20 Episode results for "Center For American Progress"

How to Build and Improve Employee Loyalty

The MOD report

22:10 min | 3 months ago

How to Build and Improve Employee Loyalty

"For tuning into the corporate shadow. Podcast where we discuss how to maneuver through the ends and outs of workplace politics human resources and leadership. Because no matter what you do at work you are always casting a corporate shadow. I'm dr jonathan and on today's show. I discussed employee. Are you loyal to your organization. Are you ready to quit. Wants the job. Market becomes employee friendly again build employee loyalty. And how do you improve employee retention through loyalty. Exciting this is. This is my thirtieth episode. Since i've started this podcast back in the summer of two thousand nineteen hard to believe. We originally started as a podcast show called the hr and hospitality. And then we transitioned over to the ammo de report or some call it the maud report which actually stands for manager on duty but guess what. We are transitioning once again thanks to subscribers like you and our listeners. All across the world at the time of this recording on december thirtieth twenty twenty. I got my statistics in from spotify and all the other platforms that we post the show on and it's very exciting to see that a lot of our listeners are throughout europe and even brazil once again just like a twenty nine hundred several listeners in brazil so we love you thank you please keep subscribing just because we have a new name we still bring you that wonderful contents that you expect so keep on listening subscribe leave comments were available on all podcast platforms. Tell your friends tell your friend amaze so let's go ahead and let's get into today's topic on how to build and improve employee loyalty a large majority of today's employees regardless of where you're listening until this isn't just a united states issue in terms of covid nineteen and the things we are experiencing in the workplace but at large majority of employs. Today are actually looking for better job opportunities in a not so scientific survey of my friends or a students and whatnot. Several folks have actually said. Yeah when this thing blows over the thing referring to kobe. They plan on quitting their current employer's because of the way they are currently being treated lot of them being treated by essentially having their salaries slashed upwards up to forty percent or they're simply being laid off for load or the threat of it happening of being furloughed laid off and so yeah in the back of their minds are thinking man. This sucks. i'm. I'm gonna quit on our last episode. I talked with scott waldron about employee loyalty and how brands could better align themselves to help improve such loyalty. If you haven't listened to that episode. I i encourage you to go back. Just one show before this and listen to that especially if you are a person in authority such as a human resource executive or an owner or someone who has that empowerment to essentially make that change by. Aligning your brand to ensure that employ loyalty. Please do it. You know go back and listen to that and so today. Today's message is not only for owners and managers but it is for anybody any anyone who is working in the corporate mindset. This message is for you. Recent studies show that more than half of the workers in a typical company are looking for better job opportunities and albeit in a copen nineteen environment although they may not jump ship now because the job market is so tight and more so employer-friendly in the back of their mind. They're contemplating man. I can't wait to get out of here. Jesus when this kobe. Nineteen thing is under control and the job market start shifting back towards the employer disorders the employees. I'm going to quit. I'm going to go work for the better guy across the street. I'm going to go work for the competition. Because of how they treated their employees and how they built such loyalty with their what their staff so on average companies tend to lose a third of their employee base annually and based on these statistics employee. Loyalty really seems to be nonexistent. These days and the good news is it doesn't have to be it doesn't have to be and yet some employers tend to think that you know i'm gonna i'm gonna lay off. I'm going to furlough. And i'm going to rehire those employees back when things turn around. Well guess what those employees regardless of how great they were great they were treated are probably not loyal to you. You know in the last episode again. I'll say this again. When i met with skepticism in that last episode we talked about you know what what makes a great leader and what makes not only just a great leader but what makes an employee loyal to that leader. And it's very simple. You know the analogy. I like to use if you know if you've seen the movie braveheart that's a great example of when we're out on the battle line and you have your general in the front line or in any battle for that situation or your soldiers actually going to be inspired and motivated enough and show loyalty to you to follow you into battle. And if any of those soldiers decide to retreat when that leader looks behind them. And there's nobody there guess what they're not loyal to you so let me back up a second. What does that mean. What does employee loyalty men. Employ loyalty can be described as a worker who remains dedicated to their current employer and they have no desire. This is the key here folks. There's no desire to look for different job that offers better pay or benefits. If a head hunter were to email or call an employee today and dangle a carrot in front of them and say hey we have an opportunity. We think you're really a fit for. Would you consider it if that employee. Even hesitates hesitates for just one moment. They are not loyal to you and that my friends is what we should really be. Trying to think about is in terms of. Why are they not loyal to you. Why are they even hesitating versus reacting. And saying no no thanks. Thanks for that opportunity. Thanks for the call. But i am so happy here. I am so loyal to my employer. They treat me right. This is a truly great place to work not because some some list susilo but because this is a great place to work employers must do whatever they can't to increase employee loyalty throughout their organizations ensuring that workers remained with them for as long as possible. Not only does this make business sense from profitability and bottom line standpoint. But it's the right thing to do you now. Doing so is going to guarantee that the company will not lose that money the prophets or waste time hiring going through the hiring process hiring recruiters you know and and dealing with all that because of losing several employees due to this lack of loyalty. Don't even get me started on the turnover costs of what it takes to hire someone. It is much more cost effective to maintain employees for the longevity of their careers than it is to constantly turn over and hire new folks so to increase employee loyalty. A company needs to improve its positively and decrease or eliminate all the negativity that would drive someone away learning more about what causes positive and negative emotions for employees is the best way for company owners to find out how to improve their employees loyalty. And so how do you do this. How do you do this. How do you learn about what causes positive and negative emotions for your people while the most simple and free and cost effective way to do. This is managed by walking around m. b. w. a. I say this a lot in my shows but we managed by walking around. Get out of your ceo. Get out of your c. suite. Get out of the meeting room. And you know if you're not in an office building right now because you are working from home or working remotely due to the restrictions of the pandemic in which has caused get creative. It's not very difficult to pick up your cell phone. Send a text message. Give a brief call to your employees for a couple minutes a week. You know as the leader of the organization and sm. Hey how you doing. How you holding up. Do you need anything do you have do you know. Can i send you anything. Can i give you something tommy. What's going on. That's managing by walking around folks. You're going to get a lot of information that way. You can do it and the more traditional not so personal way which is probably good on an annual basis and that is an employee satisfaction survey get an employee satisfaction survey that is reliable and valid instrument valid tool meaning that. You'll want to have someone who's experienced survey development and collection to do that so that they can build that survey to make sure that it is measuring. truly what you are wanting to measure. But by doing that you're going to hopefully get some confidential feedback from employees who are going to be willing to share about what's going on. So that's what it's essence. That is what employee loyalty means. So let's talk about some other ways to boost employee retention within organizations based on information at i obtained from the center for american progress. It costs about twenty percents on average of a worker salary to hire a new employees to replace them twenty percent twenty percent. So if you're essentially paying someone one hundred thousand dollars a year it is causing you right out of the gate. It's costing twenty thousand dollars the moment he loves them. Twenty thousand dollars. What can you do at twenty thousand dollars. Well if you're a turnover rate continues to go up and up and you've you've laid off or you have terminated or have turned over four employees at one hundred thousand dollars that my friends is a lot of money. Eighty thousand dollars that coulda went to another employee. Who that you could have hired onto your payroll so twenty percent. That's a high price to pay to replace a worker so taking the time to invest. Not only in your hiring and selection process to ensure that the employee is a right fit or the job candidate is a right fit but ensuring that you are taking the time to invest an employee loyalty you can benefit from that and more ways than one so some ways we can do that. Is we simply offer fair and competitive compensation do not take advantage of your people. It frustrates the heck out of me. When we use the excuse of cove nineteen the september eleventh terrorist attacks. The list goes on right. Use these tragedies. We use the great recession when the housing market collapse. We use these as excuses to lay people off to put that work of those people that were laid off employers. Take that work and they pile it. On to the current individuals that maintain their jobs but then on top of that they slash those employees salaries. Now we use some common sense here for a moment. I get it. We have a business to run. We need to remain profitable etc etc. I get it. But i have seen it enough in the hr high executive level and a looking at the payroll numbers. It doesn't make any sense. It's simple math folks if we are laying off all of these employees and we cut our labor costs by five hundred thousand dollars and you cut labor costs by five hundred thousand dollars. But you're still seeing some prophets coming into your organization and yet you take your current employees and you slash their salaries and then pile on additional work because all those laid off employees. Their work just doesn't go away. What do you do with it. You see it's not fair. It's not fair it's not right and it surely unethical however however if you choose to do that because that is you're right that's fine but i am promising you right now. Those employees are on linked in right now today in their home office or even in your organization and they are looking and they are networking and they are looking for other jobs because of how they are being treated because they are not being fairly and competitively competitively compensated that is why by offering a competitive compensation that is fair across the board. You will have a better chance of maintaining your employees loyalty member if they quit. Twenty percent of their salary goes to hiring someone else. Another way that works pretty well is through a referral program of some sort. You can initiate one of the best way to guarantee. A strong connection between your employees is to create this referral bonus programme having our employees refer their friends for a job or a position can help ensure that you will see a much lower turnover rate. And that's because employees want to work with others whom they already know and trust and in fact when you look at productivity and the data that comes out of productivity employees that feel like they have a friend at work or likely to be productive and have lower absenteeism rates. So that's a win win. Here's a third way allow employees to have more control. Let your employs be more. Empowered stop micro. Managing at does not work. It doesn't work. I don't care what research you've read or whatever you want to argue with me about. It doesn't work many years ago. The key to good company management was to delegate tasks to others today it is recommended that companies have workers who are more engaged meaning that they have the power to make decisions instead of taking orders from others. You gotta give workers more control over how they perform their daily tasks folks. This will improve loyalty because they are actually able to shine by using their creativity their college degrees that they've earned and to use their brains making them feel like they have self worth and not they are making a difference towards your company mission. Do not micromanage do not micromanage. I don't know if i can even say that enough. I should just do a thirty minute. Podcast and just say that over and over again but don't micromanage we listen. If you're going to micromanage why. Why the hell did you hire that person in the first place. If you're going to do it yourself if you're telling them how to do their job. Why are you why like. Why did you even bother hiring them. And paying them eighty thousand dollars a year. If mr and mrs micromanager wants to do it anyway it makes no frigging sense. It makes no sense. So don't micromanage let those employees have control. I promise you they won't let you down. You can still provide site through strong leadership and accountability and goal setting absolutely. You should do those things because we all as employees. We all want to be held accountable. We all want goals that we can meet and achieve but what we don't want is someone pointing their finger at us telling us what to do and how to do it and when to do it and that i need to do it between the hours of nine to five pm and that's the only time i can do it and i have to do it inside my cubicle. That's ridiculous the iphone and much of the great software you're using today was not invented in a cubicle. Between the hours of nine to five the iphone was invented and someone's household most likely between the hours of work and five. Am sitting on a beanbag chair having some beers and pizza and probably smoking weight as my guests. Right computer technicians innovators software programmers. They don't work between these hours of nine to five. So get away from that old school mentality in your old school way of thinking. It doesn't work okay. So i've provided you some ideas on how we can increase employee loyalty how we can maintain our employees. You know it. It's filled with uncertainty. Get at the workplace is filled with uncertainties and the economy is rapidly. Changing high-tech innovations are really eliminated. The need for some human workers right through automated processes through automated customer relation management systems or or cms's cmr's etc. I get it so many people are left wondering if they should even stay with their current employer or if they should leave before their job disappears. A lot of people today are going out and they're getting these certifications in areas that they never thought they would whether it's through. It computer software programming coding etc. Knowing that there's careers out there. That may not be there very much longer. There several professions. I can think of right now whether it's in the construction industry education medical to where a lot of positions. You think we need today are not going to be there. They're not going to be there. all right. automated processes are going to take those over whether it's an automation of how clean hotel rooms and having a robot essentially clean the room or whether it's how we put up drywall. And how we painted when we have a construction project where. I don't need a human to do it. I will have a robot do it and through a so while it's impossible to diminish all the uncertainties keeping our employees and formed of such changes. We gotta think about what's happening in the future. And when there's changes on the horizon communicating those equipping our people and giving them hope in terms of how they can still be part of the team. And how we give it and how we shift and adapt to the new revolution and how we work. That's what we need to do no longer. Are we in the industrial revolution. We are truly as peter. Drucker predicted we are truly in the core of the knowledge workforce and when your employees are no longer loyal and they walk out the door that knowledge has walked out with them. That's a high price to pay. That's a high price to pay. Thanks for tuning. In for more topics burke books and other great workplace leadership visits enos spire dot com. Until then remember you are in charge of your career. Always make it a great dane.

dr jonathan scott waldron brazil susilo kobe center for american progress europe coulda united states tommy
Neera Tanden on Medicare Extra, the Democratic primary and Trump's legacy

POLITICO's Pulse Check

32:27 min | 1 year ago

Neera Tanden on Medicare Extra, the Democratic primary and Trump's legacy

"I feel in the trump era. We have faced a lot of existential threats but it's not my experience at backing down from fate means. You actually win it. I'm Dan diamond this pulse check and how was your attendance president and C._E._O.. Of the Center for American progress and today's guest weighing in on the State of play nearer has led cap for nearly a decade on today's show we talked about caps Medicare extra proposal which would build on Medicaid and the affordable care act to create a new government run health plan. They comes at a moment when the Democratic field is battling over proposals like Medicare for all were more scaled down public options near also discussed the broader Democratic Graddick primary and President Donald Trump's legacy. I mean I can't think of a worse event for the Progressive Bags and healthcare. I do not think they say will survive a second term trump and here's our conversation near attendant. Welcome back to politico pulse. Check great to be with you last time we did. This was two years ago in the middle of Republicans repeal effort of Obamacare at the time you predicted that the bill would be toxic and that Democratic candidates would win win on healthcare in the midterm elections. I I wish my ability to see the future was always true. It's a good batting two. We're talking today because cap has just released an updated analysis of your Medicare Medicare extra plan Mrs Your Coverage Expansion Plan that you've been working on for a few years according to an independent study Medicare extra will lead to everyone in America having health coverage but also keep private insurance while reducing healthcare costs yes. We're very proud of the plan and glad to see the analysis affects it up the way works Medicare extras like a supercharged public option so sale. I don't think if it's him it as a public option <HES> <HES> I think the way to think about it is <hes> it's a universal plan that <hes> ensures that everyone is in the Medicare program and actually improve Medicare program <hes> except people in the employer-sponsored system meaning meaning people get health care from their employers and and those folks can really choose whether they want the new Medicare system <hes> or their current healthcare under their employer but since it's preserving private insurance and there's his new government plan that people could to choose is that not in the public option we'll house it is any challenges there are variety of public option plans <hes> that still in still would have a system in which there are people who aren't covered and our plan in a very forcefully won't we're really proud about our plan is that it does maintain the choice for people but everyone is covered. It's universal coverage and that's a incredibly important point. Why is cap not pushing mm for something like Medicare for all where we know that everyone would be covered by this? One plan as opposed to a world where there is private insurance still well. Is You know there are multiple ways to have universal coverage. If you look around around the world there are single payer systems that are entirely government run but then there many countries European countries that have universal systems of private insurance <hes> often not for profit insurance well regulated insurance but it's still private insurance and we wanted to do is ensure we in a we we very much believe in the value of healthcare as a human right that every American deserves healthcare but we also recognize in the American system system that there is an interesting choice and we thought it was an actually important value to maintain that choice for people who have healthcare today. Is You know one hundred and fifty million Americans are in the employer-sponsored system and we we learned as you can maintain that choice and and actually reduced the costs of moving to a universal healthcare system under our plan <hes> it costs between <hes> two hundred eighty billion dollars a year and four hundred fifty billion dollars artear. That's that's significant dollars can still actually be paid for by taxes exclusively on the wealthy not the middle class and say the wealthiest going to fight like crazy to make sure that those taxes don't take effect they will but actually Ashley. We have a better history over the last twenty years of enacting tax increases on the rich then we have on the middle class if you look over at tax policy over less twenty thirty years in fact both President Obama and President Clinton were able to successfully raise taxes significant taxes on the wealthy clue frozen being an exception to that trend in fact every Republican wants has lowered taxes on the wealthy and George W Bush and trump both lower taxes on the wealthy but democratic presidents have been able to make the argument on inequality grants and others that the wealthy are not paying their fair share so we actually think that is a more stable basis of. Support for a healthcare a universal healthcare system than another one just playing with this idea for a second though in the past week we've seen Congress released the House work to repeal the Cadillac tax and as part of the this was the tax on high value plans. Every obamacare tax has been attacked by some lobby and the individual mandate which some legal minds decided was a tax as well that was attacked when it was struck down at the time people were generally on both sides <hes> d._v._R.. Pretty happy about that is the tax that you're looking at essentially just another form of the individual mandate absolutely not in fact I think the experience of Obamacare and the taxes with Obamacare is a good example of how our tax base make sense the tax the tax that has not been under attack the tax that is still there is the tax on <hes> you know essentially the capital gains tax for the Medicaid program Medicare so that tax has sustained itself from conservatives eh from from even progresses <hes> and I think that that illustrates how actually being able to say this to support a healthcare plan with taxes on the wealthy is is more sustainable then then the alternatives the health wonks like your proposal and part for reason that we haven't even talked about payment read upsetting. You got a very favorable right up from his recliner vox who talked about the impact on hospital rates and lower costs if Medicare's essentially using its power to keep payment down lauren adler brookings wrote quote caps universal coverage plan is worth long look but Democratic Socialists Progressives on the on the left have been picking it apart for preserving private health both insurance and according to Avellino projections of your plan more than one hundred twenty million Americans with still have private Insurance Matt Brunette at the People's policy project quote <hes> it just simply is not true that you can keep your employer plan if if you want to. Why is it important to keep employer sponsored health insurance and the system well? I'd like to first address Matt's quing met Burns Point which is that <hes> under our plan there there are <hes> five million and there there are five million employers five million people who worked for employers who would move to the Medicare plan but that is a small drop in the bucket of people <hes> so you know for most people they will choose one hundred twenty one million Americans in fact would choose to maintain their private insurance. I think of that as an argument in favor of or plan because what we're really saying is given a choice people would choose to keep their employer sponsored plan so do I think the truth of this is that there are two paramount concerns for even Democratic primary voters one is universal coverage to is lowering health care costs our plan and <hes> gets to both it lowers costs through appear rate-setting for everyone in the system and it is a universal plan now we also maintain the value of choice which has been important in every healthcare Kerr debate that has ever existed with the broad public and you're sitting poll numbers that show people like the idea of being able to pick their plan as opposed to having a mandate just just as just this week there is polling that showed <hes> a plan like ours it has seventy one percent as single payer plan has forty one percent with the broad public that is before the rough and tumble of a congressional debate in which <hes> stakeholders are training their or fire on every single person so you know I will want to be clear the insurance companies don't like our plan either but we start at at seventy one percent support in the public not forty-one so going back to your point though in choosing a plan I think the progressive argument isn't necessarily that people with stick with private insurance out of out of preference for it but more that in our current system I'm at politico politico might switch insurers from CIGNA TO AETNA united which has a different set of benefits different doctors and providers so when Joe Biden Former V._p.. Gets up and says if you like your plan you'll be able to keep your plan under my idea and other Democrats make make that same argument that that's an argument that they can't promise will happen because employers my boss. My boss's boss's boss could say were switching insurance plans tomorrow I I'm not I'm not arguing. I I have not argued in favor of our plan that everyone who likes their plans. Get to keep it because as as you know that's actually not true today if you can really like your plan and your employer can choose to change it. What I'm arguing is that we give you for most employers what we saw the lear ear data is that most employers will continue to offer their insurance and then it's really up to the employees where they want to keep it or move into a better Medicare program than the current program and what we see is a hundred twenty? One million people choose to keep their plan which I think is a statement that <hes> single payer plans are taking away choice from a lot of people unnecessarily. You mentioned that insurers don't like your plan cap in the past has had donors like Blue Cross Blue Shield Association. I looked at your most recent donor listed did not see them there or any. Hope you for looking at the most recent. I appreciate that I'm a reporter. It's kind of my job but are any health insurance still donors. I I don't we first of all no no private. <hes> no company can be a anonymous donor. All companies are public donors. I believe we do not have any insurance <hes> support <hes> but I would say that the insurers are <hes> any the insurers are pretty clear that they oppose our plan and how do you know that I think they've put out statements that they've has clam but we've definitely heard for. We've heard criticisms directly from insurers one one last question just on health. I should say they oppose a public option and we are much more expensive. <hes> we limit insurance much more than a public option as I remember when Joe Biden came out with his plan about a week and a half ago which was a public option in a smaller scale and the Partnership for America's healthcare future which is the industry backed group very quickly said we are opposed Medicare expansion of any kind the the one last question I had here was just thinking about how big game you talked about seventy one percent support for your proposal or similar proposals at this point and yes every time a healthcare proposal comes out it starts high and almost always goes goes down as negative some plans. Don't start that high even though Medicare for all is not polling as well. There's an argument that it's a more expansive vision of what should happen to America's healthcare system awesome why should Democrats just aim as ambitiously as possible for changing how healthcare is delivered so if they need to fall back there can be a compromised plan like Medicare for America Medicare extra so I want to be clear that I think people should support. I have respect for single payer advocates <hes> I think these are two ways to get to universal healthcare and substantively a respect both plans. I think that we should recognize the that we live in a world that is is perhaps not our optima world. which is we live in a world in which we have a trump presidency? We are going through primary debate. The success of or failure of a healthcare idea through the primary and general election will mean a lot for the future of the debate so just to age myself here. I worked on Hillary the Clinton campaign in two thousand seven two thousand eight and then I went to Barack Obama's campaign and the general election there is a heavy <hes> <hes> intense debate in the primary process but was really critical is is that Barack Obama as general election candidate defended his plan and actually went on the attack on healthcare and had a decisive victory but also was seen to have won the healthcare debate against John McCain which meant meant that which made people in Congress much more comfortable with pushing that debate I and that set up the conversation so I actually think it is important to have broad public support for a healthcare plan in the primary and in the general election and we know trump will attack plans you will attack everything has socialism but having a tax having a plan that perhaps you know that relies on middle class taxes or takes away private insurance are going to be more susceptible attack to attack in general election so I don't apologize for having a plan that meets progressive goals like like universal coverage <hes> and addresses broad interest in the public like lowering health care costs <hes> all why maintaining choice which is evaluate a lot of people have because I believe this plan best sets up the next president to actually have healthcare for every single person and I am happy to debate that with people who just want a public option and happy to debate that with people who want single payer <hes> because I think thank our ideas are not about making ourselves feel good about the optimal world our ideas about about making change in people's lives and insuring people who need health care actually get it. Something tells me you'll be having that made with a single payer advocates for at least the next nine months. We've we've talked about health coverage. There are other issues in healthcare in the primaries and in the general election that I know cap believes need to be focused on what in your mind Nira needs to be another another top health priority for Democrats well. I think there's a broad issue which interacts with <hes> <hes> expansion but isn't limited to it which is if you if you really think about where the public is. Anxious it's really bad healthcare costs. That's pharmaceutical costs. Let's healthcare costs premium so how <hes> how a healthcare plan actually reduces healthcare costs. I think is a vital debate and we're happy to discuss house. Ours does is that I think pharmaceutical costs drug costs <hes> really important issues and we're very proud of the work has done over several years ran drug pricing <hes> Emma Lars for example <hes> Emma Lars for drugs medical loss ratio ratio for the five people who listen to this podcast. You know what I know I I'm giving I'm assuming broad knowledge from the audience because I needed to do that. That's my job as a hero. The Time Democrats who tell me we need to talk about pocketbook issues. We need to talk about healthcare so election is going to be decided by healthcare and you have talked quite a bit about and not just podcast but I looked at your twitter feed before coming in and you've tweeted about your Medicare extra plan or re tweeted people about a dozen times this week <hes> and yet I get the sense that trump and his behavior or his actions the Russia investigation regardless of what Democrats want to talk about that's what ends up not just consuming media attention but consuming a lot of political energy to take Robert Muller's testimony on Wednesday. I looked at your twitter feed for that. I definitely tweeted about that. We do not at twenty three times. Where does healthcare really rank as is an issue set that gets people fired up in the trump era so I think this is a fascinating at issue and <hes> an important debate because if you looked at <hes> everyone's twitter feed in the fall of twenty eighteen eighteen or <hes> new the car the national media conversation it it is consumed by trump's behavior and not irrationally so your President United States who does in my view aborted things on a regular basis say they do <hes> it is it that is subject to national media attention because <hes> because <hes> it is deeply problematic <hes> but I think what's instructive about what happened? In two thousand eighteen is candidates audits because that information is so pervasive you can kind of assume it <hes> and a lot of candidates spent their time talking about healthcare costs preexisting conditions defending the A._C._A.. <hes> prescription drug costs candidates candidates. <hes> ran ads on healthcare vase. They did town halls on healthcare. They really use the different differentiation on healthcare as a central as a central <hes> line of their campaign argument and I hope this happens again in the future which is the national media debate can be here <hes> and the national media discussion and cable channels the candidates early spending some of their time talking about let people are do what their policies would do for <hes> you know the public and what's interesting is essentially. I think a lot of people are just you know a lot of people who don't pay attention all the time <hes> actually are hungry for politics. That isn't about someone's twitter feed isn't about <hes> you know the latest craziness <hes> that's happening out of Washington or Washington dysfunction but are actually interested interested in how is someone going to make my life better and that is on the politicians to to make that case if you look at people's town Democratic candidates town halls they spend a lot of time talking about what they do. They're about two dozen Democratic candidates still running in the primary where does cap tab fit into this process so <hes> think tank or you advising all of them or then coming to you for all your your blessing and we're a think tank and our goal is to provide ideas that are available to everybody all the campaigns <hes> getter materials all our campaigns many campaigns. I think all of the campaigns have reached out to us on something issue or another you talk to personally. I think I've I've seen I've talked to most of the campaigns. At some point. <hes> we want the debate to be an issue rich debate and <hes> we are proud of the role we played on health care. <hes> a lot of candidates have adopted. Are you know we put forward a framework on democracy as the basis of our national security Mizzou candidates have taken really used that framework <hes> and take in particular ideas so <hes> maternal mortality. It's it's ideas turn on tonight mortality. We did a universal child care plan a few years ago. A lot of people thought are John Universal Child Care plan a lot of advocates that it was too bold at the time that we did it but over the last several years removed Patty Murray to take that plan and and as Senator Patty Murray and now Senator Warren has a plan. That's you know similar in size and scope tour plan so you know we're we're proud of playing that role where we have ideas that are available to everyone and then you. I know some <hes> a slew of candidates. Take our plan <hes> versus other plans as a candidate stepped up and said I want to take Medicare extra as my plan. You do have any indication of that so actually <hes> that our work <hes> endorsed endorsed Medicare for America similar <hes> which is very similar is live very similar congressional plan <hes> Kojo K. sponsored by a representative Delauro and Schakowsky so he's identified that as his as his plan <hes> Mayor Buddha judge has talked about Medicare for all whom wanted so that you may well be using about our plan or more of a public option but I think he's in the in the in the Ballpark <hes> Hulan Orlando Castro a couple of weeks ago said that he was for a Medicare a universal plan but Medicare available to everybody so I think he was sort of referencing our plan but a few candidate sewer in the top tier of of polling Kamla a Harris has not adopted a plan yet as she someone who could be the Medicare extra avatar and I'm always I'm always happy to receive their calls. Let me ask that a different way. Do you have a preferred candidate. I do not have a I do not have a preferred I do not have I do not have preferred candidate period be based on your twitter feed. I don't think Tulsi ranks. I mean you know I have some. I have some questions about some of the candidates I will admit that what happens Athens's Democrats don't win the White House in twenty twenty. How devastating will that be for the progressive movement I mean I can't think of a worse <hes> event for the Barez movement is and healthcare? I do not think they say will survive a second term. If trump so survive based on Congress Act taking action or administrative changes to the I think if he wins reelection <hes> it will be hard to keep the house. It's hard to keep the house if if he's won reelection the heart you know people should remember the house. Democratic majority rests on a lot of Republican leaning districts so if he has t. v.'s win reelection seems hard to win the house. I'd see I'd say it's possible on both ends at least east administrative but structurally <hes> I think he would make he would he would he would successfully be able to take it on anything beyond the A._C._A.. In healthcare worry about I will get so much attention but let me just say I worry about every aspect of humanity. If Donald Trump is reelected I can't I mean it's the existential threats will will be pretty large scale so in hope people get active over the next year and a half. I think it's fair to say that you don't back down from a fight battle with progressives socialists on twitter I mean I really feel like I just defend myself on twitter the voice but I would say like my basic take is I trained to defend <hes> you know our views and my views and I feel in the trump era. We faced a lot of existential threats but it's not my experience at backing down from a fate means. You actually win it a few months ago. You Attack The New York Times for interviewing your mom I did I. I didn't even attack the New York Times The New York Times. <hes> interviewed my mom under I think they were. I think they were a little <hes> what his word they weren't clear about their intentions when they interviewed my mom and <hes>. I didn't think it was behavior. That was befitting of a great great newspaper. We've never talked about it but my understanding was the New York Times this pitched a profile because the two reporters on that a political reporter Vogel Ken Vogel and Elizabeth Williamson The profile writer. My sense was that Elizabeth Williamson was working on a profile and then it got retrofit to be more of a political story and perhaps your mom spoke to the times when it was more of the profile story than the near attend inverse breathe <hes> Bernie Sanders Supporters Story then New York Times reset to my mother with the idea. The reporter reached out basically claiming they were going to write a favourable profile of May which I think at the end was not accurate and my mother reached back out to her and said she didn't she didn't think she was going to be quoted and <hes> and was only told old far later that she would base. I did not think that was honest outreach but you know it was kind of painful experience that I'd like to not relive. There seems to be a lot of unfocused outrage in the world these days I don't you know if that's just a function of social media allowing people to be mad. I've I've experienced this myself where the wrong word in a tweet lead to an immediate online pylon. Do you think that this moment is predictive of where we we are going politically or wilder. Come a time when we move from fighting to peacemaking. I think that what is energizing the level of anger. Her in the world is a sense that so many core values are under assault. I mean we basically live in a super tribal period. Where what I what drives trump is actually just attacking liberals Liberals feel under assault and we in the in the tribal warfare goes down my my soul? Hope is that with the defeat of trump we can then move. I'm not saying that everything will go back to normal or he's just an aberration but you can't get back to trying to resolve the bonds of country while he's president so I think it's a lot of work for us to go back to a point where we can actually have policy discourses. It's not like everything when you're doing is because you're a complete sellout pig or everything I've done is because I have some weird motive issue. We actually go back to discussing the polly policy differences we have and how do we make good policy. How we make the country better but we can't really do that in a time time where everything is warfare because people just don't have the emotional space for that in everything has worked for because we have a president who makes everything warfare and you know he succeeds by humiliating or attacking or denigrating some other group of people? I mean that's what is attack on the squad is basically creating atrium democratic or young democratic congresswoman of color of color Taylor who he you know he wants to make his an enemy and people feel under assault in that moment and they they are angry. People who are not one hundred percent allies and I just think that that is a world that is going to stay with us until at least we removed him and we it'll be a lot of work after that. It's not like it's over with him. There's a great new book up by my colleague Tim Alberta I now I have to read it. I haven't American-carnage. It's worth reading all six hundred. I'm fifty pages kind of want to read it on the other hand. I feel like I'm living in. Why do you know it's one of those issues? which is do we need to? We you know it's not even like it has a happy ending so sure it regardless this of how you feel about reading it. I think it is instructive. In explaining how we got here and essentially like the Republican Party withers is what Tim Chronicles and trump steps in and takes over the party with that makes me wonder is looking at the Democrats who is as leader of the Democratic Party right now. The leader of the Democratic Party will be the nominee that is there is a leader in waiting just to be clear in two thousand nine the leader of the Republican Party leaders of their Bogan birdies were John Baiter her and Mitch McConnell. I mean were these compelling figures in American history no then you don't get one until you have the primary thing to say is a person who wins in a field of twenty three. We'll be seen as <music> a successful political leader because it is such a competitive field and you know people complain. There's a lot of talent on the Democratic field. There were a lot of extremely talented people running for president. Whoever emerges merges will be the leader of the Party and hopefully you know president of the United States to save us from the madness? Barack Obama has virtually disappeared from the public eye. Is that a good thing for Democrats. You know I'm really torn about says because there's so many times I think like you know like people need some hope and the to remember that there's like there was a time in American politics wasn't so ugly on the other hand and <hes> we have to essentially create our own future. He's not coming back as president much as I would like that. It's not happening so I think a little bit of it as he's ensuring they're space for other leaders in the future and I'm sure it's somewhat maddening to him to see the country as it is but I think it's more important that we create the leadership of the future and it's it's painful but it's you know him him. tweeting a lot isn't going to change it. Change what we're dealing with less question. If a Democrat wins the White House and there is a rush to staff up the administration. Would you want to go into a democratic administration. I plan to have a good lifetime cap but I definitely need a vacation vacation so I might take if there's a Democratic president. I might take a month off to dislike hang out on a beach. I will confess that because you know I mean doing with this. Crazy is not easy day to day. Which <hes> which beach do you go to? I you know there's so many California beaches I love. I think what I would do is do a weekly tour of the beaches on the west coast that that would be my plan and start off point Reyes beautiful and then like head had all the way down to San Diego something to potentially look forward to in twenty twenty though a few other things happen to have tendon president of CAP. Thanks for joining political pulse. Check again great to be with you. Thank you so much for having me. That's for pulse check this week thanks to near attendant at cap as well as COUNC- Burger and Chris Ford for making the conversation possible Jenny. I meant for producing the show. If you like politico pulse check you can help us by reading reviewing our show.

Medicare president Donald Trump twitter President Obama America politico Joe Biden White House The New York Times. assault Center for American progress reporter Congress President Clinton
Jobs Friday: The Racial Unemployment Gap

The Indicator from Planet Money

09:08 min | 1 year ago

Jobs Friday: The Racial Unemployment Gap

"N. P. R. Breath Carbon. Stacey in the day couldn't arrive fast enough because today I didn't even finish it's Friday. That's what the Air Horn signifies because jobs. Friday couldn't even wait very special official day. It comes only once a month and there is a lot to celebrate this month. In the month of January the economy created impressive. Two hundred twenty five thousand thousand jobs and the unemployment rate was three point six percent which means that the unemployment rate stayed close to its lowest point in about fifty years. Now on this show show. We have cited this low unemployment rate before as a sign of a relatively healthy labor market. And when you break it down further it's also true that the unemployment rate has come down in recent years for every group of workers but that does not mean that the unemployment rate is the same for every group fright. The Bureau of Labor Statistics breaks all these numbers down reports on the unemployment rates for different racial and ethnic groups for white workers for example the unemployment rate is down close to three percent but for black or African American workers. The story is really different. Their unemployment rate is still six percent twice as high as the unemployment rate for white workers and this gap gap between black and white workers is known as the racial unemployment gap and that is what today's show is all about. It is also the focus of ongoing research by Ben Gadget Lori a senior economist at the Center for American progress. One of the things that I find is that the black one implement rate is twice the white unemployment rate but the key is that gap has has been consistent since January of Nineteen seventy two when the Bureau of Labor Statistics started following it since one thousand nine hundred seventy two almost five decades ago that ratio of roughly two to one one for black unemployment to white unemployment has held in fact for most of that time the ratio has been higher than two to one and this unemployment gap between white and black workers also so exists when you focus just on workers with the same educational backgrounds or when you zoom in on the same age groups or other categories for example black women have a higher unemployment rate right than white women and black workers with college. Education have a higher unemployment rate than white workers who also have a college degree. Benda argues that this gap is the result of when he calls structural racism. Says it's really important to understand. What the word structural means in this context so we think about racism we think about individual behavior someone being racist towards Schwartz someone else structural? Racism is that system is created so that people of different demographic groups end up getting further behind an outcomes so example of that is the criminal justice system so their studies showing that White person gets arrested is less likely to be incarcerated than a black person so once someone gets involved involved in the justice system when they're incarcerated once they come out they are going to have lower outcomes than anybody else if we have people who are more likely to be incarcerated. That's GonNa Create Racial gaps in outcomes like employment We think about education systems. The schools that are in certain segregated areas are going to have worse Outcomes and then you create these racial gaps without individual behavior because the system is creating these gaps Benja highlights a few trends to show that structural. Racism is what's causing causing get employment gap and it's not the result of something else. The most important trend is the sheer persistence of the gap itself through both good and bad economic times. This this includes times when the labor market has been really strong or tight tight so when economists say tight labor market they are talking about a situation where the economy is so strong and so so many people have jobs. The businesses really have to work hard to find employees. This tends to make it harder for businesses to discriminate against groups of workers because they just need eight people to do the jobs. For example. Black workers or people with disabilities and mega says a tight. Labor market can have that effect. It's a great thing. And in fact. Participation dissipation in the labor force and participation means either looking for work or finding work has gone up faster for black workers then for white workers in recent years as has the labor market has gotten tighter and yet the racial unemployment gap has stayed the same and what that suggests is that even once. Black workers are in the labor force and looking for work they still face systemic barriers to actually getting hired that white workers do not face and so one thing that we know about with African Americans. Is that a Lotta Times Times. They are the first fired and alas hired. A lot of research has shown that this is the case in a lot of cases. It's actually the first fire. That's more of a stronger effect that when there's a downturn Africa's are usually the ones that are fired I for example during the deep recession that ended now more than ten years ago the black unemployment rate went up more more than the white unemployment rate and took longer to start recovering than the white unemployment rate did and a trend that big bang says cannot be the result of individual or isolated cases of racism. It's happening on to scale across the whole economy. That's what he means by systemic or structural racism a simple way to put it is that it's racism without racists and obviously Benghazi is not saying that there are no racist in the economy. Would he's trying to say. Is that to shrink. The racial unemployment gap policies have to address the system that creates a gap in the first place and ask for what might work Bengal will share some of those ideas with us right after the break support for this podcast and the the following message come from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of American businesses are using Google tools to grow online learn learn more at Google dot com slash. Grow support also comes from the capital. One saver card earned four percent cashback on dining and entertainment to percents at at grocery stores and one percent all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in capital one. What's in your wallet? Terms apply Benghazi Jewelry says that policies to close the racial unemployment gap between black and white workers can't just leave the burden for shrinking the gap on individual people or individual individual companies. They have to address systemic problems. Here's one example. The biggest key is with a mass incarceration and so one of the things that we know about is that there's huge racial disparities in the criminal justice system and when people come out of the criminal justice system they have a hard time of being able to join the labour market. So there's things that we have. We can focus on in terms of employers. I think about programs that higher formerly incarcerated individuals. They work there and now to get skills and then they get kind of Think about like a stamp of approval so the become more employable. Because what you want you wanna put the onus on employers to say oh they use that as an excuse to say well what. We don't trust people who were formerly incarcerated but if you're able to get rid of bias any program or policy to get rid of that bias is going to to help. Close that gap. Another thing recommends is to bolster the staff and funding of agencies that exist to enforce civil rights laws and which are empowered to investigate a business win. A worker brings a claim of racial discrimination agencies like the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission the Federal Agency created in nineteen sixty five as part of the civil rights. ACT The EEOC. Oh see is there to combat employment hiring discrimination however over the last forty years the EEOC has been systemically dismantled lower staff law resources and they are the groups not just a federal EEOC but state level groups need to be able to enforce the rights laws so why these to enforce the existing laws and strengthened laws strengthen the agencies that enforce laws another thing Bunga says would make a difference changes in the economics profession itself. He's an economist and he notes that black economists are underrepresented in economics relative to the overall population and in fact he thinks that is one of the reasons. The racial unemployment gap hasn't gotten more attention. Even though it's been there and pretty much fixed for half a century it's one of the things that it's been fifty years that we've seen this unemployment rate gap and economists should have been looking at this over the last time but this is something that only recently. I've noticed when I've been focusing on it. That people have talked talked about it that has made some of the newspapers made some of the articles about jobs day but not enough people talk about it and I think that has to do with. Who are people looking at the numbers who are the economists there? There himself tweets about the labor market every jobs Friday at Benja underscore adulatory and in fact. That's where we came across his work and as always we'll have links that we referenced Prince in today's episode. NPR DOT org slash money. This episode was produced by Lena. Sons Giri in fact check by Britney Cronin our editors Patty Hirsch and the indicator is a production of N._p._R.'s.

Bureau of Labor Statistics Equal Employment Opportunity C Air Horn Stacey Google N. P. Benghazi official Center for American progress senior economist Benda Schwartz Benghazi Jewelry NPR Prince
Trump Officials To Overhaul National Environmental Policy Act

Environment: NPR

03:45 min | 1 year ago

Trump Officials To Overhaul National Environmental Policy Act

"The trump administration is expected to announce sweeping changes to one of the country's most consequential environmental laws. Today under the proposal federal agencies wouldn't have to consider climate change when approving major new projects like oil pipelines highways. We've got NPR's Jeff Brady with us to explain. Jeff Good morning tell us more about Sir this change what it is expected to do. Yeah this lies called the national environmental policy. Act It's better known by its acronym Nipah and it's been around for fifty years. It requires your special agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before approving him. Now doesn't say that the agency has to choose the least polluting option. It just says that they have to think about the environmental consequences and that gives the public the opportunity to see what the government is doing and how it arrives at its decisions and Nipah. It also gives the public a chance to a comment on those decisions and it also gives environmental groups a chance to comment over the years through a series of court decisions and as some of these issues have become more complicated The need for process has gotten long up to six years. That's because some of these big projects like a gas pipeline or big highway. They have a a lot of environmental consequences to consider. Okay so that's what the law is and what it has done previously. What's the change about? Why is it happening now? Since these these industries have long complained about The time it takes to get through the process it's expensive They want these regulations streamlined. And that's what the trump administration is proposing to do here. Some of those groups led by the. US Chamber of Commerce have long been working with the administration to rewrite the regulations. We haven't seen all the details yet but they're gonNA come out later this morning. And there are some early indications of what they've come up with one big issue is whether an agency has to consider the cumulative environmental effects of a project and think about an oil pipeline under these changes the agency would count only the environmental effects of building that pipeline environmentalists agency. You should also have to count all the oil. That's flowing through that pipeline. They argue that not doing that. Makes it very difficult plan plan for climate change so anytime you lift regulations. I mean fair to say the industry is going to be pleased with this change. Oh Yeah from early indications you can definitely say they're very pleased with this They don't like the direction that the Nipah cases have been heading in courts They've There have been some recent decisions about Oil and gas drilling on public land and about pipeline construction where judges has said that agencies must consider climate change during the process That adds all that complication. And there's another big change that we're gonNA see here Companies would be allowed to conduct their own environmental reviews Christie gold fast. She's with the Center for American progress and she was an environmental the official during the Obama Administration. Here's what she had to say about that. This is clearly a conflict of interest to just say to the company. Go ahead and and tell us what the environmental impacts are going to be. Does anyone believe that's actually going to result in information that the public can trust or that we can use is in the future to make wise decisions right. self-regulation is always sort of problematic so once these changes are announced what happens then. What president trump? He's expected to make this announcement himself at the White House later this morning. And there's GonNa be a public comment period but there's a question about whether this will ever even take place because there's is going to court challenges and then we don't know if it's GONNA become finalized before the November election alright. NPR's Jeff Brady on this news today. Jeff thank thank you for explaining it to us. We really appreciate it. Thank you Rachel.

Jeff Brady Nipah NPR Jeff Good US Chamber of Commerce Jeff government White House official Obama Administration Center for American progress Rachel Christie president fifty years six years
Erica Williams Simon, entrepreneur and author: The only way out of feeling stuck is to move.

Skimm'd from The Couch

33:59 min | 1 year ago

Erica Williams Simon, entrepreneur and author: The only way out of feeling stuck is to move.

"Today's episode is brought to you by. Hr Block tax pro go expert tax. Prep without the office visit doc the only way out of feeling stuck is to move and by movement I mean create some space in your life to start trying to think. Think deeply and proactively about what can I do to change things. What can my next? FBI You won't necessarily find the immediate answer but it's asking the key questions. Shins that I think can help. I'm Carly's Aitken. I'm Danielle Weisberg. Welcome to skim from the couch. This podcast is where we go deep on career advice from women who have leapt from the good stuff like hiring and growing a team to the rough stuff like negotiating your salary and giving or getting hard feedback. We started the skin from a couch. So what better place to talk it all out than where it began on a couch today. We welcome Erica. William Simon to skimmed from the couch. Erica is a writer podcast hosts and the CEO of Sage House media as a self-described -scribed professional question asker. She facilitates conversations to inspire social change. Her new book you deserve. The Truth Discusses The career decisions nations. She made in order to re write her life story and she shares. How you can do the same Erica? We are so excited to have you with US mainly because you have interviewed us many times and now we have you on the other side of the table. I'm kind of your good energy. Yeah I'm like I mean I feel a lot of pressure. You're the welcome to the couch. Thank you for having me. So we're GONNA start how he started every interview. Just Skim your resume for us. So I started out my career in politics six. I'm born and raised in the DC area and went to the leadership conference on Civil and human rights which is the nation's oldest largest civil rights coalition that no one has ever heard of. But they're behind every major piece of legislation since the march on Washington and they're a coalition of women's or LGBT or eggs and black and brown ours and so what was awesome about. It was right then I got to kind of get a lay of the land of the entire like social justice progressive policy world. So from there I went to run in the national use arm for the Center for American progress which they call like the White House in waiting. It's Clinton Chief of staff ran it and it was just the forefront of progressive policy and my job was to figure out how to work with young people millennials to get them involved and support their campaigns and in the process ended up on TV quite a bit and my spokesperson and fell in love with that part of the work did a couple more jobs in that arena went to the citizen engagement lab which is like this really cool incubator for social change projects and kind of had carved out at this role for myself as like the Voice of Progressive Millennial America. You know what I mean and I loved it and it was fine and it was flashy and exciting and yet there was a part. Pardon me that felt like I want more than this. For my life felt very limited then became the creative director the first creative director of up worthy which at the time was like a social good buzzfeed inroad a buck and then went to snapchat and built a program. They are called the creators lab. It was the first of its kind. It was a program physical space to bring storytellers digital media creators and influences together to have meaningful conversations. And now I run my own company. So that's the that's the resume and the highlight so we can get when something not on your linked in that we should know about you. I have been singing in the choir and directed McGuire. That was a little girl so music is like my passion outside of work and I bring that up. Just because it's kind of what I do is try to create the same spaces professionally that I felt. As a little girl growing up a pastor's kid singing and having meaningful meaningful conversations and community with people that still very much a part of the mindset that I bring to everything I do. What's your favorite song to Sing Whitney? Houston's I love the Lord which she sang in the preacher's that's why I love it. It's so good. When you started to say Whitney Houston I was like Oh my God me too? I'm like I WANNA dance with somebody and then you went into. Yeah I know I'm GonNa Dance. Somebody's a good one. So let's talk about how you grow grew up in DC. Your father was a preacher. You call yourself a preacher's preacher's daughter for life. What does that mean to you? The way that I view the world everything than I am came from that experience so the way TV depicts black. Churches coaches is actually not the way that most black churches in America are most of them are actually very small kind of like mom and pop. They call them storefront churches. So that's what ours was and felt like a giant family family. He started the church literally in our basement when I was nine months old. So when people say they grew up in church like literally of course then the church moved out and had the real building and all that stuff but my life revolved around a couple of key principles around service so ours was the door that was always open. If you needed a place to stay needed to be bailed L. out of jail in the middle of the night like you called my father it was that kind of orientation around just selfless giving it was oriented around having honest authentic conversations so whether it was because he was counseling people or the group or Sunday mornings. It was just this. Is the place where you can be real where you can be. Authentic used. Always say like we're not interested. Is it in your Sunday. Best like how you look in your outfit but we want to get to know the real you and have meaningful conversations and so that is kind of been a thread through everything that I've done in my life. I've realized that I've been doing that whether it was in the sphere of politics or media or attack my main mission was select. Let's cut through the BS and have meaningful conversations that can help you change your life and change the world in some way and I got that straight from from my father and really both of my parents. We met you with four ever really knowing this part of your background and so it was really really fun to kind of research and read more about you realize what a huge part of who you are is really based around your dad and based around growing up that way and around faith we are struck once said where you said you define in view faith specifically that your faith is about wonder what does that mean in general but particularly for for our generation for those who grew up like in the nineties in two thousand and even now the way that faith is presented in the public sphere is very much about certainty. Like you have to know these these things and believe these things. There are these lines around religion. That safe you you know you have to know with absolute certainty that this happened in this way and I just find and that to be such a limiting way of thinking about a God who was ultimately big massive and unknowable. Right and so I prefer to think of faith as looking at the. Aw and under of the things that I don't understand the things that there are no clear answers for. I'm not GonNa sit in debate science. There's an answer for that right but there's so many things we don't know and don't understand and you can't put words to love you can't put words to kind of like your own growth and development and all of these beautiful amazing things and so my faith practice is really really grounded in just the wonder awe of life and how how it exists and how we communicate and engage with one another and I think if you do that you can kind of free yourself from so many restrictions that society and institutions have put on your faith and your spirit and your internal life. I feel like that was beautiful too. Yeah I'm amazed that someone who has this authentic sense to face can then go into politics girl me too and and I are benthic since a face because I think that both parties all parties. There's kind of a religious pandering. How did you reconcile that? It was was hard but I went and pretty naive. I went into that world for the purest reason possible which I must say actually a lot of my colleagues did to. Let's be clear. A lot of people who are doing social impact work whether on the activist side of the political side tend to go in with a really pure mission. I want to change people's lives. I went to help help. People recognize their own power change systems and structures all that stuff like I felt like it was a continuation of my fathers when he did in our community. And I was like. This is just a different Scale a different level in a way to do that that you know spirit and and services one thing but let's talk about systems so I went in with that mindset and then saw what it is that I think everybody sees. which is you know all the red tape all the hypocrisy again very similar to how most people view religion right these are institutions? That are very change focused and I think when you go in with that power gets involved and things become corrupted and so it was really hard and talk about this in the book and the chapter on faith with and actually in the chapter on work and in identity. I think I talked about I do but just this idea that I was struggling to reconcile all the different parts of WHO. Yeah I was and so at work. I didn't talk about faith a lot for very obvious reasons right especially if you're progressive. We're not supposed to talk about that. Because Faith Jason Religion is supposed to be owned by conservatives and so that's just not a thing that's really cool to talk about and then on the flip. When I was home in my faith environment I was not talking about the fact that like Hey I am on the frontlines literally fighting for marriage equality fighting for reproductive rights and justice which were taboo topics in the church and so I was was kind of walking this line for a while and I think part of why I ended up at a point where I said? I can't do this anymore. I have to remake my life and write a new story for myself was because because of that I was living kind of this divided existence. Well a lot of people. It's a don't necessarily have the extreme of the divided existence that you're referencing. Lots of people have a job and feel like this isn't me like I'm not doing what I'm supposed to be doing fulfiled because of a multitude of reasons but ultimately this is informed me. That doesn't mean that everybody is like okay. Take a step back and rewrite my story really really hard thing to do and to have the courage to do I want to just kind of get into your mindset around around how you thought about stepping away from that and also I wanNA talk about relationship with money because it's not just emotional courage that you need to have to step away from something but it's also financial courage which is a really personal thing to think through. Yeah yeah it was tough book turbans saying like you don't have to do it this way. You can slow down. You can think I didn't do much of that abruptly quit my job. You talk about how you quit your job. It was an angry email. It just don't recommend that I had just come back from my honeymoon. I was on this high of living life. I'd be doing yoga. Whatever I came back and it was to be fair? My last job was not a great job. It was really toxic. I had a terrible boss. I was being disrespected. It wasn't just like I'm I'm mildly unhappy. It was like a job I needed to get out of. I didn't plan on doing it that day. Hey but I got an email. That was like once again while it had been on vacation. It had changed my job description without any conversation about it. They had messed up my pay. Hey there was just all of these things. I don't know what came over me because I am not usually a person who does things just that suddenly sent an email and I was like okay. Great thank you. This is my last day working for you but by and I walked into my living room with my brand spanking new husband and was like so I just quit my the job. What did he say he was stunned? But on the other hand he's like all right. Erica okay like I don't make rash decisions but I do move with my gut. And he knew how miserable I had been in that job so he was surprised but he wasn't surprised. I on the other hand became very surprised. Like maybe like an hour later. I you have that feeling we. Did they write back I don't know I log out of my email. I never logged back on C.. Never have spoken to them since then but I don't know what their reaction was. That's on that day about how I would be like trying to get back in a moment. I mean five minutes later what did I do. I need to see what they wrote any till I felt like I felt like I'd had some sort of a stroke like you do it. And then you feel really high. And it's just a super exciting and then slowly settles in. I tell that story for two reasons. One you don't have to do it that way but to I do tell it because people like me. We are never supposed to do that when you hear the quitting stories. You've got your eat. Pray Love you've got your Jerry Maguire's right like young women young black women `young load middle income. Women are never supposed to step back. There's a stigma around the idea of quitting. And I just encourage people not to abruptly quit or make unwise decisions agents but to know that it is okay to step away from something that isn't serving the world will not end. If you can figure out and we'll get into that part the financial piece of it which is huge huge. I just want to take away the stigma of that because sometimes you have to take a step away. Even if you can't quit your job though I do think it's imperative of that. How ever you can in your life that you create some space as opposed to just dwelling in the unhappiness and the being unfulfilled and the complaining which we naturally do right you gotta let off seems way but I think there's just a sense of feeling stuck and the only way out of feeling suck is to move and by movement I mean create eight some space in your life to start trying to think deeply and proactively about? What can I do to change things? What can my next be? You won't necessarily find in the immediate answer her. But it's asking the key questions that I think can help as CEO's CEO's. We are very busy very very busy important people and we are always looking to get time back and in that way we are just like everyone else because no one has enough time no matter what you do no matter where you're from there are never enough hours in the day so we are obsessed with helping all of you spend your time wisely and we're going to give you the biggest tip on that it is Asian are blocks tax pro. Tis The season you have to do your taxes. Taxes taxes are easy when you use H and R block tax pro. All You have to do is upload your tax documents and attacks pro literally does everything else. It is truly the easiest way to have the expert expert. Like do it for you. But you don't have to go anywhere you do it at home. And they're trained to get you every deduction credit that you deserve go to H R block dot com slash skim that is HR block dot com slash skim. It is better with block and we couldn't recommend the sport. Doc I want to talk about the financial part Because I always feel like to your your point when we hear these stories or when we talk about our story and taking on credit card debt I feel like that Perkins glossed over when you're hearing stories where it works out. How did you think through that? What's your advice to people that are going through that themselves? I mean advice want advice point number one is do not abruptly quit your job. You can actually take a little bit of time to plan but in either case So I'll tell you what happened with me so I Also how old are you this. Plan Twenty seven thirty seven now twenty-eight sorrows and you know I had no idea what I was going to do next and this is the part that's going to Piss people off because it's like my faith the`miracle managing staff but the next day. I had an e mail in my inbox from someone I had met before in like a professional networking group. WHO said Hey? I don't know if you do consulting but I've got a client that I think would love to just talk to you and pick your brain about kind of how to engage millennials and social impact stuff. And I was like yes I definitely do. Yeah absolutely I do. I had never consulted before. I had no idea what that entailed. But I was like. Okay ass and the client and then that being coca-cola like it was my massive so random But that was a short term project and it wasn't like a consistent income and it took a while to get paid and I still didn't really know what I was doing. I also had throughout the entirety tired of my work. Life had a side Gig which is also something I encourage people to do. Don't run yourself. Ragged and drive yourself into the ground to have ten jobs. My identity has never ver- been solely tied to my one job. Because I know that all of WHO I am fit into one job. We try to put pressure on ourselves. That kind of have every single part of who we are every passion and every gift and talent in one job that will never happens. I've always had multiple streams of income so I had media and communications training on the side that I'd always he's done and so I basically put the word out like I can do more of that now guys and so I kind of consistently had that coming in that hustle. Come from your family weirder that come from that. You always always had that stuff happening. It wasn't even the hustle that came from my family. What came from my family was the idea that you have to use all of your gifts? It was again a very existential spiritual the thing that if you have gifts and talents it is your job to figure out how to use them to serve the world so it wasn't really about like I gotTa Hustle and multiple jobs. It was like okay if my job. Bob Isn't taking advantage of the fact that I do this too. I'M GONNA go find a way to do it. It really was me trying to find fulfilment that then turned into okay so then that means you're hustler and you have multiple gigs. How do you react when people say? I want to be able to bring my whole self to work. Well that's rare. It's very rare. The metaphor that I give in the book is that statement is like pretending you have to get all of your belongings in a carry on suitcase in one carry on right. He's someone who has to check every time I I understand. What do you really annoying one time one time and we were there ten days and like I don't understand how you didn't check check check moon? You should have just checked with me. It was really annoying. Wasn't it. Yeah you don't have to fit your entire life in A carry on you have multiple suitcases and so it is important that you can bring your best self to work. Meaning if you're coming to work and the part of you that is showing showing up is not you know positive is not maximizing your talent. That's a problem but you don't have to bring your whole self even when I was talking about my faith side and my political side. I wasn't looking for a job that was going to let me like have a protest sign in one arm and like a Communion Cup in the other. They're like I'm not expecting my job to allow me to express all of those. I wanted to be in a place where I didn't have to pretend to be someone else. It's rare that you'll find the job that takes advantage of every single one of your talents and skills you can put those into different areas of your life with side hustles with hobbies with community service. Your job is to complete the circle of your life. But you don't have to do that. In one slice you moved to Los Angeles. I did why I wish I had like a super bossy progressive feminist. Answer for that my my husband. He wanted to move. I went kicking and screaming because I was like California. Had Your family react. Oh they were not happy my grandmother till the day. Hey that she passed away. She passed away a couple years ago. We were very very close and she. She loved my husband too. Because we've known each other since high school so he's part of the family but till the day she passed away every time. I would come home Tom. She would pat my head and say he won't let you leave how Hollywood secondhand not like holding it is. My family was not happy about the but I'm glad I did at the time that I'd quit my job. I didn't know what the next forget. Forget job I didn't know what the next season of my life was. who was I going to be next? What was my identity? What did I want to do? And it was so good to begin a new space to to explore that to be in a space where our lays a very like multi hyphen culture. I'm this and this and this and this and that was what I needed to be who I am so it was good to be in that environment. One of the things we asked a lot is when people either have gaps on their resume and terms of years taken off or whether maybe they were consulting freelancing doing doing multiple things at once how to position themselves then for a fulltime role. Because you did eventually take fulltime rolls what we're small startups than than one became snap. Yeah Yeah but how did you position yourself as someone for fulltime role. If I was GONNA pick one career skill I would tell people. It's the art of crafting. Your story story and I don't mean that in the abstract sense like your life journey I mean literally what is the story. How do you tell a tizzy what has happened in your life? If people don't recognize their power to do that you assume that you have these pieces. I have this job. I have this consulting gig. I have this gap and I just have to presents the pieces to someone and let them put them together however they want. No you decide how you string them together so for example instead of saying well I worked in politics and I had a job and then I left that job and then I was consulting and I was consulting with a corporate client and this and that and then I work attack. I was stringing together to say I've been on a journey journeys in three different industries to identify how to tell the best stories to young people right like that is a way of talking about it. Another way of talking about it is I could say at three three change focus industries. I have worked to help. Young people figure out the best way to create meaningful impact and transformation not lies suspending. Its packaging. And you can't do that on the fly. You have to take the time to kind of look and say what is the threat here. What was similar between this experience and that experience even if they were wildly different jobs or wildly different industries? Has there been one key motivation. has there been one key skill. Set that you've used and tying it together give someone someone the ability to say. This is the package I'm presenting you and it looks good. What has been helpful to you as you have gone through those moments of introspection two things so one is faith? But the way that I'll talk about that here is just saying like really developing your inner life before you start seeking out. INSTAGRAM quotes quotes influencers. Books I mean. All of those things can be helpful but I found that they are most helpful once. You've done the inner work to figure things out as best as you can on your own first. And here's why I say that influencers and self help books and all that stuff can be very very helpful. I mean I know I wrote one. It is amazing and it is hopefully very very practical and helpful to everyone who try to carve out a new life but they don't replace the inner work you have to do for yourself first of all. You're never seeing anyone's entire entire story anyway. You're looking at their instagram account. And you're like wow. That was easy for them. They quit their job and then the next day they had a brand supporting them. Whatever it is and you don't know the real story so one is like being really consistent and committed to my own inner girls like what does it mean to listen to myself? What do I actually enjoy doing? So that's one thing and the second is just as best you can hand find people who get you and support you whether that's friends or partner or if you need to join some sort of group whatever it is but I found that I wasn't the only one going this transition at that time. I mean some people had quit their jobs. Some people hadn't but understood and we're able to say like yeah. I'm rooting for you. You got this when you are working working for somebody else working at a company. Are you good on a team. I'm very good on a team. I'm not happy being told what to do. So are you to manage. I think I am to be honest. I'm hard because because I am always the person in the room that like if someone tells me what to do I'm like cool. I suggested no way instead like so. It's annoying. I'm sure so. Because there's a lot of people would say they also got driven what you're talking about resonates with them. which is that? There are very key parts of themselves that they are bringing to work in the parts of themselves. Maybe people don't see yet and they make decisions in a way that works for them and isn't necessarily following a rule book in an operational plan. But that doesn't mean that that those people are going to quit their jobs and start something. I'm very curious what advice you would give to those people about how to thrive in a more corporate environment the mindset shift that I had that eventually actually made me a good employee. Even though I don't like being play one was when I saw every opportunity as a chance to learn something I would see these environments as okay. This is like this is like school. I'm here to learn something. Learn people learn what it is. They're doing and how are they making decisions and I started to see it as a challenge to learn as much as I what could we tend to because we're not bring full to work which we don't necessarily need to but we tend to have very surfaced and shallow conversations with the people that we work with the more I was really really transparent and honest at work about what I was struggling with at work. Let me be clear. Not My personal life but You Know Hey. I'm having a difficult time time with this or I saw this way. You saw this. We can you explain that to me or yeah. I'm usually not good in this environment but I'm trying to get better. Can you help me like just being really honest. Just the more. My connections with my bosses were authentic and they actually wanted to help me thrive and didn't see me as competition it just felt much more collaborative operative so learning and being as on its and transparent as you can about where you are if you are having any challenges that the combination of those two things made me much better not member so the single worst thing happened to me yes. Have you ever accidentally picked up your significant others toothbrush and used it by mistake. Because that happened to me and I take out my tongue and my teeth I would. It was most horrifying thing in the entire world. That's that's gross. It was grows and reminded me that. If I had used my clip I would have known what was mine quips. Electric Brush has a sensitive sonic vibrations with a built in timer and thirty second pulses to guide to a full and even clean also. I really appreciate this quip delivers fresh fresh brush heads floss and toothpaste refills to your door. Every three months because who remembers to switch them out they do that with free shipping. So your routine As always right on and if you go to get clipped dot com slash scam right now. You will get your first refill free. That is your very first refill. FREE AT GET QUIP DOT COM Tom Slash Skim. I'm going to sell it for you. It is G. E. T. Q. U. IP DOT com slash skin. Quip is be good habits company. You've called yourself a one woman important. Conversations Business which I I like? How do you suggest people start that conversation at work or just in general? I think in general because I think a lot of people want to be be introspective and also there are so many demands and distractions and you're refreshing AFI checking email tax. goes off that it's hard hard to know how to actually start having those types of conversations. Either with yourselves more with the other people in your life adjust practicing asking questions. I was just with a friend yesterday and he was like I know people ask. How am I was like what? That's a very general basic questions. I mean that's the point like what is it that you want to know. Do you want to know. Oh how my day was. Do you want to know how emotionally who's GonNa come up to you and just ask out of the blue. How are you doing emotionally intense? And he's like I know but I WANNA get to the heart of the issue and I was like okay. No one's GONNA start off that way but it is a good practice as you're having conversations to keep asking questions to go a little bit deeper as opposed to leaving things things at the surface level so instead of just saying like how are you fine. Great you can ask someone what's been going on with your week as they answer questions continuing to ask because I find that we all start off surface all of us. We all start off with just a quick answers and the quick shallow questions but the deeper we go the more people realize you're genuinely interested in me. You're genuinely interested in what I have to say or what I think. And when people feel as if they matter they tend to much more quickly be authentic antic and strip some of that surface to me. That's the easiest way to start is to make sure that whoever you're talking to knows that you you actually care about what they're saying and continue to ask deeper questions. The narrative intelligence. It's my favorite thing. It's really the core kind of principle that I teach in the book. Narrative intelligence is our ability to understand and see the stories. Is that are shaping us in shaping the world around us so we talk about emotional intelligence. IQ right but no one ever teaches us that everything we see everything we consume is telling us a story that is shaping how we think and how we view the world and all the industries that I worked in. They know this very well right. Like politics understands. The power story media understands the power of story even the tech industry right. I worked at snapchat snapchat literally created the vertical story format story being a frame for your experience. It's these are industries that understand using story to get people to think a certain way believe and behave a certain way and we the average person just sitting around consuming and have no no idea that that's happening so narrative intelligence is in some ways putting that power back in the hands of people and saying okay. When I'm watching this film? What is it actually you telling me? What is the premise based on? What is the narrative here? Yes it's a fun love story but it is telling me the story that there is one soulmate one person for me out of the billions of people on this planet. Do I believe that or not right like asking that question. That's narrative intelligence in practice. If someone is telling doing me that the best way to succeed is to hustle and make a lot of money and Blah Blah Blah Blah Blah and. They have this kind of very clear path to stop. and Ask yourself self before you just run in and do it. They say ask yourself. What are they telling me about success? What is the story here about my purpose about my identity? Do I believe that yes or no. It's not up to me to tell you whether it's good or bad but just the act and the art of saying what is the real story here. And how can I see it. And then make a conscious choice to accept did or reject it as I'm sure people are listening and probably going to be very inspired and are going to be like I didn't know who it was. I'm going to follow her now. Like I I like the story I like. I like the story. She's telling and they're GONNA buy your book. Yeah they're going to buy her out. But I think the question people are going to have is. How do you make money doing what you're doing like wizard job? What does your day to day look like? It's just found someone the other day who said Oh it's a portfolio career and I was like Oh what Buzzer buzzword. They just learned it means. I do several things but they are all tied to what we've just talked about. So how do I make money. I consult with organizations brands when they WANNA have important conversations whether with their employees or their consumers. I'll come in and help them design an event or design kind of a messaging campaign designed like we want to have an important conversation about issue. She acts or about topic x Eric. Help US strategize that come facilitate that. So that's one way. Second way is through content through books. Do podcasts through workshops and trainings things so I come in and I actually help people help staff. I helped regular individual people craft their story and understand how to better talk about their life their work and and then the last thing is like hosting and facilitating so moderating and interviewing. I love to ask questions so those are all the pieces. What sage house does which is my company is? It does all that like I said Ed specifically for brands and for organizations and so we'll come in and design the meaningful conversation that helps you write a story. Can you talk about the name. Yes so it's funny. I didn't think about this at first which I probably should have but being in California when I said Stage House people thought I meant like sage. That's why ass I was like no I. We have been known to sage office during the year and my home. So wasn't that but I guess it works too 'cause I am very spiritual and he did but no I meant it because sage as in a wise the person that we are generation in a society right now that is so overloaded with information and we have access to anything we want to know what our fingertips but wisdom is deeper than that it is. How do you apply that as how do you process that? How do you sort through that information? Fine Gems that help us live better lives that is what stages are and I think we have too few sages in too many influencers and so kind of what my mission is with these conversations and these spaces and this content ah is always to dig deep and get to the true wisdom of how we can live time for our last round favorite round. Okay row lightning first job working and physical therapy a PT assistant physical therapist assistant. Worst job the one that I had that I quit. WHO's the first phone call? You make when you get good news my husband. What about when you get bad news? My sister what's the most recent show you benched hip hop evolution on that flight. I'm obsessed it's really good. What's your biggest vice carbs? The French guests potato lava potato last book. You Read Atomic Habits by James Clear a layer DC ONO EH. How about L. A. or New York? Oh La. I can't stand. What's your shameless plug? Shameless plug is my book. You deserve the truth. My website heirlooms DOT com. Where you can sign up for workshops that I'm leading virtual workshops about the topics in the book awesome haircut? Thank you so much for being with us today. Thank you so much. Thanks for hanging out with us. Join US next week for another episode of skin from the couch. And if you can't wait until until then subscribe to our daily email newsletter that gives you all the important news and information. You need to start your day sign about the scam dot com that's the SK S K. I am DOT COM two. M's for a little something extra.

Erica CEO Los Angeles California Tom Slash US Whitney Houston FBI Center for American progress INSTAGRAM director Danielle Weisberg Aitken William Simon Washington McGuire Clinton DC
Trump Administration Proposes Major Changes To Bedrock Environmental Law

Environment: NPR

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Trump Administration Proposes Major Changes To Bedrock Environmental Law

"The trump administration wants to make it easier to approve. Big New infrastructure projects think oil pipelines and highways. A proposal announced today would limit the environmental our mental reviews for them and some cases agencies likely won't have to consider how the projects will contribute to climate change. NPR's Jeff Brady reports environmental the groups plan to challenge it the National Environmental Policy Act or kneepads turned fifty years old on New Year's Day. But it's future could look very different different from its past. We'll cut the federal permanent time line for major projects down to two years. And ideally. We're going to try and get even less than that. That's much shorter. The four to seven years on average takes now at the White House. Supporters stood behind the president some in construction vests and others wearing cowboy hats. Today's announcement was was part of trump's effort to limit and rollback environmental regulations to boost the economy. But this is just the beginning will not stop until our nation's gleaming new infrastructures has made America the envy of the world again. It used to be the envy of the world and now we're like a third world country. It's really sad beyond oil and gas and construction other industries history also support the changes to regulations. Jennifer Houston is president of the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. Her members are subject to Nipah reviews for things like grazing grazing livestock on public land. These reforms are very exciting They will streamline the process reduce duplication allow more local control and let our are cattleman rb producers going back to what they do best and that's raise high quality beef to feed the world environmental groups though say these changes will hurt the country in the long run. The National Environmental Policy Act was designed to make government decisions more transparent it requires federal agencies to consider and published the environmental effects of projects before approving them. The law also gives the public information about how decisions were made and an opportunity to comment on them. That trump proposal places new limits on virtually every element of the law. It could even exclude. From review projects like oil pipelines that are mostly refunded with private money and agencies may only have to consider the environmental effects of building the pipeline not the climate changing consequences of burning all the oil that would flow through it. Steve Shaima with the group earthjustice says the changes also would make it more difficult to plan for the effects of climate change without Nissanusa honorable consideration of climate change. We're not going to be building projects that are going to be able to withstand increased flooding increased wildfires. More extreme weather among the proposed changes changes the trump administration wants to give companies a greater role in conducting environmental reviews perhaps even allowing them to do the reviews with oversight from. I'm an agency Kristie. Gold Fuss with the Center for American progress was an environmental officials during the Obama Administration. It's baffling that. The trump administration thanks handing the keys of Environmental Review. Too Big polluters is going to pass muster. These are just proposed changes. The public will have at least sixty. Today's to comment there will be public hearings in Denver and Washington. DC environmental groups likely will challenge them in court which means they almost certainly wouldn't take effect until after next November's election and if president trump loses reelection a democratic president likely would abandon this proposal altogether together. Jeff Brady N._p._R. News.

president Environmental Review trump Jeff Brady NPR National Cattlemen's Beef Asso Jennifer Houston White House Obama Administration America Center for American progress earthjustice Kristie Steve Shaima Denver Washington
Trump Administration Proposes Major Changes To Bedrock Environmental Law

NPR's Story of the Day

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Trump Administration Proposes Major Changes To Bedrock Environmental Law

"The trump administration wants to make it easier to approve. Big New infrastructure projects think oil pipelines and highways. A proposal announced today would limit the environmental our mental reviews for them and some cases agencies likely won't have to consider how the projects will contribute to climate change. NPR's Jeff Brady reports environmental the groups plan to challenge it the National Environmental Policy Act or kneepads turned fifty years old on New Year's Day. But it's future could look very different different from its past. We'll cut the federal permanent time line for major projects down to two years. And ideally. We're going to try and get even less than that. That's much shorter better than four. To seven years on average takes now at the White House. Supporters stood behind the president some in construction vests and others wearing cowboy hats. Today's announcement was was part of trump's effort to limit and rollback environmental regulations to boost the economy. But this is just the beginning will not stop until our nation's gleaming new infrastructures has made America the envy of the world again. It used to be the envy of the world and now we're like a third world country. It's really sad beyond oil and gas and construction other industries history also support the changes to regulations. Jennifer Houston is president of the National Cattlemen's Beef Association. Her members are subject to Nipah reviews for things like grazing grazing livestock on public land. These reforms are very exciting They will streamline the process reduce duplication allow more local control and let our are cattleman rb producers going back to what they do best and that's raise high quality beef to feed the world environmental groups though say these changes will hurt the country in the long run. The National Environmental Policy Act was designed to make government decisions more transparent it requires federal agencies to consider and published the environmental effects of projects before approving them. The law also gives the public information about how decisions were made and an opportunity to comment on them. That trump proposal places new limits on virtually every element of the law. It could even exclude. From review projects like oil pipelines that are mostly refunded with private money and agencies may only have to consider the environmental effects of building the pipeline not the climate changing consequences of burning all the oil that would flow through it. Steve Shaima with the group earthjustice says the changes also would make it more difficult to plan for the effects of climate change without Nissanusa honorable consideration of climate change. We're not going to be building projects that are going to be able to withstand increased flooding increased wildfires. More extreme weather among the proposed changes changes the trump administration wants to give companies a greater role in conducting environmental reviews perhaps even allowing them to do the reviews with oversight from. I'm an agency Kristie. Gold Fuss with the Center for American progress was an environmental officials during the Obama Administration. It's baffling that. The trump administration thanks handing the keys of Environmental Review. Too Big polluters is going to pass muster. These are just proposed changes. The public will have at least sixty. Today's to comment there will be public hearings in Denver and Washington. DC environmental groups likely will challenge them in court which means they almost certainly wouldn't take effect until after next November's election and if president trump loses reelection a democratic president likely would abandon this proposal altogether together. Jeff Brady N._p._R. News.

president Environmental Review trump Jeff Brady NPR National Cattlemen's Beef Asso Jennifer Houston White House Obama Administration America Center for American progress earthjustice Kristie Steve Shaima Denver Washington
"Book Talk" Guest Ulrich Boser Author "The Leap: The Science of Trust and Why It Matters"

Doug Miles Media

09:41 min | 2 months ago

"Book Talk" Guest Ulrich Boser Author "The Leap: The Science of Trust and Why It Matters"

"Joining us today in our book taught second break to welcome wonder thing book at the that deals with the matter of trust. Fall the leap the science of trust. And why it matters for joining today by alrich blazer today from i believe up in washington d. c.'s that right that's correct. I'm here gusting from washington. That's not the most trusting city washington. She's not the most Trusting city and then certainly a lot of the headlines. These days seem to be about the lack of trust in government Certainly sound that in in my book. You know the the trust in government is is impacting the lower in many areas than than we even tank girl. The good place to do your research them. It really is kind of interesting to kind of break. It down We'll talk about that in a minute if you like about. What states are more trusting in which are input What led you to kind of do a boca on at it is a great topic. Write a book about it is it is fascinating topic. That's my work here. The center for american progress on on a project that was it that rebuilding trust in government and to become more interested in trump's overall. I became just fascinated with the topic that a lot of research and reporting skydiving. She's my trust hormone. Went up went to rwanda's other rebuilding trust or a little device for all weekend to measure my my body language and you know just really trying to wrap my hand around this kishi that shape so much. The bottom line is if you're engaged in any cooperative activity raising a family or running a nation or having a company you need to have some form of trust thing that you just mentioned that i was gonna ask you about of the press. Hormones that actually. There's something that goes on in the brain right that That that helps trusting right. Yeah that's right there is With what people have dubbed this Trust hormone oxytocin And Largely used to help women go into labor but when you give to people in these types of economic experiments far more trusting of of other people so what we From that guess is we're we're really built to connect with others to to put our faith with others Were much more cooperative. I think than the headlines Suggest about people having trust in government but our people more trusting of each other or less trusting the other nowadays Well over time just in other people in in strangers really has has gone down When i've seen in my and some states that Almost no one in states like tennessee reports fully trusting people that pigmeat For the first time. And that's a problem. And that's a problem at the local level where you know. You wanna engage with your neighbors or Participate in in your church but it's also bigger problem as a nation right. I mean trust is is t- to our economy Research shows that just small increases in our faith. Another can Boosted gdp full by my my parents who grew up during the depression years in new york. I'm from new york and back in those years. You leave your Your door unlocked and your keys in the car and people will take it too hard to believe now but but that was a time where that could happen. I i don't know if that can happen again but The white will lose that. I don't think we're gonna go back to the social cohesion of the nineteen sixties anytime soon. But look there's been a number of things that have led to our trust in other people is somebody that simply economic you know the the great recession On the rise of do trump inequality has done a lot to ruin You know our sense of faith and social cohesion you know and and education is When people go to college when they graduate from high school they show a lot more Faith in other so you know. I can't say there's one single issue that brought the lack of social you to the other but i think we need to do a lot more to Reveal that sense of community in something might be as simple as as You know going to more community activities like pickup basketball games or volunteering But our government also plays a role too in terms of reducing income inequality and helping us come together more broadly. Good point there. Nothing wrong with being on the internet and all that kind of thing. But i think people are so isolated Their phones or whatever communicating. That way gotten away from like you said just to pick up basketball game or or being a group of people at church During the week that hurts his weird one side. There's no doubt who just walked down the street of the city or town. You see people texting while they're walking around and and that really does hurt our sense of connections others but you know. I think i can also be optimistic. Neo technology and the rise of the websites whether it's ebay where you're now buying selling things from strangers or airbnb where you're renting at your house to two strangers that show that there are new ways to connect with with other people so technology You know it's a double edged sword and we need to make sure that We get the thing stories in the book maybe Briefly tell it. And i know it's a kind of a long one but i found it interesting about a radio soap opera places that That had to do with Restoring caprice trust right. Yeah yeah no. That's exactly right. I want to see you know the incredible There was a genocide there. Hundreds of thousands of people Passed passed away In these terrible killings and today one of the fastest growing economies in the world. How's that how's that possible. And they're all sorts of bottom up grassroots types of programs that have been put in place that allow people to learn a little bit more about how they can re engage in society. How they can rebuild together and one. Is this your radio soap opera. Where people would learn about Reconciliation where they would learn about coming together again also a lot of economic programs that we're just really really important where they had the two ethnic parties who choose cheese co owning Votes and pigs together as a way to regain That that sense of trust no one thing to keep his mind. What matters often just as much as trust trustworthy. S you know people honest. Are they dependable. And when you engage in those types of partnerships can really help a lot mentioned some of the the least pressing states will what are some of the most trusting states When we look across the data maine new hampshire nebraska utah You know those some of the states that You know show greater levels of trust in our data and you know make sense to me. Those are states that have a high levels of social capital That have long history where people you know look similar. They went to similar churches. And that can help a lot. But when it comes to the united states right. I mean we have to keep in mind that we're a nation about ideas about a set of principles and that means we need this type of bridging capital to trust people who might not like us Who have different backgrounds of us. And that's going to be key to our future. It's called the leap the science of trust and why it matters today. Well let's give a specific statement. Give out or people get a hold of you yeah. People are interested in the book. My websites has lots of You know Freemason want scared shaves. I jumped out of the plane. Some photos up there But we also have a whole bunch of god and other extras For folks guide around how to increase trust and your teams and neighborhoods Is up there Looking at the forty niners as a metaphor there and then also got for policymakers. Right when we think about rebuilding trust. We really need to folks. This work dot com right. That's the out there show Hopefully pretty freelancer league name or thanks for joining us today. I'm stone brock. So two years ago i formed remote area medical to help people overseas but then we found generations of families in america isolated by policy from the healthcare. They need together. We can take dental vision and medical help to a million adults and their kids right here at home in the united states of america.

alrich blazer washington center for american progress boca rwanda new york basketball tennessee airbnb depression ebay new hampshire nebraska maine utah united states of america niners brock
Episode 4: Reflecting on Trump's First Year

Opportunity Agenda

33:29 min | 3 years ago

Episode 4: Reflecting on Trump's First Year

"Hi I'm Senator Martin Heinrich ranking member of the Joint Economic Committee and thanks for listening to our podcast opportunity agenda in two thousand seventeen was a rough year for working Americans in his first year in office president trump and congressional Republicans hurt workers pay and benefits rolled back consumer financial protections targeted public lands for commercial development and attempted to strip rip healthcare coverage from millions of Americans at the same time the trump administration failed to take any action on key issues affecting the nation there is no comprehensive plan to address the OPIOID crisis no infrastructure plan and no proposals to help lift up rural communities across the country the Republicans missed opportunities in some areas and roll back progress and others with the president having just completed his first year in office and it's. I E the union coming up at the end of the month. It's a good time to take stock of where things stand and where there may be opportunities Chinese for bipartisan progress in the year ahead. I have with me Sarah binder. She is a senior fellow. In Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution a professor of Political Science at George Washington University and Co Author of the myth of independence dependence. How Congress governs the Federal Reserve and I also have Michelle Wando? She is a vice president of legal progress at the Center for American progress and Co host of the thinking cap podcast together. We're going to look back on twenty seventeen ahead to two thousand eighteen Sarah Michelle welcome to the show. Thank you so much for having us all right so let's start with last year two thousand seventeen the first year the trump administration we saw trump administration repeal a lot of policies like Dhaka <hes> net neutrality in addition to sabotaging our healthcare system and undermining individual market stability by cutting the open enrollment period in half and slashing the Affordable Care Act outreach budget by ninety percent talk to me about what some of these changes mean for working Americans in two thousand eighteen Michelle with you again. Thank you for having us here when we did and analysis of really looking at the last year we put forth a few pieces says that really looked at how many harms have been afflicted on the American people so we did a funny paper that was fifty two harms and fifty two weeks <hes> and what we continually see with this administration is a betrayal of promises not that <hes> we would say but that president trump himself has said <hes> or stated as his goal for running for president. You know whether we're talking about Daca you know if you examine his rhetoric over the campaign or very early on in the administration he said he wanted to protect dreamers and yet we find ourselves on the cusp of a government shutdown because he has failed failed to extend permanent protections for over seven hundred thousand young people when you think about the impacts in the harms to working people the overtime rule was something that you found some bipartisan support support on both sides of the dial it was promulgated under President Obama and what did the overtime rule do well essentially <hes> during the Obama administration there were these overtime protections that would benefit employees each who are making less than forty seven thousand dollars a year. This administration is seeking to remove that rule. What's the harm five million workers who are benefiting from that rule would lose <unk> over twelve billion dollars twelve billion? I gotta say that <hes> over the next ten years <hes> and whether we're talking about job growth or the explosion of people who are uninsured you know at the end of two thousand sixteen we continue to see a growth in the number of people who are insured and that was thanks to the affordable care act or obamacare whatever you call it. I'm just happy we had it and what we find ourselves houses in a unique position that at the end of twenty seventeen we still five million fewer people who were insured in this country. We're talking about men women seniors young people. How do we as a country country continue to reckon with the fact that so many people don't have access to high quality health insurance and how do we find ourselves okay with that so I think you know as we review what twenty seventeen looks slyke for most of the American people there were harms inflicted and promises that were made from this president that were betrayed Sarah anything to add on that front so Michelle's points about the policy impact or quite important? I would add that this past year. I think is a good reminder of both the power and the limits of Executive Action Right everything you've mentioned <hes> ending Daca killing net neutrality most of the unwinding of the affordable care act almost all that with exception of repealing the individual mandate in the affordable care act almost all of that was done by executive action on the one hand of we could see the policy impact that Michelle points out but it is <hes>. It's not permanent. I think Democrats learned that with Obama in his move to try to use executive. Executive action when he found he couldn't legislate with Republicans <hes> and again it opens up that these are unsettled issues as we see on Daca and whether or not <hes> there's power across the Congress to actually use legislative power to try to redress these in a more permanent way so one thing trump and the Republicans did actually get done this year was their tax plan. <hes> this bill emerged from a deeply flawed process and the final product definitely reflects that the tax law adds one point five trillion dollars colors to the national debt and the vast majority of the benefits are going to go to the wealthiest among us and corporations so Sara. What's your take on the tax bill and what challenges are we already seeing since legislation passed? Will I think what's remarkable to me at at the beginning of two thousand seventeen and even right after the election there was a lot of discussion. Will what would this unified Republican government do and tax cuts has always been a top priority <hes> and sometimes tax reform aren't really changing the tax code. I think what's most stunning to me is how limited Republicans have been and they had to turn to reconciliation right a budget procedure that meant they had to do it with fifty one votes or fifty votes plus the vice president they couldn't really do reform but how do they get met situation. They couldn't agree with each other right right and they were the president was a little erratic and what he'd accepted what he wouldn't accept in so you ended up with this lowest common denominator what Republicans wanted which really was corporate tax cuts in so it leaves certainly more <hes> in the end keep in mind uh-huh remarkably unpopular <hes> nationwide bill though still popular amongst many Republicans. What does that mean it means in part? They rushed it through. It's not clear that everything will work as intended. There'll be many loopholes and the efforts to corrected to do technical corrections. That's going to be difficult in a congress where they'll will need democratic votes to try to do some fixes not all of which reminder <hes> but if he's excluded Democrats on taking the plane off. I'm not sure why I there'd be a lot of appetite <hes> to try to go back and resolve some of these problems that they've created themselves. You know I have to add a little bit of kitchen table wisdom that my grandmother were often share <hes> that you should trust people when they show you who they are definitely <hes> and when you have a conversation about tax reform you saw an opportunity a missed opportunity where you had Democrats who generally agreed on some of the tenants like let's do something about the corporate tax rate and we WANNA do something for <hes> middle class working in middle class families <hes> and yet what we really got at the end of the day was not that what we saw is for many many people who spent the last few years screaming about the deficit and <hes> making sure that we were fiscally sound have now added over one point four trillion dollars to the deficit <hes> when you think about the fact act that <hes> there will be twenty five billion dollars in cuts to Medicare beginning this year in twenty eighteen would result in huge additional burdens on middle class and working families and all but three states would see more than one hundred thousand families with tax increases beginning in twenty twenty seven and so I think you know wild tax reform may have been an opportunity for us really to to change into find a democratic and a Republican opportunity to do something on taxes which all people agree listen. Nobody necessarily likes see that a line item on their paycheck but we recognize that there as a common good and what does that go to that though taxes go to our infrastructure which is badly in need of reform in this country goes to things like Medicare and Medicaid and making sure that families many of whom lobbied lobbied this president and this administration and members here in the Senate saying listen. Don't let these cuts particularly on Medicare go forth <hes> and what you what you also saw was kind of this nefarious action action at the last minute to also hurt the affordable care act <hes> repealing the individual mandate and I and I bring that up again because I think we are making conscious decisions about where we we are choosing to invest in this country and it doesn't include most working middle class Americans yeah definitely not and Michelle you hit on this briefly already <hes> but the Republicans did just add one point five trillion dollars to the nation's credit card so can the Republican Party even credibly claim to be the Party of fiscal responsibility anymore well again. I think you know you you put your money where your mouth is. When you're adding one point four trillion dollars to the deficit <hes> <hes> when you look at <hes> that part of our taxpayers actually gives five billion dollars more to foreign investors who own corporate stock than the combined families in the bottom eighty percent of income distribution an every state that voted for trump? This is some of the analysis that we put together at the end of the tax reform debate and so you know when you when you look at who benefits golf club owners private jet owners. Owners foreign investors <hes> the wealthiest among us and look at WHO's been harmed and what it will mean long term for our children as they do have to deal with an imploding deficit <hes> and within then means to cuts in other programs. I think we have a challenge in front of us. <hes> that we all are going to have to figure out together because each of us will be affected definitely <hes> Sarah's or anything else that we should be watching on this issue well. I I think one thing for everyone to keep in mind is that the question is do these tax cuts actually lead to growth right that is the claim on the on the Republicans have made <hes> that they impart while they claim will all play themselves but will they partially pay for themselves selves and will they pay for themselves do in any way that makes the government makes the the economy more productive right if not all will be have unemployment is at record lows inflation is at near record lows <hes> if these tax cuts don't don't produce a better growing economy than some of the Federal Reserve will hike rates more quickly and then it's a loss <hes> <hes> doesn't have its intended impact <hes> which would be unfortunate all right we could spend all day talking about the mistakes twenty seventeen eighteen but the reality is that we're now in twenty eighteen the battle to renew dacas still waging the opioid epidemic hasn't been addressed and we still don't have an infrastructure plan. What are the risks of continuing to delay on this legislation and do those delays make progress on other issues more difficult you know when we have conversations about young people in this country we often tell young people want you to go to school? We want you to work hard and really contribute to the future and the promise of this great nation and I think dreamers in many ways are some of the best representation of that American ideal and yet we have used <hes> the undocumented status that is of these young people as a political football <hes> and you are in the midst of a crisis <hes> of our own. Doing you know there is a bipartisan group of senators who relented I think in many ways I think many people on the left would argue that the compromise was too great and yet that was rejected by the President <hes> for more monies for border security and to continue to really alienate <hes> and to really put in practice and policy some of the hateful rhetoric rhetoric that we've heard about immigrants in this country. You know my great grand. My grandparents were immigrants to this country. My father father emigrated to this country <hes> and so I am a proud second generation <hes> young person that each generation of my family has contributed to this country and so when you hear the kind of rhetoric that is used views and talking about people <hes> and these are people and I think it's really important that we sometimes kind of crystallized these policy debates to remind ourselves of who were talking about. We're talking about young people who have served served in our military who have gone to medical school who are teaching our children who are <hes> doctors and lawyers and are in a situation through no fault of their own and so when we really say <hes> we don't care who are we use them in this way. <hes> we really devalues what we have agreed to in this country as the American promise to do something more than we've been. We're almost one third of the way through the fiscal year and we still don't have a budget Sarah. Could you talk a little bit about the consequences of this sure well <hes> all good budget nerds though that October first twenty sixteen was the start of the fiscal year in so since then <hes> instead of enacting twelve special spending bills <hes> one at a time by October first each time there have been several kicking of the cans <hes> I in October by the end of September <hes> and then repeatedly now we're in <hes> February in January. It looks like they'll probably kick the can for another four weeks or so. I think the bigger picture here <hes> we've had I think it's been almost if not more than twenty years <hes> going <hes> that Congress hasn't been able to an expert and bills on time all time <hes> what's unusual this time around is we have unified Republican control <hes> previous times largely. They've been split or divided government but this is a remarkably fractured republican Republican majority. I think both fractures between the House Republicans and what they want Senate Republicans them within the Senate twins in a very very far right in the house <hes> and given those small margin <hes> for the Republicans. They have a very very hard time producing anything that's acceptable to Senate Republicans let alone the fact that they need democratic votes so we're in the situation <hes> and everything has kind of been balled up into one big ball because every body knows these are must pass bills uh-huh and is an opportunity for Democrats to make progress given their votes valuable here to make progress on their priorities <hes>. That's what we're wound into with another deadline coming. It's unfortunate for the federal government for. Bureaucrats for agencies for departments who can't really make any changes that should worry Republicans as well as Democrats because if you have a new governing majority and you want to do things differently well. You can't do that if you just taking stopgap every couple couple of weeks well. Let's just be clear. Oh they're the president is this is an understatement a bit erratic. We doesn't seem to have a core set of principles that he's willing to stake out to help merge and overcome these disagreements within the Republicans Republicans and so no surprise we're stuck here kind of pivoting back and forth between positions <hes> and it doesn't seem to be an ability here to make the language right to govern and the trump terms to make a deal all right and this last week I think I've been watching Congress for twenty plus years and even I was a stout at just an dysfunction sort of overused but there were there seemed to be two competing negotiating groups in Congress dot com and then and then the president and some Republicans seem to have blown up the DACA and look you can't even negotiator like trump should know you can't make a deal if you don't trust the the good faith negotiation Gatien. That's that's that's and I. I think that is outside Congress Observer. That's just been kind of remarkable to me that they've really kind of ripped up that that fabric it's in a world of polarized parties where there's no no. I'd logical agreement what you want to do. You have to know what the other side wants and you can't give the other side. They want you to trust him so I don't like to be at two demoralized eh lesson Michelle anything else to add on the budgets. You know I think as we continue to move forward. It's also really important to think about where we have have <hes> either heard indicators of what they are interested in cutting right so there are a number of concerns about the government programs <hes> that don't Consi- take a considerably larger percentage of overall budget but are constantly on the chopping block. You know whether again we're whether we're talking about chip or whether we're talking about Medicare Medicaid or whether we're talking about <hes> supplemental health insurance or supplemental food food benefits <hes> these take-up such a miniscule portion of our budget but we constantly hear about them in our public lexicon why because we're making choices of who were willing to help and who were willing to hurt so so state of the Union address is on January thirtieth. Do we have any predictions on what are slightly erratic president trump is going to talk about Michelle serve with you. You know it is interesting when and you in in some ways I haven't anxiety about the state of the Union you know I I almost forgot for a moment that <hes> Donald trump will have an opportunity to the congress just taking that but it is just such an austere really important significant moment for the country <hes> it is the clarion call that the president lays out his vision and I have some anxiety ah about what he will share with the American people and the reason I say that is when I think about some of the hateful rhetoric <hes> I shared earlier my concerns particularly my attacks on Haiti and African nations listen my last name his John Doe it is Nigerian. My family are from Caribbean nations so it feels like a really personal direct attack against me and my family and those that I love and I know what we've contributed to this country but when it feels like the president president has so <hes> specifically targeted you whether you're talking about the Muslim community earlier with the Muslim band or whether you're talking about the lack of protections for dreams you have a concern about what this president is going to say okay when he has such a huge audience in front of the entire country I share the concerns that I think many do particularly as someone who who who sees the constitution as a as a flaw document document but as something that was a unifying force in this country and when I think about the fact that <hes> I've seen attacks on the press and attacks on free speech of the kind we've never seen before you know most of D._C.. Is eagerly awaiting waiting these fake news awards and what does that mean in the context of a state of the Union speech <hes> what are those messages that were sharing with our allies and those who seek to do harm around the world and what will the president residents say when he has the big stage in the world <hes> and then finally I often think about the attacks on the judiciary you know when you look at other nations that have to stabilizing forces one of the areas is that you see immediately kind of breakdown is our judiciary and <hes> even this week you see a markup of a number of <hes> nominees that many people have raised concerns about their qualifications and their temperament beyond. Beyond the normal ideological banter back and forth and when you've seen a concerted effort to really change the kind of fabric of our country by putting in place judges who are not if they are to be fair minded but really have an ideological an ideology that reflects the president you're concerned about what that means long term so I think the state of the Union <hes> we'll be interesting to say the least <hes> and I really am looking also for the moral leadership you know <hes> Congressman John Lewis has stated that he won't be attending <hes> the state of the Union <hes> both as <music> a moral declaration that of about concern about where we are at this country at the time in this history in this country and when someone who's the moral conscience of the Congress says that I think is true alert us all and and we should stop and listen all right Sarah President trump say the Union Michelle really covered the cover the faces I think I mean the question is which which Donald Trump shows up and I'm thinking back to last year <hes> the speech that was written for him and was delivered e first of all he stuck to the speech pretty much and it was written with an eye to sort of broadening especially after his kind of dark and dangerous yes <hes> inaugural very dark inaugural address. He seemed to whoever wrote it broaden the perspective to speak beyond the base of his what he perceives to be his base will do that again. Dan One one never knows but there's opportunities here particularly in an election year where many lawmakers are hesitant to be too partisan. There's an opportunity here to overused overused word to pivot to the issues that have a broader constituency. <hes> certainly infrastructure <hes> I think the healthcare issue he'd made commitments early on health care for every bigger and better <hes> that that ship seems to have the sale the different different direction there are opportunities here in the question is whether the White House <hes> recognizes them and wants to act on them to broaden the the appeal let alone the popularity of the of the President <hes> but that remains. It's really to be seen as may have seen we released a fact she last week on ten numbers that most likely will not be talked about by the administration during the state of the Union <hes> for example there are twenty three million role residents without access to broadband right now and there's been a five hundred and sixteen percent increase in average student loan barring over the last forty five years Michelle. What do you think the American people want to hear from their president at say the Union and what are these numbers? Do you think president trump probably won't mention well. I would like to probably pivot back to job growth and you know I have a feeling that there will be some trumpeting of the tax tax reform bill <hes> but let's go a little deeper <hes> when you look at job growth in this country under president trump the economy has generated a little less than about one hundred and sixty thousand jobs use a month but if you compare that with the almost one hundred eighty seven thousand jobs a month we saw in two thousand sixteen and almost two hundred twenty six thousand jobs we saw in twenty fifteen <hes> something thing is awry and again. I think we look at other numbers around inflation <hes> and we see you know again. It's a steady job growth but we've seen a decrease <hes> and I so I think that that's a number that we will not hear from this President President <hes> again we have to ask ourselves who and what were the tax plan for <hes> and I think many people would argue for the wealthiest among us and when it comes down to who will be <unk> hurt and will we see any job growth while thus far we haven't seen anything and I think there's a real concern. <hes> as we move forward <hes> about what that plan was really all about definitely Sarah Sarah any thoughts I think at the end of the day eve even though voters themselves are probably more partisan than they've been the last twenty plus years of most people want the government to work to solve problems and that Ed needs to be and then I say this to my Undergrad students who were taking Congress class all the time it doesn't matter whether one favours sort of moving policy in a liberal direction or moving policy in a conservative direction right. You need a functioning glamorous and I don't think the most voters have much patience for shutdown talk. They don't have much patience for the the tweets that come from the White House. That's the one thing that the Democrats or Republicans agree on they want they want to worked want it too intrusive but they want to improve their lives. <hes> and everyone knows what the problems are and when you see <hes> issues like Dhaka just lingering out there with eighty ninety plus percent saying solve the problem <hes> it just it it. It just raises the stakes here and I would hope that that would motivate <hes> both parties here the find a way to solve these key key issues right with very little very little disagreement on the narrowed on the DACA issue even even if it gets couple of the issues that are tougher for party all right before we wrap up. We have one last question outside of Dhaka. What are some of the key areas that Congress definitely needs to make progress on this year? You know I'm going to step out here ear and say around voter both security thinking about that in a different way <hes> we are thirty first out of thirty five wealthy nations when it comes to eligible voter participation in as many of your listeners are familiar that earlier this year the president disbanded his voter Integrity Commission <hes> because the real reason there was the question about voter fraud which we know is non-existent <hes> and they actually saw that <hes> but what I think we as a country really have to see on both sides is how do we get the more than almost one hundred million people who don't really participate in our elections that's damning for democracy of our size and it is a step in the wrong direction as we we really end head into a new millennia <hes> one of the things that I recognize is we have heard from our intelligence agencies that Russia penetrated our election system in this country and wherever you are on that issue that should concern you and so if we really want to do something that I think there should be and we've heard some bipartisan agreement you now from some Republican members on the Senate Intelligence Committee who are saying that they are committed to making sure our defenses are what they should be. We have an election coming up in two thousand eighteen that is significant vacant and so we need to think about critically. How do we get more people engaged in our democracy? How do we protect our democracies so that we can protect from foreign intrusions <hes> and that is really something that I think both Republicans pins and Democrats can get behind why because this is our democracy? This is our experiment <hes> there's some ownership here and so I think <hes> that would be an area that I if I could put my little Magic Guan together I would. I would love to see some action there all right Sarah what Republicans need to get done. What can we work together on? We'll the areas where there's tends to be broad public support for infrastructure rebuilding roads and bridges and communities stories around the country the OPIOID crisis in Dhaka right <hes> matched however in what form to some sort of border security those seemed to be areas in which the two parties agree that there's a problem and that's that's rare these days and so one would hope that these are areas in which Republicans would take as part of their agenda and <hes> to pursue <hes> some policy policy solutions but they really need to do really need a government budget and then he's spending and they're all sorts of issues that come come under there <hes> so we'll see and not forget they need to raise the debt limit so the government doesn't default which which was nice sort of basic governor Tass that I think many people many would agree should be should be high in the winter agenda definitely all right any final thoughts before we close out I remain optimistic nick. <hes> you know I look back. You look over history. <hes> we've been in worse moments as bad as difficult as this has felt <hes> when you think about the civil war and other instances where millions of Americans were on opposite sides in killing each other's blood in the street and there's plague in this disease we're not there so there is a way forward <hes> I think there we have to have over nude commitment. I think that <hes> rhetoric really needs to change. I think we need to bring back in attitude of respect for one another <hes> in a way that we we unfortunately don't see enough of our elected. Leaders really embrace because these are difficult questions it's about. How do we grow the economy? How do we protect people here? How do we protect our young? People are dreamers. How do we provide health care for children and adults? These are difficult questions and I think the way forward there is a lot more respect some trust of one another and recognizing that at the end of the day. We're all in this together definitely as I always remind my students congress. It's it's Article One. The constitution is not two or three it was it was meant to pay this pivotal role <hes> and it doesn't matter which party you're from you. You need a functioning Congress to make this huge huge diverse country work <hes> and so that's all I.

president Congress Michelle Wando Sarah Sarah Daca Donald trump President Obama vice president Union Dhaka Medicare Sarah Michelle Senate Federal Reserve Center for American progress Sarah binder Congress Senator Martin Heinrich Brookings Institution White House
What's Next?

The Asset

14:53 min | 1 year ago

What's Next?

"The Max Bergmann here for more of the asset podcast please go to our patriarch page at. Www W. W. dot patriots dot com slash asset podcast that's PAT are E. N. dot com slash acid podcast. You'll hear the a full interviews with our roster experts and analysts you'll also get more exclusive content from the acid team like our interview with the Chairman of the House. Intelligence Committee Adam Schiff F. R. Y.. Event reacting to Robert Morris testimony and upcoming episode following the mysterious trail of Dead Russians around the twenty sixteen election and a whole lot more. Don't don't miss out sign up today at. WWW dot patriots dot com slash asset podcast. Welcome again to eight other edition of this week. In impeachment it is is a An exclusive show that we put out on our patriotic page. That's Patriot dot com slash asset. podcast where you can and get all kinds of great goodies if you listen to the asset podcast. We put lots of great goodies up there for you to hear. But don't worry if you listen to the asset podcast cast and you love the great host of the podcast. He's right here. He's Max Bergmann. Hey Max how you doing good. How are you all right now? I just want to point out to people who are listening and Pull back the curtain just a little bit. We take these in advance right. So we are taping this on Thursday January thirtieth thirtieth seventeen hundred hours. That's where we are right now so anything that we say if it changes between now and when you're listening to this this we can't be held responsible for it right right right okay. All right so for people who have been listening not have the longest shelf life of an episode Sir. Look a lot of stuff to talk. There's a lot of stuff that's happened between the last time that we taped and this episode For starters the impeachment trial rallied begun. Yes the IT has officially begun. I'm GonNa ask you just sort of a a a really big broad question. Has it going going. I have to say you know. There's I think you can be a glass half full glass half empty kind of person. sometimes One sometimes than the other. I think the glass half. Let's maybe we'll start with a glass half empty perspective. The glass half empty perspective is. Oh my God. The Republic is collapsing. Look at the Republican Party getting just bombarded with facts in evidence and then just retreating into gobbledygook league nonsense and not caring about the Constitution the Republicans doomed and if Donald Trump wins reelection. It's all over. Oh my God the you know the Senate the the world's greatest deliberative body is just not doing that and I think there's a lot of genuine depression that we haven't seen the cracks and fissures that I think we were sort of hoping to see emerge and so I think there's a real glass half empty perspective. It feels like the glasses. This is less than half empty when you put it that way. It'd be honest and I think that's very legitimate however however I think if you're already sort of like Oh man word sort of already drinking at the bottom of the glass. I actually think that there's some reason for actually think this has gone extremely well for those who are supportive of democracy in hoping that this goes badly for Donald Trump In essentially for the Democratic Party who the party that's GonNa Oppose Him in two thousand twenty and the reason. Why is because I mean where we are where we were was not expecting Republicans to break break in to remove him? But we wanted this to be a clarifying moment for the Republic where we are entering an election season and so if if Senate Republicans were going to back inside with trump that he was going to be as painful as possible for them and so when you look at this this is become an extremely painful process for Senate Republicans were they are getting bombarded with these facts and evidence that I've mentioned in they're going going to put their head in potentially if they all vote to exonerate and not to hear witnesses put their heads in the sand and are essentially tying themselves Dell's to Donald Trump. And so what we had before was you know Senate Republicans like People Joni Ernst could go and say like look you know I. I agree with the president and a lot of issues. I don't you know. I wish he'd get off twitter and I wish you wouldn't talk that way and it should be a little bit more respectful And I'm not sure I would have done that. You know they they can create some daylight to trump and what that means is that if there was a real action that Joni Ernst could sort of run this kind of pro trump but more moderate Republican in. Maybe if it's you know trump's that sort of forty eight to fifty percent in Iowa she was going to be at a solid like fifty five percent fifty three percent in serve outperform him in May be that still the case. But I think what we've done is potentially made it so. Oh where trumps numbers are. That's where Joni Ernst numbers are going to be. So it's you know this is. This has been clarifying. You're either with him or against him and they're all gonna either sink or swim Depending on how twenty twenty goes and so two thousand twenty is going to be this existential battle for the future. Future of America's soul for the future of American democracy in Joni Ernst and Susan Collins and others. We're going to have to pick a side and by picking aside by either by siding siding with trump potentially I think they've made it more likely that if Democrats win that it's a potentially bigger victory than it would have been previously. Okay that's a glass half full okay. I appreciate that optimism. Because I'm I'm I've been sort of glass glass. Well let's say in a glass like nearly empty. Well actually let me just add. I also think we went into this being. Like what's the sorcerer Mitch. McConnell going going to do you know what is he. Got Up his hat to sort of make it. So this makes makes this look like a fair trial right and this is what we're sort of gone unwavering. Is that how what is he going to do to make it look like a totally fair trial and we're going to spend all our time saying it's not a fair trial but then they're going to have all these arguments to say it was what we've now realizes like the AD. Nothing they just. They just went straight in on the cover up. And that's the other thing now sort of forgetting this back in like the the previous week but we like okay. What is what? What maneuvers going to do to make? This seem like this'll this'll be legit. They haven't done anything they've just this gone full. We got nothing all. We're GONNA do a straight cover up. Let's do the crime and let super fast the crime of the cover up. Do it quickly just rip the band aid off. And that is in their approach and in some ways it just makes it very clear and I think the other element of the glass half being in half full is that the American people have been have called of called. Bs On that and said you know seventy to eighty percent of the public looking looking at polls wants witnesses things. That's what happens in a fair trial and then you look at the other numbers and plus fifty percent believe that the president should be removed that he's done something wrong along those are all really good numbers For Democrats really terrible numbers for the Republicans that we just mentioned so this has been a very bad week for Donald trump a very bad week for Senate Republicans think the question will be how much of an impact will have in twenty twenty. How Much Democrats make an impact impact? But but that's that's been there. Yeah okay that's A. That's a really good overview of of everything that's going on and you mentioned about how they're just they've completely bought in on the cover up moving along quickly Pay No attention to what's going on but there are procedures in place. There are things that are You know we're watching play out and I WANNA ask you about the job that the impeachment managers are doing doing With all of this house how do you think there are they making the case. I guess not only in the impeachment trial but the to the people that are watching. Yeah so you know I think as listeners of the asset podcast and of of This weekend impeachment. No I have no qualms qualms with you know Monday morning quarterbacking democratic leadership and pointing out where I think House Democrats and Senate Democrats and others are getting wrong wrong in this case. I'm kind of absolutely Ford at how amazing they've been. You know. I you look at the the the trial and how it's played out and particularly how they made their case on the opening Opening days it was just remarkable. I mean Adam shifts performance gio I mean lawyers have just been gushing over it as one of the great constitutional trial performances in American history. In the thing that I thanks so astonishing is how you can speak for so long but not actually say exactly the same things as as our listeners. Know I repeat myself a lot And and there's Adam Schiff just being eloquent all the time. It is truly astonishing and I think they came absolutely prepared and it started on day one when they started going over the motions and the procedures and they started making their case. There was a clear plan in place for how they were going to go about the trial trial. I think every one of the managers has done an excellent job in what's come out of. This is just incredibly red. Ably strong case for a number of things one for trump's clear guilt for They've I think outlined it incredibly thoroughly and they've been hammering about the need for witnesses again again again and in pointing out pointing that out And so this has been I think done as well as they could do. I think my one sort of you know small critique and this is a little bit like critiquing football you know your your whoever the football team you support. They were winning forty to nothing at halftime or forty two three. And you're like well. They punted on that one series of downs and they really should have thrown the ball when they ran it. You know my one critique is I think they made a kind of constitutional legal decision to make make the article abuse of power And I actually complain about this on twitter last night and then Adam Schiff went in and responded responded to a question from Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski asking. Why didn't you include crimes and shift then just lawyer me effectively by pointing Out Y which is that. Abusive power is sort of the highest constitutional crime. And if we had done all these sort of smaller crimes they would said seasons not a constitutional gripe all of that being said I still think they needed to get it in there. That trump broke the law. That trump committed these crimes and while that's sort of been permeating throughout. There was a sort of Eric. Confusion Ginola this lack of a talking point that Democrats have had Just in the messaging that this is a criminal act that trump committed criminal conspiracy and so my one critique is like I get all that but you should have found a way to just be trump committed crimes. Because that's what people think of trials about committing crimes. I know you're much too modest but I'll say hit the power of Max Bergmann is he wishes Adam Schiff would do something and then Adam Schiff did it. That my friends is called Gravitas Or happenstance okay. All right fine. We're GONNA stop it there for now now. If you want to hear the rest of the conversation that we are about to have. There's a lot of conversation that we're about to have good or patriot. PATRIOTIC DOT com slash asset. podcast subscribe there become a member and you can hear the full episode. Otherwise you just get this little snippet and as good as it is. You will believe the other stuff that we have on this show. It's crazy the threat that's right The asset is a production of the Center for American progress. Action Fund protect the investigation and district productive fall. Would he went hall. Max Bergmann. I'm Andrea purse executive producers and Peter Senior producer. The asset is written by Max Bergmann and the good people at the Moscow Project Jeremy for nook Talia Missile and CNN. Garelli and the team at protect the investigation and Paul Woody Woodhall in his court at district productive the learn more about Russian interference in the two thousand sixteen presidential election go to the Moscow project DOT ORG and protect the investigation dot org. Please subscribe look podcast on Apple. PODCAST or your favorite podcast APP and please leave a rating and review when a man unprincipled and private life despotic in his ordinary demeanor known to have scoffed and private at the principles of liberty when such a man is seen to mount the hobbyhorse popularity to join the cry of danger to Liberty Liberty to take every opportunity of embarrassing the general government and bringing it under suspicion to flatter and fall in with all the nonsense the sense of the zealots of the day it may justly be suspected that his object is to throw things into confusion that he might ride the storm and direct the whirlwind.

Donald Trump Max Bergmann Adam Schiff Senate Joni Ernst Adam Schiff F. twitter president Susan Collins Republican Party Robert Morris Chairman Center for American progress depression Moscow Adam Democratic Party Action Fund
One Of Biden's Biggest Climate Change Challenges? The Oceans

Environment: NPR

03:36 min | 3 weeks ago

One Of Biden's Biggest Climate Change Challenges? The Oceans

"President biden's environmental policies include a pledge to conserve. Us land in us waters. The goal is to protect thirty percent of the land and thirty percent of the water which is a lot. Climate change will complicate that goal because warming temperatures are changing. What is happening. Just offshore and altering what needs to be preserved and lawrence summer reports a few years ago marine biologist kyle van houten saw video online of a small great white shark was young only about five feet long and it was swimming right off a pier in california's monterey bay. It was almost hard to believe. Our initial reaction was. That can't be true. We know they're in southern california and mexico. Not in monterey young white sharks normally hang out hundreds of miles south in the warm waters of southern california then houten and his colleagues at the monterey bay aquarium have tracked them there but starting in two thousand fourteen. They began showing up in monterey because the water is warmer there. Was this event this marine heatwave in the north pacific which we called the blog and that was some of the warmest water. We've never had in recorded history off of the west coast the us the sharks habitat had moved and mountain. Says that's beginning to happen all over. Think what this tells us is. This is not a story about sharks. This is a story about climate. The sharks are following their temperatures in habitat. They're following in their home as it moves. The oceans are literally taking the heat from climate change. Miriam goldstein is director of ocean policy at the center for american progress. She says the oceans have been doing us a big favor. They've absorbed more than ninety percent of the heat in the atmosphere from human caused warming in the last fifty years so she says biden's plan to cut emissions is also key for the oceans but beyond that the hasn't laid out its priorities yet. Biden is yet to nominate a key ocean role. The head of noah the national and atmospheric administration and goldstein says. There are urgent challenges for the agency. The fish that used to be in the carolinas or new jersey. The fish that used to new jersey or new england and our management system has not caught up so we need to look at what it will take to help these fishing communities fishermen processors adopts to what is unfortunately the new reality those tough conversations to have because for some fishermen. There's potentially a lot to lose but some are ready to talk. Fishermen are the think about it like the canarian. The goal line right. They are the ones who often see an experience. These changes before anybody else does. Eric razor is deputy director of the gulf of mexico. Refills shareholders alliance. He says a key issue will be the biden administrations thirty by thirty goal to conserve thirty percent of the land and ocean by twenty thirty. Historically that's been contentious because protecting waters sometimes means putting them off limits to fishing fisherman's businesses are going to be impacted by this and that's why it's especially critical for us to be at the table. Be at the podium have access to the managers and start to answer these questions. That are unanswered at this point. Fraser says that's how the biden administration can get by in. Everyone is looking for solutions. He says because the oceans are changing in ways that no one can ignore lauren summer. Npr news this message comes from npr sponsor capital one in capital one shopping downloadable browser extension that searches various sites for shoppers. What's in wallet. More at capital one shopping dot com.

President biden kyle van houten monterey Miriam goldstein houten us california monterey bay monterey bay aquarium national and atmospheric admin north pacific biden southern california center for american progress swimming new jersey west coast
A Biden Pick in Trouble

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

30:11 min | Last month

A Biden Pick in Trouble

"In this episode is sponsored by charles. Schwab meet schwab intelligent income a simple modern way to pay yourself from your portfolio overcome the complexity of income needs in retirement with automated tax smart withdrawals so that you can start stop or adjust at any time without penalty plus ongoing monitoring seal always know where you stand and since lower fees mean more money for you to invest you pay no advisory fee available at schwab intelligent portfolios visit schwab dot com slash intelligent income to learn more about their modern approach to wealth management. I think of the confirmation process so many biden appointees are going through right now as a kind of beauty pageant for wonks. They get up tell their stories in the most favorable light possible. Let c-span see them sweat a little and hope it all out. Slates jim newell. He thinks about this process a little differently. More like hunger games for nerds. I think would kind of like twenty come in. Eighteen will come out or something like what jim saying. Here is not all these nominees can survive. The opposition is not gonna just wanna let the new president Have everything done without scoring points along the way and typically that means getting one or two six either defeating their confirmation or were typically getting them to withdraw their nomination. So you're saying if you're president you basically you have to like you have to build a heard with some slow antelopes in it just to let them get picked off. I think that you know the opposition going to look for a couple of pick off and then you could look at the administration than coming up with their lists that way. The slow antelope in joe. Biden's heard jim says that's pretty clear. The nominee to head up the office of management and budget near a tendon. Now you know. Is that exactly what they thought that. near tan would be for them. I don't exactly know because the white house's thinking of this nation from the beginning has been kind of confusing if you look at alive biden's on knees looked really safe. And she was the one who really did not look very safe at all. The president might not have expected any republicans to vote for tandon but her snap ish twitter persona and unapologetically. Partisan hotcakes have proved unpopular on both sides of the aisle. Now even some democrats seem to be withdrawing support west. Virginia moderate joe manchin a crucial vote has said he's a no. I was prepared for this nomination to be kind of a a slog and i thought actually it wasn't that the hearings were kind of debasing for tannin. Just because she had to achieve all these tweets red bag her apologize for them. But then i thought she would pretty much go through that that little hazing ritual and then and then get confirms on fifty fifty vote but Joe manchin seems to have upended that plan today on the show when you're a tendon has faced such stiff opposition on capitol hill and what that means for the rest of biden's nominees. I'm mary harris. You're listening to what next stick around. What next is supported by transfer wise. The best way to send spend and received money internationally picture this you need to send money to another country. What do you do. maybe. Think i'll just use my bank easy. Transfer wise just as one of question for you. Will your bank give you the real exchange rate like the one you see on google. Can you even find what their rate is. Banks and providers like paypal usually. Don't make it easy. And that's because they've marked up the exchange rate and that means that no matter how low there other fees are. You could lose real money with transfer wise. It's totally different. You always get the real midmarket exchange rate when you send money to eighty countries no matter which currency you sent and their fees are always super low. that's transfer wise puts their rate and their fees. Right upfront nothing to hide for prices. Just one reason. Transfer wise rules speeds and other with transfer wise over fifty percent of transfers arrive within one hour. So you don't just save money. You save yourself. The stress overdid it get their transfer. Wise even has a multi-currency account that lets you hold up to fifty four currencies and convert them instantly and their debit card. Lets you spend or shop internationally. Without worrying about sneaky foreign transaction charges join over nine million customers who save more than three million dollars from bad rates every day and try transfer wise for free at transfer wise dot com slash. What next leading. The office of management and budget means joining the president's cabinet and also spelling out the president's priorities in dollars and sense. Jim says it's a role that makes a lot of sense for someone like near a tendon. She's got her hands deep in the guts of policy making in washington for a long time. Choose often thought of as a potential chief of staff for hillary clinton but that loyalty to clinton it's part what's made her such a lightning rod. It means republicans. Don't have a lot of reasons to love her. And neither do some progressives who watched his hand in eagerly attacked bernie sanders in defensive. Her boss that said if you're wondering whether she's qualified. Jim says there's no question i mean. She worked with hillary clinton since the nineteen nineties and she's various roles some political but a lot of more. Recently she was policy director failure clinton in two thousand and eight work again in twenty sixteen. She worked in. The obama. administration is a senior adviser at the department of health and human services when they were drafting the affordable care actually a very big role in that since about the last ten years. She's been the president of the center for american progress which is a very central democratic. Think tank so you know. I think there've been some saying she doesn't necessarily have enough policy experience. This is a lot in my opinion. I think she knows very well. How washington works so. She's not an economist but she knows how to pull the levers right. Yeah and she knows policy questions about ten often come down to her style. The new york times published this infamous story for mac. Two thousand eight about a time. Tendon brought her then. Boss hillary clinton to an interview at the center for american progress. That think tank tannin would go on to lead when clinton was asked about her vote for the iraq war which was a sensitive subject. Tandon reportedly punched the interviewer in the chest in her defense. Tandon said i didn't slug him. Pushed him a decade later. That interviewer would be running bernie sanders campaign there. Couple of interesting things to me about this story which is first of all. It shows this quality in tandem that she's aggressive and i don't mean that as a slight like even her own mother told the new york times that her daughter can be aggressive. She used that language and then it also shows this divide in the democratic party where you have someone like clinton coming in to talk to someone at place called the center for american progress. You think it's going to be a friendly interview and then you're being pushed and the fact that that might be uncomfortable for folks who are establishment democrats who worked with the clintons for really long time right and i think in the last couple. She's probably better known on the left. As this embodiment of the centrist democratic establishment. There have been all sorts of controversies about from the last when she was a cap about the fundraising. She was doing Either from questionable regimes where for major corporations. But i think once she really started taking shots at bernie sanders campaign and after two thousand sixteen when her emails were hacked the russian having episode released and she was saying some pretty nasty stuff fair. I think that's when she really became a kind of big villain of of a lot of sanders supporters. What the email show. There was a lot of what the left thinks. The establishment says about them behind their backs like tandon. Who publicly say i believe in the idea of medicare for all. But it's politically very you know it's not likely to happen. And i think she was just a lot more kind of venting a little bit more emails. About how unrealistic and idealistic you know some supporters. Were and i think. She showed a lot of frustration that a lot of the hillary team had in two thousand sixteen that sanders could just offer anything no matter how unrealistic and it was hard for the clinton campaign to top. The last four years near attendant really got known for her tweets. It was like the person in those emails just started putting it out there online. Like i wonder if you have a favorite exchange. Well i just would like look at twitter at like one a and i'd see her like fighting with just ranchos about anything you know. I do think that she after. Twenty sixteen and these specific experience of being hatched by russian military intelligence She was quite radicalized by that and just to the extent that she ever playing nice before kind of stopped doing that. I think she was like a lot of people who after trump was elected. You know you saw the sorts of protests. Emerged right after that. Maybe from a lot of people who aren't politically active to begin with all ready politically active. But i think she just kind of fell like this war now. When trump got elected tendons online persona started getting more aggressive. She used her platform to unleash missives against many of the senators. She's now depending on for confirmation. She called senator. Tom cotton a fraud. Mitch mcconnell was voldemort and she said vampires have got more heart than ted cruz. She went after moderate republicans to called senator. Susan collins the worst. I have to tell you. I'm very disturbed about your personal comments. But people all this is created strange bedfellows in washington when ten went before committee chaired by her erstwhile political rival bernie sanders. It was a republican senator. John neely kennedy from louisiana who spoke up and defended the democratic socialist from vermont. I mean you call senator sanders everything but ignorance slot as nats. That is not an basically what happened. He can read a few of these tweets are paraphrase them in his unique way and then yeah just kept saying. Did you mean when you wrote them. And she gave a bunch of responses senator. I have to say. I deeply regret my comment understand that them. Did you mean them understand. You've you've taken back. But did you mean them. I'd say the discourse over the last. I feel really badly about senator. I feel terribly about them. I deleted them. Social media is a terrible discourse and he finally just keeps us senator. I must have been dimmed. But i really regret i mean i feel badly look back at them. I said them. I feel badly about them. I deleted tweets ever only saying that because you want to be confirmed now. I felt bad about them into jim being them. When you showed them senator. I must have met them. But i really regret them. And you know that was that was actually an effective former question because she came in here. Just ready to give a blanket apology at all these questions and He got her to go a little bit off script. And i think he. I can't accurately say what cannons contrition is or what it should be but she clearly had a preparation for this that you know sue kennedy was trying to get through our the republicans are there objections to near attend in about having their feelings hurt or is it about something more real. That was the other funny thing from all the senators who these tweets including bernie sanders. Who has been the object of some of the criticisms all clarify like whatever. We're big boys like these would actually hurt her feelings. But you know just saying you know we just saying. I am very hurt. Ow whether you know but just in terms of your job like you're knocked be able to you know it's not professional. I mean things about me anymore. There's something a little bit rich about. Seeing a bunch of republicans re tweets back and try to shame someone. Yeah it's that's part of the surreal aspect of the whole thing. Given what i spent the last four years in the capitol hearing senators and members of congress republicans say. I haven't seen the tweet when you'd ask about you know. Donald trump liked you. Know to like doc up or a beat up someone or whatever insane thing he might tweet at any minute you know. So it's kind of nebulous. Exactly how directly linking this to making her unqualified to like right to the budget. Proposal is but it's something like one thing is. We just had an insurrection in the capital because of the environment or whatever and we need to cool temperatures. That's kind of what. Joe mansion is going with a lot but then others are saying we need just embiid is someone who works a lot with members of congress and we need to know that we're working with someone who who will actually communicate with us and isn't just such a sharp partisan so then what happened after these hearings last week we began to see some folks start to come out and say no. I'm comfortable with this nomination. Starting with joe mansion right right well. Friday afternoon joe manchin came out with a statement saying he would not support her. It wasn't just that he was on conroy. He was saying. I will oppose her. Did that. surprise you yes. It did why. I thought that if it did seem to be coordinated with democratic leadership at all i think it took them by surprise but it just seemed to kill a nomination without much of the coordination You'd usually see when it's determined that a nominee does not have the support whereas all kind of quietly withdraw their name. I remember a couple of confirmations. In the trump administration where you would see say susan collins or lisa murkowski. They're actually good example for for betsy. Devos that education secretary. They announced their vote against her. But it didn't imperil the nomination because mitch mcconnell still have the votes from everyone else. That seemed like something where it was. There probably conversations ahead of time about fat With this one. I mean it really does imperil the presidential nominee. And you've i just thought it would have been negotiate with leadership a little bit more. You did say at one point. You know mansion is going to do things like this from time to time like make these little sacrifices to the gods of bipartisanship to have this semblance of centrist credibility. Is that what you think happened here. Yeah i think mansion maybe feels he knows how much power has the most conservative vote in the democratic congress. But he's kind of being squeezed a little bit on the reconciliation bill. The relief of they're working on he wanted to be bipartisan. Leadership chose a partisan path. He doesn't wanna deal with minimum wage in it. They do so. He's being squeezed on that bill because he knows he can't really vote against joe biden signature opening piece of legislation. He can only taylor a little bit. So i think he's going to try to express himself in some other areas along the way and that may be you know have a nominee whose controversial who doesn't know very well is coming down to pike and who he wasn't given a heads up about or anything then he's going to. He's going to take the opportunity when we come back. Tendons not the only one facing criticism on capitol hill. Why it's important to pay attention to who is getting this kind of pushback. This episode is brought to you by progressive. Saving money in your car. Insurance is easy with progressive average savings of over seven hundred fifty dollars for customers who switch and save in fact. Customers can qualify for an average of six discounts on their auto policy with progressive including discounts just for starting a quote online or having multiple vehicles on their policy. Get your quote online at progressive dot com and see how much you could be. Saving national annual average auto insurance savings by new customers surveyed in twenty nineteen potential. Savings will vary discounts vary and are not available in all states and situations spotify and higher ground are launching a new podcast renegades. Born in the usa president barack obama and bruce springsteen sit down to discuss the country that's given them both so much chronicle the stories of its people and connect their own search for meaning truth and community with the larger story of america. They may seem like unlikely friends to men with very different backgrounds and career paths yet. They built a friendship on their shared sensibilities and a belief in the american ideal. In renegades born in the usa we get to eavesdrop as they reminisce about their hometowns. Role models explore manhood. Fatherhood and growing up in america and examine the sometimes painful distance between the american dream and the american reality and they get into some trouble with joyriding springsteen's vintage corvette. Don't miss renegades for the usa episodes are available now on spotify. Listen free only on spotify with joe manchin a no. The biden administration needs at least one republican to cross party lines and support near a tendon and some of the usual suspects are out. Susan collins and mitt romney have both made clear. They are not likely to back this vote. I mean susan. Collins was actually really harsh. She didn't just give the whole like she's partisan and i'm afraid i won't be able to work with her. Excuse she also. She's not qualified for the job. Yeah i mean. She said her past actions have demonstrated this kind of animosity. That president biden has pledged to transcend. Yeah but i mean. I think she said on experiential level like she didn't have the experience to do the job neither the experience nor the temperament. yeah yeah so on all counts. Susan collins is out mitt romney a moderate vote and he's a fiscal conservative. So i actually didn't really see him to be especially in play for nominee especially when you probably just lit up his presidential campaign in two thousand twelve. I don't know maybe mitt. Romney hasn't remember all that but i think you know some of these senators even though they say that they don't take personally all the stuff is set online. Or what have you political. Did a story that susan collins was really upset that candan had picked for her staff. This guy toepfer spiro. Who is a healthcare policy advisor at the center for american progress in is also very active very aggressive. on twitter. collins was concerned she said why would you put someone who is a troll against the united states. senator in a key position at o. M. b. is something susan collins ass so she knows she called tougher spear a troll of hers needing susan collins is like checking her account and everything no so near cans probably call these people names and some other people at cap have probably been a big pain for lobbies republican senators last especially for years so even though they say they're they're not really they're above all that i think they know kind of what's been coming out of the broader cap cinematic universe here and you know they they might have some grudges chicken out there. Mentions they know what's up. Yeah yeah but even with this narrow pathway for support the biden white house is digging in the way of a clean be mirror. Tannin doesn't work out and give us a sense of what that looks like. Well the white house's focus. The president's focus is on working toward the confirmation of near tannin to lead to the director. That is our focus. I gotta say. I don't understand how near attendance nomination got this far. Like a look at how it's gone down and to me like blocking this nomination is like the most bipartisan thing to happen on capitol hill right now like It was that the intent. I think it's something where just because of her her negative history with some of the left. I think this is an easy one for for some democrats in the senate of block because you can show off your bipartisan credentials. Any won't actually irritate the left. I mean we should be clear. There are a lot of people who are very mad about this. You know. I think a lot of people have viewed this. This whole process is sexist and insulting towards an indian american woman. Who would be making history here. But i don't think that near tannin had quite constituency on capitol hill that biden's team expected. Can we talk about the conversation. That's going on right now about especially women of color because you raised a good point. Which is there are a bunch of people on the hill. Who are concerned with the optics. Here you saw. Aoc tweeting about it the other day and so it raises this issue of are the women and the women of color having to jump through more hoops to get approved by the senate. Yeah it does. I can understand why some people see that as as the real problem. The one that i think is going to get the most heat in the end is a hobby airport. Sarah who's the nominee for hhs who'd be as hispanic director of health and human services. And i mean he was in congress for twenty four years. He left at the beginning of the trump administration became a california attorney general which is a bigger job. I think a lot of house democratic positions sub speaker because you are basically doing a live the litigating against the trump administration. And i guess just you know doing a lot of partisan lawsuits. That's that create live grist republicans to say that. Oh he's a big partisan who hates all these people and all these things and you know they just stated they think he's a little too partisan and he's made a good target just because of all the lawsuits he's five but then when we look at the raise issue again there. It's another one of these things. Were going around saying. He's unqualified and that seems to be a bit of a thread here if you look at him. No he's not like some some of what the opposition is. Oh he's he's not a medical doctor. Well most each secretaries are not medical doctor. So that's donald Wasn't a medical doctor. Yeah we we can dismiss that like right off the bat you know but he was a senior member of the ways and means committee which has healthcare jurisdiction he was on the subcommittee that oversaw healthcare and use a member of congress for twenty four years. And that's like good enough. You know. I think that's plenty. I think he's been involved in healthcare policy. I think is california attorney general. He did a lot of work that touched on healthcare policy. So i think when when people are saying this only the nominees of color who get this unqualified rap and you'll get near tan. Who is straightforwardly qualified to be ownby director. And that she's hit with that too. Yeah i think that's a serious thing to look into. It can kind of see both sides here at least with near a tandon because biden has pushed this return to civility. And you look at some of the stories about near attendance aggressiveness. And i think oh. Is that what we want to do. Here i'm not sure right. I mean you. There's you know. There's a lot of different strands around here. I think the unqualified is is ridiculous. But i look at these nominations. And i wonder you know the opposition's gonna want something to unite themselves especially this opposition which has had a really bad month of january with everything that trump did on his way out and they need something to unite themselves around and near. Kansas doesn't really offer anything to republicans to do a favor for joe biden. So is this a biden misstep. I would think so if you're struggling to get forty nine votes on your own side. Who knows how. Many votes actually has among democrats. Then you did it. Read it very right and you. You put her in an awkward position because you just didn't pay attention to the politics capitol hill very well. But i do think for all the complaining that the left and specifically some bernie supporters have been doing about near And maybe some hoping that near tannin wouldn't get the job. They're real concerns because even though they may not like that she lectures them about how medicare for all is unrealistic or whatever. She is on board with the project of big spending right now through deficits to to rebuild the economy and to do a lot of very bold projects and some of the other nominees that by is reportedly looking at like bruce reid for that's a former director of democratic leadership council which is a very centrist. Think tank that would not have been a good fit there so be careful what you wish for for some of the left. Be careful what you wish for and for those you know we look for yet again. Another reason why. Republicans shouldn't go along with this nomination. They can roll the dice and maybe get more favorable to their policy. Beliefs looking at what happened with near tandon. I kept asking myself. Like what is the story about like. Is it a story about bad tweets. Is it a story. About the death of clinton ism is it about like legitimate conservative grievance or is it about how women and people of color nominees are getting the short end of the stick. What would you say. Is that all those who have been using twitter for the last fifteen years daily basis are never going to get confirmed by the senate and we made. Never actually yeah. In twenty years people are not able to get any cabinet. Confirmed jim newell. Thank you for joining me. Thank you jim. Newell is slates senior politics writer. And that's the show. Next is produced by mary. Wilson davis land. Elena schwartz and daniel hewitt we get support each and every day from alison benedict alicia montgomery and mary harris. Keep your eye on the speed tomorrow. Our friday show what next. Tvd with lizzie. Leary is going to be here. And i will get you back here on monday.

bernie sanders schwab Joe manchin biden Susan collins center for american progress clinton tandon office of management and budge Tandon jim Boss hillary clinton hillary clinton capitol hill washington jim newell Tom cotton mitch mcconnell ted cruz
Watt It Takes: Executive Producer Stephen Lacey

The Energy Gang

51:23 min | Last month

Watt It Takes: Executive Producer Stephen Lacey

"This podcast is brought to you by sun. Grow son grows a leading provider of pd inverters solutions around the world. And it's meeting the growing calls for deep decarbonization with constant innovation son grow was able to deliver its technology on time during the pandemic will also keeping an eye toward what the future of clean energy will need learn. More about son grows cutting edge. Rnd at sun grow power dot com. Rosso brought to you by seapower. Seapower has a new book. It's called demand side energy management in the time of covid. It takes a peek into eight of the biggest commercial industries. In north america and reveals key energy management strategies that organizations executed during the pandemic authored by nineteen seapower experts with a combined total of more than three hundred years of energy experience. The book is a must have resource for any commercial and industrial organization striving to optimize energy use in twenty twenty one. Visit the seapower way dot com slash twenty twenty one to download this new book. Green tech media podcasts. This week we have another addition of what it takes featuring well yours truly. What's it like being on the show now. Now that you're on it i'm nervous. I was nervous. When someone's interviewing me. I ordinarily don't like to talk about myself that much. I would prefer to profile other people but back in december powerhouse. Ceo emily kirsch interviewed me for a special holiday edition of what it takes. And we talked in front of audience about my career in journalism. How the world of podcasting has evolved in about my own. Entrepreneurial journey launching production company. So this week we're sharing that conversation with you. Yeah it's usually takes me a good like five minutes or so to kind of settle in But this feels very meta to be interviewing that interview master. So i just want you to know how much admiration and respect i have for for you and everything that i've learned from you in this podcast journey. So so thank you for saying yes. Thank you so much honored now before we get to that. I've got a great piece of news. What it takes is now a spin off series. That's right in two thousand twenty one. We are profiling a ton more entrepreneurs and executives who are building the next generation of climate tech companies and we're evolving the format to tell their stories in an even deeper way. It's going to be hosted by emily. Kirsch who you here regularly. Conducting these interviews. You can go to whatever podcast app that you're on right now. Search for what it takes. What what it takes and tap that subscribe button and throughout the year. We're going to help inspire and challenge you with a bunch of new chronicles and climate tech entrepreneurship. Okay now with some hesitation and trepidation. Here is emily's conversation with me all right back to you and where you were born. Which is in rural new hampshire. Your mom worked at a steel fabrication plant where she was the only woman in a company Of of men for pretty much her entire time there. She worked her way up from a secretary to general manager to a vice president and manage sixty men while raising you and your brother out. What influence did your parents have on you. Both parents were very influential. My mom definitely gave me the a window into what it was like to be a really hard worker and was a role model for I think a very strong woman and she worked in a male dominated. Industry played A hard nosed manager role and a mother to A lot of steel fabrication workers and worked tirelessly really long hours And it was only really later in life that i realized i picked up a lot of my work ethic from her. So having that as an example Was really influential. My father was a forester and then he went into real estate and so being in the forest. I would go onto property and go. You know. look he would help me name trees and we would run the boundaries of properties in the woods of new hampshire and so that gave me an early exposure to being out in nature constantly so the two of them had very direct roles in my interests and behaviors as a teenager as you described it. You were private lee rebellious which i love that description but also very studious and as you said constantly outdoors. Who was stephen lacey in high school. And what role did movies and the media play in your life at that time while. I'm a typical gemini. So i have two personalities. One is the professional personality that people in school in high school and in college and parents would see. then the other is the more rebellious side So a lot of people are surprised by that when they see me in my natural habitat when the mike isn't to honor not in the classroom. High school was really influential for me. Because that's when i got into filmmaking. I got my first access to cameras. And first exposure script writing 'em we had a small group of people in high school who were really into Making films and doing it very seriously. I mean we look back on them now. And they're not particularly good but we had a management structure in place to actually create things. And we had regular meetings. We would plan them out and so it wasn't us like this fun little thing we would do off in the woods. We were really serious about it. So that early exposure Made me super passionate about media and storytelling pretty early on. It's all it's all coming together. You graduated from franklin pierce university a small university in your home state of new hampshire in two thousand and six with a degree in journalism with a focus in digital media production. You lived with your parents and commuted all four years of college and your peers saw you as very studious and kind of straight edge. was why journalism. And what were your college years like well. I was into the idea of fiction writing and producing films. And i initially went. Because i wanted to get into filmmaking. Franklin pierce had just gotten a massive investment into new digital media center so they had all these huge editing as a lot of access to equipment and they were giving freshman immediate access to that equipment. So i knew i could build something right away but what i realize is that i'm not very good at fiction writing. I'm good at story. Construction and understanding. What makes a good story but ultimately like the creative juices weren't flowing very well. And so i would look back at stuff that i was doing and i wasn't very happy with it but i was really good at talking to people and i was really interested in news and politics from pretty early age and once i realized that like i could draw out other people's stories 'em use those same kinds of techniques to develop nonfiction stories documentary style stories and interviews. That was really when it clicked for me While in college you intern for talk. Radio news service where you covered congressional hearings and white house press briefings. You were only nineteen years old yet. You had a pass to go basically anywhere in congress and you took advantage of it by attending every congressional hearing that you could. You told me that you're most joyous moment of this. Internship was attending the correspondents dinner. What happened at that dinner. And how did this internship at nineteen years old shape your career. I mean it was really the window into everything else that came because they their business model required interns to do all the work so it was really one person who directed an army of interns to gather tape around washington. Dc cut that tape and then send it out to news segments on talk radio stations. And then she would get on at the end of the day or in the morning and talk about what was happening in dc. So i got to go to all sorts of all around congress. I had just free rein anywhere. I wanted to go And i every day was a new assignment. both at think tanks and on capitol hill so I got. I was under pressure to have familiarity with the tech. I had to get the tape right. I had to select the right tape and know how to cut it so that we could send it to the radio stations and then at the end of that internship. I got this opportunity to Attend the white house. Correspondents dinner with the presidential motorcade. So part of my responsibilities was going to the white house. Press briefings gathering tape. They're going down into the tiny little studio in the basement and sending that off During the day that we went to the press briefing the or the white house. Correspondents dinner. i got to sit in the white house all day. Hang around with you know the camera people and the journalists you know many of these folks are real cowboys. They're they're like crusty cowboys who've been there for thirty years and they kind of sit around sharing war stories and chew the so to speak and i got. I got this kind of backstage exposure to how it really works on the media side which was super influential at the end of the day. The presidential motorcade ran up and out runs the white house staff and out runs the press pool and we got in the different cars and george w bush a few cars up from me and we pull up to the hotel and out we run and we're getting into the building we rushed through security and on my right as condoleeza rice and on my left is then white house chief of staff andy card and for me. It was exciting. Because i had exposure to these people with power but i got to see how they're interacting with each other. I got to see how the inside of the process work and it was like. Oh people are just human beings just like anybody else and so it actually took away the luster a little bit in a healthy way And i i think getting exposure to that early on helped me realized like the humanistic people even people in power following graduation in two thousand and six. You've got a job as editor and producer at the online magazine renewable energy world where you were paid an annual salary of twenty five thousand dollars to start your first podcast which was called inside renewable energy. Where did your interest at that time in renewable energy come from and andrew your experience with podcasting like how similar or different was that from the internship works. Now that i'm thinking of it. I think it was. It was twenty seven thousand dollars and It sounds low now but it's probably more than most podcasters make good point so I it was a really amazing experience because like the talk radio. News service service internship. I was just thrown into it. I had a real passion for the environment and environmental science. Even though even though i wasn't great at the environmental science part of it it was something that was really interesting to me. So environmentalism had played an influential role. But i knew nothing about cleantech new. Nothing about the energy business. It was not something that was really on my radar. In fact i was applying for you know local newspaper jobs. I was willing to report on basically anything And i applied to talk radio stations. I mean really any kind of exposure. That i could get and there was a small outfit. In peterborough. New hampshire called renewable energy access. At the time they had started in the late nineties called solar access. They were the first True business publication covering the early solar industry and later renewables and the ceo and co founder. Jim callaghan who a real mentor of mine had launched an early podcast and they had been experimenting with 'em they needed someone to ramp it up and take it on full time and so I was like okay. I think i can do this. I had been doing the manager of the radio station in college and I went in and they took a gamble on me. I mean i had never made a podcast. I didn't know anything about cleantech. But they said like we just need a young person who thinks they can do this and we're going to give you rein to do this and Once again i was. I was thrown into the deep end and That's how i got my start in cleantech. I had to force myself to learn every single day and really uncover very complicated subjects and communicate. Those quickly It sounds familiar for. I think every person who has come up in this industry Five years later you joined the center for american progress progressive. Think tank where you were hired as deputy editor providing progressive commentary on climate science and politics. You were there for just under two years before leaving to join green tek media where from twenty thirteen to twenty eighteen. You were editor in chief. During which time you launched both energy gang. In the interchange podcasts Why did you leave center for american progress. And what led you to green tech media. Well what led me to center for american progress. Was this desire to talk. More about climate change so at renewable energy world was purely focused on the business of renewables which was very attractive to me. I always liked the business lens. And i was comfortable there but there was a broader climate conversation that was really starting to materialize in washington and i liked the idea of talking about climate politics climate science. When i got there. I absolutely loved everyone at the center for american progress and i had a great relationship with my boss joe rome at the time but what. I was a little concerned about an ultimately one of the reasons why i left. Was that a lot of that information. Gathering was seen through the lens of like how to operationalize information in service of political ends. And i didn't really feel comfortable doing that. I mean i still had this kind of traditional journalist Feeling like. I didn't like the idea of disseminating information for a political party And while i'm i do fall on the left side of the spectrum. I was i just i. I don't really fall into any particular party so to speak. So i left with the desire to go back into business reporting because i felt like that's where a lot of the momentum was happening and i had been following green tech media since the early days i mean they launched in two thousand seven and they were immediately on my radar and i was constantly reading them and they had this really fresh. Take on how the money was moving around. How deals were getting developed. How companies were growing and that spoke to me. And that's why. I moved back from sort. The political side into the business side In your first year at great agritech media in two thousand and thirteen you launched the energy gang. How did the podcast come to be well. Scotland donahue is the see the former ceo and the co founder of green tech media have been playing around with a podcast and it was an interview show and it wasn't quite landing And i joined and we were both talking about okay. What kind of audio can we do. He knew he was all amped up on podcasts and he knew that i really wanted to launch a show as well but we didn't really have a good idea. And so we let it slide for a little while. I got a call from jigger shah and i was really nervous when jigger called me. And he's like hey. I had listened to your podcasts for the last five years you know. He just called me up and he's like. Hey i want to start a podcast. What do you do i you know. And we had talked about podcast in the past You know at conferences like we'd had some back and forth and we both listened to the slate political gabfest which was one of the first political round table shows that still ongoing one of the first shows ever listened to a really fantastic model. You have three experts journalists. Who are talking about a particular subject and you develop a relationship with those three people who are talking about. What's in the news and he was like. Why don't we just follow that model. Why don't we talk about what's going on in the business world of cleantech or in politics and bringing the three same co-hosts on and just see what happens we had been working with katherine hamilton. At the time. Who's our other co host on a bunch of grid stuff. So she was at the grid wise alliance at the time. We were developing a new grid edge business at green tech media and we had a lot of relationships and we were developing projects with her and she was like the perfect fit because she knew the policy world really well and she knew the grid tech side of things. You know she'd she'd been in venture capital in in she'd been aligned woman early in her career she knew the policy landscape very well so she was just like the perfect well rounded person to bring on as the third co host. Am that's how it came together. It didn't land well at first but then people developed a relationship with us in that built over time. What did it. What did it sound like in the early days while it was terrible. We were all on skype recorded on one stream so instead of three separate tracks. I mean just really basic stuff. That seems so silly now but we just recorded a skype call together. I actually recorded myself locally but sugar and catherine on skype we were you know. Sometimes the voip line would like get really terrible and just quality isn't good but i cringe listening to myself. I mean you can listen to all these if you want to go back way in the feed you can hear how different the show is I was so nervous. I had just been doing interviews for a long time so i was nervous about being a host that had to have take or at least had to facilitate takes in real time so i showed up. I had like these pages of notes. That i wanted to read and i had these intros. And the intro are way too long and then like the points i wanna make. I'm so nervous about jigger coming after me. I like to have like three pages of rebuttals and then over time you just get more comfortable with the dynamic and you let the dynamic kind of feed you into what you're going to talk about and so that that took about a year to really evolve but it doesn't sound very good compared to what you here today speaking of being afraid of jigger coming after you. I learned something in preparation for this podcast. That shook me. Which is you and is your antagonism between each other is intentional. It stressed me out so much. And i was like man or are they okay and now. I know that it was actually intentional. So i appreciate that that secret to success of kind of like people like most people like it. I don't know it was tough for me. But i'm happy to know that it's all with love. It is intentional and very much with love and at first jigger would have these takes that we were unsure how to respond to. Because catherine and i hadn't really developed the relationship with like. How much do we push back. And then i just realized like okay. Every time jigger makes the point. I'm just gonna try to disagree with him. And we talked through that and it became very explicit and so a lot of the arguments back and forth are very real in real time. They're not planned. But we have an agreement that like. We're probably just going to say no you're wrong or here's here's why i see this differently and try to create some kind of drama. I mean that's really what's important. The differences between the characters are what make people wanna listen. It's not just the information. It's that you're saddling up to the kitchen table with people who have slightly different perspectives. And you want to hear how those different perspectives react to each other before we go on. Let's take a quick break here and talk about our supporters of the show. We're brought to you by seapower. Seapower has a new book out. It's called demand. Side energy management in the time of covid and it takes a peek into eight of the biggest commercial industries in north america to reveal energy management strategies. That successful organizations have used during this very wild year. The book breaks down the demand. Response demand management programs available in five nations open energy markets as well as those offered by several of the largest electric utilities in regulated markets it's authored by nineteen seapower experts and boy. Oh boy do they have a combined. Total of a lot of years three hundred years of energy experience so this is a must resource for any commercial industrial organization striving to optimize energy use in twenty twenty one. Visit the show notes. We've got a link right there. You can get the or go to the seapower way. The seapower way dot com slash twenty. Twenty one we're also brought to you by sun grow son. Grow is a leading global supplier of and better solutions for renewables. It's also a leader in decarbonization son. Grow joined the ari. One hundred with a commitment to switch its global power needs to one hundred percent renewable energy by twenty twenty eight and you can bet. Those renewable energy projects are going to be powered by sun grow inverters beyond ensuring its factories are powered by solar sun. Growth has also invested in electric buses to move its staff around facilities in china and that earned son grow china's national standards for green factories. Son grow is innovating in its own operations in innovating out in the field to build cutting edge. Solar projects everywhere to learn more about son grows products. Go to grow. Power dot com. You were twenty two years old. When as a result of all this podcasting people started calling new the podfather which i love and ask him to take pictures with you at conferences. What is it like to be a celebrity in our industry. Did you ever feel like you had imposter syndrome early on. And if so what was that like i have pictures. That people took That are posted on facebook or like. They're they're buried away somewhere. I always felt like okay. I'm reaching people. But this is kind of niche industry. And i never ever let it get to my head. I mean i've always had perspective on that kind of thing and an i listen. I'm a heavy heavy listener to podcast. So i understand what it means to have a relationship with someone. You listen to all the time so i never let that create an outsized impact on Like how i felt about myself. It was very fulfilling because people would say job in the industry. Because i listened to the show and in i use this information in my job interview or like you help me with my market research. That stuff is so fulfilling and it will always be fulfilling You know what's interesting is that like. I'm kind of have this snitch. Celebrity but it has expanded a bit because like the climate and clean tech world has expanded dramatically over the years so the my presence has changed a little bit but i have never let that impact the mission or made me feel like Too big for my riches le. I've always kept kept it into perspective. Did you face feelings of imposter syndrome early on impostor syndrome. Yes definitely That's that's a big part of the question. So all the time i mean. I have the impostor syndrome in my entrepreneurship journey. Now which we can talk about but early on. I was forced to sound like an expert on topics that i didn't really know much about in the the real art was like trying to figure out how to get enough information so that i sounded smart enough and can hang with people. Who were you know. Truly immersed in this stuff and that that imposter syndrome guided me. It was my real motivation. My into getting better and better I have a great story about ira aaron price. Who's a really famous investor in early on in my career. He they launched like this massive fund and they had invested in tesla. this was in two thousand six Maybe early two thousand seven. And i'm on the phone with him and i'm trying to sound smart and asking questions and he's like do you know how venture capital works like. Let me just tell you like how it actually works. And he wasn't he wasn't being mean or anything. It was just very clear. That like oh. I was a little out of my depth in terms of understanding how the fund worked and everything and So i had moments like that and it made any kind of kicked me down a couple notches but you just use it as your motivation. Your your co hosts on the energy gang ara katherine. Hamilton intrigue is said. What is it like to work with them Given as long as you have worked with them what do you want them to know. Oh they are some of the most delightful collaborators and friends that i've ever had the pleasure of knowing and working with and we truly like each other a truly respect each other. We have a good creative dynamic in that we know our roles on the show and so it makes selecting topics and figuring out the direction of the show very easy and the amount of time and commitment that they've put into it. I mean it requires a lot of their time. And i mean i could not speak highly enough of the dedication that they have also put into the show. So that relationship is truly special They're awesome so. I think the it's a beautiful shout out to them. Two years after launching the energy gain in two thousand fifteen launch the inner change. Shell khan who i think. You perfectly describe as recline of cleantech. How did the interchange come about. And what is it really like working with shell. Someone wrote on linked in the other day that The description of the interchange as the interchanges for those listeners who the energy gang isn't wonky enough and shale really likes to dig into the numbers. He really likes to be thoughtful about having long conversations about that he is thinking about and so he was then the head the vp of research at gtm and we were developing a new show for subscribers only behind the pay wall and that worked well and we experimented with different variations. But we realized that we could. We could expand the audience dramatically and it was probably better financially to monetize the podcast publicly rather than just stick behind a paywall and you have a much smaller audience. So that was the genesis of the show and the the differences that were just we're truly trying to explore In the most fun and wonky way possible some of these big picture decarbonization topics and Shale is just an incredible mind. I mean he has these conversations very often without notes he can just very succinctly talk about topics without seemingly any preparation at all and it's awe inspiring. I mean i cannot do that. I have to have some bullet points. I have to do some reading. I have to kind of prepare my thoughts. Otherwise i'll just derail off and go elsewhere. But he has he just has distinct communication style and he's a dear friend to You know truly a very warm remarkable person. So i'm very lucky. Having co host like that co hosts and friends on those two shows two years ago amid the booming podcasts space you left green tech media to found postscript audio where you surface executive producer of both energy gang and the inner change which are still distributed by green tech media as well as new independent shows like a matter of degrees. How did you decide to take the leap to become an entrepreneur and start postscript audio. Well it's a great time to be a producer because everyone's trying to figure out their audio strategy and media companies are launching podcasts left and right organizations are realizing that the relationships that you create with podcast costs are really strong and so every you know a lot of people are listening to podcast now and they realize how important and valuable they can be so we were just getting a lot of inbound requests requests on. How do i make a show. You know what should i do. What's my strategy m. It was very clear that i had this level of production expertise and management expertise to launch our own production outfit site at that. Same time In the two thousand seventeen to two thousand eighteen timeframe there were dozens and dozens of other small shops like ours popping up many covering different facets different types of topics. And so it. There's a reason for that. And that is because audio is such a booming medium right. now. I really felt like we had certain level of expertise to help launch new shows. I would definitely agree with that. Given our experience with what it takes you decided not to raise capital for postscript audio which is now an eight person team you still only pay yourself a modest seidel solid more than twenty seven thousand dollars. But i still modest. Why did you decide not to raise capital and then what are the biggest challenges that you faced in launching the pot or inland business over the past two years. Well to be perfectly honest. The reason why we haven't raised money is because i think we're still figuring out the business model. We have a very successful process in place. Got some really great shows that i'm proud of but we're still figuring out the exact direction of what the totality of shows that we take on. What is that going to look like The business model is still varied in terms of how we fund shows You know we're still. We are production. Model is very much based on raising budgets and were not Focused a lot on advertising revenue. Right now and so. That can be a bit of a stop start industry. So we're trying to reorient the business to figure out how to get better recurring revenue. How to get some of our shows to even bigger scale And monetize those differently. And so i think in the next year or so were were you know. We're in talks now about like how to reorient the company. So that's i think that's the reason why it was just sort of having an honest description of an honest take that is we're still figuring it out Over the past twelve years now you have launched five shows that have collectively received over eleven million downloads. If you were to summarize the one thing based on all of that experience that people should know about podcasting. What would it be. Oh my gosh. So many i mean you have to have a plan. The shows that we've launched that have been successful. We've put a lot of thought into we. do not. Just setting up microphones and saying okay. We got to people who are good at talking here. let's do it. It's a very clear plan of wired developing a show. How is it going to differentiate from any other show What is the role of the co hosts. How is this thing gonna sound. How are you going to integrate interviews. There's a lot of thought that goes into it just like any other complicated medium and podcasting in general is accessible to a lot of people which is one of its greatest strengths but it also means that a lot of people show up thinking that they're going to set up a couple of microphones and it's gonna work great and they're going to have a hit podcast and it just doesn't work so any of the successful shows that we've launched had months and months of work that go into them to figure out what it is. What are we going to do with it. And why is it going to land It makes sense You you are now an entrepreneur. What have you learned about entrepreneurship since. Launching postscript audio well a lot rests on me and my idiosyncrasies and the responsibility that you have as an entrepreneur to members of the team thinking about scale is also a challenge I very much m a creative person. And i like to be involved in projects and sometimes that can distract me from thinking about some of the bigger picture stuff and i have to be able to manage those two things I think that's probably the case for a lot of entrepreneurs and that's why you know you have people at companies who go from ceo into some other row because they realize like oh. Maybe i'm not ceo. I'm much better at running the engineering team and much better at product development. And so i think that's what i'm grappling with really liked to be involved in the creative process but i also know that i have to make all these bigger decisions cova through a lot out the window. I mean this the schedule this year has been really tough for planning but I suspect even in a normal world that That tension would still be there. Yeah As far as you've seen so much podcasting over the fourteen years that you've been in it How has it changed evolved. and where. Where's it going from here. I mean it's there's big money in it. Now and factories of podcasts into ip for hollywood is really fascinating and it means that All the big media organizations are launching. Podcast left and right with the idea of time. Podcasts into a hit. Netflix series or some kind of film and so at one end of the spectrum podcasts. Are this really interesting experimentation tool where you can ask fairly minimal budget. Compared to what it would take to develop a pilot series test out an idea and then send it off to other creative agencies so like that's one under the spectrum and that's why a lot of big money is getting into it On the other end of the spectrum there are record numbers of podcasts being developed every year. And we now have a million. Almost a million and a half podcasts That had been logged by spotify and apple and because the medium is so accessible. The recording equipment is a lot cheaper and the distribution is very easy There's a lot of noise out there right now. And so even if you're launching show with fairly high quality and good budget behind it. It's a lot harder to make a splash. So the big money folks are dominating the top apple charts and they are dominating listener attention. You have a lot of smaller podcast. That are making the space a lot. More crowded and shows in the middle market with fairly decent budgets can stand out but it takes a ton more money in a ton more time to make those shows. Standout we were. We were lucky for with the energy gang and even with the earlier podcasts at renewable energy world we were first mover so we got an audience overnight almost and What you find some of the bigger podcast. That are just like talk. Shows have huge audiences because they were in a at the very early stage and a lot of the shows that are similar to them. Don't have a big audience because it's a lot harder to break out. So that's the biggest challenge right now. the strength is that a lot of people can get in it and the drawback is that it's harder to get seen I'm happy you've been in it for as long as you have and are taking it in the direction that you're going postscript audio podcasting has been such a through line through your life and your career all the way through to your marriage. I know you met your wife through your podcast at tell. Tell me that story like how did you meet. Are we at the meet cute now. This is the moment. Yeah that's right. That's right podcasts. Are part of my relationship with my wife. We back when i was developing my first podcast. My wife was Listening she was she was at tufts and she was listening for you to the before we meh and she listened to the show well running and She reached out randomly to to ask about internships or jobs in the space and we had an email exchange going. And i said oh well coming to boston For a conference like let's meet up and a friend came with me and the three of us had drinks and dinner and ended up staying out most of the night and we really hit it off and it was very clear that there was a spark there but we went our separate ways and she went off to do great things in government and in the energy space and we would trade some emails and i think we have one email. It's like hey what are you seeing for. Lithium ion battery pricing So that was the relationship and then we lost contact 'em in twenty fifteen The facebook algorithm connected us and we reconnected and started messaging. And in fact. I had a video of me on the dancefloor Going kind of wild. And she just wrote in the comments Is it possible to fall in love with someone. Threw a dance video and then we started talking to each other. And i was like. Oh i'm going on other reporting trip in boston. And we should meet up again and it was very clear from the start when we rekindled our relationship that like there was something there and within within months i had packed up from dc and moved to boston and started our relationship. And then we we're married in two thousand seventeen. It's the most romantic podcast. Dr ever heard. Well now she's really sick of hearing me talk about podcast but we'll always hang our hat on that lovely story. It's a great. It's a really good story this june. You celebrated your first father's day father's day came one hundred days after quarantine and i'm wondering if you would be willing to read what you wrote on twitter on june twenty-first of this year on father's day sure yeah. This is fairly heavy. Were going from light to heavy. Let me bring this up When corona virus hit. I was in serious mental anguish. My brother had just died suddenly. I was struggling with being a new father. I stopped exercising. I stopped sleeping. Turn to alcohol. I would start my work days at three. Am and work late at night. I became deranged. It was impossible for me to distinguish between small and big things. I couldn't let anything go. I was filled with tension and anger all the time. A therapist told me i was manic. He suggested i take lithium for mania. This was all hidden from my professional life behind a microphone. Then the lockdown hit a hunker down with my wife and baby in a frenzied state. I had a clear choice. Do something about my mental health or face unknown consequences. It frightened me to think about how. I would act in a state of lockdown. The way i was taking care of myself no child childcare. Losing business no leaving the house a recipe for disaster right but then something happened somehow. The confines of the situation created an opportunity for me to get my mind straight. The lack of choice or the clarity of choice was a blessing. I forced myself to sleep my half work half parenting days forced me to work more intelligently. I abandoned all alcohol and enhancing substances except caffeine. I slowly cleaned up my diet. And i created a regimented exercise routine. Totally simple and ridiculously obvious. Stuff right it's hard to describe the radical changes to my psyche. I've seen over the last hundred days a re engineered my brain. I'm much closer to the person. I want to be from my wife and little girl the person that i know i am. It gives me chills hearing it. I feel like it takes a lot of courage and bravery to share something like that with yourself let alone the world. What's it like hearing that now Well it's a reminder of how much work i had to put in and still have to put in during these really difficult times It's it's pretty emotional. Because i definitely became a person that i didn't expect to become I mean the lack of sleep in the stress around having a new baby and Just not taking care of myself was threw me a completely unexpected direction and it took me a long time to dig out of that hole and then every week i had to come behind the microphone and put on the stephen lacey phased that people know and here and that was very difficult I mean i. It reminds me of the work. That i still have to do. Right i i. I'm constantly striving in my personal life and even as an entrepreneur to put the work in to get closer to that person that i know i am for someone who is where you were at your worst in that description. What would you want them to know that. It doesn't have to be this hard that you don't have to hold on to so many things. My biggest weakness is that i hold onto things so tightly and i let them i can let them spiral that can often be very good. Strengthen an entrepreneur. In that like i really care about each and every detail. I have a running list in my head of the things that i need to do. And i'm able to pick and choose from that list but what happens in what happened during this period is that i just have a list of things some many of which are not important some of which are very important and i can't distinguish between them and so i need to constantly remind myself how to better prioritize because that is a big piece of that that inability to prioritize can be a big piece of how i mentally spiral And it's such a common experience for so many people and yet it's something that's often stigmatized and we feel like we can't talk about it and i think one of your greatest strengths is your willingness to be vulnerable in a way that is relatable because everyone's facing struggles and to have somebody who you admire and respect share theirs is really powerful and meaningful. So i think on behalf of a lot of people wanna thank you for being willing to to share the last question of course for our high-voltage round is as part of your your mental health. you're physical health. Exercise is really important to you. You used to do competitive powerlifting. You can deadly five hundred pounds. I recently started lifting during the shutdown. I'm dead lifting one hundred and thirty five pounds. I'm curious what advice you have for me. Actually at six hundred pounds six hundred. Oh man these now. That was a few years ago. So i i should tell people. Some people might confuse. Powerlifting with bodybuilding. They're not the same thing so it's lifting for strength instead of aesthetics so for me it's been hugely beneficial to some of that has taken a hit particularly in the last like six months in terms of physical exercise because of the number of production that we have going on. But it's always there as essential tool I don't. I don't often talk about this but the when i was competitive. Powerlifting i Dead lifted six hundred. Pounds squatted five hundred pounds and bench. Press three hundred and forty five pounds so i was fifty pounds heavier than i am. Now so you're seeing a much different version of stephen lazy when when all that was happening but anyway the physical exercise piece is so crucial. I think too good performance one of the things. That's kept me healthy. As outside of this door in this closet is have gym. That's been that's been bill. I have a powerlifting gym. Like with with a ton of weights So that's really helped me. During lockdown awesome we are going to transition into our high-voltage around these are questions with about ten seconds answers as you know the first question is if you were to be an animal. What animal would you be. And why. but i don't want you to answer yet. I want to tell you that. I asked catherine jigger and shale what animal veith thank. You would be someone to tell you all three animals. Then i want you to choose who you think said each okay. That's good so the three animals are a badger a wolf and a dolphin jigger said badger. Catherine said wolf was the third one a dolphin. She'll send deafen. You got shell right. I'm so shale said dolphin because you are very smart kind of hyper and you wake up early in the morning but katherine injector. You got flipped to catherine said. You're a badger quote for obvious reasons and jigger said you're a wolf. You're very social but also value your alone time. Yes what is your actual animal. I chose the lyre bird which is an australian bird that can mimic any sound It can mimic any sort of machinery can Birds or animals and even sometimes mimic human voice. And the reason why does it is because to be a good interviewer And really just a good human being. You have to be able to mimic the other person in a way that gets them to open up and so i thought that was really appropriate and i picked the latter because we have a my daughter is really into birds and we have a bunch of bird books and i've always been fascinated by the lyre bird In her bird book. And so i thought it was. It's very appropriate for what makes a good skill set for. An interviewer sounds perfect. You were the first and only what it takes. Bird next question is if you had to start a new career tomorrow what would it be. I would probably be a ski bum working as a lift attendant and writing magazine articles. What kind of articles about skiing or about action sports or about nature and like hiking and you know like an editor outside magazine or something like testing out ski gear and working in the cafeteria at a at a at a ski mountain them other than yourself. To whom do you attribute your success. Oh my wife has been huge in Really promoting my success and she has a lot of entrepreneurial bones in her body and she gave me the opportunity to exercise mine. I saw always be grateful for that In addition to mentors scott lavina that co founder of green tech media scott Who is formed ordinary human. Being and then jim callaghan. Who is the co founder of of renewable energy world. Both of them were very much like Father figures to me and gave me extraordinary unity's and retrieve friends who gave me the best advice possible so any the qualities that you would look for in a mentor. They both they both had through and through. When have you failed well. I know that everybody says i fail regularly. And i feel like i do I mean i think that Going back to you know the the struggles with mental health I feel like when. I'm if i'm at my depths and i'm unable to myself out of them i feel like i'm i'm failing That's that's not a good feeling to have and luckily i've developed the tools to try to get beyond that We've launched some bad podcasts too. So we failed there and sometimes what. I'm not giving proper direction to people. And i'm assuming that someone has all the information and i'm i'm not being as communicative as i could be. I think i'm i'm failing then. And i really like i really want to be a better manager and someone who is giving people the tools all the time to do their best work and when i don't do that It really makes me reevaluate myself. what is the best investment. You've ever made definitely sandy. My wife I think for the reasons that identified above. She's been extremely supportive. The other is The the powerlifting gym that i have over the next to me. I mean just we we have a thousand pounds of weights in there and kettlebells and all sorts of stuff You know. I'm taking up the entire basement by putting my recording studio in jim down here and so my wife has been very good about giving giving up that space but that is that is just absolutely crucial for maintaining my mental health. So the Those those are the two best investments. They go hand in hand. What is something that you thought was true that you no longer believe that i was that i'm a chill person. Apparently i'm a badger. I used to think i was chill and i. I know that. I am very much not a chill person and i really like i grew up with like very much ingrained. In like the counterculture movement. I was fascinated by the counterculture movement. And i listened to a lot of you know grateful dead and i just thought i was this chill person and like in reality. I look back at who i was over and who i am now. And i'm like very much a very neurotic person. It's good to be self aware if you could change one thing about the world. What would it be disinformation I would change the voter ability of human psychology I'm really dismayed by the world. We live in and how easily manipulated people are and i would wanna give them more mental tools to not be so easily manipulated. If one of those is podcasts lou. If there was just one person who was going to hear this podcast which you want it to be my brother who died just a few weeks. Before lockdown who for two decades struggled with severe mental health issues and addiction issues. You know we lived the opioid crisis. First hand in the darkest ways for many many years and I just he There were a lot of times. When i didn't see my brother or talk to him and he always said how proud of how proud i made him but i would just want him to hear how things are going because You know. I'll never get to talk to him again I would also want to my mind acadia to listen to this as well. Because i want her to know that i'm the time i'm spending doing. My work is to to try to do some good in the world and help give other people the tools to create exponential change. Other people have cried on the podcast. I have not had on the podcast. But there's the closest that. I've come last question to build a successful company. What it takes is relentlessness in an unrelenting world. Wow beautiful close to a really special interview. It means a lot to me that you did this. Thanks so much for being on the show and sharing everything that you did. Stephen thank you so much. It's spent a lot of fun and that's going to do it for another episode of what it takes again for listening to my own personal journey. I am hugely thankful for the people who've listened over the years and who find meaning in this show. You give me a lot of meaning so thank you. You can give us a shout out on social media if you wanna share clips from the show or you want to suggest story ideas or people who you want us to interview. And don't forget that what it takes is now a spin off. Show so go to your podcast app just type in what it takes and we're going to have a feat there where you can listen to lots of other great entrepreneurial stories in this space over the coming year. Thanks for being here. I'm stephen lacey. Catch you next time.

white house Seapower stephen lacey new hampshire nineteen seapower Ceo emily kirsch sun lee rebellious franklin pierce university Jim callaghan cleantech skype andy card emily center for american progress p joe rome green tech media jigger shah
The Economy with Neera Tanden, President Bidens Nominee for OMB Director

Your Presidential Playlist

15:51 min | 2 months ago

The Economy with Neera Tanden, President Bidens Nominee for OMB Director

"Welcome back to your political playlist. i'm your host. Emily tisch sussman with a new presidential administration. A new congress. There is a significant amount of work to do to clean up the mess. That trump left behind and enacting new policies. Every week i'll be offering up bite-size policy conversations from women who are leading the charge either as elected officials. Advocates or policymakers as always all of our guests will be women. Today i'm joined by near tandon. President biden's nominee to lead the office of budget and management in the white house also known as m b. She's sitting for her confirmation hearing today with the senate homeland security and government affairs committee flyer to the nomination. Nira served as president for the center for american progress where she served in different roles since two thousand three near helped draft the affordable care act and has served as an advisor on several presidential campaigns including hillary clinton's two thousand sixteen and obama's two thousand eight campaigns. We recorded this conversation before she was the nominee so her opinions are all her own and do not necessarily reflect the administration but the converse does give us some good insight into how she's approaching. This huge job welcomed nira. Hey hey very technical difficulties so you always great to be with you know. That's the word from home like that. I have dogs in here. I could have kids in here at the same. I don't think i realized how much i was clenching. My jaw all the time like maybe the last four years until we not want i know i feel like i definitely. I definitely had my like i. Good night's sleep and like years so definitely and so we're excited. It's a quick cut. Conversation were excited to jump in with you to understand. What should we be looking for like. What do we expect to be seeing on from economic puzzles on economic front. The conversation that you and i had talking about the economics of the different democratic candidates. I mean relating to it before this. It seems like a lifetime ago. Yeah it's definitely a lifetime ago. I think the democratic primary was Maybe many lessons ago. Thank god you know. I think the first order of business for a biden harris administration will be at dealing with the virus containing the virus fighting the virus. There's really good news on the vaccine front that that's a that's a really important piece of business for him so Most importantly i think he has to work on a covid. Relief package If we haven't passed olympic. And probably even if we've caspian landeck it'll be an appetite for additional action to help states to address the issues around an employment to actually if we really want to deal with this virus. We need to close bars and restaurants which means they need targeted support. You know there's going to be a lot of energy around. That and i think that'll think how he handles. The virus van important proof point for going forward. I mean what is in any economic package would be. I mean hopefully short-term is hopefully we can get into a post pandemic world at sauce and there's great news on the vaccine. The next thing is great if we could have mass distribution at the vaccine by you know mid to late spring so which would be an actor. We have Distribution of vaccine we should see relatively strong economic growth but there are a lot of people hurting right now. Unemployment insurance is running at a rental. Assistance has run out You know millions of people particularly people on the service economy are hurting and hurting badly. And what we learned is from the quick action and the falls that we can really insulate people from the sharpest attacks with targeted. Spending for is people need it. These are people who are suffering through absolutely new vault of their own and we need to ensure that we help them. But it's not just to help them. It's it's that if people to eat into their savings or you know have to actually lose your homes or things that causes long-term economic dislocation and where we really wanna situation like this where you can see. The light at. The tunnel is to insulate people as much as possible from the shock experiencing and then get to get to the vaccine and that's why it makes a lot of sense for us to know and there's there has been in support across the aisle to do actually A fair amount of investment republicans are at have supported a trillion dollars. Democrats are now two point two trillion dollars relation. Be find an important package. That will help a lot of americans and honestly we need federal systems for vaccine distribution. So there's a desperate desperate need to pass legislation quickly. Do you think that all of the economic proposals that are in front of the people who are like building. The biden harris administration right now are focused around cove really. I mean. it's really hard to think about anything else economically leon. Nearly it's not just about covid relief. So you're you're you're is a really good point to the u. Biden proposed his build back better plan which had really three components to getting our economy going over long-term one Large scale investment in climate related. Jobs such deal with the climate crisis two trillion dollars over four years. I think that you know. That's a high priority Now into future of big caregiving agenda. A lot of the people jobs that have been lost in the service sector. We have long term economic challenges. Getting put a lot of people to work. We have long term challenges with women. And he's really born the brunt of this recession slash depression. They've they've particularly with so many schools closed. They've really been forced to make decisions to stay home. And way staying home in ways that will hurt their economic productivity over long which is just another way of saying. We really need to find jobs for for for women and caregiving. It is not just for women but is a place where we could put a lot of people to oregon. The third area was domestic production. I've been busier some there. Their areas where you could see some support from republicans for investments in jobs. Will i think you make a great point about where the intersection of policy and politics is right here. At this moment. I mean just from the presidency like from the administration from the executive branch. What do you think that it's going to be a priority. Even in those big areas of what can we see as a priority that the administration can actually do on their own and not me to look at congress for well. I do think that In it may be the javan tries to pass legislation in area. So let's think of wary compromise beyond executive action. You may really try to make a good faith effort to work with republicans and democrats on issues. So you know for example you could work on. A major infrastructure proposal has a fair amount investment in clean energy rates. Do we need to ensure that there is a grid for electric cars and there's a lot we can do it. Infrastructure to enable essentially making us more climate resilience climate resilient and supporting renewable power. So that's one that might that might be one approach. Which is he might say. At first. i'm going you know. He's going to definitely reenter paris. The paris agreement. And you know undo the kind of really mean-spirited and ugly immigration policies. That we've seen he's gonna do all those things. Take away the restrictions or push bashes i past all the restrictions that happened reproductive rights. I think all of that will happen. The big question as has that. Will you see him. Try to reach across the aisle to have you know to try and pass legislation where everyone gets something and you know that may happen and it may be the republicans decide that they can't do any deals. And then you know. I think it really requires a biden harris administration. Think creatively about how they use corona virus relief to address some of the structural challenge of seeing whether it's in childcare leave or other places and i think that's you know we think of it. I think this is the billion dollar question. You're actually seeing some indications that republicans are not gonna fight all of biden's candidates nominees erga. You know there. There's a group of republican sort of farming to be more reasonable romney Senators romney's and our senators romney murkowski and collins as well as you know who knows maybe fast or others. So i think you know. I think the thing here is to try. People may get rebuffed but a biden harris administration. Joe biden his orientation will be. Let's try and pass bills. you know. Republicans now very much rely on White while his voters to win. I mean the trump did bring those voters out so maybe maybe jeb vitamin purchase a fifty dollar minimum rage than some of the. You know it'll it'll they'll be some republicans who recognize it's in their interest to not just me. Everything will the fifteen dollar minimum. Wage is really interesting proof point of where we actually might see. The party's realigning on principles. Because florida passed a fifteen dollars minimum wage by ballot and also went to trump. Yeah there are lots of voters. Yeah you're right there. Let's veterans who you are crafts pressure across. The board said that can be that can be a real opportunity. Do you think there's places that we are going to see like realignment of party principles. I mean i think that one place where we saw a lot of places where the republican party relied under trump abandon long-held principals they had had before the as an example there but do you think there are places that we are seeing can principal realignment among parties. I mean it's not just that we're dealing with democrats and republicans now but kind of the the extreme. The extreme right in the extreme left democrats are really have very strong sees in how the parties negotiate right now. So how do you see. Those dynamics playing out. And how do you see the policy issues. Kind of aligning there. Well i mean. I think it's hard i mean. I think people have to really analyze what happened in the election and it's A niche worn likes teargas. That the truth is that biden's brand was a bit stronger than the democratic. Party's brand men's hard to look at what happened down. Ballot particularly in state and local races. Some congressional races but really state local races announced that there were voters decided to vote for joe biden and then just down ticket that republican whether they're worried about Democrats having unified control. You know is one question or whether they're concerned about particular voices in the party. It's not clear but it you know. Why would they be. Concerned about control. Must add some anxieties about where the party was heading. And so you know. I think average unity's biden is going to be president who's going to be the strongest voice in the party. And it'll be his voice Think we have to recognize that it that the structure of the country in search of the senate the structure of gerrymandering means democrats. Have to run some plans and kind of more conservative places and strong coalitions recognized that you have to give flexibility to people running kind of conservative places. I think we some of us live last side of that particularly over the last two years people understood that front and center in two thousand eighteen and a forgotten in two thousand twenty s so I mean joe biden out. Did you know he. He's going to win by three hundred six electoral college votes because he was able to pull really surge people on suburbs. But he's able to you know win it particularly the blue wall with in smaller towns and you've outer suburbs that democrats have one of the past. So i think there's a lot of lessons to be learned from his election and i think one of the things is sometimes. Are you know The More extreme voices in the party in each party can play off each other in refi together. Think there is a little bit of anger for trying to solve some problems in the middle. Which i taste your question. I don't know. I mean the real question for me is how republicans deal with not just the kind of culture war aspect of Of their base. But how do they actually also deal with the economic issues and if they can if they can deal if they i think there's a lot of common ground Because you know fifteen dollars. Minimum wage helps a lot of people helps struggling struggling people. Who are black white. Latino or asian. So you know. I hope that there's a building block there. Are there any particular issues that that biden had economic issues echina- that biden had had long histories of working on and then harris had real commitment to working on That you think are likely to indicate for us. About what are their priorities will be like. Is there a particular economic theories. Economic issues that you think the dell really push to the forefront because they have had long histories working on them what i think of raw in japan is a person who really believes in investing investing in people. I mean he's in. I don't think is as a open to some of the kind of deficit at hawk arguments people have used in the past in terms of what he's I in terms of his longstanding support. He's been he's had a very very very long standing and a commitment and support organized labor into into essentially ensuring that you're raising the wages of low and can like lower lower wage workers. So i expect all of those areas to be priorities. I think the newer issue for them for him in terms of scale is climate. Although you know he he did vote for a climate office over forty years ago alongside al gore but he is one of the first senator cds so but i think that kind of scale and scope of the investment is really critical issue. I think he's on the An a real critical opportunity. I think this is an area where you can see Some of the kind of debates in climate have moved considerably where we could just really invest in renewables and solar and And and that's some of the sort of trade offs and that would have really large scale improvements as well. Thank you so much nearer quick interview. Quick congress ation thank you good to see you great to see you. Thank you for listening to this episode of your political playlist. Don't forget. Follow us on instagram at your political playlist. Were you can see of nearest interview and join us. Live to ask questions during future ones for more from near follow her on twitter at near a tandon. Join us every week for smart bite sized conversations with women at the seat of power and activism. Subscribe if you like us. Leave us a rating and comment to let others know. Talk to you next time.

biden harris administration Emily tisch sussman President biden office of budget and managemen senate homeland security and g Nira biden center for american progress congress joe biden hillary clinton romney murkowski jeb vitamin white house romney paris
Crisis Conversations: Essential stories  and essential lessons  from a year in crisis

Better Life Lab

25:40 min | 4 months ago

Crisis Conversations: Essential stories and essential lessons from a year in crisis

"Well hello and welcome everyone to the year end ramp up of the crisis. Conversations live from the better life lab. I'm bridget solti. The director of the better life lab and today we reflect when we started these weekly live interactive conversations it was at the beginning of the pandemic. No one had any idea what was going to happen. How long it was going to last. I anticipated we would do six. I thought we would do six episodes and today this is our twenty six so the crisis continues the pandemic drags on what we wanted to do when we started. These conversations was to create space. We all felt so isolated and the changes were happening so rapidly and so much was being disrupted and work and care That we wanted to create space to come together and share stories to understand what was really happening to real lives and what we need what we were learning and what we needed to do to not only survive the pandemic but really to help all working families thrive. How could we have real work. Family justice gender equity in the pandemic and beyond so with that based on the stories that we heard. We put together. What we're calling a bold for work family justice and gender equity in the pandemic and beyond but what we wanted to do today was to have a minute to kind of talk about. What have we learned over the past year. So this is a better life lab roundup and let me turn it over and have every team member introduce himself so vicki. Let's start with you or high. I'm the bow senior fellow for paid leave policy and strategy flab miller a policy analyst for the better life i'm many mischievous ziya saint joy and i'm a research associate at the better life lab. I my name is emily. Harris burn a phd intern working on our better life lab experiments project. Hello my name is stubborn. Cast and i add a phd working on our communications. A right so what. I've asked everyone to do is to bring a clip and actually clip or a story. That really stuck with them. That can really help us understand where we are. And i want to begin by grounding us in the moment because here we are nine months into the pandemic. I'm sitting here. I you know i've had covert and recovered. I've given plasma i. I don't think i've worn shoes. Nine months cases arising again hospitalizations are rising. There's so many programs that were designed to help work and family. That are expiring. If congress does not act in the next week paid leave paid sick days unemployment protection student. Loan productions all are expiring unemployment protection of already expired in july childcare which we've talked a lot about which is an enormous crisis before covid and certainly in covid it got three billion dollars in march advocates in economists and lawmakers have said it needs fifty billion dollars just to survive. And it's never happened. We've got one week and if congress does not act there's a world You know things could go from bad to worse so to really ground us in what people are really experiencing. Let's start with the clip from an episode where we featured a number of parents and we had just been ruben. Who's with parents together. A group of parents from all walks of life. This is the hardest thing that's happened to families in eighty nine years right so absolutely parents feel abandoned and desperately in trouble right now either because in some cases they don't have enough to eat or they can't make rent or they've had to cut back on worker quit work entirely to do childcare or because they're doing remote learning and it's not going well the kids. I'm getting the services they need or they're just doing remote learning and it's going okay but it's still breaking them all. This incredible squeeze total desperation and frustration. So vicki let's start with you. You've been really active with what's happening. We've got one week and these emergency paid family leave and paid sick days spills. These programs are expiring. Talk a little bit about what's happening in what you're hearing and what's at stake. I mean what's happening. Congress right now is a mess. You know there's an effort earlier. This week to reach a bipartisan agreement. And even within that framework of the agreement these key essential very inexpensive provisions that guaranteed to ten paid sick days for workers that had to quarantine or self isolate or get a cova diagnosis or care for a family. Member who did an a total of twelve weeks to care for a child who was out of school or doing virtual school or childcare was closed is provisions in the act that were passed in march of they've spire at the end of this year. If you think back to that time in march who would have known that we would still be in essentially the same place that we are that cases would be rising that parents would have dropped out of the workforce in record numbers to be able to care for their children. we just didn't know those provisions they were in the families. First coronavirus response act. They were 'perfect limited sick time and know paid family and medical leave for serious health issues. They carved out about half of the workforce but they were something for people who they have helped and businesses who received reimbursement. They were a lifeline. And yet those provisions run out of the end of the year and what that means if congress doesn't act is that about eighty seven million workers that received protections or should have received protections through the emergency paid sick and family leave provision will not have that guarantee leave anymore. That's about sixty million private sector workers whose employers were also getting help by getting reimbursed for that time thirty one million parents of an estimated fifty million children access to that emergency paid leave according to Saroj england at the center for american progress. And so what we're doing is cutting off a policy that has been proven by researchers academic researchers to prevent about fifteen thousand cova cases per day time cases arising. We're cutting off benefits to parents. Who are still at home. Who are running out of time if they've used it And who need more while their kids are still virtually schooling or virtually schooling again as schools. That had kids go in person are starting to shut it back down exactly and what this does is push people into into the unemployment system again those provisions to are expiring although hopefully they will be part of a package so not guaranteed it pushes people into other programs that are funded through either federal state or local revenues which are starting to dry out it pushes people into precarity with prospective food and homelessness and those provisions to and so what we're doing is through an action really defining down what it is that we expect people to be able to make do with and for women and for communities of color in particular. This is devastating. These are the communities that have been hardest hit by covid communities That are most in need of paid leave but may not have it through an employer on and these are the folks who are most likely to be hurt as this continues and until we have a vaccine that's available to everybody. Yeah you know you were talking about how you know this is. This has been a lifeline for so many families and it wasn't perfect One of the clips that we brought is of Mercy corps bell. She is a lawyer in portland oregon and she felt like she was about to. You know she couldn't do it all and so what she described was this paid. Leave was a was a lifeboat. So let's hear what she had to say what i had to realize for myself. Is that me not taking leave. Isn't going to fix that for anybody else. So it's not like by taking this leave. That means that you know some working single mother. Does we get to take it. It it really. They're sort of independent problems. And it was frustrating and terrible that we have a system that would create a life book that really only helps people who are somewhat privileged. So which the point. She was making the point that you had made that there. Were these carve outs for so many workers if you worked for a large company That had over five hundred Employees you were not covered by this if you work for a small company. There were all sorts of exemptions you could claim and what so much of the research showed is that the people who were carved out where the very essential workers who were out there all the time and most exposed to the virus. They were the ones that did not have access to this. Paid paid leave. You know so. So we're talking about can we. Can we even protect this. This imperfect program but what are the prospects for for fixing this for really making paid leave really work well before the pandemic tremendous momentum in congress on the issue of Universal paid family medical leave program similar to what exists now Students to be ten states on. That's one of the good things that happened. In twenty in twenty twenty was new state. Some tuna states got their programs up and running another niece state. Colorado passed its program in the twenty twenty election ballot for the first time ever. Congress was looking at this. I think the other interesting thing is that organized business groups are starting to think that it might be better to have a national standard as well. There's a lot of daylight between what a strong universal comprehensive affordable and accessible paid. Leave program would look like that guarantees a baseline to everybody. And what some of the other alternative proposals look like the fact that there is cross in know business and consumer and advocacy conversations. The fact that there is some interest on the republican side. Although i would say that this this series of negotiations that happened has really to me. shown a light on the difference between lip service to an issue and actually being willing to provide support We haven't seen republicans. Step out to champion the extension of this families first. Emergency paid leave notwithstanding the lip service that some paid when they voted for and that some paid when the law first passed so You know we need a national family medical leave program. The guarantees leave to all working people no matter where they live or work or the job that they have or whether marriage traditional employee or an independent contractor. We need access to paid sick days in normal times for things like the flu or to go. See the doctor to get preventive care As well as pandemic aid sick days or emergency health paid sick days that get baked into any kind of law. So that we're not in this position again right. Deeds that had paid leave in place actually were able to handle people's needs much better at the beginning of the pandemic and every other place and there's fascinating research shows that people who live in places that did have universal paid sick days. The number of cases was actually much lower so that it was actually good for everyone. It was a good public health benefit. So i wanted just really briefly. Play a clip of maryland washington. She was she's a home health. Aide she seventy one. And when i have this interview with her her comments have just stayed with me. All through the pandemic just heartbreaking. Let's let's listen to so maryland did not have any access to paid leave He was Exempt from the paid sick days proposal and this is what she faced every day. Make you feel like you just. We're not working we at. They're going to take care of people that are sick to make sure that there be able to you know to do since they do. They said that we have to do it. But we always we get sick. You know is that. Oh no the best your job as i have care workers you have to go out and take care of people even if it means you're risking your own health and and potentially you're a life. Yes so that's just it's one of those. It's just one of those comments just as as hung with me. Rosalyn turn to you. You tell us about the clip that you introduce the clip that you wanna play. And then we'll listen to and talk some more interesting see how benefits Social policy benefits have actually been able to support people and looking at the ones that are going to expire at the end of the year. One of two benefits expiring are pandemic unemployment benefits and pandemic emergency limit. Compensation so latrice. Wilson wasn't furloughed payroll. Supervisor advocate for unemployed action who spoke on a crisis conversations podcast and her story really resonated with me. The six hundred dollars is a cinch and hear from congress stating that. It will keep people for one back to work well. I don't have a choice but to wait. Because i am furloughed unless i choose to go find another job and lose my health care benefits and i need medication for my autoimmune disorder so i have a choice but i don't have a choice right now. About twenty million. Americans are receiving some form of unemployment benefits and about half of those people will lose benefits at the end of the year when these programs expired and we know that that's going to have huge equity implications as well With black unemployment rate changing almost twice percentage points for every one percentage point change in national unemployment rate Well the thing that struck me so much about latrice as she was really stuck so she had been furloughed which means she could not go look for another job and she had an autoimmune disorder so she needed medication and so she had to end up paying her portion of her healthcare that her employer would normally pay if she were employed. So she's picking that up and then she had that the six hundred dollar supplements six hundred dollar week supplement. That helped her do that. And then she was already worried that expired in july and she was already starting to dip into her savings. So here's somebody like latrice. Who was in a know. A real Dire situation in august and now the supplement has gone and like you say these extended benefits are that also covered gig workers. You know so talk a little bit about. What are we learning from this. The that not only do we need this short term. But what do we need in the long term short term. We definitely need to extend and expand emergency unemployment on offense and longer term. We need to work on looking at the unemployment system as a whole We heard from malaysia. Who is a retail worker in the beauty industry. She was part of a mass firing eight hundred times to try and get someone on the phone to get these unemployment benefits which we needed immediately and a lot of tech infrastructure so long term we really need to invest in how we deliver these benefits how we implement them to make sure that we have equitable access to all communities. I'm really struck. You know vicky one of the things that you were talking about is some of what the sticking points are The republicans wanna take out aid to state and local governments and yet just roslyn to your point So many we heard from so many people who came on and shared their stories that the technology is you know is kind of old and doesn't work all that well and so many of these state in unemployment systems were just overloaded and so you did have stories of people calling hundreds of times and still not getting through. Let me move on to jeddah design. Talk a little bit about the clip that you brought today. Yes so the clip that i brought today is from dr michele holder who is a labor economist and when she came onto the show it was for the episode around why we need to center women of color. When we're thinking about the pandemic moore thinking rob policy solutions to help workers and families and so she shared her story about what it was like to grow up in new york city. I'm in watching her own mother's struggle. I basically watched her struggle in a country with so much wealth. And i was really trying to understand why public policy seem to be failing my family especially a woman who wanted to work who did work but because she didn't have a college degree she didn't make very much because she had three children she also had caregiving duties so sometimes she lost job. Because you have to take care of the child so tight you know we did. We've had an episode around why we need to center relief on women of color. We've had episodes really looking at the racial justice reckoning so so talk a little bit about what we've learned and what we need to do now and also what we need to do. Moving forward Really center equity in these in these family justice conversations. I'm so i think something that we've all learned. As the pandemic has revealed is really the a disparate economic and social outcomes that are most harmfully impacting people of color women of color and very clear ways in which we can see this during the pandemic is just the mere fact that the brunt of the unemployment numbers have been impacting. Not only women but women of color who are in sectors that are most impacted by the the pandemic in terms of service sectors and food sectors. And you think about the people who are on the front lines and those people being disproportionately again women of color. And so they're either losing their jobs or they're exposed to the virus in unprecedented ways so when we're thinking about policies like paid sick leave and paid family leave and we're thinking about the fact that millions are excluded. Wonder who's being excluded women of color. And the thing is you know these exclusions from public policies that should be benefiting. Everyone have been impacting women of color. Historically this isn't necessarily a new phenomenon bit something that we're being exposed to bring force to reckon with and so when dr holders talking about watching her mother growing up in bedford a new york and just seeing not only her mother but a neighborhood of women struggling to make it is because those public policies. We're talking about today. We're also failing women of color in the seventies and eighties in the nineteenth century. Right in it's because let's think about for example. The unequal pay right a women of color making less money. The racial wealth gap. What should be helping people you know. Stay afloat during this pandemic savings assets income which helps fuel wealth and people have colored coming short each and every time you're thinking about the trees listen and an unemployment extensions supplements the six hundred dollars. That is supposed to help her right. Make ends meet and supposed to you know try to address the compounding effects ratio an inequity and so these policies really are about economic justice at the end of the day there about racial justice at the day and so i think that's a really crucial part of the conversation. The doctor holder was drawing our attention to this is an opportunity for us with immediate legislation and long-term legislation to address inequity across race class and gender. Yes i think that's a huge takeaway point. Yeah that's so important. If you know have really focus on equity across race class gender as you say you know as horrible as miserable as this year has been and so you know so. Many people have been under such struggle. It has really laid bare so many cracks in the system. And i said wants. I don't think we can unseat what we've seen. I hope that's true You know. I hope that it doesn't we. Don't kind of fall back. But at this moment we are seeing. I think we are seeing the reality for so many people so much more clearly. And we're seeing so much more clearly what we really need to do to really support. We say we're a nation of family values. What we really need to do as vicky says to really make that real more than lip service you know another thing. That's also become very very clear. And i think all of us with our work. We know this. But emily talk a little bit about the the clip. That you've chosen or yeah thank you so I chose clip featuring eve rosinsky the author of the book fair play which talks a lot about how families can create systems to fairly balanced. The the labor in their home care work. It really spoke to this sort of crisis of invisible labor that this unprecedented time israeli pointing that out. While we're all finding over who's picking up the you know the broken beer bottle or the sponge in the same or who's setting the table for dinner. The small details right now are the dirty dozen are causing huge problems by the real finding of fair play and it's really more important. Even now was idea that society and men view women's time as as infants like san and we view society review. Men's time is finite like diamonds and we know that equal pay because even in the same job ray. Women are paid less Especially women of color but what about women. It was women who were denying their time. The most i'm struck by the whole idea that for you know for so long. We've thought of women's time as as not as important as not as valued it's also true with care. We have not devalued care in a way that the pandemic has really shown us is so sighted then how how central time and support for care is for making everything else work so stab. let's let's let's. Let's go to you for the final clip because it's really right at the center of care and making time for what matters with family and also supporting that you know. A lot of people don't think about here in their daily lives. Despite the fact that you know i think about twenty. One percent of americans are tax carriers we think of caregivers as a critical element for our social sick sector our healthcare sector and yet we don't see very many opportunities where the caregiver is the center of that conversation they're usually the after thought that was Jennifer olson. she's the executive director of the roslyn. Carter institute where they do a lot of work supporting family caregivers. So stab You know what struck you about that. This is family. Caregivers are often invisible. you know and especially during the pandemic when they've just been so many health issues They've really been under a lot of pressure. Without a lot of support i actually think about caregiving is seen in my own life. I don't think i realized how working it was until my grandmother's house. The way last. You know my dad was really doing a lot of the working. Taking care of her ever meet was an afterthought soon until it became something personal in my grandmother was ill i. My dad would go there. You're re times a week. You know he would make sure her russia's were dying he would make sure was mode on these types of things but he would do a lot more complicated things. One of them was making sure there was no kind of tax fraud. My grandma's identity wasn't stolen very difficult. Work and you know. It's it's kind of believable that we don't even think russia and a lot of public policy considering the reality of the matter is that many Givers don't even have time to work. And i suppose if there's one thing i like to think we'd all we all hope is that kobe. Nineteen at least brings us a new opportunity to discuss this insane. Look things need to be restructured. So that here actually. Me centered more meaningfully. All right while. i think that that's probably a great place to leave it. We try to keep these two Thirty minutes because we know that everyone's busy and we respect their time. And so i think you know the sort of the big takeaway from me. And i think from our conversations from many of you is is really just how central care is and how central it is to not only our lives. What makes life worth living but it is central to a healthy economy central families central to communities and so now is really the time. Can we learn this lesson can we. Can we make these changes quickly. That can help people in the in the immediate moment and can we all work together for real equitable work family justice and gender equity moving forward so please take some time to rest and reflect at the end of the year. Wash your hands. Wear a mask will get through this together. And let's work together for family justice in the coming year so we'll see next year thanks everybody.

latrice congress bridget solti three billion dollars fifty billion dollars six hundred dollar vicki Saroj england six hundred dollars Congress one percentage point ruben emily center for american progress maryland dr michele holder Harris miller Rosalyn vicky
NPR News: 11-30-2020 12AM ET

NPR News Now

05:41 min | 4 months ago

NPR News: 11-30-2020 12AM ET

"Now is the time to capture your father story story. Terrace is a biography. Writing service turning people's life stories into beautiful books with our professional writers. Give dad the gift of a lifetime. Story terraced dot com live from npr news. I'm nora raum. The number of corona virus cases continues to grow across the country. A total of thirteen point three million. According to johns hopkins university healthcare professionals are concerned. That thanksgiving weekend was a superspreader event for virus. Infections texas is one of those states from houston public media. Several willa ernst reports prior to the thanksgiving holiday public officials across the state asked texans to cancel gatherings or limit them to only members leaving in the same household el paso and san antonio even issued partial curfews for the holiday weekend. Dr joseph chief of staff united memorial medical center in houston told. Abc news that. He's worried about the coming weeks. I am concerned about the knicks. Six weeks because of what. I have seen the last few days because we have seen people gathered for Thanksgiving in large groups. Because i have seen people going out. Shopping over thirteen percent of hospital. Patients across the state are sick with covid. Nineteen for npr news. I'm sarah will ernst in houston. President elect joe biden will name near at hand in to head the office of management and budget. She's the president and ceo of the center for american progress. A think tank president trump says. He's ashamed he supported. Georgia's republican governor. Brian kemp because he says the governor has not done anything to question the state's results trump loss georgia to president elect joe biden from member station w. a. b. e. alex helmick reports. Biden's win in georgia was the first for a democrat in nearly thirty years. There is an official recount. Going on. now that's after a hand count audit of nearly five million votes after the audit kemp a staunch republican certified the election. As did the republican secretary of state on fox news. On sunday trump again without evidence claimed there was voter fraud in the state and the governor. Nothing absolutely nothing. I'm ashamed that i endorsed him. Meantime trump is set the come to georgia on saturday to stump for republican senate candidates for the january fifth runoff for npr news. I'm alex helmick in atlanta. The trump administration is going before the supreme court. Monday to defend president. Trump's directive to alter the census numbers that determine the nest electoral college map the constitution and federal law requires those numbers to include every person living in the us regardless of immigration status. Npr's hunslet has more even if the supreme court were to rule that president trump can legally exclude unauthorized immigrants from those numbers. Trump may not be able to practically do that. that's because the census bureau recently found processing anomalies that need more quality checks and is now planning to release the first set of census numbers after the end of trump's term. Npr's hans along you're listening to npr news. New york city will reopen schools to in person learning for some students. Starting december seventh. This will apply to elementary students and those with disabilities whose parents can send to weekly testing for the corona virus. The schools were closed two weeks ago. When covid nineteen cases exceeded a three percent benchmark. New york city has the largest school district in the country with one point one million students. The state of colorado has entered into a formal agreement with four latin american consulates in an effort to keep children safe for a member station k. u. n. c. carney huckabee's reports the colorado department of human services has partnered with the consulate of el salvador and aurora. The consulate-general a ponderous and dallas and the consulate general of guatemala and the consulate general of mexico. Who are both in denver. In order to share information and collaborate when a child from their respective countries involved in child welfare case in colorado this agreement formalizes that the consulates will be notified in a timely manner and that each agency will work together to keep children and youth safe and with family for npr. News i'm carly huckle in. Colorado of volcano erupted in eastern indonesia sunday forcing thousands of people from their homes. At least twenty eight villages were evacuated. There have been no reports of deaths or injuries. The eruption sent a column of ash more than thirteen thousand feet into the air prompting. A local airport to close the volcano has been erupting off and on for the past three years. I'm nora rahm. Npr news this message comes from npr sponsor. Three him who continues to expand production of the respirators frontline workers need globally and is on track to supply two billion by the end of twenty twenty more at three m dot com slash cova. Three m science applied to life at story terrorists memories matter. Remember how dad was always there for you. How he could fix anything. The stories he told about his childhood work and travels now is the time to capture. Your father's story story terrorist is a biography writing service capturing people's life stories. One of our six hundred professional writers will interview your loved one and turn their story into a beautiful hard bound book. Surprised add with the gift of a lifetime. visit story. terraced dot com.

alex helmick trump nora raum georgia willa ernst houston Dr joseph staff united memorial medical npr thirteen percent sarah will ernst joe biden Brian kemp npr news trump administration hunslet Npr johns hopkins university Trump center for american progress
Republicans Who Ignored Trumps Tweets Are Using Twitter to Attack Bidens Budget Pick

TIME's Top Stories

06:47 min | 4 months ago

Republicans Who Ignored Trumps Tweets Are Using Twitter to Attack Bidens Budget Pick

"Presented by the salvation army in a year with fewer red. Kettles helped rescue christmas for the most vulnerable to give ask your smart speaker to make a donation to the salvation army or donate at salvation army. Usa dot org for years. Republicans ignored donald. Trump's tweets now. They're using twitter as an excuse to attack. Biden's budget chief pick by. Philip elliott as soon as near attendance name emerged as president elect. Joe biden's pick to run the nitty gritty of the entire government washington heard the political manifestation of a record scratch this cabinet nomination was either a going to be a spectacular flex from the incoming administration empowering a fierce walk who could make history or be going to devolve into a pile on with progressives teaming up with republicans to exact revenge for tannin's history of savage tweets. If everything else from two thousand twenty s predictive you can see which direction this is heading. The embodiment of a washington insider and personification of. It's murdoch chrissy. Ten is one of the rare figures in this town who seeming ubiquity doesn't dictate irrelevance player and democratic politics for decades. She started out by volunteering for mike. Dukakis nineteen eighty eight presidential bid tendons rolodex rivals almost everyone else's her steel trap. Brain seldom forgets a footnote or a slight when her critics have dismissed the fifty year old insider as a lightweight. They have been proven wrong in short order. Tangling with tendon is seldom a winning proposition. Pattern is a policy wonk who got into politics and the clinton white house where she became a trusted advisor to both bill. And hillary the ucla and yale law graduate worked for hillary clinton on her two thousand senate campaign on her senate staff and for her first presidential run officially and as an outside sounding board the second low. She was unfailingly loyal to the clintons. She was also one of the few clinton insiders who successfully integrated into barack obama's two thousand eight campaign and administration from her senior posted. The department of health and human services helped negotiate and then right the law we today call obamacare when she wrapped up there. She returned to the democratic establishment favorite. Think tank the center for american progress as its president and ceo tendons credentials clearly indicate she is more than capable of running the powerful office of management and budget. The white house arm. That has a hand in everything from spending an oversight to regulation reviews veto threats and congressional testimony from any corner of the administration a strong. Omb director can be a president's enforcer because she or he can financially kneecap fellow cabinet member who freelances or astray from stated administration interpretation of the law. Yes embiid chiefs are a member of the cabinet although lower in the pecking order. Then say the secretary of defense. There's a lot that government can do through these little notice tweaks emanating from. Oem be few people know where all the tricks are hidden or who to call to ask as well as tandon who would be the first woman of color to lead the normally behind the scenes department but tendons qualifications aren't the problem. Tendon can be unapologetically confrontational her twitter account rivals president donald trump's when it comes to hard edged at dings against conservatives and fellow progressives alike as soon as her name became public lawmakers and their aides alike predicted her nomination would fail in the senate senator john cornyn of texas called her biden's worst nominee so far while his top spokesman predicted she had chance of being confirmed. Senator tom. cotton of arkansas called her. A partisan hack tenant has spared few and deleted tweets in one. She called senate majority leader. Mitch mcconnell hashtag moscow mitch. An insinuation that he is beholden to the kremlin. Can people on here. Please focus their eireann. Mcconnell and the gop senators who are up this cycle to enable him cory gardner collins ernst cornyn purdue tillis and many more she said in one broadside against senators whose votes she now needs in others. She pledged to defeat. Susan collins for her vote to confirm brad kavanagh to the supreme court that track record those and other republican lawmakers say should disqualify her for being intemperate best and partisan at worst lost on. No one in washington is this for the last four years. Republicans have gone out of their way to ignore. Trump's near constant tweet raging if trump's tweets carried no political price. How can tandems nomination being questioned for a fraction of the froth from the senate floor minority leader chuck schumer marveled at the about face. Honestly the hypocrisy is astounding. Ever republicans are concerned about criticism on twitter. Their complaints are better directed at president. Trump schumer said republicans next year are expected to have at least fifty seats with two still up for grabs in the upcoming runoff races. In georgia tannin will need at least fifty votes so vice president-elect kamala harris can break the tie and put her over the top democrats in twenty thirteen changed the rules so administration nominees can now skate by with the barest of majorities rather than the typical sixty votes needed to leave a procedural hurdle required of most legislation and supreme court picks. Biden's team clearly saw the problems coming on monday. As word became official tannin was touting her childhood as a daughter of immigrants and recipient of public assistance she has recently deleted more than one thousand tweets. According to the wall street journal many of them directed at republicans who didn't stand up trump on those that remain her policy chops. Still shut down any ridiculous talking points. She has little patience for hypocrisy or hyperbole. Especially when it comes from conservative quarters or the so-called bernie bros. supporters of senator bernie sanders. Who have slagged her. for years. For using corporate money to fund the center for american progress in a development that surprises no bernie world is also seething at her pick. Tannin is wise enough to the ways of washington to know her. Confirmation hearings will be brutal. She's been in the clinton orbit since the nineteen nineties. And there are few scandals that some senate republicans love to dredge up more than those involving the clintons. The funding of her think-tank will inevitably be called into question much like senate. Republicans tried to make an issue. Out of the clinton foundation's money and don't discount the problems that could come from the left where lawmakers are none too pleased with her consistent. Opposition to ideas like a single payer health care and medicare for all any potential work on bill clinton era centrism or her handling of hashtag metoo at her organization. Still the real issue for the right and the left alike is this tannin is as competent as they come. She is at ease negotiating across the aisle as she is schmoozing. Friendly donors as genuine on a sunday. Show set as she is in her office with the door. Closed and trading political gossip. You can dislike her politics and question her social media habits but you cannot deny she knows the ground that's been tilled for her. It now becomes a question of just. How much team. Joe wants to fight for a relative outsider to his orbit. The answer may lion tendons first task as the budget chief to get fifty votes.

salvation army senate Philip elliott murdoch chrissy fifty year cabinet Omb washington clinton Biden twitter president donald trump senator john cornyn center for american progress Senator tom Dukakis Joe biden clintons cory gardner collins ernst cornyn
This is Why People Are Quitting Their Careers

Work Matters With Ken Coleman

04:41 min | 6 months ago

This is Why People Are Quitting Their Careers

"This work matters with bestselling author and syndicated talk show host Ken Coleman. It's Thursday October fifteen. I saw this article, the other day and it really troubles me. Troubles me deeply. And I think as a society we to wake up to what's happening here and and this is in some ways. A bit of a political issue because of the leadership decisions in this country that has caused this challenge the challenge itself is not political. But we the people whether you consider yourself left right. D. R. WHATEVER YOU WANNA call yourself whatever which way you lean. You're going to be troubled by this and this isn't cool. NBC News. PUTS US headline out? Facing challenges of work and home schooling more women are sacrificing their careers. I read this and I went. That's not good although quite honestly, not surprising. Given. The fact that in many states in our great country kids are still doing remote learning they're not in school. As virtual schooling ramps up in some areas, women are being forced to make the choice between caring for their children or prioritizing their own career into the article. Now, direct quote from Martin, Vice President of Education and Workplace Justice at the National Women's law center. She said so many schools are opening with distance learning. It certainly is a new set of obligations on parents to help their kids move through the day, and we know that women tend to bear the lion's share of that childcare distance learning work. Gabrielle Brat is a Marine biologist mother three kids ages. Between the ages, A and eleven. She said it doesn't matter how flexible your bosses in your colleagues are. At some point things start running into each other. She's been working from home since March and the conditions are increasingly. Becoming more stressful. She said, I thought about quitting a lot because it's untenable. It's not sustainable for any of us. I'm trying to thread that needle to keep my job and still do a good enough job but then also take care of myself and my husband and my family really it's been tough. I can't even imagine. Mike Mata wits economist at the Center for American progress said. The month of September October has been a disaster for working women eight hundred and sixty five thousand women dropped out of the labor force. Versus two, hundred, sixteen, thousand men. Nearly half of parents with school age kids said schools taking place online in only twenty percent of the parents said, their children will be in the classroom full time. This year, this is according to an NBC News poll conducted last month. The Federal Reserve's most recent Beige book, which is a document details. Current economic conditions highlighted the dependence on schools as childcare providers as an impediment to economic recovery. Duh. We all saw this coming. Several the regional fed banks saying local employers are still struggling to fill positions or comedy parents Juggling Online. School job demands. Debra Friedman. Labor Employment Attorney at the law firm, of Cozine, O'Connor said one of the long term impacts of this pandemic may be the reversal of some of the important gains. Women have made with respect to increase career opportunity and pay quality. They are being forced to make choices between career and family often resulting in a career setback. All right folks. Here's where my non-political political statement comes in. Some of the people who have championed. Women. In the workforce progressing in position and pay. Are the very same people with draconian. lockdowns of school children. I. Live in the Great State of Tennessee. My kids have been going back to school. Since August there have not been outbreaks and children are not dying do your own homework on who is most vulnerable lockdowns. Are Killing Women's careers. At what point do we say enough is enough my kid needs community. My Kid needs collaboration. My kid needs to go back to school. I'll let you answer the question. If you like what you're hearing make sure to subscribe and share work matters with a friend for help on your career journey listened to the Ken Coleman Show podcast part of the Ramsey network.

National Women Ken Coleman Gabrielle Brat NBC NBC News Vice President of Education an Federal Reserve Tennessee Center for American progress Mike Mata Debra Friedman Ramsey network Martin Labor Employment Attorney Cozine O'Connor twenty percent
"A moment of silence for Bowling Green."

Pod Save America

53:05 min | 4 years ago

"A moment of silence for Bowling Green."

"Welcome to save America I'm John Fabra I'm John Levitt vetoed on the today we have the president of the Center for American progress near attendant also Longtime Hillary aid and healthcare expert we're going to talk to me Tori it was boss move the story is called trump and staff rethink tactics after stumbles but it really should be called Donald Racist Wanders around White House in a bathrobe take this thing for me is that trump leaves the offices six thirty pm nothing else to do I guess walks okay thank you we're GonNa Start Music in their memoriam segment yeah just a few seconds in the cash up he link your debit or credit card you selected him out to send type in your friends phone number email address and that's it but what if you forget everything is about politics but we're compartmentalizing because we're patriots fan that's right yeah and I'm fine with that topography and this was on last night let's start with the The failing New York Times had quite a story than that Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush dropped just at halftime last night yeah just a great and your time yelling at Dot Lemon Yell Yell at US yellow I just the thing about these stories about it feels like year six Nixon like it just the trips we did President Obama by interviewing the people who made the decision while we were there this week I have Dan Restrepo who handled all of Latin America policy for President Orders Unimportant source of feedback validation fan everyone talks about him by the way and writes about him like he is a six year old rightly so but it's just so funny the tone that comes through in these stories he feels increasingly pinched by the pressures of the job in constant and the constant presence of protests that is awesome yeah that's probably the best news in them in there the best part about the square cash things I went in there to talk with sponsorship guy and he's like well how do we pay you and then we realized we don't have it invoicing system so thank you square now we have an invoicing system I waved thank you Jackie media policy the world my new now weekly we moved up to weekly already due to popular demand show about foreign policy and the two guys inside the White House situation room the big meetings feels like a president who's just beleaguered and who's been at this the it's two and a half weeks old it does I mean in fairness it feels like it's been ten years the the extraordinary act that Donald Trump left his own super party a little after the half right when the pats comeback began so he's not a real fine I just WanNa quickness to America let's not make everything about it it's not great he often offers a bitter play by play of critics like CNN's done limit of all the critics he's wasted hey president trump don't upstairs and like watches cable alone with the private security guard just screaming Don Lemon on the TV in his bathrobe that's what it was it's very often he is mad about the protests they're getting into it also it's definitely getting to him because religiously this morning on Fox and friends Sean Spicer who's now been the go-to story though joking aside is that he was so upset about the presidential memorandum that codified Steve Bannon as part of the National Security Council because he didn't actually understand it when he signed it that is you gotta get it over with yeah we don't want to be insufferable patriots fans we know our listeners just in central Patriots look I'm taking comfort in the at this is the guy can barely sit through the PDB everyday shrinking the thing down to like bullet points essentially but he flipped through a seventeen page book of window dressing options I mean like we waited immortalized by Mo Melissa McCarthy and SNL This weekend toughish on tougher Spicer says that was asked about the protests and he said they are quote a very paid asked on the way there it is very good media okay so we let's let's get to the news I have a moment of silence for the victims of the Bowling Green massacre I was going to win the laws going up and and before we begin we have a quick word from one of our sponsors square cast their cash square cash is the simplest way to pay people he should not be president so back to the band and thing though so that trump is trump is pissed that bannon got on the National Council and he didn't know about it apparently because he's just signing things left and right and then last week the Washington Post Ashley Parker and Full Rucker had a story that said ah I would have gone I would have gone further yeah yeah so there's some great couple details from the story closer to the White House he now has little access to his fans doc lovett friends family coworkers anyone really sending and receiving money is totally free and fast and most payments can be deposited directly to your bank account in toys off okay this they can't ignore lie about because this is real and it's in your face and they're still lagged like what where did these people send their w two's what are you talking about and and of president trump prisoner abandoned thing and then they discuss that maybe bannon's calling the shots and sure enough like five minutes later we get this trump tweet I call my own shots largely based on an accumulation of data and everyone knows it some fake news media in order to turf tight movement not like the tea party which was organic this is it this one really bugs me yeah yeah sort of cutting a lot of k. one generalize lies just based on trump you can't that's too much like we can made these interesting characters they don't forget when we love sales almost over capitalism kickstarter thanks to Jesse MacLean graphic designer woman who trusted him and who just wanted somebody to talk to and by the way how much do those guys hate Chris Christie just so thirsty for a job that he will tee off on them at any moment for Chris Christie trump has raised the fact with AIDS that Bannon got the cover of Time magazine so then this morning on trump's primary source of information about the world turn into another crowd size lie three five million illegal votes lie I mean there's just there's no evidence whatsoever they're at their worst when they dig in and defend defend defend the other thing I loved about McCarthy The house number two speaks with trump several times a week by phone and trump dotes on McCarthy even referring to him as my Kevin yes uber to the airport everybody's fine lift to the airport reporter at the briefing should ask spifer spicer like what is the evidence that you have that their hourly rate could easily old woman who can't afford it that's what he's basically doing he's running commercial he's doing a reverse reverse mortgage Emma really smart guy he understands the politics policy and he speaks a human being in multiple languages so I'm going to tell us how to build the wall a year and a half to redecorate the oval because we thought we'd get attacked for it and because Obama paid for it himself he had the gold curtains up literally day one he's very proud of the curtains very proud of the Baylor turning show yeah trump's VDB morning joe show the ban in Time magazine cover they play the clip of President Bannon Ed and which immediately led trump to tweet any negative polls are fake news that is that is a parody of a trump tweet not just like polls or fake news because polls have been any negative polls are fake news positive polls right on-track how two weeks whereas recover which is that that Paul Ryan and Bannon are talking all the time and we and now the story originally said there were texted they were texting then somebody got it I just WanNa make sure we're all aware that Paul Ryan Kevin McCarthy are not holding their nose they're breathing in and out they are in it Brennan Buck for Marsha like all right I get you WanNa say that you're calling the shots but nobody believes you're making decisions based on an accumulation of data knowing things you have data then what you're looking at the facts directed and now they're just talking but regardless this is from the story Speaker Ryan have you ever texted Steve Bannon do you have his number Mr Ryan he wants he wants described it tr true trump morning jobe also watch CNN this morning because David challenged this whole segment on his polls and how his polls as he's ordered to and then or I said well he's a killer and trump said well we've got killers in this country what do you think our country so innocent his level of parody nothing even say about that he knew what it was nice watching the super bowl last night looking at twitter because even though everyone was making everything political it was like a moment where you weren't conscious I point out that this is the softest bill Riley history he's such a Wuss when it comes to interviewing Donald Trump Obama did this interview in twenty seven bill asked him does it disturb you that so many -Sconsin Kumi maybe the riff great job guys I I joke forty five percent chance at the there've been many aides in the White House that have flown a little too close to the sun right Karl Rove called Bush's brain was probably not great we've seen over the presence Steve Bannon got there faster than anyone else in history I would be which the charitable explanation is that he's referring to Iraq in that the toll the civilian casualties is the result of that enormous mistake were enormous but there's just there's no way you can say that we target and kill political opponents or journalists the way Putin I mean he's funding separatists in eastern Ukraine he which he is there's a long list of political this comment rightly so but it's just amazing to watch these people these are the same folks who accused Obama of going on an apology tour because he admitted that maybe our foreign policy there are a lot of yourself lot of NATO Tommy you WanNa talk about pods the world's the Juggernaut juggernaut gently scared upset by something trump was doing you know 'cause I noticed this morning when he wakes up his tweets again like we're back to it we had like a brief three hour window it's like Boris Nemtsov and Alexander Litvinenko who died from a radioactive plutonium that was slipped in his drink they murdering has all the time happens all the time urban Stein who's not going to be up for election until twenty twenty two can only muster up I think that Putin's not good Marco Oh we're although I have to say yes reporters you can you can make a joke about how the game was like the election the Philippines Marco Rubio and I'm serious adult immigration for not anymore whatever you want I want I'm Marco Rubio so anyway so that was that was the O'Reilly interview this was also taped right before the big news of the weekend which was a judge he's in the know sprintone zone for yeah so bill O'Reilly said he's talking about Putin and de Respect Putin trump said yes I respect Putin and it's also it's protests like it's somebody who's making this point it's not that expensive it's a couple of bottles of water and some cardboard what do you what do we think we need to do to bankroll this the enemy force out but he now talks regularly with with Mr Ryan to coordinate strategy or plot their plan to overhaul the tax code separately political reported that can there have been a whole bunch of other rulings since the ban went into effect but this one was by far the most expansive because he said that it had to go for every state it wasn't just Washington Minnesota even though they brought the case so the entire order the entire EEO is now on pause while it's appealed basically the government then appealed to the ninth circuit and said that they wanted the ban in place while it was still being appealed the ninth circuit denied the government's emergency request to reinstate the band in in court and for that trump can thank the Republicans and keeping the seat open from Garland Yeah but anyway so as opposed to just saying you know maybe the game can be fucking football game it's not about China and swear anymore it can be just the game be better about this is also say that this is when he was basically like five tweets about this from trump over the course of the day the last one was the worst he said just cannot believe a judge would put our country in such peril and while Paul Ryan knows Steve I just want to talk about the tax part question mark is Rubinstein Marcus getting that texting thing changed a phone call to the front of the pot you're allowed to come anytime we voted on the tweets I want to know what emerges they use when they exploding truck face it's scary and having them sign memo's like just initial here here is the president now you you have no more power subprime mortgages the most egregious thing he's done via twitter I think and maybe the entire time he's been in office he's turning the if something happens blame him in court system period people pouring in period bad no they're not they're not so yeah this is now that'll be judge a judge James Robart in a case brought by the states of Washington in Minnesota putting nationwide halt on the use your source check by a t shirt and then go to the protest everyone's everybody wins protests One other thing though in that story that I wanted to make decision making hadn't been perfect overtime Mitt Romney wrote a book called no apology as a rebuke to Brock Obama who as far as I can tell who only was the first to be like is this year with all those contracts because they fake news all the time and like believe you're infallible like the when you have when you see pictures of thousands and thousands of people protesting now the next place it would go is to the Supreme Court if there is a tight the supreme court the federal the original federal decision stance because that's what happens when there's a tie the supreme equal branch of our government they will call hearings they will make the central to the Gore sick Gorsuch nomination fight I'm Paul Ryan has raised this personally with Donald Trump and made it let's go to the Super Bowl talk about a riley trump's down with O'Reilly and it's Bill O'Reilly you might have heard of him he spins the courts rightly probably isn't the final check on his unbridled power to do whatever he wants his country and he's lying the predicate to attack them case something bad happen thanks for saying it was a Nice Beach Tommy Viz Muslim ban again mix less safe because it's GonNa make more of these people come up Michael Hayden wrote a really important piece about how the band makes it harder to get human intelligence okay win enough for all concerned book the Center so early that one was a good one I said it because I didn't WanNa say it you know recipe Americans are not your enemy we sometimes make mistakes we have not been perfect dear God now is that n- not worse than Putin what do you want come at me I wonder if you like me is this is this segment so important things from the New York Times over the weekend it's it's very Reagan did it talking about I mean like it started this whole debate about American exceptionalism and finally like a lot of conservative came out and blasted him for trump could have said something like that was a bad decision I don't agree with it no no he said these so-called judge so called judge that wasn't even the worst one and then no that wasn't the worst own Wolfman often they're actually directed by Isis from abroad right but these are people who feel you know like they're they're being radicalized they feel like they're we're at war with the West right in like what you do in advance other than just talk about it and defending the judicial and van have as many people in influential roles as possible whether it's Republicans other people hate you have any follow up like three times they hate you okay so yeah rallies pressed him on this and he's like trump said yeah we've got a lot of killers do you think our country's so innocent leaders just talk you know and I also a lot of people were very quick to rush and be like well this judge that that halted the band was George W Bush appointee in you know he has some conservative positions but it's like it's were just at some point God forbid but the likelihood is that there'll be a lone wolf attack there will be some kind of terrorist attack and then if he's doing this now I don't care if he was the fucking most liberal judge ever judge right like when the judiciary makes a decision they make a decision the other thing is I'm thinking about to that we're GONNA really important story about the way Isis actually direct attacks in the key takeaways that the threat we face is not foreign it's people in states who we call them America's made some mistakes in the past no apologies in example joe part of my country has not perfected itself was the first thing he said when he was in Berlin that was the attack he said to in the and how we handle that hauer ready for that with ACL ACLU is doing to be prepared to help those people I am heartened that the after you silly guy as he is he's been tweeting his play by play the Super Bowl I think the super bowl going great I enjoyed lady Gaga but I won't be critical of a president who hates America there's an all the countries named because one of the things we promise them we'll bring you and we'll bring your family the United States if you help us and now they feel like we can't keep up with that that honor we can honor that social system he's just outright saying if there's an attack I will blame them because I can't keep the country safe under the constitution and that's the most dangerous thing he's done so of course rescuer credit is great but like Ben Sasse strongly criticized him there wasn't Republicans out there on this even McConnell was like this was inappropriate then SAS is it does okay ban on the travel ban And of course is your word band as you said Dan banks band so I get to the point where we'll be talking more about Federal employees having to decide whether or not to honor an order from the administration that violates a quarter experts weigh in on this he didn't do that because it is a clown show in the White House and so he he's sort of trying to mask the competence of his own administration by attacking the judge the President goes this is positive America stick around there's this great stuff coming there were they weren't and you wondered was it confusion or was because they're just deciding not to carry the order out and I was like very worried about that but it's good to see that at now that the confusion has what does he do that I mean that's the real he's always telling us what you can do and I don't know what like we're just sort of like watching the watching the train come you know I mean these agencies are currently vetting refugees it's an eighteen to twenty four month process like in the president's just saying that's not happening he's telling these people they're incompetent they can't do their job you some judge made a rule it's not how you lead a workforce it's not easy to do anything like this this e o landed in the courts because of his Donald Trump's gross incompetence that's policy genius P. O. L. I. C. Y. G. E. N. I U. S. Dot Com Zero Jargon Zero sales pressure zero hassle it's life insurance made easy guys you're welcome it was really good I liked it but I think like people think you don't like me near ten minutes let's go we gotta that we disagreed with but that would have maybe been lawful right tailored it in the right way he could have had the right you know he could have had all kinds of people in Congress and in his White House and Promise Co. hidden the former Bush until You know you see these tweets it's like oh he's done something outrageous agrees but I do notice that would have no idea before policy genius policy genius dot com is the best online life insurance marketplace the most accurate quotes from top rated life insurance companies they placed over a billion dollars in life insurance for people just like you and they have a very simple user friendly websites you can shop and compare all the top rated life insurance companies and get the best options breath scared to death if I reme yeah I mean I think we should keep it up you know impeach President Bannon guys President Van and coming to America insurance companies their life insurance do you have it if you don't why not why not John I'm GonNa Dependence too expensive or hassle most Americans can expect weeks of hearings from the Republican Congress who will do their best not just as represented representative of a party but literally the representatives of a branch of are equal of equal and putting together an executive order with a bunch of incompetent goons in his White House who didn't know what the hell they were doing right right like he could have he could have devised an order I love it love it just thinks he's a policy genius go policy genius Dot Com today save over seventy percent of other prices for life insurance when Life Insurance Compete for your business you're the one who saves money focus of their of their conversations I wait wait wait could even happen or are they just rolling over like a bunch of feckless cowards so country I penciled Mike Pence on meet the press was like he's good feelings about the judiciary he can talk marching Mike Pence defend on trump is just a sad but I mean he's clearly there are a number of things that happened last week that I do think threatened to expose the emptiness of the promise that trump made to work in class free quotes peace of mind don't wait go to policy genius dot com so a few other things were going on this week Erica don't they don't care as much about the ban the protests and they don't follow the news like we do and so they are not as uptight about that and I that's that's probably true in many cases lots of great stuff positive America is brought to you by policy genius life me is brought to you by me Oh boy by John Lewis the policy junior sitting at a table it's actually there's GonNa be a customer service team that's great they help you find the best policy at the best price it's very easy so go to policy genius dot com today but not me go to the website go to the website the Muslims to live in the Midwest but anyway this this last week trumping Congress repealed regulations prevented mining companies from dumping toxic we yeah with all these regulations are about to go into its well I barely recognize half of these things happened and you hear some journalists in conservative common commentators say you know the people in middle and order repealing the rule that Obama put in place that said financial advisers have to act in their customers best interests you know what people are sick again good vice shen and normative judgment like they describe like this is not breaking through a Middle America and now that may be true it's not true but it's not good walks payer money this is just it's why it's also so how do we key trump doesn't care about any of this he's just a vessel for for these ideological down they all are carrying out the order following an illegal order doesn't mean you don't go to jail just because the president told you do it right and people will like the president won't go to jail he can pardon himself apartment anyone sure of former Goldman Sachs co Gary Cohn smiling behind trump signing his order to dismantle Walter Regulation to apologize to the about some ACA stuff but I would a day yesterday lots of the Super Bowl victory working to protect them and if I had my way like and I was running a democratic campaign the main message be trump said he was going to help working class people and he did not and here's why they want to look into and repeal most of dodd-frank which were the Wall Street regulations put in place after the economic crisis so now Wall Street in the business trump signs this with a with a pit this one is just like why the FCC is now stopping nine companies from providing subsidized Internet to poor people supposed to find trump's tweet yet and then you could list the regulations that we're going to get into right now but things in the news you see this all the time which has reporters constantly back and forth between descript okay who has returned billions of dollars to consumers to make sure that banks and mortgage lenders don't take advantage of them and also this is because I do think this is when people in the when when most people hear about these moves that he is screwing over working people that's what's going to separate it's an Aura Susevi well condescending and paternalistic and guess what there's some Muslims who live in middle America probably breaking through and big protests in red states we we brought in huge numbers and it's first of all danger how do we even it's like even structuring. His conversation is impossible because there's so much happening between Thursday and Monday that's insane this is sort of the whole point right an initial round of confusion like D H s said that the customs and Border Patrol would honor the the judge's order because there is a little there was a moment put you break the law on his behalf you don't work for him it's also you know we have the Nationalist National Counterterrorism Center at the FBI terrorists screening centres seat department dod D H S Nation at that first hearing two thousand eight before the bailout guy yeah man just a just a real fuck you'd everyone and then also signing exhibit rate them from trump and I it's so hard because he does it's the tweets and it's the you know it's the bands and it's the protest and it's just hard to keep the protests has been the one east into water cool oil companies now do not have to disclose their payments to foreign government finally trump signed an executive order stating that the hello around him goods you're saying goons we're all saying Linzie much sorry started how do we keep these things in the news the life insurance cost two to three times more than it really does but life insurance is a good idea to protect the ones around you but where do you go to get the best prices on the best policy with the best service A. and so it's like well okay because what it says you you people you people should stop talking about this stuff because it's not breaking through in middle America doesn't care but it is like a it's like a uh-huh they want to know that their financial advisor has getting a cut something weird derivative and that's why you're getting they're they're trying to fire the consumer watchdog Richard Cordray Kazak what child in twenty seven can do homework without the Internet. You know you're just that's who you're hurting so it's paid for by the companies the companies want to subsidize us it's not only sure fire way to grab hold of the news cycle right for us has worked And put I mean that changed everything so but you know you can't you can't approach like today's about the first ticket or not the second you know it's like hard this is also where Democrats and need to be very focused on the language they use and if you're out there chanting no no no we're still repealing and replacing gotten this thing because this is this is again this is the divide now right like when it comes time for unconstitutional travel bans the glitter attack is what got them at Bowling Green Yeah no no it was mostly mostly casualties due to glitter at bowling green excessively fabulous but so he just said yes we have something in place they have nothing in place the affordable care act has never been more popular than it is right now I don't know what's going on there. Well then Ron Paul Ryan interviewed on meet the press and he's I think Chuck Todd said you know argue are using this word repair now too and Ryan basically said at least the rudiments but we should have something within the year and the following year first of all an quote that is actually amazing for a couple of reasons he sounds like it affordable care act their Republican officeholders in very conservative districts since are one story out of Tampa Bay where the town hall was overwhelmed character sheer and trump's quote was maybe it'll take till sometime into next year but we're certainly going to be in the process it statutorily takes a while to get that is the first I do well with this messaging one place where this all comes together is the fight to save the affordable care act the protests and the calls are working politician he's like a president who's dealing with the fact that that the job is hard and he doesn't he's he's he sees the danger in repealing the Affordable Care Act Paul Ryan's against it but doesn't really want to say anything or just nods in approval because he's waiting for the tax cuts and he's waiting for the review but when he comes when it comes time to do these things in in the O'Reilly interview he was asked about trump was this and try and a rally said you know will there be a replacement for the the I love that he's pushing this thing at twenty eighteen push it as close to the midterm elections as possible let's make this as big a deal as we possibly can for as long as possible yeah people who just wanted to save the ACA in this guy had no idea what he was one there was one person at that that had a very funny quote that I really liked it was very simple this was at yeah I'm surprised at Franklin's has is out in about because most recently he was recovering from a glitter attack and I believe bed bound for quite some time Paul Ryan and Steve Bannon having argument that's about something small but really is about their relationship you know like someone feels undervalued one of them's a white supremacist that's when you send boots disturbed buksh dot com their farm fresh that's B. O. U. Q. S. DOT COM. What if you want to send the president flowers because you took some limelight because you're on the cover of time at now the people want to get rid of it grass is always greener isn't it guys frankly leave about Franklin's is out there telling Republicans not to say repeal and replace anymore but to say repair time he's ever used the word statutory somebody said to him that day maybe an excellent and he said we're going to be putting it in fairly soon I think that yes I would like to say by the end of the make them put your financial interests of theirs I mean these are there we have to be able to talk about these things fair market with regulations that protect consumers but we're not against businesses there's simple simple ordering there's no gimmicks transparent pricing there's no hidden fees no endless up sells no additional care in handling fees they're also fresh doing well Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders are good at those area yeah shirt Brown is good at this Democrats that have that that a fresh cut flowers immediately unconstitutional executive order administration they make Great Valentine's Day gifts in addition to all this other seatgeek is always the first place pods of America goes to look for tickets to game concert everything about it is designed to make life easier for fans they do all the it kind of make up with some flowers boots dot com so you can be a hero this Valentine's Day and save twenty percent when you order dot com early free delivery on weekdays when you read soon then they're not talking then to make up for it Paul Ryan has descend Bannon Bukhsh dot com one of our sponsors so let's say like refacing hey how are you I'm fine you have a chance to jump on the phone no let's just tax pain texts can you say repair three bubbles free ticket on seatgeek is given a grade based on value you'll immediately see any underpriced seats and be able to find the best deals that fit your budget best of all Pod Save America listeners get Kazini posed like a bloated cadaver and you want to make sure he knows that you worked for him cinema bouquet from this website is to that game you find seek seek is different they've come along and created an amazing APP and website that makes it easier than ever for fans to buy and sell tickets comparison for you by searching multiple ticket sites and ensuring that you get the best possible deal so seek does all the work in you save all the time and money they also want to help you get the most bang for your buck that's why is coming soon beleaguered assistant I'll also look at last time we last time we did this ad you said you were going to send books Tamil issue the love it promise so again go to boots dot com it's twenty percent off your order when you use the code crooked US Steve Bannon used the crooked books books dot com dot com thanks when we come back we will have the president of the Center for American progress near attendant this is positive America stick around up and enter the Promo Code Crooked today please forget the Promo Code listen you guys you just gotTa do these advertising things for us you gotta go download on you gotta make us look like a twenty dollar rebate off their first seek purchase it's pretty good guys so to get your twenty dollar rebate on tickets you're gonna go download the seatgeek APP love it do it okay and more great show coming your way Putts of America's brought to you by Seatgeek let's say you're rooting for the team Sean Spicer Donald Trump and some racist or waiting for go you WanNa get listened to the podcast and there were no books at the House yeah I'm a busy guy media mogul I've got a lot of my plate all right we gotta make some hires so that I can outsource some of this bullshit which is why we're doing this ad for with us on the pod today we have president of the Center for American Progress Longtime Hillary Clinton aide healthcare expert near at hand I started typing but then he just you know perhaps perhaps getting a big tax bite they can those things escalate and then the you're going to go to the settings tab and click at Promo Code you're going to enter the Promo Code Crooked credited sequel send you twenty dollars after you've made your first ticket purchase so download the whatever happens to the affordable Care Act from January twentieth forward and CEO January twentieth twenty seventeen forward and so all like one of my fears is that they don't act on anything right now and yet because there's no certainty a bunch of insurers leave Exchan- is reasonable I guess what I would say is that he he donald trump and the Republicans are going to own changes and then bad things happening to the individual insurance market and then prices go up and then the Republicans say well look now it's failing even worse than it was dead anything remotely looking like his promises and and address healthcare so you know we've done a lot of research others have on hit or miss was issued true okay near we were just talking about the affordable care act and spend and look I asked her what she thought about love it and there was a little bit of a pause I should've I should've taken that rather than see a mystery behind us I think the truth is that they have actually no idea had fulfill his promises or Hamedani trump voters actually rely on the affordable care act five to six million people those people actually believe that he would produce something better? You probably saw the O'Reilly interviewer trump now said you know they might now push it into twenty eighteen what do you think there's like a method behind this madness at gene that people listen to the ads and do what they say that's very good for our business which is very good for books what's good for crooked media it's good for the country seatgeek definitely undermine the insurance market's through regulation I think my message to them and I think hospitals insurers and others food of like scratching their heads about what to do I mean the number of senators who don't who have stated they want to do a repeal and replace together vote on that Very Anura welcome to the pod great to be with you guys I think it'd be great fabulous it's going to be amazing terrific John Common which is craft help us fix this law like I'm sort of wondering how this plays out I mean I definitely think that in the world of Donald Trump any conspiracy theory is is within the ACA for them something less paperwork or many of them did believes they'd get less paperwork or lower premiums than the reality is that this is a giant orange like okay can we repeal obamacare and Stevens like we're trying to be populist over here so watch out text. XXX died across the country. Yeah it's been really interesting thing that the more obamacare's in jeopardy the higher its approval rating goes now do you think Proton Hbo and switch it already was and they have no plan and I think truly they're just in the mood lose if they lose the affordable care act and I think that's what's really feeling this groundswell of opposition you're seeing fled into town halls image could trump's health and human services secretary Tom Price due to the affordable care act without any legislative changes I mean they can actually delivering this message is that and and consumers is that anything that they do to undermine the markets is is there going to own now and telling him how they their lives are better because of the affordable care act and I think it's it's not a you know to me you know when we look around the country town halls are and how to call your member of Congress but this is all organic you know people are worried about what trump will do worried about losing their millions of people and the good part of the debate we're having now which is really ship show shifted public attention and public support is like we're having a debate about what people I think with any policy or any policy change it's easier to understand what you lose and what you gain and so I see I think he I appreciate that Paul Ryan has an ongoing strategy to tell people that the ACA is a disaster so that he has free cover to do with eminent idea that if you're going to repeal the healthcare system you should have your placement at the same time and they don't know how to do that how much did telling their stories their own stories of being in college and being able to afford surgery because they you know were able to stay on their parent's plan he'd like to do but I think honestly you know they don't have a lot of credibility on healthcare it's not like people tend to believe trump on these issues or I worked for both of you so congratulations on that too for John after may so I don't have a hat make it a a little bit more affordable for folks you know there's been tremendous savings in the affordable care act hundreds of billions of dollars it's come in hundreds of billions of debt her having a pre existing condition and being able to get health insurance for the first time these aren't you know these aren't stories I made up these people were going into Tom McClintock's district her I mean that's a great question and there are steps that we've offered the White House's offered people offered for the last seven years too assed and strategy is playing a part in that or do you think it is more the basics of people now see it in their lives and they're worried about what happens if it's repealed colors below cost estimates and so taking just a little portion of that in helping increase subsidies would do a lot we can strengthen the we have one and have a discussion before they decide any votes on the affordable care act yeah we need a big presence at those town halls if someone's a town hall with the Democratic member Aaron Healthcare worried about you know in a rotation of democratic institutions and they're taking to the streets and I think that's the most important thing coming up is the February recess that starts February twentieth and I urged people to go to their town halls asking their members of Congress who are now avoiding townhouse to action centers in the Senate and a lot of Democrats have offered that and I think when you hear Democrats say that they're happy to improve the law they're good ideas to do that we shouldn't Brian and that you know we have a job to do which is to remind voters that this law you know obviously it could have some improvements but it is fundamentally succeeded in delivering health care for sure people are really focused on what would happen if the ACA went away and you're seeing people you know people are going into town halls in there what do is tear apart this law with no replacement in place public option I you know I I'm a strong supporter of a public option surest but ensuring that they really stay insured they're a bunch of ideas they could improve absolutely improve the affordable care act and you know a lot of the moderate democratic senate an and every part of the country this is just a pet peeve of mine how much damage we think Paul Joe Lieberman personally did by getting rid of the buy in and getting rid of the public option because it makes I've got this fancy name of the family glitch but those things can be an of smoothed out making it harder for making it easier for people to get in hey this is there's no strategy here we love people to go to their town halls and he's the Center for American Progress Action is definitely delivering information about when inefficiency the kind of benefits that are offered make those more affordable there's some issues with particular families that particular incomes it's kind of adding that excitement in the future and that you need to have a strategy in which your base is energized but also you know obviously have a strategy that reaches out to levels of enthusiasm and excitement and I think you know just to move to the other side trump had a strategy of really exciting his base in another podcast and we were quite I think dismissive of some of the arguments that the Bernie Bras were making about Britain's appointed Bernie supporters and Bernie's policy positions his campaign so you know what the the big thing I learned this year are and asks you know what would you do to actually fix the affordable care act would you tell Democrats to propose to that would substantively improve the affordable seeing something at stake in in and taking their labor in trying to change the political process and that is that is vital sure and it applies it applies to Bernie Sanders but it applies to obviously more than sanders is that I think we do have to recognize mccrae's like once a week guys like the public option might be just one of the top ten things of damage sanders which we should you know I I was on the platform committee I saw it I bore witness to that and I think we need to recognize the importance of generate and emanating out you know growing support from the base out and I think there was an incredible amount of enthusiasm for senator democracy and that is the kind of thing that's going to overcome some of the money spent against us in the future and so that was a really important lesson from I think from Senator Sanders I think that would be great and offer offering it and it actually does offer competition it's not a friend of the pot making sure all right near I WANNA get into it for like one second which is look we we here at Positive America we want approval for the Book Care Act I mean there are issues with affordability particularly for Middle Class folks and whether we could improve the subsidy level a little bit yeah no I mean I consider myself to burn I use it as a term of of love okay Bernie Bro I mean we're Bernie Bro before there were Bernie burrows thank you near a correct I don't know how you think that but I'm going yes but anyway I'd be like we were dismissing the hair about their argument on policy and also on electability and I just I've I've been we've been reflective about that I'm just wondering what you think the lesson of the campaign is with

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Republicans Who Ignored Trumps Tweets Are Using Twitter to Attack Bidens Budget Pick

TIME's Top Stories

06:52 min | 4 months ago

Republicans Who Ignored Trumps Tweets Are Using Twitter to Attack Bidens Budget Pick

"Brought to you by quantocks. School of business and technology transformative business leaders need a transformative. Education quantity brings the traditional mba to life with a focus on innovation and technology delivered a micro lesson format providing personalized feedback every eight seconds visit quantico dot edu slash time for more for years. Republicans ignored donald trump's tweets. Now they're using twitter as an excuse to attack biden's budget chief pick by philip elliott as soon as near attendance name emerged as president elect. Joe biden's pick to run the nitty gritty of the entire government washington heard the political manifestation of a record scratch this cabinet nomination was either a going to be a spectacular flex from the incoming administration empowering a fierce wonk who could make history or be going to evolve into a pile on with progressives teaming up with republicans to exact revenge for tendons history of savage tweets. If everything else from twenty twenty s predictive you can see which direction this is heading. The embodiment of a washington insider and personification of its nerd. Accuracy tendon is one of the rare figures in this town whose seeming ubiquity doesn't dictate irrelevance a player in democratic politics for decades. She started out by volunteering. For mike dukakis his nineteen eighty eight presidential bid tendons rolodex rivals almost everyone else's her steel trap. Brain seldom forgets a footnote or a slight when her critics have dismissed the fifty old insider as a lightweight. They have been proven wrong in short order. Tangling with stanton is seldom winning proposition. Pattern is a policy wonk who got into politics and the clinton white house where she became a trusted advisor to both bill and hillary the ucla and yale law graduate worked for hillary clinton on her two thousand senate campaign on her senate staff and for her first presidential run officially and as an outside sounding board on the second low she was unfailingly loyal to the clintons. She was also one of the few clinton insiders who successfully integrated into barack obama's two thousand eight campaign and administration from her senior post at the department of health and human services. She helped negotiate and then right the law we today the obamacare when she wrapped up there she returned to the democratic establishments. Favorite think tank the center for american progress as its president and ceo tendons credentials clearly indicate she is more than capable of running the powerful office of management and budget. The white house arm. That has a hand in everything from spending an oversight to regulation reviews veto threats and congressional testimony from any corner of the administration. A strong rb director can be a president enforcer because she or he can financially kneecap othello cabinet member who freelance or strays from state administration. Interpretation of the law. Yes oh embiid. Chiefs are a member of the cabinet although lower in the pecking order. Then say the secretary of defense. There's a lot that government can do through these little notice tweaks emanating from a few people know where all the tricks are hidden or who to call to ask as well as tandon who would be the first woman of color to lead the normally behind the scenes department but tendons qualifications aren't the problem. Tannin can be unapologetically. Confrontational her twitter account rivals president donald trump's when it comes to hard edged dings against conservatives and fellow progressives alike as soon as her name became public lawmakers and their aides alike predicted her nomination would fail in the senate senator john cornyn of texas called her biden's worst nominee so far while his top spokesman predicted she had zero chance of being confirmed senator. Tom cotton of arkansas called her. A partisan hack tannin has spared few and deleted tweets in one. She called senate majority leader. Mitch mcconnell hashtag moscow mitch and insinuation. That he is beholden to the kremlin. Can people on here. Please focus their ire on mcconnell and the gop senators are up this cycle to enable him cory gardner collins corner purdue and many more she said in one a broadside against senators whose votes she now needs in others. She pledged to defeat. Susan collins for her vote to confirm brett cavanaugh to the supreme court. That track record those and other republican lawmakers say should disqualify her for being intemperate at best and partisan at worst lost on. No one in washington is this for the last four years. Republicans have gone out of their way to ignore trump's near-constant tweet raging if trump's tweets carried no political price how tannin's nomination being questioned for a fraction of the froth from the senate floor minority leader chuck schumer marveled at the about face. Honestly the hypocrisy is astounding. Republicans are concerned about criticism on twitter. Their complaints are better directed at president. Trump schumer said republicans next year are expected to have at least fifty seats with two still up for grabs in the upcoming runoff races. In georgia ten and will need at least fifty votes so vice president elect kamala. Harris can break the tie and put her over the top democrats twenty thirteen changed the rules so administration nominees can now skate by with the barest of majorities rather than the typical sixty votes needed to leap of procedural hurdle required of most legislation and supreme court picks. Biden's team clearly saw the problems coming on monday. As word became official tannin was touting her childhood as a daughter of immigrants and recipient of public assistance. she has recently deleted more than one thousand tweets. According to the wall street journal many of them directed at republicans who didn't stand up to trump on those that remain her policy chops. Still shut down any ridiculous talking points. She has little patience for hypocrisy or hyperbole. especially when it comes from conservative quarters or the so-called brutally bros. supporters of senator bernie sanders. Who have slagged her. For years for us. In money to fund the center for american progress in development that surprises no one bernie world is also seething at her pick. Tannin is wise enough to the ways of washington to know her. Confirmation hearings will be brutal. She's been in the clinton orbit since the nineteen nineties. And there are few scandals that some senate republicans love to dredge up more than those involving the clintons. The funding of her thing will inevitably be called into question much like senate. Republicans tried to make an issue out of the clinton foundation. Money and don't discount the problems that could come from the left where lawmakers are none too pleased with her consistent. Opposition to ideas like single payer health care and medicare for all any potential work on bill clinton eurocentrism or handling of hashtag meet at her organization. Still the real issue for the right and the left alike is this tannin is as competent as they come. She is as at ease negotiating across the aisle as she has schmoozing friendly donors as genuine on a sunday show set as she is in her office with the door closed and trading political gossip. You can dislike her politics and question her social media habits but you cannot deny she knows the ground that's until for her. It now becomes a question of just. How much team. Joe wants to fight for a relative outsider to his orbit. The answer may lie in tannin's first task as the budget chief to get fifty votes.

senate edu slash philip elliott mike dukakis washington biden clinton eight seconds cabinet twitter president donald trump senator john cornyn center for american progress Tom cotton donald trump Joe biden clintons cory gardner brett cavanaugh Tannin