dependent upon the type of cancer patient has what their nutrition status is, like, what their what their comfort with cooking and preparing their meals is. And then also physiologically what's happening in terms of the stage that their cancer isn't and how we can help support that. The probably the biggest thing I see people are going through chemotherapy is just those few days a week after treatments where they have very, you know, low appetite in the low desire to eat. So then it's finding out, you know. So what would be your perfect meal? If you could eat anything and figuring out healthy ways to incorporate that into their diet, had a really close friend when I was in residency who had stage four breast cancer, and she really wanted reese's peanut butter cups that was like the only thing that sounded good. She called me one morning and she was like up doc. I think I hit a new low and I said, what's wrong? And she said, well, I woke up in bed and I had a recess. Peanut butter Cup stuck to my thigh. And. So I said, okay, stuff. We gotta figure out a way where you can like satisfy those cravings, but it's actually doing something good for you. So we came up with this recipe and it's funny all the time. I make it all the time and give it out to my patients all the time. It's wrong almonds and almond butter and coconut oil and ground. Flaxseed, and ninety percent dark chocolate. And we, you know, we're just kind of playing around in a little bit of Annella Stevie, and we threw that all into a cuisinart and kind of blended it up and put it into a casserole dish made our own kind of sweet and salty almond bars. So it was good because you got that that salty and sweet that you would get from racist peanut butter Cup yet. It was all great ingredients that were good for her serving perfet purpose, nutritionally dense. She's being good protein, good fiber, good, healthy fat, and it satisfied her cravings for more of that junk food. So I love coming up with stuff like that with my patients. Like, tell me what your cravings are and we'll figure out a healthy way you can still have that. You're not feeling deprived their culinary. Restaurant experiences coming through right. Exactly. Thing, right food is medicine, so we have to get excited about it and make fun can take all the supplements in the world and to all the medications in the world. But if you don't have the nourishment from the food or eating that stuff solid just sitting on the career. Right, right, right. Yeah. I've talked about the IV therapies that you do too. I mean, traditionally I've heard idea is very common for people to do like high dose vitamin c, you know, as a cancer treatment also, I don't know if you do lose Phya me and I, you know, certainly rental a lot about that and helping with, you know, perform up. See. So what kinds of I've you treatments do you do. For, you know, I'm college specific. We do the hydros vitamin c, we do offer that and we do offer igloo defiant as well. We actually offer. I be known for, you know, with goes along with all the different ideas as well. We really have to just make sure with IV therapy that were timing inappropriately so that we're making sure it's going to be maximally effective and not have any interference with any type of conventional treatment. The patients are getting. And then we also do a lot of other types of therapy. That's, you know, very supportive. Vita high dose vitamin c is specific to target those cancer cells and cause cell death there. But we also meet a lot of different vitamins and minerals just to help with normal cellular functioning and all the physiological processes in our bodies. So we do all different types of vs with acid blends all of the B-vitamins all of your minerals, your calcium, magnesium, potassium selenium different tie. Targeted amino acids, like glazing Torian. So really just depending on what the patient is looking for, what they're symptom picture looks like we can custom build an IV for them that's really meeting all of their needs. We can base it off of their symptom picture alone, or we can also do migrant micronutrient deficiency testing. We use spectra so laboratory for that and actually test their levels of different mechanism. Micronutrients that we can cuss to make that bag specifically for what their body needs. That sounds very, very smart. So then do you look at the various different drugs that somebody is on getting and then look at the Pacific side effects that those drugs could cause and then kind of custom do nutritional supplements for those folks to that will counteract some of those side effects? Exactly. You know, I always I always kind of joked, but one of my patients said to me, no, it seems like you know about everything that my medical oncologist is doing, you know, every single treatment, but they really don't know a lot about what you do, and this is very early on when I was a resident. And I said, well, you know, I have to, right, that's how I know what I can do and where I can step in and support you is based on what chemotherapy regimen you're getting, or you know what radiation protocol you're getting. I have to know everything about the conventional treatment in order to really make sure that might naturopathic treatments are targeted in the correct way at their helping in the right way. So you're exactly right. Look at, you know, all of the pathology. I look at any type of surgical history of the patients had biopsy surgeries, any of that we look at what's happening with the cancer. If it has progressed where it might be moving in the body, we look at their chemotherapy regimen or the radiation protocol, and then we personalized plan that specific to what they are receiving to really look at those side effects and what's happening with the mechanism of action of those chemotherapy drugs and to make sure that we're not only helping the side effects, but also really protecting the health of of the different organs in our body that can be sometimes affected by those by those chemotherapy agents as well. So in a way, you know, even when you're when we're going through treatment for cancer, we're still looking at prevention, right? Because like let's say, a patient has breast cancer and they're getting Adriamycin. Of course, we want them to get the jury mice and to make sure that we're. Targeting those breast cancer cells. But we also want to make sure that we're protecting the heart. We know Adri mice and can be a really tough chemotherapy for cardiac function. We wanna make sure that we're protecting that heart muscle so that we don't have any issues down the road because our hope is to come out of treatment, healthy and strong. And we wanna make sure that the rest of the years that we have to live, we've got that good cardiovascular function as well. I mean, just to me, I, I get really vocal about this, but to me, it's like a malpractice not to be working in conjunction with the Natura path when someone's going through chemotherapy. Because the great example that you just gave us with eighty mice and it's like, you know, oftentimes people die of the treatments and they're, you know, completely preventable and you know, plus you can help with their quality of life so much, you know, thinking process to doesn't have to be so horrible where actually we have about a minute and a half left and the segment. So the next week tech, continuous conversations. We're, we're just getting into it. I'm says, he can go ahead and give people your contact information and websites. Sure. Our website is mice spark health dot com. And our Email address is spark at my spark health dot com. And you can also feel free to give us a call clinic where Rainsville on a beach. The number is eight, five, eight, two, two, eight, four one, eight. Great. And do you do you know, let's just say that somebody's living in the city where there are no natural has or the state or they don't have them. Do you do remote like telephone consultations with people? Yeah, I sure do do telemedicine. 'cause you know the patients already been diagnosed, so I'm just giving them some tips and and supplements and things that they can take to help with their treatment and get them through it. So that's a really common question from patients, especially when family members and other states. So absolute working patients. Yeah, right. Okay. Good. So we'll look forward to talking with you again next week. Absolutely. Thanks so much. Thanks for joining me on the radio health show with Dr Christine Horner on your host, Dr Christine. Horner good health can be yours simply and naturally download my radio show this week in every week and follow the advice of my expert guests. And soon you'll be experiencing radiant health and as Los beauty, no matter what your age don't forget to check out my website, Dr Christine, Horner dot com and be sure to sign up for my free newsletter. Give me like Facebook and follow me on Twitter so that you can keep posted on all my comings and goings and laze tips and tricks. Extrordinary health mice seem song is beauty surrounds by Jenny bird available at Jenny. Burt dot com. That's j. e. n. n. y. b. I r. d. dot com.

cancer nausea Dr Christine Horner Dr Christine colorectal cancer Dr. Christine Horner San Diego Dr LIZA Cicero Jim Thome Intel MD Nezmar Sydney private practice ulcerative colitis America basketball peripheral neuropathy
1381 Advice for Orthodontic Startups with Jill Allen : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

00:00 sec | 8 months ago

1381 Advice for Orthodontic Startups with Jill Allen : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"It was just a huge honor for me today to be podcast interviewing Jill Allen an orthodontic consultant and owner based out of Golden Colorado that specializes in startups and working with doctors and teams across the United States. Have been in practice. Eight years or less Jill has been in the ORTHODONTIC field for twenty years and has worked in all areas of practice. This allows Jilin. Her team demeanor doctors and teams when they are there and help them where they need. The most Jill believes in taking a practical approach to practice management and customized. Her services to the needs of her clients. Jilin and associates is a full service. Orthodontic practice management consulting firm with a special focus on new practice startups. You you like to get them. Young specialties are orthodontic practice startups customized solutions for existing practices case acceptance training for treatment coordinators practice analysis insurance and collection training team building. I want to start with a little historical Jill You've been doing this for twenty eight years. Never said that. But you you're old enough to remember back in the ORTHODONTIC centers of America Day when Gaspar Lazara to Osa all the way to the New York Stock Exchange is the only one in dental diaz. Who History that made it to the New York Stock Exchange. It fabulously crashed. They all went away and now they're all back and what's what's cute is how the loan young little adorable millennials think. This is all new and exciting now. Now Dan Daddy. They've been here before. Is What is different about round one with or say or serves of America total collapse and now round two is history repeating itself or did they learn some lessons and are doing some things better. This time around. You know I have to say. I do think that they've learned some lessons. And they are doing a little better this time around and I think that a lot of the practices and I'll have to see. I don't work with a lot of them. Because they really focus on dachshund it'd be startups within their own practice. But what I am seeing is that I think having more on Dr Ownership. Within the the new dea so programs you know some of that and I it just having the doctor stay part of that little bit longer. It's definitely I think that a little bit more. I think one thing that's not going to go away. Is that when a human has skin in the game? They're completely different animal when they don't. I mean I saw four boys if I did something. I thought I was doing good I. I'd surprise them by a bike or something. How lately I'd have to have to scold them because they're leaving out on the street but they had to pay for half that bike then the park in their bedroom I mean they site and you go to conventions and all the employees are sent or starters at their cell phone on facebook posting on Instagram. And all the owners are sitting there with their sharpened pencil taking notes. And there's just there's just no difference between owner operator and or management. Did you do agree with that. Or is that old school or is out of copyright. No I do agree with that. I think I think I agree with having skin in the game makes a difference and you know man. I know that you know I understand that there are a lot of doctors that are moving in that direction but I think in still having an active role in it versus just being told what to do really does make a difference And I think too when you have a you know a different groups of doctors getting together to bring in some of these. You know these plans. I think it also helps a lot versus just having you know angel mummy or whatnot out there helping us. I'm so old I remember when it was just angel food cake. We were just looking to get. That would change in twenty years and Ortho I mean. How is the is the game? Silver same is a very different. No that's a great question you know and because I work with startups and I really work on helping doctors succeed now. Where things are at and twenty twenty. I think some of the big things that are changing his just how digital Israeli affecting our industry right now I would say that most of my startup docs are starting right. With scanners were designing offices with dry labs right from the beginning. Our changing the way. The new process a happens again trying to beat the patients where they're at and trying to be as excess accessible was possible. Hannah with our fast moving generations of patients out there. So you know I think You know the importance of being able to schedule online in text right away with patients and getting away from the notion that the way you contact a patient through the phone those are all some big changes that have really come along in our industry and I think for for dockside are trying to really stay in Toronto. They they have to be able to work with all of that technology. And you're in. Are you in Boulder or you? Golden Golden is that near Boulder. Yeah it is. It's it's probably thirty minutes away. If that see you the full college see you. Yes work so I went to Creighton University and we'll got so drunk one night. We drove until boulder see Mick Jagger and the rolling stones off the next day and dentists. I'm not gonNA say the other people's names because it might get back to Gary Solely Data Jersey and Randy. Kerr Denison Kansas. But we were sitting there like we realized it was straight down the highway. I mean all we had to do this was before mapquest. We realize you just gotTa get on interstate eighty and drive a long time and we'll get jagger and the rolling stones and good good bit until that's also when you're starting with with a young practice. I mean I knew how they think they want to go live in boulder. They you know they they have memories of Mick Jagger and and what was the Hart was playing that member heart the to of course and they WANNA go. Let's say they want to go there that that's where they're from the demographics demographics matter would boulder has more than do demographics matter. Absolutely that's something anytime I work with a start at. That's one of the first places I try and start is getting a good demographic report and there are a lot of pieces that we have to think about now. I have some docs. Maybe like yourself this. I just want to be in boulder no matter what I want to go back to my roots. Whatever it is that takes them there You know one of the things that I always tell my doctors if if we are going to go to an area that the demographics are just saying it's not great but your heart is saying I gotta be there. Then we definitely have to be going is wide open and be looking for alright. If if the odds are against us what are we gonNa do to set you apart so that you can be successful and you know what you know what you're getting into basically. And how do you kinda demographics are you looking for? Is it a ratio of a dent of Ortho to Dennis Population? What are you looking at? Actually I try and look for an orthodontic. Practice Tram and look at the number of orthodontists per residents in the area and I really try to not just look at the demographic of like that eight to sixteen age range odd because in orthodontics. Now we're seeing will treat patients from eight to sixty eight because of you know the the the different modalities out there now on orthodontics so I'd like to see my ideal is twenty thousand residents per orthodontist. So we can draw thousand. When you're seeing resin twenty thousand people now they call them residents up there in Colorado home and then my ideal and that would be like a population people were asked Noah and then my ideal age range I really like to get us in age. Range were in like that young thirties in too late to early fifties so I think if we can hit the population and then the age range. Those are two really good sweet spots that we're looking for when we're looking immediate average or median age median age of what between that You know in the Mid Thirties to mid forties right in that range. Their independence thirty five to forty five. Now that'd be good okay and so does so. You do say that demographics matter would you say street patients From age eight to sixteen. Is that what you said? I think that that has been the traditional that bread-and-butter approach orthodontics though. I definitely think that that is changing now with again. Just you know. All the a liner treatments that are out there and the different modalities lingual braces the different things. That are out there and I think just in general population is you know seeing the need for straight teeth in a good by later on in life and so I you know I I really feel like there's a big market to be had by focusing you know outside of that eight to sixteen year range and how often does a person that gets braces. Get braces again. I mean I see it all the time I. It's kind of member when I said I started show with humans are so different with skin in the game. I mean it's either. You have never gone to the lake or you have your own boat. You either haven't gone bowling and ten years. Are you own a bowling ball? You're all in all out and it seems like every single person that's looking in the mirror teeth. She had braces when she was in high school. She has invisible line now and then when she gets divorced. She's having another smile makeover before she enters the market Do you have a number on if you do get braces? How many will get again. I think now with our generation I would say probably more than fifty percent of them will again and I don't think that that is because orthodontist aren't doing a good job at telling patients they need to wear retainers for life but I think that it's just where people are at right now. Everyone wants to good smile. A good haircut and you know wants to you. Know what would they say if these are the new forties and you know I just? I think that you know as adults continue to age in. We have all of this. You know all of these tools right at our fingertips and disposable income. The older you get. Why Not yes? When I was a child at which saw handles big Catholic families I had seven brothers and sisters. The hennessy's had twenty one kids but back in the day only the child who look like they could never ever get married and make your grandkids. Got Ortho. Everyone else was turned out to pasture and now with birth rates down to two kids for family. Its passage and My Gosh I cannot believe the people that are getting braces and I can't say that it was one of them was. I can't wait to tell my aunt. Sue that the best dental orthodontic consultants says that. It's only from six to sixty eight because she got older than that. She was well past and she's wonderful. I mean just absolutely wonderful I mean. We have orthodontic practices right now. That are you know doing Bo. Talks Lip Tillerson. They're in their practice. So you know again. It's meeting the patients where their needs are. And you know. I think if we can do that whether it's sixty eight seventy eight or eighty a if if if a patient feels like that's GonNa that's GonNa make me feel better. Why not why? Why would we be offered that she said it was? She said the looks of it was bothering her. And I went and got board. Certified orthodontist Harry Green. And he fixed up my my. My point. Is that as population. Come down. I mean you've got to remember. Nineteen hundred one in ten women on Earth still died during childbirth You know Big Families but birth control brought bought down child mortality rates when really brings down the side of the family? Because I'm when you don't know how many your kids are GonNa make it. You have more. You don't plan you have extra but it goes back to the the smiles club. Which is the biggest controversy in all of dentistry would tell dentistry but my thoughts word that when you when you come out with something that lowers the cost like say regular. Ortho sixty five hundred. See you come out with some entry level. Tell the dentistry scan retainers. Whatever my Gosh for twenty five hundred that's GonNa explode the base and it's obviously not going to hurt like when orthodontist tell me they're trying to get rid of the Orthodox I said well it will because you don't do anything day when you come home I mean you you just come home because you're bored you. Have you ever felt like you worked all day and came home or you're tired and then I heard I'm trashed I might? Oh so you're working and working. What are you worried about your working but wounded just really blow up scale the base of all these people now trying to get Ortho and looking at their teeth for the low end and then realize indeed I need to actually go see someone That's trained as an orthodontist. I would think it would do think it will grow the ORTHODONTIC specialty or subtract. Because not many markets I how many markets in the United States do only three percent of the population participating each year? I mean this industry has so far to go it's comprehensible. That's why STI fanatic weinstocks. We're doing so well because I mean how many people do you know in your own personal life. That want braces. I think every I think people want you know now whether it's phrases or a liner. I think what people want are straight teeth. I want I think they want to a nice smile and a good functioning bite okay. That's usually that. I don't agree with these. They are only have one goal to reproduce and have offspring and they want to enter the either a game producer or get might receiver incubator and the whole deal is the look as pretty as a peacock. So you can do your only job which is to Replace yourself that's so all of biology is telling you you need to do this and I'm here to tell you don't do any of it. Don't get married. Don't have kids save your money. Stay in school. Just just. Don't listen to your at all. But they WANNA THEY WANNA look got enough to reproduce and have offspring. But do you think you'll be an overall positive or negative? I think that what the smiled Direct club has done. Is it has really highlighted that. There is a need out there. There's this group of patients out there that if we can learn to market to them and treat them and still hit what they're looking for. Maybe they're looking to fix that Sunday smell but my you know my goal is that we continue to educate these this group of patients to say you know you wanna be able to be treated by a doctor not by somebody sit behind a screen and so you know if we can in our orthodontic industry find the right Financial Platforms to get in front of them and maybe be able to treat them in the right way. I think I think there's a huge market for us out there in the ORTHODONTIC industry. Well does that meet. I think Gaspar Lazara who is a Controversial figure among or it's an honest. I think a lot of them there were lessons. Learned from OC. I mean when I look at my age fifty seven or older I think. Any orthodontist fifty eight and over his old and any of them fifty seven and younger or young and the next year. I might change that but I'll say I'll say okay. Well they had a one billion market CAP. What lesson did you learn from Gaspar? And they say I don't know I said well if you're an orthodontist and you don't learn one thing from the only orthodontist had a billion market cap on. Nyse returned to your cave and and Roller Rock in front of the front door. What lessons did you learn from us? And and and what do you think will learn from small circle? I mean I have my favor lessons Formosa. You can't. Do you really think for comparing apples to apples when we're talking about. Hey and smiled. Direct known they're completely different dismal. I smack the most controversial well. Let's see I most controversial all denison understand the liquidity play. If you go to sell a house in Phoenix a three bedroom two bath you can sell in a day. But if you're a multimillionaire. Nba Player and you bought an eight bedroom eight car garage and go to sell it. It's an illiquid asset because not many people can buy in or in general Dennis Right now a seven hundred and fifty thousand dollar practice cells in Phoenix in a week but a three million four million dollar practice is a liquid and if it's in a rural area to liquid so gas for new this he went to Wall Street. He got one hundred million dollar line of credit and he started buying out the big boys the two three four million dollar players that needed liquidity. And they all jumped. He gave him the money he sold. All these practices one time and then their contract was add to work for him for three years and at three years and one day they quit and then they were replaced them with some young punk at a school and that guy was perfect for a million dollar practice but he couldn't do a two or three or four million that some guy. It's going to like the boiled fraud. You don't know when you're sixty and you're doing three million a year you don't know how slow your on your twenty-five lesson learned one time. I was looking at an x Ray. I turn to my sister Jannie but it with me thirty years and I said look at that I mean what idiot would do something like that. And she said doc you did that in nineteen eighty seven. I was mortified because I had forgot that I used to be that dumb. I mean you know we all start a journey of a thousand miles somewhere but what I liked about. Osa though is it doesn't make sense to me if I go get my hair and nails done. Let's say I'm let's say you go get your hair done once a month and it's one hundred bucks and let's say you get a manny petty done once a month and it's one hundred bucks and you walk into your Mandy Petty and she says well it's one hundred dollars a month But I need to be a two year contract so I need half down. I need twelve hundred. And then we'll see if care credit approves your financing for the back half and Gaspar was the first person who told me he said what are you financing? Are you gonNA prepay or ran mortgage equipment bill computer insurance malpractice professional do Blah Blah Blah? He says on a new patient. It's one hundred dollars. Set of brackets and panel on study models Egos so they went one hundred percent financing. No one can be approved one hundred ninety nine dollars a month no down payment cars and furniture and of course it exploded and to this day I see. There's there's a guy out. Mariko got a big billboard or no down payment one ninety nine a month. No-one's finance that just declared bankruptcy. You've been approved for financing one ninety nine a month and so that was a huge lesson and it makes you wonder why doesn't orthodontist need a down payment because in economic theory? I mean in Chicago University of Chicago that I think has eighteen Nobel prize. Economic say a down payment is an economic barrier to entry. And so why do they want an economic barrier to entry to finance something that they're they don't need financing because it's a service and they're not gonNA prepay their rent and electric bill and labor so I think well you're asking me a loaded. Question here voted or lots. I think I think that why I think to some extent. It really depends on where a doctor is. If you're a new doctor and you've got you just took out of six hundred and fifty thousand dollar loan to open up your practice and you have five hundred thousand in student loan debt and you're kicking you know you're getting started with a practice in. Let's say you're GONNA do some type of a liner treatment or anything beyond braces. I think from an overhead standpoint had not take some type of down just a cash flow is not there just is not enough in a margin to allow a doctor to be able to support themselves should not have to be working somewhere else else for multiple years so I think that you know when you're looking at it from a doc who's been a practice eight years or less especially in that five years unless window. I think we do have to have flexible financing but I do think we have to cover costs and I think there's a difference between covering costs Liner treatments or specialty treatments versus. Just braces I think that when you're talking about a doc who's been practicing ten to fifteen years for sure. I mean we should have that cash flow that a ar revenue especially for keeping our delinquencies at three to five percent delinquency rate. So we're doing that. Can we can. We may be changed that barrier for sure that I really do think it it depends on where doc his at in their career and you know where they're at from what type of money they're making compared to the debt work that they're holding so when demographics matter and they're going to treat people from eight to sixty eight need about twenty thousand population per orthodontist. I'm when they opened up that a orthodontic practice. Are you gonNA recommend since they have five hundred thousand dollars of student loans? Or You gonNA recommend that the lease human still are territorial. They like to own their own farm. Or your new guys. Are they more likely to buy the land and building or just lease you know? I think I think it depends on if they're coming right out of school or if they'd been able to associate pay down student loan debt so I would say in most cases if we're coming right out of school probably leasing unfortunately makes the most sense because we can afford that I think that if a doc has been able to associate for a while pay down that student loan debt then get in and ideally I think my ideal is always docked to be able to have a property and a business you know so we can. Have you know those two revenue streams? That's that's that's always great Or you know those you know goes to investments but I think just wear a doc is out at. They're coming right out of school or not. And do you see you know? We're always told that The generations are different. Had boomers different than generation x and Jenner in baby boomers and Okay Karen. And all that kind of stuff. Do you believe that? The millennials are different and being and their drive to be an owner operator. Do you think they're more content? There obviously content with having smaller families and children are they more content with feed employees at a Dso than working for themselves. I think I I don't know I've been. I've had my business for the last twelve years and have been focusing a startups. The last twelve years. Now in what I would what I would say is that I think that because the student loan debt continues to go up. I think that doctors are a little bit more hesitant to jump into their own practice And they're they're definitely feel a little bit better about going getting an associate's ship job for a couple of years. But you know I have a continual you know Of Docs that I speak at a lot of the colleges and are calling me three or four years after graduating saying okay. I'm ready now. You know I I. I can only take this for so long now. I'm ready paid down some debt. I'm ready to handle my own practice. So I still think. That millennials in the younger generation. They WANNA be owners You know I think unfortunately when we had the big stark stock market crash everything happens. You know in about ten years ago or so. I think one of the things that happened is so many orthodontists are holding our our senior. Docs are holding onto their practices. That it's forcing a lot of the younger. Docs actually have to start their own practices. So there just isn't as much on the market and more when you say when the stock market crashed ten years ago you mean ten minutes ago right. Yeah they should be talking about ten minutes ago. All three indices dropped seven percent. I mean to the kids I just Wanna I just WanNa say a couple things. I'm getting a lot of tax and all the seven emails but the bottom line is I've lived through. Four contractions. It was nineteen. Eighty was the worst. My Gosh that was how. How old were you in one thousand nine hundred? Let's see so I was born in seventy one so so you're nine okay so you missed that one. That was the worse. It was twenty one percent interest rates double digit unemployment and enter. And it was. I had three friends whose dad lost the family farm that had been in the family for generations that went in the barn and blue. Their head off It was it was bad and Paul. Volcker the Fed chairman. He had to have armed guards in. It was the worst. And then you had a graduation eighty seven and then black Monday seven. The market fell a quarter. And then the longest build up then y two K and then Layman's Day and all I want to say about these bills is They they happen and in eighteen months. The they're they're over. I mean it's just. It's just something that you lived through. Its nobody deals. Seems like people spend more years worrying about the next one than the actual year or so going in but as far as your business here. Here's what it means when the stock market crashes imagine every day that you walked out of your dental office to get your car Some dental consultant was standing there yelling price. I'll buy it for five hundred grand and then the next day walkout although for four hundred grand in the next eight hundred grand well they someone's going to give you a price every day has nothing to do with your business. Do you get new patients you you retain staff. Are you having a profit margin when you buy stock like a dental office? You should be able to hold it for five or ten years without ever getting a price when you buy a stock. It's like owning a business so a lot of people are asking me and asking on the deal day. We'll pick up. Sec that it's plummeted. The question isn't the price of S. D. C. Invis- line or anything. The only question is this business like if I went back home to Kansas. I went to any wheat farm and I said how was this business. They would tell me every year. What the grounds putting out their costs or we and you could make a decision on whether or not you would want to buy that farm for ten twenty years. But the people who trade in stocks aren't buying businesses or gambling casino crazy nut jobs whatever and but what I this is going to plummet. I only have one prediction on this recession. There is a recession it's underway. I'll say it. I said the our word. Juiston shooter got a Nobel Prize and economics the Austrian economists who wrote about cycles. And there's a business cycle because humans are making all the decisions and unlike me who's never been rose long in my life. Usually after a whole bunch of humans make a whole lot of decisions for a whole long time it turns out that they're wrong and a correction. The water goes out to the sea. And you get to see who's swimming without any swim trunks on and then those malfeasance and people become unemployed and they get redeployed into better business models and I can tell you that and the world that a A third of the DSO's offices. If I if a DEA so owns thirty offices and I know everybody wants to talk about the that own fifty to one hundred like earth thousand like they all want to talk about heartland and Pacific and Aspen. That's a whole differently that's like. Nfl The average DSO is going to be like three to fifteen offices and it's and it's a huge chunk of the market it's about twelve percent and every DSO that I have ever had the honor of seeing the date on one third of their practices or kicking ass one-third just treading water in third or bleeding and they're getting fed a continual influx of private equity money which will shut off immediately. And I am predicting that when you're you can't you fund cash into an expansion and when it turns off you get the contraction and the contraction is now and so when you call your private equity guy and say sorry. I got these five offices and they're still bleeding. He's still got tapped staff turnover. D- still a bad location. The markings not working. They liquidate him so I believe that there's in the next several years that people like you who are focused on young startups knee will have plus four of offices being sold and liquidated and so it just just changes the game and will redeploy asset better. Because you'll get someone who doesn't have skin in the game to sit there and say that so on that note. I want to ask you that. This was all the lead up to one lousy question so so when they do how do you. How are you going to navigate the future with? Hey I got old practice you can buy from some guy that was so old yet an AOL email address more. Start hammering out there. Yeah so so how do how do you decide that? Well so it may navigate that right now and you know really it. I'm GONNA bring it back to what I tell docs. Even if I'm working the ducks were looking at doing an acquisition. Because for me. I don't care whether it's an acquisition or a startup. I just want them to be successful in their next twenty years a practice so believe it or not even on acquisition. I'll have them pulled demographic records and make a decision is the practice that they're going to by going to make sense just like we would if we were gonNA look at doing. A startup isn't in a successful place because just because an orthodontic practices sat up and ready to go in and you know has been there for twenty years but if it's been declining and the doctor really hasn't been working on the practice it may be better to buy the the you know the doctors patients if there's any left and maybe start your own or or start your own again. It just kind of depends on what the demographics say and what. The opportunity is with an acquisition. So when you're when you're working with the young and you want to get him fresh and I love that I remember as a little kid. I used to power. Because my dad wouldn't take me with them golfing and he finally said he was. GonNa take me with Golfing. And then he dropped me off at the clubhouse to take lessons and he said no he's not gonna you're not gonNA learn you're GONNA learn right and and the teacher said to me he dad's right he goes. I could never correct your dad swing. It's so mooned and he's trying to get you to get best friend so when you're looking at those those those kids is the slice. What what is the bad swing? What what? What are the mistakes that when they get with people like you? They're not gonNA make and have to eat for their whole career is at demographics. What is it systems software? I think I think it's a little bit of a combination of both. You know I had somebody asked me wants Jill. What do you specialize in in? I think as an orthodontic consult does. What do I have to be a special? I have to specialize in all areas of the practice. And I think you know it's not just about marketing or it's not just about systems. It's you know it really is everything so you know when we're when I'm working with a doctor when I'm trying to help them. Do we have a good marketing plan? That makes sense because we got some really good fundamental numbers that we have to hit within our first year I like for my startup practices to produce a minimum of three hundred thousand in our first year. Which is collecting right around. One fifty in our first year so we have to. We have to hit some very basic numbers and in order to do that. We have to keep our overhead correct with the amount of training and team members that we have the systems that we put in place So it's it's really a holistic approach to training to getting them going where we wanted to go in that first year on. Ortho town which. I'm sorry we have to be an orthodontist to get on the site or owned The yes I own it so I can get on obviously but I'm not allowed to post go figure that but anyway I I called you to be on the show. You didn't call me. I mean when I do a search I had Joe Allen and associates train my insurance coordinator Susan well Blah Blah Blah Blah. I mean everybody loves you. But but my my feedback on you. Bond from dental and Ortho town is I would have thought you were just only trained staff. It seems like everybody talks about your your team training. Not Starting up an orthodontic practice marketing all that kind of so why. Why is your brain and more staff and team trading and it's very good. I cannot find one person to say anything negative about you but after you've been on my show that were just that will that will change. I can't believe she went on our show So so does when I when I talked to my orthodontist seems like some of the young or scared about SDF or anything like that. But the old guys. It's the same problems it's it's it's it's always people. It's either the worst one which is paced. You know patients are bad staff can be annoying and if your spouse gets outta line the alimony will make your student loans. Look lame. So how'd you? What are you doing team building? An orthodontic practices for team building. You know it it. It really comes down to just making sure that we're working with the doctor in the team to make sure that the culture is right you know so so what what does that mean and I think especially younger practices. It's it's you know a doctor's just trying to figure out how to run a practice estimate haven't even really figured out. What is the culture of their business going to be an? It's it seems scary to not have employees that fit the right culture but you know one of the things. I'm always talking about done. A couple lectures on hiring and firing his. If you don't have the right team member on your team that matches your culture and matches the direction that you're going to go in your practice. You're just not GonNa go where you WANNA go. I think that this is especially evident in practices where doctors have done acquisitions and maybe they have team members that were holdovers from a previous doctor and that team member may have been wonderful for the previous doctor but when a new dot comes in. They're trying to take a practice in a new direction. Sometimes there's a clash and the doctor will never get where he wants to go or she wants to go as long as they've Kinda got the person that isn't moving in the same direction with them so from a team building standpoint. I think it's just trying to really help the doctor in the team. All be on the same page in recognized the values of the practice and where where they all were. Vision is in helping them get their one of the things that all dentists are. Ya. But you're an expert in orthodontics and remember if you're a general dentist She's a specialist in ordinance. You wouldn't ask your ended on us about Damian Floyd but I'm always struggle with insurance participation serve orthodontist is is insurance participation different for orthodontist and General Dennis or is it the same. Or or how does it look in Taking Insurance and Ortho Practice. I think we are a little bit different than in the general practice world. I mean I think you know the basics of billing as the fact that we have one code to do multiple things in dentistry. You have a code for everything and you almost have a code for putting gloves on right. I mean you could bill out for everything and so I personally think that the dental feel this much more restrictive and I think you have to be Much more selective on you know if you're going to participate or not and and what you're GonNa do it. In a dental practice I think in orthodontics we still have the ability to choose to be in or out of network because luckily for us or orthodontic benefits even though it's a lifetime. Maximum are orthodontic benefits. Pay whether a patient is in her. I'm sorry whether a doctor is in or out of network and so unless we're looking at you know like I tell my docs we're going to choose to be an participate in Orthodontic Insurance plans number one got kind of think of it as marketing dollars so every time we have to do a write off you know that we kinda look at is. That's what it cost me to get that patient But it's only a write off once And you know and I think if we can get away with not having to participate. It's better because all of the insurance companies out there. Hey out a network so I just don't think we have as big of an impact. I do think we still have to be smart about it in North Atlantic. There's three different tiers. There's also Chimera preferred in an HMO tear per se You know some of that has to do with what a doctor specifically wants out of their practice and their insurance. You know what you're looking to get out of that but I do think that there is some differences. Angie think that insurance in orthodontics can also help drive patients into a practice. As well. Another thing I hear you talking about Orthodontic. Orthodontic treatment coordinators converting shirt handing patients. And he hears I mean I love Dennis. I really do I love him. Why do you know the thing about? Dentists is all my friends who are dentists physicians and lawyers. They all have eight years of college already. One Thousand Bucks. Every time I go over to a dentist home and there they got a hundred nonfiction books. They've read they. They know they know. And what's amazing is so many of know so much about the craziest little stuff and then you go to other people's houses and there's no sign of anything nonfiction and all. They talk about his Netflix and HBO and it they live in a world of of that. And there's nothing wrong with that but I'd rather talk to my homes and my my homeys are very very red. But they're also very honest. They'll tell you it jill. I don't I don't like solid. I didn't go to school eight years to sell. If you WANNA YOU WANNA sell used cars go for but they hate it. It's a four letter word and so How do you even work? How do you even work with people who will tell you what you'll you'll say? How many new patients how many opportunities? How many close did you get? Men they cringe. How how do you? How do you make an introvert scientist? Who should have got a degree in physics? Now he's an orthodontist and he works millimeters. I'd you convert them to get into cells mode closing so I think I think that key is if if an orthodontist can help it they should not be the one doing the sales aspect of it they should be coming and present resenting a treatment plan that a patient can understand in meets the needs of a patient where they feel like they can get a buy in from the patient and then they should use their treatment coordinator to close the deal for them. I try and encourage every orthodontist that I work with. They should not be presenting these. They should not be doing working. The deals you know however you. WanNa you know. Different offices do differently but I think I think having a well trained treatment. Coordinator is the key to that that allows the dock to come in and shine. Talk about what they know. Talk about what they're passionate about and then handed off to a treatment coordinator who does like the sales. And that's that's the beauty of it. Is We have a lot of really amazing treatment. Coordinators out there are industries that really enjoy connecting and becoming a liaison with Asians. Getting them to say yes to treatment on you wrote an article for Ortho town Software solutions by Jill Alan in how server or cloud based system. The answer depends on your preference. What thoughts about that now. More than ever in. Gosh I wrote that. How many years ago five? Maybe four years. Yup Yup. Okay so you know I say now. More than ever if a doctor can go with a cloud based software system I can't even think of in the last four or five years in office that we haven't went cloud based but you know. I just think it makes the most sense if we can do that route. And there's so many great operating systems out there now that are cloud based and whether we read Mac's or PC's I I just highly suggest it. We don't have the upgrade of keeping up with the server in the maintenance that comes along with that and I think You know it also knicks. It really nice should a practice decide that they wanNA have multiple locations. We don't have all the issues with the server one location of promoting in somewhere else. Just you know all of the headaches that come up with that so I am a hundred percent on board with sticky. Gweat they and and trained to go with a cloud based operating system The get mad at me when my guests? Don't you drop names? Oh they WANNA know exactly. Sure so I I think some of the really good cloud based systems out there right now. cloud nine. What's Nice about cloud nine as they are truly cloud-based doesn't matter if you have a PC or a Mac you're going to be able to get on. You could be running your Mac right next door gear P. C. And you can still jump on another really great company out there. I really like a lot is Ortho to Edge they're cloud based system. I do think that they work a little bit better. If you're running. Pc's in your practice. But I have many practices that run Max and we just run parallels I again to very robust systems and also make on. Dolphin cloud does a really nice job at You know Now they again are more. Pc based But they also do a really good job so those would be probably my top three that I would go with. We were going with cloud based operating systems and the orthodontic field. I noticed them a lot of them. A lot of companies. Now that all the patents on on my list is now forty different liner companies. That are just coming from everywhere but the big boys have him Henry Shine. Gc is everybody going to have a An a liner company. Someday or do you think the orthodontist or going to skip all that and go right to software and be printing their own liner treason office. I think I think it's probably going to be happen. Half I mean I already have startups. That are starting right from the beginning of scanners and digital printers right from day one opening so I really think it's just What the doctor themselves you know. What what they're interested in and you know if they can scale it and that's that's really what it comes down to. I think if anything my startup docs can definitely handle is just the cost. It goes back to that overhead but they can definitely handle scaling You know the production of you know doing a case here and there I think You know again it. It'll just depend on Amis and you know what how much time a doctor has a right now. I see so many of my docs that you know are doing to say you know you know all these align or treatments there. I think what they are finding is. They're spending more and more time working on the liner treatments. Now we're almost having to put new Job Positions into the practice in our digital specialists into our practice to help our doctors just maintain so it's just kind of switching one thing to another but I I think they're all going to have them so just to be clear. Your top three set a precedent covering up through was cloud nine software or do ed by Ed's Dolphin Cloud Dolphin imaging and management by Dolphin. And now they have a server based system and they have a cloud based so for talking. Cloud-based I'd go with cloud through Dolphin and explain to them. Why you Like the cloud though. I think it just comes down to not having to deal with you know when you think of the server. I and I'm sure all you know everybody who's listening if you've had a server in your office about every five to six years you're having to replace that. Server in a server is very expensive piece of hardware tends to go down a lot you know. I just think that if you know if we can and and I think there's barriers having both offices with server with server so if we can not have the investment in a five or six or seven or eight thousand dollar piece of computer equipment not have to build a room around the server closet you know an NBA able to have a software that we can use from home or one of our four remote offices. I think it just makes sense to you. Know to look for those kind of it hacks. And I think that would be through through cloud base systems and Why What do you like about? Ortho too. I you know I think Ortho to has done a really good job at listening to what they're Orthodontist out there are looking for and being aware of what is new technology and bringing that onto their platform and just incorporating it into their software So I just you know. I think they do a really good job with that. They've got a really good support team a good sales team. I've never had any of my docs that. You know You know just really had any issues at all which I think that speaks a lot for a company and then say something about Dolphin Dolphin. Actually my Gosh I remember that that's been around forever when I got out of school. I mean eighty seven. That was the big new thing for orthodontist because they want to take a regular SAF but was trying to get the tracing done immediately which in the eighty s was like no. No one can do that. But they've been there forever with a Dolphin today. I love Dolphin I think again. Just a solid company. They just done such a good job I think. Overall Dolphin is is just a good. Probably the most robust from a recording standpoint because we started dolphin imaging and then they developed managed and they've just been solid all the way across now they started in the server realm and then went into the cloud based and then you know last year they were kicking off. Dolphin blue Which is still in a Beta version for them. But you know just overall if you WANNA be able to have custom reporting I think dolphins dolphins definitely the way to go. I know the one thing I see with Dolphin is it. Isn't you pay one price and you get everything they do have like paid for modules which can get a little expensive sometimes my younger docs but I think for my ones who you know. Money isn't an object. I think they're great solid company now in do any of them integrate well with accounting software. Quicken quickbooks pro or is it on when you talk about their numbers they might not. They might know how many new patients got the definitely know? How many starts they have. But then when you say well what's your Labor it's like you just saw your first giraffe. And then if they give number for Labor if you say well that include Pfizer matching and health insurance and their or due any of these. Do any financial accounting. They absolutely do not. I just I st- office. I don't know have been ORTHODONTIC SOFTWARE. That does now. They may have Where you can download into an excel file and then upload. But that's one of the biggest things that I you know I teach with with my younger. Docs is now. You've got an operating system. You've got a quick book system and you may have a CPA and they all three. Don't talk talk so you gotTa make sure you know that that we're managing all three of those areas so you have a really good understanding of what's happening in in each of the areas so that you know that you don't have issues going up. It's the curse of healthcare me. We only see lines in government and healthcare. And there's nothing more hilarious to me than listen. You know most of the dentist. My Age are redneck Republican from Kansas Nebraska. I'm out here in Arizona. They're old school conservatives. They're always badmouthing the government. I'm like dude. You're the twin sister. It's government healthcare. No one else has lines. No one else. Has I mean th the same people? And they don't even know then that is. They don't know their numbers. They just don't know they don't any of their cost structures. How do you try to for the older dentist listening to me right now? We're GONNA put this on. Ortho town and the older orthodontists winning old. You know like those fifty a year old guys you know just old if they were fifty eight and they wanted to sell their practices. Sixty five for easy math. Let's say say that would. How would you coach them? Which is really bad. Because they're gonNA use all information to hold against your client. So you gotta you gotTa so school my old boy homey on how he can get your young client to give him the most money. What what should he do to his orthodontic? Practice his last. Yeah that's such a great That's such a great question because that is right in the other area that are really work is eight years to retirement. I have a lot of docs that hire me to come in and and help do exactly what you're asking one of the biggest things that I would tell my. You know my docs my season docks. That have been doing this for a while. That WANNA get out on top is you cannot run your practice into the ground. You have got to look at it with fresh eyes. So that means that you've got invested. Maybe a new website. You've got to invest in getting new patients. And you know I. I like to have my docs look at at least your last three to four years to show gross in the practice versus decline in the practice. So we want to see that in production not just collections because in an orthodontic industry You know any orthodontist. That are listening. We know that what we produce in one year. We're collecting over two. So just because your previous couple years collections look good if production has been declining that young doctor. If they've got somebody like myself or some of the other people out there that help you know advise on that are going to be telling them you know they. They already took the money out so so I think that that my season docs need to invest in in their practice. They need to really take a at. You know the employees that they have on their on their team and you know. Make sure that we are helping them. Have the you know the tools maybe need to be moving from paper to paperless? Maybe we need to really just be looking at. What is it take to take you from where you are now to be two thousand and twenty standards and and going forward if you really want to attract the eye of that younger Dr One of the problems I see with these older doctors and why I would tell young orthodontist or run from that practices that they You know they've had betty with her with him for twenty thirty years and every time. The earth goes around the sun based on astrology. He gives her another dollar raise. Because it makes sense if you look at the solar system that if the earth makes a complete rotation all the way around the that it's time for another dollar and just keeps giving another dollar every year but nothing. Nothing changed anything. Get more starts. They didn't get the cost to go down. In fact it's the opposite. Inflation is driving everything up and then I look and then some of these old guys practices. It's like my God. I'd rather do a Novo from scratch. Then go in here until three ladies making thirty dollars an hour that I mean how was. How do you advise about that? This is probably one of the hardest decisions and hardest discussions. I have to have with younger. Docs is that You know I think if you're going to be buying practice you need to be evaluating that team members that are there and you need to bring a lot of times in this is hard. I'm telling you this is hard but you need to bring those employees down into industry standard numbers. You are not a senior doctors. Been Practicing for thirty years and doesn't have any debt you know you're a usually a young dot coming in like. I said with five hundred thousand plus in a you know in some type of alone maybe student loan debt and if your front desk if industry standard as a front desk eighteen to twenty dollars an hour and your front desk person is making thirty three to thirty five dollars an hour. You need to make decisions. That are hard decisions but it will be the best for your practice because there's nothing worse than I. Young docs being held hostage in their own practices to senior employees. That don't WanNa work hard. Don't want to help get them to where they need to go. So those are some really really hard tough. Tough decisions but I I work a lot with with my doctor gone through acquisitions. In helping them. Navigate goes really rough waters beginning and some of the some of the. Dso's would use to sort out with like we talked about in the beginning of the program. Czars being liquidity play. And now there's a lot of DSO's Hartland one of them he says you know we're we're we're done. We're done buying your old high overhead office and trying to coach it back down to profitability We would just start at INOVA from scratch Is that kind of where you're at or before you even explain it. You said three times. It's hard it's hard it is and you know this is a really hard facts but a lot of my docs with if it's harder to do an acquisition than it is to do a startup for my stress level standpoint and in most cases the doctor doesn't acquisition will not have all of those team members there by the end of that first year anyways so I think I coach my doctors and a lot of a lot of the docks that I'm working with to say it's better to just rip the bandage in the beginning. And get it over with and you know have people except where they're gonna be. Add Add and get a team. That's behind you build your during team from the beginning Versus just kinda dealing like a lot that goes on and maybe having to get rid of somebody later on and get a lawyer involved in all kinds of things. Because you couldn't do it beginning. Did you hear about that legal case today? The Doctor One two hundred and seventy eight thousand dollar settlement. He fired his assistant and she made a bunch of online reviews against them. Sus Catch Saskatoon dentist. Gary Husband wins two hundred forty thousand dollar settlement against two former employees. He trashed him online on. Google reviews after they were both separated from his practice. Yeah I mean the thing. I don't the thing I think these young kids don't realize like you know well first of all when I was little I could go to the store and with just like two bucks. I could get mill bread age cheese. I can get everything we wanted. Because they didn't have all those security cameras around there you know and now you know now the these all your crimes are digital. I mean you go to a crime. Somebody filmed your phone. Gave it away I can't believe that people are online reviews on Google against the dentist and then are going to be shocked when an attorney and Google and somebody doesn't figure out what it was but back back to the numbers you say Labor's too high and all that said what would our that. What should the numbers the what would? What would you say that Rent more our. Yeah overhead yeah you know so. So ideally we wanna see that you know no higher than thirty three percent You know in and overheads you know in a neighborhood standpoint for all overhead or just labor labor wow so orthodontist have thirty percent higher than thirty three. Yeah and what would you say no higher? That's after what would be the median? Where half the orthodontist or Higher Hafer lower? Ideally I'd like to see it and that you know I don't know twenty eight to thirty between what twenty thirty and what about other Labor in in regard to Rent mortgage equipment. Bill Computers Supplies. What should I? What SHOULD SUPPLIES V? Gosh you know. I I would like to see that and you know that eight to ten percent. What would be eight to ten for supplies supplies? Okay so please. Eight to ten percent What what gets to be a little bit tough as when we are bringing a liner treatments into an orthodontic practice. We can see that number. Come up a bit Especially if they're using like an invisible line or some of the bigger companies that you know that definitely have that higher higher charge there in the one thing that you have to keep in mind. Is I think that you know when we're looking at overall overhead when we're looking at a startup practice you know. Our overhead is going to be probably eighty eighty five at the highest percent in overhead as total for an orthodontic practice. Once once a practice establishes gets out of those first eight years. We should be down closer to fifty five to sixty percent in an overhead so it definitely is a little bit different when we're talking startups to existing practices as we're coming along seen the biggest outlier differences is what some orthodontists spend in advertising. What are you what? What have you seen the range being? Sure I recommend that my Orthodontics spend between three and five percent of their previous years collections. And the you do you see Some type of advertising working different. Because I think you would. I mean if you told me you wanted to be an orthodontic advertiser I think well. Why would you pick that? That'd be like going into dentistry and wanted to be a pediatric dentist. I mean what went wrong in your childhood where you're just like. I want to hear screaming kids through Friday. Eight to five. I want him older cry. Okay but you're you WANNA do braces on Little Bambi from thirteen to sixteen. But it's parents GONNA pay for it. Have you seen anything? Is that like more likely. Be Mom to pay for dad to pay for his first picking on us. Who Are you? Who are you aiming at it marketing? I mean you've got the pace the customer but the person paying for is the adult for sure. I think I think the marketing has to go towards the parents and again. That's where you know when I say we're looking at that media at age member bringing it back to the demographic piece so we've got our parents that are in that thirty to forty five range which is usually about the age bring again that eight to sixteen year old right. That's that's that's who we're marketing to. And I think nowadays in orthodontics our number one first place. We have to be marketing to is out there. Socially so garnered the days of sending postcards. And I'm not saying that you see there won't be an orthodontist out there that will say but Jill because I have them but you'll postcards worked for me but I tell my dachshunds about building your brand. It's about brand awareness. In that first year in the way we do that is direct to consumer through a good website through good web presence through good social media sites. That's that's where we need to be living right now not that we don't still want dental referrals but I tell all my orthodontist that takes a good two to three years to just get a few good dentist referring to you so it's definitely switched in the way we have done things over the last twenty eight years in the market that we're going to. We still need a good social presence in the community presence. We still need a dental presence. But we we really need to be spending dollars and money and effort on that Internet And social sites and Would you. I can't believe we went over an hour for I mean really. I can't believe that that was the fastest. Our life do you do? What are you most passionate about now? Though I mean after doing this twenty years obviously you don't have to do what you're not pash about anymore as you get older you just gotTa do what you want. What are you liking now? I mean you know at the top of your game. You've been doing this for a long time. What what what are you most passionate about? What what do you like? And why are you so happy? Ratto they legalize marijuana right now. It's all coming together. I said I didn't have any brownies. Today St no you. Don't you know what I I just love the area that I met you know I got in to consulting when I made a decision to get in. I could've with mainstream and I I had a passion for those startups in those younger. Docs and I truly want our industry to be strong. And I feel like if I can help those you know. Those younger docs have good strong practices. You Know I. It's not that I don't think that the Diaz Aren't going to be there but I think that you know if I can help. These younger doctors have good solid practices and no patients will always want a choice and and if we can give them a good choice from a private practice and you know some of them may choose to go to some type of media practice and that's okay too but I really want to be able to be there and be a good voice and be an expert in my industry for for those younger. Docs helping you know my senior. Docs that are saying. Hey Joel I wanna be able to get out. Get out on top and be able to hand over a practice that I feel really good about to somebody new. That's GonNa come in and kind of keep the legacy of my practice going. That's that's that's what I that's what gets me up in the morning and keeps me going. You know. I know that the news headlines For orthodontics is always in the line. I mean when I got out of school. The big brands of colgate crest and listerine. They were all the only new world brand. Because I've been lecturing since ninety this August. Fourth Nineteen Ninety will be my third. I and I don't care if you lecture in Katmandu Malaysia Indonesia Tanzania soon as the bartender finds out your dentist. The first question is in line and the whole world knows it. And that's all they wanNA talk about but what I see. The biggest trend is that mom doesn't like to go to a pediatric Dennis. And say what does my baby. You need braces. Always you gotta go get another line drive to another store and wait again. And she's got a job and she's got to get off work and take her kid out of school and and when you look at the business model of retail since eighteen hundred every generation killed the one before it might be increasing size from little shophouses. They just went from fifty feet to one hundred two hundred and they maxed at about two hundred thousand square feet before I and Walmart and all these people said No. No there are two big now. That's to get back but do you see this trend like I do that. Pediatric Dennis and orthodontist peanut butter and chocolate. When you add those together they seem to be growing faster than Solos. Do you agree or not agree? I you know I do think that that is a trend. That's coming that's actually something that my business model is bringing on. We are bringing on working with pediatrics. Startups a for that very reason whether it's independently or marriage ing them together with orthodontic practices and I do think you make a good point. I think making it easy and accessible for patients to know go from one to the other is yours definitely You know there's a convenience factor there That you know that that I think appeals to you know it definitely appeals to patients at the start of Dolphin Dolphin. Their their whole start was back in the day that you can do. I need Ortho. Oh why can't tell anything? I gotTa take a staff and the piano and then you leave for two weeks and then come back and then I'll tell ya I came here the find out and now you're saying a week two weeks and and when my orthodontist God fat and he could take and do the tracing instantly he was so excited and so I'm the one stop shop is Never GonNa go away Do you see. Do you think there'll be a DSO? That's orthodontic focused. I mean there are who who's the biggest. Eso Ortho player. I now there's a couple I I don't know I don't know which one is is bigger and which one of you heard anything about. Gosh you're putting me on the spot any so yes so my point being i. It's a big thing in general dentistry but I know they've launched one endo which is good luck with that one and in orthodontics. I don't know I don't do you I. I don't think that's really going to be a big deal right now. I think what do you think I think I think that they're you know that? Dso's are in the Ortho industry and they are. They are coming. I don't know exactly what that what that is going to look like. I think the model of trying to put multiple specialties together. Make sense and so why somebody wouldn't be doing that and there are you know I can think of you know some doctors that are you know kind of doing that on their own you know and and trying to build that way but you know I think I think you will see that we will see that in our industry. Do I think it's going to take over everything no but You know but but I definitely think that it's you know that it will be there and We're not the only ones thinking about that. Well the the biggest one is by far de foresee dental brands. And that's GONNA be. Jim sheely clinical dental officer. We're trying to roll out the D. Foresee dental brands is raising the standard and children drawl health. We are the fastest growing largest pediatric dental and orthodontic especially network the United States But that was my point. My point was that the only dso really going after. Ortho is adding pediatric dentists. To I mean so. It looks like the ones that were able to get the money and make a run out of it was combining the two which would make me think if I was an individual orthodontist so I was just getting out of school that maybe I should find a pediatric dentist and team up with him. I think I think so. I think that it makes sense You know if you can find that and I've got some Pedo. Ortho is going right now like with anything. I think you always have to find the right heart. You know partner because partnerships can be tricky and so like merit exactly exactly. Yeah just and then you throw money in the middle of it and you know I think the biggest thing when you're looking at how do you you know? I was actually just talking to Kris Benson about this. You know You know how do you put a good deal together? So it's fair for both sides right because there's a piece where Pedo may say. Well you know I'm doing all of this but then Ortho as they're coming along they you know they they start to make more So it's figuring out how. How do you marriage that so again? It's a partnership but then you throw money in the middle of. That's where most people have issues so you're trying to make that work and then trying to decide. How do you set up those officers sense and if there is a split how do you split that you know so? There's there's a lot that de definitely goes into that well. It will be interesting to watch how all-star L. CEREMONIAL CEO at D. Foresee. Dental brands combining pediatric orthodontists. Because there's three hundred and thirty one million Americans. There's eight billion humans. There's plenty of business for everyone but I always found it enjoyable When I was practicing to see how all these other. Dso's what they were doing what they were learning. You know it's just it's fun it's taken your mind out for a ride But I want to thank you so much for I. Are you still doing your Webinar on practice? Results Dot com as far as well practice results DOT COM as my website. And you can you. Anybody can find out anything about made through through the website for sure and then I do webinars with different companies just depending upon. What my topic is I speak. Also at a lot of different conventions so people can find me all over. Will they love you on a on? Ortho town which is only four orthodontist and then Donald town is for any buddy Dennis reece specialist consultants were but they they love you and they're going to be thrilled. I've I've had several. Several orthodontist asked me. When when are you gonNA podcast Jill and how wonderful well Howard? Thank you so much for allowing me to be on this. I mean I think that anytime we could get good information out to dentists. Unorthodox out there I just think it's good for us. It's good for all of us right. So thank you again for taking the time to interview me and let let me be a part of this and ten years from now when someone says to you. We're were you in the market crash. I was I was with Howard and Jill. That's right that's right for coming on the show. Chubby Grey Day

Orthodontist Jill You Boulder Jill Gaspar Lazara United States Ortho town Ta NBA Jilin DSO facebook Toronto Dolphin America consultant Kansas Jilin
39: Kilometre 0 | Memories of Michele

The Cycling Podcast

00:00 sec | 7 months ago

39: Kilometre 0 | Memories of Michele

"You're listening to kilometer zero by the cycling called CAF supported by over assists racer designed for flavor. We started protocol veto. Zuni Lapenne salvo out the window. Four need not what I thought because it's important that Clinton at all Kelly Scott ponies death on April twenty second week before he was due to lead the astonished team of one hundred jittered Italia. Nothing short the cycling world but immediately left the sport facing unfilmable void on Tuesday. The owner the Eagle Philip Panel on the mountain. He conquered on route his most famous win. In the course of the mortar all in two thousand and ten. Meanwhile ever since that fateful Saturday a month ago Scotland his legions of friends in and around the Peleton have done little else but remember and mourn him a former teammate. Lewis Matei TUB SCARPONI. The William Wallace the mark his beloved home region while to others. He was a court jester. A brilliant talent and exemplary professional or just a loyal friend and family man. He threw the memories of some of those former teammates opponents associates and admirers cycling. Podcast pays homage to make Scott Pony Margaret. Sanger from them serious. And so yeah I guess pointing pretty good. You're team is for years as Antonio Freely. And then he's my age so yeah I know him since junior actually and You know these years it was always the guy that one When I was meeting in the pilot owner yeah always like something funny to tell you it was really a guy that was able to add to make use. Milo's really worst moment always said something and I have a fantasy and I say that if there was one guy that Everyone likes like everyone who had a chance to be with him at least once Like like It was Michaela because We try to talk to each other after he'd either like so text collects that I knew that they were really close to him. And everyone had message. Voice Message Analogy. Mesler reveal that he sent them in the few days before and Yeah it is crazy I saw him Tuesday two days before he died. The started my hometown and I WANNA stage and came to hug me and his wife was there so we want to see. My baby is nine months old and Today's after I was training nine forty. I got the call and The other day I was in the airport of year hood voice for a moment of shoes. Gillian look at him. Like Guided. Let me get a like pretending. Could be possibly was there because it's really hard to believe that these really happened and yeah. I think I feel blessed for having met him and Now hope that his wife and I and the kids would find a force to accept it and And then go on. I remember last year we had Quite animated conversation after the cancer staging Reynaud. The oldest Dante was really really. Let's say angry about this decision and We almost had a discussion and then Embassy mcgilla sit down and talk and we talk for Like forty minutes table and Is really intelligent person. So we really like Explain each other what was going on and he had through some some good point about the situation that you can really see like an open minded person and Yeah of course it was a was super nice guy. The first thing you think anybody who was a champion at the Andy WanNa jury won twenty six races and He was Was Thirty seven is to do. We need a few days before so really professional and Yeah going to be Mr. From several point of view from stunner get was Not just The mate and just a nice guy like everybody knows already was very Special either not. Just because he was a strong writer was A real read Because he can manage well group riders Gupo Friends of a spoiled guys yes. He had a very strong personality Always very funny very nice but also very strong to to keep the group altogether without aim with our big leaders very different We have a big responsibility. Donald BUT WE ARE. We are trying every day. Too Much summum So I think if we're a bit of black we will get some mattress out before they energy Pity rather for waterhouse grow. We'd like to spend Suspense about today I got to know him In Two thousand twelve after my first year at that time I was just a small writer ones. It wasn't At this level now and Yeah after that zero in two thousand and wherever I go the one Monday I got a phone call two days after I got a phone call from California. Didn't talk to him before that moment and He just called me like Lake like it was a friend of him you know and I told me Mini reason for a couple of this holiday. Maybe we can. We can train together and called me like like no one was like a guy who can window can can be on the podium in many races thing. Nobody else would have done it. Other writers they feel level higher than than normal writers and That's the Saudi to cater and we train the together two days and was wholesome and all the way the way he talks the way the way dogs was a fun with him. In the in the training nine the race is offering independent on when when the bed thing happened two weeks ago. I was in Belgium for Dan Classics and the might my teammates. They asked me if I by new in personally and I know him personally but the friend of mine is a friend hold him was a fan of everyone and it was really like that because I think he was one of the writers. No problems in the pedal we have any other Reuters. What can I add a few weeks? Boss what's still stood? It's hard to believe we say that's uh always the best. The best ones live to live birth. Sometimes ready made sentences. What's This as it was really like that. I am Mark Owen. Our EGO journalists at career in one thousand nine hundred percent of the cases the lead psyches as a lot of programs to talk honestly about adoption case in case refuses to talk telling always the same story. It's it's past my boss. I don't want to talk about my doping case on fifteen twenty percent of the case they say okay. There was a mistake. The analysis there was a mistake in a small small percentage of cases as indicates Oscar Pony and the cycler saps to talk to token are harnessed way about his case. It was a case of weekly weekly admitted the case in Berry Berry since away That the first time I I'm after Casey Say Okay. I was I was involved in Westport. Mistake was not. It was not a mistake of the system. It was not a general because my case it was it was me and and I will be Will be affected by this case for my life and when I will when I will explain to my children's what happens. It will be ashamed for me but it was honest about it. It's it's rare it's rare it's the first time maybe maybe the second case of an athlete we admitted was open with and I think that the sincere our honest was was. We killer an intelligent. Yes because intelligent means to be intelligent in this case due to be able to stay in the system looking in the eyes journalists France and audio is not easy. It's not easy when when you when you come back after doping case to behave this way my name is Mateo Cover to the staff digital and everyone is remembering every day. It's just too big things to be. Forget in so short time my last memory about him is I was at Trentino his last race and we spend almost entire week speaking about the Bharat because The protests was doing some mistakes in the town all around. He's on town and everyone. There was saying that someone has to pay attention to him because he was doing on On the supermarket was doing some mistakes to everyone and he said me to find out a way because I want him to be interacted about. I have to take care about my own safety because everyone hates this part about the law and then nothing we were talking about doing something about the power to digital and then we just say hello. Friday evening and Sunday morning. He was just a gun in my opinion and in my career and now he's the espn the best in this kind of A. It's a job actually because in a team you know there are some tension moments. I'm yet period. That not everything goes as you as you wish. And he was just the best in fact one of the thing that I liked to remember. Is that Yes died in I think in most Happy moment of his life. I'm speaking I was talking with his dodd in the past days and he sat me. That Michaela was just super super happy because the condition was growing for some something that has happened to farm bureau and he was going to be the leader. The Geo and I was really super happy that the only thing I like to remember one side. I'm on the Shimon. Manager of Makita Scarponi great writer and great family. Conflict could just feel an incredible sense of loss every day. You hope to come to terms with it a little more but unfortunately it's not possible anything that helps seeing the love that everyone involved in the sport had Michaela. I love that. It's now showing to me because people know that our bond was very strong for example. I've just seen Michaela Bartoli. He coach Mikhail for Awhile and he hugged. Me Is always a family member these things. Bring tits your eye. But they will say. Fill your heart with warmth. This kind of action. Plus the fact that there were seven thousand people at his funeral on the way people commemorating. Michaela the go. It warms the heart. It also tells you what kind of relationships Michaela had with. People says humor was very talion. Owed even say Midi Denali typical of the south of Italy. Even though he was from central region they mark the beautiful thing about the sense of humor came to realize this got to know him better was it reflected his intelligence and sensitivity woman. He was way above average among bike riders in these respects on what? I spent hours and hours with him talking about family values but the little irritations and tensions that can arise family cyclists fixated on say the pressure to put in that ties. The next day with him. You'd be talking about the subtleties in the relationship. Between I didn't know a sister in law and a brother for me the knowledge that I had this kind of connection with Michaela elevated a friendship to a different level. And that's what makes it so much harder to deal with his loss today. She second hand in Utah. Listening to the episode of Kaziro by the cycling podcast supported by all practice espresso. Music was bite therapy centers of America era. Thanks at the Bowie who produced this episode.

Michaela Bartoli writer Kelly Scott William Wallace jittered Italia Scotland Mark Owen Reuters Clinton California Sanger Antonio Gillian Milo Dante Andy Wan America Berry Berry Donald Oscar Pony
How to Stay in Shape, Psychedelic Assisted Psychotherapy Data #1051

One Life Radio Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

How to Stay in Shape, Psychedelic Assisted Psychotherapy Data #1051

"The content of the following program is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis treatment or cure always consult your physician or a health professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition <music> ooh baby. Do you WANNA go higher baby. You're in the right. Mike please. You're listening to one life radio. This is Bernadette with Diamond Gray Adriana Betty Antos and Daniel Tag. I forgot forgot to introduce you last week. I was like what I didn't introduce them. Yeah it was crazy. It was crazy you you make mistakes like that sometimes so I'm going to introduce you right now. Daniel tag is an orthopedic specialist trainer at Tell US fitness center next door here to the iheartmedia studios in Dallas Texas <hes> He is certified certified in orthodontics bio mechanics resistance training and muscle activation techniques and he's also a licensed massage therapist and holds belts in three different martial arts systems and and he was also a wildland firefighter and he's been on the show for a long time and you're leaving to go teach Ortho kinetics right you said tomorrow tomorrow going city Kansas City okay so or kinetics I say it all the time on the air but you know I'm not sure if I've ever asked you exactly what it is for our listeners it means correct movement connects correct movement so we really look into the bio mechanics of lifting and the the technology of the science of you know levers and moment arms and physics okay and then by mechanics and anatomy and physiology while we train so really more bio mechanics anything so we make sure that we're getting optimal movement to really work what we want to work and and within that which I harp on here all the time is assessment assessment assessment because you don't know where is the correct bow McCain's for that person if you don't assess them yeah and it's crazy like you you know you never know what's GonNa throw you outta whack and so you know I'll go. I'll go weeks or months and I'm going to have any aches or pains and then I'll just wake up one morning and like my right <unk> foot will hurt right and it's in the back like I don't know if it's like. Is that your Achilles so you're killy's he'll like your kills is a ten in that that the gas rock the gastric and the so as soleus excuse me attach your calf muscle where he detaches into well. I have a problem down there. Okay I don't know what to do about it. I I just keep massaging and stretching and maybe it's because I wear my boots a lot because I'm always wearing boots high heeled position Russian. You're constantly shortening those those Kathy and I do walk fast too because you know I grew up in New York and you walk in. You Talk Faster New York because it's so cold they gotta do what you gotTa do. Oh my gosh well so I was walking down the hall back from the cafeteria to get a cup of coffee and Tea Jared D._J.. was there and he had this book on his desk and I said that and I said this is he goes Oh. That's a that's a man's man's book. I said Oh can I grab it. Can I borrow ever this for the show because I bet daniel. Israel has bought Steph out of here before have you I don't know but it had a wildland firefighter on the cover and he he's a sawyer which is exactly what I used to do. So that's what I noticed that used to be me so this. I didn't have that killer mustache though I had a killer beard mustache. We look like pedophile like Tom Selleck and my dad's generation they could pull it off my generation not so much I I don't you know I can't stand bash. What's the name of the magazine? It's called Philipson Wilson since eighteen ninety seven <hes> protectors of the forest a unified front the U._S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service is in it's one hundred fourteenth fire season and all across the nation firefighter scientists Rangers engineers and volunteers are working together nonstop to prevent the devastation of our forests and grasslands <hes> from wildfire fire. Oh they even have a picture <hes> hey happy birthday to smokey the bear smokey is seventy five years old. That's awesome. Wow really interesting. I you remember reading his little comic and stuff growing up doing and then years go by you grow up and you forget about them and I was in a fire station in flagstaff. Arizona was in the National Parks System there yeah now sitting down in the back like wait. We're on some fire engines and I look up and I see smokey the bear in like wow this is full circle because like now I'm the one protecting the forest like who would ever thought and who would ever thought well. They have some nice gear. I'M GONNA have to open a hatchet and I'm like Oh my God. This is right up Daniel's alley. There's nice in here you know how lovely and all those flannel shirt for Christmas do that Wrexham some whites or knicks boots. He like like waffle knit thermal crew. I don't know what that is why they are the more you wash from the software they get yes and here's feather cloth shirt ridgway fleece jacket. Here's an Antique Tin Jack Shirt would is that until Jack Scher conjecture in mackinaw Jack Shirt and all kinds of stuff. Oh here's another guy with a muster mustache or muster beard to go with it which looks better I <hes> beard and mustache together isn't so bad. Just the most mustache makes the guy looks anybody out there. That's got just a must off a mustache. You had to have a big upper lip. I don't have a big upper lip and ends up looking narrower no matter how thick it is my dad has an upper lip and he has a good Mustaq yeah yeah I never i. It never really noticed. Your Lips never noticed the upper lip. I never noticed your here's the block one ten folding Hunter Book. Here's awesome I recognize. I love doing that accent. I just can't help myself. Maybe that's what you should do on your twelve day. High Eighties is go find some fires voltaire would probably love that would <hes> <hes> here's the life of smokey the bear look at this. It's got the whole history in here fair. That's cool. Wow So smokey the bear wearing a rangers hat belted blue jeans and a shovel appears for the first time on a fire prevention poster in Nineteen nineteen forty four look how cute and friendly he looked back then in the beginning seriously and then in nineteen forty seven smokey slogan. Remember only you can prevent forest fires yeah. I remember that one. I remember that famous one yeah well. How would you remember it was nineteen forty seven well? They still use this. Oh they do okay didn't he have had a real time. Remembering smokey had a really voice right. I don't remember ever hearing smokey. I just saw commercials on T._v.. A lot of T._v.. Yeah I didn't either but I remember smokey the bear being on like public service announcements and stuff especially in the summer in upstate New York. I was at the foothills of the adirondack mountains kind of there's a lot the catskills there's a lot of mountain areas New York. People don't realize that kind of predicting a New York New York yeah exactly but anyway so enough about this. This is fun though I knew that you would enjoy way that grabbed it. I've got to give it back to D._J.. But we've got a fantastic show today <hes> we've got Daniel tag talking about not just how to get in shape but how to stay in shape not. I don't know what the difference is but we're going to talk about it and <hes> Dan ingle <hes> is coming up. We're going to be continuing our talk about data of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy therapy <hes> this is really interesting and you know I got I've already got the September October issue of the Wellbeing Journal and an on the front of it look at this it's all about mushrooms terms and here's about depression fighting fungi and mushrooms and microbiome foraging for edible mushrooms and Cilla Sivan cancer treatment but it's not not just cancer treatment. It's therapy for cancer depression and addiction and so really interesting and <hes> I do you were here last week when we spoke with him. We're going to give to speak with him again again you. You actually had some really good questions for him as well. I really enjoy listen him. I mean you have a lot of good people on here. I get more benefit by being on here because I just I listen more intently intently because otherwise I'm going to be listening in the car. Might my attention is one hundred percent. There and I don't know if you ever look at me when when you're when you're guests Ron I'm like staring off into the sons into the clouds because I'm just like you're. I'm trying to absorb it all. It's always very good. Dr Tan Ingle is absolutely a fascinating man and with <hes> incredible credentials he you know he's been studying this for very long time <hes> and so yeah he's <hes> he his clinical practice combines functional medicine said Integrative Psychiatry Neural cognitive restoration and peak performance methods and he's actually the medical director of the revived treatment centers of America and he also serves as medical adviser to on it labs one of my favorite labs and one of my some of my favorite products from on it <hes> Andrew Rest vote centers we used to sell on it <hes> products or all of their products editor floats Bob Yeah so I'm very familiar with the company so but we're I just love talking about this stuff. You know just from reading this quote out of the Wellbeing Journal if view can create a condition in which seventy percent of people will say that they have had one of the most meaningful experiences of their lives that that's just incredible and that's it's quoting Michael Poland. I believe from the book which is an incredible book. If you want to know about this how to change your mind with the new science of psychedelics teaches us about consciousness dying addiction and depression and transcendence by Michael Poland one of the greatest greatest writers in this country author of the omnivores dilemma <hes> just really good stuff really good stuff so I do have twelve days by kids are playing right now. <hes> they'll be in Milan sometime in the wee hours of the night <hes> and so we were or joking about what am I gonNa do what am I going to do. I might go. I might even go where obvious going to know where you're going you're going to it's a place called Santa. He's a clown. What's a museum? They're having a stevie wonder tribute tonight. That'll be cool. Oh stevie wonder I thought you said Stevie necks. Sammy wandered. That's even better. Oh my gosh no offense D v Necks acts. If you're listening I love Stevie Nicks too but yeah <hes> <hes> very superstitious. What am I all time favorite songs best song ever like ever writing year your mind would be blown? I have the sexual move that I that I that I developed when I was about thirteen that my brother and I did to the song superstition that we would do it together at the dance. Yeah I was there but he was you know episodes in friends when Ross and his sister do a dance on that just reminds yeah now my brother and I both loved to dance my brother Mind God bless his soul he passed away actually <hes> from <hes> from the side effects of drugs for Epilepsy Yeah Yep <hes> he developed epilepsy and <hes> had to be on really strong dot drugs to <hes> you know stop the grand. Mal Seizure said he used to have and I could've sweet say we could've saved him a C._D.. Oil Can eugenic diet all kinds of things that that no one knows about but <hes> yeah my brother he was <hes> he was really. He was really We why we love life so much when we are alive and why we need to appreciate that and take care of our health because it's the most it is the most precious gift that we have your health is truly your wealth and that's what we like to talk about here on one life radio all different types of things that affect your health both your both your spiritual hell. They've got like a little list here this morning. I'm your spiritual your mental and your physical health so everyone we've got a great show coming up. Stay tuned. You're listening to one live radio crabcakes one life radio. How is brought to you by our sponsors? Great companies like Sun Warrior plant based protein use the code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas honest temp happy healthy honest C._B._D.. Use The code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off nature's played plant based meals to ago Paleo magazine Wellbeing Journal and the International Society of Sports Nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our website for twenty eighty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio here we go I'm going to I'm going do the dance. The dance armed back and forth swinging the his <hes> a little bit a little sway back and forth to walk into gather by side rider one person going back on Johnny Marine was and it was man. I wish everybody could see facebook live. I'm going the wind behind Mike Not Without a camera. Oh my gosh so great to have Daniel tag studio with us today. Welcome back everyone. You're listening according to one life radio and this is Bernadette with diamond degray Viana and of course as I said Daniel Tag. I want to let everyone know before we get started. I'm out of breath doing doing that that burst but <hes> you can go to our website one life radio dot com to download and listen to our podcast or subscribe to our newsletter. We actually put went out yesterday was fantastic and our our next one will have all of the information from Dr Alvin Dannenberg who spoke yesterday about how he is fighting cancer one day at a time with all of his <hes> tidbits of information and things that he's doing to <hes> to lead the fight and so it'll be good with a lot of it'll be <hes> you know with a lot of really good information so go to our our website one life radio DOT COM com subscribe and of course you can go to Iheartmedia dot com to listen live or download the free iheartradio APP and listen to us from anywhere in the world and a big shout out to our sponsors great companies that bring this content to you that truly care about you and this world that we live in great companies like Sun Warrior <hes> joining their mission to renew ourselves our minds our bodies in our world together we can truly transform the planet one warrior at a time go to their websites on warrior dot com and use the code. Oh l. for twenty percents off your order and of course crazy water is the only mineral water bottled in Texas. A crazy water boasts loads of benefits that other bottled waters only can envy so visit them eh drink crazy water dot com and of course Paleo magazine and the well-being Journal <hes> Love Them Paleo magazine is dedicated to the Paleo lifestyle and industrial health. You can find your favorite Paleo gear along with issues packed with the latest research visit them at Paleo Mag online dot Com and the well-being Journal <hes> is available in both print and digital version order online at wellbeing journal Dot Com okay. Let's get down to business and we need to get this magazine sponsor. You guys really they'll say this is like the wildland firefighters this legit you WanNa you WanNa do the content with them. That would be fantastic and then we can talk as you know. Men Love to talk about men stuff down was the tool that you were talking about a show Lasky. The poll asking the plastic is like the first tool you get fire data boy in school and his last name was Pulaski well. That's the the man who created was plastic. Alma was his name was but it's like a it's like it's acts on one end and then a digging instrument on the other one with the short handle and you mostly use it for are digging and you're meant over for sixteen hours a day digging in scratching <hes> it was it was it was miserable but it's a cool little tool. You think a lot of guys would like that magazine magazine the guy that's like a legit like like the outdoors and has any idea about chain saws and axes which is awesome and then they have these these chainsaw so awesome Daniel I mean you can take down huge trees that you want to take down a beautiful tree because they're on fire and they're gonNA catch. More trees. Remind seems why can't you. I don't know I don't know anything about it so I shouldn't speak about it but it's the power of being able to take down something that massive with a tool and then the tools powerful. It's just you know it's got an engine and you know it's got oil royal in dangerous to Oh yeah I caught my leg on fire once restored. I do not see that maybe lab better better but there's a science to as a sawyer so in that cut down trees. You had a guy that was falling you call the swamp and he'd pick up the stuff that you that you cut in. If it was on fire you throw back in the fire if if it wasn't you throw it in the green well you'd have to think three or four cuts ahead 'cause you're not always just cutting down the tree. You gotta limit you gotTa do a whole bunch of stuff cut through the brush so sometimes you're limited things and and you've got to think like three or four cuts ahead and be like sit up that that cut with this next because you're going to do this because when you do that for sixteen hours a day you have to be efficient a muscle at you're done after about a half an hour well. The thing about a chainsaw that that scares me is what if the chain comes loose you can't you. I've heard of people getting really oh no. I've I've had a a couple chains thrown and then something else that is the ultimate sin as Sawyer is trapping yourself so you're wearing these things that are calling for people that just now joining us. You're listening to Daniel. Hey He hasn't Connecticut Specialist Trainer at Tells Fitness Center but he's also he was a wildland firefighter and he got real excited about this. This book catalog that I brought brought in the Philipson what it is all the highlights and all the fun stuff of being a firefighter doesn't talk about any of the boring nasty when you can't can't back for like two weeks three weeks over thirty one days no over thirty days was my I had some kind of weird fungus gramma back. It wasn't good. It's like after one day you can barely smell like you can barely stand your smell added that up over thirty days of like over one hundred degree weather working sixteen hour days yeah. If you weren't so tired you want to be able to sleep in your own tent. 'cause you smell so eyes watering the biofilm on you I would imagine I'm the stuff I mean your shirt. You're Standing Standing Upright. It's it's bad but no so like you wear your wearing these shops which are like chat. Most people call them. chaps are actually called shops so there and what what you do is if you if you hit yourself in the leg with a chainsaw you can kill yourself arteries all kinds of stuff well. These shafts are made chester material that it will bind the I saw it will shut down before it can actually cut you but if you chap yourself like you're you're shops will show it and that's the ultimate sin as a sawyer like if you you do that you're probably taken off of the saw and Sawyer is a specialty a special name for a Fire Land Firefighter. It's like that runs it. She goes to someone that runs a a chainsaw is called a sawyer. Okay so then you work your way through the Polaski and the shovel in some of these other things and then you had to be a swamp or for a while and then you work your way up to the chain saw on on hand crew chainsaws like like the sought after Gig. Did you have to do jump training so that's for the the smoke jumpers and no I wanted to if I would would've stayed in you had to get another two or three seasons on your belt. I think it'd have a total of three or four seasons. I only had two and then you could go to jump school. I WANNA do hello repel repel off the helicopters to I was getting I was getting helicopter crew member certified and then when I decided that was going to do it again. There was no point in continuous certification helicopters are so I actually stop by to see my friends that own sky helicopter town this morning it was great to have all the choppers flying around and all the you know it was just exciting fighting business but <HES> <HES> you know. We're supposed to be talking about how to stay in shape but that's okay you know that's the Nice thing about you know the show. We can navigate go wherever we want <hes> but you are an expert in this field Daniel tag isn't kinetic connectik specialist trainer at tell US fitness center he's also certified in bio mechanics of resistance training and muscle activation techniques last week. We talked about how to get in shape and now we're talking about how to stay in shape. Feel like this is a subject that most people don't touch on everyone's. How do I get in shape in shape but if you've ever been in shape it's so easy to fall out and then you gotta get in shape again? Well yeah yeah trying to stay in shape so staying in shape is the key 'cause getting in shape is hard thing. Stay in shape really isn't that hard it just takes consistency constancy and that is the key is you just have to do a little bit several several days a week. Even if it's only three days five days as optimal seven days even better but you you just gotta stay consistent and then find things that you enjoy. You're smiling a lot over there. I just I'm just laughing because it's so easy to drop that consistency assistance see once you see results yes it is and that's where okay got the result now I can take it back and I don't have to go quite as hard yeah but I have to make it a commitment and that's making get a routine. You have to just make it part of your routine like you wake up your brush your teeth you wake up you go to the gym. It's the same it should be. The same thought process consistency as Akita success no matter what is if you're talking about fitness if you're talking about the Campbell Soup Company which is my first business book that I ever read <hes> about an and the key to that was consistency that is the main message takeaway consistency is indeed the key to success so the customer always knows what the client they they get what they expect. They're going to get when they opened that can anyway but we're not talking about business. We're talking about staying in shape. I feel like everyone knows it's consistency but there's little tricks that hey find things you like doing for you. Burn into its dancing is doing little workouts in between the the doing the house cleaning Lyng the late not the dogs cats whatever find those things that keep you active and then another thing to stay in shape and staying in shape can mean different things for different people. I'm talking okay. You're at a decently low body fat. You look healthy. You have good lean muscle mass and your joints feel good all that encompasses in good shape to both look and how you actually actually function in pretty good shape I actually was on the floor with Mick Sunday morning and I snapped a picture of me <hes> completely candid picture and I was like you know what I look pretty good. You know and I didn't look great like it wouldn't look at me and go wow but you wouldn't look at me and go either I mean I've looked pretty good and and it's from consistently Bentley you know trying to stay in shape working out at least two or three days a week. Even in my worst times you're doing to stake to keep the consistency assistances or to keep the staying in shape thing basically the workout volume can go down but the eating needs to stay on point and that's another thing is a lot of people like Oh. I'm in shape. I can now eat whatever I want and it's like no fine the lifestyle we talk about this all we find a lifestyle and we all drop off like if I if I drop off it's like say out of year. I might drop opt-in percent of the year something but ninety percent of the time I'm pretty darn good versus other people. They're like good ten percent of the time that's when they get in shape but the ninety percent of the time they fall Skew it towards the greater percentage of being on well. I think a lot of it is diet too because I know when I don't do my protein shake in the morning typically at Sun Warrior <hes> somewhere protein plant based <hes> once in a while another thorn one two. That's a plant based one P protein but when I fall off of that when my diet isn't consistent either and I'm not getting thing that protein to you know to help build muscle mass early in the morning and keep me satiated. I find that I snack more later in the day so the Diet is a huge huge party diet's going to help fuel the energy that helps you energy to get into the gym and then the energy fuels that energy to keep on the Diet and it's the cumulative effect of the snowball effect in the good way yeah well well <hes> so much more that we talk about and you're going to be back in a few weeks. He said Oh you're next week. We'll be back and then you're taking a little sabbatical and we've got more. We're coming up today too with Dr Dan Ingle data of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy. We're GONNA talk all about it. Stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one life radio. Oh one life radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like Sun Warrior plant based protein use the code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas honest temp happy healthy honest C._B._D.. Use The code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off. Nature's nature's played plant based meals go Paleo magazine Wellbeing Journal and the International Society of Sports Nutrition be sure to go to our Thorn Research Dispensary Chancery On our website for twenty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio. Go Oh my gosh back in time with that. I don't even know what you're that's round that <hes> and Daniel. You're not very good at music so I'm not GonNa ask you Daniel. <hes> everyone welcome back to life radio. This is Bernadette with Diamond Gray Daniel tag IBM about Antos and Dr Dan Ingle. He is a medical doctor. During he is the author of the concussion repair manual practical guide to recovering from traumatic brain injuries his clinical practice combines Functional Medicine Integrative Psychiatry Ahah Tree Neuro cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He is the medical director of the revive treatment centers of America and he also serves as a medical advisor Iser to on it labs and true rest float centers. His website is Dr. Dan INGLE DOT com and that's E.. N. G. L. E. Dr Dan Angled Dot Com always a pleasure how you doing today Dr Dan Great Bernadette Well Yeah Yeah I love this. I'm just obsessed with this. With this topic I really am and as I said at the opening opening of the show it is one of the lead articles in the September October issue of Twenty Nineteen of the Wellbeing Journal all about Scylla Sivan Cancer Treatment for cancer depression and addiction and so today we're talking about data of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy and so what is the current data show as far as using psychedelics. It's just psychotherapy doctor Dr Ingle well. It's pretty impressive and it spans multiple different medicines <hes> if we were talking about suicide then for example there was an excellent <hes> study in Johns Hopkins in two thousand six that worked with people they didn't never worked with any kind of medicines before they had some kind of experience with meditation and self enquiry but no medicine work and in one experience experience three quarters of those people said that it was one of the top five most meaningful experiences that ever had and they continued continued to feel that way over a year after the experience happens yeah and I'm one of them right. That's like really clear for San Perspective now. That's just one example of somebody who's going in so to speak for something of optimization but if you go into the healing arenas suicide and phenomenal nominal in that it's very good for treatment this depression. That's why it's in phase three trials right now. It's also good for addiction. Recovery people get concerned about these medicines being thing addictive and many of them are actually anti addictive for example suicide and has an eighty percent cure rate for smoking addiction addiction in two sessions of cognitive behavioral therapy using it and now there's nothing else that's close to that kind of addiction recovery rate for nicotine or smoking addiction and clearly so many Americans are are suffering right now. I'm reading from notes from our last show. Sixteen million Americans suffer from depression and approximately one third of them are treatment treatment. Resistant depression is also an epidemic worldwide affecting three hundred million people around the globe and that Silla Sivan has already proven effective as a mental health treatment treatment and cancer patients suffering from end of life distress a John Hopkins University New York University and U._C._l._A.. Have all conducted trials and which have consistently found that that a significant number of patients saw the depression and anxiety decrease <hes> if not fully go away that's pretty powerful. It's huge and it's one of the reasons that Michael Palin and his recent book how to Change Your Mind recognized that this was a massive movement in the fifties sixties and seventies and there's never been an accelerated <hes> potent medical research investigation around a particular therapeutic modality it it was all of a sudden just stopped in its tracks and that's when the Nixon administration put everything in schedule one wrongly because it most of these medicines don't meet the definition definition for schedule one which means they're highly addictive and there's no benefit whereas most of these have extraordinarily high medical benefit including India may for for treatment resistant chronic pushing stress disorder even l._S._d.. was shown to be like sixty percent beneficial for helping people to or alcoholism <hes> back in the fifties plow when it first became studied so many of these medicines when we're looking at the difference between recreational national use therapeutic use actually talking about the therapeutic use with train providers who know how to facilitate a healing process there through ordinarily ordinarily powerful for a variety of different conditions most of which you just mentioned that are all in increasing epidemics right now. Well you know what wh- because it is illegal Silla Simon is not is not a legal substance. How're the clinical studies done with this type of <hes> with this type of therapy time? You're studying a new methodology go through the phases of that testing and phase one tests for safety phase two tests pets for efficacy at a small scale phase three tests for efficacy at a large scale right now. Envy May is being studied in phase three trials. It's already been proven even safe. It's already been proven effective right now. We're just seeing the larger scale so more people being studied simultaneously and <hes> both these new medicines have the potential to be legal within the next one to two years fully federally legal in the therapeutic context or therapeutic arena India may for P._T._S._d.. And suicide been for chronic treatment resistant depression and so as these phase three trials get get underway then we're gonNA see the large scale data and be able to distill the amount of advocacy and then get more clear on what are the inclusion criteria that means people have to just like win. Cannabis became first legal as a medical treatment and then it became mhm legal as a recreational tool. You had to meet an inclusion criteria to be included either into the study or to be <hes> allowed participation dissipation to receive that medicine attic clinic. That's already been deemed <hes> proven <hes> effective methodologies and saved by the federal government. Who's funding these studies is that the federal government or are big pharmaceutical companies involved in the in these studies? Neither these are all <hes> private funded really which is one of the most amazing things as well. <hes> maps is that organization organization in a P. S. DOT ORG and you can go to the maps website and get all of their data and really see what they've been doing over the last thirty years. This is taking thirty plus years into this point for India May to be in phase three trials well phase three trials. I think cost twenty million dollars. It was all through private donation. Wow well you know you read so much about this and <hes> you mentioned <hes> you know Michael Poland's book and I have of it right here in this article in the well being being journal that says that Poland writes that <hes> Rick Dobelin P._H._d.. Public Policy Harvard <hes> that's his you know his credentials chills believes fervently in the power of psychedelics to improve humankind by disclosing a spiritual dimension of consciousness that we all share regardless of our religious beliefs or lack thereof because I think so many people really suffer when they don't have a spiritual connection whatever that connection didn't look like. Would you agree absolutely absolutely there's a really <hes> compelling definition of suffering that suffering bringing pain divorced from meaning oftentimes. It's our spiritual connection that gives us meaning to two particular challenge. We have faith that something is is happening for me as opposed to happening to me then it's easier to move that challenge life is going to be challenging and variety different capacities is going to be pain. Involved suffering. Old Daughter who was experiencing anxiety and depression and having nightmares and so the doctor put that child on Prozac when I heard about it my hair almost stood up on as I told the mom Oh my gosh you gotta get her off of that immediately. You need to get some oil and some other things that you can do you know even something something as simple as a and you know this from your you know your medical adviser to the true rest float centers that magnesium is so powerful to fight anxiety just taking absence salt bath in itself <hes> calming down the central nervous system and all the great things that even something as simple is absent salt can do for a child Orna Dot. Would you agree absolutely absolutely symptoms are helpful because they tell us that something's out of balance and if we just use the medication into subdue the symptoms that we never get to the core issue right and that's a perfect example of somebody if they're going to be medicated early on particularly in their childhood it's GonNa Affect Their neuro development element and then oftentimes that person's going to be on medications throughout their entire developmental landscape in their teens and early adulthood and I ended up working with clients who've been on medications for thirty years yeah well. Thank God really know themselves without it. Yeah thank goodness and I have to tell you so <hes>. I called her back a few days ago. I told you know and she took my advice. I'm so glad she did that she at least listened anyway. She talked to her a couple of days ago. She took her off. The medication started on the C._D.. Oil and doing some of the things that I told holders simply an epsom salt bath <hes> her nightmares were gone and she told told her mommy. I didn't have nightmares late last night. I feel so good and and anyway so <hes> <hes> and just makes me feel good when I hear stories like that because children's lives are in the balance and I really believe like you do that they <hes> unless it's a very extreme circumstance. That should be a not our first option is to throw them on a psychiatric drug. Yeah well put ideally it's not our first option yeah and win it's severe and when it needs to be used great then use it but use it judiciously while we're still investigating what the underlying causes absolutely well. We're going to continue on with us. Everyone out. You're listening stay tuned because there's more with Dr Dan ingle data of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy. You're not gonNA WANNA miss it. Stay tuned. We'll be right back. <hes> one life radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like Sun Warrior plant based protein use the code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas honest temp happy healthy honest C._B._D.. Use The code. Oh l. are for twenty percent percent off nature's played plant based meals to go Paleo magazine Wellbeing Journal and the International Society of Sports Nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our website for twenty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio <music>. Welcome back to one life radio. Everyone this is Bernadette Unidad with Diamond Gray viane toes. I Have Daniel Teigen studio with me and Dr Dan Angle on the line. <hes> he is the author of the concussion repair manual a practical guide to recovering from traumatic brain injuries his clinical practice combines Functional Medicine Integrative Psychiatry Neuro cognitive restoration and peak performance performance methods. He is the medical director of the revived treatment centers of America. He also serves as the medical advisor to on it labs and true rest float centers his website. The site is Dr. Dan Angled Dot Com. That's E. N.. G. L. E. Today. We're continuing our talk about the data of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy which is very he promising. I might add so you know which psychedelics Dr Angle specifically are looking to be the most promising oh right now for the inclusion into <hes> psychedelic assistant secretary before the masses here in the country the two that are on the launching pad are India May and so Sivan 'cause they're both going into phase three trials and they both have the potential <hes> to be <hes> available ball within the next one to two years because they're they're both been green lighted by the federal government to treat really severe conditions so nice. That's the yeah which India may treating and then major depression which suicide mistreating well what kind of disorders other than the ones that you've already mentioned are or medical. Oh elements are actually being treated <hes> when we look at the broad implications of a variety of different medicines. There's a medicine called E.. Boga or I began in there. I began clinics that are legal in Canada and legal in Mexico. Unfortunately there is not legal here in the states that had up to sixty to seventy percent cure rate eight for chronic opioid addiction after one treatment. Oh Wow wow there's nothing on the landscape is anywhere close to that efficacy rate and that's just one example of something that we know that works. I ran an I._B._M.. Clinic in Mexico about seven years ago and our results were consistently phenomenal and the the challenges we have still just skewed perspective of mind altering experiences being really dangerous and <hes> that are GonNa you know mess people up even further but this is the difference again and it can't be stressed enough. There's a difference between recreational use. It's not done mindfully with with train providers and then therapeutic syracuse is done in a safe container with people that know what they're doing so e Bogan. I began for OPIOID dependence. <hes> I- AWASA is at the medicine. That's being used a lot of underground circles globally yeah the or sorry. I'm sorry I didn't mean I was going to make a joke about a lot of people go to Costa Rica to do that. Don't they will they're illegal centers and they're good centers in Costa Rica. They're good centers. IMPRO- I lived in proof for a year studying with that medicine and it's very good for depression anxiety P._T._S._d.. Addiction chronic pain chronic digestive issues because it works in the gastrointestinal system <hes> and when you look at the data particularly when you look at the data that is global data and you go to places that are reputable also <hes> websites like maps dot org. I ICE E E E R s dot Org <hes> these are just two examples of great databases for these kinds of medicines. The data is just so freaking compelling. That's why it's not a matter of if these medicines are going to become legal it's a matter of win win and how they become legal because the data's so good in so compelling in this grassroots movement has already taken off and it's only accelerating well. Let's talk about the micro dosing of L._S._D.. What can you tell us about that? <hes> there's a really good book. <hes> also a Tedtalk <hes> by <unk> by the title a really good day and I forget the woman's name but she's a previous lawyer had chronic severe depression for many many years tried all the pharmaceuticals cool to no avail and then heard about microdosing l._l._c. she started trying it and it was phenomenal and very helpful for her <hes>. There's a lot the people that are using it both for optimization to for like cognitive enhancement many <hes> executive and business professionals and people that just want the extra <hes> mental force and mental edge 'cause L._S._U.. Degree highly creative medicine however over the long period of time for some people that can actually worsen their anxiety allow because it's pretty strong that way and <hes> it can't have some blood pressure effects over the long term but overall there's no l._G.. Fifty does there's no lethal does highly safe. It's safer than most things that we ingest on a regular basis that are very addictive like nicotine caffeine sugar and alcohol uh-huh and when you look at the benefit over time the <hes> it seems to be in this comes from a guy named Jim Batman's work work and you can go to his website James Faddem dot com and he had the largest database of case studies and case reports globally with people using different medicines is in the microdosing arena and after twenty to thirty thousand or so case reports some nation <hes> seems to be that the best use the use of these medicines in the micro Serena including L._S._d.. And suicide been tends to be every third day. One tenth of a journey does Lonzo. You're working in the micro arena only every seventy two hours and not to place that alters consciousness yeah you might just notice that Oh like in the title of her book. Oh it's a really good day. Yeah my experience. My depressions less my anxieties last my concentrations better etcetera yeah using that term <hes> one tenth Anthony Journey that that term see. I'm one of those people that I really fear L._S._D.. Because I remember one time when I was younger one of my friends friends were trying it and they said do you ever do it. Don't look in the mirror or you'll see your face melting in the mirror and that was enough for me to say you know. I just don't think that's something I would ever experiment with so yeah so even one tenth of the dosage being one tenth of a journey <hes> that's that's an interesting way to describe it really is but <hes> let me ask you this. What will the effect of this be on the pharmaceutical industry? <hes> you know oh I think big farm is going to get really <hes> more and more curious about novel analogs and the pharmaceutical companies are already curious about <hes> altered states and how they can leverage <hes> patented molecules to support the current psychiatric epidemic apology so for example Johnson and Johnson just launched

daniel depression Wellbeing Journal Texas Bernadette Unidad New York India Sun Warrior medical director Daniel Tag America International Society of Sport Dr Tan Ingle Michael Poland Dr. Dan INGLE Mike Dr Dan Ingle US federal government Stevie Nicks
A Plan to End Partisan Gerrymandering

The Daily

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

A Plan to End Partisan Gerrymandering

"From The New York Times unlikable borrow this is the last month the Supreme Court ruled that federal courts are powerless to who on cases of partisan gerrymander saying that judges are not entitled to Second Guess The decisions made by State legislators who draw the voting Max today. A conversation with a man has long believed. There's way to fix the problem without the courts Monday July twenty clue hello hi hi Mr holder yeah. This is Eric holder. Hey It's Michael Barbaro from New York talking to Michael. How're you doing good good? Thank you very much much for making time for us. Sure Eric holder was the attorney general under President Obama so I WANNA start in twenty ten which is when it seems that the story begins. What were you doing at the time in two thousand ten? I was in my second year as Attorney General it's the day after in America with midterm elections delivering the biggest shift of power and more than sixty years in the midterm elections that happened at that point Democrats Democrats didn't do well at all the biggest walloping of the Democrat since the forty biggest midterm election results in seventy years. That's history President Obama faced the media. After the American people delivered their devastating verdict on his policies and I remember in the post election press conference that President Obama had this is something that I think every president needs to go through. He described what happened tonight before as a as a shellacking feels bad <hes> but I don't think that people understood at least Democrats didn't quite understand at that point what that shellacking was going to mean for the redistricting process that was going to occur a year later. We're GONNA take short break and when we come back we'll turn our attention to the issue of congressional redistricting what it means now that the census figures are in twenty seven was ten year redistricting that is done in this country. We get one shot once a decade we get a shot to redraw the district boundaries and it's so very important that we mobilize now to participate in the process works is that state legislators draw congressional lines. That's should just be a technocratic totally apolitical thing but of course it isn't what actually happens is the party in power draws weird crazy lines on maps in order to give themselves an advantage on election day grouping and Republicans understood in the twenty ten twenty eleven that if they did well at the state level they would have the capacity come twenty eleven during the redistricting process to really draw lines so that they would have state control which then would give them the ability to draw lines for the United States House of Representatives and give them control of the United States House of Representatives in a way that was inconsistent with a number of votes that they would have <hes> received <hes> they did that very successfully in in in twenty eleven and we saw the result of that over the course of this last decade. We'll give an example of one of these districts that was drawn in a way that preserves republican power and how that flowed from this twenty ten electoral victory by Republicans well. I mean if you look back just at the most recent elections if you look at North Carolina for instance where Democrats got about about half of of the vote for all of the Congressional Delegation in North Carolina and ended up with about twenty three percent of the seats in Ohio Again Democrats got about fifty percent of the boat and got about twenty five percent of the congressional seats Wisconsin Democrats Democrats got actually fifty four percent of the congressional votes and ended up with about a third of the congressional seats and that's all this is in two thousand eighteen and that's all function of the lines that withdrawn by Republicans in twenty eleven okay so in two thousand fifteen you leave the Obama Administration. How are you thinking about this issue of Gerrymandering well given the fact that I'd spent a fair amount of my time as attorney general in protecting acting the right to vote? That's something that I wanted to stay involved with and it also seemed to me to be a place where there was not I thought sufficient amount of attention being paid to what happened in two thousand eleven and what could potentially happen again in twenty twenty one so what did you decide to talk to President Obama about this because he's also made the determination that in his post-presidency this is going to be his chief political involvement. We started to think about what is it that we might do and so set out Nancy Pelosi locie Terry McAuliffe thin the governor of Virginia and decided to come up with with an organization that would focus on this issue of Gerrymandering Fair redistricting and get ready for the process that was going to happen in two thousand twenty one and and those are those are all democrats that you mention all democrats but every one of us was convinced that all we needed to do was to have a fair process and that our party would do fine. We didn't think that we needed to create create an entity that would gerrymander. We thought we needed to create an entity that would make the process fair in your mind. Affair Process would produce better results for the Democratic Party then what was happening already yeah. I mean if from my perspective I think affair processes just good for the nation good for our system. We live in a hyper partisan environment. You know the number of reasons why that is the case but I think gerrymandering certainly contributes to it. If you're in a safe eighth seed you're not worried about general election. You're worried about a primary and that drives people further and further to the right and be fair further and further to the left and cooperation is seen as a sign of weakness and therefore we see people dissatisfied with the way in which governments operate or more precisely don't operate in the level of cynicism tens to rise so from my perspective I wanted to affect a positive systemic change that also had the collateral impact impact of electing <hes> Democrats putting more Democrats in places of power but my focus I mean it's quite sincerely my focus was on a positive systemic change and you know if that meant that it would result in more Republicans being elected holden. I'd say you know what we as Democrats D to change our priorities change our our policies and be more attractive to more voters. You're basically saying that you're thinking that you as Democrats. It's you don't need to cheat to win. You don't need Gerrymander to win and if that wasn't true that would be a sign that Democrats have much bigger problems and they need new policies a new messaging and everything else to persuade voters to vote for them. I think that's precisely right and I firmly firmly believe that the Democrats do not have to Gerrymander in order to win all we need to do his have the lines drawn in a way that is that's fair so let's talk about the plan that you come up with what are the actual strategies here to try to end gerrymandering and as you're saying create a fairer system here yeah well we announced the creation of the National Democratic Redistricting Committee against in January of twenty seventeen and are thought always was that in order to really get at this in an effective way we needed a state by state process and so we did a state by state analysis and decided which states we would target and then decided all right. We're going to support candidates who will stand for affair redistricting. We're going to support reform efforts in the states where that is possible nets chiefly the creation of these nonpartisan commissions non partisan commissions are structured in different ways in in different states but the ultimate goal of all of these is that you take the power to draw the lines away from interested politicians and put it in the hands of a body that in its totality is really just trying to do <hes> the right thing. Among the third thing is we would bring losses in those states where we had the ability to do so to challenge this appropriate gerrymandering and then four thing was to have an advocacy effort to make people aware of the negative impacts on <music> our country of partisan gerrymandering so we had four prong strategy that we would employ in our in our target states so part of the strategy is supporting candidates at the state level who vow to draw aw fair or fair districts so you would support Republicans as well as Democrats who vowed to do that sure I mean we are you know they'll finding Republicans who will say that that's extremely difficult is yes. It is Republicans have not generally been in favor of this kind of effort because it necessarily means they understand. It'll be a diminution of their power with the changing demographics in this nation with the change range. This nation is undergoing ideologically if they were to have a really just totally fair process that would mean fewer Republicans in Congress. You know that's a hard thing for individuals Israel's foreign safe Republican seats say why I'm in favor of making what is a safe Republican seat that I now occupy make it more competitive decrease the chances that I'm going to get reelected and so that's why I think it's typical to find Republican partners in this effort. We'll be right back. This podcast is supported funded by wordpress dot com with powerful site building tools and thousands of themes to choose from wordpress DOT com. Let's their users pursue with they love by launching a site. That's free to start with room to grow their customer. Support Team has made of actual wordpress experts who are standing ending by to help you twenty four hours a day including weekends and wordpress users own their content forever get fifteen percent of any new plan purchase at wordpress dot com slash the daily so we've talked about the ways that gerrymandering helped the Republicans in two thousand eighteen. How did your strategy for combating gerrymandering play out because I felt like the first major test right yeah we did quite well in the mid terms in two thousand eighteen? We won governors his races in eight states. We flipped six state legislative chambers. We broke super majorities in four chambers. We may really significant gains in seven additional legislative chambers. We passed five ballot reform form measures that put in place these independent commissions in Michigan Colorado Missouri Utah and Ohio we went three Supreme Court races and those become important because in states where we wanNA bring lawsuits to challenge links these unfair gerrymanders ultimately have have supreme courts that will look at these cases in an affair nonpartisan way so we were successful in two thousand seventeen twenty eighteen both in terms of or electoral efforts in lawsuits that we brought so this is working. If you believe the Democrats that you're behind when they say that they will draw fair districts but I wonder how you can be sure about that if and when Democrats take over these chambers. Congress in these states that they won't turn around you know and Gerrymander as well and there's a very legitimate question earlier this year Democrats in New Jersey tried to use the power that they had their to do things that I thought were inappropriate in essence essence to Gerrymander for Democrats in New Jersey necessary free public in my condemnation of what it is State Democrats trying to New Jersey and ultimately Democrats in New Jersey Back Down and did not put in place the measures that they were trying to fact that would have advantage Democrats inappropriately so in that case you ask Democrats to disarm despite having the power to Gerrymander exactly and unprepared to do then this is not an attempt up to Gerrymander for Democrats. I would not put my name my reputation on such an effort Norwood President Obama. This is a fight for fairness but let's talk about that because there will be people listening to this <music> who will think to themselves Mr Holders Right. This is a fight and democrats should bring their biggest weapon which is partisan gerrymandering. I'm sure you hear this from time to time knowing the argument that you're making making here that that what you're proposing is noble but that the tactics of your opponents will make it very very hard and that affair system may not be their goal and so then there's the old Jon Stewart Line that when it comes to Democrats there frequently bringing a tote bag to a knife fight and are you suggesting a kind of unilateral disarmament by Democrats that may end up hurting the party despite the nobility of your goal no nobility using way that equates it with weakness and I don't see that at all I'm tough all right. This is a tough Democratic effort to fight for this democracy moxie. The use of inappropriate means to fight <hes> what you consider to be an inappropriately created structure. I don't think is the way to get at this. That's not what I think. The Democratic Party should stand four war. We should stand for those policy ideas those programs that will generate the kind of electoral support that will put Democrats in power and once power is obtained attained it should not be used in inappropriate ways to continue to have people in office if they're not supported by the people and as a result of this noble effort will end up with a better America Erica as you're talking about this idea. I'm thinking why would ever have made sense. Why would anyone design a system in which local elected officials are responsible for drawing districts that would empower or disempower members of their own party in other ways? It's kind of illogical you know. The prime directive for any elected official is to get reelected and to give power to those people to draw the lines in some someways is illogical but we've been doing it that way since there has been a United States of America and there has been gerrymandering done by both parties by Democrats as well as by <hes> Republicans from my perspective simply because we've had it in the United States almost since the creation of the republic doesn't mean it has to continue. Let's just do away with list. Come up with let's improve our <hes> or system. It occurs to me that the most logical place for this to get solved might not be in state legislatures legislatures where Democrats and Republicans may go back and forth controlling these chambers with their self interested instincts always at play but that this is an issue for federal courts what better place to kind of take an issue like this then judges who can come up with some sort of a test for what is a partisan Gerrymander district and say well. That's one of them and I'm going to now. Call that illegal and make you go back to the drawing board and come up with a fair one. We'll let me give you a really concise legal analysis here Supreme Court Blewett period full. Stop you mean case that just happened. Today's Supreme Court decision on your vote and Gerrymandering. It's a win for one political party will tell you what it means that the court today by a vote a five to four ruled that partisan gerrymandering is actually something that courts should not get involved in what they call. A political question with the Supreme Court says is this can the only be dealt with at the state issue for decades people that have been disenfranchised have looked to the federal courts and the Supreme Court in particular for protection now they can't do that any longer the best way I would have been for the court to say you know you can go too far when it comes to partisan gerrymandering and it would be best to have from the highest court in the land some parameters some guardrails court had the opportunity opportunity to put those guardrails in place and there are guardrails in place when it comes to racial gerrymandering and the court had that opportunity and simply decided I think wrongly that there are no there's no place for the federal courts when it comes to making determinations about the constitutionality of partisan gerrymandering efforts so where does that decision leave you and your organization and your mission well. We still have the capacity to bring racial gerrymandering cases in the federal real. Course we still have the ability to ring partisan gerrymandering cases in the state courts. I mean I think it certainly means that we have got to be successful in winning elections successful in our reform efforts successful in the lawsuits where we can and bring them. We can't look to the federal courts for help. When it comes to partisan gerrymandering you know this partisan gerrymandering decision I think will <hes> more this court as a body that simply did not defend? Our democracy in a way that should have in fact his allowed with a perversion of our political system so with that in mind twenty twenty the next big election feels like an enormous chance to show whether or not the country is invested but in this question and I wonder what you think the stakes are let me the stakes are very high and one of the concerns I have is that <hes> you know the nation it will be focused. Obviously I think appropriately on the presidential election but I don't want people to lose focus on what's happening in the in the state elections and we've got to make sure that in twenty twenty we continue to be focused just to make sure the Democrats are at the table when the lines are drawn in twenty twenty one right twenty twenty like two thousand ten leads to one year later a redistricting process exactly exactly and that's why we have to win elections in twenty twenty MS roller. When will you know that you've accomplished your goal here? What what would that now look like yeah? It's interesting. I think about that. I think after the twenty twenty elections the test will actually then be a what happens in twenty twenty one when the process is actually underway. We moved the states in such a way. The process is coming out more consistent with the desires of of the voters than happened. Previously I kinda imagined that you might say that you would declare victory when Republicans get on board with your mission because otherwise it sounds like this might be an endless fight for you unless you can get Republicans to support this mission right. I mean if it's just Democrats who you believe it will draw fair districts. You will be beating back the threat of partisan gerrymandering seemingly forever and I wonder if you have a plan for that how you plan to convince the other side that this is right and that this should be their mission as well as yours. You know I actually think that if we are successful in this effort and if we inject a substantial amount of fairness into the system it almost inevitably will draw Republicans into this effort as well as they tried to make sure that and as they try to protect any seats that they have any power that they have if the systems are are fair it means that they will want to participate to make sure that Democrats will I think have more power our don't use that power in ways that will disadvantage them in that will almost push them towards towards fairness but we don't get to that point will then you know Democrats have got to be prepared dared to continue to focus on the states in a way that Democrats have not I think previously done and be prepared to to fight for a fair process in twenty thirty one you know and if that's what is necessary well you know we gotta be prepared. <hes> got to be prepared to do that and make sure that we are. You know we're successful at it air quarter. Thank you very much. We appreciate Tarts Congra- talking to you <music>. We'll be right back. We call it the mother standard of care. It's the idea that if our mothers were diagnosed diagnosed with cancer. How would we want them to be treated? That's how we care for you. With teams of Cancer Experts Delivering Advanced Treatments and compassionate support every step of the way all here in one place with one purpose to fight your cancer together. That's what's the mother standard. This is how we inspire hope. This is how we heal cancer treatment centers of America learn more at cancercenter dot com appointments available now. Here's what else you need to never gave president trump further inflamed racial tensions with a series of tweets in which he falsely claimed that the Maryland district of Representative Elijah Cummings is quote rodent infested mess where no who human would wanNA live Democrats Congressman Elijah Cummings Saving Care About how migrants are being treated at the border but what about the families and people in their own district Congressman Cummings was elected to represent West Baltimore trump's criticism of cummings one of the most prominent black members of Congress mirrored a segment on Fox News the questioned whether Cummings was doing ineffective job of representing his constituents living conditions at the border on better than most areas in his district congressional congressional Democrats including House Speaker Nancy Flus called it the latest racist attack by the President Acclaim White House Chief of Staff Nick Moving was asked about on Fox News Sunday. There is a clear a year pattern here back. The fact is the before his inauguration the president tweeted about John Lewis a black congressman that he should spend time in his crime infested district then two weeks ago he goes after these four members of the squad won't women of Color and says they should go back to the crime infested countries from which they come then he talks about <hes> Elijah Cummings and he says his district is wrath and rodent infested infested Ashton. It sounds like Berman it sounds subhuman that there and these are all six members of the members of Congress who are people of Color. I think he's been expanding way too much time. Reading between the lines does not reading between the lines on reading the line watching that's it for today. I'm Michael Belong seat of all this is supported by rocket mortgage by quicken loans within award winning team of mortgage experts obsessed with finding a better way to make the home buying process smoother for you with a history of industry leading online lending technology rocket mortgage is changing.

Supreme Court President Obama president America Democrats Congress Representative Elijah Cummings Gerrymander attorney Democratic Party Eric holder Gerrymander New Jersey United States House of Represe Ohio Michael Barbaro The New York Times New York North Carolina National Democratic Redistrict
United States v. Jeffrey Epstein

The Daily

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

United States v. Jeffrey Epstein

"From the new york times i'm michael barr this is daily today prosecutors in new york are accusing jeffrey epstein of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls and asking them to recoup other underage girls patty ms on what happened in a similar case against epstein over a decade ago it's tuesday during the morning tom jeff berman united states attorney for the southern district of new york today we're now seeing unsealing of sex trafficking charges against jeffrey epstein patty tell us about what happened in new york on monday morning the united state's attorney for the southern district of new york jeffrey berman holds a press conference where he announces a new federal criminal charges against jeffrey epstein that's being were taken to the metropolitan correctional shuttle cetera and love hot and later today to be presented before my fridge epstein is former hedge fund manager who made his wealth in wall street he's got eight illegal townhouse upper east side of new york he's got a mansion on palm beach island got property at the united states virgin islands end he is friends with the rich and powerful including president trump former president bill clinton andrew york in england that's was arrested this past saturday evening at peterborough airport aboard his private jet just land from paris france and what his attorney in new york alleging alleging the epstein epstein was charged with two counts of first conspiracy to commit sex trafficking sucking the substance of crime of sex trafficking of underage girls according to prosecutors epstein created this network between two thousand to two thousand five the victims all underage girls have reportedly alleged conduct in which he invited girls under age girls into his mansion in new york end in palm beach end he paid them to give him nude massages massages became increasingly sexual in nature will typically include water more sex at a specified in his eyes those encounters often ended in masturbation oral sex an in at least one case rate as alleged affair and also to certain victims to recruiter national girls to be similarly abused and he also paid them to recruit more girls that could come to his house there for creating this sort of ever expanding network of sex alleged behavior shocks the conscience and while the sharks congo is from a number of years ago it is still profoundly important to the many alleged victims now young women they deserve their day in court we're proud to be standing up for the by bringing the dog and the prosecutors said that even though some of these encounters happened a long time ago that some of this is all of these girls who are now women deserve their day in court five you so the prosecutor in new york makes a point of saying this alleged behavior dates back years and years basically the two thousand the two so why are we just seeing these charges today that's the key question michael because what is studying about this case when you listen to the u s attorney in new york on monday is that it sounds so familiar to allegations made against jeffrey epstein in florida more than a decade ago in that case the girls in florida did not get their day in court but the story of how the florida case against epstein unraveled is one of the reasons why we're here today talking about this case against him in new york and so what exactly is the story of what happened in florida the story begins in two thousand five when eight girl and her parents go to the police in palm beach and tell them that she has been molested by epstein and paid for it and the police start investigating and what they find is not just one girl but many girls with stories about being molested by epstein and some girls just leads to more girls end so they wind up with what they think is a very big case on their hands they take it to the state attorney but eventually the police feel like i've seen might not get as harsh of a charge as they would like giving the number of victims but they have seen unconcerned about that they take the case to the f by and say help us we think there's a big case here in one of the local police have that suspicion but epstein will not be appropriately charge what exactly do they fear they become anxious that either because of epsteins wealth or name in the community or the fact that he didn't have a criminal history that he just might not be charged as strongly as they think he should be charged for example then instead of some sort of sex abuse charges she might end up with something like soliciting prostitution that would elicit a less harsh penalty is a what dizzy fdr i do when the police bring this case of them d f b i starts investigating an finds more victims and victims corroborating the stories that the police had found stories about massages and new massages and payment for these massages that ended ended up in various sex sex an aide web of recruitment where one girl would be paid by epstein and his associates to bring in more girls to his palm beach house for these this hodges end eventually d u s attorney's office in miami which at the time was run by a man named alex costa drafts eight fifty three page indictment against epstein and what isn't vitamin de indictment lays out these allegations of sex trafficking against minors end carries a potential punishment of up to life in prison so serious yeah it was pretty thorough and so what happens so we go by and then months go by and finally in two thousand eight the victim's learn that there will be no federal criminal indictment against epstein unbeknown to the victims behind the scenes epstein and his high powered defense lawyers had negotiated with federal prosecutors so that they would not charge him in federal court they negotiated what is called a non prosecution agreement and so in the end epstein pleaded guilty to a single counts of soliciting sitting prostitution in state court he had to register as a sex offender he had to pay financial restitution to some of his victims and he got eighteen months in county jail in which he could leave six days a week to go to work leave prison six days a week just kind of walk out of jail in could work yeah it wasn't extrordinary arrangement and it raised eyebrows even at the time but the prosecutor said it was how they were going to guarantee that i've seen serve some time in jail and that he register as a sex offender which they viewed as important help the community around him so the local police brought this case originally to dsp why because they were worried that the state attorney would be rolled over by afternoon by his wealth by all his connections and his fiancee lawyers and then he would get a sweetheart deal prosecutors would tell you that they did their best end that men sending epstein to jail but in the end he faced a prostitution charge in state court and not a sex trafficking charged in federal court and that's exactly what the palm beach police worried could happen at the start of the case but will be fbi's and the federal prosecutors right the people who they had turned to for help patty you said this was unknown to the victims why would that be these victims were not given a chance to speak up against this agreement before it was signed it was essentially actually just negotiated between epsteins attorneys end the prosecution until the victims didn't find out until after the fact and after i've seen had already agreed to the plea deal and what's the reaction from the victims who have been cut out of this plea agreement and are now learning that he's gonna be facing an unusually light sentence victims are outraged an as soon as they find out about this non prosecution deal in two thousand eight they go to court asking for be agreement to be nullified for for them to get their day in court end this argument human turned into years of legal battles over what was negotiated in secret that the victims did not know about and what's going on with epstein during this time as this battle over the plea agreement is playing out in court epstein gets out of jail about five months early he reportedly has a party to celebrate his return to society and you have to register as a sex offender but other than that he basically goes back to his old life he have his lavish lifestyle but he continued traveling between his properties in new york and palm beach end the virgin islands and they case kind of receipt is from public view for years until president trump asks alex acosta the former top prosecutor in miami who reached the secret deal not to indict epstein with federal charges should be his labor secretary will be right back we call it the mother standard of care it's idea that if are mothers were diagnosed with cancer how would we want to be treated that's how we care for you with teams have cancer experts delivering advanced treatments and compassionate support every step of the way all here in one place with one purpose to fight your cancer together that's the mother standard this is how we inspire hope this is how he'll cancer treatment centers of america learn more at cancercenter dot com appointments available now hi i'm any brown and i'm one of the people who makes the daily one of my favorite piece of tape we've had on the show was from an episode we made with times reporter francis this row bliss who was investigating the death toll of hurricane maria in puerto rico and she sent us back this file where she's standing in this group of reporters who are barrage being be officials with questions and she asks and again and again how can you not not acknowledge that these people were killed by the hurricanes and you want her to get to the bottom of it i think the reason why i love the tape that are reporters send back to us so much is that we get to see how hard the reporters at the new york times work they're trying to pick up facts that are buried for a reason that nobody wants to know francis is gonna keep asking those questions and she's gonna keep sending take back to me were gonna keep putting it on the air because we think you deserve to know the answers to the question that francis asking and if you think that's important is the best way to support us is to subscribe to the new york times senate committee on health education labor and pensions will please come to order this morning were holding a confirmation hearing on the nomination of alexander acosta deserve what happens after acosta is nominated as labor secretary we do a cost nomination comes a lot of scrutiny into a costa's career rear especially his time as a prosecutor end so reporters like myself start looking into the case again m i wanna just rebus in two thousand seven acosta signed a non prosecution deal and in fact it comes up in a costa's senate confirmation hearing for the labor department what is the reason why a deal is this kind has the specifications that it will not be part of any public right of center all answer question but he says as he had said pass 'em at the end of this case i received a telephone call from the special agent in charge of the fbi's that they did the best they could aunt he call to just say congratulations this is really hard fought and it will one entity outcome was positive because epstein went to jail and have to register as a sex offender that would help protect the community you are aware that mr epstein served at thirteen months he was allowed out during the day and he had the sleep at a county jail but he was basically allowed to move and go around the community and do whatever he wants and then that became a subject of significant critise in i am on recor condemning that and i think that was awful questions questions acosta gets confirmed by the senate and becomes the labor secretary which he still is now but the miami herald his hometown paper decides that it's going to dig even deeper entity epstein case and see what happens especially now that not only is the cost of labor secretary but that the me too movement has happened end that perhaps these victims cornell young women might be willing to talk publicly for the first time in waters the herald fox herald is reporting that acosta gave a sweetheart deal to a wealthy man accused of sex crimes including sexually abusing underage girls the herald investigation which was published in late twenty teen found a trove of documents showing how the secret non prosecution agreement with the goshi aided the paper found that as usa attorney in florida in two thousand and seven acosta and another federal prosecutors struck a plea deal with epsteins legal team end the documents show epsteins defense lawyers being chummy with prosecutors on a first name basis this while the victims didn't know anything about what what's going on i was young i was scared i very powerful i didn't know what would happen if i said no i didn't know what would happen if they reported purported them that sixteen year old girl just let it happen in addition to that the herald finds more victims and victims were going on the wreckage for the first time now they're adults it takes a long time to start the healing process i mean i will never heal there are pieces from me that and never be put back together and the combination of de behind the scenes communications about disagreement and they additional victims and the victims putting a face end details to these allegations asians starts to build new public pressure for something to be done in the case and it's not long after that miami herald the report that something else happens that lawsuit that the victims in florida had filed seeking to invalidate the secret non prosecution agreement eight judge finally issues a ruling anti rules in the women's favor he says the prosecutors made a mistake in not letting them know now that this was being negotiated and by prosecutors you mean alex acosta who is now the united states labor secretary that's correct the judge ruled that acosta and his office violated the victim's rights by not letting them know about the secret deal that they had negotiated with epstein and that's where everything was until we got monday in new york is that would lead you attorney in new york to bring these charges on one day we don't know exactly that case is still pending in florida what we do know is that the prosecutor in new york apparently found a new victim in his jurisdiction and that seems to be eight primary driver in his decision to pursue this case now and it's possible for him to also draw in some of these allegations from florida into his case we know that he went out of his way to say on monday but the non prosecution agreement in florida does not apply to them in new york humidity is key to note that they have found eight victim there and so that is a new dimension to their findings so it's possible that these girls now women in florida who alleged the jeffrey epstein had done these things to them and who were kinda boxed out of this non prosecution agreement that they may be drawn into this case and how their day in court here in new york possibly were going to have to wait and see giving this sort of tricky dynamic between having somebody in the justice department in new york signing off on a new case that had been sort of closed end done by somebody in the justice department in miami it seems like you attorney in new york is saying something about how the case was handled in florida it sounded like the u s attorney in new york with implying that that this case maybe wasn't handled so well the first time around either by his predecessors in new yorker by his colleagues in florida and now he has another shot they they get a do over here and they find a ticket and they have a chance to make things right for all these victims after all these years about it you've been covering this case as a reporter in florida for years what do you make of these latest developments to me it's an illustration of how society has changed in the time since this case first came up and now i think between the me too movement that has exposed some very powerful men and their behavior towards women i think some of societies impatience now with us perhaps wealthy people having a bigger say in the criminal justice system than people who don't have money and it's also just interesting that the charge epstein faced was for soliciting prostitution boy i'm so struck by the fact that the resolution of that first florida case was a prostitution charge which meant that prosecutors they're essentially labeled minor who is allegedly paid for sex but jeffrey epstein as a prostitute not a victim actually vm former police chief in palm beach who's department first start investigating this has said that what he would really like to see here in addition to win apology to the victims who did not get what he would consider timely justice he would like to see lawmakers keep that from happening again he would like to make impossible for prosecutors to treat minors like prostitutes in future cases like this one to prevent what what he considers was a miscarriage of justice where it is jeffrey epstein right now he he is in jail in new york and not the kind of jail where you could leave everyday to go to work like he lives in florida end he faces the prospect of up to forty five years in prison if this case moves forward and he's found guilty thank you very much thank you michael on monday federal investigators said they had found hundreds of photographs graph of nude and partially nude young women and girls inside jeffrey epstein new york home after reviewing the photos prosecutors said that epstein crude is not reform he he is not chasing he is not repented rather he is a continuing danger to the community shortly after epstein pleaded not guilty in federal court leader on monday attorney general bill bar was asked about how alex acosta boost former u s attorney in forward and now the president's secretary of labor had handled de original epstein case in florida declined to comment this this message is presented by vm what kind of tech company is the world need today one apply smart technologies at scale with purpose and expertise not just for some but for all with hr block chain in quantum technology they were developing smart scandal technologies that how businesses work better together let's expect more from technology let's put smart to work is it i b m dot com slash smart to learn more here's what else you need generic in a highly unusual move the government lawyers defending the president's effort to ask about citizenship on the twenty twenty census have left the case apparently in protest lawyers had been asked to defend the question despite a recent ruling by the supreme court that found that there were no legal basis for including the question in in sudan military leaders and protesters have reached an unexpected agreement to share power after the military carried out a deadly crackdown on the protesters under the agreement an army general rule runs who dan for nearly two years followed by a civilian leader of the next year and a half the plan offers the possibility of a venture will transition to democracy after three years of dictatorship i'm michael barr this is supported

new york times michael barr new york jeffrey epstein tom jeff berman united states attorney six days forty five years eighteen months thirteen months sixteen year five months three years two years one day
1177 Dr. Todd Bovenizer DDS, MS, Board Certified Orthodontist at Bovenizer and Baker Orthodontics : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

1:09:10 hr | 1 year ago

1177 Dr. Todd Bovenizer DDS, MS, Board Certified Orthodontist at Bovenizer and Baker Orthodontics : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"It's just a huge honor for me today to be podcast reviewing Dr Todd bow visor he's a board certified orthodontist and the founder of bovid either and Baker orthodontics, he graduated for Virginia Tech with his bachelor's in biology from West Virginia and his masters in orthodontics, and Dr dental surgery, Dr Bo is past president of the North Carolina association of worth it on us and member of the American Association of orthodontists and southerners socio Orthodos is part of Damons mentor program this lousy orthodontist on the southeast. Visit the office and shouted Dr bow to learn about state of the art technology and techniques regarding the Damon system. He speaks nationally for ormc. Oh, Dr Bo lives in Cary, North Carolina with his wife, Megan and their three wonderful girls. Dr bow can be found cheering on his kids at the soccer field is also heavily involved in their school Carrie Christian where he serves as president on their board and his church, colonial Baptist. He can be found running his kids around playing. Dennis and traveling to the coast. Dr bowl also loves bit Modi's the Carolina Hurricanes hockey team. Dave Matthews is big ring. Eight charcoal grill multi now, how could it worked it on his support hockey that seems like a moral conflict? Well, we'll completely ban Wagoner's my three daughters have taken a like into issue. And it's been kind of funny. How? Every week. There's a couple of games here down in the begging me all the time. We're sock family and two of them played field hockey. So I don't know if it's just taking the ice to the field. But it's wonderful family thing for us all five of us go, and we really just enjoy it. We get in the car our phones or not with this. We've got one purpose to get to the game. We sit together we've popcorn and site. My wife, and I said we had no idea that this was gonna take all kind of like a family thing we do. So it's been it's been relatively new, and we'll kind of lighting the the canes success issue. We haven't been to play off contenders since you know, oh, six or seven. We won the Cup. No six I was at the games in kinda just dot off here. North Carolina is far as you know, the playoff. But now were contenders to make the playoffs this year so excited about it. While that is odd that is so cool. I was thinking I'm having you on the show today that, you know, the the ABA just started their tenth profession with anesthesiology when you and I got out of school. There's only nine and orthodontics is seem to be steady at all when I graduated all throughout the eighties and the nineties and the two thousand but man things are changing fast in the Ortho space. What do you think of all the changes going on? I mean smiles drug clubs gonna do an IPO invis- line. What what do you think about all these changes? It's got to be making an orthodontist have more competitive market with more challenges and houses affected you and what what are your macro-economic thoughts from thirty thousand feet. Couldn't agree with you more. It's changing rapidly obtained imply cuts with OT in years. So I set up my office when I was resited at West Virginia saw graduated in April. When I started building the practice man in December of two thousand five so I was actually doing construction while a resident of his coming down move my wife to carry and because my family was Hugh, and I was coming down meeting with the contract was meet with the architects and opened up a no six, and none of this stuff was around. I mean, a busy line was was around, obviously. But they was still making many changes to that. There was so may changes to to visit line. It still wasn't Wade is today. Manip- put so much RND ended at and it's like told my partner other only been doing it for thirteen years, and he's been with me for four and the profession has changed so much. In the thirteen years. It's like tell him it's hard to imagine. We'll be ten years from now. Like, he he he seeing it because he's only been in four years. So he seeing everything around. I'm like, listen, ma'am, thirteen years ago. Reading have any stuff, you know, the the iphone had just come out. I've found Jen one. You know, we just thought texting when I was you know, in my first you have private practice of still phone calls. Texting didn't even exist. Look, y'all texting in most people aren't even take voicemails anymore. They said, hey, if you need to get me, they may attacks people just don't wanna be on the phone in orthodontics is just while. It's it is changing so aptly I can't even get my I can't even get my head about it. You know, Howard, not only smile to that club invis- line all these consumers, look or doing online. Look what you and I are doing now Mindy consumer has so much defender tips in. Donnas in the dental profession has so much vindicates every day with podcast and Facebook bloop, some clothes Facebook moves minutes, almost like you can you can learn so much inflammation as an orthodontist or dentist of ended honest just from being online with with these different learners. It's exciting. But you know, I tell people you'd better invoice to change. And if you're not if you're not looking at the you the fund your windshield. You know, you need to be you need to be looking at the review mirror. You need to be a head of trying to chase this stuff. It's it's it's gonna lead people are, so what would you think of what would you think of this direct to consumer Ortho movement? What what are your thoughts on smiles dry club in? Are you going to participate in their IP L? I don't think so, you know, I just kind of do the passive investing. You know, I'm vanguard or so, you know, I all that I read to pay for lift lift just had the right peo- when it's it's getting a lot of store, but you know, what I would say about the direct consumer whether it be smelted, you've got all these other companies one coast coming out spark three m has shown a line of what they're doing is the strategy is to go, you know, in my opinion to those going really broad with this. And they're trying to gather up is many people's eight can from Fhimah horizontal standpoint, and they just wanna reach many peoples that can then once they do that. They were then go vote a place side. Thank what we're seeing. Now is just at the beginning phases of it. And what it's doing for people like me is it's getting more people wearable with arms, and I like that. So people aware of with it honor. Wchs in come in my office in quarter, smarter dot crab date. Hold of six months. Smiles may six months miles have been going on earth. I don't know seven or eight years, and that's been artery. I mean, obviously are right next to Research Triangle park, and you know, people are little bit more ahead of the technology curves of six months miles, maybe dealt with that way. Seems I use ago, and now we're dealing with small club wave in you know, the bislama way, but it is getting people more in tune to orthodontics in orthodontist and just treatment treatment options. And you know, I like would come in educated, and I like to educate them farther on in. What can I do what can you expect in treatment in office verses treatment on your own? So when win though it looks like a lot of these patents have come off on the clear liners and now you start eight others. Got to be. If you go around the world, there's probably twenty companies that are getting involved in the clear liner space. You just mentioned three hymns liner. They're really substitutes to invis- line or invis- line such a high quality with the materials and the plastics. Or do you think there really are clear competitive substitutes in the marketplace for clear line therapy? If you're an invis- line fan. I don't know the answer. Toby that all we use use this line. And we have a we have three D Quinto. So we we have own software three shape that we use. It's not a south way. But we used three shake, and let's say I d band that patient this morning and number twenty three who's just said in a little languidly. And I look at this system say, hey, I wanna move number twenty three measly out says she makes note in our easy X software. Then our lab technician comes and gets the and says, hey, you have a reset on patient. X we go into lab. Remove number twenty three we click on the twenty three we can move number twenty three higher. But we want them. We can sweetie that patients model move it with our with our own clear liners now that is very tough. I know some people in a space to do a lot of the own three d pining in office. What Dr Baker, and I do we do it. Most. Just one two three liners. So we can't capture the movement and three retainers assist not predictable enough for us. So then we tell that patient. Hey, your treatment is way t- substantial for what we can handle in our lab with our own liners, you need to go to phase align, and you know, 'cause it's tried and true and Embiid line. I remember I did it on my mother back in seems like it was two thousand to two thousand one two thousand two men that was eighteen years ago. I didn't baseline on my mom. I can remember you know, how was in. It has come such a long way with the attachments in research and development has gone there for us in our hands. You know, it works. Well, I don't know where these other allies, I don't know where it's gonna fit in like you said patents coming off even Henry shine in which shine. I'd I'd mentioned but about their own though coming into the liner space. So I think it would just depends on what kind of technologies behind the plastic what kind of vocal setups these company using. And I think we're going to a lot of competitiveness in the marketplace indicator liners. Yeah, Henry shine is huge. Stan Bergman, I think he's made sixty mergers and acquisitions in his tenure as the president CEO Henry shine. So what he does with his what is it the S L X T M clear liner system. But, but you, but you sounds like you're saying what I'm hearing from so many orthodontist that the invis- line technology of the tray is still superior to the competition. Again without using it. I haven't used any of the liners out there. I wouldn't be able to comment on that. But you know, I do know what they put into it. And I do know what it used to be. I mean, I can remember back in six when set up I was doing, you know, one to two invis- line cases year, and then it just slow to get home more because I got more and more comfortable on the types of Malka Jans that I could tweet with a missile. Yeah. You these podcasters tend to be young they're all under thirty seven Email Howard dental town dot com. Tell me who you are where you live or make a comment on the YouTube channel on YouTube or YouTube dot com slash dental town magazine, come out of school with about two hundred ninety thousand dollars student loans. So when they go to buy something a piece of technology. They're they're really looking at it. And you said something very interesting where you use the three shape scanner yet. You love align. Technology invis- line and technology unto viz line anti-terrorist scanner and there's been some disputes between zero and three scape. But why do you use the three shape scanner and not the Tero scanner if you're an viz line provider. Why us three shape software Dodoo use the terrorists Kano have the elements of two elements. We have two elements from Naito that we use to skin, but our software a lab is actually three shape software. It will use to manipulate the let's say we need to close the space between we'd have to space between them and three. So what would do is we use three shake software to me's allows number two vocally close out space that way when we deliver that retainer it's a little type of the patient, but it closes the space, but we use I don't scandal. I've ever had his I tear. I've never tried any data. Scanners. So do you print out that tray out after you do use the tarot scanner with the three shape software? What's what's the name of the three shape software for clear liners it? It was just it should stock software used digitally in the lab. So we'd put that model on our three d printer. So you pretty model? Yes. But but then we went back clue retainer on top of that or two or three you make three -tainer. Yes. A with with three printing. Yes, sir. And what what machine? The three the three D Mato is printed. So we have the mode of the tea in then we'd take our bowed star many star from Greg lakes, and we vacuumed forms the potato on top of the three D model. Yeah. We don't use down machine we use computers in a vacuum bottles from from Great Lakes. It's called a buyer star amount. Love their things hot. And that we're Great Lakes had. Where is the way the company? Yeah. Not not punished for not not totally. I'm Tony I'm guessing the new learn one of the lakes in the midwest. So what percent of your Ortho? Are you doing today is old school bracket versus new school clear liner are you about eighty twenty eighty percent bracket twenty percent Claire lighter? Whether interesting game is way track. What would doing with software? We look at stats having night. Now, I'm indications economy office, how many exams we assume that the kids how many exams doing that adults and the adult part of a fact this is definitely glowing. And what was in is the the fixed appliance is part of factors is staying about steady says mains take somebody out of his eighteen twenty months. Would planting pope pretty well. The adult part of back this people know forties. Fifties sixties, it is glowing astronaut Macree. And side said that the percentage of pats fixed extreme it is about seventy five percent in a line arose is about twenty five percent though. If you're seventy five percent fixed and twenty five percent clear liner what what's the difference between someone getting fix? What would the most correlating variables on why to fix versus removals at age is it what is it? We're still I still look at and I try to get them in to clear liners so looking at a dull in the got gold clowns they've got opponent, crowns. They've got implants. They have bridges have heavy store devoid Amata medically them thinking, I would love to have this patient by Cam inclu liners and other get the patient. I say, well, if I can treat you wait the with a clear line or fixed appliances in at the end, I don't know the difference between what updated you were yen. I'm willing to take that chance. But I'm not going to be a difference between one option or the other. I'll try to do that patient into that option. You know with adults how you know with deep bite said they have deep bite, and you put fixed appliances on the many Bill arch is on you the week with the bracket off in things like that with with with clear line you want to worry about. Prepares you deliver that mandibular clear line or not biting plastic on plastic. And you don't have to worry about that. That's the nice thing about about shooting don't with Peter liner. I think that you know, my book which has nothing do dentistry business. Uncomplicate busy only manage free things. People time money. I love the fact that you just said you look at your numbers every night. I mean, dentist they love their art gosh, so many just hate the whole business side of it. Tell me what numbers you said you look at you said how many new patients calling how many new patient child exams? How many new patient adult exams are what are your basic numbers that you're monitoring people time and money money being the number. Absolutely. You know, what what I use is a pot called gauge an-and not affiliated with gauge whatsoever. But I've been using gauge when it was over the metric so engage when oppose came out, it was a company called metric since outs gauge. And I log into gauge what it does is. It polls information from us over every night in every night. Nine o'clock PM eastern time for me cage populates all mandate at what I do is. I go to the summertime and I look at I look at production Sadeq net production. I don't glows. I look at network option for the day. And it gives me a relative index at how do it for the month. So on April folks, when I looked tonight, I'll look at my net production in it's compelling to what I did last you maintaining able to eighteen so it's given me Don baby down twenty percent. In that. This means a person is really good. A folks giving me a lot of numbers. I look at net production look at net collection. And then on look at patients thirty sixty ninety. I look at insurance thirty sixty ninety than on look at new patient phone calls. I look at my new patient. Sam's did that adults kids? And I look at look at my observation. My we call kits is we don't do a lot of phase one in office. We do a lot of we call. So if we see those seven eight nine ten roads will put him on recall. We don't feel a lot of phase one phase going Bates about five percent on look at my week hopeful in how many I've got on what would the recall and then finally one of the most important statistics. Look at is what I would call over estimated completion date. That's people Howard that. I said we'd be out of bases in eighteen months and do not for whatever reason said, I'm told you twelve months in Yuna dull. And you fourteen months in treatment. I wanted to why I wanna flag those people one of look at my percentage of my overall practice how many over estimated completion date. So that's really what I'm looking at everything told you there. I log in at nine o'clock nine fifteen that right? There takes me about two to three minutes to get. So how would I look at my numbers every night? It's too quick. Snapshot of what what the office did that day. It's not like it's taken me ten fifteen minutes to three minutes tops. Well, you know, you, and I have something so much in common. Besides good. Looks than hair. You got that one covered. You beat me on that one. But I got out of school may eleven I had my office opened September twenty first you were building on your office while you were finishing dental school walk into it. These why would you think makes an entrepreneur like you who just happened to be a doctor of orthodontics? What why why do you think you just did? It it while so many the millennials they come out of school, and they job-hop all these associates, and they have to have five jobs in five years for for their so moves Rable. The only reason they open up their own practices. Just because they're sick of the alternate. It's democracy. It's the worst system in the world except for the L turnip a'dictator ship. I mean, you know, why why do you think you just did it and what everybody else walks around the pool dip in their toll in the water for five years. That's a great question. I get that question. Lot howard. You know, when I there was no other option for me, you know, been killing killing it's extremely competitive area. It was competitive back in two thousand five so my family had relocated down here. And I knew that's well wanted to be had just made it to time, and we had one daughter of our three. So I was looking at other areas. But I kinda knew carry was where I was going to end up, and I talked to everyone honest people, of course, said, you know, it's competitive, you know, you may want to consider other places in listen to all that. And the the end of the day on his decided to get head set up on shop. It's what I've wanted to do since I was in school when I think it really if I can bowl it down at bowls down to my father's business. He was a family independent pharmacy. It's still a family instant pharmacy in West Virginia. So I go up to junior that was. One stop light for my dad to get a work in West Virginia. It's about a ten minute commute. And he still has his pharmacy day. It's still in. It's still successful. But Mia, my two sisters, my mom and dad we walked in pharmacy you around. So we got quite a bit of snow in Virginia Ammon school was called off. My dad was going into pharmacy. I guess he won't with kids. You know, we will Endo filling up the pop machine I was doing inventory. I was sweeping the floors out. All the DO to solve the shelf dust that shelf at all the DO back on the same thing. The shampoos take face. I mean, we've all been in these drugstores that was all done by family. And it was just not worth that it my dad and imam stowed in me in in that came down from there, though, panelists any my dad went to Wake Forest and his dad made a more into coal mines to help pay for Wake Forest, and you know, so it's that and. It's just it's humility I try to look through everything to it will. A biblical ends on on my coach to life in one of the things that I really try to come to work with is defensive of humility of there's no job beneath me in the office with our twenty one twenty two team members, you know, our claim to bathroom, I'll do whatever it needs to take. And I'm not a not a dictator and alike to just show people that I'm willing to do any task and even to daddy. I'm I'm a student number owning. And I tell people even know the they may be trying to learn the may I'm trying to learn from them. I'm trying to learn as much as I can. I think I think we need more humility just those kind of features in in today's today's oiled interview. If you're if you're able to come to the table with those kinds of qualities, I think the people can be more successful. So that's to some of the things that's helped me will. Attention your dad's industry was completely taken over by DSO's. I mean, Walgreens and CVC it was a slaughter and your industry when I was in school. You probably you don't remember any of this. I don't know how old you, but orthodontic centers of America made an attempt to this with a big line of credit and tried to roll up all the orthodontist and it failed. It was the only one that made it to the new York Stock Exchange and it failed miserably. Why do you think orthodontic centers of America failed miserably yet your dad's industry a pharmacy? It did not. Well, that's a great question. And I can remember when WalMart came to Bluefield Virginia. So there's not a WalMart in Bluefield West Virginia WalMart came in built vite on the state line. It was halfway between my home in our family store in my dad was so stressed out when WalMart came because he was saying, hey, is this is gonna be it in family business. If he got his parents, his his mom, his father and his uncle will pharmacists. So it had been a family business full allow but WalMart came and what happened to my dad. He igloo and people wanted that customer service in people were able to count him out dad and a lot of people in our our area or on multiple medications. My dad would potentially find a. Nato feelings between one gun to another and my dad, call up the doctor just add that extra layer that extra customer service. So he actually came out of out of the WalMart or blowing in his pharmacy, and you bite when I when I just got out of residency orthodontic OCA orthodontic centers of America that were they will hot topic. And it was kind of at the end a lot of people had jumped on sold the back. This is to orthodox of America. Done that time that obviously it was something that came in win. But at the end of the day whether dentistry or ended onyx also revolted onyx, we have to be customer facing. We have to be what customer service oriented, you know. Yes, we provide a Fahd act. But if we're not gonna create raving fans, raven patients in and do everything we can to meet not only make patients expectations, but exceed them what we're not gonna be successful. Well, you know, the orthodox America it went public in nineteen ninety four held in nineteen ninety four. I was twenty. Oh, so so were you. Well, I don't know if you're twenty if you're paintings that, but you know, they had two thousand employees eight cells of two hundred twenty six million dollars on the New York stock Jane as OSA for America gas for Lazar was amazing. But white white you think it failed? Why do you think your door thoughts? Why do you why do you think they failed? I don't really know nineteen ninety four hours Jeanne attack. Not I didn't even know want to be an I was Genentech totally oblivious to to CA side. I don't I don't really know. Why I don't know what the business model was you know, we've got a lot of that going on. Now, we've got a bunch of big groups in America that are coming together and doing. You know, some of those similar type things and doing they're doing gift on. So, you know, it's it's it's not something that's been a one done minutes of its petted. Cycle in our profession where new even these corporate dental Pakis North Carolina is one state where we don't have a lot of corporate industry. But you got these dental opposite is now bringing in orthodontist rain also Jains bringing in period, honest, ended honest, bringing everything in house. So I think everything sip will certainly would kill them with with these types of things again, even know or that unac- centers of America, the may even be a couple of assists still remaining, I'm not sure. Right. So so going to fix I noticed you're a big huge Damon fan. Why why? Talk about why you're Damon orthodontics fan. Yeah. That's a great question. Monopoly train from Peter non at West Virginia, we were heavily Larry enders in the end was was a great pioneer the straight wire plants not in the seventies. And when I was training, I was trained Dr non Dr Tim tweet Mont, Tim Tintri months now on the Pulham in USC Medical University of South Carolina, and we would try with the six elements of optimal collusion, so canine guidance into coupling. So the way I was trained was the twin bucket came out. I was I was twin traditional worth onyx and Damon was allowed in wages, pitting. We did not do Damon when I was residency. So when the on Colfax would come into the office, they didn't even try to sell me on on Damon, passive. Asian and I developed a great relationship with one of our earlier reps. Here's now at Hugh foodie. His name's del home. Adele Herman came into office, literally use it didn't try to sell me. He developed a relationship with me. And he knew I was an avid avid Lido in and things like that. And eventually he got me to try Damon Bach. It's I couldn't believe I was putting those but knows on T because all new was twin and end Huda Endo, Dawson, low end, ruse and Kane onto slippage in in all that. But low behold put those on started with in one case ten case is fifty documented with photographs and I was using a lot of expanders of time in conjunction with with fixed appliances, and not is Saul some differences with passive self that I really really loved, and, you know, how now Paktis thirteen years into Papa pack some not counting residency of years. But in touch news Pakis. I'm practicing orthodontics. Totally get them went on strike and always tell people though king years from now I'll tell patients this though tenuous now on pipes in same way that I do today. Shame on me. So bombed-out loaning and getting better and in learning. Better techniques example, we put early elastic on every single patient. So we put two outs love abeyance the day. They get places in the white album twain was to wait until you leveled align start elastic twelve months into treatment. And we use big six ounce of bands six ounces and with three sixteen search Minnie's think very tough over bands, very tight. And now what we're doing what trying to achieve class one on to lever. Bans? It's like it's like Fateh whites. So. Eamon is a product which is owned by ormc. Oh, which is owned by cable Kerr, which is owned by Danaher? My my following this correctly. You got it. Right. Thank think, there's a lot. All. Yes. So does does ormc. Oh, have a clear liner to. Yes. What's that called, then spark the spark? And are you a big fan of of spark? Do you think that's going somewhere? Well, though, they just come out of the clinical trials with that. And we were not on the clinic Taussig that pot, but we will be trying not pot out the shore. And I don't know yet because we haven't we haven't actually used it. Yet hunt says. Okay. So there liners on ormc. Oh website or insignia clear guide express simplify five is that what you're talking about. Nothing. That's more the insignia product insidious more by indirect bonding. So insignia is where they custom fabricate fixed appliances. Okay. For the feeding. Yes. But I I don't see clear liner on the Armco website that that'll be that'll be interesting. See how that's going. I'm gonna I want this dentistry centered. So I wanna hit you with some hard questions. I hope this one doesn't hack you off. But there's a lot of Dawson orthodontist people that are really big into collusion. And I know a collusion is the most controversial part of all dentistry. I mean, you get you get five ACLU's experts in the room, and none of are gonna agree on anything. But a lot of always worked it on us under a bridge and say, well, you know, the orthodontist he blows out the Curva speed Curva Wilson, they don't you know, when I get these faces back there closure as blah is that a fair is that a fair complain. By a collusion. And again, a lot of the collusion. People are fanatics, I agree with that. So, but what would your thoughts on orthodontics and inclusion and all the Dawson CR versus newer lingual and all that set because when I'm talking to the kids in school of clues, Ian is a they're more troubled and under not understanding clues in more than they are in, you know, basic bonding, fillings trays, so talk talk all things inclusion and Ortho. See see what I knew rant so long. You've got to be one good question in there somewhere that you'll take run with. That's a great question. And you know, ACLU's. Equation office is extremely important. Now, I'll put it up there with facial driven treatment pointing so what we try to do is tweet to the face and make sure that the the smallest are going to be great. But we cannot compromise the pollution unless the patient is aware of it. So a lot of what you just talked about earlier where you know, you blow it out the curb of you know, cosplaying rebel Wilson. And things like that. I think the biggest disconnect is between between Denison orthodontist is the communication. So if I've got a a skeletal class two because that's generally what we Gill with in orthodontics and in dentistry class to patients men dividend deficient. They got blue jet would not do with class the Wheaties. Now, that's very small part about that so down with class tubes in those class can come in where we can do nice camouflage treatment what I would call camouflage in. And camouflage could be by leveling, the local curb spe- and gaining weight inclusion. But for what I'm tweeting an adolescent what we do is doc Baker not have a patient care coordinator. And what we try to do is. We have an ipad with an eye pencil and will on Google suite on the office. So we don't do any of these types of UPS is where we're talking entities earpieces is Bill sweet. And you know, we have we have a lot of shows in our office when we have twenty one people within this office, but we will Google sweet the kit coordinator out said, hey, we need to send a report to patient acts, so not four months into treatment. Howard. So we're Dr bacon. I will get a sheriff. Our report nuts hip compliant. We on the I pencil on we actually bite the dentist note without pencil for months into treatment a wish slug one here. You know, you patients not keeping teeth cleaning or not wearing elastic south way. The. Indication is very up sought in the beginning. I always tell parents. I don't wanna tell you about autumn sixteen months in what's been going up months zero sixteen. Why are we not achieve in an optimal result solid? I like to let our Denison on us on that situation. The earlier the better than I like to hit him one or two times during treatment that we may be finishing with a cop amount of Zolt because always tell people we do photos day of demand because I want people to see what kind of job we it. And you know, Dr bait gone, I talked about Allston we we do central collusion. So cynically Latian central pollution for us is close contacts. We're doing sink for pollution in. We measure any slide to m I in our exams at every patiently seat which essential conclusion on what what's coming together when we do manual manipulation. And we'll do some plastic quotation. But I think if we're not getting canine guidance report, whether or not we'll get in canine guidance in an to disclu on a push to remove what's so for us light up there with facial driven treatment planning a collusion's Keith amid if I can't enter digital the tea and always talks Dipper fact, you know, what I'm doing a new patient console in its it's on our big screen in the new patient moon and talk about their teeth being able to sip other. That's what you know. Number number six has to go right to the twain number twenty seven twenty eight point on the scream boy does that to. No. And so for us. Yeah. I can't comment on the on the vest. But for us we're trying to we're trying our best to do the best. We can with collusion. And when we can't get there that because everybody's gonna have that. So percentage of patients that he's has. Just as such a severe skeletal class to that you have to finish them end on class too. Because you don't want to extract pretty Muller's just to gain a good collusion because sometimes I'm against extracting them five and twelve just retract everything knows no crowding just to get them in a in a more, quote, unquote, a vehicle Asian I'll educate that patient. Hey, I'm gonna finish class too. And here's the reasons why a class to gain on face. Our that's great chain dissolution. If you've got a class to gain on end on and you haven't Bill into exclusive movements, you have you have absolutely hardly any non working in a few Ince's. Do you think it's way too much of an oversimplification to say that dentistry three diseases ACLU's in carries and Perreault? Do I think it's? Yes. Some people always say that. In their lecture. You know, these are the three diseases that dentistry treats clues in carries and Perreault. And I was wondering do you think? That's true fault. Oversupply Einstein said make it simple enough. I get where you're coming out. Now. I think it's I think that's simplified. I think the Guinness has a very tough job. It's kinda like, my my general physician, he's gotta know everything headed toe, and you know, I think the dentist they gotta deal with cute chronic problems. You know, they have to deal with Pat Dala, Judy. You know, what about the what about the little irritation five William on they on the lip? What about that? Little Luca Plakias spot. You know up there near the second molar. Visit you know, the prodded, you know, the site carries clues in in Perreault goes well beyond that for for general practitioner. I think they're they're though runway so glad and. Hats off to always tell people onto eighty I I had to go in tunnel vision the orthodontics because I can only deal with one thing. You know, I did dentist for four years. And I would be reading about root canals be reading about you know, h docks. You know, all these different supplements that I could do my head was spinning. And I wanted to do it all well. And I was like, wow, you know. Oriented unexploited debate. Yeah. And I think that, you know, nineteen hundred there were no specialties, and by two thousand there were fifty eight with the and nine for general dentist, and I think when these kids come out and want to be a super Dennis, and they wanna do implants in Ortho. And and everything I just I keep telling them, we're not going to go back one hundred and twenty years to one thousand nine hundred where the doctor delivered your baby and fixture is ears nose and throat. I mean, it's it's I think like you are luckier because you can go really really deep on one thing. And when I see successful dental offices doing any type of specially work. It's like their main thing they don't do. They're not really into specialty work in ten all ten specialties. But you cannot go deep, and everything fact, this will blow your mind, I own a magazine dental town magazine or town magazine, there's forty thousand magazines that go to doctors. Now, you gonna read forty thousand magazines each month to stay on top of. And look at implants. Okay. You learned implants, do you understand bone grafting? What about sinus lists? What about all enforce? I mean, it's never never ending. But I wouldn't ask one more question on the equation because it's dentistry and center, and it's controversial her Cecik decision is I'm out of school been practicing couple years. I wanna learn more inclusion, but it seems like there's that Dawson CR camp in that building or Sohn LV neuro muscular reclusion, and she just doesn't want to just once. She can't take everything I say take them all over your forty year career. But would you guide her right towards Dawson CR or left towards neuro muscular? For me. I'm going. I'm going more. Spear Dawson panky route. I'm not familiar too much with the Elvia of out. And you know, we have some people in our area that subscribe to the LV about that. I would say you're in in Kunal Carolina. Most of our pediatric dentists and general dentists in placid on us way off speak the same language of Dawson panky spear. You know, I mean, I mean look at spear look at that study club that is that is just grown leaps and bounds. And when you get a win there. You know, you got multidisciplinary when they're inland nights. When I can go in there. We can all talk the same language now. I wouldn't be able to go in there and talk yell the island because I don't know. So I would if I was if I was training a dental student in somebody's coming to say, hey, Dawson, panky spear. These try. And true. And this is what you should start with inclusion. But now, remember what what I said before, you know, sometimes I think orthodontist, can you know? If we're doing treatment plan Justice inclusiveness. What are we going to the joints? So let's set out taken out pre molars on the maximum attracting sixty eleven you know, what am I doing to the mandibular tonight? My my Oakland pinging it on the to the disk in things like that. So I think we've gotta know where pollution is. We we need to know where on baseline is. But we've got to be a know what's best region. Degelation yet. You said on you said. You speier Dawson panky you forgot my favorite ones right next to you Ross Nash. And then coys in Seattle or you're close to Ross Nash, aren't you? He's an huntersville he's he's outside of Charlotte, North Carolina. Yeah. That's about two. It's about two and a half hours away from me. So nice. Did you like his a collision training? I've never done off. Nash. I've done more of the depend key dos. I liked to mostly support the bulb beauties and dentistry and Ross Nash has a gorgeous bald head. So I'm gonna I'm gonna say, and I love coys. He is God what what agree glycolysis. He is. So amazing. My favorite joke is he's a hundred percent Greek member that big fat Greek wedding. I always tell night Cuevas secret is he sprays all of his crowns with windex before. He sees you. Remember that windex? All. Wedding movie. Yeah. And I love reading courses relatively bit new on the scene, and you know, the material that come out of there. I'll love written about that. Yeah. He is an amazing, man. I'm so let's let's switch subjects completely different. Let's go to business would you? You're very successful businessman. I'm talking about what what makes you know. Establishing your purpose. Your brand your differentiation, your top of mind awareness, brand strategy talk about the business of orthodontics. Absolutely. You know, one must consider any food dentistry as business always tell people you've gotta be Decio. The nobody's gonna pack like you are. So if people aren't willing to dive in and deal with the hard decisions, you're the they may pay point in a long run, the one of our one of my big things when I set up six close to really put a money back into the community size. Started sponsoring all these teams swim team became in sponsor them in the schools came in. And I guess what I was thinking. How it is that everybody was doing the same thing. I was but they weren't. But you know, here was a model hole. And I just assumed everybody else was doing this and come to come to think about if they weren't. And you know, that's what really got the ball for us. And I love to talk about top of mind awareness. You know, whether or not apparent is at a swim meet of maybe a school where we're giving away a set of his maybe two cents braces onto the school. Sound auction in people actually bidding on our brackets on a braces to win for your that treatments. And maybe they're there or maybe they're on a closed Facebook glue. You know, we've got faced with loops here close with moms in maybe the mentioning about orthodontic send you know. I wanna get an opinion on orthodontics so top mind wounds just means for us when somebody mentions teeth or braces or straightening or biz line. We want them to think of this first, or at least think that this. So that's that's been huge for us to go into the community and really support on community in the community come to us, and we've actually taken it a step farther in the last two years, not only give money to the community elax active in the community to participating in events. Most most weekend in obviously to weakens month would participating in some community community. Event. Wa- staff actually goes to those vans. Now, I know my home as I know, I know my only the first thing they're going to say as well, do you have to pay him to to go to these events so early absolutely the diet so odd on August. But it's the most common question or. Yeah. You know, we pay you know, we do a staff to every year that she will want to Nashville so taking a whole team in Nashville. We'll we'll pay for them to obviously go there. But while they're all deploying that get paid because it's a working hours. So we're gonna fly Wednesday afternoon though, on the clocks are not only we pay him for the plane ticket to get a Nashville, we're paying for them to sit on the planet, and it's all spelled out in our leadership documents in our our our our employees employed him books in manuals, everyone knows where we are. Because we have team meetings every quarter in we spell this stuff out to our team. So they know what? To expect marketing is everything according to Fred Joyal. And when you talk about top of mind awareness or Toma, t MA top of mind awareness is that mostly social media. That's something you're doing on Facebook YouTube, Twitter and linked in or is it direct mail or Instagram. Is that a marketing concept more, and how would you break up your marketing between social media print, you know about? Dr Baker and are not huge social media. So sensual media's got such a small small peasants. In fact, is in those guys out there. The glowing Novak's is Gaza in girls have grown up prices on social media. And that's not we're not to bake our in we're not into male Vido. We don't mail things to people's homes. We don't give money off for braces. What we do is we focus on the patient in here. So not only we're going out of the schools and all the events in town, but we focus on on our branding in our vision in our strategy wants to do patients, Hugh, we've focused on the new patient experience. And we don't we don't we have a terrible job of asking for good with us. You can tell the people that asked for giggle reviews started zero negative two hundred twenty been open for a couple of months. You know? So we've been imploded in us. I don't even know how many. Of us. We have it's I think it's. You know hundred hundred some I don't I don't even know the nub of we do we do a bad job of asking people with the people come into our practice. And I think one thing that sets us apart his week to be a second third opinion. And we're not offering treatment for that for that patient that may be a twelve year old boy in may have much to the teat in. But, you know, eighteen thirty one still on all the way in and looking at the parent like, you know, your son's twelve years old now, why don't you wait another view? What's the hurry? Why give Boyce's on right now? You know? And that's that's done. Really? Well, and that's just at the coal honest opinion. You know nuts. Why unfortunate to have a partner that thinks the same way? I do and that's that's generally done. Really well for us. Some people want to all now on though, get another honest, get braces on attempts. Go ahead. With the other thing, I would say Howard. You know, there is a lot of business again, everything another doctor Baker not do not do is. We don't do what they call. Same day starts sin known a patient comes in here in they want braces, we appoint them. So we want them to go home and think it over and make sure that this is this is what I want to be and they actually have to come back into our office. And at a later time after records of gathered in voices on. You know? Sam Walton, obviously built the largest distribution center in the world. It's a largest employer in America. And one of his key things that he said in his autobiography was that everybody was doing games with like a Labor Day sale afford to July, Sal by one today. Get another one free. He said, it's all noise, and he pioneered everyday savings at WalMart. And he wasn't gonna play the games because two promotions costs money, and the more games that you played like that actually makes your costs go up and the secret to lower prices lower costs. And I see that same thing in dentistry where everybody's talking about the new patient experience. Well, that's got to be a gimmick compared to everyday customer experience. So are you do you? Find yourself focusing your internal culture with staff and team building on the new patient experience or the every day every customer experience. We do we do both. So we focus on on the on the patients every day. So we do things every day in this practice where we will pick out patients, and like them handwritten notes won't gauge with patients with our reward hub are are back. This genius were wore down for hygiene, you know, worrying elastic Salou folks in not only on the patient, but those patients in treatment minnows, those are just as important if not more, you know, just to satisfy the people that are intrigued -ment because you know, if you've got somebody that's unhappy with your services once in the Donald is it's a funny place to be because of Santa Subba couple months for for couple of years. So they come in here twelve times or so even more. And if you make them mad at any one of those visits, they'll tell Tim people extremely happy may tell one maybe. But you know, I do think. You do need to look at all those things you just mentioned because we have a coffee bar. We do made cookies we've got a flavored water machine and people come in, Hugh in basic while you know, Dr Bohdan Bego has a lot of bells and whistles, my money's going to pay for this. But we actually keep overhead though, we won't check. So we do have those things we're not doing those positives. You talked about every single month. But we do have that little extra ups when you come in who doesn't feel like a regular work onic back this. I would say on the new patient experience and the overall patient experience general. So you said you dropped a couple of names, you said, a reward hub is that patients rewards hob dot com, which is owned by practice genius. Yes. We use that system. It's worked out really well for us. We actually we track. What team members do? So we track the percentage. So if we have team member that she's not doing it at all though, not engage him with patients say we have a team member that just wants to get Howard out of the chair, and he wants to get somebody else in there. And he may one of you know, he or she may wanna finish how appointment five minutes early. So they can go into the Blakeway get on Facebook. You know? So we'll look at those things. We'll look at it. How engaged are with our patients. So we'll look at those reports Dr Baker I looked at those every month. What percentage of our assistance are using practice genius? You know, because that goes into what you said, you know, goes into the patient experience so practice genius powers, the patient rewards hob and engagement marketing suite that features reward kids, clubs social media reviews. Contests engagement all rolled into one easy application. How long have you been on? On that. Oh, gosh. Probably eight us, and you like that. I love it at me just have to use a by. And nothing's go. A lot of a lot of out. You know, how people are in in this profession our people by teens in sits on the shelf. We buy that new tool woman. Dennis Donna, some especially we love we love. We love new things we love new products that a lot of times we go into we dob out the deep in. We don't really understand that product or that tool one how we're going to implement it on Paktis. So it's like anything else you have to work on it. You know, we work in our practice, but we work on our practice. So you can't just walk in your office eight to five everyday into home yet the woke on your practices. Well. And who's the CEO who's ahead dog in charge of that place? I had no idea. No idea. I I love your your your business side of it lauded dentist plane with invis- line. And then they go to their local small town study club. And they're like, oh, I don't want. I want to doctor Bo he might find out. I'm doing invis- line, and he won't love me anymore. What do you think of other people in Cary north line of General Dennis doing clear liner therapy? Are they friend or foe? Different. You know, Dr Baker. And I mean, if you have anybody listening, I mean, anybody this closely session with us knows when we'll go out to lunch. One courage in people to do those vezzano expresses, you know, that the number twenty three number twenty six that voted in that patient wants to get clear line or treatment, absolutely fine with the dentist, and what will help the dentist out if they need any help. We're not we're not here to shun Antoni buddy away could somebody wants help whether or not that be another colleague orthodontist colleague, it's dentist. So we certainly encourage it in what we like to do is. We just teach people what what may be what they can handle what they can do in different skill sets. We have dentist to tackle complex invisible. Cases. We have other people that stay more in that expressed. Just simple linemate. You know, I take. As long as we're doing proper, communication and proper informed. Consent in lecroy taking I think it's I think it's absolutely fine. You were the past president of the North Carolina association worth on us. And we had another guest that was to David peck. Say Paquet, David Picacho who with his bald head. Would you say he's the most handsome orthodontist and all of America where you know, you know, with bald headed he's one of the most handsome orthodontist short. He does very well. I know I know you like, Dave. He has a cool do man he is just so darn cool. I- hod cast presidents of founders CEOs of large Esso's. They've all said on my show transparently. Will we go to certain states, but we avoid other states because of legislation or laws or whatever unto you does the North Carolina bench orthodontic association that you and David were past presidents. Do you guys think that the future needs more raining in some of these orthodontic DSO's like say smiles club? That's a tough question. You know, when I vote off the orthodontic board that would as three years ago and smiled about crab was not even that made is far as I can tell what around. So I think it's it's the each individual state, and you're not can't really comment on, you know, those states where there's large DSO's because I know I know people who involve with individual. Yes, owes do great work, and you know, the models action it well. So I think it just depends on the state had an how states run for North Carolina. We had again aboard a longtime back in oak five when I took the dental we had to take the North Carolina dental since then dental board, we I think network with seat up so you can take multiple boards in become licensed in North Carolina. When I came through if you did not take northbound in avoid it was like Florida if you did not take again avoid you couldn't take sorta or nerve or anything like that by North Carolina. But now it is a little bit more friendly, and they do have that reciprocity. He will now where you practice. I think thought us in another state you can come in North Carolina. So we're definitely seeing a lot more influx of people coming into the larger cities like volley kid with Charlotte. My final question. I know you're a very busy, man. And it was such an honor that human the show. And I know you got patient scheduled last question. She's a General Dennis she's working as an associate. She wants to learn more worth though, what where would you advise her to learn Ortho as a general dentist, we're can? She go. I would go. I would go on you know, there's there's two different ways. So most people that are General Dennis foreign to go under the Cleveland space invis- line dot com has a lot of police horses on on toils. So I would I would start his anytime the loan in your own home. It's it's free mainly, and it's it's fantastic. It's it's made convenient the other thing. I would do tell her to get in touch with a local orthodontist in her area and just express desire. Hey, I wanna learn pollution battle. I wanna learn how about but I got I gotta stop being remember dental school. And I remember Creighton I had four of the greatest friends we all became Dennis. They were just world class personal human beings. But when you go to dance on Friday night, they just sit there, and they wouldn't ask anybody today because they are so fear of rejection, and she so. Frade she's going to drive over to your office. And you're gonna say, hey, you wanna learn how go to Ortho school and slammed the door in her face. She's too scared to ask talk to. So invis- line. I think for the fixed I would be I'd be a little cautious about these you mentioned about male earlier. I mean, I'm an orthodontist. I get all these matters about. Come to this weekend. Course, you can learn about braces and everything like that. Oh, by the way, it's twenty nine ninety nine. It's three thousand dollars. I'd be a little I'd tell her you know, proceed with caution day there. That's just my opinion. So I would I would social online and N just do do as much as I could online. I would what those a wealth of knowledge out there online with these Facebook groups and just podcast like these tons of information, you can learn forward than onyx, it's free. It's online and it on. No. So that that's the way I would and you'd recommend going to invis- line dot com and taking their online courses. Absolutely. Yeah. They've got tons of tutorials. And webinars and all that and all that sets they do that for honest. So they do that for the Donald engine artist. Was there any question you wish I asked I was too stupid asked? Did I forget any question that you're thinking, I wish hardwood? I think I think everybody needs to have you know, we talked about how we develop is. I think everybody out there have core values. I think they need to know why. While they're in existence. You know, so what's the core values? I think everybody out there should have a mission statement. I think they need to have a brand vision know, brand vision is voted they wanna go. No. The the mission statement is the reason for existence, but the brand vision is is potential where they want their brand to go. And then I think people need to have planned plums. So I just really encourage people to to look into those things end them just value positions and differentiator he's taught stalling out. So I'd really encourage people to really do research on you know, what what what makes up their internal being in expressed that the fact facts, you know, people in office, they know what makes up Todd Vanessa. Then know what makes Chris Baker because we were we wear outward every single day minute. That's how we try to operate. And I go back to our early treatment philosophy or treatment way. I'm not saying anything against treatment those unilateral cost by those under bites would treat knows every time. But we'll careful with Tommy people running braces, it's nine ten years old. I mean, it really gotta need it. That's why our phase one with the rates five percent last year. Do you think your purpose brand mission? Brand promise, you think all the all those core values come from your your childhood as a colonial Baptist is that we know. Well, you know, my childhood was Virginia with my parents and very similar, you know, Colonia Baptist. I've been going there thirteen years. That's what Meghan landed when became you. That's certainly helps shape who I am today. And just you know, how glowing you know, how am I willing as father? How am I grew in a husband Alan glowing as a business owner, you know, we can't stay stagnant. But a lot of the lot of the core values mission statement Thomas it comes from the my father's family, independent lugs work. Good Ken's been good coons is still there. While while. Hey, I know you got patients. I know you gotta go. I cannot tell you what a honor. It was to have you on the show. Thank you so much. And also, thank you that article euro, four-tonne magazine on passive. Gatien actor results by DOD Boven eiser or two time magazine, December eighteen thank you so much for all that you've done for dentistry for the Donna it's for the North Carolina socialization for orthodox magazine. I just think you're one hell of a guy and was an honor interviewed. Thank you for everything you're doing I'm I'm a big fan. And you mentioned earlier about the the phone. I'm still I'm I'm forty four and I'm still a computer guy. So anytime, I poem or third town. I do on the computer. So there's things do on the phone. But does other things I do wanna computer? But I'm gonna tell you something. I'll try to learn everything that I can that what ten o'clock I've already done some about that. I should've had pre and post treatment seth's on their, you know, self metric x-rays after published on. And I even went to a little I posted proof. I'm like all my gosh. You know, if I ever like one of those again, I learned some my guide I'm gonna put that pre and post treatment self metric action on there. But you know, what it was it was a good article could have been better. Absolutely next one. Right. Whether it be different. Absolutely. Yeah. And you know, I just read a deal that read it is like one of the fastest growing social media sites and injured. Shooting thing about is ninety eight percent renters never post and people are always afraid to post because their fear public speaking. They're going to be wrong. No one will love them anymore. And I was it was the opposite. Every I've had a monthly column since April of nineteen ninety four and everytime. Icee something wrong. I love it. Because that's what I thought. And then all my homeys run to me and say, no, no, no. And so it's when you're transparent and post you get a new editing clean up your own information act that so many people can think wrong thoughts the rest are life and never have edited by their friends loved ones. But I know you gotta go. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. Hope you have a robbing day. Great day. Okay.

Howard America West Virginia Hugh WalMart Facebook Spear Dawson Damon Bach Dr Baker Dennis Donna North Carolina Dr Bo ACLU Sam Walton Peter liner partner Dawson CR hockey ABA
Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture  Challenges and solutions for isolation, expansion and maintenance

Cell Culture Dish Podcast

00:00 sec | 9 months ago

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Culture Challenges and solutions for isolation, expansion and maintenance

"Welcome to the cell culture dish. Podcast museum Komo's stem cell culture challenges and solutions for isolation expansion and maintenance. I'm Brandy Sergeant. Every of the cell culture dish joining me. Today is Dr Jennifer Chain Scientific Director of Research and Development at the Oklahoma Blood Institute. Dr Jennifer chain is an experimental immunologist with primary expertise in Saul `isolation cell culture and flow Saitama Tree. She began her scientific career nearly twenty two years ago and has worked in Academic Research Biotechnology Consulting and nonprofit research and development in her postdoctoral fellowships at National Jewish Health University of Colorado at Denver she worked on Gamma Delta t cell activation and function then on memory t cell responses in autoimmune and clinical lung disorders following her academic training. Dr Chain work to develop new diagnostic testing panels at a biotech startup comedian Oklahoma before starting her own independent are in D. Consulting firm in her current position at the Oklahoma Blood Institute where she serves as the scientific director of RND. Dr Chain is responsible for leading the development of new blood and sell these products and contract research and manufacturing services for the cell therapy industry. Dr Chain is also a consultant and liaison from OBI to the cell therapy industry to develop custom products and services for industry partners and to educate the industry on the many ways. Nonprofit community good centers can promote the development of cell. Therapy cease. Dr Chan. I want to start by asking you if you could tell us a bit about the Oklahoma Blood Institute and what you do there. They Oklahoma Institute is the largest independent blood bank in the US and our network extends across Oklahoma Arkansas and parts of Texas and we have almost a thousand employees within our network. And we're not for profit five. Oh One C. Three charity. We collect close to three hundred thousand blood products every year since blood products are regulated as drugs by the FDA. We actually are a not for profit pharmaceutical company and we manufacture close to twelve hundred drugs every day. Our primary mission is of course to collect test store and distribute safe blood products to our area hospitals and they use those products for transfusion and we have over two hundred hospitals and medical facilities that we supply blood to the last few years. We've been extending our mission for the community by helping support the growing cell therapy and regenerative medicine industries and doing that with rnd towards novel. Blood products blood source products. That could be used for therapy development and support cell culture growth. I'd like to learn a little bit more About some of the projects that you're working on it. Ob there's a few that. I wanted to mention if any of them. You want to discuss further. I'd be happy to so I do. Some contract research there some labs that they need access to human cells or they don't really have they work on my and so they don't really have human expertise and so they really looked at us to help them isolate these cells and stimulate them and culture them to support their research projects and so they really tapped into our existing expertise and develop methods. And so I do some of that and that supports cancer research other immune studies throughout the country I have a a really exciting project. Manufacturing clinical trial treatment that stem cell based treatment for dry disease. And so this came to overfly through a company. an eye doctor a scientist and they were looking to turn their research protocol into a clinical protocol in order to manufacture this treatment and so I developed their clinical protocol and manufactured the treatment and may have been using it in the clinical trial. And it's been helping people heal the dry eye disease. It's really exciting. And soon we'll move the manufacturing of that treatment into our clean room space and we'll scale up for a larger clinical trial so it's been exciting to be involved with that another thing that. I'm also really excited about is that I have you know my background is in Gamma Delta t cells and so I really wanted to try and get back into working with them in some capacity and so I have identified blood. Sores that's actually really highly enriched for the tissue resident Gamma Delta Cells Gamma Delta normally live in the tissue and health fight off infections and cancer development in the tissues and organs and I found these cells in a blood source and so You know looking out and learning about the cells. There's not a lot of information available but what it does look like is that this population is primed for a cancer response and would make a good adopted if therapy or a platform for car. T. Therapy and so this project. I just need to gather some more data on the functions. As population and optimize the culture and expansion protocol in order to be fit for clinical use and then possibly could find partners. You want to use it in their therapy development and then finally of course the most exciting project that we have going on is is to develop. Canterbury bone. Marrow derived nothing romell cells as a suitable product for research and therapy development. That sounds really interesting. I'm I wanted to dive in a little bit and ask you why you're working to isolate. Ms's from Eric Bone Marrow. There really is a shortage of method germ cells. That can be used for therapy. So there's hundreds of clinical trials that are studying the potential use of them. Essy's for therapies like Turning Down Tesol activity for graft versus host disease and although immunity regenerating bone and cartilage healing chronic wounds. So I think the shortage of material is or the growing number of their visas going to be a problem in the future and so the two most common sources of their MRIs are bone marrow and bill court tissue and so marriage donation is associated with risks. And it's painful and a lot of people just don't WanNa do it umbilical cord tissue. Although it seems to be widely available. They're always babies being born. It's actually difficult to obtain in large numbers. The consenting process is really long and involved. There's issues at protecting the donor to deal with. And what I've seen is also. It's more difficult to obtain. Ms's from umbilical cord. Tissue without changing their growth and talk show properties. There's a real need to find other sources of MS's that are more sustainable. And there's been examples of bone marrow transplant physicians using bone marrow from the vertebral column for bone marrow transplants for mcadoo donor. But in general. There's this really not that much data characterizing Esi from a category source and comparing it to MS's from Living Source. And so really. That's where we come in is we have access to some of this tissue and so we think that if we can show data that category bone marrow derived. Ms's expand function like expected. Then we can attract some partners. Who want to use it as a more sustainable source for their therapy and part of this also we need to be able to harvest the bone marrow in an FDA compliant way. So we're we're developing this as part of his effort as well. That's really interesting just to fall on with that. How similars are the. Ms's from live versus. Kev Eric donors so I think logically. There really is no reason to think that they would be different from a category of bone marrow versus a living bone marrow but I think that just the way scientists think is that we need proof and biotech companies. If they're gonNA use the cells develop therapies. They need proof and of course regulatory bodies. They're going to need to see the data. Before any of these therapies can be approved before anybody who's GonNa want to use them to develop their therapies and so I think that's really where we're focusing to give interested parties that proved that they need that cells. Do were just like cells from live bone. Marrow donors so far in my work. I've seen that kind of arrogant s these do express the ICT defined service marker phenotype. This'll be lineage negative and then positive for CD. Seventy three CD ninety and CD one five and I see this as early as the first passage and they seem to maintain this phenotype through at least passage for they also have similar metabolic activities similar proliferative potential as living donor derived. Ms's at the same stage of growth. And they also have more metabolic activity when they're in the presence of a high pox or nitrogen rich environment to low oxygen rich nitrogen. They more metabolic activity there compared to growing in like a normal oxygen environment and so the hypoxia culture really mimics environment at the wound site to this allows us to confirm that they would be valid for use in wound healing applications. I've also done a few migration experiments. I really seen that if I put macrophages and Care Tim sites in a trans well that he says cross that transfer to get closer to the NFC's and so we think Cata Vera Ganassi's are drawing those cells to them which is one of the major of MS's wound healing perfect a real interest to our audience in terms of the work that they're doing is the key factors in culturing these cells. I'm sure everybody would be interested in hearing a little bit about that. Yeah I haven't done a lot of my own work in deciphering the media components. But what I do know is very important as you definitely have to specially defined media it's optimized for NFC growth. And like I said. I haven't teased out those specific things myself. So it's good to have access to growth media that's already optimized but I do think it's important to use some kind of protein supplement like platelet lice eight or human serum in your cultures Just doing a little bit of comparison in the growth rate I sees it. They're actually increased the groceries increase in serum supplementation. Although I realized that I'll clinical protocols allow for supplementation they haven't been developed with supplementation. I do think it is important to us. Throughout the entire culture period. You may have touched on a little bit. But what are the biggest scientific challenges that you're facing when culturing cells I think just challenges to cell culture? In general that I've encountered myself is every cell type gross differently have different needs needs different support medium supplementation. And so you really have to care for each culture individually known to feed and SPLIT ETC. So it's really It's an art that you have to find him and it's not easy you thinking might be easy but there's all these little things that can happen that you just have to to troubleshoot until until it works And then specifically culturing human primary cells. Ms's and corneal stem cells. That I've been culturing recently. Is that cells from different donors just grow differently. Some don't grow it awesome grow fast. Grow slow until you really have to adapt. Even what's you know? How es cell type grows you have to adapt to changes from individual to individual? And that's something definitely experienced and then other challenges really are contamination bacterial fungal Michael Plasma. And there's just a lot of things that can influence whether culture becomes contaminated and I feel like it's almost impossible to know win. It happened or how it happens when it does and and then of course the trouble with MICA plasma is it it's just not detectable by but it drastically changes the growth and functional properties of your cells and so you really have to practice good technique and you have to test your cultures for things like Mycoplasma to make sure that you're not contaminated. Yeah we've had done a lot of articles on the topic Michael Task because it is such a challenge in the lab but also in production to I think a lot of people struggle with that and looking for ways to address of mycoplasma contamination beyond the challenges. That you face when culturing cells. What are some other important factors? It should be considered when selecting media for expansion and maintenance of cells in your opinion. But I think that it's important to see documentation so if you're purchasing media from somebody from a company important to see documentation that's going to support the growth of the cells that you're studying so in the cases. Mse Is there evidence that and that's the growth is supported with the media formulation and with Ms's I feel like it just needs to be just right. And so that's important. And when scientists published their data they need to be able to show that the basic phenotype of theirselves preserved so that they really are working with what they think they are. I also think he's scientists needs to determine ideal supplementation for their cultures. The industry is really moving away from animal derived products like SBS than I think. That's a good thing. They should be moving away so I would discourage starting or using. Spf at all. If you are your plans are to go towards a clinical chronic. I think the FDA will be much more favorable to your manufacturing protocols in the absence of BS. Could you tell me a little bit about how you see your work with South Particularly with this idea of moving away from F. B. S. evolving in the future so I was really fortunate to like a a Regent Grant Award from Biological Industries This she's house and eighteen and so they granted me twenty five thousand dollar award to use for products from the company and this included there neutra stem. Msc growth media and some HP L. products and some other products. That will help support the studies that I'm wanting to do help support looking at the cells and their wound healing properties. And so I've been really fortunate to have that resource available and that that has really accelerated the project that looking. Ms's in so biological industries really helped make these projects possible and so from that a really are short. Term Goal. Going forward is together enough. Data to publish and present that Ketogenic. Mris are functional and useful for research and therapy. Can you please give us some examples of your collaborations or describe the collaborations that you wish to start? You know. We're not to that point where we have partners for the CADILLAC GMC projects yet. And we're still trying to gather the data in order to attract the partners and so we expect these types of partners to be academic labs scientists from academic labs that are looking to transition from the basic research into clinical trials clinical research and spin out small companies. We don't necessarily expect our partners to be large more established companies who already have the infrastructure built to do all this on their own to really you know. Our goal is to help partners developing grow and grow with their needs and so You know starting out with with unestablished companies and unestablished. Investigators are probably where we see that going but like I say. We have blood center partners. We have something called bio partners. And it's six independent blood centers and the goal of this group really is to share protocols and promote standardization of cell therapy product collection and specifically with bone marrow and Theresa's products. And so if we're able to do that on a small scale with six blood centers. Hopefully we can filter that out into the larger blood centers of America which is network of fifty two independent blood centers and so we already work with centers within that larger network on specific projects or self therapy companies and so there's really lots of great relationships out there in the blood center world to tap into that a new partner could not only have access to OB is manufacturing capabilities and product capabilities. But the entire network potentially like. I said there's lots of opportunities there. I WanNa thank you so much for your time. Today this has been so interesting. Really appreciate you spending the time with us. I'm wondering if just to close if there's anything else that you have that you'd like to add for our listeners. Today Kirk scientists are working with. Ms's to really know yourself beyond the minimal. I AC- criteria for the more. You know about yourself better even understand your clinical data down the road. If that's your goal and how it's helping or not helping the patient so I just think that's really important. And then finally if anybody out there looking for manufacturing partner not necessarily for Catovic Mris but let us know it'll be we can help We're establishing clean room space to support multiple cell therapy projects and the blood center. We have a lot of expertise in developing. Fda COMPLIANT MANUFACTURING PROTOCOLS. And we're really looking to grow with the needs of our partners and so if you're working with a a nonprofit CMO with existing infrastructure just going to save a lot of money in time on development and might give you a strategic advantage when it's time to market your therapy. Well that's great. Thank you so much for that and really appreciate your time today and thanks so much. Thank you for joining us for this edition of the cell culture dish podcast to learn more about this and other stem cell and bio manufacturing related topics. Please visit us at. Www DOT cell culture dish dot com or for downstream bio manufacturing topics www dot downstream column dot com.

Ms FDA scientist Dr Jennifer Chain Scientific D Eric Bone Marrow Oklahoma Blood Institute MS Gamma Delta Cells Gamma Delta Dr Jennifer chain OB Komo US Dr Chan cancer Oklahoma Brandy Sergeant
The Clock is Ticking On TikTok

News O'Clock

00:00 sec | 3 months ago

The Clock is Ticking On TikTok

"Tick Tock Tick Tock. The clock is ticking after trump signed an executive order threatening to ban tick tock from the US in forty five days. Kylie. Jenner made an appearance in Cardi B. and Meghan these Dalian's new music video and the Internet had some feelings and if you love the idea of your vision, wait till, you hear what they have planned for the US. The date August seventh two thousand twenty time news o'clock. Everyone I'm his Brown and I'm Casey Rackham welcome to Buzzfeed's news o'clock. JC before we die. Then I have to point out some extreme irony on this Friday that being that the United States has put out a travel warning warning against Americans traveling to new. Zealand. Because they're having a surge in corona virus cases. Casey, do you want to guests many cases they currently have? No but as so much lower than what we have. So please tell me. I they are have a surge of twenty three cases to three. He felt the reaction. That's the right reaction Hayes. There's probably twenty three cases on this block in La Right now so I don't know why the warning is not for everywhere here plus I'm pretty sure new, Zealand isn't even letting anyone in yet because they unlike US got their shit under control. No, I'm pretty sure the for their first wave they did a complete shutdown and that's why they were one of the first countries to be like, okay, we're good. Right. For while there could be let into New Zealand worked New Zealand citizens coming back from elsewhere, and even they had to be quarantined. Imagine a functioning government functioning state. Okay time for today's top stories. Here's what you need to know. President trump signed an executive order last night that would ban tick tock from the US if it's not sold to an American company in forty five days, the order names Tiktok as a national security threat saying that since it collects US users data that information could be used by the Chinese government against US interest. It also says that the APP quote may also be used for disinformation campaigns that benefit the Chinese Communist Party such when tick, Tock video spread debunked conspiracy theories about the origins of the twenty, two, thousand, nine novel coronavirus. Tuchus at shocked by the order and plans to fight in court if need be, it's parent company Bite dance is already and talk with Microsoft head of potential sale of TIKTOK US arm. If that deal isn't completed by September fifteenth under the order, anyone under US jurisdiction will be barred from doing business with bite dance effectively banning tiktok. The executive order trump signed also use a similar language to Ben we chat and instant messaging system owned by Chinese, Corporation Ten cent. The APP is definitely surveilled and censored by the Chinese government, but is a key way that the Chinese diaspora can speak with people behind the great firewall. It also allows companies in China to push messaging out to the greater world and fun fact tencent also owns or has investments in several video game companies including both riot games and epic games. Those companies for the news out there produced a mega hits League of legends and fortnight. The White House quickly moved to clarify the La Times that the order only effects we chat not ten cents other. Holdings. Meanwhile the US unemployment rate dropped based on last month's hiring numbers, but the number of jobs added was way fewer than the month before. The unemployment rate now it's at ten point, two percent after previously hitting fourteen percent back in April at the height of the corona virus lockdowns that drop comes after the US added one point eight, million jobs in July, more than most economists were expecting. That comes with a caveat though it's way fewer jobs were added in June when four point eight million people were newly hired back and the bumps we've seen still haven't covered the twenty million jobs lost during the pandemic next month isn't likely to look much better. The virus is continuing to circulate in the US and though new daily case numbers have stabilized there's still extremely high and we're still seeing over thousand covid nineteen related deaths in the US per day all while schools to open up and Congress has yet to pass another relief bill. So September, going to be great. Finally, another sobering statistic more immigrants have died in ice custody than anytime since two thousand six, the fiscal year ends on September thirtieth and already seventeen emigrant have died in US immigrations and Customs Enforcement Attention. The most recent a fifty one year old from Taiwan and seventy, two year old from Canada passed away this Wednesday according to ice. Is provided. No further details to buzzfeed news on either persons passing but a knowledgeable source said that the Canadian man passed away after testing positive for covid nineteen, she had been detained at the immigration centers of America in Farmville Virginia, which has the second highest number of positive cove nineteen tests among immigrant detainees with two hundred ninety so far. This year seventeen deaths is the most since nineteen detainees died in two thousand and six with a month to go in the fiscal year and covert nineteen rates. Still High Eunice show a senior staff attorney at the Aclu told buzzfeed news at this was. A foreseeable tragedy that had ample warning about and still is has allowed these preventable deaths to happen. I mean foreseeable tragedy speaks to everything that's going on in the US for forever to be honest. But I, just want to go back to tiktok real quick. Do we have any understanding or knowledge of wide trump made this decision because previously he seemed happy as long as someone in the US own tiktok right and that's still seems to be the goal I mean the deadline that he said forty five days that's around the time when Microsoft and Tick Tock have said, they want to have a deal by I. Guess in one sense a bit of a US government pressure to make sure that happens on. The other hand though is really confusing the logic in his brain penn about why this is necessary right now could be just because he hates Tiktok it could be part of a broader strategy to push back on China. Because I mean also the US government said that they've put sanctions on Hong Kong government officials including Carrie Lam who the top executive in Hong Kong because of the human rights violations that are happening over there in the fact, the mainland is taking over. So with so many things years strategy or broken brain in the white. House. It's it's column Columbine I can't tell you what percentage it is. Can you please bring something good on this Friday. Oh yes. I can. So there's no crying in baseball, but there is crying in my apartment because a league of their own is becoming a TV series. I am so excited. So the One thousand nine hundred classic movie being reimagined as a new look at the all American Girls Professional Baseball League which existed from nineteen, forty, three through nineteen, fifty four and while Gena Davis Tom Hanks Madonna and Rosie O'Donnell will all have special places in our heart for their version. This is extremely exciting news according to show creators, broad cities, ABC, Jacobson, and Mozart in the jungles will Graham this new version? We'll take a deeper look. At race and sexuality following the journey of a whole new ensemble of characters as they carve their own paths towards the field both in the league and outside of it Jacobsen will also star in the new show among the other members of the all American. League will be Darcy Carton of the Good Place Sean Atoms Kelly McCormick and Priscila Delgado I. Am so thrilled about this and also want to have the song stuck in my head back. Good and then did you see Darcy cartons instagram that she posted of them like all in uniform did and that's very exciting for a couple of reasons. One they look great to that means they've filmed already, which means that we might actually get something at some point. Well okay. So how that works is that it got picked up for pilot which men A. Pilot and so now it's picked up for series, and now they can film the rest. That's that's sometimes y. you might have seen a show where the pilot has a different actor than the rest of the series has because they filmed that way way in advance but hopefully, they're excited to get this. Okay. Moving on Cardi B. dropped her new single WAP featuring Megi stallion last night and the video. Well, that's just seems probably for the best that we're in audio only show because it is a lot. You haven't heard it yet. Here's a bit from the radio edit since you know our parents listen to this show. MIC. A. Stream. Pundit. Kane I don't Cook I don't claim. Gobble swallow me trip meek mill outlet you. Put. It never tell them well. Down by have an running me. Call why you brought there really ain't gonNA flop or thing. The video features Cardi and Meghan making their way through a mansion with what I'm going to call a pedestal beetle juice s Dick. It also has cameos from a few surprise guests including former fifth harmony starred normany and Spanish singer Rosalia but but but but it also has a cameo from Kylie Jenner who's friends with Meghan in fact, Meghan was hanging out at Kylie's house last month before her companion Trey Songz shot her in both feet. WIP IS THE First Music that make it has put out since then but right away, there were people who were very upset about Kylie's presence in the video and whether you agree with them or not it did lead to some excellent. Me Mark this morning, a change dot org petition got started calling on Jenner be removed from the video entirely that petition racked up over two thousand signatures in about twenty minutes. Casey I'm a big thirty, two years old I'm grown in. That video and that Song, especially the explicit version left me. So scandalized when I watched it this morning, you know nine am. Thing to shepherd every other line I was like. It's a great song. I loved it, and this is really pretty to look at like it's just like some weird daydream nightmare. Right it's like, what if what if Salvador, Dali was just really horny. Mixed with a bit of sprinkle of Tim Burton in their. Kylie being in there I. I It's it's because she you know she's friends with Megan. That's why she's in there. But a lot of people were like Jordan would should be in here which I. Personally but. If. You are really so offended by Kylie being in it then there are many versions on twitter dot com she has been edited out. All right. We're GONNA switch things up and take it a bit easier than normal this Friday. So when we come back, we're GONNA be talking about the best thing that's going to be happening in the USA that's your steering there. Over the years host Aaron Monkey and the team behind lor on obscured and cabinet of curiosities have scoured the globe to bring you tales from the past with a hint of dark nets from superstitions and folklore to the curious in the bizarre. But now it's time to bring that journey home because while America's history books are filled with people and events that sit on lofty pedestals, there's a whole other world of American history that waits for us in the shadows tales of unlikely heroes, world changing tragedies and legends that are unique to the American spirit. Stories that we call American. Shadows. Each episode is handcrafted by the Grim and mild team and narrated by me Lauren Vogel Bomb, and while we might be traveling some dark and lonely roads, you're also bound to learn a thing or two along the way. Get ready for tour of American history unlike any other get ready for American shadows. American shadows premiers Thursday August thirteenth wasn't on Apple podcasts the iheartradio, APP or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome back. Okay. It is deep into summer at this point and you know what we think everyone deserves tap summer Fridays. But before we let you go off to your weekend, we have time for one more thing and today it's Eurovision but make it for the USA. So American idol I mean Kinda but also not at all so the group behind the Eurovision. Song contests announced today that the American. Song contest will be taking place in the holiday season of twenty, twenty, one according to their press release. The plan is that musical acts from all fifty states go head to head in what they say should be five to ten televised qualifier competitions leading to semi finals and the ultimate primetime grand final, all of it sounds. Totally bad shit. But also weirdly fun as I am weirdly excited to see what the hell this is going to look like okay. I am to someone who watches a lot of reality. TV which I think I was that person but I. recently played some form of like charades where I was trying to act out like survivor or something like that and the. Point is everyone the clue was. A reality TV show that I watch and everyone listed out twenty different. Is. Really. Bad. So the point of all this is that I'm definitely GonNa Watch this to figure out what it is because I mean, I, guess it just like one state is going to be the winner at the end like one state is going to have the best performer right because in Eurovision is like, okay, the winner is Iceland. I salute you want. So it gets is going to be. Delaware congrats Delaware. Would I am excited for? Is that okay my roommate she's from Ireland, and so she's told me about all of the dynamics of Eurovision and very much like the UK never wins because no one wants to vote for the UK. The rules are is that you can vote for any other country except your own. And then it's tally that way. So if those rules are going to apply for the US I'm super excited to see which states everyone hates right? I'm sure we live in New York and California No. No one is going to be like California representation on the music scene. I do wonder too. Will professionals be able to compete in this like a WHO exact they sent out in their press release some of the guidelines for how they're going to pick go. They're going to pull together like a judging pool abuse, it professionals, and industry. To judge groups of people for the initial round and then this GonNa. Be, regional. Competition so like the Mid West is gonNA decide who their winner is. Yeah, exactly. So based on your vision the movie on Netflix? My understanding of the rules via that is that they have what you're saying there's going to be people that are going to decide. So basically, like California is going to pick who they think is going to represent who would be the best represent them. So I feel like I. Don't know it could be someone semi well-known. The only thing I can think of is like one. Time there this guy who was on American idol and he made it and it's like the top fifteen and then he was on the bachelor's version of their singing show that just came out. So I feel like we could see a lot of those kind of people that are like all most famous but not there yet right or like speaking of reality show top chef of. Cooking show. So many of them can be on other things. I. Was On shop show up on top chef vice. So, we'll see a lot of that I bet okay. Markers down now Casey who what state are you hoping wins the I'm hoping. Idaho. Okay okay. Nice. I think I want I want I wanNa small-state maybe Louisiana. Money Louisiana. Now. We'll place the bet now listeners do you have a local music act that you could bring home the win for your state let us know about. Open at the Voice Mobile App on your phone tells all about your pick and send it in an email to news o'clock at Buzzfeed DOT com. That's news o'clock all one word and after up several months wondering why you weren't deeming us we realize we'd left those locked by accident. So that's our bad. So feel free to on twitter now at news o'clock moving forward. That's our show. This week we'll be back on Monday with NPR's Tim Mack filling us in on the drama behind the scenes at the NRA. And remember if you're going to listen to the explicit version of P. Make sure that you are braced and ready experience. News o'clock is produced by Dan boza Hammer check mandy reader and Sierra tall special. Thanks to Tracy Airs Manga Shaw Ticket. Cement Appendix Patrick With Minimum and Tommy. Wesley. Be Sure to subscribe to news o'clock on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you go for your sound stories and please take the time to leave us a rating and review. Help US figure out what you'd like about the show versus what you love about the show and remember set your alarm. See Never Miss an episode of Music Lock. Choir is Mexico is one of the most famous border cities in the world and thirty years. It's been home to a series of unsolved murders. Hundreds of young women have disappeared without a trace number starting to rise, and then a lot of theories were floated on the serial murder, the cartels, some sort of strange devil worship. In forgotton women of our as we story that's left a trail of destruction in its wake with FBI agents, forensic experts, reporters, and victims families. There could be an abduction in broad daylight. No one. Saw It. No one talked about it leaves her like ghost and we discover a web of corruption on both sides of the border. It was scary when you think about who may be involved Oh my God it's like Oh my God as a very. Very dangerous place to CD. I want to recommend you guys to. Binge the first season now and find forgotten women of Juarez on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Hey guys. I'm Jackie O'Brien Co creator of crack Dot Com and with my co host miles grey host, the twice daily Podcast, the daily Xikai on the daily Zeitgeist. We don't just tell you about the culture. We tell you what that culture says about America's psyche. We don't just tell you about the news we tell you the historical context and where things are headed all what having hilarious and intelligent guests from the world of comedy. So tune into the daily Zeitgeist on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever fine podcasts are given away.

United States Kylie Jenner Casey Rackham executive America Buzzfeed trump China Apple Microsoft Dalian Chinese Communist Party New Zealand Zealand Hayes baseball New Zealand Tim Burton Chinese government
Will Walmarts Health Care Gamble Pay Off?

Knowledge@Wharton

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Will Walmarts Health Care Gamble Pay Off?

"Walmart is the latest retail giant to expand into healthcare it recently opened a Walmart health facility in Atlanta suburb. The clinic offers this podcast is brought to you by Knowledge Award carries obviously important Walmart already has a brand established and that connection with a lot of consumers obviously around the world have a savings similar to what they may have at the Walmart store right and they're used to buying their prescriptions at Walmart they're used to getting four dollars generics at Walmart so there's here at Wharton's Healthcare Management Department guys great to see you thanks for coming in thanks thank you give us your sense what do you think this move by Walmart mark well so we have a one point and buy their groceries by their their various goods in those walmart locations who will who will want to go to Walmart health especially if they know that they're going to be able to a powerful attraction to a large firms that Want to try to get in on it now I guess my view is which say here before is knock yourself out care programs in January for its US employees in various states as a way to cut down on its own costs with more on these those or joined here in studio by Mark polly healthcare management the big boxes that could play this game ahead of them one quote I saw that was interesting was none of these want to be the next sears so they wanna make sure that they are as you were focusing on this here in the scope of the United States so to a degree I think they hope that they're going to be able to build off the consumers they've already acquired that come in. Marta also runs one of the largest pharmaceutical chains in the country where it offers low cost generic prescription drugs the company also announced it will begin testing different pilot how some incentive with the spread of high deductible health plans for people to want to pay attention to what their healthcare costs are presumably impart innovation is a good idea more generally although in healthcare most you know vacations have not been successful but professor and business economics professor here at the school and also joining us rob field who is professor of law and professor of Health Management and policy at Drexel University he's also a lecturer three trillion dollar industry and you already gave some numbers about how it's becoming at least as profitable if not more profitable and that's Eddie Healthcare element of trust here that they can build on so they're very well positioned for this among the other competitors out there is Amazon and our current that they're ahead of the curve less to get left behind which I it's interesting something we met you before we went on the air is that while the component of how for years and years we've heard how healthcare is broken and how it needs to be transformed how little the overall battleship has been changed from its they don't the harm of their stockholders but that's the way progress if if it's going to be made here we'll be made now I do think it's in some ways surprising given firms are willing to invest their own money into trying to do something imaginative it seems to me that's if they succeed that's to the good of consumers else care they're already trust Walmart and you've got to trust your doctor so they wanNA merge those two together in terms of defense target is out there costco is out there mark well I think that's what they're trying and remains to be seen branding I think has not proven all that successful in healthcare so far Walmart is trying to build on route think from a strategic perspective they're playing a little offense and defense on offense they WANNA be out there as the brand associated with Amazon doesn't have physical locations and you need physical locations for most healthcare at least at the current state of Technology so they have one up on Amazon as well be developed for this industry that's that's kind of what they're betting on and we will see so what do you think they need to do to be successful in this and Jefferson I'd probably go there even being despite being loyal employee of the University of Pennsylvania but maybe brand loyalty from its nine thousand nine hundred configuration but here's here's a bunch of attempts to try to do it and I guess the only other thing is there is regular doctor is really important right will they be set up to connect people with regular doctors or will it be kind of two chairs no waiting you hat and I guess what I'm wondering about is you know we have a lot of research that at least shows this is kind of the conventional wisdom that having so you have allegiance to your physician you don't have allegiance to your pharmacy rite phyllis prescription anywhere so the question is whether they can build yeah well more go well beyond what has been established especially in the last few years with the care clinics that have popped up in various communities around the country established healthcare systems so a pen makes a lot of effort to brand itself. You see the pen shield doctors offices and hospitals Mayo marketplace then well so kind of picking up on what I said and what rob said the physician still plays a central role here and the question in that people have allegiance to their doctor and they kind of go where there's doctor goes so if when my doctor move if my doctors move from Penn Dr at these facilities that are located close to the place where you do your other shops so Walmart is specifically believes that the these facilities will be pick up the role of physicians I think that's key here Primary care is more easily provided by nurse practitioners physician assistants much cheaper physician extenders nation that you're going to get a deal if you go to Walmart or if you go to COSCO ends up being a negative to this process because the last thing I think a lot of people want is they don't want a deal has clinics in Arizona and Florida and makes a big deal about branding them as Mayo doctors in Cleveland Clinic and a lot of others think the question is can that translate to a big for targeted toward primary care and that really means they're targeted to the eighty percent of people who account for only twenty percent of spending into my health to talk about because otherwise I feel pretty good Mark Mark Paulie by the way is not old he's going on what about thirty five turns of energy feed their inpatient and specialty actresses whereas Walmart doesn't has cancer care center so yes well I don't know how that's GonNa work but it's not clear how many how they're going to allocate the workload between the physician extenders and the MD's it's also not clear how they're going to bring in specialists course that's a good thing if you just want somebody to look at your poison I you don't care all that much but generally speaking will will people be able to have regular and establishing a relationship with with a physician if if they're not going to need that person very much in the future so so I think you retailer can you feel the same sense of trust in Walmart that you would in you know Panir Mayoclinic I wonder mark a little bit I if that you know the experts it may be kind of hard to get a handle on that for the even these large enterprises that if people will do want to see bluer healthy are happy with this kind of episodic care on a drop in base yes and in fact even though I'm old now and have some chronic conditions in pharmacy chains and so forth I think ultimately there's going to have to be an insurance component to this Walmart is big enough they can do themselves right but they MDD's will the economics were that's what I'm wondering yeah my next question you kind of alluded to it is what's the relationship going to be with the insurance industry on this as well right right well Walmart was speaking with Humana a year or two ago and we've been seeing a lot of weird alliances with insurance not the people with chronic conditions who spend most of that one point three three dollars through and those people of course we in healthcare the ready clinic your flu shot in your ear aches check yet but I wanted to pick up on the point of branding because there has been kind of branding that's worked in healthcare and that's with the primary care is fine but you need to be able to refer people are they gonNA have referral networks are they going to be on site if they have to rely heavily on and that's the key to the ready clinics where you walk in and get a flu shot you don't need a trained md to do that the Walmart clinics are going to include a MD's You know when I go to see my primary care doctor it's like going to confession in parochial school I have to think up some interesting sins or some interesting things that have happened roll on their healthcare they want the bottom line savings but they don't want to have the process shortchanged yeah well that's what I'm wondering about this so these new arrangements show so well for Walmart I mean Walmart actually is through the SAM's club deal it's kind of insurance arrangement that deal is you again us it's another thing to have the actual physical healthcare facility that you are tied to that's a that's a that's a potential big liability that they're looking at I and of course as rob mentioned pan another systems are doing the same thing putting their law goes on all these primary care practices but they're doing it because they wanted would like them to have a regular doctor and be coordinated and so forth but they feel healthy and they don't want to spend all their time worrying about even effectively with pools of millions of workers and family members and I think Walmart is looking at at that as well they they have he morgan an Amazon berkshire-hathaway they're gonNA look to develop artificial intelligence algorithms as ways of streamlining healthcare services you go out to get some underwear you might as well have a look at your sore throat but but but they're gonNA need that finance and I guess then the other question is the concern of potential liability that Walmart is getting into it's one thing to have your prescription drugs probably will be looking for a partner it's going to be an expensive but they're also gonNA take insurance so if it's anything more than just a flu shot in a in a sense we are seeing to refer back to what mark was talking about innovation by these private enterprises but innovation they can do very a narrow network system than than than actually doing it on site we actually did have an experiment here at Penn this health plan yeah and if you pay that lump sum payment then you're entitled to Free Prescription Drugs Up to a point which is kind of like PRESCRIP- generic prescription drug insurance certain it will include their own doctors if they have them in this facility but but it'll be more of a more of a version of of robs right employers are trying to somehow get control of what their employees do when it comes to healthcare and and in some cases of course the employees have revolted the as far as I understand the Walmart arrangement is not going to be in house meaning they will provide you with names of doctors and so forth probably so yeah so we'll see whether the show grabbing the primary care into the stick in some senses logical for the office and if it's in a healthcare facility healthcare facility is reasonably private so we'll be willing to go to a big box retailer and maybe there are a couple of steps that that will be rethought in this process along the way having that direct connection between a health facility and a place where you can buy your cheerios is an exactly seem like it's the it's the perfect formula and that has yet to be seen with your current doctor's office then have your checkup at the same time can be interesting to see how that goes particularly interesting because they're going to offer psychological services and will people be comfortable walking into Walmart had a deal on your flu shots or your lab tests or or whatever Walmart is talking about actual locations adjacent to it store yes yeah and in terms of making our healthcare choices but the experimentation and kind of where to put where to set that dial is really fascinating to watch I guess if it's a slow day in Atlanta for the eleven o'clock news they might go out and visit that facility and find something to point out that might not I don't be I'm not a member of Sam's Club but I guess you pay to be a member of Sam's Club but then you can pay another forty two two hundred fifty dollars or so to be a member at various tiers now that brings up the question of what they're going to try and do with their employees which is partly linked through that Sam's club deal that they want to do and I think that it made a strategic decision to not put them inside the stores for reasons of privacy but they'll get people to park in the parking lot and you know you can pick up your groceries and pharmacists are just back to counting pills again they're not actually Central as far as I know in terms I mean they obviously have consultations with physicians I facility is in Dallas Georgia so I guess to degree there would be the potential of linking up of having some symmetry between those two facilities as well I think the SAM's Club model is more pain advance so get wholesale gates it's it's it's kind of like Amazon Prime You pay this money and then you get that's very private and and you pick that because of the doctrine even branded University of Pennsylvania or Mayo Clinic it it's a discreet talking about their most intimate concerns to a Walmart employee there's also GonNa be a door from the clinic into the store so you can get there into the affiliated with a large retail store in terms of the privacy. This is a big step up ready clinic where we are right now you get basic oh that would create a more central role for a pharmacist in managing people's healthcare this doesn't seem like that story at all thing that that information available through some sort of cloud based program at any Walmart location around the country Walmart health location right it is an area that not only Walmart but every company is looking to try and find a way to be able to reduce the cost that they have to have with their employees surrounding healthcare right and the employee pools are great pools for experiments great population to try things on the prime example. These days is haven healthcare the jade with a health clinic on site over in the medical center and it didn't really work they they a they eventually abolished it because of lack of business plan B non-personal kinds of services your flu shot in any earache checked out a now we're talking about the full spectrum of primary care so this really will be an experimental in patients about the drugs they're taking but that that doesn't seem to be the way they're going they're trying to recreate essentially a primary care practice were they've they would stop their for their bad back if they just picked up a heavy patient but otherwise heavily used so you but in general yeah well potentially what Walmart has a national network of locations so you could go to a Walmart doctor anywhere in the country and I think that's something they can leverage region and do quite well with assuming that the branding works that you trust the Walmart signed with your healthcare the what you do for your TV and your Cheerios so then does that also actives lawyers Walmart is presumably giving that a lot of thought but a couple of bad outcomes a couple of bad cases could sort of sink the whole thing apart let me ask you this then they already know that the second facility that they are going to open for Walmart health is going to be in Calhoun Georgia which is about an hour away from where the I think I agree with that and there's also the issue of will they set this up so you have a regular doctor at the next to the Walmart that's the vision of electronic health records and it's also the nightmare that privacy breaches but you've mentioned two areas the data and the malpractice this could be a feast for the question of personal data of bringing that information into a Walmart and if you have this network that obviously you have the potential property is enormous we know that about healthcare right now but the investment that they have to make in the first place is enormous as well but no one's better -sition to make that investment than Walmart they've got a lot of money they've got a lot of facilities they've got a lot of infrastructure that they can use for that up to pick up on mark's point medicine as which means higher and higher costs because they don't WanNa be bothered but I think I find it interesting that they are getting into this and obviously as mark said the potential for had smart management to get to be so large number two they must have a lot of capital but then you know I could mention two pairs of letters g. e. and title is going to be hard to sustain a but to keep down physician turnover you kind of have to at least the sociology of medicine is you have to turn over more and more control a physician so again that's why I think the experimental character of this is is is most important and we'll we'll see how it works out Huynh would you drive the extra hour just to see that doctor I think a lot of people would but if there's a lot of physician turnover than this one png yeah both of which were large firms that diversified into a whole lot of businesses and then I found out they couldn't manage them so after is in general we've been seeing healthcare become more corporate less personal is that trend going to continue where it becomes the same as the with doctor at the Walmart health whatever it's called wall health and then your doctor says well I'm leaving and moving to the grady oh clinics to just rely on healthcare becoming interchangeable becoming a fungible commodity I think is kind of dicey we're joined here in Studio Paulie of the Wharton School Rub Field of Drexel University you're listening to knowledge award here on Sirius Xm one thirty two business radio powered by the Wharton School we're talking about the opening of the first go again from the from the Cheerios into the intimacy of a doctor's office it's been interesting so we have speculated on this program about about the CVs AETNA merger probably some mix of of help where for from we're from central from corporate headquarters we're here to help you and freedom that all of us would seek Walmart Health facility in Georgia others expected to open up in the in the near future eight four four nine four two seven eight six six or if you'd like send us a common going down the road Walmart's best strategy might be to ally with a national healthcare brand that is trusted like the Cleveland Clinic or may area yeah so it's playing it safe there's of course the risk that Walmart is the first mover and so their brand becomes the healthcare brand but I think everyone is interested in this I think they're looking at this as a wait and see at this point correct I think except for Amazon obviously pill pack and is pretty aggressive in this always been the ultimate personal business where you're allied to a human being more to a product you don't care where you get your Statton but you do care who that ducks soon and then also pick up whatever you really need on Sunday morning and that makes me wonder of how you actually lay this out and whether or not that on on twitter APP is Radio One thirty two or my twitter account which is at Dan Loney twenty-one so then going back to the other potential retailers that might be looking to see what everyone else is doing what works and behind it all is the fear talking about g. e. n. p. and G. They don't want to be the next year's robot Dr who also is affiliated with a hospital and so forth so we've carved out a behavioral healthcare actually is separate and mental health care we've carved out cancer care at the matter and also you know you're not my doctor you're my employer and it remains to be seen how that will work out I think there's services around some of the more intense primary care services they're also going to need relationships with hospitals yeah specialists and that's a huge rabbit hole that the haven't even begun to explore but I do think they can expand their offerings dental services routine kinds of care lab tests and so forth they've got cancer centers of Americans America Cancer Care Centers of America you've got freestanding surgical clinics for same day surgery uh-huh research suggests here to be careful in defying a large firm of course you you are ten

Walmart Healthcare Management Departme United States earache Wharton Atlanta sears Mark polly Knowledge Award Marta rob forty two two hundred fifty do three trillion dollar three three dollars eighty percent twenty percent four dollars
Animal Talk  Fred Willard Interview  Episode 109

PodcastDetroit.com

00:00 sec | 6 months ago

Animal Talk Fred Willard Interview Episode 109

"Broadcasting from coast to coast and around the world. It's time for animal talk with some of the best gone pet people on the planet. Dr Brad Davis Devi Emmett chief of chief-of-staff for the veterinary centers of America. Donna four near our animal behaviorist. Brian Bar Jack Wrangling. The reptiles and I'm Jamie Flanagan is animal talk. I'm excited to the zoo. Crew is excited rats. You should be very excited as well. Our guest today. We have a very very special guest on talk today. Fred Willard President visiting great. He has been on everything everything you check out his his bio. It's just simply I. It just dumbfounded it's phenomenal Just astounding how many things he's been on. We're GONNA talk about that in a second but bread. How was Your Week? It was just like just like any other. Any of the week is just more so we had a really neat little puppy today on absolutely vicious little puppy. That was just leave. This lunging at everybody. How old about nine weeks old? Oh boy yeah so that should be fun for years to come or at least until the trial but anyway but no. It's so that that's bad news there of course when you have a puppy that young but Jane what have you been up to Doing math here okay. Don't ask anything you know my weeks. Great it's just been. It's been phenomenal Homecoming Week at at the high school. So always just a lot of festivities going on with that so it was super busy with that sort of stuff but You Know Donna came over and we have the chance to talk It's just Just excited that. He's going to be on the show and just Sharing some time with him. The great thing about it with Fred. Willard is when you mentioned Fred Willard. Last week we started. We started just saying episodes of fernwood tonight back and forth tweets and we were yelling things like like rats. Leisure suits things back and forth amazing. The what a great career never got to be. He's never been headlining starboy from every yeah he was one of the was on get smart. He was a he just like one ninety eight earlier. Bits the best in show a movie. Wally and just Lots of stuff and the reason what he's excited about right now is Coming up on nick at night. It's actually tonight. At eight o'clock it was with us for the next hour. 'cause we got fred here but He's going to be hosting the first annual FIDO awards. And so we're going to be talking about that and we're very excited that our guest today is Fred Willard O he and Fred Willard welcome the animal talk. Thank you fred. You are just trying to go through the list of things that shows and movies. You've been involved with probably easier to list the ones. You haven't been involved a long list of those but I. I've done my share. Thanks but coming up Fred Willard. You're going to be hosting the very first annual fighter. Awards premiering October The fifth Sunday Sunny and I'm excited about it because I don't I've posted some things but if you're going to be fun and everyone loves dogs and I haven't been there for. I don't haven't seen any dogs. Yes so It'll be surprised to me on. Come Sunday Well Friday night we do. It'll be shown Sunday and it just sounds like a ton of fun over there on nick at night and it just really looking forward to seeing it and and you have ties to the pet world interest notably best in show every movie. That was that was fun and Since then you get a lot of offers to come They'll say we're doing a a you know a dog show you come and do something. You're crazy lines but I kind of Balk at doing that because it's I was playing a cantor. There you can get get away with a lot when you're a character just being host. Yeah they're writing the scripts. They'll probably have some athletes but some kind of Moving along I think that's what I WANNA do at the dog. Stars absolute some great categories to cutest dog. Best Dress. Best Voice and You you're not. You're not a judge but you would probably be able to judge fairly. Well you've done so much voice work yourself. I'll be very harsh on them. Then they have the the dog owner and look alike contest. That's going to be an interesting yeah to Hilton. Big Guys Guy is going to be. I think he's going to judge the most outrageous bill a present the most outrageous dogs. So how how are how are the winner is going to be deciding because we got our qualifiers here. How will the winds be decided by people are going to be able to? What Toco wait a minute? I think it's the audience right. There is gonNA votes. Don't know okay so fred again. Your animal connections go way back. And I'm a big fan from from way. Back and my earliest recollection very late night. Tv for a young man was Fernwood tonight I'm surprised. Always how many people remember that asshole? Good Lord it. It corrupted me and war to me and I thank you for that was that was a Very interesting show is just lot of people. Thought it was a real talk show. It's hard to duplicate it. Insent we try to keep it as as straight as possible so You know we never let wanted to let the audience think. Oh Yeah. They're they're being funny. We try to straight as we could just at the comedy. Come out and my favorite stick from that. One was That polyester leisure suits caused the cancer in laboratory rats and you had a little gauge of a bunch of laboratory rats with a bunch of little polyester suits on alien. I think the casting woman for that show so every zany character in La over the over two year period and We had some good in the writing was good and Martin. Mull was always great to work with Oh Yeah and you guys you delivered it so well it was just. It was such a great delivery with that. So we appreciate you spending some time with US Fred Willard hosting the first annual worldwide FIDO awards. Coming UP ON NICK. At nite Fred. You've done so much. Is there any show that like you know what I really wish? Because you've been on so many. I really wish I had been on that one. Got a part on that one. Is there something that pass you by the Ooh? I want it? That one I'm trying to think you know there's some shows that I like so much that I actually didn't want to be on them. Understand it now I got to do. I mean I love Frazier Kelsey Grammer S. But I never wanted to the on it but he called. They called me. They had special before the final episode. Where where I was played a psychiatrist. And he you know during his session then he turned around and psychoanalyze made and it was just perfect. 'cause I it wasn't part of the show is like a special things and also Seinfeld was such a fan but I never want would've wanted to be on it now. Another show I love is Larry David Show Curb your enthusiasm and I think I would love to be on there as my. I don't think I'd want to go. There as a character was like they. Richard Lewis playing himself dance and it would be very flattering to go on yourself on. Thirty rock. If I could go on his Fred Killer Dad would be a lot of fun and we got more with thread. Will it come up these toasting the first annual fido awards on Nick at Night Tonight Fred? Hang on you hang on. We'll be right back with more animals thoughts and have a chat with Fred Willard. We're talking to Fred. He is hosting the first annual fight awards on Nick at night and we're talking to Fred. He's just been on everything and we asked Fred Fred. What shows would you Did you did you not get on that? You wanted to be on a few of a mind you. He really wanted to avoid doing just to not you know. Enjoy the show so much he was still wanted to be a fan like Seinfeld and Few the other ones right read. I can't think of any show where I said. Gee I really wanted to be. We've done them all fred. I've been on some good pushing daisies on November. That was a very colorful part. I I play a magician and I it escape artist on the air and it was It was a nice experience. Really Fun Love. That show okay. Yeah it'll be. I didn't like it at first was opposite back to you was on last year. Came out and beat us in the ratings. Hey wait a minute ago now You know our show is off and now I can look at it objectively. Yeah that's a colorful show. So do you have any friends at home of your own? We have a cat then kind of adopted us and someone must have abandoned in the neighborhood because there's Kane is a started hanging around and it just fell in love with my wife and she just She one day. She said to me to get get get used to it. It's our cat now. I'm allergic to cats. Kathy Lee outside. She finally get used to it. It's our cats but it is very sweet. It's a really sweet cat does. Does the cat have any hidden talents? That you know probably can't because you're the host but the does she have any or any. He didn't tell us that my qualified I can see no but it's a very sweet cat. I remember one day. My wife wasn't home. The cat came over just sat next to it kind of cried and I thought well. What kind of annoyed in about two hours later? It's food dish was in Seoul. Bear call at me or and I came over name cried. I'll make sure it's got fooled. He's training you. Fred is what he's doing. He's doing a good job at it. You'll have your you rolling over for biscuits before you know. I love animals. You know they're they're just They depend on us. to You know they. They never complain. They can't express their discomfort. So you've got to really be aware of them and not take care of them so Have you had any pets? Because one of the categories coming up on the final awards is the dog owner look alike. Have you had a pet that you looked like? Maybe I did when I was a little boy. I had a cocker Spaniel. They're very cute. And I just love that little dog and I thought it wasn't too happy with it. Yeah dog almost got run over and read right in front of our house so they got a fun from family. Who was Had A farm in the family close woman came to our house and And they said they were taken out to him. I said can I come out and visit? You could come out anytime and I I never went to just OUTTA sight OUTTA MIND. I still remember its name was. Bingo was the what? Was THAT. Your first pet mike first and only pets okay until he never wanted to responsibly. But I love I think dogs are my favorite. I've never been a horse person. I've had to ride horses and I'm a little scared of him. Yeah you get up on a horse have you ever been elemental horse? I'll get up. It's a lot taller than you. You know when I first came out to Hollywood I took riding lessons. 'cause I figured Westerns crusty guy. Horses the stupidest animal in the world. It will walk right off a cliff. Jesus I'm up on every bone in my body riding bread. You've done a lot of voice over work and you've played a lot of animals. What what's your favorite animal to play. Oh boy what if I played? I remember I three times. I was on Jay Leno. I think I played a dog. Clinton was the president and they got a dog and I play the dog. And what else is funny? I can't you have one coming up next year cat tail. You're going to be involved with about that. I have no memory of having done that. I don't see these animated shows. They take forever you do it. And then they have to send it off to Korea or someplace the animations Larry boy two years later that thing comes out and see in a movie with Ben Stiller or Jeez and I don't know hey you say so the Internet. It's gotTa be Right Monster House with capital Harare and chicken. Little play space creatures. They're fun but there you're getting the right in the room with Catherine Hair. You do your lines but you have no interaction with the other actors so You know year and a half later you go to see if you meet the other actors like I just was in wally. And we went to the premier. And there's the Gorny Weaver. She did a voice and I was on it and I introduced myself. Doors Willard play and so oh that's great. Yeah so coming up the final awards. What category are you most looking forward to on the time doors? I'm making nine well. The most outrageous dog has any interest. I think the most fun will be with the dog. Owner look alike find out if that's really flattering to the owners. Look just like your bulldog. Uh skateboarding. Chihuahua can't that Boxes A pug and a Fox terrier ladder climbing Labrador retriever. And a deep deep diving laboratory. So yeah you're GONNA have a big tank. Set up on the stage or something for his laboratory died. We're going down through rehearsal for scrapping in a wetsuit man. Petric that Star for a couple of times. I saw some tricks that I I couldn't believe the these dogs and parrots would do so I think it's got to the point. It's going to be very competitive. You gotTa really have a an interesting trick to get on TV. Yeah Well Shit. Up and shake hands That's long right. Yeah that's old news. Does your dog and talk and read copy and doing impression impressionist does your dog to Jimmy Stewart. Everyone does Jimmy. Christopher walken brilliant line. This show really appreciate you. Taking some time to chat with US looking forward to going to talk to them very excited about this but does well so I hope they do it every year. Even if they don't ask me back to hose it it's still fun. You know. Dogs are fun. And they don't care they're not bothered with problems. We have take our minds off. What's going on? Seem the words go out and catch your dog and and if you had a dog treat them well that's my feed them. Make sure they're comfortable. That's the end of my message ban. Neuter remark their speech neuter. I'm sure they don't enjoy them down. Care luck getting imitation diving with the dog and thanks to painless. I did that on some show. I forgot that So you know so. You can't do you'll be okay. All right sir. Thanks for Thanksgiving me. The silly time here appreciate it. Thanks Fred thank you. Bye Bye all right Fred Willard. The man just kills me nick at night. The first annual fight awards that you Tibo because it comes on about a half hour from now so you're staying with us for the second hour animal talk and another half hour and this hour Of Your questions answered and that'll do it for another installment of animal talk. Thanks for being with US. And thanks. Supporting our sponsors. Make sure you follow us on twitter. Animal Talk Radio and of course the website Animal Talk Radio Dot Com. We'll see you next time on animal talk.

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Why Are So Many People Addicted to Pain Pills? Dr. Deni Carise on The Opiod Crisis | Selfie Podcast Episode 101

Selfie with Kristen Howerton and Sarah James

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Why Are So Many People Addicted to Pain Pills? Dr. Deni Carise on The Opiod Crisis | Selfie Podcast Episode 101

"Hey Everyone I'm Sarah James a beauty blogger and self help aficionado and I'm Kristen Howard Tan or writer psychotherapist and you're listening to Selfie a weekly podcast about two women trying to tackle better self-care. We're both the of the opinion that self-care is important and yet we find it elusive and while we may have all the info we need. We don't always get there from the silly to the serious. We are taking a vulnerable yet humorous look at body mind and spirit and maybe a touch of the random random all my looking at the distractions and defenses and keep us from carrying for ourselves like okay. Hey guys well today. We are going to be talking about the OPIOID crisis in the United States. If you're watching the news at all you know that this has become a major issue. people becoming addicted into pain pills after surgeries it's affecting both young people and old people. There's a big rise in twenty to twenty five years of age but also amongst baby bloomer so we're going to be talking with denise. She is a clinical psychologist. She has lots of good information for us about what to do. If we have people we know you know and also how to make sure we are avoiding getting addicted to pain pills after a surgery or dental procedures something like that but I am going to do a quick check in with Claire there take lehrer guys well. We have not talked in a while. I know I've kind of been under the weather with my recovery. Yes I have barely up above my houses says I'm recovering from this Steptoe Plassey and terminent reduction surgery that I had. I've seen her kids. You've seen children. Will you've driven them. Thank you Claire. I would like to publicly. Thank clear for getting my children to school for the last month. Oh No it works. Both ways doesn't really well a little bit more minor action to get you better. Yes yes so I'm getting in there. I'm getting there yeah myself. CARE is going. I would say moderately. Well still working out yeah. I'm not working as much much as I was but I'm like in a routine of where I'm feeling it is routine which is really what I was aiming for. Instead of doing the four days I was in the beginning like we're also gung. Ho in the beginning right of course I am so going to make these leggings work told me some going like one twice a week but it's going really well and it's kind of Nice as having my own time in the morning drop the kids off and I go for about an hour before work. sled spend really really nice. Do you find that when on the days that you go do you have have more energy for the rest of the day or less. I have more energy to appoint. Yes so I'm like feeling really great yet but at eight o'clock please stop speaking to me every one of my house at eight. PM Fair Plan. I U- We used to do like when the kids will go down at eight. My husband and I would like you know. Watch a show hanging hanging. I don't want you know just kind of want to be left alone to read or who. I'm really just like. I'm done speaking to anyone that's good. I think some more tired physically physically I will say though my clarity and like my fog sometimes they have those really foggy days because I've been trying to stop drinking caffeine just because it messes with me all all kinds of ways you know. I've been off caffeine for like two years you. You're a big T. drinker too big t but it's DECAF but still it's like the ritual oh having a drink well yeah but you can do DECAF coffee year. I it's like I'm like reflux. Is it gonNA. Making feel awful interesting so that's also it makes me feel. You should ask this in the facebook group because our Selfie podcast facebook group is where I go for the answer to everything. I don't even go to the doctor now. I just ask the H. Chocolate and like a normal person call on a selfie group. It is for real the smartest group of women and men ever yeah join us. Yes yes we actually. I don't know if you saw this but we actually had a vaccination conversation in that group. That did not go drama. I don't know what you're talking about. Everybody everyone's so proud. I was like did that just happen eight comments about vaccinations with no drama no arguing. Did someone blocked me from dot com layer. That's a whole other show. It's such a respectful group anyway you. I feel like you should go in the group and ask because I feel like this. I feel like I've heard this or you could google it. I WanNa say that if you drink coffee if you cold brew it with cold water overnight it's less acidic really could be making mishap. I will ask the group passed the that. You really miss the taste of it. I love coffee and we have were so lucky here in Costa Mesa. We have a lot of really great coffee places we do you and part of my ritual was going to thunder king. I love doing like that meant coffee situation. Oh Yeah I'm mourning the loss of my coffee. Yeah that's hard. I mean I get that. I will say that there's a lot of times not drinking caffeine. Why do feeling deprived because you know you'll go somewhere and they're not serving DECAF or the DECAF is like the plane and all that it's like coffee water totally like even at starbucks they have all these new let cold brew drinks and they're not DECAF by the way the Pumpkin cold brew. I have heard I've heard of the C. I can't drink that one. You have never tried it like that photomontage. I know it's amazing. It's a lot it's like fourteen grams of fat that I looked on the APP. How was their that much fat in the cold. Brew Foamy stopped funny. Well Myself. post-surgery is is going well because it's all I can really do like having to take a nap every day. It's I I am so low productivity. It's very hard what your skin looks incredible. Hey Claire Blair said this as she walked into my house and you guys it's true my skin has never looked better and here's the revelation so I have to sleep on my back with my ahead elevated because of the surgery so I'm sleeping on a wedge pillow and I'm usually a stomach sleeper basically saying on my face like crinkly on my oh totally and my skin has never been better. It's like yeah. It looks like I thought you had fillers. I mean I don't I haven't had a blemish in a month on. It's so weird yeah. It really goes to show like how disgusting it as sleep on your face. I know but it but it's so hard for me not to but you're not getting the quality sleep. You were getting eating before barely sleeping. I can't believe that my skin looks good because I feel like I noticed. I had some photos when you were. I think it was at mom two point now and I was like well. We're skin looks really good and then when I walked in the house you're like Oh. It wasn't a filter now. Those are my that's clear You are a serial over filter. I am but you own it. Favorite is when our friend Chad calls me out in the photo. Obviously I don't think given a start filtering his photo. That would be hilarious thumbs up for this week well okay want and I have is speaking a pillow pillows. I actually did get a new pillow that I really like. It's ahead leveler pillow so well well. It's it's a pillow where you can order it. It's custom according to how you sleep and what level of firmness that you like and so so it's it's really nice. Wow so you can order it for stomach sleeping. You can order for back sleeping. It's just like really good for your neck really good for your back they have it like they have one called. Ortho serve which is a cervical pillow so yeah. It's it's just it's really nice. It has like support art for based on your neck size and it's yeah it's just it's a really nice pill giant head do until they do you really do you measure yourself. You don't measure you just kind of answer a question extra-large yes yeah totally and then my other thumbs up and it's funny that I've not talked about this one before because we enjoyed them. You and I all summer. is these young these wine spritzers that I got so they're archer ruse wine wine spritzers and they're in a can of beer can but there you can get him in. White Rosa the Rosette yeah remember or read and they are. They're like like if if you've ever been to Spain. It's like the day wine where it's like a little carbonated a little sweet but not too sweets. I okay okay when I was in Germany. They were serving something like this like a big a big slice orange like Rosemary Hotel or something yeah. I love that what I really like about them is they're single serving and so occupy them in the fridge altering one while. I'm cooking dinner and it feels light. It doesn't feel as heavy as a wine. It doesn't give me any of the acid reflex that I get from wine. We're headache bag or headache but it just feels light and then I like that if like a bunch of people come over. It's like a nice little easy drink. You can pop out you know and why aren't we drinking them right now. We shouldn't uh-huh I know I have in my fridge all summer. It's like they've been the eternal allowance drink like we just keep drinking them on on right now. I think we had them before we over to the fair. Actually we did them also had really yummy over the summer. Oh the hard Kombucha yes. That was really oh that was so good that was flying embers so my flying embers had all the company I had all the kinds there was one like ancient berry that was really good and then there was a ginger okay and you kind of feel like you're being healthy because it's so I can have four. I will tell you this is serious stuff it hits you hit you out of nowhere. The wine spritzers are a little more like reasonable but that hard Kombucha is like hi. I'm here so I want one of those now claire. It's one thirty P. I know it's fine I want my kids are old enough that they walked home from school. If I want to have a Spitzer at one thirty I'm allowed to which is amazing all right when she got to changing gears a little bit too electrolytes okay one of the things I found when I started working out. Was that already knew that I didn't drink not enough water and so I was trying to increase my water intake but I was getting headaches. I was getting dehydrated easily yeah so a friend who also works out recommended her. Her kids actually drink this when they have like soccer tournaments. It's called Ultima Punisher and it's a powder that you put into your water yeah. There's a bunch of different flavors. I like the lemonade one. It just tastes like lemonade. Sugar Free Gluten free all the things we care about race and it lasts a really long time only need one little tiny scoop. Oh my rush and it's delicious. Oh I WANNA try. It's so good and then how this cute little container which I have to lie to hide from my kids I would have to hide it from my kids to but they do have a little packets also also sure and so I give them a couple of every once in a while but it's really affordable and it's just really yummy. Oh awesome. I'm going to order that it kind of reminds me so like my biggest weakness Chick-fil-a Diet lemonade oh it's very similar and so if you slice pizza lemon and they're okay put in the hydro flask shirt felise diet lemonade is so much by the way it's not calorie free. Did I ever tell you this. Remember what I was trying to do. Kito yes yes and I was having the worst time wasn't losing any way well because I thought that it was calorie. Because most diet drinks are calorie three and then come to find out. It's it's not calorie free and it's just I think like six carbs which is way too much if you're doing absolutely yeah still better than the regular way better her but I was on it was a sad day for me. Yes it's very ultimate love. It kids love it. They have like in black raspberry. An orange dilemma needs great because I just love lemon yeah and then my second thing not as exciting but I'm very excited because I have a fourteen inch little MAC book yeah and I've been looking for a laptop case but I hate the ones that look like a briefcase with the hand looking for a good sleeve. Yes and I'm really particular ordered a whole bunch and of course I I find one for fourteen dollars on Amazon. Of course you do oh my gosh. This one is really kid is my absolute favorite. It looks like handmade leather. Is it really leather leather. It says it's really let it hasn't really whether I don't know if it's not I'm just going to say it's begin. It says high quality micro fiber leather texture leather texture. I don't know so I think it's not so it looks like it Vegan leather and it comes in black and like a pinkish super cute a bunch of different sizes but it looks super expensive. It does look very expensive tip a great gift eight a gift and they have it in multiple sizes. You just have to know the laptop size exactly which it links all those but yeah in the photo on Amazon which I love as you can put your phone yeah little Mac and they're super Q or less than fourteen bucks. Yes see how great gift and I'm way too excited about it but I guys I. We went through like four or five before finding. I wanted the original. When I wanted was like eighty five dollars. Yeah this is great. Dupe Great Levek Vegan dupe super super cute well as always we will link up all of these in our facebook group also they will be in the stories of our instagram account which is at Sulky podcast. I WanNa take a quick break to talk about. One of OUR SPONSORS ITALIC DOT com so italic is a really great way to buy unbranded high end purses accessories clothing. Thank sweaters. It's affordable and sustainable. It's the only online clothing company where you can shop beautiful unbranded luxury goods from the same people who are making Gucci Chanel Cartier but without the mark up costs of the logo and branding they have an in house design team that travels the world to source the best manufacturers to create their own originally only designed products when you buy without the brand you can get the same quality just without the logo for about fifty percent off so I got an adorable purse there a couple laments ago. It is their marteen leather cross body bag. It's a black sort of square-shaped purse medium size and it's actually made by the same manufacturer Selene so it looks that high quality the leathers really supple. I get a ton of compliments on this purse. It's a nice black leather with a gold chain. Gold Zippers is tons of pockets. It's the perfect size you can stash a lot of stuff in it but it looks cute with anything from a cocktail dress to jeans. I love this purse and I keep looking at their website because they're always refreshing their inventory. They've got a ton of Kashmir stuff right now. They've got sweaters and scarves a really cute velvet clutch now because I tell how it doesn't by its inventory. They don't have to mark up. The products cost instead. They're manufactures are paid a fair wage. It's great because their supply chain prevents excess inventory so you you feel good about promoting sustainability without paying that premium and without compromising on quality. I will say this. They sell products quickly. So if there's something you've got your eye on now is the time for the first time ever italic has set up a special discount code just result listeners. You can use the code Selfie for a fifteen dollar credit on your first purchase at Talaq Dot com again. That's the discount code SELFIE AT ITALIC DOT COM for fifteen percent off luxury products that are half the price all right well. I am here with Denny Korea's. She is going to be talking today about the OPIOID crisis. If this is something you are not familiar with it is certainly an issue shoe. that is relevant for our times because it is becoming so pervasive. I'm so she's a clinical psychologist. She's part of the recovery community for over thirty years. She currently serves as the chief scientific officer of recovery centers of America and she's also an adjunct professor at the University of Pennsylvania Danny. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks Kristen glad to be here. Absolutely well talk to me a little bit about the opioid crisis in terms of the scope and you know it feels feels like this is something that has increased is am. I accurate in observation. Oh you're absolutely accurate so from nine hundred ninety nine when it really kind of started to twenty sixteen more than three hundred and fifty thousand people have died from overdoses so in twenty seventeen. which is the last year we have information for? There were forty seven thousand six hundred opioid overdose deaths and if you really break that down that's more than one hundred and thirty every day. That's more than five every hour. It is really becoming rampant and I I do remember seeing that this was like becoming a more leading cause cause of death particularly. I WANNA say in younger men well. It's younger members also younger women as well and it's. It's some of our older folks folks that there's really two sides of the population with opioid overdoses. One is the kind of young person that was what we call drug naive to to begin with and right and hadn't done drugs and progressed very quickly to to opioids and into heroin and then it's if there's an older group also that's done done heroin off and on in their life and had some treatment and maybe been in and out of treatment that have also become addicted to this much stronger more potent less less expensive opioid than has ever been available for us got it and so let's talk for a minute and define what opioids what that refers to a from prescription drugs all the way up to heroin right so opioids include all the different prescription drugs that would have opium the hydromorphone and you're more phone. Heidrick Koto Oxycontin oxycodone dilaudid all the prescription drugs but it also includes heroin and then it includes. It's what we call the other synthetic opioids which are your sentinel your car fenton all that are all illicitly manufactured right now so it's the whole scope of drugs. An opiate is something that comes directly from the poppy plant so there's not much that's an opiate anymore. Even heroin has some manufacturing in it so all the recipes everything but morphine falls into the category of OPIOID and do you. Do you think that most people understand when they're given an OPIOID. You know for example example. I just had sinus surgery was handed a bottle of percocet on my way out you know. Do you think that the general population understands that these you know that an opioid that you know is the same as in the same class as heroin. You know Kristen I don't. I think it's getting better but but I don't think they do. I'm so sad to find out still that doctors are prescribing opioids without stopping to talk to you about to ask you have a history of addiction. Have have you ever used these before. Be Very careful. These are highly addictive medications. It's just so sad that that's still happening. I think that it is too. It's very frustrating Australia to me because you know I I have found. I used to work in private practice and I worked in recovery as well in my experience was a lot of the people that came in there was a precipitating hitting illness. Were they were given prescription and then they you know couldn't get off the the pain pills and then they started seeking get in ways that are you know like doctor shopping right absolutely and then when that falls through that's when they turn to street drugs the people who never in a million years would have sought out heroin from the street but that's that's the decline right right. You know it's interesting. I I always say one of the few things I really like about getting older is that if you stay in the same field you start to see these incredible trends so back in the late eighties nineties even even into the two thousands when somebody came into treatment for a heroin problem they had probably been using drugs for ten fifteen twenty years. You know it was very rare to see somebody who's like no. I never use drugs before I just picked. I just started about six months ago now. Injecting heroin you see that all the time today and he's exactly what you talked about something like I think if I can remember the exact percentage but seventy five percent of people who Abuse News opioids started their addiction with prescription drug in the nineteen sixties. Karen was the drug that most often led to an opioid addiction so people come in they have a lot of them are young kids. They received a prescription for opioids or they got some from their parents medicine chest or their friends parents medicine chest. They took him at a party. They like the way they feel and then. You're right absolutely for quite a while. There is this kind of doctor shopping where people would be able to go get a month's supply of opiates opioids from one doctor on a Monday a month's supply from somebody else on a Wednesday and they would see eight doctors in a month and they would have all the access well one of the things that has worked in addressing this problem is what's called the physician Drug Prescription Drug Monitoring Program where physicians now our courage to look into a database that will tell you if that's happening and so it was a while before we got up and running and then also got interoperability between states so I'm in Philadelphia and New Jersey is a half hour drive Delaware's a half hour drive Maryland's a forty five minute drive. You know so now with the interoperability billy between states for that. It's much harder for folks to do that. And what happens is that people start taking them either for an injury or for fun they you become pretty quickly addicted to them then they start trying to buy them on the street when they go to buy them on the street like eighty milligrams of oxycontin costs about eighty bucks on the street eight but it's equivalent to about twenty dollars of heroin right giving you the same effect so people transition very quickly and that's just a a real real problem. What is it about opioids that make make it so addictive. Is it the experiences that you know. Why is this one that people become come so ensnared in so quickly. That's a great question I mean. I think that there's you know we we know a lot about the genetics of different drugs. We don't know everything we want to know about it but for example there's different genes that are responsible for the likelihood that somebody will get addicted. there's other genes responsible for how difficult call somebody will find it to quit you know and so. I and many other things and there's different genes for different drugs so I think opioids are a a drug that way. It hits the brain. The person has such a sense of feeling good such a sense of euphoria particularly if they have the genetic loading for that that they really WanNa feel that way again and then the physiological addictions starts so quickly that it's very quickly transitions over to them doing the opioids just so that they don't go through this incredibly painful withdrawal yeah absolutely I can remember my ex husband was hit by a car about fifteen years ago and when he was in the hospital they put him on a morphine drip and they gave him a button to push and I remember you know two two days in he was like a drug seeker. I mean he was pushing that button. He was waking up and pushing it you know and then it was really difficult for him to then and you know come off of that but but it was done in the hospital but it it is so powerfully physically addictive that I think people who wouldn't imagine themselves in into into personality might find. This one is different. I think that's true and then you also have to remember that with the heroin. This is the most pure you're heroin that we've ever seen on the streets today compared the Herron today compared to ten and twenty years ago is very very different. A lot of that has to come from where we get our heroine in this country it used to be we got about ninety percent of our heroine from Columbia. and then Mexico Kinda came in its pure is less expensive incentive. There's a lot of other variables that came in with that as well and today we get about ninety percent of our heroin from Mexico and the purity of it in addition to the the insertion of the the synthetic opioids such as fennel car they've just really flooded the US and the the stronger and opio it is the more intense the the addiction is going to be the more intense. The withdrawal is going to be in the more difficult. It will be to get off of that drug yeah absolutely well you know for people who who are concerned about the potential of opioid addiction you know what do we do when we're handed a bottle of something from our doctor and maybe we have legitimate pain. what's what's best practice in that situation right. Chris I mean because none of this is to say that people with with significant pain don't deserve relief. They run. We do one of the problems with that and then I'll get your question is that there used to be these very robust pain clinics that would combine in an opioid with with hydrotherapy with massage with cognitive behavioral therapies with biofeedback and they had just as good result zolt sometimes without the opioids or very low dose opioids but when the opioids got frankly very heavily pushed by the pharmaceutical industry as being nine addictive which was completely untrue and as being something that's appropriate for chronic pain not just acute pain which again is also untrue those pain clinics stopped being funded because there was a faster easier cheaper way so I just WanNa make a comment that I know there's those people out there with pain and I know that they deserve relief but the for the for the average person if you your doctor gives you a prescription one of the problems we have is that doctors have not been educated about opioids and about pain or about addiction in medical school for the most part that's changing but not much so they they don't have that and then what we had also was the pharmaceutical industry coming in in the two thousands and training all the doctors in a in a calm frankly very inappropriate way that oh you don't use these just for end of life pain you can use for chronic pain and they're not addicting and and you know frankly. They knew they were doing this. They knew they were misrepresenting data and findings and and they taught the doctors to do it and so you know they're still google docs out there that have very little education on this so if your doctor does give you that and the one that makes me the most crazy is the the adolescent kid that gets their wisdom not out and comes home with a thirty day supply of Oxycontin for what's going to be three days at the most of pain you know right and so you know one of the things people. You've got to really understand that the prescription opioids are highly addictive that the majority of people who develop an addiction start with a prescription drug. The other thing being to remember is that there's other pain relief that is effective and I'm not telling anybody they should they should grit their teeth and pain but there's a lot of times when a doctor may give you a bottle of open a bottle of pills when aspirin ibuprofen Acetaminophen some physical therapy even meditation or acupuncture could be just justice effective yeah frankly the opioids are really for cancer treatment palliative and end of life care. That's where they're they're used comes in the the. FDA has developed a checklist for people to ask their doctors before filling a prescription. You know some of the questions are that you could ask your doctor are are there non opioid alternatives that could work you know. Will this impact me differently. If my family or I had a history of addiction to alcohol or other drugs could interact with other anxiety sleeping medications or seizure medications. you know it. Can I have a prescription for now. Lacson so that you have that on hand in case as the person takes too many of these opioids because you're absolutely right once they start taking them. They do for some people. They take them and they hate them and they don't even take them anymore. For Pain for other people they take them and just feel like wow. This is what I was supposed to feel like kind of all my life you know. I feel great today and they will keep using them so you can. They also give you a prescription for Naloxone and then one of the things is you know s them. What do you do with the unused opio in medicines because that's actually a very significant problem and don't fill the prescription just in case you know only fill it. If you really need it right. Now we know the most commonplace that teenagers get prescription opioids the most commonplace they get them is from their parents or their friends parents medicine chests absolutely and then if you look at preteens the most common way preteens get prescription drugs is from their older siblings so you know the according to the DA okay actually up between two thousand six and two thousand twelve pharmacies filled over seventy five billion oxycodone hydro KOTTO pills seventy five billion of them and many of them don't get used. They're left in medicine cabinet. There's actually also a problem with open houses with realtors and and people selling their homes now that people will go and look at open houses just to take a look at the medicine cabinet and see if they can find some. It's really very big deal and you know people can just call their local township for safe disposal. There's drop-off boxes. There is national. Take back days. There's we've partnered with mothers against prescription drug abuse very similar along the lines of mothers against drunk driving to provide drug disposal pouches so so some of the things are ask your your doctor you know why is this is could something else work. What do I do with it. you know understand that they're very addictive. Fill it only if you need it. Keep it out out of your medicine chest. Keep it locked up and then get rid of it in their appropriate way drop-off box. Yeah I mean you know case in point. I'm I consider myself a pretty involved mom but I had surgery two weeks ago and I've got a full bottle in my medicine chest like I'm a perfect example of like having that risk right right here in my house and so you're reminding me and motivating me to find a dropbox for that. Yep and you know what you don't have to have bad kids or or misbehaving having kids for them to go into your medicine and we all have as curious kids curious where we were thirteen and fifteen and whatnot and kids with friends who say hey check out this. It sounds crazy but there has been a problem for awhile with these pill parties that kids have they go into the Medicine Sanchez. Take a handful a bunch of different things. They throw all in a big bowl when they get to the party and they each take a handful yeah. I mean that sounds crazy. I think to most of us as adults but I actually can imagine in that as an adolescent that might not seem so crazy. It might sounded more like fun to me you know and they're invincible. Classic Adolescent speaking all right how do we how do we impart you know this information about pills and like how serious they can because I feel like there's a perception and especially with teens of like well. If it's a pill. It's not that big of a deal. I'm not shooting anything into my arm not snoring anything. It's just a hill. How do we help demystify that for them. That's a good question I mean it's. It's you know it's not only is it just a pill. It's a pill your doctor gave you or your doctor gives somebody you know must be okay and the the reality is that you know there's a lot of medications that are just really damaging to the body. If you don't have a disorder that they're that they're written for or that are addictive. If you know the opioids are very addictive drug year muscle relaxers year of Value Human Zanex again pretty dangerous drugs in the hands of of an adolescent adolescence or at the hands of somebody who doesn't kind of keep their eye out to that and I think that you talked about how you know there is this significant problem that I'm sure they're seeing on TV TV or in the paper all the time and that it almost always starts with a prescription opioid and that's just a pill in and really got to look at that pill will as as heroin in a pill because that's really the to your body. That's exactly what it is yeah and I think it's like we have to impart that to teens but I think that message needs is to be imparted to a lot of adults to. I don't think people are thinking this is heroin. Nfl I think you're right. I agree yeah what about those of us who may have loved ones who are struggling with opioid addiction yep yeah. I mean there's a lot you know. How do you talk to somebody about it or whatnot. In everything is so very dependent on what you're saying what you're doing so you know for some people if if the issue has never come up and maybe they got a prescription for a problem and you think they're abusing thing it and they they're starting to fall asleep at dinner or they. You know do things that make. It seem like they're taking too much of that. you know if you're in a position to monitor it a little bit that could be helpful but one kind of nonthreatening way to to start the conversation is to just say something like yeah. I noticed that you're having difficulty colty doing things that used to come easy to use. There's something going on and I noticed that you're having trouble getting up in the morning or that. You seem kind of lethargic or you're not you seem kind of secretive is is. There's something going on you know and so. That's a way to start a conversation with somebody that either. You don't know that well. Maybe somebody in work. You know just this this idea of notice. You're having struggling with things that used to easily. You know what's going on an and there's a whole nother way to approach it. If it's your your spouse or your child your adult childer whatnot who you know had a problem and starts. It's having the behaviors again or or goes back. you know to be more secretive or you know some behavior that make you wonder about what's going going on you know and so what I would say is that I get asked all the time like Oh. What if I asked them if they're using drugs again and they're not they'll be really mad. Let me you know what if you don't ask them and they are hit. Oh I mean you can never have I have asked colleagues. I've asked people people in recovery that I've known forever that that I just I have to ask them. If I see something because if I don't and they are I've missed that opportunity to be helpful to to them and somebody who isn't using you know. If you ask somebody who isn't using you know I noticed your behaviors a little bit lake when you were using the drugs dogs have. How are you struggling with that again. Somebody's his not using. We'll probably say you know had trouble sleeping. I'm really tired. Whatever it is as somebody who is using will it will probably start screaming at you know I'm not using drugs. Why would you think I'm using drugs. You know because there was so it's you know what I always say is always err on the side of asking as opposed to not asking because you never know when you're going to save a life right that's right. I completely agree yeah. I mean it's kind of like the the suicide thing. It's like people think well. I don't want to ask because I don't want. You know it's like ask it's never bad. Ask absolutely right and what about for you know. Maybe we have some listeners who are struggling whether they've been taking opioids or muscle relaxants or any other prescription drug. I know out of an xanax. You know those can be very addictive if someone finds themself in that situation. Where should they reach out for help. Yeah I mean I think if somebody finds that they've started using a opioid prescription or whether it was at a party it really doesn't doesn't matter and they find themselves caught up in wanting and needing more what I was his the faster. You make a change the better you know do not wait until it gets so bad that you are you know your behaviors when you get into recovery life can be absolutely fabulous and recovery but you've got to deal with all the the behaviors you had in the past so don't let them get yeah as soon as you. If you think you have a problem you probably do and one of the analogies always make us. Nobody thinks wow man. I think I might have a problem with Broccoli. You know what I like. It just doesn't come up right. If you think how I might have a problem with this drug well you probably do yet. Oh it's it's rare that somebody would imagine having a problem with it with a drug and they they don't really have some level of a problem so I would. You know if you're you can go different places. I mean if your family would be supportive and help you. I go to family. I would go. You can go get a free assessment. at at at our treatment programs. We'll do a free assessment on the phone with you. you can talk to your the AP or your human resources person at work. If that's possible you can just make an appointment for an assessment somewhere you can talked you can go to and alcoholics anonymous or narcotics anonymous meeting and say Gee. I'm not sure you know I thought I'd see what this is about out and and talk to people who have had the problem enter in recovery so there's a whole bunch of different avenues to kind of look for you know some people will also also go to their clergy. one thing I would say is that fits prescription opioid problem and you got it from your physician than if they didn't warn or knew about this. They probably don't know enough about it and they're probably gonNA tell you. You probably don't have a problem you know by the time people come into treatment typically. They've tried to quit on their own and been unsuccessful. They've tried to cut back and been unsuccessful. So what are the ways to see. If you have a problem is to see if you can quit on your own and the if you are have a physiological dependency substance use disorder with an opioid your if you if you quit on your own. It's going to be incredibly uncomfortable. The good news is that you won't die of OPIOID withdrawal. You will feel like yeah exactly I. I always say you'll want to die but you will not wear whereas if you're also additionally using heroin using sorry alcohol or Benzodiazepines like exotics volume heavily those are withdrawal syndromes that you can die from so you need to go to a treatment program to detox from those but you know if you can cut back back and quit on your own That's a pretty good indication that you had a problem but you're you're doing okay. If you can't stay quit then that's the time when you might want to get some treatment learned some skills about how to stay off the drugs and I think people might be surprised to find that most insurance plans will cover treatment. Yeah I mean treatment. It's very interesting so there's a lot of different ways to go with treatment. If you have health insurance it is mandated that your health health insurance cover substance use disorder and mental health treatment that is a federal mandate so they will have coverage what WanNa say though is that you need to make sure that you're going to an in-network provider. I'm sure a lot of folks of her. These stories about people who got hundred thousand dollar bills after they checked out somewhere drug screens means and you know if you're going to an in-network center and we're about ninety percent of all of our patients are in network and what that means is that they will have their deductible or Co.. Oh pay which could be as little as seven hundred fifty dollars for to be in treatment for thirty or forty days. I know that's really amazing and that also means that we have negotiated with all their ensures in the neighborhood in network to set rape and we actually paid a lot less per day that way but it's it's better for the patient and better overall because we do not if you see a psychiatrist. We don't bill separately. If you get a drug screen because we feel were concerned about your behavior you you know you're not billed separately for anything else is very transparent that there aren't any other any other service billing that you're GonNa be stuck with when you get home and people do get home and get stuck with twenty thirty fifty one hundred fifty thousand dollar bills yeah by going out of network yeah absolutely yeah well anything anything else. People should know about the OPIOID crisis. Well I mean. I think there's some things about it. That are getting better. There's a little bit more education for physicians. There's an increase use in funding for Alexa and the the overdose medication. one thing I want to say is that Nell Oxana Narcan is the most common one John Sorry about that is is a is a treatment for an overdose. It's not treatment for the addiction so even if somebody gives you nor cannon in you are revived. You can't just kind of get up and go about your day. You really need to get that checked out. Some people can overdose and they get narcan which knocks the opioids off the opiate receptors and then the NARC hand will kind of fade away before the opioid gets out of the system so they can actually overdose a second time so one is that if you're in a situation where our cans used make sure the person gets treatment. you know the it's. It's what's really important today is to it's no that any use can be a lethal use. There's a tremendous amount of car rental coming into the country mostly from China and there are people that go out and use heroin for the first time and we'll overdose and die because it is laced with fence fence and we're having a problem with that being laced into cocaine in as well so it's really a very dangerous time frankly to be to be played around with any kind of drugs drugs whether it's cocaine amphetamines or heroin they we've seen fennel laced in all of them so be very careful out there and if you think you have a problem just go see somebody talk to him about it and just evaluated in suits. You know what what it needs to what can you do. It can be helped so that you will not go on to continue to have have this problem absolutely yeah. We'll denny. Thank you so much. Where can people find you online Chris o. Omit Denny Curry's down on twitter. I'm on facebook. It's it's it's denny dot curry's for both of those men linked in and then recovery centers of America has a facebook facebook and and all those pages as well and if anybody has any questions. We have a call center. That's open twenty four hours a day. They can just call one eight hundred recover fantastic nick and we will put all those links up on self podcasts DOT COM as well. Thank you so much for joining us. Thanks so much for having me kristen thanks for joining US continue to self-care conversation with us over it instagram at at soapy podcast and make sure to join our guber supportive humidity that we love on facebook by searching for Selfie podcast community. You can also visit our website to check out the resources. We've talked about each episode. SELFIE PODCASTS DOT COM make sure to subscribe to sell the on Itunes but you can catch up with us next week special thanks to shepherd audio for providing our music take care.

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Blood Flow Restriction, Legalities of Psychedelics #1056

One Life Radio Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Blood Flow Restriction, Legalities of Psychedelics #1056

"The content of the following program is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis treatment or cure always consult your physician or a health professional with any questions. You may have regarding a medical condition <music> people. Do you wanna go higher baby. You're in the right place so you're listening to one life radio. This is bernadette with diamond gray adriana barrientos. I've got lexi brinkley in studio with me today and dan the man to dance on the on the show. Today i got daniel tag and dan and dan ingle coming up here in a little bit so how you doing. I'm good little tired but good little hired. There is an ant infestation in my house and for some reason they love to get in my sheets interesting so had to sleep in the guest bed which i don't sleep as well and it was and i'm super sore from doing blood flow restriction on my lower body the toilet we'll talk about. I'm tom. Yes killer workout. This is an interesting subject. We've talked about this before. I think it was with maybe sean wells. I don't remember <hes> but blood flow restriction <hes> interesting topic. I <hes> a lot of people say this really really works so it has done wonders. I've my arms have gotten bigger in the last few months from doing all my arm so i just started doing on my blake's which is a whole nother. We're going to have to demonstrate. We're gonna have to find something that we can tie around your. We have a tourniquet sort of my car. You can use you can use my <hes>. Lanyard could be airtight say a hair tire. Liner's probably work better but it's actually pretty cool. I i learned about it from ben polski he from reading some articles of him working through some lower back injuries in training for legs for a year and a half to two years in coming into his show. He's a professional bodybuilder was top ten in the world he came to his last show or one of his last shows without lifting heavy lower body for like two years or something like the misquoting time but any his legs looked in better condition than ever had. Can you blood flow restrict any part of your body and make it bigger. No no you cannot you. Were going somewhere that what you're talking about. I was not a conversation before now very serious because you could use caps. Yes dies yes. Yes you can do so pretty much. The limbs you can do almost any limb. You can't really do like abdominals or anything like that. Essentially you you you cut off his close to the origin origin poor portion portion of the muscle as possible as you can't really get to the origin of your apps or like the chest or anything like that although there are some doubt about this so i he just decided to like i'm accuweather our time arm up and see what happens so it started in japan and they use it as a medical means for people that were having muscle-wasting muscle wasting while living while they were bedridden from car wrecks or whatever and i forget the name what the caller was essentially blood flow restriction <hes> and they would put these trinkets on and do very light weight lifting in the beds and it would retain muscle mass and actually even gain strength and now it's just we've found. It's a neat little trick or tool that you can used used for gaining strength and size for bodybuilding wall doing less wear and tear on the joints. It's thirty percent of your one mac so very lightweight but to extend to absolute failure for three to five sets thirty seconds rest in between and it is brutal brutal yeah especially lower body. Let's do something that's so brutal so it's that healthy for like you know. I'm not you might get bigger muscles but is it gonna do any kind of damage to your skin or your tendons or your way us us br. It's less damaging on your body than doing heavyweights way less damaging and it's not gonna do damage to your skin. It's not going to do any damage to tendons ligaments because there's no there's very very little force put on him. Lactic acid buildup is intense because you're going like i did. I think i did one hundred eighty pound squats for fifty reps which a lot of reps doing squats. How many fifty yeah that is a lot better than i took. Thirty seconds rest then i did thirty five was about all i could get the second time then thirty seconds rest again. Then got was thirty reps and thirty seconds again. Law got was like twenty and then i went to now knee extension that i was like i rep rep twenty years like like you that guy yelling in the gym that hate us. I apologized college is afterwards but <hes> yeah it was. It was painful but it was. It was a lactic acid painful. It was like my joints. Were hurting my muscles refine. It was just just lactic acid builds up and it's just a burn yeah i haven't. I haven't had that in a while but i'm going to start training here in a couple of weeks. <hes> tina burnett is getting ready to move back to dallas alyssa. She's gonna start training me so why she leaving colorado come at texas. That's what i'm asking like nothing against texas but colorado's beautiful and it's better wetter weather children okay. That's a good point. I can't argue with that top. Priority children forever. I'm never leaving gift for you the second i'm done with work i'm out exactly i would love to move to colorado yes or i'm gonna move to them going to kill anyone abou- because i don't want anyone else to know about it. It's a secret state yeah. I want to travel all i would like to. Maybe have like a summer home somewhere but i don't think i could ever leave texas permanently well. It's and i find that with a lot of texans born and raised guys love it. That's awesome. I it's just not for me not the terrain. It's it's hot. It's flat. It's i am. I want to get to the mountains okay. She wants to get to the mouth. You do the bike riding a so much better there. It's like one hundred whatever out and you don't want to get on a bike when you're doing a inside flag. It's just doesn't kansas city was much. It's nicer weather there. Yeah i grew up in upstate new york so i had the best of both worlds kind of <hes>. You've got michigan. They are not like michigan now <hes> twelve whoa whoa thank you like ontario yeah lake ontario <hes>. I was thinking of chicago because a friend of mine and we were talking about michigan and chicago right. Is it like michigan. Dan yes yes. Yes you know i'm a little i'm a little groggy today. I <hes> had caught like a little stomach bug yesterday and ambiente i i we had a stomach ache and i do not get stomach aches all day yesterday so <hes> but i woke up feeling better this morning so that's good. I've had stomach pains to nothing major but that's weird yeah. I can't i take probiotics every day so that's probably what stopped me from getting even sicker because i heard there is a stomach bug going around. I've heard there's like a weird summer. <music> summer be careful. Wash your hands on. Almost flu like for companies like a twenty four hour thing yeah so so. How's your energy the hygiene daniel you know it depends. Are you talking about my sleep cycle race circadian rhythm. I talk about my gut microbiome like i mean it's it's a that's a wide aid questions so i would say i pay attention to it yeah well. It's about a lot of things it's about breathing. It's about getting energy from the sun. It is about sleep sleep. It's about <hes> taking an enough water. It's about avoiding sugar and yourself ounce. I probably avoid cell phones more than one phone down. No okay no. I just checking. I do have some technology. That's a pico technology. That's blocking. Some negative waves at my phone does give out so. I do have some technology that blocks. I'm one of those little lockers. It's it's on your phone. It's actually the same thing that robin very braun this one. This one was a prototype prototype. I don't even know if they're out on the inside. I don't even know how it's supposed to say what it was. Don't name of it but okay. Let me see awesome really when robin hood india math blocker well. It's it is not allowed to say. Give them a free shout. Will oh because it's not they're doing more research their new more patents on it. You're doing that was good. They're doing a lot of other research coach on before they can bring out and i haven't talked to him for about a year so that might be. I don't know well. I'm going to call them. What does it look like a little. They don't disclose what i'm google. Put your shoes like some inserts and some other cool stuff. It's it's a pretty cool company overall in it. It has some pretty good research behind it yeah but the band with one of them on their technology. It's actually so small that they can't even measure the technology. It's crazy you like this. Guy's a absolute genius. It's beyond my understanding to even be able to explain him yeah. It's it's supposedly a blocks. The m._p.'s and i don't say that you're not dead yet and you can read about anything and become super super smart. I it is true that is true and without going to university. Well yeah i don't. I don't know if he went to university. Yes from another country so i don't know how did this case in his country yeah well. There's a lot of really brilliant people that never went to college did steve jobs. I don't think ever went to no no. He dropped out. I dropped out but that's not to say the colleges and still get getting but depends upon what you're doing. I mean education on all levels is the most wonderful thing you could possibly do to feed your mind. Do not get an education and stop. That's the beginning scene. Yeah it's not. I always thought oh you go to college and that's it might know as i've gotten older like i no so much more now than i've been called. I'm reading like or listening to think around seventy books in the last year nine seven zero. What's your favorite one. So far how hard that's hard one or two <hes> dance i well one that i just read or listen to stands out because it's about how steve mcqueen lean became a christian towards the end of his life and it talks about his life and he's the ally still no he died in the eighties steve mcqueen he was the great escape bullet like yeah who you're talk- i know that he's an actor and he was all like an to like adventures. He was a professional motocross race leader like a man's man he martial arts. His son took martial arts from chuck norris who is friends with trump. He was the one who got chuck norris into movies. He was one who suggested wow he knew chuck in west before chuck. Norris was chuck norris interesting. Check check the shot. He lives in texas doesn't he used to his wife had a complication with the surgery. The anesthesia screwed up and now she is bedridden and again. I could be misquoting this but i think he he had organization where he was teaching. Inner city kids ed's martial arts and it was called kickstart and he had to pull away from all of that he still has people running but now it's one hundred percent. He's devoted wife. He's gotta be buyer doctors. You gotta be on call out. That was last. I heard he's i think he's pushing like eighty or something. He's not a spring chicken anymore. Surgery is not something you should easily just. It's something you should should enter into easily. We say oh. That's not a big surgery. Yeah yeah because you're not having anything could go wrong it. Can you know when you put the body under anesthesia and open it up for any reason so but he had a house like one of my one of the members that tell us live right next to the house here in town and then he has a rant somewhere outside of here that i'm sure he doesn't want anyone to know about so it somewhere in texas. He said that his wife was point. <hes> poison during an m._r._i. Scan oh there yeah and so she's like you. Gotta be under constant watch so i think he's just been hanging out with the family and he's still to relatively young kids. I'd like to know more about being poisoned by an m._r._i. Yeah uh-huh your body to see on the american. Wow my mom had one in colored thing in your body yeah. I've i've i've read some stuff about. It and i'm not pulling up right now but we're going to have to investigate tom. Com chuck norris can come and talk about there you go. It'd be awesome. I wanna come back in new orleans here. Okay well. We've got a fantastic show coming up everyone daniel tag a little later on in the show show is going to be talking about blood flow restriction. That's b. f. r. and then dr dan ingo is going to be talking again about a psychedelic assisted psychotherapy but specifically the the galaxy solve it so stay tuned. You're not gonna wanna miss it. You're listening to one life radio. One life radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like sun warrior plant based is protein use the code. Oh l. for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in texas paleo magazine wellbeing journal and the international national society of sports nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our website for twenty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio. It's so great to have everyone here today. It really is <hes>. I i love doing this show and especially with daniel tag. He's been on it for a very long time. Daniel tag is an orthopedic specialist trainer at tells fitness center he is certified in ortho kinetics wchs bio mechanics of resistance training and muscle activation techniques and i guess he is specialized in b. f. r. two that's blood flow restriction. Daniel daniel is a licensed massage therapist and holds belts in three different martial arts systems and he was a wildland firefighter today as i said we're talking about blood flow restriction so so daniel for people that are just now joining us that maybe didn't hear the intro or know nothing about this. What is blood flow restriction so essentially what you're trying to do is it's like say you work in the bicep. You wanna get venial or art. Arterial flow insulated the the heart blood pumps into the muscle of the blood in the muscle so if you can stop the venial return back into the arteries in or back into the heart then the blood kind of get that big pomp that everyone always tried to get while they're in the gym net is directly correlated with what's called cell swelling which does help promote protein synthesis and helps promote bigger muscles <hes> so if you track the blood in there you get a bigger pump trump as you do that by actually putting attorney kit on at the attach point so is high up on your armpit as possible and doing high reps at lightweight controlled old and the pump is insane and you can get a full arm workout in ten minutes. It seems unhealthy to me. That's my first seem very during natural trusting the blood. There's just not natural. It's not natural but it's perfectly guys do this to other parts of their body just by the way i'm i'm just saying pressure machines they do it looks a little funky but it's the same essential thing just a little bit longer like so no i was actually because when people say this healthier you're going to hurt your arm or whatever like that so i was just at a training conference for <hes> protecting people essentially and protecting yourself a few months wants back with a whole bunch of military guys former military that yeah and one was empty in the military and had put on people in real life scenarios where they've been they were bleeding out and stuff and we found in iraq that you can leave a tourniquet on for like a day and that arm that limb is perfectly fine. You're not going to arms not going to drop off and that's attorney. That's that's like put on like one hundred percent <hes>. We're talking like seventy percent so there's tons of blood still getting through both ways. It's just that it's going to impede the blood leaving the area so you get more benefit the blood pooling around they're going into the mossel which makes muscle stronger and better and better endurance and a increases muscle mass while putting way less stress on the joints so it's actually very healthy for you. It is not very enjoyable but it is it is healthy and i've not read any side effects effects from it. There might be out there. I've not seen i have personally not that man would even listen because muscles are so important to most guys. Would they even listen. I mean if they're smart they would. It's a lot more efficient and it saves your joint select. These people that are there. I know this bodybuilder that has like a had back surgery because he's lifting so heavy trying to get big lower body and this hasn't been polcy. This is another one and he i mean he had back surgery like slipped disk all stuff. He's he's got to live here to get big and that's true but like like. Would you rather do that or maybe hey. Let's do some blood flow restriction us like thirty percent of your one rep max so maybe over less than half of what you normally use and save your joints and save your back. You'll have back surgery and get the same case eight. Not better you save your joints okay so that's supposed to be one of the benefits is to decrease where on the join because you're having less wear and tear because you're not putting as much load on like when you're putting three four hundred five hundred pounds on a back squat. That's a lot of compression on your desk. There's a lot of you no issues at your hips. Your knees a lot of weight on them. It's just like if you're walking around with one hundred pounds overweight. Your joints will deteriorate quicker because wears through a lot so if you're lifting with lighter weight you're automatically going to do less wear and tear on the joints and you're lifting less like you're in and out of there at ten minutes versus. If you knew in a heavy leg workout you might be in there for an hour and a half two hours ten minutes well so lower body her attention so i can do i can do biceps and triceps and ten minutes or less the legs yet yesterday or two days ago i think took me twenty five minutes and my lower body is like in a good way ravi going to the gym right after this just think appealing a little too crazy about all this muscle stuff well muscle is directly related to a better bone density longevity health so having more muscle mass to to a certain degree is correlated with health and you're going to burn more calories. It's just within moderation. Everything's within moderation but like i i've i put on. I'm one ninety three right now leaner than i've been in a while and i feel besides being tired today. That's kinda aside off. I feel a lot better yeah. You look natural. You look at you. Look your arms. Look big but normal big not like steroid big so you know what do you say. Ah you know that's a huge. That's huge in this world of muscle and fitness if you will all the steroid use it's so gross like i just i this morning. I was buying tickets to a to a film. That's coming here to dallas on september <hes> six things i see <hes> sixteenth. I can't think of the name of it right now. I have to get out my phone and look but anyway they we're showing some some pictures of guys that are all plant base that have these just you know incredible amounts a muscle and they showed some of old video of arnold schwarzenegger and i was like ooh gosh how would you it's just so gross to me the way he he was just like this monster almost like even hug a guy like that that was the classic were look. He thinks guys gross today whereas he looked a lot more natural if you would he get hit nothing natural about v-shape two guys just like blocks yeah and i mean guys are like outweighing him by fifty pounds of muscle nowadays. I just think it's so crazy yeah yeah i do. That's why i'm that's why i'm up for like these blood flow restrictions because there's things called stretches that i've talked about before on here and there's ways to hack the body if you will all in gain good muscle mass without having to get on royds and do all these other things like. I've gained this weight because i've been eating for. I've been making sure i get enough rest. I've been using the blood flow restriction fiction very dedicated but all natural okay. So where do you buy like these these tourniquet to do this at home and that's would you recommend doing this at home. Yeah so that's one we'd been instruction yeah. It's perfectly fine so it's it's a lot safer than normal waste because again. You're not doing much weight yeah so you can get you can get the elastic bands. They're really cheap. Turn it gets you don't want the ones that are like legit turning the plastic bands or elastic bare way way up here on my shoulder. If i want to get my whole arm working bicep tricep you want up as close to your armpits possible tighten it to where you feel like the bloods getting trapped in your arm turns like a little it'll reddish after contracting several times and in my turn maybe don't get it purple okay so for me like fifteen or twenty pounds. Get my arm up by so the us like i start out with fifteen i mean with you. I would say ten. I'm usually by the last set downtown seven and a half a show control on the way down but it's more about the positive rip because that's what's going to pump the blood into the cell so it's more about the contraction coming up or the positive rep but still controlled all the way down so you're going. You should do that even when you're lifting weights. That's one of the top secret sister go slow. I was doing some squats last night and actually it was was the night before because i didn't feel well enough last night <hes> but <hes> and i reminded myself i could hear tina in my head going slowdown bernadette slowdowns on the negative around just had a quick question like what does it feel like when you take it off. Is there like a blood rush a little bit but it feels good everything about the every guy that wants to pump. This is like alternate pump. I mean you just feel you feel. Look jack story sorry. I'm trying yeah. Okay all right well back all right. We're all gonna we're gonna we flicked not reflect to restrict restrict our blood flow and then we'll report back in a couple of weeks. Everyone <hes> we'll be right back. We've got dr dangled coming up the legalities of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy. You're listening to one life. Radio live one life. Radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like sun warrior plant based protein use the code. Oh l. are for twenty percent off crazy water the only mineral water bottled old in texas paleo magazine wellbeing journal and the international society of sports nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our website right for twenty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio. Welcome the back to one line radio. Everyone diamond gray again making me smile with the music and that's always a good thing. I just absolutely love how good diamond is is on the music like she gets it but <hes> you do diamond. You really do just such an excellent job so everyone welcome back to one life radio. This is bernadette with diamond gray vienna betty antos. I've got lexi brinkley in studio today. Daniel tag and our very special guest is back again dr dan ingo <hes> he he is a medical doctor and is the author of the concussion repair manual a practical guide to recovering from a traumatic brain injuries. His clinical practice combines functional medicine integrative give psychiatry neuro cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He is <hes> he is. The medical director of the revived at treatment centers of america and he also serves serves as a medical advisor to on it labs and the true rest float centers. His website is dr. Dan ingalls dot com. That's dr dan ingle dot com spelled the n. g. l. a. such a pleasure to have you back how you doing today dr ingle. I'm great bernadette with you again yeah yeah i'm full energy this morning. I was a little sick yesterday but i'm one hundred percent. I think today so so great to have yeah so great to have you back with us today. We're talking specifically about the legalities of psychedelic assisted listed psychotherapy so let's dig into this. I don't want to lose any time because this is such a fascinating conversation and so i read in the rolling stone magazine in that solicitation along with amd e._m._a. Could potentially be legal for therapy use by twenty twenty one. Can we talk about this absolutely yeah. They're they're both right now. In what's called phase three trials which is the last trial before pharmaceuticals or medicines are becoming or allowed to become therapeutically equally legalized so they've gone to phase one and phase two trials already. They've both been green lighted f._d._a. As breakthrough treatment i don't even for depression india may for p._t._s._d. So they're actually being allowed to get that up through the process lau <hes> well do you do you think that they will. <hes> psychedelics will ever be legalized for like prescription. <hes> you know it's interesting question. How much is going to be available. Salable and the pharmaceutical arena for medical patents <hes> both of the suicide bombings a completely natural medicine and you can't actually patent completely lina natural medicines and india may has been available for forty years so it's already gone out of patten as far as its legalization for being available as an inavailable prescription or usage in a clinical setting yeah. I completely expect both of them to become legalized. Hopefully in the next year are ideally assume sooner rather than later because people need you therapies yeah well. There's a lot of guys out there. That are all over this. I i was just scouring our internet yesterday looking just for stuff and scientific american. I have the app on my phone and it was so coincidental so i'm scrolling through and i see this article <hes> and it says is the psychedelics evangelist german financier wants to turn magic mushrooms into modern medicine one company. The entrepreneur invest in wants to develop silla sivan in a lab so there's no need to extract it from mushrooms. Do you know anything about that. Yeah there are some companies particularly in europe who are looking to extract the main active alkaloid or <hes> psychoactive property and ingredient in the mushroom itself and if you do you an extraction method and you're only working with the primary principle active compound yes you can patent that and make that a pharmaceutical and actually that's how a lot of schools from the studios are made. We're we identified something in nature that works really well for example. That's how aspirin was patented from white willow bark right find active ingredient synthesized just cry mary affective compound and use that clinically the downside is you're not using the whole plant uh-huh and when you use the whole plan you have a lot of other alkaloids that suffers the primary and allow it to work even better without side effects <hes> well. You know there's a lot the controversy around <hes> around aspirin. I don't know if you wanna talk about it for a second or i don't know a lot about it. All i know is i've read <hes> many many times that it really. It's not good for you and that bear <hes> you know. Pharmaceuticals is has made like billions of dollars but it's not really good for you. Yeah i don't know so much about the long term data on aspirin usage and it's a good point that you're bringing up which most of the medicine are pharmaceutical and medications nations that we use a nature we use as needed and so if you have an injury and you have pain and part of the rehabilitation process is decrease recent amount of pain so that you can function in life and you can work through therapeutic practices and and <hes> like the procedural <hes> rehabilitative exercises then were using it well. We're using pharmaceuticals to mask symptoms over a long period of time then that typically it creates more imbalanced them well enough to use them just episodically yeah well and i'm thinking of so many plants cannabis <hes> crate him a case in point white willow bark and all these different things that our planet are out there in nature that pharmaceutical companies have basically taken control of and turned it into over the counter drugs when actually using the the you know the natural plant south is so much more beneficial <hes> yeah the votes of those are great examples samples because there are so many content constituents in cannabis that allow it to be neuro protective newer rehabilitative the u._s. government has actually had to medical patents on cannabis for close to thirty years. You can find that data and not even while the federal government is held it in the schedule one means. It's no no medical benefit in highly addictive and most of the medicines that were speaking about it was in may a host of others. Don't deserve to be scheduled one because they don't actually meet that criteria yeah. It's actually pretty crazy. You know that we've got. I was thinking about it last night. We've got got people in prison for having joint <hes> an and yet we and and yet you know it's legal and this is very timely to go in and by an a._k._47. And in all the magazines that you want and yet you can't buy joint <hes>. I you know right. It seems a little crazy this very hypocritical and and i really we're showing more and more of the efficacy and data for these medicines so that we spread the message. It's grassroots. Movement people are recognizing raising that the escalation psychiatric epidemics that doesn't have a trajectory of healing and medicines have the opportunity to open up different states dates of consciousness that get to the core issue the you start to heal that core trauma and you could actually be resolved in quote unquote cured versus just trying to mask <hes> mhm. Will you know i wanna talk with you about treatment resistant depression. I think we're gonna take a break here because we have to take one before the end of the show. This is a good point so <hes> <hes> we're gonna take a break. Everyone we'll be back with dr don angle. We're gonna be talking about three minutes resistant depression so stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one life radio. One life radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like sun warrior plant based protein used the code. Oh l. are for twenty percent off crazy water the only mineral water her bottled in texas paleo magazine wellbeing journal and the international society of sports nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our our website for twenty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio. Well on sound welcome back to one life radio everyone. This is bernadette with diamond gray lexi brinkley obviously obviously a new one body any talent silly today. I have to tell you john i. I know i'm not gonna tell you anyway. Never mind on the line with dr dan ingle of you're just now joining us. He is a medical doctor and he is the author of the concussion repair manual a practical guide to recovering being from traumatic brain injuries. His clinical practice combines functional medicine integrative psychiatry neural cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He is the medical director director of the revived treatment centers of america and the also serves as a medical advisor to on it labs and true rest flotation centers and i'm going to give a shoutout to on it because as i love their products and i've used them for years so <hes> dr dan ingalls website is dr. Dan ingle dot com. That's e. n. G. l. e. today. We're talking about the legalities of psychedelic assisted psychotherapy <hes> before we went to break we decided we were going to talk about <hes> treatment resistant depression and how many people have this and yet they are are still taking prescription drugs. What do you want to know about this. Dr ingle well. It's becoming more and more of an epidemic with increasing numbers numbers every day and even in the <hes> advent of psychopharmacology. We're still finding more and more people with this chronic depression condition mission. The world health organization is identified it as been number one disability worldwide wow wow and then of course you have all the suicides rides which seemed to just be so rampant and it's it's it's crossed. All you know it all generations to you've got you know so many older americans committing suicide and so many young americans committing suicide and so what do you feel based on all your experience and scientific research and your medical degree. What do you think is at the root of it it. I think there's a couple of things one is that the technology has outpaced the evolution of our nervous system. Uh we are consistently bombarded with more and more information were consistently trying to keep up with the speed of technology our attention span shortening gene consistently so that we actually need these really small bite sized chunks of really intense information even pay attention. Now and more and more of our younger generation are being developed neuro developmentally in this kind of arena in environment. We've never seen this before. Uh-huh prior to fifty sixty years ago we were mostly living at the piece of nature right and then with accelerated technology is becoming more intense. That's number one and then number two do is even though we're more and more available <hes> to connection virtually like we can email somebody and get an immediate response halfway across the world ruled instantaneously. We have less than less get into skin. I human human touch and connection yeah even in the midst of <music> all of this technology and all of abundance were feeling even more disconnected from each other from ourselves and from the planet itself when people feel disconnected you have dislike this emptiness at the level of this deep psyche and soul. You know you're making me think of an article. I don't even know where i read it. It was years ago but it really hit home with me and i've never forgotten it case in point when you were just speaking i it came to me it was it was a story about men in ireland orland <hes> older man that had <hes> you know become very used to the tradition of going to the local pub to have a beer with their friends at night you know and as the pubs started started closing down in some of these smaller areas these these these older gentleman found themselves <hes> committing suicide. Oh yeah i remember that yeah <hes> uh-huh and it's like wow so that connection that camaraderie all of it is so important to to mental wellbeing and emotional wellbeing right one hundred percent. We're we're very social. Creatures and we rely on each other for that degree of <hes> connection the the degree <hes> associated love mir neurons the degree of <hes> sociability that really engenders a sense of camaraderie and fellowship as opposed who suffering and isolation yeah so we have to really address this up that level of connectivity well and i you know i think i've never been to relent. I wanted to go. I haven't gone yet but i'm not dead yet so i probably will go back to my roots but it's also the act you know and in growing growing up italian doctor you know there was many many times that we gathered around our table with cousins first cousins aunts uncles and partook in just you know family time and that included you uh-huh camaraderie playing with my cousins. I didn't drink back then but i remember just you know my parents sitting around having a little sip of wine or a little sipa whiskey or beer which lightens the mood and puts the brain into a more relaxed state and so i feel that you know that alcohol and the right level aval very small amounts can be very beneficial to fight depression as well as long as you're not drinking alone. Would you agree absolutely every medicine has its place and every medicine has its sweet spot if you don't use enough. There's no effect if you use too much. It's poison. Yeah and alcohol is one of those social lubricants. It's it's been used for eon in generations unfortunately when we use it to excess it becomes neuro toxic <hes> had patio toxic could just gauging to the liver and it creates addictive cycles which a lot of people do turn to alcohol when there's so much deep emotional suffering they don't know how to address and pharmaceuticals aren't working and maybe not i i did to find the core levels of trauma will use with available label in order to experience well the reason there's so much alcohol <hes> you know <hes> abuse is because we don't have availability to drugs like cannabis and a lot of these things that are truly so wonderful. I have to tell you so. I was saying earlier. I'm not going to tell you but i'm gonna tell you so <hes> you know yesterday. I wasn't feeling well until this morning when i got got up and <hes> and i also had sent some crate him to dr elvin dannenberg who is in stage four cancer fighting it right now long story short this morning. I thought you know <music> with because i was having a little knee pain. I took one for pain and it was it was. I don't remember what particular strain of craig but it was it was for pain and to feel good and it made me. That's one of the reasons. I'm such a good mood. I'm telling you like whatever is in that has made me very happy today. It's a great recognition of being able to use a natural medicine in in a way that is healthy relationship with it we use is it only when we need it and we don't become dependent. I only took one and recommended. You could take up to three based on. I only took one and i and i it's remarkable double actually yeah yeah. That's a fascinating medicine that we just really starting to study more and more because it's it's a great <hes> step down treatment even for people who are trying to come off <hes> chronic prescribed opioids uh-huh similar profile helping to relieve pain an opioid epidemic or one of a massive at the dimick's. It's creating havoc and high degrees of accidental overdose. Yeah hide freeze addiction throughout our country well yeah and so you don't have a choice if you don't like you know the reason the the first time i start started using crate him was back. <hes> you know just actually i'd heard about it before. We've done shows on it in the past couple of years <hes> but <hes> couple of weeks ago i threw out my back going underneath my daughter's bed to reach for something and tried to get up and i was like oh my gosh i could barely early do the show i could barely walk out of the building. It was a rough day. It was a rough day and avi went with me to the c._b._d. Creidim store that is here in dallas <hes> and anyway so i took that one on the happy one with the with for pain took three of them that day and the pain was literally gone in thirty minutes and i thought to myself. Why is this not available to all americans. Why why do not all americans know about this this alternative health secret if you will that truly truly works to fight pain <hes> that's a good question it it comes back to follow the money and the reason cannabis is now becoming more widely available <hes> medically and recreationally. There's a huge money in it and so more and more states are going to legalization process including texas. It's not now yet available available either medically recreationally but could become so soon and it's because there's a massive financial opportunities so unfortunately as as with most things in the political arena you have to be able to follow the money and a crowd him hasn't really had a whole lot of money associated with it because it's a natural supplement lament medicine and until you extract the primary alkaloid you can't patent it will yeah and the pharmaceutical industry has so much political lobby beat and they tend to work with those that can be patented and therefore market yeah well and and case in point i mean it works works really well and yet so many people don't know about it and it works well for anxiety to i told someone to go there a couple of weeks ago that suffers from crippling anxiety and he went back because is it really did help him. So you know so many things out there that we all need to know about and i just hope that <hes> minds will be opened by this conversation and <hes> and there'll you'll be some change some positive change yeah. There's there's massive change happening right now. Denver just past the decriminalization measure for cilla sivan and oakland a week later has to decriminalization measured for all natural medicine now nicer by walk okay odi. This is just in the last two months yeah. It's it's coming up on a matter if it's just a matter of win and how well it's always great to have you on the show it is and <hes> i know we're going to we're going to hear the music here in just a second but what a great conversation with you today and thank you for putting up with my silliness <hes> but you always laugh at my jokes dr ingle. I like that awesome yeah. No it's always great and you know. I wanna let everyone know that you can go to our website. One life radio dot com to download and listen to our podcast or subscribe to the newsletter or go to iheartmedia nia dot com to listen live or download the free iheartradio app and listen to us from anywhere in the world a big shout out to our sponsors great companies like sun warrior crazy water water paleo magazine the wellbeing journal thorn research the international society of sports nutrition and our most recent sponsor enviro medica you you can go to environmental dot com. They have amazing products. I'm holding tariff flora in my hand right now and i think that's one of the reasons. I didn't get any sicker than i did yesterday so check it out. Go to environmental dot com. Everyone thank you so much for listening. You get one body. You get one mind and you get one life. Get out there today and make the most of that ah.

texas bloods chuck norris Daniel daniel lexi brinkley dr dan ingle bernadette dallas texas paleo magazine cannabis wellbeing journal dr. Dan ingle dr dan ingalls tina burnett michigan dr dan ingo accuweather steve mcqueen medical director
Truths and Myths on Psychedelics & Plyometrics #1041

One Life Radio Podcast

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Truths and Myths on Psychedelics & Plyometrics #1041

"The content of the following program is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice diagnosis treatment or cure always consult your physician or health professional with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition <music> aw baby you WanNa go higher baby in the right place your listening to one live radio. This is Bernadette with Diamond Congra- Adriana Betty Antos and Daniel Tag. You're back back your back in in gray but we have black pants are black shorts black shorts on yeah. Yeah I like that new logo the tell US logo this <hes> we're Daniel Trains people and works them out and does all of his ortho kinetics in bio mechanics and and muscle activation techniques you look at you can shoot and he also can kill you if you if you cross because he's he's he's. He's a belted in three different martial art systems so any knows how to kill a fire too I do I I do know how to kill a fire. I've never thought of is killing the fire that makes it sound a lot cooler. Yeah kill that fire. He'll the fire right. What did you say it's not learning how to kill? It's learning how to not be killed as far as self defense yes yeah. It's learning how to defend yourself not how to hurt others. I'm against hurting well. I'm hoping that you can I am to a himself. Knowing voice heard anyone. If you can help I mean we all make mistakes and we're human. Just you know I was going to say to some degree. Actually that's a dump state. We we are the human species uh-huh but it's great to have you back to be banned. It always is great to have Daniel in studio. We're going to be putting out a video here in a little bit and we're talking about Playa metrics because you know I think I know what this is but I'm not sure so have no clue. It's explosive close of movements U._C._L._A.. People jumping on boxes metrics used to do a lot of that with Tina when I was in really good shape man the great workout cardiovascular great for muscles but it's a higher risk so we'll talk about how to mitigate some of the risk and then when into do it. I haven't worked out yet today because I was up so late last night <hes> <hes> I'm GonNa work out. When I get home but <hes> I could? I do ply Oh metrics on my steps jumping up on steps out. Also you some different ways how do boom versus just doing with two legs dealing with Lake like when do we push a two legs in everyday life not not very often. I you gotta get your legs really strong though to do that. I would think like Jack up your knee or exactly like you need to have some basic general strengthen endurance and you need to have indecent stability and mobility before you apply mattress. You're kind of like the upper echelon of you got the basics down he got good platform strength and endurance and all that and then you go to the next level is ply metrics. It's not something that uncondition person when you you gotTa have good balance you have to have strong core muscles. At least I did when I used to do them a lot. I'm pretty strong now. But of course I'm not as strong as I was when I was training with Tina but Tina's actually moving back. She says she's going to start. Excuse me training me again so awesome. I hope to be <hes> <hes> in really really good shape in two months I so we'll see that's about how long I think it'll take for me to be able to kick some. You know what right there's more motivating in the summer though sons out as nicer but I'm looking in the fall. I'm already buying follows aim I am. I've already got a couple of little outfits stored like like a squirrel storing nuts. You know seriously I wear flannel shirt yesterday over my over my daisy dukes and my t-shirt okay thinking that far ahead ahead. I'm enjoying the moment yeah I know what that is so I I love summer but I love football so much. I start to get antsy. I you know and preseason starts in August. I just love football and and it's it's. It's too long of a break that it reminds me my friend. I I enjoy football that I it's not my thing anymore yeah but you know I say it's too long break but it's really not because we don't want them. Training start summer trainings yeah yeah. I think they're training right now. Yeah summer trainings already started but you know it's it's kind of fun funded only have what is it thirteen games twelve thirteen games. Something Sixteen thinks you know what you might be right. You're probably right. We're going to go with you Daniel because you're Dan the man I've got you now <hes> but anyway <hes> it just doesn't seem like it's enough games <hes> so maybe that's why my memory is is <hes> or my brain is like putting your coming to x._F._l.. Next year after the in the season Yeah Vince is trying to put together a really upright organization where he's not GonNa let dirtbags in it and he's not GonNa make it as as it was last time we only I have a client that's Kinda working on some different things on it with him and it actually sounds like it could be Kinda cool for an off season football steve something entertain. It's not going to be the N._F._l.. Yeah but it looks like it's GonNa be a lot better than what was. It was a joke before yeah well. Oh football's fund. It's it's just it's a it's a great sport and for me. I don't know I just find watching an hour football watching well. It's actually three hours one game and our the actual game is a lot like life sometimes struggle team virtual ooh yeah yeah but also strength <hes> it's it is a very when I played I really enjoyed it. Yeah and you win. Some and you lose some times you learn more by losing absolutely and I love it. I I really good to have you back in studio. <hes> I want to let you know that I will be. I WanNa ever went out there. Listening know that <hes> listening that I will be in mesquite tonight at the North Texas Vascular Center at Thirty to twenty Gus Thomas and road <hes> at <hes> the <hes> as I said the North Texas Vascular Center Center Dr Risks Bukhari is going to be there speaking and I'm going to join them and I'm actually giving away to fifty dollar gift certificates. I'm giving away nice and those were those those two sweet ladies that were they will be there tonight tonight's. Their products tastes great from the couple that I've had they're really good well and I they're. They're my personal ones that I have that. I have <hes> bought in order to give away so because I think it's so important to eat more plant-based will now. Aren't things still tastes good. I'll talk about that like in the last two months. I've had one slice of peace and that was the only thing I've had remotely bad for me in the last two months pizza but once you find stuff that you enjoy tastes good. There's no need to eat a whole bunch of junk. Food like good. Food doesn't have to taste bad now. It doesn't impact once you get once you start eating healthy. You don't even want that other food like <hes> I had pizza over the weekend too and it was really salty. I could hardly eat it in a way too much salt in that unless you make the dough uh-huh yourself you're really good flour <hes> organic flower flower <hes> you know alternative alternative but like ancient grains like <hes> Oh my goodness Italian flowers Italian flour yeah. It's always the best right we really is yeah. I don't know the ancient grain that you're talking about. Their several of them like what is it. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. There's there's a whole bunch of them. Yeah they have all wacky names yeah Wackadoo oodles <hes> but we have <hes> speaking of Wackadoo oodles <hes> we are talking about less st today with Dr Dan Ingle he is aboard sir. He's board-certified in psychiatry neurology. We're going to be talking about the truth and the myths of psychedelics so <hes> specifically. I think we're GONNA talking talking more a little bit about l._S._d.. <hes> some of these questions are super funny that I want to ask them like myth number. One is dropping acid. Will it make you a better person. I'd almost immediately gonNA talk about shrooms at all have a question that I always we're going to be talking about psychedelics general but yes absolutely I had a clause classmate that his roommate stabbed into death <hes> many times and they were doing shrooms but I was but I always assume they were doing shrooms and and other things because I always thought you were kind of chill on shrooms so I wanted to ask him like. Is it yeah because they were doing that. It was in their system they they had their but it was just went crazy. This guy was just psychotic and went crazy. Guy Happen Debbie on mushrooms. I don't know maybe the guy killed or yeah. It was it was like sixty seven lethal tabs will great e seven crazy and the guy was my right. He sat right next to me in class and he was something nice the freaking me out. I'm like Oh my God. You're killing me over here. Let's let's talk about the new truck that you got the new new G._B.. Let's talk about that and the little buck the baby buck that that no one shot no that was in your mother learn father's like I'm front yard eating crab apple across the street our our neighbors front yard. I come out and right before I left to come back here. From Colorado I was going to get my motorcycle ready and open up the garage door and across the street at the crab retrievers this little little the buck the velvet in Colorado and the crab names like in the velvet. It's a bucks with a male I know about means so the velvet is when their antlers are growing back and they had this like velvety like it's like it's almost like hair. <hes> it's kind of hard. It's just it's called Velvet. It's not it doesn't look as hard as it does win. It's fully developed with Sandler's you. How often do they do? They lose their antlers once a year for dog choose and stuff don't they they do some sort of like a deer antler powder that that man claim makes bigger and stuff like they aren't strong. Does it's like antler powder fact tried it didn't do you believe that it does it could could have the placebo effect on your mind but <hes> yeah I got an old new jeep so it's a nineteen ninety two willie jeep with the foreign lift kitten thirty three inch tires a whole bunch of work that needs to be done on which is half the fun yeah that is have to fund. I got a street six engine on it was room can actually put your hands in there and work around offer. It is a fixer upper guys in their cars so much fun. I'm having my brother-in-law who's a mechanic great guy to have his brother-in-law. He's working on the front axle right now because it's not quite stable enough off to drive on the open road yet your parents Garin mayor listening today I. I don't know if they're listening. They should be heading back. No they're back home they should they're. They're probably listening now or they'll listen to the next road trip. They kinda catch up a lot of times on road trips if they can't catch it during <music> our well you know what you can always let them know that they can go to our website. One left radio DOT COM to download and listen to our podcast anytime they want so they do always good stuff and you're not gonna WanNa Miss Daniel tag today and you're not going to Miss WanNa Miss Dr. Dan ingle truths and miss on psychedelics that includes M._d.. M._a. l._S._D. or solicitation we'll ask that question. I'm really serious. He's milking expert. Absolutely we'll stay tuned everyone. We've got a great show coming up. You're listening to one life radio. One Life Radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great eight companies like son Warrior plant based protein use the code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas honest temp happy healthy honest C._B._D.. Use The code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off nature's played plant based meals to go Paleo magazine Wellbeing Journal and the International Society of Sports Nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our website for twenty percent off and free shipping thank you for you're listening to one life radio. Welcome back to one life radio everyone this this is Bernadette with Diamond Gray Viana Barrientos and Daniel Tag. Daniel tag is an orthopedic Specialist Trainer at Tells Fitness Center he is certified in Ortho kinetics bio mechanics of resistance training and muscle activation techniques. <hes> Daniel is a license massage therapist and host belts in three different martial arts systems and he was wildland firefighter. I'm being very particular being because they got my tongue twisted before are we went live trying to say truth and myths hard over together so everybody out there listening. Try to say that you know of course we can't hear you but I miss and myth on psychedelics okay so it's very difficult to say truth and myths together right and five times and do it quickly anyway. They couldn't even do it they couldn't do it and I'm like well. How do you expect me to do that professional? Well no I I am a professional and all that's for sure but that's a that's a difficult tongue twister Daniel Daniel tag and speaking of twisting you know and exercising and getting out there and moving your body today we're talking about one and how to do Playa metrics okay so our our metrics good for everyone to do before we begin there for people that are just now joining us. It may be didn't hear the explanation at the beginning of the show what are Pyo metrics explosive movements most the time is jumping. You know either like a frog jumps Omega jump jumping up and then back down those are us. It's explosive movements or biometrics yeah. Are we going to live during the broadcast and show yeah. Where are we doing? Instagram Line instagram instagram live one life Dan Y'all you're going to be Asuka. Law Our use your lips when you can't close your mouth cats and the facial <music> is the ice show it all all try when I'm not on National Radio Gosh okay well okay okay so they are explosive movement good for working explosive fast twitch muscles close which can be very good for sports and everything else but they're not necessarily if the average Joe just wants to give fit. It's a higher risk thing are exploding need to be in better shape like we talked about one. Is it like you know we were talking about the N._F._l.. I get so excited about football. I can see a football football player right now going back and forth with the legs in the tires. Is that biometrics that isn't necessarily apply metric. You know what I'm talking about. I do know exactly what you're talking about it. That's that's a quick footwork. Thrill yes what you're thinking about the though it is but it's more about quickness versus explosion and they do that more th- ladder nowadays versus the tires <hes> but it's not so much the explosion explosion would be more like you know the lineman coming off the PAT coming off the line and exploding and hitting that dummy the tackle tackle dummies. That'd be a little bit more close to apply metrics nice but it's it's a it's a higher risk thing so you WanNa know you WanNa have your basic strength. You WanNa have basic endurance. You WanNa have basic stability and mobility which balanced goes in with all that okay you want to have those foundations dacians down before you start to add ply metrics in if you're going to do an explosive sport activity. This is very good to do but you also don't WanNa do every single day you want it like one or two times a week for like three to six weeks and then cycle it out and then cycle back yeah I used to have to do these explosive jumps with Tina. It was <hes> I'm GonNa say that the it was I remember it well. It was like a red metal <hes> stool <hes> about <hes> maybe eighteen inches square and the top with a black rubber matt and I would like jump up with both feet onto it up and down up and down back and forth back and forth and I have to tell you you can't do a lot of those without your legs just being on fire in your lungs to it's a great cardiovascular thing you will get your heart rate up really quick and that's the most basic thing that you hear about box jumps near probably doing them both legs which is great but if you're looking for if you're going to be doing a sport anyone explosion for sport. You're never pushing off a both legs at the same aim time. If you want to go to work out that's awesome but if you want relate it more towards sports football or something you want to actually explode off of one league and then instead of jumping back yeah let's go. I don't know how we're going to coordinate this because you're going to hold the camera Avi. You're going to be off the Mike. I'M GONNA be only he went on to Mike. I'm going to have to tell him and you're going to have to help me by a big part of this. Though is you jump up onto the object in you. Step down because it when you jump back down. That's a high impact on your knees. Your hips your ankles so if you want to lessen the stress on your joints exploded onto something yeah and then stepped down. I'll show you how to do with one way this real quick. Let's see what we're doing here yeah and you can. I guess you go into that. Mike there you go all right so we're going to be this. We're going instagram live lower okay he kind of a good launch this would when you're taking a step against floating take straddle boom and you come up you lance lovely and then you step back out. You're getting the explosion of well but then there's bear little impact and you step back down versus you this boom boom this but that when you that's what I used to do the boom yeah I bet workout but this is a little bit more functional for pushing off you would do if you're gonNA come right here and you're pushing off to start to run why they motion that makes sense hard school boom. Step down quick the same way yeah diamond can't see you. Can you see it diamond. She can just see jumping up in the air. Yeah so you WANNA hire right. Come up wow. You're like a little a ballerina over there. Did you see that last jump everyone that was really good. Are you. A dancer definitely not definitely not well. Why do you say it like that? You know that dancing is very taps into your creative mind and soul soul and spirit I do and my creative mind is lacking not my strength well so you said there's some risk of chips to certain joints and stuff like that apply metrics and so what's the best way to lower that risk so if you're just starting exactly what I told you is step down instead of jumping down from whatever you're jumping up onto so if you're doing like just jumps out in the out in the yard or some some people just jump up in land on the ground so again there's a good explosive movement but then claiming back on the ground. It's hard it's high impact on your knees got to decelerate that you're GonNa Land Weird and he knows I'm out of breath. Just say that well yeah got your heart rate going. Is this very similar to like. I know Burke's. I remember guy massacre saying that typically even a person in in really good shape cannot do more than fifteen burps if they're doing them correctly yeah it. Just you agree with that. Yes it just takes a lot of a lot of energy which is good but the biggest thing is jump up on some whether you're doing it with one leg or two legs. If you just WanNa go to work out you can a jump up to this perfectly fine. I just think it relates more sports if you do it off one well you know what's funny is so many people think oh they gotta go to a gym. They gotta do all these things you can find so many places to exercise right in your home. Oh Yeah your home like we said for you. Just doing those you can jumping onto the step step down stairs. That's where I do my pushups yeah so you can do all this stuff at home like last week. When I was in Colorado the week before whatever it was I I would take my bicycle ride through my town and then I would go to local jungle gyms new poll up sit-ups do sprints Sousse imply metrics? I'd find something to jump up onto then step back. You can be as create if you want but the main thing is jump up on something and step down and do it one leg at a time and then mix it up with maybe two legs at a time but don't jump back down. That's going to increase the risk now. There's a certain time we we're trying to get what's called a mile static stress reflects. We hit the ground explode right back up. That's good to get that reaction of of using that kinetic energy and exploding backup but you need to do that. You have to have perfect control to do it and you WanNa do very few reps because you don't Wanna fatigue yourself in had the form go and then put more stress on your knees ankles well. What are some good exercises that you can do with them like so again I mean it's it's really pretty simple? It's how long did you warm up. I'm looking at the cover of an an old Time magazine that I have in here and it's the exercise cure the surprising science of lice of life changing workouts and they have a guy jumping rope on the front. Jumping rope is an excellent exercise. Isn't it for warm up it is it's a very good exercise and I'll say warm for at least ten to fifteen minutes. You know do some high knees. Do some just regular body weight squats. Do some post your lunges back. League is straighten out putting weight on that back leg. You know jog around for a couple minutes if you're outside if you're inside you know do a couple minutes on the bike but warm up with the kind of movements that you're going to do if you're going to do a squat jump where you're jumping up Warren for some squats. If you're going to do well one leg jump up then do it with do some lunges to warm up and the just you can create things where you're you can jump laterally into it. You can jump door you you start out lower and then you build up to hire jumped as you get more more warm day. I've got a great question. <hes> what's the difference between high intensity <hes> training and play oh metrics so high intensity is or apply metrics are high intensity so it's how harder muscle is working with amount of load put on it so when you're exploding up that's putting a lot of load immediately in those muscles I and that is high. Intensity high-intensity does not necessarily mean you're getting out of breath like if you're doing a one rep Max <hes> that is high intensity your muscles have to recruit every little fiber to do that. You might not be huffing and puffing after that one but it is high intensity for the muscle fibers what about uh sprinting on a spin bike or on a cycle so that again would be a high intensity thing depending on if you do more resistance it's more to do with the resistance as the true definition of high intensity we think of it is something that you're going to be just gassed gas after <hes>. That isn't the truce definition but you want you would want the resistance be relatively high right and then you would be gassed as well but it's not synonymous. When I do my spend bike I warm up for two minutes then I I'm up out of the saddle for fifteen minutes and then I sit down and I? I let my body on wine for another two minutes one of my quickey workouts what do you think of that hit workout Hitler interval training all right but not play metrics unless I really hit it hard and between even harder or make the tension really tough warm up the explosion is high intensity. Okay all right Daniel tag always great talking about exercise with Daniel Tag <hes> we'll be back and we've got Dr Dan Angle one of my favorite doctors on the show. He is board-certified psychiatry and neurology. We're going to be talking about out the truth and myths on Psychedelic stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one live radio. One Life Radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like son Warrior plant based protein use the code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas honest temp happy healthy honest C._B._D.. A._B._D.. Use The code. Oh L. for twenty percent off nature's plate plant based meals to go Paleo magazine Wellbeing Journal and the International Society of Sports Nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our Website Right for twenty percents off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio. I love it a little Purple Haze Diamond Ray. Thank you so much. Everyone welcome back to one life radio. This is Bernadette as I said with Diamond Gray Vienna Betty Antos and Dan Daniel in studio with us today and we have Dr Dan Angle on the line with us. He is a medical doctor and board certified in psychiatry neurology his clinical practice combines Functional Medicine Integrated Psychiatry Neuro cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He is the medical director of the revive treatment centers of America as well as the medical adviser to on it labs and the true rest floats honors <hes> Dr Angle is the author of the concussion repair manual a practical guide to recovering from traumatic brain injuries his website his doctor Dan ingle dot com and that's E.. N. G. L. A. Doctor. Dan INGLE DOT com so great to have you with us today. How you doing today Dr Dan? I'm Great Bernadette great to be with you again. Yeah Yeah and you know we last time you were on. Thank you for saying that we said we were GonNA talk and more in depth about the truth and miss on Psychedelic so let's talk about this. What are some of the myth that are surrounded by psychedelics well? There's a lot of them out there for sure and they fall into two camps those that believes psychedelics don't have a place and they're dangerous and then everybody's GonNa get their brains fried and knows the believe that there panaceas and good for everybody so we can talk about a few of those each each kind of camp and take them in that order. If that works view yeah that works great. We'll so you know psychedelics as you know. They're very intimidating. They really are especially to someone who has never really experienced it. So can you explain what it feels like when you use suicide or psychedelics like a l._S._d.. Or Sula Sivan well they're all pretty different and that's one of the mid's is that not a lot of people have this <hes> image in their mind that we had from the nineteen eighteen eighties in one thousand nine hundred during the war on drugs that were drugs that these medicines were quote unquote drugs which I don't believe in an actual fair representation of their therapeutic benefit and that if you take them remember the Friday commercial that he's GonNa end up being your brain on Oh yeah we all have that image still really burned in our psyche. It was really good media for that. We're on drums and part of the blanket statement is that they're all dangerous is is also that they all work the same victory untrue as well. They all have different affects. The feeling state of is different how they work in the brain is quite different. The length of duration is quite different and and the data for each of them and how they were from any of the psychiatric conditions for example India May <hes> is known as the chief component of ecstasy but street ecstasy three different because it's all oftentimes cut with a lot of different things pure form in the therapeutic context it has between a sixty and seventy percent efficacy rate in treating chronic severe post traumatic stress disorder which is so fascinating. It's so fascinating you know I I have to say I've never done it. KINDA SCARES ME L._S._D.. Have never done it. Kinda scares me Silla Sivan I've done I absolutely had the most amazing experience with it and <hes> you know when it's legal I would do it again is in fact I bring up a good question. Is it legal in some states. Well just recently. I'm calling from just outside. Denver Colorado. I live in Boulder and Denver last month are actually about closer answer to sixty eight weeks ago. Pass the Denver to decriminalize movement. That's right which meant that now society been is decriminalize. It's not officially legal but the police now had it as their lowest priority and have agreed need to not prosecute people for small possession in using it for their own medicinal purposes now that doesn't make it legal where you can transport it and have it in even clinics yet which I see coming for sure in this realm of transformational medicine these medicines will be eventually legalized in the therapeutic context just like cannabis was and then it became recreational and India may in Phila- Sivan are leading that charged urge right now nationally because they've already been proved for safety and they're going into phase three trials to be proven for efficacy and this is the last stage in the government trials for full legalisation. Wow Wow I I read somewhere. I'm trying to pull it up but I can't put my hands on it that that I think we've actually discussed this before on the air that that <hes> particularly l._S._d.. microdosing with L._S._D.. Is Very effective. Intriguing alcoholism is it can be and for many people has and it has a fascinating history regarding alcohol use in the United States. One of the founders of the alcoholics anonymous organization Russian used L._S._d.. To support his ongoing sobriety this Bill Wilson he eventually he got so reusing mescaline and then continue that sobriety path with L._S._d.. He wanted to use these medicines. This is back in the fifties when they were <hes> he wanted to use these as a part of people's recovery because in the therapeutic context mini these medicines have very deep healing experiences for the core wounds that oftentimes drive addiction depression anxiety <hes> post traumatic stress disorder but there's a very big difference between therapeutic use like in with the facilitator that knows how to support the process oftentimes a person with some clinical or therapeutic background. That's very the different than using it recreationally oftentimes in a very uncontrolled setting and not really knowing <hes> the safety of the container in how the experience is GonNa unfold is it Timothy Leary is the one that made everybody so scared you know uh-huh with his right isn't he the one that started all the from no no pun intended here but the craziness right he was an icon in the Cultural Revolution was in the fifty six hundred seventy and he was really genius his <hes> investigator of these medicines US actually working for the government at one and then he went really far to the other side of the spectrum in his <hes> global advocacy for wide recreational use and it's one of those myths to that these medicines are safe for everybody right and that they're the only passed to waking up and that at any point they're going to rescue near save me from my work to do so if I just take a trip it's GonNa take care of all my alcoholism or depression anxiety and truth be known these medicines they they revealed the truth is still our work to do so oftentimes the bring up the traumatic materials so that we have a chance to work through it they don't save us from the core <hes> looking into the dark Mir or going into that shadow material. I think that's where we actually gain the most benefit benefit when we're able to bring these traumatized parts of ourselves back home into more full integrated holes. I love talking about this. I find it so fascinating. <hes> and I did find what I was looking for. It was from the book how to Change Your Mind by Michael Michael Poland. I'm sure you're very familiar with the book but <hes> it's but are you yeah that'd be great book just letting in his face and it was just written at the right time yeah it was he says it here on the history of this that but however it worked it worked are certainly seem to by the end of the decade L._S._D.. was widely regarded in North America as a miracle cure for alcohol addiction so based on that statement. You know I'm going to ask you this for those who don't believe that psychedelics have a place. What do you say to them from a scientific take standpoint check out the data Wayne in simple like if I'm talking to a group of physicians or a group of doubters so to speak <hes> the best thing I can do start from place neutrality a place of curiosity gossipy? Let them know. I'm not trying to sell anything but I am here especially. If I'm talking to physicians I end here to show the objective data and as physicians we should be interested in the objectivity of the data will be should be curious curious about these novel treatments that showed so much efficacy in the fifties sixties and seventies until the Nixon administration everything in schedule one which they don't belong because schedule one means they're highly addictive and most of these medicines Addison's are anti addictive and there's no therapeutic benefits the fact that actually how they work and they work neurologically in the brain to help recover these traumatic experiences and with something like l._S._d.. Or even some of the other the medicines that work specifically for addiction recovery they seem to reset the addictive Niro Chemistry and she'd be known. We're still figuring out how in exactly why they work in the ways they do so that's why there's been this massive explosion in psychedelic another research in the last fifteen years well because we need it. We we really need it. You know <hes> Dr Daniel wanted to ask you something. Dr Dan a quick question I for Lehman like me where I go to get legit data versus just googling it. Great Question asking that question the best organization in the United States it has broad based out of for <hes> variety these different medicines is the maps workin ization fans. That's an acronym Emmy P._S.. Dot Org stands for the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelics Studies. It's been in existence for thirty years. <hes> Rick Dobelin is the founder he just gave the first Ted talk on on <hes> the large Ted Stage so to speak. There's been a bunch of Ted talks but he just gave the first Ted. Talk on India May for P._T._S._D.. And the data is just so good and it's really compelling especially if we know the truth <music> of the epidemic which is twenty to forty or so veterans commit suicide in the U._S. alone every day from P._T._S._d.. And a variety of chronic psychiatric conditions and India may has an efficacy rate a better than any other known single agent. Wow now those the data I gave is sixty to seventy percent to or rate not just improvement rate not just symptom reduction rate but curate after two to three supported rooted in facilitated India May psychotherapeutic sessions with trained clinicians that know what they're doing well and that's the key to it is trained clinicians that know what they're doing <hes>. I'm so fascinated talking about this <hes> if you're just now joining us I'm on the here with Dr Dan Angle. He is a board certified in psychiatry neurology. We're talking about truths and miss on psychedelics. There's more coming up. Stay tuned everyone. You're listening to one life radio and one life radio is brought to you by our sponsors. Great companies like son Warrior plant plant-based protein use the code. L. Are for twenty percent off crazy water. The only mineral water bottled in Texas honest temp happy healthy honest C._B._D.. Use The code. Oh L. are for twenty percent off nature's played plant that base meals to go Paleo magazine Wellbeing Journal and the International Society of Sports Nutrition be sure to go to our thorn research dispensary on our website for twenty percent off and free shipping. Thank you for listening to one life radio. Welcome back to one life radio. Everyone we want this is Bernadette with Diamond Gray Vienna Betty Antos and Daniel Tag got Dr Dan Angle on the line continuing on. We're talking about psychedelics. Dr Dan Ingle is board-certified in psychiatry and neurology his clinical clinical practice combines functional medicine and Greatest Psychiatry Neuro cognitive restoration and peak performance methods. He is the medical director of the revive treatment centers of America as well as a medical adviser to on it labs and true rest float centers. Dr Angle is the author of the concussion repair manual a practical guide to recovering from traumatic brain injuries. You can find Dr Dan Ingle at Dr. Dan INGLE DOT COM and his last name is spelled E. N. G. Alley. That's Dr Dan ingle angle dot com okay psychedelic so many people out there are so fascinated by the subject and interested in what you have to say so who can potentially benefit tremendously from this type of therapy well in my experience just about everybody now. It's also important to say that again. They're not a panacea and not everybody's either healthy or safe enough to have an experience number. One and number two is not everybody's ready as a big experience uh-huh and so the Contra indications are people are on psychiatric medications. Most of the medicines were speaking about don't interact well. If people have clear history of psychosis Romania <hes> it's usually a dangerous situation and <hes> there's a readiness component about it as <hes> in addition so these are strong experiences and like with any tool you can use it. Well were you can use carelessly or like with any <hes> anything that builds life water light nutrition <hes> etc it has it's therapeutic sweet spot. If you don't use enough there's no effective much poisonous we have to use them right and in the right setting I would say the vast asked majority of people can have a meaningful experience and this is some of the data that came out of we were speaking about suicide earlier. John Hopkins did a great study <hes> over about ten years ago now <hes> with people that had never had an experience comes with and went into suicide been experiencing process and then came out the other side and ninety four percent of people said it was one of the most meaningful experiences that ever had I'm in that ninety four percent. You know I I oh I did it with a P._H._d.. I did it with H._D.. And other a couple of other people that I really trust it was a small group of us and I did it in little tiny increments like very very because I have a brother that schizophrenic so I had a lot of fear of having like delusional thoughts. That's where like they always say if you do L._S._d.. Don't look in the mirror. You know you'll see your face. Melting and stuff is like oh my gosh. I didn't want any of that crazy stuff going on so I was really very apprehensive but I wasn't a very good place and you'll understand this being into sensory deprivation flotation therapy I had been floating for a couple of years before I decided to to try Silla Simon and I had an amazing trip. We've talked about it many times on the air. You and I and I would recommend it <hes> to pretty much anyone if they do it. Correctly yeah agreed and you mentioned a couple of things that I think you're really important to highlight is that there are preparatory practices that can really help people become familiar with the unknown and that's part of what these medicines offers they they offer the subconscious material to come up onto the screen of the mind so that we can look at it and we also don't know what's GonNa come up so it's getting it's getting <hes> more comfortable and available to curious about the unknown and flotation tanks are really good in that regard because they help us start to auto regulate be able to self reference in <hes> work with our own fears not freak out find our Brad come back to our center and another thing that you mentioned is that the doorway into these experiences I see as being one of two different directions one is the direction of healing and so if somebody knows that they haven't experienced with depression Jennings Eighty P._t._S._d.. Addiction pain then these medicines can be very good for healing and they can also be very good for optimization and that's supporting the worried well so to speak for like most of the Western narrow sees where we think we're doing pretty okay but there's still stuff to learn. They're still stuff that experience and connecting with the divine aspects of ourselves or the connected life that is this one planet that we call home. There's so many different ways that even if you're not going for quote unquote healing that that experience can engender one of the most meaningful experiences that people ever have yeah I <hes> you know as I said I shared my story with everyone and <hes> you know I i. There's there's so many things that we're we're so unaware of you know and this is one of them and so the science that you're doing. Where do you see this going in the near future well? The future of medicine work in this regard is really endless and that's why it's important to do it mindfully and do it well and so that we WANNA make sure that we're offering the right education and advocacy so I think it was a great question that Daniel brought up around where to go for the right eight clear objective data maps as one <hes> Hopkins <hes> has done a lot of really good research. Ice Sears is another organization <hes>. There's a bunch of new conferences coming up every year about the newest data so there's this resurgence. We WanNa make sure that people are if they're using on their own. A lot of people are there's some studies suggest close to ninety percent of all people throughout tired of their life. We're going to explore psychedelics Alex the case obviously we need to have a conversation about it because most people are doing it and then we need to have people with <hes> enough information to safely to responsibly so that we're not giving more data to do the doubters that might not want this research for advocacy work to be <hes> included in the larger cultural landscape but what I see is really promoting. A huge resurgence in the research is that we are in the midst of growing psychiatric Epidemics Depression anxiety P._t._S._d.. Addiction pain all five of those are ever increasing even in the arena of using more and more pharmaceuticals we need to look for novel all treatments that help get to the core issue and start to resolve those core traumas and I don't know of a more effective efficient and safe when done well therapeutic modality then the use of these medicines so I just see it growing growing into a realm of legality so that we're gonNA eventually be able to launch the clinics where multiple medicines are available to a person coming in to the front door and they say yes. I WanNa have a healing experience where I want to have an optimization experience and looking through the menu of services with train providers and really clear assessment tools being able to switch medicine is going to be which is going to be good for which personnel which time in which order of their healing arc we're just GonNa get better and better with the research and with the clinical implementation in outpatient setting of a legal therapeutic arena in which to do this and I think that's the most responsible way that the medical community can continue to make these medicines available <hes> I would agree and we're almost at a time I think we're going to run at a time before I make this point. I was reading and Michael Poland's book how to change your mind about Catherine. <hes> McLean the former Ho a hopkins researcher who wrote the landmark paper on openness. I hope someday to establish a PSYCHEDELIC hospice a retreat center somewhere out in nature where not only <hes> the dying but their loved ones. Can you psychedelics to help them let go the patient and the loved ones both and she's it says it quotes her by saying <hes>. If we limit psychedelics to the patient she explains we're sticking to the old medical model but psychedelics are more radical than that. I get nervous when people say they should only be prescribed by Dr <hes>. What do you say to that? You've got like thirty seconds Dr Angle. I think ultimately that's true but I don't think we're ready for large stage recreational uses. I don't think we've yet put in education advocacy <hes> implementation at a widespread level. I think what she.

Dan Daniel Daniel Tag football Dr Dan Ingle Bernadette Dr. Dan ingle Dr Dan Angle US Wellbeing Journal Tina Texas International Society of Sport Adriana Betty Antos India Dr Dan Colorado gray Michael Michael Poland medical director
Les Brown - How To Overcome Your Fears With Fiery Faith

Addicted2Success

00:00 sec | 2 months ago

Les Brown - How To Overcome Your Fears With Fiery Faith

"You're now tuned into the addicted to Success Dot Com podcast where geniuses entrepreneurs and next level game changers shared their juicy little secrets on achieving massive success. This is the advice you wish you heard years ago be prepared and take note as we expose the real nece and the raw of what it takes to be successful on addicted to Success Dot Com Ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to the addicted to success podcast. I'm your host Joel Brown and I have my cousin. Less Brown. Who is a Self Development Titan Incredible Motivational Speaker Entrepreneur bestselling author. The list goes on and on and on lesbian rocking stages for decades now and moving cermony minds and hearts over the years. So leads it's so good to have you back on the addicted to success podcast. Last time we had join here you cried on the podcasts you got super real we got super vulnerable, and then you left us with his super profound message about really living out dreams. So excited to have you here today. Thank you I'm excited to be here. I promise not to cry this time. We cry. Not. Your your life is contagious. I'll tell you that we had a lot of people messaging like I just love listening to Leslie Laugh it just makes me feel good for the morning. of Or it's it's very important to be joyful. It's good for your health and for your attitude and and how you handle this they in call light because in life you, you are going to experience a lot of things in victim Franko causes it. He calls it unavoidable suffering that you either in a problem just left one or edit to what what? A that's it. You. You gotTA gauge yourself right in and check in and see you where my I right now and to that north. Let's go into this because last time on the on the podcast we went through. Your perspective on dreams and beliefs and you shed really powerful stories dive into the current situation that we're in right now, and I think just really reflecting on. For those that are in a in a space where they may feel stuck. You know there are a lot of people right now that are challenged by the the situation, a climate that we're in. So what would your advice be for someone that may be in lockdown because out here in Australia? The whole city of Melbourne in Victoria State of Victoria some full lockdown for six weeks and then they're told it could be twelve months and you know as you could imagine, people are just losing it right now. It's is very important. First of all, thank you for giving me the opportunity to be on your program and to thank you for the commitment that you've made on your life and answered the call to be a voice of light and helping people to Developmental Resolve, and that's that's the major thing that people need to do right now because things are happening. That we never saw coming. So when I think about the movie forrest Gump, his life is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're going to get. He did not lie. We didn't see this coming and so when you when something happens when life snatches the rug from under you. And and you don't see. A light at the end of the tunnel. One of the most important things first of all is to be still not to react to be still and to gather your wit about yourself to to gather your mindset I. Remember when years ago perhaps before you were born Mohammed Ali for Joe Frazier the first time he was not down and he jeb back up in Howard Cosell, the the sports announcer said, why did you get up? So quickly Bahamas and he said I looked at where I was. And he said a canvas is no place for a champion to be, and he said, so I jumped back up and I think that people lead to right now jump back up inside of themselves win win a fearful situation the majority of people. Zig Ziglar would say they forget everything and they run they forget that there are more than a conqueror forget greater see this in you than he that's in the world they forget the words of Lion, King Simba you more than that which you have become. And then he said there's a small group of people. Who Face everything and rise, and those are the people that's in your audience because this is the time that we must pour into ourselves. Elsie Robinson said things may happen around you and things happen to you but the only things that really count of the things that happen in you and so this is a time that we have to reflect and we have to have a ritual. and. A plan of action to fortify ourselves to fortify our faith and allow doubts to stop to death to strengthen out cells from the inside because we don't know what's coming next and be able to have your mindset is major I used to wonder why my mother said in Church. I think the lawful waking me up in my right mind this morning now that I'm seventy five understand. You know we had Tony Robbins on the cost and we're having this conversation about making better quality decisions. He he said that's the quality of life like to really live that deep quality of life is better quality decisions and it starts with how you start your day. It starts with really censoring yourself. So I love that you're talking about this too. It must be really important. You know we got through grates that are sharing this so Okay, less you and I are in a movie together called the age of the Entrepreneur and in that movie you talk about the power of the Internet you talk about how it's really important to tap into these new platforms with technology to really get your message out there. So for anyone that's in lockdown quarantine whether they've just realized like economically, it's not working too well in the way you stir and they wanna pivot what would your advice be when it comes to just starting to gather your message in getting getting ready to put it out to influence others we've created something called. The power voice system, the power voice system, and the reason we have. that. We've gone from brick and mortar to click and order. Things have changed in the economy. Globally. And the people who learn how to look at this green light. And sit in front of this computer. And be able to do basically three things. Number one attention is the new currency to attract attention to yourself with your story. Because when people see on this computer, they're asking three questions unconsciously, who are you what do you have and why should I care? So being able to attract attention next thing is. Being able to create an experience around the attention to hold the attention because of you attracted and can't hold the attention because of all the noise and all the distractions you're GONNA lose out. So having a plan of action to create an experience that will transform the people that watch you individually and collectively, and the next thing is to direct the attention so. That they become his mother Teresa, would say who I love to quote a pencil in hand of God and start writing new chapter with their lives. So this is where we are the attention getting processed is major for us to begin to amplify out out purpose. The things that we want to do the goals that we want to achieve the ability to create collaborative. Driven supported relationships that can help us to go to where we want to go. Man I love this a love this. Yeah this is such. A great opportunity right now, we can look at it as you know, what's a pit of sorrow or platform that we can from in a new direction? So yeah, you're. You're people say that opportunity knocks on every door. No opportunity stands by silently waiting for you to recognize it as so yet millions of people who lost jobs just in the United States over fifty million and another forty seven million will be losing their jobs to artificial intelligence. Here's what I believe. Then opportunity. Stands by silently. Waiting for you to recognize it out of this place where we are right now three guys of people to come through millionaires, billionaires, and witnesses. Billionaires and witnesses people who will watch do why? People that listen to you. The people that watch you. They're going to be the first two categories. They'll be millionaires or billionaires he will be with us this. Yes. Yes. Some people are spectators that bench warmers but then not on the field in the game, right? No, they're they're caught up in the information and entertainment driven culture and what happens is that the viewership of entertainment up sports, old fights and football games and basketball games that won't serve them the watching pornography twenty, four seven that will help them put food on the table, and so there's a certain level of consciousness that you have to go to and say. Now what? Now, what do I do? With this place where I am with what has happened how do I make this an asset rather than a liability? Where should my focus go right now because we're focused goes energy flows that many people they react rather than respond reacted with fear and confusion hopelessness and powerlessness but not knowing that they're greater than anything that can ever happen to them, and like this place where we are just happens to be extremely strange because making the wrong decision can cost you your life I practice social distancing not only from people, but from my refrigerator. I. Love it. That's funny. So so as you mentioned before that you're in your seventies right now seventy five. Yes seventy five in good to be alive I love it. So. That would. I'll. Trademark. Number. So you're in your mid seventies and you would have seen quite a bit in your life. Right I remember when I was a little kid my granddad here in Australia used to say. When we act up play around, he'd say you know what? Said Your generation pussies you said you go to good. He said you'll spoil. He said you don't know what hard times on because he came from the war as really interesting to see because I feel like we have softened in everyone's getting so concerned about self and not so much in mission. Are You See that like when become sulfur as a side a society in a sense of. Getting a bit spoiled getting a bit distracted like chasing like you said, the entertainment and not stepping up and being in Michigan. Are you noticing this? We don't have that luxury now things have so radically changed. People A. Three thinking their lives people are looking at where they are a friend of mine was traveling. On a train cross Europe and soldiers ask them. who were sleeping woke him up and asked him several questions number one who are you and a lot of people are reflecting on themselves who am I really a Viktor Frankl who wrote the book man's for meaning he said adversity introduces a man to himself number two. We're have you been and people are looking at their lives and asking themselves do a have the life that I envisioned for myself. Most people don't want to die a life of regret you hear on television the thousands of people that are dying every day from the corona virus and there's a fear for your life. Other thing he said, where are you going? And that's something that people need to really focus on. Because during this time, I see it as a cocoon. We wanted to spend this time working on ourselves. No matter how many legs a caterpillar has it can never fly in. So when it's in the cocoon, it's working on himself it's going through a transformation. And where are you going and who's going with you, and this is the time that you want to evaluate your relationships. Then two types of relationships are nourishing and relationships and they're toxic relationships, nourishing relationships they bring the best out of you. They challenge you a when I think about the gentleman who transformed my life. He's Mr Brown. Someone's opinion of you does not have to become your reality. Those words are very important to me because I was born in abandoned building on a floor and a poor section of Miami, Florida called Liberty City I'm adopted I was labeled edible mental retarded and put back from the fifth grade to the fourth grade and I fell again in the eighth grade sows called DT the dumb. I'm one of seven children that my mother adopted and so when he said someone's opinion of you does not have to become your reality. He interrupted my vision of I self how people live their lives is result of the story they believe about themselves. We live in a world where we've been marginalized until more about AL limitations rather than out potential rather than being educated we've been indoctrinated particularly if you're a person of color and led to believe that you are inferior and so this is a time more than ever. At self awareness is important self approval that you look at what is you want out of this thing called life life is God's gift to us and how we live our lives. I'll gift to God self approval and self commitment that once you envision those things that you want for yourself beyond your confidential because in order to do something you've never done you've gotta calm someone you've never been. And then out of that come simple filming and that takes you right back to self awareness. It's a cyclic process. So when you come up in a system like in in the United States. Are dismissed where you are demonized where you are marginalized and systems are put in place to prevent you. From advancing the Saint Louis Federal? Reserve said stunningly. A white. Highschool dropout will create three times more wealth. Than a black college graduates three times more wealth. Why? Because of the things in the system that's designed? To, hold people of Color back and to the advantages of of the light expression people as I love to say and so in order for us to break through that and live a life of achievement, a life of significance, a life that will allow us to live what Harz men call a life of contribution. He said we should be ashamed to die until we've made a major contribution to. Humankind and so in order for us to do that to live a life that will outlive us, you gotta be hungry. That's the title of my book. You've got to be Ongeri and people that are hungry. They make things happen in spider people that are hungry believe always strive to get on top in life because it's the bottom that's overcrowded. People that are hungry find a way to win. Yes if you're listening to this right now, watching this, get your plates ready get your bibs on. Let's go. Love IT I. Love It. So. Less in the loss interview we did together. And even in this one here, I've noticed you make reference to God and Scriptures and Jesus. Out of all the Bible characters because I know you grew up in church and you've gone through descriptions of yes. Out of all the Bible characters, which one do you resonate with the most? And and maybe even relate to in a sense that you feel like you've gone through a similar struggle or similar break for that, we can learn a lesson from as well. You. Know I'm not a religious person alice feared you person religious people afraid of going to hell spiritual people have been there. Like the. Difference between me and ministers they preached the Gospel about Jesus. I preach the Gospel that Jesus preached arrives Yes. Yes. I I. Love. Paul because of his character. I love what he went through and how he stayed. The course unexperienced a lot in my my oncologist who just had an unusual personality Mr Brown you have Ford stage. Cancer. And you've had it for the past twenty-seven years. I'm here in Atlanta and also at the cancer centers of America three weeks ago, Mr Brown a you aware you have fought stage cancer said, yes and IRA was reminded of what the doctor goes and said to me when I asked him, can you give me a second opinion and he says, yes and your ugly to. Happen. To us. We talked about that. Don't call. You yooglie did. This. We determine the diagnosis you and God determined the prognosis I don't tell patients their terminally ill he said I tell patients mine knowledge, my skill and my ability to help you as terminated. Now, you in God have to explore some other options. So I left his office not with a heart full of fear but a heart full of faith that I got this. Then I say that people that are watching and listening to you and I right now. That, they should begin to embrace the reality. That they got this that this is not come to stay. It has come to pass that. There are all kinds of moments in life when things will happen you'll be in a different territory, Newsday Oh my God I can't handle this and you got through you not only survive but you became better because of that experience, there are some things that happen to you, and there are some things that happen for you and as a result. Of that it it it strengthens you I remember you mentioned Tony who is I think one of the great icons in this industry what I wrote, the company that spent millions of dollars promoting his personal power program and I sent them my information, my video, this Oh you got a fascinating story but we don't believe that a black person would have any appeal to the American public. Why until I answer to you is no, we will not partner with you and I wrote them back and said, thank you very much. I never would have known that I was black. Had you not told me I'll see you from the top. Of that response. Because Tony has the complexion of connection and I have the complexion of Jek Shen at fired something up in me. and. So I said I WANNA make in spite of an infomercial and went toastmasters in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, two. Selected the top five speakers in the world they selected General Norman, Schwarzkopf Robert Shula Paul Harvey, Lee Iacocca, and myself no infomercial no pumping of millions of dollars in but what I focused on. Was a hyping people to do his fire walk how is changing lives and so when you have. The heart. To live a hard centered life in an answer, the calling on your life where your heart is there your treasure is also. That I, his not seen ear has not heard knows ended of mankind what God has in store for you and I encourage everybody whatever they've lost their job. If they have the business of gone under understand if you created before, you can do it again eight out of ten millionaires been financially bankrupt Walt Disney filed bankruptcy seven times and had two nervous breakdowns and he's still came through and so I believe that everybody that's listening to us right now if they focus their mind because that's the main thing stuff's happening. Then when things happen to you or someone you care about. It it takes a toll on you not talk to my second oldest daughter and she told me that the the that two people looked at her ambulance attendants when she went to the nursing home to see her mother and say, Hey, we think she might be the positive and you to that that impacted me. As. Well, and so we have to really work on ourselves and we have to do the things that we must do to keep our lives moving forward will have so much time here, and so having the focus the discipline and positioning yourself to win. Once we come out of here to rethink your life to reinvent yourself to look at your relationships and asked the question. Is this relationship? An asset liability. Am I growing mentally emotionally and spiritually the some relationships we have to let go or be drag, and so right now jim ruin. He talked about the fact that you have to look at your relationship and asked the question what kind of. Am I becoming because of this relationship? Am I growing mentally and emotionally and spiritually am I becoming a better person a better father a wife. Until this thing called life you have to evaluate and monitor. We have to watch as well as pray. Amen to that. I. Love It. Yeah. You know it's interesting. I heard somebody say the other day that God's not an architecture. Because if he was an architect, he's very frustrated that we're not sticking to the plan. And Co creating. You know it's like happening real time and I love that you said it's like it's me and God, and that's it is relationship with God? Rather than an institution you know in a system that that's man made we don't know what we're doing in that sense. I love this is an area in your life less. Where you feel like you haven't quite doubled down on it yet in self development or spiritual development that you feel like you. Know if you had like an extra ten fifteen, twenty years that you'd really love to dive deep into to just really double down to double down on my spiritual life. And on my health Because doing this time gaps from God. So my prayer time meditation when I get up in the morning, I say to myself law whatever I face today together you and I can handle it and there's an one of my favorite scriptures. All things work together for good for those who love God for those who are called according to his purpose, and then my exercise it my goal is to have a six pack like you I got one pack now covering the. Tax But I'm coming for you I want you to know that. All right though list seventy, five, fool you and so working on my spiritual life working on my health and spending more time with my children and my fifteen grandchildren and my four great grandsons. That's what I hope to do and and living a life that will outlive me to leave a legacy with the time that I have left to live full die empty and to rob the cemetery of my gifts. Doing a big man during a big for the Kingdom I. Love It. That's awesome. Yes. So less we're just about to wrap up. Can you please fill me in and the audience in on what you have going on right now that they can jump into because I know you that you have some programs. I've seen some emails come through a see what you're up to your hustling, you making it happen. So you'll be, yes, my goal is finish strong I. believe we need messages of hope. More. Now, than ever before evil prevails when good men and women do nothing, and so we have created something called power voices system and for people who have a story or a business that they want to grow into amplify and call attention to and want to learn how to tell this story. My Angelo said there's nothing as painful as an untold story buried. In your soul, they can email me at less brown seven seven. At gmail.com, seven is my lucky number less brown seven, seven at g mail, dot com, and someone from our staff to get back to them because what we're doing is teaching people how to tell this story, how to increase their sales, how to amplify their knowledge, their abilities and talents how to. Make a greater impact on the planet. Harz man said we should be ashamed to die until we made some major contribution to humankind, and so we're going to teach people how to develop their leadership voice, their power voice that superpower and to leave a legacy rather than liabilities. Love this guy's jump on it make sure you don't miss out on this incredible opportunity. Less taught me a little while back how to find my soul signature message and has been so powerful. He's allowed to to move into a highest space as speaker and I've been impact so many lives because of what leads us told me don't miss out on this. If you want to step on the stage to maybe it's not even a stage maybe it's social media. You know maybe it's it's through a youtube channel whatever it is you have a voice in it needs to be heard so leads thank you so much less one last question before we wrap up I every interview with this question here, the question is if you to deliver your lost thirty seconds speech. To the world what would that lost thirty second sound like? I'm thankful. For the ability. That I've been given. To be here in present on the planet, mind go has been I aspired to inspire until I expire. This has been cousin Joe's pride and joy and Mrs Mamie Brown's baby boy less. Brown. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Mrs Mamie Brown Tony Robbins Brown Australia United States Joe Frazier Joel Brown Paul Harvey Leslie Laugh Franko Mr Brown Zig Ziglar Bahamas youtube AL Melbourne Angelo forrest Gump Europe Elsie Robinson
Dr. Graham Brayshaw, Director of Animal Services at Animal Humane Society

The Community Cats Podcast

30:05 min | 2 years ago

Dr. Graham Brayshaw, Director of Animal Services at Animal Humane Society

"The. You turned into the community cats podcasts ready. Let's cal. Welcome to the community podcast. I am your host. Stacey lebaron. I've been involved helping homeless cats for over twenty years with the mayor MAC river feline rescue society the goal of this podcast. Just dispose. You two amazing people who are improving the lives of cats. I hope these interviews will help you learn how you can turn your passion for cats into action today, we're seeking with Dr Graham Brayshaw, Dr Graham is the director of animal services at animals humane society and also serves as the organization's chief veterinarian, he graduated in two thousand and four with the Devia m- from Texas. Am college of veterinary medicine before working in animal welfare, he wasn't associate veterinarian and medical director with veterinary centers of America for more than seven years. Dr Brayshaw started at the animal humane society in two thousand twelve as their senior veterinarian his areas of interest include high quality, high volume spay neuter on college. Entercom -nology and balancing individual and heard health in may of two thousand seventeen doctor ratio was appointed by Minnesota. Governor Mark Dayton to serve as a board member on the Minnesota board of animal health animal. Humane society is based in the twin cities of Minneapolis and Saint Paul last year the organization took in more than twenty three thousand animals, including almost eleven thousand cats locally and from partner shelters in southern states animal. Humane society runs for open admission shelters, and is the largest animal welfare organization in the upper midwest the organization as a placement rate of ninety six percent and has an active community kept program. You're gonna say also runs. A low cost veterinary clinic with a second location to open on the east side of the metro area in twenty twenty to serve even more people and their pets when not working Dr Graham enjoys playing ultimate frisbee and spending quiet time with his wife, Brynn dog MAC and many many cats that Graham I'd like to welcome you to the show. Thank you for having. A really pre eight to allow me to be on. Well, I can't even believe it. It's been over two hundred eighty episodes of the community cats podcast. And I haven't interviewed anyone for Minnesota. So wow, are wet representing the state, and we're actually going to be doing a double show here. So we're going to have our next guest next week is also going to be from Minnesota. Now, I feel like I'm covering the state. Well, I appreciate you. Joining us today and first off I really liked to find out how you got interested in community, cats and animal welfare, general, we'll my first foray into animal welfare. I interest actually came back in vet school. They have all of us do a rotation down in Texas through the local shelters Austin, and it it was fascinating fast paced work, and you know, you're making a difference every day. So it really is challenging and rewarding at the same time. Which is all you could ever ask for the job something to do. And then I went out to fry practice. Got my hundred. As me with the learn a lot of that area medicine skills. And then in twenty twelve the opportunity arose to come humane society to be senior veterinarian and jumped at it. Honestly didn't think I was qualified, but they did. And it's been it's been great ever since I really have enjoyed being in it and on the community cat side of it. There's really a lot of advancement that animal. Humane side of the organization is done that his allowed us to get to dealing with the cats that are living out of the community and don't even come into our sellers compared to other states. It's a very different community can unity than you. Then you get when I was down in Texas and Florida a lot of southern states where there's a lot more roaming feral cats with our frigid negative way. Too negative temperatures will get in the winter living just out and about in the field is not really doable. For most of our community cats. So they have smaller areas. Smaller niches what we can get later. The things we've learned on where they live compared to other states. If you're trying to figure out how many cats or knit community take the population and divide by six of very very rough estimate of how many cats are out there. If you got six million people in the community, you've probably got a million cat somewhere. But that's a nationwide average, and you get to some of the southern states, and it might be two million cats, but you get somewhere up here and maybe half a million. So it's they live in different spots different places than we definitely seen other parts of the country. I love the language that you speak with regards to trying to figure out what your population ratio is your population your cat population. I was raised up on but targeting philosophy and trying to always figure out, you know, how many cats assisting, but yet you're also throwing in that concept of tribal knowledge, you know, because of our. Our area because of our climate because of our economic situation, you're able to fluctuate those numbers, and they will change depending on the area. So it's not we're not able to have a blanket statement as to exactly how many community cats we have out there. So my other question to you is from concept of return to field. I would assume in Texas, you're going to do a lot more return to feel than you would in in. Minnesota of actually depends on the numbers that are coming into your shelter. We will feel do a good number of returns for what comes to us here. And the really only difference time-wise on return to field as it is unseasonably cold. And meaning if it's little January middle of February as long as it's single digits teams if we're lucky and gets balmy. It's up in the twenties. Then we know that say temperature these cats are living in so we'll still return them year round and less. We get one of those cold snaps for days where it's. Ever getting a bugs negative ten. So as long as we have, I guess, percentage wise, we'll still return about the same percentage of cats. We just may have fewer cats coming in and that really depends on the shelter. If you have a community is going to bring you every single federal straight. They can find everything they run running around or if they're likely to leave them where they're at. But it really has been we've we've had success on returning them pretty much any time of year unless it is super super silly. Unless it really is one of those horrible colts. Nets can you tell us a little bit about the specifics around your community cat program? And when it was started, and what are the services that are offered and the pricing? 'cause I know that's always a big question. So many people find that it's just practically unaffordable for most folks to assist community cats, even if it's cost thirty dollars. If you're talking ten or twenty cats your. Tting into an expensive price range for an individual. And I'm just wondering how you address some of those challenges shirt. Great. Yeah. We we got started in twenty fourteen. And it was thanks to PetSmart carries. They they had a decent sized grant for us to get things kick off and started it's since then been operationalized just part of our our yearly work and the approach we took were two fold. We had a targeted trap neuter return program. And then we had a general return to feel programs the targeted to return was and individuals who basically did outreach work they had their target the code or two codes would go do door to door canvassing. Try and get a hold of anyone who is calling a caretaker in that area and really focus on trying to get the population in that specific area. 'cause as we all know if you try and spread it widely. You're never gonna make much of a difference. You need to get depending on talk to any. Between fifty and seventy five percent of the animals in an area sterilized to actually affect the population to try and not eliminate it. But try and help control population in that area. So we had the the targeted PNR part of it. And then returned to field where cats that came to us that had a history of living successfully outside and if they were not adoptable for one reason or another or middle summertime, which are higher feline and take time of year. If we were just filling up as a shelter we are in open admission shelter. If if the that came to us, we didn't have an easy bailable space for them. And we knew there were living successfully in this area would sterilize and return them. So it was a chance to help us population wise in the shelter. But also make sure that the cats that are out there that are using resources in the community are sterilized and not perpetuating sort of overpopulation issue with those two parts we have seen returned to field pretty much been steady and successful ever since things that rolling twenty four. Eighteen we learned a lot and failed a lot at first with our targeted trap neuter return. Just because there weren't the cats there that we all we were loser. Earlier trying to figure out what's right for your community. We found it wasn't just areas with all cap. Kind of roaming around everywhere each had their specific area. There's niche that had some sort of shelter associated with it. And in many situations, some sort of resource setup with it of someone either feeding out their back door, the the very kind lady who has the colony that. She's developed putting food out in the bag someone who lives in that suburban to rural border line that has a little hobby farm and just a ton of cats and their barn. That's really where our community cats are mostly living because in the summertime they can spread out a little bit. But wintertime, they do need that place of refuge place to go back to hide and the area, we targeted it's I was actually more urban than where we really see. The cats, and so we were able to transfer it to different zip codes and having a lot more successful targeted tea in our as we got into the later years of the program and that the fascination lesson learned actually so when defined your first target zone. Did you look at the numbers of cats coming into the shelter and use and use that as your way of defining code? You wanted to approach I yet we looked at both total number of cat and takes zip code and then number strays by code and use that to target it. We found that even in those areas, it was just a cat here or a cat. There wasn't the bigger colonies where you can impact that much change. It really was onesie Tuesay kind of cats that you can help some. But you're lucky if you can traps handful cats a week or can cats a week versus if you're going to have been. Pocket's bigger colonies, you can have a successful fifty seventy eighty cat week from the exact same investment of trap neuter return resources more benefit from like an owned low cost pain Nuder program for the owned cat population to be indoor only indoor outdoor, but does have some sort of a relationship with a with a guardian and I've seen programs in urban areas subsidy programs that only address that own population and the shelters still seen a sixty percent drop of intakes from that area without a specific ten our program in place that actually fits pretty well with what we've seen because as we've moved on with the program, the targeted tea and ours, become less and less. Well, we've looked at in investing in and we focused more on the return to field side of it and really trying to build relationships with the different members of the community that. That already know these cats manage these cats we'd have had a good number of conversations with people that have formed their own group. They they don't call themselves rescue themselves with the fish organization, but it's kind of a loose conglomeration of people that all have their colony they care for and they know to other people that have different colonies they care for. And it's it's really interesting how it is a a network, but not in the fish organization that seems to care for all of these community cats across the city. So know we have adapted to if someone has a cat that is living outside and needs to be sterilized. We have different ways we've taken to working with them and one side if they see this as their cats, it is they're out door cat that they feed live outside. They're taking ownership for that cat. Then that is something where if they need surgery for that cat. We do have a low cost Bangor program that is in place. They can bring that cat in and get them sterilized through that. But they would. You need to pay for the services, and that is where it's fifty sixty dollars for spay neuter, depending on the gender of what's coming in on the other hand, if it is cats that it's a collie that someone's going out and caring for these are not their cats or not catching what inside even for just a little bit. That truly are cats that that don't want to live in with people. They wanna live out in the community. And they're not when they take ownership for then those ones that they can come through our shelter programs and come in and say, if they come into the trap to one of our shelters, we will sterilize them that day give him the nights recover. Make sure that everything was good the next day. And then the and the caretaker can take them home. The next day we do request a fee of fifty dollars for each Catholic comes in with it. But we also understand the realities and limited resources for people that are trying to do their best for these cats. So I will say on average we do not get back even probably a third of that per cabinet comes in. And that's absolutely fine. We know the Justice service to get these cats taking care of and we try and work with them where they can help support us financially best we can sweet and keep doing what we're doing. But we also understand the impact that those dollars have on them and their ability to care for those cats get back in the community division. We really use is are these their cats. They really see their pets and letting into their house where they are taking ownership of that cat versus these are outdoor cats. But I'm trying to do my best to manage and help in that colony that they have. Today's episode is sponsored by space. Kitty express your one stop shop for exotic cat drugs. 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Cats doesn't your cat deserve the best spoil them today at space kitty, express dot com. Vet logic based in Scots, bro, Alabama provides educational support and product solutions to professional pet care providers pet parents throughout the country as a licensed veterinary medical continuing education provider, pro vet logic provides a variety of educational tools designed to help care providers. Create a cleaner and safer environment for both the cats in their care and the care providers to learn more about pro vet logic. Please visit WWW dot pro vet logic dot com or call eight hundred eight six nine four seven eight nine. Now, we're going to fast forward that five years. And what were the key lessons learned or you know, could have should were there things that you would have done differently. Looking back. Do you feel that the creation community catch program was successful? As it went. Or were they are there any tips or ideas that you'd like to share with others that are maybe in the process of embarking on developing the community cats program could be two biggest things that we did. Learn that adapt to and did see our with one is if you are doing PNR have it be where you really know that the cats are there, it's not just as the population. Or this is the GPS mapping that we have with our intake numbers. But really do that groundwork that footwork to make sure that there are colony caretakers or people that have these colonies that are living in their their Barnes that you can really go out impacts make a difference on. On the communication side of it. It took us about five six years to really get to where the where the words out, and we do see the number sterilization surgeries, we do every year rising and rising and rising just a little bit through this program. It took a little bit at first. But then it started going up as the word got out there. So trying to do whatever you can to reach out to this. This loose conglomeration of trappers, Connie caretakers, people that are really just passionate about it. There's people like that in everyone's community. And if you can get into them and build a good report with them, then you really can impact some positive changes because they've already done a lot of that groundwork for you, many of them, depending on on the organization, you are the rescue are many of them may have skewed view of what you are. What you do? We are. Nope. Initiative elder. We will not use an is for just time and shelter, but we were seen as an organization that pretty much any cat coming to get using is and our live release rate. Felines a decade ago was only about fifty to fifty five percents. We're now even for adult cats coming in at ninety plus percents because of the changes in advance that we've been able to do, but that stigma against us was was well set and the community for for years. So it's been quite a battled trying to fight that as been a lot of not just putting something out in the paper. But really individual conversations that has allowed be perception to change and made it four people are lot more willing to work with us when they really weren't willing before. Yeah, I think that communication outlet. And the to me is why from an organization that may have done things a certain way changing that organizational behavior does take a lot of time. And it just you're always you feel like you're messaging over and over again. And it just takes a long time to create new relationships and new build new bridges and all that kind of stuff, but it does happen. And I'm sure you've seen it happening. So I'm going to ask you question that I get from many, many, many people trappers other veterinarians especially in the colder climates, and here we are. We're in the middle of January. So this is a question. I get all the time. Which is when you are saying neutering a community cats is going to be returned. How long do you? Hold them until you release them for us. We give them the next day that is that's generally our approach for summertime or wintertime, the cats themselves, they are up and active and ready to get around. And we have some good injections of pain relief. The last several days afterwards, we know they're paying under control. They are really fully functional cats again the next day if there was ever a extensive surgery if it was a pregnant female where it was a much bigger incision or there's some civic individual complication. We're worried about we may hold them longer. But in. General they're ready to go and ready to get back to where they they need to be that next day part of it is also I I do some surgeries. But really we've got very good sized really good that team about eight nine vets on the shelter side and five on the clinic side that are really good in practice at small incisions that are going to hold. Well, we haven't seen complications with this group or with or with other groups of cats and dogs surgery on his well where we've we've got the confidence in our surgeons that they're going to be fine. The next day the sutures are going to hold and everything's gonna be good. Are you microchipping community cats? We're not we actually aren't even microchipping generally as an organization we used to microchip every dog cat. You name it that came through. And we found that unfortunately with how much are published of people move and how low on the. The register ended up microchip is most microchips are dead ends. Even if we get a cat back in this won't be Mike ship before the majority end up turning into dead ends. There was a lady out in San Jose out in the valley that she started a nonprofit this to simply worked on trying to increase the rate of microchip registration and updating and even with years of work on it wasn't able to move the needle. So we will still recommend microchipping. But it's also talked about it that it's their personal responsibility to make sure not only they get it in. But you gotta keep it up. And if you don't then it's it's nothing other than just a little thing sitting underneath the skin. It's benign not gonna cause any problems. But we thought that a few years ago and returned to own a rates and actually gone up a little bit compared to the those past years. I think that's more from work done in the community than it is from actually have anything to do with microchipping. But we didn't see return to own a rate change it all with stopping microchipping the. The nineteen twenty thousand adopted animals we have come through or the community cats what we do do for them. And it's purely. So we know which ones we have outlets because we we give them a rabies. We know we've had a chance to evaluate them is we put a little tattoo ink inside the tip ear. So if we see them little green notch inside the year with the tip here and a little green notch. We know. Okay. This is one that he made side. He's done. We know we're on rabies some other things about these cats, and are you catching the spe incision site. Also. Oh, definitely. Yep. Yeah. We're catching both places. And what about testing protocols we do not combo test for any of the community cats that we have coming through once again, the the reason really is the numbers we see for those that have tested positive not we've looked at those that we have tested and the percentage rate even for selecting for just the ill ones. And the ones were roaming inbreeding is still only one to two percent for that specific target population. And in general, we were look at all of our cats we test it's it's less than one percent for FBI or FIV. So just for our population for what we see in Minnesota, the percentages of those diseases in our stray cat population similar to what you see across all cats nationwide. And when you adverage all cats were definitely lower. So simply from the return, where's the right place to investor dollars. We have seen. Gene that that doing f- y'all the testing just isn't the right place to resources combo cast cats in your option program, if they have a history of roaming and breeding, then we will basically any tax cat comes over a year old. We will come to us before going optioned floor and the percentages there. Yes. Still continue to be incredibly low. If it's already sterilize house cat that's been someone's house rate years. We're not worried at all then we're just moving those guys through without testing. And we do try and really do just the right work. We can't shelter and not over shelter over work here and get them out in the community and get them out to the veterinarian's. We've got a group of about two hundred plus local vets that are all partner with us in one way or another that offer a free first exam afterwards, and we try and do the basic get them out and really have them build that relationship with that. 'cause that's that's where they need that relations. To be going down the road. We do our part and get him to the vets from their out. Wow. This is an incredibly fascinating conversation. I really appreciate you taking the time to talk with us today. Dr Graham, I have a question for you. He could put your magical crystal ball right in front of you and think ahead ten years from today. How would life be like for community cats in Minnesota or across the country? And if you had also a magical pocketbook, and you could send as much money as you wanted to for community cats. How would you spend that money? There are always going to be cats just the nature of their ability to live successfully in the wild where the population will never completely go away. At least I can see the belt of near future, Kim twenty or something along those lines where I would love to see the infinite pocketbook and see things go is having. All shelters be able to either offer internally they've got that Mary services or refer to a vet or low cost baiter standard a group in their community where any cat that can be sterilized gets to be sterilized. And I would be amazed. If we ever saw day where we truly have every cat sterilized period we sterilize between the vet center and the seltzer thirteen thousand fourteen thousand cats year and have done it every year for many years running, and if not seen those number of necessary sterilizations decrease whatsoever, and we have a relatively smaller cap poppulation other parts of the community. So if we're ever to really get at shelter overcrowding euthanasia exclusively for space within which have to happen for some open admission shelters. It's just the nature of their Dr base and the number of cats that live live in their community if forever to really get at that. Where? We're no longer having to youth Anais, healthy friendly animals. We've gotta sterilize absolutely everyone. We can. So that would be the the magic wand wish is that these resources are there absolately everywhere we bring up a lot of dogs, and at least number of cats from partner communities, especially down south. They are still having to do that. And we are trying to help out through our end became I giving them a place to put some of their cats. But that would be the hope because they're definitely counties and good slots of America where there's a ton of cats, and there's not the resources for for Spain. Neuter. I agree with that one hundred percent on. I also would put all of my money in stay neuter availability for any cat that were owner of tat or caretaker or just any cat to have some sort of connection to those necessary dollars to the necessary Cheryl is Asian that every cat should get. So I'm on the. Page with you on that one. It folks are interested in finding out more about the animals main society, and the work that you are doing how could they do that we have everything through our website. It is animals humane society dot org. All one long big word animal humane society, it is a very generic name. But it's it's kind of a coup that it that it is our name. We are a Minnesota only animal welfare organization, or we have our our physical buildings, but we get occasional calls into our pet helpline from Arizona places across the country because it just animal humane society, but through that website is the best way to get any information on it, heck, even my office, number and Email and those of anyone who's interested in contacting specific part of organization programs. He can find that website. And is there anything else you'd like to share with our listeners today? I always like want to get in front of a good number of people to make an ask for if you're Minnesota every day. Dollar. We get helps us health more animals, and we try and do best we can. But for those other parts of the community anything you can give to your local organization is is going to help things help food help stuff helps. But honestly, most of those groups they really can make the best use the dollars. So if there's ever a chance to be in front of your people, I always ask you your local animal welfare organization 'cause they will make use of it, and they will help as many animals as they can back to grandma. I wanna thank you so much for sharing your time with us today agreed to be a guest on my show. And I hope we'll be able to have you on the future. Excellent. Thank you for having me. Thank you for listening to community cats podcast. I really appreciate it. If you would go to tunes leave a review of the show. It will help spread the word to help more community cats.

Minnesota partner Dr Graham Texas Kitty America Dr Graham Brayshaw Governor Mark Dayton Minneapolis Stacey lebaron PetSmart Saint Paul medical director Austin Brynn Spain director colts
Why We Do This

Our Life In Transition

00:00 sec | 10 months ago

Why We Do This

"Hey Shannon Hey Rachel. Have you been having fun making the PODCASTS? Have I? Wow that's exactly you've been handing off. The production has been hard to do. Not at all do you know why. Yes well I'm glad runs Me To maybe you should tell listeners so now okay fine. I just use anchor. That's right you do. You really do know what I'm doing I do. I do you do it all the time. Let me tell you anchor is the easiest way to make a podcast. It is yes. It has awesome creation tools to help you record. And Edit your podcast so that it sounds great. I hope ourselves great. They give you everything you need in one place in you can use anchor right from your computer or even on your phone on your own. Yes on your phone. Inker will also distribute your podcasts for you so that it can be heard everywhere that people want to listen to spotify. Got It apple podcasts. Also Google absolutely and the best part is it's free which is why we use it. It's crazy if you've been thinking of starting a podcast. This is the best way to begin. Anchor will get you all set up help you get your podcast off the ground and out into the world and you could start making money from your podcast with no minimum listenership precisely what people are waiting for obviously so download the anchor APP now or go to anchor dot. Fm to get started. This podcast deals with issues about LGBT families and transpacific topics we would love to hear from you and welcome your questions and comments however we will not tolerate any discriminatory language or hate speech. So please just don't do. It enjoyed the show. But you know there's a lot of misunderstanding and misinformation about what it means to be trans. What your life will be like what it what it all means and I think ultimately like the goal of why we're doing this is to try to demystify some of the Trans Experience now. Do I speak for every trans person in the world? Absolutely not no because they don't pay us to exactly but not every trains experience is the same. When we were kids. We met at Camp After College. We got married ten years later. We finally had a baby that same year. I came out as trans. This is the story of our journey through marriage. Parenting gender and all the changes that life breaks. This is our life in transition. I think we're ready to go. We have the official popcorn apart coffee. I've got coke Coca Cola Coca Cola. Yeah yes it's not that. Kind of a podcast. Coca Cola is not our sponsor but if you'd like to be down with that I mean taking corporate money what the Hell I I have. I have no no scruples. As far as me. I'm GonNa tell you I don't want to do anything I want them to give me money. Yeah Anyway I'll take free product over Coca Cola anyway. Hey everybody thank you for tuning in my name is Shannon and I am. Rachel and this is another delightful episode of our life in transition. Welcome back to season two. We made it to season to season two. We followed through. Yeah we had quit. We said we'd be back and we are. Yeah look at that Yeah but so. It's been a little while. The last time was before Christmas was before Thanksgiving. I think it was before Thanksgiving and it was like right around Thanksgiving. It's been a while it's been. We haven't had an episode citizen the last decade. It's bullet don't make that face of me but seriously folks the holiday the holidays they they are tough. Air Air super difficult to do anything. Yeah no and especially when you have a two year old forget it a two year old. Who is just exponentially evolving? She's getting crazy smart and throwing like weird complex thoughts and talking to us chattering nonstop repeating everything everything every everything something. She shouldn't repeat. And Miranda is your yup well this popcorn though putting her sentence I probably just like. Yeah whatever popular anywhere kind of hard getting back into staff. It's like when you're on vacation from you know. This is work but like you know you have to do something. Here on vacation is just kind of staring at you. And you're like doing what you do should i. I don't know yeah. I mean it's like you know so. We finally kicked our butts into gear. Pays like you come back from summer. Vacations excited to see all my friends. But I don't want to do homework so I I'm not GONNA lie. There was probably one or two days in the middle of the holidays. Were like how are we going to come back? Should we come back is worth coming back? Does anybody care is anybody. Does anybody care yes. We had some John Adams moments. Yes Call Peter. People but Yeah so in the midst of the holidays. We had some interesting Communications dropping in our lap. And so after that we kind of had to come back back. Do you want to explain what happened in all opening up the materials for us to discuss. Explain what happened? Yeah explain what happened? One day I logged onto our g mail. And they're in. The inbox was a letter. Ooh from a listener and I say letter and I mean e mail because nobody writes letters anymore it was an email was a very nice nicely composed nicely written email and we read it. I read it and then I said Oh my God Shannon you have to read this and I read it to her. Because I wouldn't let her read it because I wanted to to get the full reaction out of her and I read it like. Oh my God. This is so special. Yeah like no right and yeah yeah. So what all excited okay so I guess I'll read a little bit of this just to give you an idea of what what we found in our inbox. One day. No identifying information. No okay so to our listener. You know who you are and you'll know by your email but so it starts off in Nain himself and They're very nervous and but they just wanted to say thank you That the road I've been I've struggled since early. Teens with Sometimes intense destroyer That as I grew older and married and had children Well I thought it was free of this oppressing failing and something was drastically wrong with me about two years ago. A reach a nearly dramatic personal low. It was becoming more obvious to me that I was transgender. But the fear of losing everything. My wife my kids my job. Well it made it worse nearly terminally worse so I hit it all the way. No dressing alone. Nothing so I recognized. I needed to take better care of myself and started eating healthy and working out. The problem was my body was very masculine. that's when I started hitting myself So I mean this is how it started and I'm just like what intense. Yeah what's what's going on. This is A lot and we don't we haven't gotten a lot of communications from a listener so The PICK SOMEBODY. Who's reaching out to to tell us. This was unexpected but very special special. But that's also went. I found your podcast specifically the episode. Not Broken anymore which was episode to know what I don't know about. Yeah it was right right after pride. It was right after I went to Philly pride and was explaining what One friend had said to me about how when she realized that she was Ace how suddenly there were to describe her. How how she felt. She was so happy that she didn't feel broken anymore. And that's exactly how it felt to me. When I realized that I was Trans Am what was going on with me and so they were It to me felt like you're reading my life story all the thoughts the guilt. Shame fear all of it. I've listened to that episode five times and I'm always crying around twenty minutes in So that's what I face. My fears was not easy for me but then I talked to my wife. I shook and cried waiting for her to run screaming which we talk about a lot. That's what everybody expects and she didn't. I believe her exact words were quote. So what is the extreme result? You'll still be my blank but in a different container and happier and I'm not running away so it'd be kind of wrapped up just They wrote about Cut The next few steps that they're taking I can do this because of the support of from my wife and my kids but I never would have discovered that support. If it wasn't for you putting your stories out there if nothing else you've helped me in ways I don't have a character space to type. Thank you for my entire being. I appreciate both of you for who you are will always be indebted to both of you. My wife is one hundred percent supportive But need support to install. Be showing her. This podcast is while this weekend And then They prolonged PS in inset them that after discussing The destroyer with their daughter never desire to transition that Their teenage daughter. I'm told him that she has a crush on a girl. I'm at school and the garlic's are back so Wrote that we've helped at least two people under households so that's a lot. Oh my God and you can. You can see you can hear why we were just blown away you know because like sitting here in the office munching on popcorn blocking and you know they're actually people listening and like it's making a difference so and yeah so it's one of the things we're when we started recording this. We started putting up so doubt. We hope that you know people would listen would be helpful but it. I'm glad for a large part. We weren't even sure who was listening. We could see numbers. Some people were listening. We didn't know who well somebody cares. Somebody carrots and I just. We're glad that we could help. In whatever way we could but And so this is we got this email and then we sat down and said well now we have to come back. We have to. Yeah so here we are. Thanks again for listening to this. Show if you like what you hear so far subscribed so you never miss an episode. Also be sure to share with your friends and family so they can enjoy this. Podcast is made possible by listeners. Like you thank you for your support but I mean that kind of that response. The what they were saying are podcasts was able to do is kind of what was hoping for when we started recording. This I wasn't sure if we would be to help anybody who would have any impact I I I just know that for me. The reason I said. Hey we should start doing this as When I was in the midst of my confusion over my disoriented when I first started looking up what was going on with me. I found a lot of people online. I found a lot of youtube videos. Podcasts out there besides ours but ours is fantastic socialism. And maybe not them. But you know you can listen to them to. It's it's not a competition competition. It's not zero sum game right. Yes you have all the hours. Listen to everybody exactly but it's you know it helped me get to a place of going. Okay I'm not alone. There's other people that are feeling the same thing going through the same thing as May I can't tell you how many times I've been listening to one of the other Trans Pacific or translated. Lgbt podcasts out there that They said something. And I'm just not in my head along driving in the car and lead. Yep that's how it is. Don't name them. They'd have to pay and kidding kidding. Are you know kind of but if you WANNA shout out on the show? Yeah Patriarch for but but I mean and on top of that like you know and there's a couple of other ones there's people that are couples but then we talked about this a little bit before where everybody expects expected. Rachel to just run the frick away that you were gonna up and leave and go. Well we're not doing this and I'm too lazy for that shared. I haven't running years sitting here on my eating popcorn drinking a coke. Why are you talking like that? That's what is that voice. It's my lazy sitting on my butt and even popcorn Bush. Okay all right anyway escalated quickly. I am not going anywhere. Yeah so I mean I think one of the main things that kind of drove us to do was we weren't other people don't like your marriage isn't doomed necessarily because of this because of this I mean SP- caveat. Your mileage may vary but just because your trans just because one of the people in your relationship May Have this for. You may have something else going on. That doesn't necessarily mean that it's it's not automatic divorce. Yeah the unfortunately. Sometimes you know it doesn't work out between people but it doesn't necessarily mean that you should try to hide in order to save your marriage because to save your marriage with because if you're unhappy and miserable eventually is going to come out one way or the other whether it comes out be because of you coming out or whether it comes out you know in a thousand little microaggressions because you can't come out and resent it or you know you're just miserable and unhappy not comfortable in your own skin and that's going to take its toll and you said before that like before. I I I actually came out. You're like what the fuck is going on with. You like. You are not in a good place. Something she was insufferable. Yeah I'm still in suffer for a year or more insufferable. Would you like to expand on in suffer inseparable? No you suffer. I'm sorry you know I was miserable. I'm sorry but yeah like but you know whenever communication is key in any marriage. Yes so if one person is hiding something new whether it's about being trans or having an affair or spending money on something that they shouldn't or whatever it's going to take a toll and it's always better to like be out an open about two to be communicating about what's going on with you because you know your partner does not have a crystal ball. Sir Fortuneteller even so I doubt crystal balls were that good. But so so. If you're not communicating with partner then your marriage is doomed and whether it had whether you're trans or not is not the point. If you if your marriage is unhealthy then this probably will not be a helpful thing but your marriage is unhealthy to begin with and there there. There's going to be something whether it is this or not. That's going to wind up causing an issue and if your marriage is healthy that doesn't necessarily also mean that it's going to survive too. You guys might find that you know. Being friends is better. You might you know you might have a period of time where your partner is grieving. the tra-. The transition that the change the loss of the person that they thought they knew and to be fair. You had that. Yeah well yeah and we had a couple conversations where you were like really like and like in tears upset like where I would say. This is what you signed up for but like you you were. You had like a real fear that the person that I was the person that you knew the person that you fell in love with was going to disappear. The person that I fell in love with has not disappeared. I'm selling a self-rule asshole. It's true she is. She added a pickle craving pickle boobs senior pickles. Can God damn it always comes back to this. Here's the thing. It's the pig madness. Here's the thing about the pickle madness is I haven't Ted's typical cravings. I had some pickles last night but then like I'll be fine. I won't it won't be friend of Mine and then you'll bring it up and now. I'm sitting here like this popcorn scraping any pickles mail. Normal people can talk about pickles without like needing to have pickles as we've established. I'm not normal people which will feel like I need to call. Recovery Centers of America also not a sponsor. Ask them if they had some kind of program for the People Magazine's well probably just blew everybody's ears left. I'm sorry we have to microphones now which you may have seen in our instagram post We got new equipment so it's just so we don't have to shovel faces next to each other to to To try share them. I mean it was nice. It was close cuddling Biden. Your she hadn't pressured he. That's true if I had the pickles. Yeah absolutely. It's a little bit too much pickle breath in your face go using Minton comments anyway. We've gotten off track. So here's the thing the point of this. Is You know we started doing this? Because we wanted to show that you can have a healthy working relationship and that you're not doomed because your trans or because your partner is trends and I mean here's the thing like do we have fight sometimes. Yeah a lot where a couple everybody does. Intense fights yes. Names are called pickle. Madness is thrown in people's faces. But you know there's a lot of misunderstanding and misinformation about what it means to be trans. What your life will be like what it what it all means and I think ultimately like the goal of why we're doing this to try to demystify some of the Trans Experience now. Do I speak for every person in the world? Absolutely not no because they don't pass to exactly but not every trains experience is the same but I but a lot of what is kind of their other out the information. That's out there. There is a lot of it is crap and and there are other. People who have similar experts couldn't speak probably will unexperienced yes? We're not saying that we have the Trans Experience. I don't know we have a trans experience. Ours is pretty good but you know testing really history so modest. That's me what happened. What are the handles broke? Oh Yeah Yeah. Did you break something of mine and not tell me and here comes? The fight broke something of ours. It was old and I went to move it into snapped off because it was frail. And Oh would that. It were that easy. Listen if Ya yes okay. Yes anyway anyway. The point is we're trying to. We're trying to tell you why we decided to do this. And what makes it worth doing and why we decided to come back here and I think the whole point of all of it is Matt Pales or you just haven't we intense burfoot just per but no. I bet you for interrupting me. Sorry because you made may chew go off the track. Part of the whole point of this is like when we when Shannon came out and we got all these myriad reactions from people and stuff like that. I don't know what I was expecting but I was not expecting the confusion confusion. I was not expecting the confusion whereas Rachel going then because clearly. That's not a thing that can happen and then stupid with birth. Alston like no. No houses. Don't hear what are you talking to them. And and what about your child? She's still alive. She's breathing what about her? And and my favorite. How could she do this? How could he do this? Yes how could he do this to you? Hear people were outraged on my behalf outrage unless there's gender and involved you're right you're right and like and along with that there was like this will you know. Can't he? Just choose to ignore it. Just go away and like no. It's up the flu like spree. It's not the flu vaccine for it or take some vitamin C. And restaurant for a couple of days. You'll be fine chicken soup. Sorry No. It's more like a bottle of whiskey every day for the rest of your life so that you can suffer through it and that's what a lot of people do and then they have short lives and honestly that's what boiled boils down to is and I had this conversation with somebody not that long ago that you know the reason I came out is because I wanted to live and if I didn't I wasn't going to so I maybe it seems selfish to some people but I chose My own survival and wellbeing over The meaning that I posted yesterday. Airs Two human figures sitting at a table. One of them says growth. The other one says comfort and growth just looks come in the face and says I'm sorry but this isn't going to work out and I couldn't I couldn't move on couldn't it was pretty damn comfortable. Yeah but you know strike me read the hell out of my comfort zone. Podcast AND PODCAST. This popcorn combinations have been made. It's a little comfortable Yeah so the middle of the afternoon. I can't have a beer so you can have a beer. I'm driving. It's been a long week at work if I have a beer. Obviously okay fine but yeah so hopefully moving forward. We can do a little more to illuminate some of the confusing issues around what it means to be trans what it means to be a couple with a trans partner. And but here's the thing people radius emails and stuff because we have one email and we've gushed on it for entire episode cry. You guys could be famous now just so you know brackets in the podcast world specifically translated podcast amongst listeners. Who listen to this particular protest but famous nonetheless you were just talking about history a second ago so I mean you got big plans for this podcast. I guess fingers crossed still looking for that sponsor. Anybody Bueller Yup. Chris Sorry in intensely loud significance. I promise you I'm drinking cocoa. Nobody here is cold. I have hold. That said see Disney. We just quoted. You're you're frozen shorts. Give us money. Don't say that they'll sue. Us comes out anyway So we're back and We hope that you all come back. Please come back and listen to the PODCAST and hope that we don't put this out there. Nobody listens to US anymore. Because we're going away for a couple minutes please please. We promise that we have an exciting season ahead. Yeah there might be fireworks. Who knows I like fireworks? This is news to me. I'm very excited now. Okay everything I do. You're right and this is why we don't have a healthy marriage. I thought it was diff out what is happening. We're we're really said these people mixed signals. Is this working this hour? They said it was sent people mixed signals for thirty five years. I mean to be perfectly honest. Everybody was like clearly this person's gay when I was like. Oh this is the kid ever and then you came around. They're like what the fuck is happening. And then I was like. Oh no actually. I'm a girl and I'm like Oh that makes sense. Okay neither sutton run some wrong. Okay okay. Fine and Rachel. What are you doing now staying put? Now we're confused again. Yeah you're awake but we were very puzzled so we need to finish this popcorn. Need to go get the Munchkin. I apologize if This entire podcast. It's sounded like Were In the middle of a war zone or something like that. Iran airplane because it's really windy outside on Ireland. I haven't noticed any of it but to be honest. I can hear me crunching on popcorn so Rammai into the microphone. That's what happens when you become a smart ass. Let's see I can't have my microphone. I need you to protect poker anyway. We thank you very much for listening. Welcome back yes. We promise. We won't stay away for a long time again. We will be regular episode ING People. Yeah regularly putting out. Episodes episode isn't a verb. But Listen Rachel. It's not a word yet but all words a made up. Be a pioneer. Okay we will do regular episodes. Yes so But reach out because we want to hear your thoughts so we went to pursue. Give us some ideas. You know some things you want to know about things you want us to stop talking about. If you're totally sick of pickle madness too bad ass life with the transportation but it'd be really fun since Nemo Yourself. Tom Marlins transjet Jesus. Christ this is really crazy stuff. Step kids what all trans refer you to episode one. Yeah any anyway so I think we're done so I am Rachel. I'm Shannon. This has been our transition. Thanks for listening. Yeah Bye thank you again for listening to our life in transition. This show is hosted by Rachel ensuring MacDill our producer and editor is Shannon. Macdill The music. Seize the day by Jens Kill Sock. Check them out at yen's dot kill soft dot net support us on patriotic at Patriot dot com forward slash. Elit pod that's forward slash O. L. A. T. P. Your support makes this show possible thank you.

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