35 Burst results for "Cellini"

"cellini" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

Armstrong & Getty

01:47 min | Last month

"cellini" Discussed on Armstrong & Getty

"Frustrating, now. But he's giving the government more and more power because the more power they have the more accountable will be d. So new study on the whole. Trans thing the What's IT genders Fauria. You're born physically a man, but you always felt like in your mind, you're woman or vice versa new stuff on that from a psychological standpoint. That's pretty darn interesting, and then we're going to get into just flawed research at the university level which we've talked about several times but we should repeat it since climate changes in the news so much indeed frenemies Donald Trump and Gavin new cellini got together yesterday and Cal Unicorn yet to to both agree and disagree about what's going on with all the wildfire, some fairly entertaining tape of that and. NAMIC, Kaz trump's son is dating Gavin's ex wife. That's right. Right show you what a small world bowl. Powerful people thing is yeah. Yeah. Yeah. How much time ago Michael? Yeah, off to talk about this more later I'm about to have a about a quarter of my house taken away from me this mold problem we have. All of our bathrooms will be taken away from us as of Thursday morning and I won't get them back for like two months. No bathroom with Mom Dad and two kids are you gonNa dig that little train? I suggested get kids you star me life. Or with China. What do you? What do you think bears do out there? Armstrong and getty..

Donald Trump Gavin Michael Cal Unicorn Armstrong cellini China
Experts predict active 2020 hurricane season

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Experts predict active 2020 hurricane season

"Fight fight fight to to to defend defend defend James James James Phillip Phillip Phillip in in in New New New York. York. York. We've already had nine named storms during this year's Atlantic hurricane season. The head of the National Weather Service Dr Lewis you, Cellini says this year is now forecast to be one of the most active on record. The chance for an above normal season has now been increased 85%. On DH. There is also a much higher potential, but this season to be classified as a

James James James Phillip Phil New York Dr Lewis Cellini
Weather experts issue most threatening hurricane forecast yet

Rush Limbaugh

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Weather experts issue most threatening hurricane forecast yet

"And Atmospheric Administration is updated its seasonal outlook for the Atlantic hurricane season to suggest there could be a Zeman Ia's 25 named storms this year. There've been nine so far, but Noah would prefer we not concentrate on numbers of storms, but on individual readiness. Dr. Gerry Bell is lead hurricane forecaster with no Oh, uh, the hurricane season outlook is not only about the numbers. It's very much about preparedness, Doctor you, Cellini already stated. Regardless of the predicted activity. We all know that it only takes one storm that catastrophic impacts on lives and communities, Noah says. They're forecasting tools don't make long range predictions about how many cyclones will reach land. But the increased frequency of storms means chances of a land impacting cyclone are greater. Christ, the pump

Noah Atmospheric Administration Dr. Gerry Bell Cellini IA Forecaster
Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

The Vergecast

48:04 min | 3 months ago

Big tech CEOs testify before Congress

"So, this hearing just going to say it, it was six hours of chaos. So. So many things like individual moments of pure chaos happened this hearing. But because every member of Congress was only given five minutes to ask the questions in and they moved on, no one could process the moments of cash. So here are some things that happened during this hearing. Jeff. bezos just started eating nuts on his call. That was just a thing that you started snacking for the first ninety minutes. It appears that basis had tech issues was operating in some kind of delay. So we didn't hear from him. They just answer any questions and they'd take a ten minute break Jeff. bezos could fix his computer. Amazing. Jim Jordan, who McKenna pointed out. On the show last week is always sort of chaos element. Try to talk over several members of Congress got yelled to put his mass back on floated. Just elaborate conspiracy theories. was when I say was chaos I. Don't know if there's any other way to describe it. I. Think that led a lot of people to think the hearing itself didn't accomplish its goals, but I think in many ways it did. But Kennedy you WanNa Kinda go through what the committee was trying to accomplish the themes they were pointed at in. How hearing played out, right. So okay. First off. Harkening back to last week I mentioned Jim. Jordan's mountain dew obsession. Definitely drink a handful those throughout the hearing I took notes in screen shots. So, I, called it. But regardless of their pores soda choices, there were a lot of lawmakers who definitely did their homework and I think that was really apparent throughout the entire hearing and when I look at. The picture that they tried to paint I think that became really clear in chairman Sicily's opening statements. So this is the guy who liked. And spearheaded the entire investigation from the beginning, and in those opening statements, he pointed out that yeah Apple Amazon Google facebook. There are different in a lot of ways and they exhibit anticompetitive behaviors potentially allegedly and a lot of different ways. But what they tried to pull together and was a story, and it's really hard to tell a story and five minute fragments. But what happened yesterday was Sicily. Ni, and a lot of the Democrats on the Committee wanted to point out that these companies they become bottlenecks for distribution whether that's information or just like APP stores marketplace's they control what gets distributed in how what was really key to the investigation was how? How they survey competitors. If you have so much control dominance over a market or a specific part of the tech industry, you have a lot of insight into your competitors and you can do a lot of dangerous things with that, and then lastly, after that dominance has gained, it's how they abuse it. Right? How they abuse it to make harder for small businesses in competitors and I think that's exactly what Cellini pointed out in the beginning and I think they did a poor job that storytelling throughout the process. But I think that's also our job. Right is to pull that evidence together and tell that story for them in a way that isn't like. Yes, no yelling at CEOS and like stopping them and I think by getting that in the evidentiary record doing all this questioning, I think they really did achieve their goal in the end. Yeah. I mean, I think the thing that happened sort of next to the hearing was that they released a bunch of documents from these one point, three, million documents of clutch. Over the past year, they released pretty targeted selection documents for every company showing some of this stuff, Casey, I wrote a story about. facebook. INSTAGRAM. My I'm going to frame this email or mark Zuckerberg. Literally one sentence, no period. The Andrew says I need to figure out. I'M GONNA buy instagram like I would love to just be in a place were sending that email like super casually like I got this thing to figure out and it's not like am I gonNa buy the model of the car. It's like instagram. I've been thinking of the text messages where so and so says that Mark Zuckerberg's didn't go destroy mode on instagram ever since they got that up. Case she this to Kevin and right that text was. Yes. Well, it was Kevin. System was talking to an investor and Kevin said to the investor. If we don't sell well, mark, go into destroy mode on us and the investor side probably. Of course, stray casual. So there's just a lot of documents and I think one of the functions of hearing was to get those documents into the official congressional record to make the CEO's account for them. That did not seem very successful to me. Is like a takeaway people should have from this hearing, right? No. I think a lot of people that go into these hearings are expecting like these big Gotcha moments and expecting like a lot of news and all this stuff. But it really, it wasn't oversight hearing. You know it wasn't. They didn't come. They came at this like in a report last earlier this week that they came out at as investigators. They didn't come at it to make a big show horse and pony show out of it, and yet I think the CEO's didn't. The record well enough to the extent that they could have. But there was definitely, I was expecting them to do a lot less evasion and I expected a lot less room probation with the documents, but it's just the process of a Congressional hearing. It's. It's hard to do that in a congressional hearing. But if you put those documents out there, you get the CEO's on the record a little bit who does excite this excites the FTC. J, and that's who can take this next and then it's also congress. You know they can't break up a tech company, but they can regulate going forward and it's those three key themes that I pointed out earlier that they could regulate. You know what I mean. They could legislate to forbid companies from surveying competitors and things like that, and that's where this goes. So the format of the hearing, every member and five minute chunks, it seemed very clear that the Democrats had some sort of coordinated evidentiary strategy, they would start and. And they would say, I, want to read this email to you. What did you mean by this email and then Jeff bezos would say something like I have. No idea is on works. I. Was real pattern that developed was basis really not doing or claiming he definitely knows claiming not really no way Wayne is under the thing they did or they would ask sooner Pichai about the very granular add deal google made by an ad product, and soon I, would say I'll get back to you, which is basically all responses. So the Democrats seemed like they were coordinated to move through their documents. The Republicans seem to be doing something else that also seem coordinated intentional, but what was their focus because that seemed clear split my takeaway from Jim Jordan who? We got into earlier, he he was interviewing. As if they were all Jack Dorsey. And as we talked about like, yeah, he invited Jack Dorsey to testify, but he doesn't sit on the antidote subcommittees. Anything. He says, it just doesn't matter. So it sounded to me as if he prepared questions Jack Dorsey and then it was like, oh, he's not coming I'll ask Tim Cook the same questions. Another completely crazy moment that happened just seen by and five minute chunks is that. Represented Sensenbrenner from Wisconsin Dear Sweet Wisconsin. Definitely. Asked Mark Zuckerberg why the Donald Junior was banned from twitter and mark. Zuckerberg was happening on twitter facebook and there was just like a moment of confused silence, and then he tried to move on and that just sort of floated by in the river of chaos to tell you how much chaos there was kneeling. When you started to tell that story, I thought you were going to tell the story about when Jim Jordan asked him cook if the famous one, thousand, nine, hundred, four, Apple Super Bowl, AD was actually about twenty twenty cancel culture, which is another thing that really happened. I think that's out of context. He didn't ask him. He said clearly, this is. That's definitely what Steve Jobs was thinking IBM is canceled culture and Apple's going to break it with hammer and Jeff. Bezos said that social media is a nuance destruction machine and all this crazy stuff from that. It was a wild will that that particular question when Jim Jordan asked, do you support the cancel culture mov, you could see the CEOS like. 'cause they went in order. He asks them all in order. So First Tim Cook just like basically muttered nothing. Here's like I don't. I support speech whatever. The iphone a keyboard like that was his answer. Sooner per child also, just like muttered, right? He's like Google has always supported free expression Zuckerberg like saw the opportunity and took it and the forces of liberalism I rising I, and then basis was like I cannot. I cannot do in like went for it, and that was just totally insane moment. But it also seems like the Republicans were intentional to try to create their own moments where they were yelling at CEOS about bias on platforms is obviously something cover a. At. You were paying a lot of attention that case you're paying a lot of attention to it. Do you think that was effective in creating because you know there's like a parallel conservative Universe Jim? Jordan was on Tucker. Carlson. Last night like was that effective or d think that the CEO's were able to sort of tamp down on interesting the Tucker Carlson pointed out that Google and other companies are all big donors to Jim Jordan another folks. So that is a weird side, but I think it was actually besides the moment where they mixed up twitter with facebook I. Think this was much more effective off. Off Topic yelling about technology than we usually see like are genuinely issues that like they are upset about that, they could point to largely around like cove nineteen misinformation and they could at least like pick those topics and stick to them rather than kind of asking vague questions about like, why is my phone listening to me? Well, they're definitely asked questions about why are my campaign emails getting filtered by G mail? Yes. I should. I should mention that they have really and they have all of these cases where they ask about extremely specific one off incidents that anyone who has used social media knows happens constantly. And, then turn them into a sinister pattern. But I think they managed to come off as sounding more like they understood what they were talking about the unusual. I think that was a real theme of the hearing, Casey. What did you think of this sort of bias side show that occurred? Well, I mean the the idea that conservative voices are being suppressed is foundational to the conservative movement and is behind the rise of conservative talk radio. It was behind the rise of Fox News. Now that social media exists, we have seen it in this new form, but it is sort of being presented as extra, sinister and worthy of. Some sort of legislative intervention what frustrates me about it is that much more than newspapers or or cable news like Mark Zuckerberg Dorsey. These people benefit hugely from having all possible voices on their platform. None of them is incentivized to drive conservatives off their platform. What they are incentivized to do is have rules that make the place safe and welcoming. So that people want to hang out there and so to the extent that there are issues on the platform, they've largely come because these platforms have rules. And you know you would think that a bunch of free marketeers would realize that the alternative to the system that they're so mad about would be creating a new system, but they don't seem at all interested in doing that. So I just sort of dismissed all of them as charlatans I actually thought it was interesting that the opposite track came up, which was the Stop Hey for profit campaign I kind of wasn't expecting that. The representative Raskin I believe asked facebook. Basically, why aren't you kicking more hate speech off. I forget who else asked like look is the point that you're so big. You don't care about advertiser boycotts I. Mean, you know it will here. Here is a fact that the number one complaint that facebook gets from its users, the thing that users. About. FACEBOOK is that it removes too much content and so if you're running the place, you do have to take these complaints seriously in a way. Right? It might not be you know that you shadow band conservative whatever that even means on social network in twenty twenty. But the fact that you're removing content is really upsetting people. So you can't dismiss that idea entirely, but I still don't feel like we're having that intellectually honest conversation about it. So this was definitely I feel like you can connect the you control distribution. We're GONNA show the abuses of power narrative. We got other. Democrats. With the you control distribution. You're banning conservatives right like I. Think what's Sensenbrenner Again, cups and conservatives are consumers to is that people don't realize that like fifty percent of the population in many ways. But facebook has like famous conservatives working its highest levels Kevin. We last week, we're talking about Kevin Roose keeps sharing the list. List of the most engaged content from crowd tangle. It's all conservative content, and that's so problematic for facebook that they're. They're pushing back with other metrics and graphs of their own, making the facts just aren't there, but it doesn't seem to be convincing. Brett Kevin is being asked to recuse himself from facebook case because he's like best friends with facebook I, AP I wrote a column almost two years ago. Now, arguing that conservatives were trying to redefine. Any conservative identified person having any unwanted outcome on a social network, right? So bias is your name was higher than mine in search results. Bias is used suggested that I follow a Democrat and not a Republican right, and if you take action on your policies that apply to everyone against me a conservative that is biased against conservatives, right. So and by the way I have to say this has been hugely successful because we've talked about it. How many minutes now and the longer that these discussions. Discussions. Go on. They just sort of refi people's minds. The idea that there really is a vast conspiracy to silence conservative speech because he's networks are so big millions of conservatives are having experiences like this every day, and now there is an ideology that is basically a religion for them to attach to, which is although Silicon Valley liberals are out to get. Reason I wanted to talk about the conservative side show, which in many ways was a circus is it feels like the notion that we should be punitive to the companies or mad at the company's. Bipartisan, right we were. We were not looking at a hearing where the Democrats were on the attack. Republicans are saying we love. Apple. We're looking at hearing where they were. Everyone was mad. There are a couple of exceptions to that. There were a couple of I think sensenbrenner and a few other folks were like look we want to be clear. Big is not bad. We just WANNA make sure we're not punishing you for your success, but you were like almost entirely, right? Yeah. I. Mean I. think that's it's important to. To capture that mood like Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg, Tim, Cook soon. Darpa, try they usually get to finish whatever sentence they start saying. Right. They're not used to being interrupted. Their thoughts are usually like you know they get to live in complete sentences and people take them seriously here in five in intervals, they were interrupted almost every time they started speaking to be told that they were wrong that they were filibuster at one point Sicily said stop thinking is for the questions. We can just assume they're all good questions. They. Were getting yelled at and they're going yell that about a variety of things that were pretty specific. So you kind of in your kind of structure here. The first one was controlling distribution. What did you hear as a hearing went on the indicated to that? The committee had a case here? I think the apple's APP store is one thing you know charging thirty percent cuts on certain things is just controlling an APP store. It's the same thing with Amazon's marketplace. They can inherently in control what gets placed and what gets sold and you know if they want to play with search results on Amazon, they can do that, and then on facebook and Google, it's not just like products and software that's information. And it could be information when it's like Google. Google. Stealing yelps, texture views right in putting those in its little info boxes in search queries in facebook if facebook is just like an. Mation, distribution platform and. It can decide Algorithm Mickley. Knowingly. What people get to see this bution was very keen to the committee's hearing yesterday and they pointed out different aspects in which you know each company exhibited that kind of behavior. So the one that will you bring up apple? We wrote about this, say there's much emails. Apples document production is just one hundred and thirty pages of unrelated emails and whatever order see it's like scan through it. So there's a lot of little stories in there. There's one about right to repair and apple realizing it needed to repair. By watching PR people operate by reading their emails journalists. Very entertaining. They're like we had a break like here's our strategy. Here's we're GONNA. That's all in there. You can look at it, but there's a lot about the APP store itself and how they're going to use the mechanics of the APP store to control their platform, and it started at the beginning like the first emails in this production from twenty, ten there. From Phil, Schiller Steve Jobs saying, are we GONNA? Let Amazon Sell Books in the kindle store. Store, it felt like I saw an Amazon ad was hard to watch this hard to watch this ad where a person's reading a book on an iphone in the kindle APP in the pick up an android phone keep reading. He's like literally like it was hard to watch like Schiller's at home like pain what a customer is having an experience that good it really just. Heart and so he's like it was hard to watch. You fours Steve Jobs. They're like we gotta shut it down jobs is the bookstore will be the only bookstore on the APP. Store. That's the way it's going to be everyone's gotta used to it. We know that restricting payments will hurt other things, but that's what we're doing and they started there in two thousand ten and they pulled it out, and then that ladders up into everything that we've seen with, hey, ladders up into the analysis group showing up to. Apple, can pay them to say that there's independent study has revealed. Everybody has a thirty percent cut. It has landed up into Tim Cook, forwarding. He gets a letters from developers that are in this direction. It's like apples breaking my heart and he just like Ford's it. Tim, Cook forwards that email to filter credit eighty, just as thoughts like amazing like they are constantly thinking about the APP store as a mechanism of control for the platform in the leverage and other deals. So the other one was apple is this Amazon one which I have very mixed feelings on saying that this is bad or legal I'm curious for all of your thoughts famously. Did, not have the prime video APP on the Apple TV and all these other places apple, Amazon came to a deal. There's an entire presentation in this production like the slide deck of how the deal is going to work. Apple got to be the preferred seller of its own product. So third parties cancel. Apple. Products, Amazon pages, they got. They have a custom by flow. They've custom product pages, all the stuff in return. Amazon got a lower commission on the APP store and gets to Selatan products which no. No like you can rent a movie from the Amazon APP on the Apple TV, no one else gets to it in one world. This is just pure platform collision, right? Apple cut VIP deal for big companies because it wanted something and you could say this is legal in another world. It's like this is how deals work apple something valuable. Amazon s something valuable and they came to a conclusion wherever made more money and quite frankly the consumer experience platform has got better. How do you read that? Casey? That is good and fair analysis of it. I. Think I did read slightly more scandalous. Tones into it in part because apple would never acknowledge that some developers are more important to it than others even though if you assume that that's true, I think maybe one of the things that's frustrating about it is there is no transparency accountability around which developers get sweetheart deals is that once you hit a certain threshold of revenue will cut your price. Why couldn't they extend that deal to everyone right? Or is it just if we withhold something that seems particularly valuable, we can eventually drag you to the table. Table, which is sort of what seems like happened here. I think in all cases, what I'm always looking for is the accountability, right like and some sense of of equitable treatment of developers and I understand the guys are always going to get the best treatment, but it can that be publicly visible. Can it be acknowledged and there'd be routes for others to achieve that same level of success and treatment, and that I'll just seems missing here. Did you buy Tim Co? He said it twice. It was obviously A. Glimmer, of sympathy for all four CEOS. There is a lot of reporting that they had spent months preparing for this hearing like being grilled there, they'd hire outside law firms. They. Practiced they all clearly had soundbites memorized in none of them. Got To say him because it kept getting interrupted. Tim Cook had this one where he is like if we're the gatekeepers, the gates are open wider than ever. We've gone from five hundred. APPS to one point seven, he said like. A whole speech. and. The thing is there's fierce competition for developers. They don't like our store can do for android the windows. For xbox and PS. Four. Which I was like the idea that adobe is going to be like we don't want to be on the IPAD. Here's PS. Four Photoshop is insanity to me. I'm going to build a spreadsheet. APP. For the five. That's how frustrated with Tim Cook. To that ring. True to you I. Mean, there's no, it does not ring true. There is a, there is a duopoly. In the United States when it comes to smartphones, iphones have majority share in the United States and you can't say, well, you know there's there's a rogue fork of android in Malaysia that you could go develop for if you really wanted to and have that come across as a credible argument to Americans. Right it is. Natural for any monopolist to spend most of its time, arguing that it is much smaller and much less consequential as as you think it is and they're essentially always asking you to ignore what is in front of your face, which is that they are the giant. They are in control. What they say goes, and it doesn't matter which small businesses get hurt along the. The. Way I would point out that the contact and we're gonNA talk about earnings eventually. But the context for that is apple had its biggest third quarter ever this month, their revenues went up eleven percent year over year, they're making obviously making billions of dollars in their services revenue, which is a lot of the narrative around the APP stores increasing that services line. Also went up. I think it was thirteen billion. So you're right. They're very big in their earnings the day after the hearing did nothing. To reduce that impression. I want to switch to Amazon a little bit McKenna. You really focused Amazon was basis first time up there. They came at him a lot about marketplace. How did you think that went I think it went pretty good. I. Think. John Paul specifically was just like killer her questions with breakout star. Yeah. She was just like killer and she's the representative for. SEATTLE. So this is where Amazon is right. So she just like killed it and. And I think there were a couple of instances in the documents and in questioning yesterday that really pulled important things out there was like testimony from one bookseller who was like, yeah. We just can't sell a category of books and we don't know why Amazon doesn't let us do that just like testimony like that or even when it comes to like acquisitions, the ring acquisition especially, I wrote about that today through the documents and how. They said, this is for market position. This is a for technology, your talent or anything. We just bought this and that's something that base said again, yesterday he was just very clear. It's like, yeah, we do buy things market position, which is like so insane just here like the richest person in the world. But like, yeah, we're buying market position. It's just what happens. That's another one I have mixed feelings right, and by the way, people should read McKenna story because those documents have just a very funny breakdown like the pros and cons of buying. Buying ring in many of the cons like what if this turns into nest, which if you're just the verge cast listeners like it's just like the Keyword Bingo, but it's fine to say, we're buying market position like this isn't the best product out there, but it's the category of video. doorbells is not huge, right? So to by the the market leader in video doorbells is maybe the most rational use of the money. What is the problem that you think the committee was trying to show an address sense of we're just going to market position. Pointing out, they can just do whatever they want and how casual it is, and there really isn't. It's really funny to read an email like that, and we could buy it or we could just copy it or are. We could just watch. You know that was one of the emails that base from someone. Those are just three options you know and it's like just pick and choose you know. Pointed out like a lot. Just that email itself really pointed out just how easy it is for them. They used a lot of that time history to talk about copycat behaviors and to talk about just like you know buying up competitors and it just seeing that all in one little e mail having to do with the ring was like really i. think it was really kind of I opening and especially like useful for the committee. So Amazon got hit a lot for the data collection side of it of copying competitors. bezos did not seem to have great answers there. Right. So that's the. The thing they got in trouble with this. There is that Wall Street. Journal article from like April where employees were literally like, yeah. We dip into data and we use that to guide our own private label products and everybody was like Whoa and Amazon basins. Yesterday said, well, we do have a policy that bans that but giant pointed out yesterday. It's like, okay. So what's your enforcement look like you can have the policy, but like if you don't enforce it, then it's like meaningless. And then yesterday I. Think Paul was like, can you give me a yes or no answer? Do you dip into data and he's like I can't I can't give you. Yes or no, and we're just like we're looking into it. The story had anonymous sources. So that isn't very helpful to us. You know what I mean. So that was one of the main things and that Wall Street Journal article and I think it's the same kind of examples in the committee's documents. They point out specific examples like car trunk, organizers of all things. It's like weird little products like Amazon's like this is a little hot. Maybe we should do that. So I, I think. I, think they made a good case yesterday. Yesterday on that. Yeah. I mean bezos brought up that Wall Street Journal, Article himself twice, and he was like, well, your policy against it. But I can't guarantee never happened. Then there is a strange just didn't come across clear I. Think I know what the committee was trying to get at their like US aggregate seller data when there's only three sellers and then only to sellers? Yes, I. Think what they're getting at is when you're down to the aggregate data of two companies, you heard effectively looking at individual data. What is the problem? They're like the I get what you're doing. You're just reducing the denominator to get to one, but like it, why is that particular problem? Right? Well, none of these. Dipping into individual seller data and looking at aggregate data. That's not a legal. There is no law. This is all voluntary of Amazon. So they have a voluntary policy where like we can't do individual seller data, but they say nothing against aggregate and aggregate what you're getting at eight. Here you is. Does the same thing if it's just like some goofy little product they. They bring up pop stock. It's all the time before pop tops in a moment. Right? There's only like one pop. So company like you know pop soggy, it was kind of an innovative product. It's like well, if there's only two of them and use the aggregate data, you you you have everything you need to know you know about that product line looking aggregate. If that's what you decide to qualify as do you as you're looking through the other Amazon documents and other stuff. So anything jump out at you is something the committee was trying to prove or get at. The questioning seemed very focused on. Like are you using the state at a copy products? Are you buying things? You shouldn't buy. There's one question which I did not understand why came up about DMC. Take downs on twitch and Jeff as just had this look of panic in his eyes. He's like I don't know man I bought Wedge because my kids want to. Do something like that was like the side show stuff, but the real focus here, it just seemed like it was definitely in the marketplace, right? Amazon, everyone came at Amazon for the marketplace. That's what everybody knows him as like they have all these little sides. They got rain. They got Alexa Alexa was one thing too. That was kind of interesting. It's like. Are you buying things like ring to put Alexa into and dislike expand your like Titan Ism as like an Internet Internet connected home. Thing and make that more closed off and walled gardening. That was one thing. But no, it was just focusing on how much power they have to kind of change. What happens in the marketplace to kind of decide what companies in what products are able to come up on the first page of results. You know that's also something that they dug into Google and in something that one of those like themes that kind of ties everything together. We should say they all spend a lot of time talking about counterfeit goods, and why is it Amazon removed? Fake stuff from the platform and how much is it profiting off of you know selling pick rolexes? Is it surprising? The whole foods didn't show up at all they're. Like that is a really massive thing. Amazon owns that. Is it moving into a huge new product category? I think whole foods is not an online marketplace, which was the title of the hearing, not that that restricted anybody from doing anything except that, one of the things Amazon says is we have lots of competition from offline marketplaces, right? Brought up kroger a lot I mean, this is the case he's point. They all made. It seem like they were beset at any moment. They could be crushed by the likes of stop and Shop Right? Like I think the point though was really on the. Digital. Experience Consumers have and like I, don't know Ho-. Foods fits. Into that narrative, especially, because it is itself not dominant like they bought it because you needed to grow in their. Good at that at my question for you on the Amazon stuff was when you think about, we talk about two thirty a lot right like you and I in particular spent a lot time to thirty, which regulates with the platform can do with content. There's not really an equivalent of two thirty for goods on store. Right like there's some case is out there saying like you're liable for what what happens on your online store page, but Amazon doesn't have that like second order of like Messi nece around it that twitter and facebook to with two thirty, I. Mean, it gets invoked a lot for marketplace's, but it's way messier. Well, I just wanted to like this question at counterfeits question about ranking the store like they are even more free than any twitter is to to sort tweets algorithm. Algorithm clear to modern like it just their store. Do you think that they're like that Algorithm transparency? Your wire things ranked. Did you catch a sense that that's where the regulation is GonNa go. So much of the conversation around Amazon really felt like it was individuals sellers being wronged for reasons of Amazon being unresponsive or stealing. It's data. So I don't know it didn't. It didn't seem like a really big focus of the hearing, but it is a huge deal. Yeah. The, digital marketplace frame of this, which is where we have talked to. Cellini. That's where he's going right like facebook and Google very digital. They have like they don't do physical goods. Really. Apple is the APP store. It's all digital goods. Amazon is the one where it's. Front to a lot of physical things, and that is the only place where I can see this regulation needing to make some sort of like major meaningful distinction in I. Didn't see it in the hearing, but I was curious of you caught a glimmer of it. I'm not positive that they have to make a huge distinction there like depending on what they come up with because. So much of this is about their companies and whatever product they produced. The issue is more or less whether or not they're being surveilled and unfairly by targeted and crushed by that data surveillance. All right. We have gone for forty minutes. We should take a quick break. I said I wasn't going to go by company and it happens. So we should come back and talk with facebook Ango. We'll be right back. This is advertiser content. When I say utopia what comes to mind. Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the perfect social body. Every Body Matt Place. Everybody happy now while the peacock original series, brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. A concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago. But we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous Huxley's Utopia and not finding it Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades, and we're increasingly lonely whereas in a utopia. Everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen forty-three, the psychologist Abraham. maslow's developed a theory of Utopia. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in Utopia, we decide for ourselves, what we need and how we're GONNA get it in Huxley's Utopia citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds. Pretty good. Right. Then why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society the work we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism even family. See for yourself. If a Utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch brave new world now streaming only on peacock. These are really difficult crazy stressful times, and if you're trying to sort of cope, it could be helpful to find something that gets beyond like doom scrolling and like obsessive worried. But digs into what is really going on underneath the surface, and that's what the weeds is all about I. Matthew Yglesias. Weeds podcast here on the box meeting podcast network. This is podcast for people who really want to understand the policy debates and policy issues that shaping our world. We've seen now more than ever like how relevant policy is to our actual lives, but so much in the news isn't focused on really understanding and explaining detail way if that sounds good to you, join us for the weeds, every Tuesday and Friday to find out what's going on why matters and what we can do about it. You could download the weeds on apple spotify or wherever else you get your podcasts. Tracy. When it comes to facebook I turn to you. FACEBOOK is patience consumer of startups as what we've learned. Yeah. But you said something to me yesterday was interesting, which is everyone else's problems are forward looking and it feels like facebook's problems are actually in the past break for people explain what you mean. Yeah. So when Congress is looking at any trust with respect to these four companies for three of them, it's It's sort of about the marketplaces that their operating right now with facebook, the question is much more about should we have allowed it to buy serum? Should we have allowed it to buy WHATSAPP and most of the antitrust conversation that was around facebook yesterday was all about that. What did Mark Zuckerberg know about Instagram, and when did he know it? We wrote a story based on some documents that the house released yesterday. In which facebook has clearly identified instagram as a competitor. In at least some ways and wants to go after it and knock it off the table, and so that's kind of where the focuses their facebook and Burke did get a lot of other questions yesterday, but it tended to be much more about content moderation and things that don't have a lot to do with antitrust. So there was weird section where they asked the face. Face Research APP in the novel, Vpn? Any kind of got lost well, explain what happened and I'm curious reactions. Yeah. So facebook has a bunch of nifty tech tools to figure out what's trending which APPs or the kids using, and so that can essentially have an early warning system if it needs to consider acquiring something or more likely in these days, go out clone it. and. So Zuckerberg was asked about the way that the company uses these systems and if they are anti competitive I, think you know traditional antitrust law probably would not say copying an APP feature is anti competitive, but could lobby written in the future about it shirt I. Think the one that caught me was I mean, this is what I'm. McKenna's points from earlier is like one of the themes here is, are you so dominant that you can collect data that's unfair and then use that to crush or killer competitors, and definitely bought the Inaba VPN to do it. That's true. Now, when I've asked executives at facebook about this, what they'll say is they don't get surprised anymore. When you have three point, one billion people using your apps around the world. You know what links they're sharing, you know what they're talking about. And so you're not going to need some kind of specialized tool to know that WHATSAPP is really taking off. Right. So they would argue that, yes, these tools were useful to them, but you know at their scale, they know what's popular now, which doesn't really seem like addresses, the problem is reached. The fact that we're so big that we're all knowing is maybe not the defense that they sometimes presented as so here's what I didn't get. I thought, Zuckerberg I want to the instagram. What's about who's issues, but on the facebook research front, the data front, they him about this APP facebook research, which you were giving to teens. They were deploying with an enterprise certificate that story broke apple revoke the certificate, and all of facebook's internal APPs went dark, and this is a scandal story after story about it, they went on for two days. So I can I, don't recall that APP? Just how he you know, he remembers the day that all facebook's internal APPS went down and people couldn't go to the cafeteria. I would agree I found that answer. Extremely, ed? Persuasive. that. Do you think that was like actually strategic for him to be like, I, don't know and then come back later and correct the record I do remember when that happened I. Mean. I really don't know I mean also you know during a six hour hearing, it's also possible that you just you get flustered or you miss here something or or something because. Yeah. As as you say, I'm sure he remembers the day that apple turned off their internal APPS I mean. Honestly. Seems like an opportunity to talk about apple's market power, and the fact that you know a day of work canceled at facebook because apple got mad. But I think most of the CEO's didn't go into yesterday a wanted to pick fights with each other. It was kind of sad that they didn't. I was Kinda hoping that Tim Cook take a shot at soccer burger. Point that the other two APP platforms I was expecting it. It was there. It was. There was all there. So cellini ended and he ended the whole meeting with closing statement. He said, some of these companies didn't get broken out. They all need to get regulated in the off too much power that some of them I. don't these breaking up apple. What sort of break. Right like. The division get sent into the corner thing about what it's done. Right. Does should spin out the finder team I've always wanted to. A clean is always that they want to. They want the APP store to be separate from the IPHONE. Basically, that's the thing I always hear. Can't break I. Think you can write some strong regulations but not playing you're on store, right. But like Elizabeth Warren's point was it's cleaner if it's two companies, but it's still a gigantic remedy that I don't think there's a lot of like like consumer or public opinion is going to walk into an Apple Cup I think you'll radio at marketplace. It seems very clear that we says some of them she broken up he is talking about facebook. I have a twenty percent conference level. He might be talking with Google and Youtube as well. But if he's going to say some of the need to get broken up like it's facebook, did you hear anything yesterday that supported that conclusion or Saudi stocks I? MEAN HE I don't remember which Republican it was, but he was like the Obama FTC looked at this and they said it was minding love. Obama. Right. Like. Why would we go back in time to relook at I? Mean, there is a belief and I mean. Somebody who thinks there could be a lot of benefit in instagram and WHATSAPP being different companies from facebook. And the reason you ask. So many questions about that acquisition as you're making the case that it never should have been approved in the first place, and so now you need to remedy it. So that was actually like the entire thrust of the argument against facebook yesterday. I think, you could probably make just as good a case that Amazon after spin out aws, but lawmakers chose not to make that case. Yeah. I think that also gets into. Politics of the acquisition of the time. To his credit is like nobody knew instagram would actually be a success like we made it a success. It didn't happen by itself. I, don't know if the lawmakers. By award, these guys said, but I don't know that he actually made that case very persuasively. and. Who knows I mean? That's like anything could have happened. Right? Cram could've stayed independent and rapidly grown and overtaken facebook like that's something that could have happened. It could have kind settled into a middle zone like snapchat or twitter seems more likely to me although I think probably would have been bigger than those two but. You're never going to know I mean it is true that facebook gave Mike and Kevin it instagram enormous resources. A lot of the reasons why Mike and Kevin sold was because running tiny startup that's blowing up is absolutely exhausting Mike. Krieger. was dragging his laptop all around San. Francisco. Because the servers were melting at all times of the day whenever Justin Bieber. Posted like the site stopped working and they really we need help. Finding a person who can quickly fix this? So we don't have to like that is the reason that they were entertaining these offers and wanted to sell it. So that is also thing that happened. Do you think that that same kind of argument or approach can apply to what's up? What's up basically did not come up yesterday and all the focus on Instagram, but that's the other one, right? Yeah, and we know weirdly a lot less about that acquisition I. Think it's because people in America just have so much less love for what's APP generally. That, it's never seemed as important. What happened to WHATSAPP as what happens to instagram even though WHATSAPP, is used, you know way more, it probably has way more engagement even than instagram does so I don't know why that didn't come up as often. We know there was a competitive bidding war for that as well. Goule. Wanted it as well. You know Mark Zuckerberg made them an offer, they can't refuse. Do you think everyday Google's we should've spent more money on what's whatsapp like this could have been solved. Should have, but Google has been placed under an ancient curse that prevents them from ever making the right decision about any social product. So it was doomed never to happen. It's fun looking through the documents and watching them casually say they should buy facebook dot com. Yeah, that. Point. That is how they talk like the window into these executives just casually being like we should just this thing or maybe not, or we should just copied ourselves and kill it before it gets any traction like it's repeated over and over again last facebook question. This one is like harder to parse because I. There's a chance, it's October is just joking around but. But. He's in many of these emails. He's like the thing about startups, as you can always buy them, which I think the committee thinks is a smoking gun, right? Like facebook's entire plan is to buy the competition to get the data from wherever they get it to say, oh, man, this apps popping, we just buy it and kill it before it competes with us. I. Think he actually said at one point. That's a joke. Yes, he did and I believe that you know it was two thousand, twelve, right? He was probably still in his mid twenties. At that point, the company was a lot smaller like people were joking around like there's more loose talk when companies are younger and I do think. It was it was part of that. I think the more interesting question becomes. Let's say facebook is telling the truth about everything. Let's say they thought it was going to be a successful acquisition, but they never knew it was gonna big as it became today and they invested in it and it got super big. Okay. Well, now, it's as big as it is. Should they be allowed to keep? Keep it or should they be forced to spend it out and if you're GONNA force them to spin it out. What's the argument that you'RE GONNA. Make about why one question that I have a lot is clearly the referral they're gonNa make, and it seems like if you don't have some other reason, we've heard hints that there's some other reason, the FTC scrutinize this that will eventually be revealed. But what you're saying is the antitrust standard at the time, the Consumer Hartman stand, which is still our standard. Says, you have to prove prices will go up both products for free. You're screwed. Right? There's nothing to review because you're not gonNA prove prove that free products are gonNA get more expensive. I think it's pretty unfair if you change the standard and you go back in time and say you missed that standard. So I think there has to be something else there. Well, what was the standard by which at and T. was broken up? Right? Like presumably at and T. didn't used to be that big, and then it just got really big and then they broke it up at least. That's the thumbnail understanding I have of that break-up. Well, yeah. But then reformed itself. Right. But because of lax antitrust regulation, right? Like it wasn't a naturally occurring phenomenon that all those APPS got back to the other or was that just sort of like inattention to capitalism It's like in the seventies and eighties. This is Tim moves book the cursive bigness in the seventies and eighties Robert Bork I can't talk about Robert on this podcast. Are we doing this right now. Robert was very influential judge Appellate Judge Federal Appellate? Judge. And basically moved the antitrust law to the consumer harm standard as part of a movement called and economics. A whole thing Robert. Bork. Mostly famous because he was not appointed. He was nominated Supreme Court by Reagan but they leaked video tape rental history, and then he didn't get nominated and that is where the expression getting bork's comes from. This is all true Netflix's still has to abide by videotape data privacy act is a whole. This is all true when facebook and Netflix had some partners, Nansen? Partnership. To. Automatically share your net flicks, watch history to facebook. They're like pending the change of this law which we are working on Robert Bork. He haunts us all. I'm sorry, I can't believe this much. Yeah I. think that's just like the law changed in the in the seventies and eighties, the standard change. The conversation right now is a very much about changing it back months and months ago, pre pandemic, we had an economist from I. Think it was Nyu Thomas Philippon came on the show, and he was like look you have this natural ab test going on in the world where the European Union when it formed was like, how do we get an economy like America's? So, we'll just take their competition policies pretty good, and at the same time we changed consumer harm standard. So everything you're seeing the EU is basically our old competition antitrust standard in. You can see how active they are in everything. Here's a new consumer welfare standard. Whether you believe, this is actually a functional Ab test given. The state of both governments is up for debate, but that was his point I thought. It was spare can say.

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The Biggest Takeaways From the Big-Tech Antitrust Hearing

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:26 min | 3 months ago

The Biggest Takeaways From the Big-Tech Antitrust Hearing

"Gatekeepers the digital economy these platforms enjoy the power to pick winners and losers to shakedown small businesses and enrich themselves while choking off competitors their ability to dictate terms. Call the shots up. End Entire sectors and inspire fear represent the powers of a private government. Our founders would not bow before king nor should we bow before the emperor's of the online economy. That's the chairman of the House. Antitrust Subcommittee Congressman David Cellini kicking off yesterday's hearing with four of the world's most powerful tech. Ceos Amazon's Jeff Bezos Alphabet Center Pichai. Apple's Tim Cook. And facebook's Mark Zuckerberg all videoed into to address lawmakers concerns. Their companies are too big and that they're squashing the competition. Here's our reporter. Brian Tracy with some of the biggest takeaways. From yesterday the biggest takeaway was just how hostile the questions were virtually the entire hearing and how they came from both sides of the Aisle Democrat and Republican. There were not a lot of breaks for the CEO's in terms of a friendly moment where a lawmaker thank them for the warehouse in their district for example it was. It was virtually all adversarial. A for these guys. The questioning was definitely choppier than we would normally expect for a congressional hearing there. Were also some odd moments. When the chairman of the committee asked the witnesses to swear in he said UN. Mute your microphones and raise your right hand which is not typically what you hear in a Congressional hearing. When they're standing in front of the cameras so yesterday's hearing was a big spectacle but Ryan says it's not the end of antitrust concerns for these companies this subcommittee will be issuing a report about whether the US antitrust. Laws need to be changed. We could also see in that report new evidence that the committees gathered. That didn't come out. Potentially if the committee wants to do that it'll be interesting to see whether Republicans and Democrats can agree on that report since there was some tension over changes to antitrust law. And keep in mind. There are also ongoing antitrust investigations of these firms by the Justice Department the Federal Trade Commission State's attorneys-general and over the coming months. We'll have to see how those play out. Investors seemed to be hopeful shares of tech companies rose more than one percent on Wednesday and the companies are expected to report quarterly earnings. Later this afternoon

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The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

10:03 min | 3 months ago

The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

"The purpose of today's hearing is to examine the dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. Roger the covert 19 pandemic. These corporations already stood out as titans in our economy. As American families shift more of their work, shopping and communications online, These Giants stand to profit. Locally owned businesses. Meanwhile, Mom and pop stores on Main Street facing economic price is unlike any in recent history. Rhode Island Democrat David Cellini, opening today's House hearing with the heads of the world's big tech companies. Amazon's Jeff Bezos out of Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google Sunder Pitch I. The foremen faced hours of questions from House lawmakers over whether they've used their superpower status to crowd out competition. And enrich themselves. The House Judiciaries Antitrust committee, which Cellini chairs has been looking into that question for the last year. Joining us to talk about the hearing today is tech expert Tim Woo. He teaches at Columbia Law School and is the author of the book The Curse of Bigness, Anti Trust in the New Gilded Age. Him welcome back to press play. Thanks for having me here. Well, you've argued for a very long time that the's tech giants have gotten too big. What do you think today's hearing accomplished in terms of getting more support to break them up? Well, they I think there are you know, for the first time, putting the most intense documents right in front of them and seeing how they react, and I think what we've gotten out of them, especially on Facebook. Is already some admissions of anti competitive intent that to my mind, make the case for filing a complaint even stronger. And what were some of those admissions that you heard today. Well, Ah. Mark Zuckerberg was questioned about by Jerry Nadler about the his. Ah, why he bought Instagram and pretty much Zuckerberg admitted they were ah, dangerous competitors. We sought to eliminate them at Natalie reminded him that it's illegal to buy off competitors because I don't want to compete with them, and they left it there. But, yeah, that was, I think a big admission and the main thing I've taken from the hearing so far. But isn't that part of business of hostile takeovers and trying to squeeze out the competition isn't part of the American way of doing business, so there's a difference between beating out your competitors and buying them. And since about 18 90. It's been illegal to buy a company just because you're sick of competing with him. You know, you could imagine. Let's take Coke was tired of Pepsi People's Children, Coke and Pepsi, you know and said, All right, forget it. We'll just buy each other and, you know, settle the so so Now it's been illegal since 18 90 or so. Right. So when it comes to Facebook, what about the issues of how it Spreads misinformation, especially campaign misinformation, and, you know, fake news for lack of a better term. Yeah, I know. It hasn't so far. Um, it has a little bit sorry, especially hate speech. I think the big issue there that they're focusing on and Is this idea that that Facebook has an impunity because they have such a secure market position that they're not really afraid of advertising boycotts. They're not really afraid of people leaving That's the least a point that the House representatives were trying to make, and so therefore they don't really have an incentive to clean up their act. What about the other companies? Amazon that also has incredible market share. Can you first catalogue just how big Amazon is and how much bigger it's gotten since the current virus epidemic? Yeah, you know, the Amazon has closed in on the market cap of 1.5 trillion They have 280 billion in revenue. They have increased dramatically. Actually, stock prices increased since the beginning of the Corona virus by I don't know the exact percentage don't want to get it wrong, but by a tremendous amount, in fact, And there was one day in which Jeff Bezos gained $13 billion personally, so they are the biggest of big attack for the first part of hearing they didn't get any questions, but representative Dia Paul brought it in accusing them. Of lying in front of Congress about how they treat third party sellers and pressing bass. Those hard on how he runs his marketplace. So they they, they've got some of they've got some fire. Coming in. Yeah, I guess the problem. There is not only well they sell, you know products from third parties always there slow selling their own products, and so they are. I guess in competition with 1/3 party supplies on their own platform. How does that work? I mean, that's I think the acquisition or the problem is that people worry that Amazon has become more or less the dominant online retailer. They have some competition Homer, but you know, more or less dominant. So you make it on Amazon are Or you don't make it at all. And if that's the marketplace, the prospect of You come up with successful thing? I don't know Better mousetrap, and then Amazon makes their own copy of it. So the Amazon version of it and then sells it for less. You know, that turns into a sucker's game, and I think that's been the main complaint about Amazon is ah, less that they You know about their competitors or something but more that they have turned the marketplace into something of a rigged game for their own products. Right and a sweet noted Jeff Bezos is the world's richest man. Right now, the company is you outline is just so big. It's hard to even wrap your mind around it. Is there any way you could break up Amazon or hasn't just become too big to break up? That's a good question. You know, it hasn't been subject to a lot of discussion, probably for the reasons you suggest. Most of scrutiny of Amazon is how they treat the marketplace. I think for a true old school antitrust type who just believes that too much power to concentrated should always be broken. Would want to switch, you know, break Amazon into some kind of pieces. One way might be to break off their Web services division, which is a dominant in its space. You could also imagine, as with it and t breaking it into baby Amazons. I guess that are supposed to compete with each other. But I know it hasn't been unlike Facebook and even Google. Has been talks about how would you break them up? Think Amazon. It's been more about can they? Can you get them to run their at their market place better? And then Google. Obviously a search giant and it's become a verb. It's such an intimate part of who we are at this point again. How would you break up Google if you could It's a good question. Let me let me say that Google has come under fire this hearing both from Sicily knee on the idea that they are essentially eating their ecosystem That is to say. You know if you if you like like with Amazon actually similar that if You know, you could come up with a really successful Web service of some kind in your sort of small enough that Google will make a version of it and then send all the traffic to it so that that's the accusation against them. As for you know, what would you do to Google one You could say, don't do that. That's what the Europeans are trying to dio. Another would be to say, Well, listen, it Google, you run the search part and just leave it there. Don't do everything else. Okay. Maybe run Gmail, maybe right maps. But all these other little things that are just clones of other companies. Stay out of that, or make them be independent companies. I should add. By the way, there's you know, I'm maybe we get to this, but there's been AH, Google face us a lot of Republicans during the hearing, talking about different issues. Trying to get Google to admit that it Ah Is too friendly to China. Eyes too unfriendly to the US Pentagon. That's been another theme of this hearing is that I think should be mentioned. Well, you bring up China, and I guess the argument against breaking up these companies is that they're competing against Chinese companies, which In many cases have the backing of the state and there's there's no limit to their monopolistic practices. And so if these are global companies, should there be different rules when it comes to monopoly now than there were, you know, back in the 19th century. Yeah. Or the 20th? Yeah, that is the argument. So you know, kind of goes like this. If you break up Facebook or make fix books, life difficulty the Chinese will take over. It's kind of a national champion like argument. So we have to have our guys. Um I don't find it convincing at all. Last time we heard that kind of argument was when Japan was the all great mighty power that was going to take over everything in America. And they said it so you can't break up the tea and you can't break up IBM. I think we've had a better track record. Forcing American companies to be competitive. It's not breaking them up, at least putting him under heavy scrutiny like Microsoft and hoping a new generation arises. So yeah, I think that's a pretty lame excuse not to enforce the law that put it that way. So what do you think is going to come out of this? You know, I think from what I've heard there was some documents that were coming out of this that nobody has seen. And I think they put more pressure on the administration and also the states to file complaints. I would not be surprised if Google ends up on the receiving end of an antitrust complaint before November. And after this hearing, I wonder of Facebook's gonna get 12 or whether that's going to be something that the election decides. But, yes, I think it adds to the pressure to file actual cases as opposed to talking about it.

Amazon Facebook Google Jeff Bezos Mark Zuckerberg House Judiciaries Antitrust Co Columbia Law School David Cellini Tim Woo Rhode Island Tim Cook Titans Roger Apple Jerry Nadler Congress Microsoft Natalie Coke
The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

Press Play with Madeleine Brand

03:35 min | 3 months ago

The Big Tech Hearing Proved Congress Isn't Messing Around

"The purpose of today's hearing is to examine the dominance of Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. Roger the covert 19 pandemic. These corporations already stood out as titans in our economy. As American families shift more of their work, shopping and communications online, These Giants stand to profit. Locally owned businesses. Meanwhile, Mom and pop stores on Main Street facing economic price is unlike any in recent history. Rhode Island Democrat David Cellini, opening today's House hearing with the heads of the world's big tech companies. Amazon's Jeff Bezos out of Apple's Tim Cook, Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg and Google Sunder Pitch I. The foremen faced hours of questions from House lawmakers over whether they've used their superpower status to crowd out competition. And enrich themselves. The House Judiciaries Antitrust committee, which Cellini chairs has been looking into that question for the last year. Joining us to talk about the hearing today is tech expert Tim Woo. He teaches at Columbia Law School and is the author of the book The Curse of Bigness, Anti Trust in the New Gilded Age. Him welcome back to press play. Thanks for having me here. Well, you've argued for a very long time that the's tech giants have gotten too big. What do you think today's hearing accomplished in terms of getting more support to break them up? Well, they I think there are you know, for the first time, putting the most intense documents right in front of them and seeing how they react, and I think what we've gotten out of them, especially on Facebook. Is already some admissions of anti competitive intent that to my mind, make the case for filing a complaint even stronger. And what were some of those admissions that you heard today. Well, Ah. Mark Zuckerberg was questioned about by Jerry Nadler about the his. Ah, why he bought Instagram and pretty much Zuckerberg admitted they were ah, dangerous competitors. We sought to eliminate them at Natalie reminded him that it's illegal to buy off competitors because I don't want to compete with them, and they left it there. But, yeah, that was, I think a big admission and the main thing I've taken from the hearing so far. But isn't that part of business of hostile takeovers and trying to squeeze out the competition isn't part of the American way of doing business, so there's a difference between beating out your competitors and buying them. And since about 18 90. It's been illegal to buy a company just because you're sick of competing with him. You know, you could imagine. Let's take Coke was tired of Pepsi People's Children, Coke and Pepsi, you know and said, All right, forget it. We'll just buy each other and, you know, settle the so so Now it's been illegal since 18 90 or so. Right. So when it comes to Facebook, what about the issues of how it Spreads misinformation, especially campaign misinformation, and, you know, fake news for lack of a better term. Yeah, I know. It hasn't so far. Um, it has a little bit sorry, especially hate speech. I think the big issue there that they're focusing on and Is this idea that that Facebook has an impunity because they have such a secure market position that they're not really afraid of advertising boycotts. They're not really afraid of people leaving That's the least a point that the House representatives were trying to make, and so therefore they don't really have an incentive to clean up their act.

Facebook Mark Zuckerberg David Cellini Jerry Nadler Amazon Google Apple Tim Woo House Judiciaries Antitrust Co Titans Roger Jeff Bezos Tim Cook Coke Rhode Island Pepsi Columbia Law School Natalie
Facebook's Zuckerberg at Big Tech Hearing: "We Compete Hard"

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Facebook's Zuckerberg at Big Tech Hearing: "We Compete Hard"

"Of criticism from both sides of the political spectrum. This afternoon, CEOs of Silicon Valley's biggest companies are testifying virtually on Capitol Hill to an antitrust subcommittee. Big tech, especially social media companies have earned bipartisan criticism Antitrust subcommittee to Chairman David Cellini simply put They have too much power. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg, we compete hard. We compete fairly. We try to be the best. Meanwhile, Republicans like Ohio's Jim Jordan accused them of censoring conservatives. What's not great is censoring people censoring conservative and trying to impact elections. Steve Dorsey, CBS NEWS Washington knew this

Chairman David Cellini Steve Dorsey Jim Jordan Facebook Mark Zuckerberg CBS Ohio Washington
Interrupt Negative Thought Patterns

The Daily Meditation Podcast

09:05 min | 6 months ago

Interrupt Negative Thought Patterns

"You are going to discover how to break negative thought patterns. There are many ways to do this. But I'll be sharing with you. A to break thought patterns that are especially prevalent and hazardous to your thoughts. Negative thinking is a bad habit that can be broken. And that's what you were exploring this week and this week series and you have a challenge. Each day this week I challenged you to chase down your negative thoughts. So the challenge is a thought chaser begin to notice when you're thinking a negative thought and then track that thought to its origin. Why made you start thinking this negative thought in the first place. How does it make you feel if it makes you feel angry? Is it really anger or is it more fear because you feel threatened in some way and what really makes you feel threatened and begin to unravel that thought as you get to the root? You're negative BOT. Keeping Journal helps immensely as you do. This process in fact. There's a lot of research that shows. How when you journal writing something down on paper the old fashioned way it helps you process your thoughts and your emotions much more effectively and just thinking things through or even if you were to text or user voice recorder to process your emotions writing with pen or pencil and paper is a powerful way to clarify your thoughts and emotions so you might try that will we are past our mid week of this series and you may have noticed that some of your negative thoughts follow a particular pattern and I'm going to mention a few patterns that are very prevalent among negative thoughts. Remember we all have these negative thoughts and we can break these thoughts when you recognize. Certain Common Thought Distortions. So see if you can identify your negative thoughts as I share with you. These thought distortions. This is coming from psychology today. An article in the women's mental health matters by the Cellini Institute. It's an article by Dr Patricia Harteneck. And it's titled Seven ways to deal with negative thoughts learn how to tap into the positive and manage the negative so she talks about thought distortions and the I thought distortion is black and white thinking. Do you notice yourself seeing everything as one way or another way without too much flexibility in between just think about if you take your thoughts to an extreme in any way so you might see someone and think they don't like me. They didn't smile at me. I think they gave me actually a really dirty looks so I know they don't like me when really that person may not have even noticed walking past you because they were so deep in thought or do you recognize this common. Thought Distortion personalizing. It's similar to black and white thinking. Do you feel that you are to blame for something that goes wrong for example when you pass that person and they don't smile at you you? It's because they saw something about you that they didn't like and that there's just no way to please this particular person you can go on and on and on and create a big scenario when you personalize your thoughts. Do you see any of your thoughts being distorted in this way. The next way is filter thinking when you're choosing to see only the negative side of situation so you just think that no matter what it's just going to be negative. There's no hope it's just bad. Do you notice yourself falling into this kind of thought pattern. Maybe your in a dispute with someone and you just see no way. Will this ever work out? Could be just a bad thought. Distortion your parts. So consider that and the fourth thought distortion is catastrophe. Ising now you might notice that you assume the worst possible outcome is going to happen. So let's say you wanted to make amends with someone that you are in a dispute with but you think oh it will just make it worse and then that person will just go on and on acting how they act and you can just think of all these ways that. It's just going to be a big catastrophe notice if you do this. We all do these to certain extents notice. If your thought distortions are actually habits so what you can do to reverse. These thought distortions is to challenge your negative thoughts. Think about whether or not there's a complete reality in the way you're thinking or if you could see some wiggle room for improvement so the person who walked past you and you thought that person just didn't like you and on and on and on maybe you could say well maybe that person didn't see me or maybe that person's just in a really bad mood and you can even have compassion and sympathy for the person. So think about this as you go into your meditation today. Consider your thought distortions. You might notice a definite pattern in how you frame your thoughts and your experiences. So that is your technique to do as you settle yourself down to meditate about a particularly negative thought and analyze it and consider if you are personalizing that thought if it's black and white type of thought if you are filtering that thought by only thinking negatively or if you're catastrophe thought and just only thinking the worst possible outcome see if you can reverse that thought process and think of maybe not the cure to your negative thought but how you could begin to see some hope or rationalize in a true invalid way how you could improve that thought so this could be a very important pivotal change for you this week because once you do this once you may begin to recognize that you could do this again and again. Rinse and repeat it across your thought process

Dr Patricia Harteneck Cellini Institute
Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:40 min | 6 months ago

Let It Roll: The Subversive Side of Classical Music

"Some. Let it roll. Let me host Nate Wilcox. They will have the pleasure of welcoming back Ted Gioia to discuss again his book a subversive history of music. Today we're going to talk about a section of the book focusing on what we probably call classical music European concert tradition and starting off with chapters like musicians behaving badly so it's kind of a different take on classical music ted. Welcome back to the show right. Thanks for having me back. It's a pleasure and I wanted to do this because you know we talked about the book before and and it's it's a paradigm shifting book for me. It's one that really expanded my mind and and clarify things that have been wrestling with and you put it into words brilliantly and it it helped me focus on the whole scope of the show but the section in particular was one. I skipped over last time because I considered outside the breadth of the show which has covered things like the history of rock and roll music and Pop Music in the twentieth century. And I realized reading this book and do more research that the history of popular music as a business really goes back to the renaissance while absolutely on a lot of the behavior patterns of the musicians as well date back to that people often ask me what I learned researching this book and it was many years of research. But one of the quickest summaries. I have is. I found out that the music of might time and the music I grew up with which was jazz. Blues and rock and roll really the musicians back in the glory. Years of classical music weren't all that different and we have a tendency to sanitized that whole record to treat these people with great esteem. But they were just disruptive in many ways more disruptive than later rock musicians so. There's a lot of things that we take for granted in the current day that in fact for justice vibrate noticeable two hundred years ago. Yeah and you talk about this phenomenon that repeats throughout the history of music in the book which is a transition from disruption to respectability from outsiders to insiders and so often musical. Innovations are driven by people on the outside of the system but then there as they succeed as they impact the popular consciousness. They're pulled in to the inside. Sometimes they themselves become insiders other times. They're co opted. You know postmortem talk about that phenomenon. Logan that's right and we're very familiar with this in our own lifetime. We've all seen it when I was growing up The the Beatles and the Rolling Stones Bob Dylan. These dangerous. Figures feared by the establishment. But nowadays Bob Dylan is Nobel. Laureate Mick Jagger Sir Mick Jagger Paul McCartney Sir Paul McCartney and even the most extreme examples I mean take hip hop. Nwea the FBI tried to shut down the record label when they came on board nowadays. That same record has been enshrined in the National Archive of historic recordings of Congress. You have the Smithsonian out there putting together an official Smithsonian Guide to hip hop with fifty hip hop professors. Very idea about professor would have seen the contradiction in terms but they got fifty of them putting together this Canon of hip hop song. So we know about this from our own life and we've seen how these styles has been a good sized what we don't realize the same thing happened hundreds of years ago. The classic example is Bach. You Know Balk is considered now the poster child for respectability classical music is great composer. Who composed for God and country devout booth and run it Cetera et CETERA. You go back and do his own times and you find. That balk grew up with juvenile delinquents. Went to a school famous for gang. Culture was mentored by one of the worst gang members all his early jobs. Disciplinary problems At a young age to spend a month in jail He was called to task for cavorting with a young lady in the organ. Loft had prodigious beer-drinking every possible violation of rules and discipline he exemplified. None of that is is remembered nowadays. He's just the Lutheran composer so this recurring. We could talk about other composers. But there's one point I do WanNa make though I raise these issues in my book. Not because I'm trying to be gossipy or salaciously and it makes for great reading to read all these sexy anecdotes. I have the point. I'm trying to make though is these. Figures could not have created disruptive music they invented if they hadn't been disruptive in their own lifetimes you know almost all the commentary on Bach. We have from back then people complaining about him. You know people complaining about how show he was. He was called the task before the city council had to submit a written document explaining why he was using such new progressive and strange musical techniques. So this thing is conducted disruption in their private life and the disruption. Their music is connected. And that's why well upon it because if you don't understand that you will never understand the evolution of music and going back a little further. You talk about a couple of composers from the Italian renaissance. Who went way beyond Bach in terms of violations of social norms? I'm Talkin about two particular Rotella Mayo Trump Esino and Carlo Jesualdo and bothered these guys. Were involved in love. Triangles that resulted in murders committed by them. Oh this is right. It's interesting if you start with the music of these two individuals trauma Chino and swallow. Its gentle music and they will have songs. These pretty gentle love songs. Mandra goes in front of us but in their private life they were violent angry people and both of them not only did they commit murders but it was obvious to everybody that they were guilty and they were never punished and this is interesting because it shows you that. Starting around the renaissance it became the norm or musicians to go outside the norm. They were allowed indiscretions that other people were not and in fact. I'm convinced in both those instances their fame and reputation was increased by committing murder. I think people felt well. If this guy is such a passionate lover that he he he. He kills somebody in a fit of jealous rage. Who you know. There must be a similar intensity of passion in the song and we laugh at that. But that's the same way. People look at rock bands and the sex pistols. And we've seen this in our lifetime. If the musician out of control we suspect there must be a certain intensity in the music as well so it all came back to that time I mean just one more example I find this fascinating people that want to understand what it was like to be an artist during the Renaissance. The most famous book. They read the autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini. He was a renaissance artist famous as a silversmith sculptor but he was also a musician played the flute and he wrote his life story. And it makes fascinating reading but I went through that book page by page and I just marked off every time. Shalini committed a violent crime and and I think I came up potentially with at least fourteen. Violent crimes committed in his life. And this is not including the the the just the vandalism or the varsity these are actually violent crimes where he murdered somebody or beat them up and none of them was punished for he was. He was actually put in jail couple times. It was only because of arguments with his patrons over payment and artworks and my favorite anecdote from the whole book comes from a conversation when someone would approach the Pope instead of the jubilee. WanNa hire this Guy Shalini. You know he's committed murder and all this and the pope said you don't understand for people like Ben to Chile. Different rules apply that came directly from the mouth of the Pope and the renaissance. And this was a new idea and I would say we still live with this idea to even though even in the midst of the metoo movement and all the scandals. They're still this expectation that great musicians with by their own rules and they violate rules and and For good or bad that's part of the whole Agassi Western music.

Murder Bach Bob Dylan Ted Gioia Nate Wilcox Mick Jagger Smithsonian Rotella Mayo Trump Esino FBI Benvenuto Cellini Chino Sir Paul Mccartney Shalini Logan Sir Mick Jagger Paul Mccartney Vandalism Congress The Beatles Professor
Explainer 189: Why are Ethiopia and Egypt fighting about water?

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

05:23 min | 1 year ago

Explainer 189: Why are Ethiopia and Egypt fighting about water?

"The weeds Nobil Committee has decided to award the Nobel Peace Prize for twenty nine hundred to Ethiopia Prime Minister I'll be off mid Arlene Nabil Prize for peace is a considerable Accolade It bestows not mealy immense Gravitas but a fortune in political capital upon its recipient this is especially useful the recipient is as two thousand nineteen recipient Ethiopian Prime Minister Ahmed is an ambitious reform seeking to forge progress in different Colt and unstable environment will discussing how to change the political landscape and how mixed upcoming election democratic free and the battle of the previous well there is however a downside to life as a freshly ennobled Nobel Peace laureate which is that it somewhat circumscribes your options visa the wielding of military force releasing doves whilst rattling your Saber is an unwieldy maneuver to accomplish simultaneously such is the conundrum currently contemplated by rb Ahmed in between polishing his acceptance speech prior to flying to Oslo collect fees Nobel Gong in December Ahmed has been hissing increasingly thinly-veiled menaces towards Egypt at issue is a dam which Ethiopia is building across the Nile and which Egypt would prefer if you didn't being on the project known as the Grand Ethiopian Danz damn has been a dream of Ethiopia's since long before amid became prime minister in April last year it would be Africa's largest hydro Electric plants work began on the site in two thousand and eleven is currently scheduled for completion in two thousand and twenty one and would be potentially transfer formative for Ethiopia development it is costing the thick end or five billion US dollars and is being built by the Italian firm Cellini Impregillo the gypped however is less enthused Egypt is down river of Ethiopia and depends on the Nile for roughly ninety percent of its fresh water and even on current form is anticipating serious water shortages by two thousand and twenty five. Cairo fears that the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Could Sir if it's a boot heel on the hose which irrigates it Egypt's two previous regimes under Mohammed Mossy and Hosni Mubarak both muttered military sounding threats the dumbs direction Egypt's current tyrant Abdel Fattah El Sisi has sounded content to tread a diplomatic path so far appear has not seemed especially interested in Egypt's concerns no force mid has sullenly warned can stop Ethiopia from building a Dam them if there is a need to go to war we could get millions readied this was pretty bracing chat from someone recently garlanded by the Nabil Committee his efforts to achieve peace and International Corporation panic is not the proper response just yet however it is really not the case that war between Ethiopia and Egypt is likely nor is it clear how war between Ethiopia and Egypt would even work geography enthuse I will be aware that these antagonists are separated by the not inconsequential buffer of Sudan and geopolitics buffs will know that Sudan is hopefully in the process of transition from government quite like Egypt's to one more like Ethiopia's Cairo may be struggling for an ally on this one even Sudan recently overthrown dictatorship was broadly supportive of the Damn egypt-us spent several years negotiating with Ethiopia and Sudan attempting to rowing at a resolution of the grand chief European Relations Damn conundrum with which everyone can live but no such compromise has been reached and as is the usual way of such impasses everyone insists that this is everyone else's fault Egypt has suggested inviting a fourth party intermediary and the United States has invited the foreign ministers of the three countries concerned to a summit in Washington DC as we go to air only Cairo has ours. repeat in the affirmative even if no blows are exchanged over the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam Events will merit close observation it would be a great boon worthy of another Nobel prize indeed if a framework for negotiating water disputes between countries could be assembled on a he Ching Drawing Planet. This will not be the last such conflict monocle twenty four. antisemitic.

Ethiopia Egypt Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Da Prime Minister Ahmed Sudan Prime Minister Arlene Nabil Prize Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Nile Cairo Nobel Gong Nobel Prize Rb Ahmed Weeds Nobil Committee Africa Nabil Committee Abdel Fattah El Sisi Cellini Impregillo United States Hosni Mubarak
A defiant White House says it won’t participate in ‘unconstitutional’ impeachment inquiry

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

06:01 min | 1 year ago

A defiant White House says it won’t participate in ‘unconstitutional’ impeachment inquiry

"We're following breaking news on the White House issuing a new declaration of defiance against impeachment investigators. The president's lawyers just send a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi it spells out the administration's refusal to participate in the Democrats inquiry arguing that it's unconstitutional the letter all the dares blows you to hold a formal votes to open impeachment probe is a step that she has resisted and this comes only hours after new stonewalling by the White House if blocked a key witness in Ukraine scandal from testifying on Capitol Hill Today Tonight Democrats firing back with a subpoena for Gordon Sunland the US ambassador to the European Union. I'll be getting reaction from Democratic Congressman David Cellini he is on the Shiri and Foreign Affairs committees and our correspondents and analysts are also standing by first let's go to CNN chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta and Jim the is it is ramping up his constitutional clash with House Democrats that's right Brianna the White House and starting a constitutional fight with House Democrats over the impeachment and the president's legal team has just fired off a letter to Speaker Nancy Pelosi refusing to cooperate with the investigation the president is stoking these tensions declaring that he won't great with what Republicans are calling a kangaroo court meanwhile CNN has also confirmed the whistleblower at the center of the inquiry wrote a memo describing a White House official listened in on Mr Trump's conversation with Ukrainian president and characterizes that conversation as quote crazy and frightening the official was quote left shaken by what Mr Trump was saying during the call it's a fraud escalating standoff with House Democrats President Trump is refusing to cooperate with the equipment quarry in a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi the White House accuses Democrats of trying to play politics stating your unprecedented actions left the president with no choice in order fill his duties to the American people the Constitution the executive branch and all future occupants of the office of the Presidency President Trump and his administration cannot participate in you're partisan and unconstitutional inquiry under these circumstances a key signal White House is ready for combat the finish ration- blocked the US ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sunland from telling what he knows about the president's phone call with the leader of Ukraine about Joe Biden Secretary of State Mike Pompeo was mom on the subject House Democrats Warn White House stonewalling won't make their inquiry go away the failure to produce this witness the failure to produce these documents we consider yet additional strong evidence of obstruction of the constitutional functions of Congress a CO equal branch of government. The president tweeted Sunland won't be testifying I would the Senate embassador sunland are really good ban great American to testify but unfortunately he would be testifying before totally compromised kangaroo court an echo of gop talking points what we see in this impeachment is a kangaroo court and chairman shift is acting like a militia captain kangaroo a source familiar with internal White House Russian said the decision to silence Sunland is part of a new aggressive counter impeachment strategy that source told CNN quote the days of playing nice are done vying posture comes even as the president continues to insist his call was perfect. The people understand it's a scam. They're trying to win an election in twenty twenty by using Richmond if you look at that call perfect call Democrats are zeroing in on an exchange of tax between sunland and top US diplomatic Ukraine Bill Taylor appeared worried that the administration was holding ag Ukraine around the time of Mr Trump's July twenty fifth call as I said on the phone I think it's crazy to withhold security assistance for help with political campaign someone replied bill I believe you are incorrect about President trump's intentions the president has been crystal clear no quid pro quos of any ride I suggest we stopped the back and forth by text before Sunland sent that response he called the president? CNN is learn White House national security officials rambled contain the fallout of Mr Trump's comments on the call including moving the rough transcript of the conversation to a more secure system fellow Republicans see no wrongdoing joint president's doing his job president when when you're talking about the hard earned tax dollars of the American people going to a foreign government the president's going make sure that there is no corruption there still a new Washington Post poll found fifty eight percent agree that the impeachment inquiry should have begun a huge jump from over the summer trump ally senator Lindsey Graham calling on the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani to talk to lawmakers Giuliani's response love Lindsey but I still a lawyer have to deal with privilege now Democrats sound like they want to hear from Sunland I this is sort of like a classical Dixon type Watergate action which is cover-up often becomes even worse than the crime itself so the the White House and the State Department continued to orchestrate this massive cover up I stopped being witnesses that had actually prepared to testify now sooner ministration officials just wrapped up a conference call with reporters about this letter to the House Speaker Nancy Pelosi officials were asked on that call what Democrats would have to do in order to secure the cooperation of the White House in the impeachment inquiry one administration officials said the White House did not want to get into hypotheticals at this point indication that the White House at this point is digging in its heels and daring Pelosi to take Mr trump court Brianna it is not a stretch describe what we're seeing right now playing out here in the nation's capital as a constitutional battle that is headed for the courts the stakes have not been asya would say Brianna since the days of Bill Clinton's impeachment and perhaps Watergate Reihana Jim Acosta at the White House thank

President Trump White House House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Gordon Sunland House Democrats Sunland CNN Chief White House Corresponden Ukraine White House Russian United States Jim Acosta Brianna European Union Mr Trump Nancy Pelosi Bill Clinton
House Intelligence Committee to hear from inspector general on Ukraine

NPR News Now

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

House Intelligence Committee to hear from inspector general on Ukraine

"News in Washington. I'm Jim Howard the house. Intelligence Committee meets behind closed doors next week to hear from Michael Atkinson Inspector General for the Intelligence Intelligence Community this marks the beginning of impeachment hearings arising from communications between president trump and the leader of Ukraine. Three House committees have subpoenaed documents from Secretary Pretoria State Mike Pompeo and Congressman David C Cellini tells NPR the House Judiciary Committee awaits recommendations from those panels. I think the Judiciary Committee is of course the committee of jurisdiction from Peach man so I think the expectation is all of the committees that have been doing investigations are expected to kind of send their best asked information. They're kind of the conclusions of their work in short order to the Judiciary Committee so that we can move expeditiously when the intelligence committee has concluded investigation meanwhile Kurt Volker former. US Ambassador to NATO has resigned from his post special envoy to Ukraine in

House Judiciary Committee Intelligence Committee Intelligence Intelligence Comm Ukraine Kurt Volker Mike Pompeo Jim Howard House David C Cellini Secretary Pretoria Washington Michael Atkinson Congressman Donald Trump United States Nato NPR Peach President Trump
Leaders Are Those Who Take Responsibility for Their Worlds

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

16:23 min | 1 year ago

Leaders Are Those Who Take Responsibility for Their Worlds

"Are all leaders and leaders those take responsibility for their worlds in. That's the that's the construct I choose to operate in. That's like the construct. I'm doing my work from because I want all of us to be aware that we have a responsibility to be really consciously choosing what we're doing in our showing up and the impact it doesn't matter if it's just at home or just with friends ends or at work you know or inner communities larger stage. We all have an opportunity to influence and create him back every moment and it's it's a choice. We get to consciously make an it's such a beautiful choice that we have that opportunity. How do you see when do you think leadership Japan changed over the years and especially right now. Do you think what do we need to know about leadership today that maybe we didn't know about leadership ten years ago. I I really think it's been transforming. You know in the best way I can. I can look at that is one of the I guess. The data points I have is even just coaching it professionals coaching when I did my training fifteen years ago. Organizations were using coaching as punitive tool as is a willing to coach somebody out of something that they're not really well right thirty right whereas now organizations are investing in in developing their leaders to have a coaching skill set because they know it elicits high performance and they're providing executive coaches for their their their executives and senior leaders because they get a it's. It's it's needed so. This is an example of how leadership has shifted in that. There is a lot more of an understanding that as a leader I don't have all the answers it's important that I'm asking for help in receiving help and have support network to do so whether it's a professional or peers mentor and also that this piece around emotional I call it. Emotional leadership has really come into play at being the millennials have released shifted the workplace in the way that they've taken a stance for ivory my whole south to work so interact with my whole self not just the person that's doing this role but I'm a whole a whole person and what a beautiful gift that that is actually I mean I think the millennials for doing that because I think back to my corporate days and there were those days where I would go to work and I was my corporate me and than ever go home and I was my at home me and never did those to cross right. I mean it was really it was such a beautiful gift when I left the corporate world than I really started to build my business about ten years ago where I started to show up as me and my business and it was it was so it's exhausting to try to be two people and so thank us for the millennials really holding that up there yes and thank goodness goodness for people like you who are modeling that that it's okay to bring your full self and this was when I think back to the twenty six twenty seven year old all that McDonald's restaurant like I didn't know that and I was you know I was pretending to have it all together when I did and and I I think I would have been so much more enrolling had I been vulnerable with the team and and just said you know I need your help. You know this is a big mission. We're going to do it together. Other here are some of my ideas. What are your ideas we collaborate in co create and that takes vulnerability and I think that that's a they way how leadership has shifted and will continue to shift that leaders nowadays needs to be more vulnerable open hearted and really good collaborating and listening. Yes yes and you're teaching leaders to be more resilient with their emotions at the building really resilient relationship nations ship. What does that mean yeah so what it means from the emotional leadership body of work is that it is a leader. I'm aware when I'm experiencing emotion so meeting and maybe something is said or or something happens and I'm I'm triggered by meaning like I feel some anger so knowing one knowing that like having you blow flow into it right you just you just go into the motion and you don't even feel it rightly so there's other completely bypassing it suppressing it pretending like it didn't happen or there's getting so reactive that we were not resourceful. Were not creating the impact. We want you know in so we ended up becoming becoming difficult to work with or you know or we just took the meeting off rails because we weren't able to really say okay. Hey I'm noticing. I'm really uncomfortable with what just happened here. Can we just take a moment. let me try to understand this and get curious with you or the team to should try to really figure out what's going on so I think emotional leadership position having the awareness than a emotional beings and then be knowing knowing how did really harrogate them in a responsible way because we are all our emotions our our energy in motion and if we're a for if we're able to navigate them than we can use it to move our missions forward and to enroll people into our into our visions uh-huh that's good that's good and one of the things that really impressed me as I was looking through your information. That is really around how you are. You're you're a coup Delaney Yoga Meditation Teacher Yan. You Bring Movement into your leadership work in. I love that one of the things I do is I hi do equine guided retreats leadership retreats with my with my horses in our work with teams in their motion. There's movement in there. There's there's ways ways for people to start to to connect into their bodies and and I know that this has got to be really powerful when you're bringing Pendolino Cellini Yoga and meditation into your leadership work. Yeah and I'm so I'm so happy CNET. You're doing this work with horses. It's so powerful there it is. It's incredible. It's anything there's there's you know Kinda. Kundan leany Yoga and equine guided added work has got to have some really comparable threads yes yeah into what I noticed in my own practice of the couldn't Yoga and meditation that because every day I'm moving the energy in my in my field old might energetic body in my physical body. It allows me to have a greater experience of what I'm wanting to create and any thing that gets us in our body. Inner breath is going to allow us to create more what we want though as leaders eaters as humans. I think it's important in this day and age because of how busy it is because of how much information coming at us because of how how many like just how how much we don't have an opportunity just to be and take a moment to pause that we have some I'm kind of embodiment movements breath work practice to allow us to really connect to ourselves to be clear on what I'm here for and to be able to be discerning as to where I put my energy because all of us could be doing a million things things end can be getting pulled in so many directions and if that's happening for you or for any you know any any of the listeners might write. My recommendation is to really look at how can I harness the energy that I have so. I'm directing it to the things that matter most right right and when when you're making that space to be much much more aware. You're starting to feel that so are you. Are you teaching. Are you bringing that energy into the leadership teachings that you're doing so in my online program. It's part of the foundation of it. I'm I'm create. I'm bringing core creates or core impostures. If you will meditations to support the participants to have a healthier more responsible relationship with their emotions MHM I've actually tracked certain meditations at work more effectively with anger or sadness or enjoy so that we can regulate and work with those emotions more effectively and so I- introduce some foundational kindle yoga meditation and then then pull it through the threat of online training now that's awesome. That's really powerful and I will say to Cami for some of your listeners who are leaders was inside organizations or parents. Would I do with my team at work if we get on a call all virtual and if they're struggling ogling you know because there's just so much going on. I'll take three minutes and we'll do a quick meditation and you know and then ask them. You know what shift did now our three minutes ago when most of them will say we'll. I'm actually president now. I feel like this big fire. That's burning over here is actually manageable and and so you could do that at home too. You know whenever wins freaking out or when you sit down for dinner just let's take the take a couple minutes in breeds and you know it's a game changer changer it is you know I had interviewed Tammy Simon of sounds true and she was fabulous and one of the things she talked about was they start start every meeting with with some form of a away to just pause right even if it's like sixty seconds of quiet for people to come into the room mm-hmm and be in the room and I learned that because so often you know even think about coming home you get home. You Walk in the door at dinnertime. The the kids are ready. It's like there's so much noise but if you have that moment of pause between Your Day in one part of your day into the next I think we can move into it much more gracefully completely completely. That's good so how do you bring more peace and balance into your your life. What's what is. What kind of practices do you do personally yeah so I do morning. Delina yoga meditation sets and end sometimes all actually I was living very close to a studio in Venice Beach California where my teachers were but not there anymore so they have an online online where I can just do a class from the day before so sometimes that's sixty to ninety minutes set. If not I have like a short thirty minute set that I'm committed to doing every day and then I'm also committed to doing some being more physical. Whether it's running biking walking on going to some kind of fitness class last year the combination of for me too breath were the energetic body work and the physical body work is crucial I and then I have a gratitude practice that I begin end my days with really looking at what I want to create for the day. It's awesome journal that it is it is all laid out for me so makes it really easy to fill in the blank spots but it's like what what would make today gray and then at nighttime the time so what are three things that I'm grateful but what happened throughout the day and they know I think there's a lot of scientific data out there and a lot of mindfulness information that would talk about whatever we focus on we get more of than so. I think gratitude is having a the daily practice of that really really helps us again to create more of what we're wanting jaggery and one of the things I love that you just talked about there is and because I live live in a remote part of Colorado. I live in the foothills of Colorado writes. I'm not in the heart of city anywhere and to get to a yoga class. It's it's a good twenty minute drive for me. He and I love the fact that you've found on online source that you're you're tuning into that on a regular basis. I might have to get that online source from you happy to share that with you. Yeah that'd be awesome and we'll share it in the show. Notes has after you send that to me said just because it's good for all of us define nine ways that we can connect for ourselves make space for ourselves and I love my own morning time. I really do you know. I I do different things. I really tune into the morning and tune in to say okay. What does my body feel like. It needs right now. Some days. It's meditation in Journalism Days. It's journaling and reading other days. It's just sitting outside and the especially this time of year is such a beautiful time of year to build the still enjoy before it starts to get cold old so that you know just to be in nature as hard so important and I love that you are listening to what you need and that day day so it's I think it's important if we can to schedule a bit of time for ourselves each day it just I know for me. It allows me to come bring more gracefulness throughout the day in be more present and kind of navigate what shows up more elegantly. I guess you know not always but I think that's a really good point Kristie. I think it's we're not even we when we do these things we're gonNA. We still catch ourselves going down as we go back. I could've handled that much more eloquently. Oh my God so much so Oh yes and so but I think the more even going back and acknowledging. Gosh that didn't go the way I wanted it to. It just gives us another groundwork to a foundation to work from right and that we can carry forward most definitely meant to be gentle on ourselves when we don't. Ooh When we're not as perfect as we'd like to be as it's like okay well. I'm learning in them growing up to fail forward the exact and that's part of the growth of it all because none of us are ever perfect so it's really being gentle on ourselves with that most definitely yeah so what is the lie. Are you see you wish to leave in the world who Hammy if I could help this. You know was. GonNa say a handful but that's not true. I WANNA help a lot of people connect to their emotions and the legacy I wanNA leave is more permission for each of us to connect and with all of our emotions and and you know and then within a subset under that would be like some tools for people to so that they feel safe to do that so that they don't continue to suppress or avoid or have the bursts but they I feel like they have some tools to connect those emotions. That's the legacy I wanNA lead in that. You know what it's okay to have messy xenakis that emotions are just part of how we give us feedback to know what's happening for us to have the courage to share that more openly brilliant butter bullied people in a responsible way.

Colorado Japan Pendolino Cellini Yoga Executive Mcdonald Cnet Venice Beach California Cami Tammy Simon President Trump Kristie Three Minutes Ten Years Twenty Six Twenty Seven Year Ninety Minutes Fifteen Years Sixty Seconds Thirty Minute Twenty Minute
The big tech lash: Tech giants under scrutiny

NPR News Now

00:47 sec | 1 year ago

The big tech lash: Tech giants under scrutiny

"Are facing scrutiny on Capitol Hill. NPR's Giles Snyder reports a key house panel is holding a hearing today as congress considers whether to regulate big tech, the hearing is being held by the House Judiciary antitrust panel, led by democratic congressman David cellini of Rhode Island. He told NPR last week that the internet is broken and remarked on what he called a monopoly moment as he made the case for a close. Look at whether the country's antitrust laws should be modernized. The hearing is expected to focus on the influence companies such as Facebook Google. Google Amazon, and apple have over the news media, their impact on content and the spread of misinformation. It will be the first multiple hearings and comes as regulators at the Justice department and Federal Trade Commission are reported to be looking into the issue trial.

David Cellini NPR House Judiciary Giles Snyder Google Congressman Federal Trade Commission Rhode Island Facebook Congress Justice Department Apple Amazon
Have Tech Companies Become Too Powerful? Congress Will Investigate

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:22 min | 1 year ago

Have Tech Companies Become Too Powerful? Congress Will Investigate

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut to California from Mississippi to Minnesota millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online. Learn how Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com slash economic impact. How important have Facebook, Google apple and Amazon become to your daily life. Some in congress think that these companies have gotten way too big and have way too much power to the point that they are snuffing out competition and actually harming consumers. This comes as the Trump administration has also suggested ramping up its antitrust oversight, Tony Romm with the Washington Post has done extensive reporting on this end is here with us in the studio. Thanks for coming in. Hey, thanks for having me, so congress is holding hearings this week on this very topic. What realistically is gonna come from them? Yeah, this is about the walls really closing in on big tech companies here in Washington. We've heard lots of theoretical concerns for a long time that companies like Facebook and Google and Amazon. Are too big. And as a result of that bigness are misusing your data or stifling competition. But we're now beginning to see lawmakers of both political parties putting that into action. And we had this week was an announcement from Davidson cellini, the top congressmen who leads the House Judiciary committee's competition, focus panel saying that they're going to embark on this very lengthy, top to bottom review of big tech companies to see exactly if they're stifling competition, and then to figure out at the end of the line here, whether something has to be done to fix the country's antitrust laws. And so we could see a lot here because see public hearings, we could see the grilling of major tech executives once again, we could even see subpoenas that force these companies to turn over documents. So it could be pretty uncomfortable for tech. I mean, we did see the Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifying in front of congress last year of wanna play a little clip of that. Let's listen overlaps with Porsche, don't think you have a monopoly. Certainly doesn't feel like that to me. Okay. So a Facebook as you point out has long been accused of privacy breaches of spreading disinformation and Washington, kind of just turned a blind eye. Now, there is this change is this all because of the Russian visitation, if feels like they're playing a bit of catch-up here in Washington. It's not all because of the Russia investigation, but I feel. And if you talk to experts, they say, the same thing, there's this overwhelming feeling that perhaps Washington just wasn't paying enough attention to the ills of the tech industry that companies like Facebook had gotten a pretty decent political ride here in Washington. But whether it's what happened with Russia and the spread of disinformation or the privacy violations. We've seen it Facebook. There's down this recognition that perhaps regulation hasn't caught up with these companies. And so this sort of translates, the antitrust conversation with a company like Facebook because lawmakers say, well, if you're concerned with the things that company like Facebook is doing. Where do you turn? What's the other social network that you use? If you find that Facebook is acting in some objectionable way, they think the choices are too few right? Because. Unlike you know. Apple. Which produces the iphone there are other alternatives. Something like Facebook. There really isn't something distinct that, that could provide an alternative for consumers. Yeah. And Facebook bought up some of its competitors. Right. So Facebook, also, owns WhatsApp messaging service, it owns Instagram, which is a photo sharing site that many folks use. And so the concern is that Washington allowed this sort of consolidation to happen. And that perhaps there needs to be a second look at a company like Facebook so separately. The Trump administration is taking these steps at least talking about them to increase antitrust oversight. How is that gonna play up? Yeah. We're sort of seeing the reckoning translate to the Trump administration as well as the Federal Trade Commission and the department of Justice, the two major anti-trust agencies here in Washington are beginning to divvy up their territory, deciding which agency is going to look at Facebook, or Google, or apple or Amazon, and so it's still early days. This is not to say that there's some immediate any trust. Invasive investigation hanging over these companies or that they're going to be broken up or something. But this starts the process, the could lead to the store. Of things that change the way, these companies behave. I mean Donald Trump and democratic contender for the White House, Elizabeth Warren don't agree on much. But at least they're both talking about the fact that these companies have gotten too large. I mean, she's just calling out for the all out dissembling of, of these companies Facebook's co founder Chris, Hughes published an op-ed in the New York Times and talk to us on our show last month, calling for Facebook to be broken up. Let's by that. To be little startup story of American entrepreneurship has become a leviathan and most importantly, Mark, Zuckerberg is unaccountable. And I think government should step up break up the company and regulate it, can you foresee that happening the world long way from that there is a rare political alignment, right now between folks, like Warren and President Trump who feel for slightly different reasons that we need to take a much tougher look at these beat tech companies. But a break-up of Facebook ready of its peers. For that matter is something that wouldn't just happen overnight. I mean remember when the US government looked at Microsoft and embarked on any trust investigation, then it took over a decade for that to even be resolved. So we're talking about a long process and the conversation started really this week, Tony Romm covers technology policy for the Washington Post and he was in our studios. We should add Facebook Amazon, and Google are all NPR sponsors. Tony. Thank you. Thanks, Rava

Facebook Google Washington Amazon Congress Washington Post Tony Romm Apple Donald Trump Russia Mark Zuckerberg Elizabeth Warren Connecticut Davidson Cellini United States House Judiciary Committee Porsche Rava Microsoft
"cellini" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:21 min | 1 year ago

"cellini" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Kelly's underage sexual victims. We talk Jim dura goddess the stories, he broke include the sex tape or rape, tape, that led to Kelly's two thousand eight trial and the sex cult that Kelly ran there got us has spoken to many of Kelly's victims. He has a new book called Solis, the case against our Kelly. Join us weekdays at to ninety three point nine. FM. WNYC. It's morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep. And I made Martin good morning how important have Facebook Google apple and Amazon become to your daily life. Some in congress think that these companies have gotten way too big and have way too much power to the point that they are snuffing out competition and actually harming consumers. This comes as the Trump administration has also suggested ramping up its antitrust oversight, Tony Romm with the Washington Post has done extensive reporting on this end is here with us in the studio. Thanks for coming in pay. Thanks for having me. So congress is holding hearings this week on this very topic. What realistically is gonna come from them? Yeah, this is about the walls really closing in on big tech companies here in Washington. We've heard lots of theoretical concerns for a long time that companies like Facebook and Google and Amazon are too big. And as a result of that bigness are misusing your data or stifling competition. But we're now beginning to see lawmakers of both political parties putting that into action. And we had. This week was an announcement from David cellini, the top congressmen who leads the House Judiciary committee's competition, focus panel saying that they're going to embark on this very lengthy, top to bottom review of big tech companies to see exactly if they're stifling competition, and then to figure out at the end of the line here, whether something has to be done to fix the country's antitrust laws, and we could see a lot here because see public hearings, we could see the grilling of major tech executives once again, we could even see subpoenas that force these companies to turn over documents. So it could be pretty uncomfortable for tech. We did see the Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifying in front of congress last year of wanna play a little clip of that. Let's listen overlaps with Porsche. Don't you have a monopoly? Certainly doesn't feel like that to me. Okay. So Facebook as you point out has long been accused of privacy. Breaches of spreading information and Washington of just turned a blind eye. Now, there is this change is this all because of the Russian vestige in it feels like they're playing a bit of catch-up here in Washington. It's not all because of the Russia investigation, but I feel an if you talk to experts, they say the same thing, there's this overwhelming feeling that perhaps Washington just wasn't paying enough attention to the ills of the tech industry that companies like Facebook had gotten a pretty decent political ride here in Washington. But whether it's what happened with Russia and the spread of information or the privacy violations. We've seen at Facebook. There's down this recognition that perhaps regulation hasn't caught up with these companies. And so this sort of translates antitrust conversation with a company like Facebook because lawmakers say, well, if you're concerned with the things that the company like Facebook is doing where do you, turn? What's the other social network that use if you find that Facebook is acting some objectionable way they think the choices are too few right? Because. Unlike? Apple. Which produces the iphone there are other alternatives. Something like Facebook. There really isn't something distinct that, that could provide alternative for consumers. Yeah. Facebook bought up some of its competitors. Right. So Facebook, also, owns WhatsApp messaging service, it owns Instagram, which is a photo sharing site that many folks use. And so the concern is that Washington allowed this sort of consolidation to happen. And that perhaps there needs to be a second look at a company like Facebook so separately. The Trump administration is taking these steps at least talking about them to increase antitrust oversight. How's that gonna play up? Yeah. We're sort of seeing the reckoning translate to the Trump administration as well as the Federal Trade Commission and the department of Justice, the two major antitrust agencies here in Washington are beginning to divvy up their territory, deciding which agency is going to look at Facebook, or Google, or apple or Amazon, and so it's still early days. This is not to say that there's some immediate antitrust invasive investigation hanging over these companies or that they're going to be broken up or something. But this starts the process, the could lead to the sorts of. That changed the way these companies behave. I mean Donald Trump and democratic contender for the White House, Elizabeth Warren don't agree on much. But at least they're both talking about the fact that these companies have gotten too large. I mean, she's just calling out for the all out dissembling of, of these companies Facebook's co founder Chris Hughes published enough Ed in the New York Times and talk to us on our show last month, calling for Facebook to be broken up. Let's that what used to be little startup story of America entrepeneurship has become a leviathan and most importantly, Mark Zuckerberg is unaccountable. And I think government should step up break up the company and regulated can you foresee that happening the world long way from that there is a rare political alignment, right now between folks, like Warren and President Trump who all feel for slightly different reasons that we need to take a much tougher look at these tech companies, but a break-up of Facebook ready of its peers. For that matter is something that wouldn't just happen overnight. Right. I mean remember when the US government looked at Microsoft and embarked on any trust investigation, then took over a decade for that to even be resolved? So we're talking about a long process and the conversation started really this week, Tony Romm covers technology policy for the Washington Post and he was in our studios. We should add Facebook Amazon, and Google are all NPR sponsors. Tony. Thank you. Thanks Rava me, the lawsuit against Johnson and Johnson for its role in the opioid crisis is a test for a company that's faced them before the pharmaceutical firm is on trial in Oklahoma. It's a company that has lasted more than one hundred thirty years and NPR's, Scott Horsely reports on how it's handled crises in the past the state of Oklahoma has accused Johnson and Johnson of creating a public nuisance by oversupply, prescription painkillers attorney, Brad becua- says that helped fuel a deadly epidemic of opioid addiction. He will will Johnson and Johnson denies any wrongdoing last Wednesday. Stock drop knock some twenty billion dollars off the company's market value. A pretty big haircut for the company behind conic brands like Johnson's baby shampoo, Credit Suisse analyst bottled Vom, thinks the market overreacted. He notes Johnson Johnson is responsible for a tiny fraction of the prescription painkiller sold in Oklahoma. Opioid epidemic a major, but then again I'm not trying to minimize that. I don't think the company is either. But the rule that Shelton don't specifically play or seems to be relatively limited. The von says Johnson and Johnson could have more exposure from a different series of lawsuits involving it's baby powder last year. A jury in Saint Louis. Order Johnson Johnson to pay more than four and a half billion dollars to women who developed ovarian cancer after using its talcum powder. The company is appealing the stakes in this and similar lawsuits are particularly high for the company because they threaten its trustworthiness consumers. No Johnson Johnson best array of baby products, maybe oil baby shampoo and baby powder, which had been around for generations of babies in December. Reuters reported the Johnson and Johnson had known for decades that the raw material talcum powder could be contaminated with specis and sought to cover it up. The report triggered a ten percent drop in the company stock price. CEO alec. Gorski, went on CNBC to damage control. We unequivocally believe that our talk our baby powder, does not contain asbestos decades ago, Johnson and Johnson was at the center of another more dramatic healthcare of bizarre and terrifying story today in the Chicago suburbs of Lincoln heights and elk grove village. It was nineteen eighty two when Dan rather reported on a poisoning case that to this day has never been solved. A twelve year old girl and two men who were brothers are dead after taking poison capsules of extra strength, Tylenol Johnson and Johnson, which makes Tylenol ordered a nationwide recall and redesigned packaging to prevent future tampering. The cost and proactive response is often held up as a case study in corporate responsibility episode created, what might still be characterized as the standard for how to deal with a crisis professor, Stephen Grazer wrote that case study. At Harvard Business School. He's as the company was guided by its official credo, which says, Johnson Johnson's first responsibility is to patients doctors, nurses, and the mothers and fathers who use its products. The credo has historically made it clear that if one focuses on customers down the road profits will come Tylenol recovered and is now one of the top selling over the counter pain, medications in the year since Johnson and Johnson has grown far beyond its roots. In the consumer medicine cabinet household brands like listerine and Lubar Durham accounted for just fourteen percent. Johnson Johnson juice sales last year fully half the company's revenue now comes from pharmaceuticals used to treat everything from depression to.

Facebook Johnson Johnson Washington Amazon Google apple congress Washington Post Tony Romm Kelly NPR Steve Inskeep Mark Zuckerberg Oklahoma CEO Solis Jim dura Donald Trump rape Harvard Business School
More congressional Democrats call for impeachment inquiry

WBZ Morning News

01:53 min | 1 year ago

More congressional Democrats call for impeachment inquiry

"Stephen we've heard the the word impeachment thrown around quite a bit. And, and Rhode Island Representative David cellini had mentioned yesterday. Mcginn didn't show up and it was time to start impeachment inquiries towards the president. Is that something that there's a stomach for at this point or growing stomach, for well, the as you know, speaker, Nancy Pelosi has said that this is not the time to start talking about impeachment? But the, the calls are growing. Congressman cellini is just one of many members of the democratic caucus, who are clamoring now for it saying that, you know. Mentioned there, a couple of arose in the quiver when it comes to enforcement of a subpoena, there's one other power that the constitution gives the congress. And that's the power to impeach. There are also many Democrats who believe that by initiating an impeachment inquiry. It might be easier for the Democrats to make their case in court that they should be given some of the documents and testimony that they've demanded because inasmuch as there is case law, what the courts have said, is that, you know, it's, it's entirely appropriate for a formal impeachment inquiry to be able to dive in as it investigates, whether the president's committed a high crime or misdemeanor and therefore the congress in that case has investigative prerogatives that investigatory providence that, that, perhaps are in greater than the typical standard yesterday mentioned briefly the house oversight committee, one in initial round. In court of the president's attorneys said this morning, they're going to appeal. They filed a formal notice of appeal to the DC circuit court of appeals, but the district court judge Mehta said that. That the presence attorneys a wrong when they say that the house oversight committee's engage in politically motivated war using subpoenas a weapon. The judge said, it's not for the courts to decide whether congress is motivated by politics or not. And by the way, the review of the president's business records, appears to him to

President Trump Congressman Cellini Congress Nancy Pelosi Stephen Rhode Island Judge Mehta Mcginn Representative DC
House passes Equality Act to expand protections of LGBT people

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

House passes Equality Act to expand protections of LGBT people

"The house votes today on a Bill to expand LGBT protections, the equality act would specifically prohibit discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Chief sponsor David cellini of Rhode Island says the measure of firms fairness equality as core American values. Republicans say the Bill would jeopardize religious freedom. I requiring acceptance of a particular ideology about sexuality and sexual identity.

David Cellini Rhode Island
"cellini" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"cellini" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"I remember David cellini says the committee has reached a tentative date for special counsel, Robert Muller to testify. He tells Fox News Sunday that date is may fifth. He says they hope Muller will come because they think the American people have a right to hear directly from him. He then backtracked and said there was actually no agreement. The committee has just proposed that date investigators were trying to figure out what caused a deadly helicopter crash near Cantillon yesterday afternoon. The Maryland natural resources police are working with the National Transportation Safety board and the FAA today to bring the wreckage up from the floor of the Chesapeake Bay yesterday. They recovered the bodies of the pilot thirty eight year old Charles night. And the passenger thirty six year old Matt Clark. A somber remembrance tonight. As a memorial service will be held for the twenty one year old university of North Carolina student who was shot to death while tackling a gunmen inside a lecture hall last week Riley. How's mother Natalie? Henry hell, I'm an educator. We talk about these things frequently about how we try to keep our kids safe. And you think about it? But you don't think about it? If that makes any sense and all the measures were in place to to to try to prevent this. But it just took one how was hailed as a hero. He was one of two people killed by the gunman. Four others were injured a police officer in mooresville North Carolina was shot to death during a traffic. Stop last night, the city's mayor miles Atkins. Please look at the poacher behind me. This is a number for us. This is a real person and the we're book massage Specht killed himself after shooting. Thirty two year old Jordan Sheldon to death. It's not a big holiday in Mexico..

Robert Muller Henry hell David cellini special counsel Chesapeake Bay Cantillon university of North Carolina Jordan Sheldon Matt Clark Specht North Carolina National Transportation Safety Maryland Natalie Mexico Fox Atkins FAA Riley mooresville
Contempt of Congress: Can William Barr Be Charged By Democrats?

America Trends

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Contempt of Congress: Can William Barr Be Charged By Democrats?

"The House Judiciary committee is threatening to hold attorney general William bar in contempt of congress. If he does not produce a full unredacted version of the mullahs report by Monday democratic congressman Davidson cellini who serves judiciary panel denies. It's a partisan move political dispute let let's be clear about this. This is about a central function of congress are oversight. Responsibly is completely dependent on our ability to compel the production of documents and to compel the appears of witnesses to testify under oath more declined to appear Thursday before the House Judiciary committee because you didn't want to be questioned by committee, lawyers only members

House Judiciary Committee Congress Davidson Cellini William Bar Congressman Attorney
"cellini" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

Newsradio 950 WWJ

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"cellini" Discussed on Newsradio 950 WWJ

"Nine fifty w w j their five game winning streak snapped last night in Brooklyn Jared Allen, try to set a strange. All the way to the basket. Fifty two thirty to Brooklyn twenty still to go in the second period. That's Mark champion ninety seven one. The ticket is a backup by Harris. Intercepted by Blake Griffin. Griffin trying to go ninety four feet drops it off the drama, and he throws it up and throws it in at ball. Look like it came off his hands. It just win the basket on its own seventy to fifty two. So that's a double double for drei trying tied. Bob lanier. The nets route the pistons one zero three seventy five to move into sixth place in the Eastern Conference. Andre Drummond lead the pistons with thirteen points and twenty rebounds, Blake Griffin finished with ten points. But only shot one of ten from the field as Detroit was held to its lowest point total of the season. Drummond's nineteen th straight double double ties in with Bob Lanier for the longest streak in pistons team history. He currently leads the NBA with fifty five double doubles and was last week's Eastern Conference player of the week up next. The pistons will visit Miami on Wednesday overnight of college hoops in the horizon league semifinals down LCA Oakland falls to northern Kentucky sixty four to sixty three central Michigan topped western Michigan eighty one to sixty seven in the first round. Of the mid American conference Turney ball state topped eastern Michigan sixty one forty three. And if cellini and in other news, number six, Michigan state expects Nick ward to play in the big ten tournament. The top seeded Spartans will face. The winner of the Ohio State Indiana game Friday in the conference quarterfinals. Meanwhile, high honors for MS Cassius Winston named the big ten player of the year and NewsRadio nine fifty is your home for Michigan basketball as the number ten wolverine start their quest in the big ten tournament on Friday. We check sports at fifteen and forty five past each hour. Traffic and weather together is next. On.

pistons Blake Griffin Michigan Bob lanier Andre Drummond Brooklyn Jared Allen MS Cassius Winston Spartans Detroit Harris NBA cellini Oakland Nick ward Miami Kentucky Ohio Indiana ninety four feet
"cellini" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

03:28 min | 1 year ago

"cellini" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Mercy or Mercedes schlep the White House director of strategic communications today with reporters in the White House driveway. So news from Richmond Virginia. Another top Virginia. Democrat has admitted to wearing black face decades ago. Attorney general Mark herring issued a statement saying he wore Brown makeup and a wig in nineteen eighty to look like a rapper during a party as an undergraduate at the university of Virginia. This revelation comes and calls for governor. Ralph Northam to resign after the emergence of racist photo in his medical school yearbook from the early nineteen eighties. Coming up in a couple of minutes. We are going to return to live coverage of the House Judiciary committee holding a hearing today about preventing gun violence while we wait for that. Here's a portion from the hearing from this morning. Republican Matt gaetz of Florida is interrupted by manual Oliver. The father of Marjory stoneman Douglas shooting victim Joaquin Alder when congressman gates saying congress should support building a wall along the US Mexico border to reduce gun violence. You also hear a point of parliamentary inquiry from democratic congressman David cellini. So I hope that we will not adopt this federalization of deprivation of constitutional rights. I hope that we will allow states to continue to innovate and find ways to keep communities safer. And as we hear the stories and circumstances for those here. I hope we do not forget, the pain and anguish and sense of loss felt by those all over the country have been the victims of violence at the hands of illegal aliens. HR eight would not have stopped many of the circumstances IRA's, but a wall a barrier on the. Southern border may have. And that's what we're fighting for. Gentlemen was suspended. Everyone here is here at the at the. As a guest of the committee. And no matter what you think would any member the committee may say or any witness for that matter you must not comment or otherwise, demonstrate miss Germany. I have my timer stored your time. We'll be restored. Chairman. Appreciate that. And so I think that was a rather instructive moment for the committee. Mr Chairman because as we gather here in Washington, there are a divergent series of us and inputs and thoughts in my concern. Is that by HR eight we actually stifled innovation that could lead to better public safety outcomes. If we allowed states and local communities to deal with the challenges my great state of Florida hasn't. So again, I hope that will deal with all of the drivers violence, the greatest driver violence in the circumstances that I indicated was not the firearm. It was the fact that we have an immigration system that allows people to come here violently. We engage. There will be no comments were demonstrations, please. Mr Chairman point of order is there. Any rule appointed parliamentary inquiry is there any committee rule that prevents a member of congress from reciting falls statements.

House Judiciary committee Chairman congressman White House congress Virginia Mark herring Richmond Virginia Florida Ralph Northam Marjory stoneman Douglas university of Virginia Mercy Matt gaetz David cellini director Washington Attorney Germany
"cellini" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"cellini" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Dionne? But yes. She sang for Switzerland in the nineteen Eighty-eight your vision, which one Canada, I know. Oh my goodness. Yes. So she wins for Switzerland with Nepal. Type. Boston's while which is don't leave without me. Oh dion. I will listen to cellini on song. Now. I am a woman in love that still gets you right right in the gully works. You know what? I mean. She's amazing. You said golly works more times on this. It's been saying gully works a lot talking about his guts. And I just. I just. Definitely seventy a Steve thing that I've adopted so. Yeah. Ninety nineteen ninety four. We get Ireland wins again with the song rock and roll kid. By Paul Harrington. Charlie mcgettigan. It doesn't sound rocket. No. I wanted it to be more rock and roll. It's touching. All right. Nineteen ninety seven United Kingdom. The song is called love shine a light. Okay. It's by Katrina and the waves what do, you know, Katrina, Katrina and the waves. Well, seven they come back and they win for the UK and your vision. I mean their hit songs were in the eighties. I don't know they were British. Yeah. Okay. That's perfectly serviceable song. I guess. Yeah. It's it's a Chipper song. Yeah. But yeah. Katrina and the waves it's probably like the most popular like, you know, group who is previously successful came back for Eurovision. I say, okay, we're moving ahead into two thousand six when Finland wins with the song. Hard rock. Hallelujah by Lordy..

Katrina Switzerland Charlie mcgettigan Dionne cellini Boston dion Paul Harrington United Kingdom Finland Ireland Canada Nepal Steve UK
"cellini" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:04 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Scott Simon. Facebook is essential enormous and successful a worldwide platform that is increasingly controversial New York Times investigation that ran this week found Facebook failed to counter Russian interference. It knew about in the two thousand sixteen election. It also showed a Facebook lobbied. Congress hired a public relations firm to discredit critics and pursued a public relations strategy called delayed deny and deflect. Of course. This follows revelations last spring that Facebook failed to protect the privacy of its users and has let itself be used around the world as a platform for hate speech government, propaganda and ethnic cleansing will a Democratic Congress be more watchful over Facebook joined now by congressman David tissue leading a democrat from Rhode Island. Thanks so much for being with us. My pleasure when your party takes control of the house. You're going to chair a panel the deals with antitrust issues, and you've been quoted as saying Facebook cannot. Be trusted deregulated shelf. What does that mean? Well, I think this most recent revelation is particularly disturbing and I think it's an example again of this the dangers of a tremendous concentration of economic power that is often accompanied by tremendous concentration of political power. As was reported in New York Times, this is a corporate behavior which was used to really discredit activists to attack competitors and even to attempt to destroy or impede congressional oversight. Really corporate kind of thuggish behavior, which is very very alarming. But what would you do? Well, I think the first thing we have to do is really bring in a group of experts who work in the space. We have to I bring in folks from Facebook to understand what really happened to hold them accountable one. Beginning response is really to some legislation. I've been working on which is the requirement that technology platforms ensure that data and social graphs are poor. So that people have the ability if you're not satisfied with the protections that you're getting of your data and the rights that they're protecting that you can take that and go to another technology platform to create some incentives in the marketplace for folks to create alternative platform. So I think that's one approach. But the first thing we need to really understand the magnitude of the problem hush. Specifically would you like to to try to protect consumers because simply Shane will. They'll be other platforms. You can go to that's a little late if their dad has already been compromised. No, I think there's a number of things we can do to protect the privacy of consumers to make sure the rights of consumers to control their data and how it's used. And then in addition to that is you can have this competition based solutions to say, but if you want more protection than that, if you want increased privacy, the marketplace can provide some options, but I think there are a number of good ways or a number examples of what California's doing with European Union has done that I think can help guide the discussion here congressman Facebook spreads a lot of money around as we're beginning to learn lobbyists, and and and in campaign contributions or their executives do and they've hired a lot of a lot of people who who worked for democratic politicians have they given money to you. Do you worry about Democrats being impartial on this? It's one of the reasons that I took the no corporate tax pledge. So I don't take money from any tax. But I think it's it's evidence of a larger problem that is that we we want to ensure the public. Policy is being developed in the public interest for what's best for the American people. And there is no question that the corrupting influence of money in our political system has produced bad public policy has produced inaction in some instances. And so this is a large problem not just with Facebook is a problem with corporate interests. You know, generally, look at the Republican tax Bill eighty three percent of those benefits went to the people. Let me ask you specifically about Facebook. Because. The times also said that it was a Democrat Charles Schumer Senator from from New York, essentially lobbied might be exactly the word. I mean, his colleagues to go easy on Facebook. But my point is Facebook is not the only actor in this. I think it is a serious problem. One of the things I experienced every place I've traveled in this country during skin pain cycle is that people have deep sense. The government isn't working for them. It's working for the special interest, the big lobbyists and the biggest corporations, and they're right in large part, and that's because of the corrupting influence of money in our political system. And we've got a break that connection and restore people's confidence that public policy is being developed in their best interest for the people of this country is she a chance for bipartisan action, I do because I think this is a concern to Americans all across this country of all political persuasions. I mean, there's evidence in this reporting about a real campaign to attack competitors to impede congressional oversight to discredit activist. I mean, this is really the worst kind of tactics. It's reminiscent of the big tobacco playbook, and we should all be concerned about it. Congressman David cellini democrat from Rhode Island. Thanks very much. Thanks for having me. California's increasing and increasingly destructive wildfires have created a growing group of people who may be able to offer help they've survived wildfires themselves. Now, try to help people who have recently been burned out of their homes. Lost loved ones. And are trying to live with trauma and loss. Karen Rimas is one of those people, and we reached her at member station KCRW in Thousand Oaks, California, misery much, thanks very much for being with us. I'm happy to be here. Thanks for having me your volunteering at a local assistance shelter, I gather. Yeah. It's a local assistance center for those affected by the recent fires, and Ventura and Bosnian Twas counties. What's it like there? You know? It's just about forty five minutes ago. There was a woman at my table. Literally crying at the table. Understandably. Other people are very action oriented, they you know, maybe are just kind of stepping immediately to action, and you kind of see the hall range, then this is territory, you know, personally, isn't it? I do unfortunately, I lost my own home in two thousand and three cedar fire in San Diego. When people should down with you. Now, what what what do they need? What do they need? I mean often it's difficult for people to even articulate a single identifiable need because it's so overwhelming and the range of need is so great I'll give you an example after my own fire. I had a coworker really lovely person who called me. And she's like listen for Dinah, go out there and get some stuff with the kids. Can you just send me a list, and I had to say to her? No, this is somebody who wanted to help. And I just had to say I'm like, I can't even create a less right now. Like, it's I'm just so overwhelmed. I'm completely stressed out. And I just did I'm saying it's just like, you're not sleeping, you're traumatized. It's it's tough. It's really tough. Must be very difficult for people who don't have a fixed address who may be sleeping on someone's couch or in a gym to begin to function and fill out forms and make follow up calls and get put on hold and all of that. You're hitting the nail right on the head. I mean in my experience, it truly takes weeks slash months. Honestly for people to regain kind of normal critical functioning damn saying, I mean, really takes some time. I mean in terms of recovery. Kind of the the rule of thumb is one two three years. And workers life. Find you. Now, how are you doing as opposed to fifteen years ago? I mean I woke up this morning. My rebuilt home. I had breakfast in my kitchen and life is normal. And it's hard to say when that transition happened because there was a couple of years there where I was, you know, Karen Ramos fire survivor, and now I'm just caring Ramos again. Yeah. What did you I gather rebuild the same place that you've been burned out some people? I dare say would have avoided that I you know, I think maybe if I'd lived in a different type of geography, maybe if I lived in a more secluded area that was really prone to wildfire. But I'm in the middle of a suburban neighborhood, you know, so going back to where our house was lost. I it wasn't even a second thought to us. Some of the people you're meeting now some of the people you met fifteen years ago those friendships last oh, they do last. Let me tell you those are the ties that bind, you know. And one of the most important pieces of advice. I offer to new fire survivors is to hold close to those people that you burn down with and especially as time goes on because candidly like right after the wildfire loss, there's a lot of attention of of help. But as time goes on, and you're still dealing with these issues, you know, the next tragedy happens, the next major disaster happens and attention shifts. So unless you've gone through it yourself first hand, I don't think you can have a true appreciation for how long this process takes and just the enormity of both the insurance recovery in the rebelled. Karen Ramos has an outreach coordinator for United policyholders. That's a nonprofit group that's trying to provide resources for fire survivors. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you for having me Babylon and ancient Mesopotamia was known as the side one of the seven wonders of the ancient world, but it's never been listed as a modern world heritage site by the United Nations is NPR's. Jane Arraf reports archaeologist working in the ruins of Babylon in present day. Iraq are hoping to change that..

Facebook California New York Times Karen Ramos Scott Simon Rhode Island Democratic Congress congressman David tissue Congress Congressman David cellini Charles Schumer Jane Arraf Iraq Dinah skin pain San Diego
"cellini" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

05:09 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Beach info available through a recorded message so if you wanna. Find out about third beach in Middletown the status today it's four one to two to twenty seven fifty one prosecutors apparently are pushing. Back at kettles claims and. The video voyeurism case that's going on Tim white from eyewitness news with that story. Former. State Senator Nick kettle accused in a ten count indictment that he secretly took illicit pictures of his then girlfriend. And shared them with a buddy in, New Hampshire his attorney is arguing that four counts should be dismissed because those photos were taken out of state in the court lacks jurisdiction but prosecutors say even so kettle kept the images on his phone when. He returned home as evidence they say he exchanged these texts with this friend when he. Was in Rhode, Island friend do you, have any pictures of her or any Anything kettle responds yes I. Do investigators say kettle sent. Four pictures then replied I have more of her do you want. Them and you can. Send me what else you got friend yeah send it. All they say kettle obliged prosecutors argue it's clear the defendant, stored the images, while he was in Rhode Island kettle has pleaded not, guilty to the charges both sides will be in court on August twenty second to argue the motion to dismiss the charges kettles attorney, Paul Demeo claims they have recently learned kettles then girlfriend had explicit images of kettle on her phone that he was unaware of a spokesperson for the state police says. They don't know of the claim kettle has allegations of a crime he should report them that's target twelve and I witnessed news. Reporter Tim white I don't know what's going on over the weekend radio reporter being accused of being, involved in, an altercation at a mayoral debate in providence last week Rinaldo on Monte the, co founder of the Latino public radio allegedly knock The phone out of the hands of James quo, and placed his hands on his neck. During the debated Dr Martin Luther King junior school. On Thursday according to a police report coup made the headlines. Recently for criticizing. Merrill candidate Robert Doroteo version. Vauban and the production of the controversial feeder piece the Makoto El Monte claims that cooled provoked the situation so police say, the reporter accused of attacking a man at the providence mayoral debate. Maybe it's the heat. I don't know maybe something in the water, Dunedin Naylor. In today's Providence Journal says critics are raising an. Outcry on social media that's Susan cellini Bonanno the sister of US Representative David cellini received special treatment, from Warwick police, officer during, a traffic stop in Warwick on Friday, night Cellini Bonanno says, the outcries unfounded now the traffic stop and a field. Test they were actually shown on a unease live PD on Friday although she wasn't, named some local viewers recognized her as the president. Of the Narragansett, town council more than half of the nearly ten minute clips taken, up by officer Matt Moretti repeatedly asking the rather argumentative Sicily Niebler nano to follow his finger with her eyes without moving her head. He also asks her to walk a, straight line and then the stand on one foot while counting one in one thousand to one thousand etc now she holds your balance through eleven. One thousand but puts her foot down before the officer. Gives the okay now I'm, already told the camera right now I think in my. Opinion there's something medically. That she can't walk a straight line I don't think that it's because she's impaired, because I don't see signs of that and. Then she agreed. To get a ride home the. Article says being a drug recognition expert and having done this for twelve years the offers to concur Foods on camera I'm going to use. My better judgement and not arrest her and get her a. Ride home now many who commented on the Facebook page I love my Rhode Island accent which posted the live PD excerpts by seven PM on Sunday at one hundred, and forty two comments three hundred one shares, and twenty thousand views and they derided the officer going to such lengths. With her and accused him of leading here off the hook because of her political connections but late Sunday Selena Bonanno issued a statement saying, that. Quote Friday evening while driving home I was asked to pullover on route four by Warwick police officer and subjected. To a field sobriety test I was very. Surprised and very nervous something, like this has never happened to me before the police. Officers determined that I was not impaired which of course I knew still I found, the whole experience really upsetting so pretty interesting story. In today's Providence, Journal by Dunedin Naylor animal rights activists are demonstrating for Knox that, English bulldog who was Found dead this month after weeks of a search here's. Ashley colonnade from NBC ten Animal advocates rallying Sunday, in memory of English bulldog knocks Yes The five year old dog belong to four patriot Gerard. Mayo he says he higher dog trainer Amelia for Raya threw off leash canine training in, providence but in June Knox, disappeared Ferrara initially told. Police the don't got loose walking in the woods in Wrentham weeks. Later she, said the dog disappeared from her. Yard then this, month the our ASPCA found Knox's body in a trash bag in Ferrara's..

Senator Nick kettle officer providence Cellini Bonanno reporter Rhode Island Warwick Tim white Providence Journal attorney Susan cellini Bonanno Rhode Dunedin Naylor Knox New Hampshire Dr Martin Luther King junior s Ferrara Representative David cellini Paul Demeo
"cellini" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

05:40 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Original vision this is from the introduction page one I wife Louisa, I live atop thirty feet of water one hundred feet from shore and a houseboat on a river in Portland Oregon at least we did, when I wrote this book one day I stepped out our back, door onto the floating. Deck, that serves as our backyard and found myself confronted a, very upset Canada goose. Bob his head up and down lifted. His wings to make body look larger and more intimidating Iran straight. At me is seen and try to nip Abby obviously observing, this behavior Mike comedian friends Swami beyond the NANDA Steve Berman was visiting us that week named the bird goose. Leany I had no, idea why the psycho goose was attacking me but there was Manama stake that goes cellini was trying. To communicate stay inside that house and now come out I got the. Message but I didn't stay inside said every time I. Went out to water the plants, on my deck I brought a bur- a broom, with me to fight off Gustav Leany I found out what was going on a week later when. I, learned from my neighbor the female goose it settled on, her back deck just a few feet. From our own and was sitting on A nest I realized that goose cellini must have been a. Proud Papa protecting his territory I stopped swatting adding with my broom goo. Cellini has a lot to tell us about indication strategies. Even though he was just doing, what a gander does when he wants a predator, to leave your attention to himself and away from his mate Attack first and ask questions later he was able to communicate the go, away part of his message, to me pretty well we all communicate, all the time. Even when we don't give much thought to what we're saying or how we're, saying it gives goose cellini was unable to use what we would call. Rational powers of persuasion e communicated by going straight for the more primitive parts of my brain. Ours, we shared as human goose, the center of our gut feelings time goose cellini attacked I backed. Off, because he was successful in. Communicating and intent to harm me which. Caused me to feel fear most primal and visceral of. Human emotions I key to. Unlocking the communication code is to understand that. When we, can communicate feeling comes first emotions will always Trump intellect at, least in the. Short term is a motive form of communication however ultimately didn't get goose Selena the response he wanted on its own the attack wasn't very persuasive instead of shooing me away goose cellini made me angry effective communicators know how to get the response They want because they understand how to tailor a message to the person who's listening in, the second key to unlocking the communication code is that the meaning of communication, is the response you get, goose cellini couldn't tell me his story, I had to. Imagine his story for myself I came up with was that he was simply, a psycho goose trying to harm me for no reason I could understand. Second story I came up with after talking to my neighbor was the story of a dad. Protecting, his soon to be hatched, goslings stories accurately described what was happening but the stories lead to. Very, different endings the psycho goose. May be angry the dad goose made. Me feel protective of goose selenium self in this book. I call stories maps and. The world the stories describe as the territory The third key. To unlocking the communication code is therefore the map is not. The territory each, story captures a different piece of reality. No one story captures at all The key to effective communication is. To find the best story the us to convey your understanding of the world to the. Greatest number of people in politics we tell. Each other stories all the time Think about politics is really nothing more than a large. Set of stories United States of America began as a story that the founders and framers told about a society that could live in harmony around the principles. Of life liberty and the pursuit of happiness Country was held together after the great depression and through a war by story told by Franklin Roosevelt when she called the new deal Ronald Reagan, told a very different story one we're still in that he called the, free market story Reagan story our corporate CEOs should run our society instead. Of our elected representatives because as Reagan pointed out and probably believed the best at minds or not in government if they were business would hire them away and a quote from Reagan Most of the stories we hear in the media today are scary we're told to be afraid because the world is a, bad place and people are untrustworthy every goose's Agoo cellini without understanding why The scary stories are profitable to. Our infotainment industry into the politicians who are typically allied. With the barons of the infotainment industry, this is a different there is a different story however in which every goose Alenia is a proud Papa is a story of. A world that is interconnected and if people who are fundamentally, good this is actually the traditional American liberal story which has been. Told and understood since the first telling of it during the enlightenment by thinkers like John Jacques Rousseau John Locke, and, Thomas Jefferson it's the story reaches directly back to the founding of this country I am with this book is to give you the tools to. Tell the liberal story, and to tell it. Well I'll show you how the process of communication is coated actually hardwired into our brains and help. You crack that code to become a brilliant communicator Urso a few. Concepts it's important to master everybody wants the best outcomes and their behavior reflects the best tools they have to achieve those outcomes Other way of saying this is the people always make what they. Think are the best choices given the circumstances and the tools they have all behavior has as its roots at, its, roots the goal of a positive outcome as a practical statement this means that conservatives and liberals are both working toward the best world possible and. Then it goes on, from there how do. We differentiate this how do we keep it this.

goose cellini Ronald Reagan Agoo cellini Canada Oregon Louisa Iran Gustav Leany Manama Abby Papa Urso United States Mike Steve Berman John Jacques Rousseau John Loc Franklin Roosevelt Swami America
"cellini" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This song of the summer blaring out across rooms must stay cornick markets but that would face and the concept of what it means to be pollyanna battalion is he shop focus need neither pity prime minister matthaus cellini is calling for a census of a group of people he believes do not fits their description missed opportunity for the ministry to prepare the on the roma situation italy to see who and how many are here nothing has been done in years and scales unfortunately roma with italian citizenship we have to keep because you can't expel them property the room i it's largest ethnic minority also known by the derogatory term zangari gypsies they live on the fringes of society they're all my beyond italy the policy has been condemned for many romans a census slung over woman i am salvini they had these just yesterday several monthly tried to steal my so i thought salvini makes them go away sooner roma people are sold you and pickpocket you it's not right maybe salvini sticking to far but i want to know how many there are where they come from and what they do i've come to a shantytown in the outskirts of rome about four hundred roma a world away from the markets to cafes and says have faced by flimsy caravan muddy field yeah a toll man with dark hair originally from former yugoslavia shows me the cramped trailer where he lives with his wife and six children the old sleep.

matthaus cellini rome yugoslavia prime minister italy
"cellini" Discussed on KMJ NOW

KMJ NOW

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on KMJ NOW

"What's wrong it's reminding you of eating a salad where you have to like constantly stab all the small of lettuce that he can't i think we've addressed that to work chopped salad were actually chopped stand constantly stabbing all those tiny little lead so he's engineered all of the restaurant salads a certain way where it's you get the spine of the lettuce because he's very particular so what's the matter do you need a spoon thinking it's like the salad thing yeah and what did you say to me eating pasta salad macaroni pasta salad to me with a fork i don't i don't care for it really i don't that's the only way i do it did he did so i used to have a whole lot of fun when i was a little kid and i would like you know skewer every little piece of macaroni until i four completely full perfect i can picture it and because i love the texture of it the mouth feel of a bite like that was so cool and then so now i'm sitting there i'm trying to eat this pasta salad fork and everything's fallen off the side it's like an getting like five pieces of macaroni on the fork because they're all tumbling did till leany by though eric did cellini.

eric cellini
"cellini" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Unlocking the communication code is to understand that when we can communicate feeling comes first emotions will always trump intellect at least in the short term this emotive form of communication however ultimately didn't get goose alina the response he wanted on its own the attack wasn't very persuasive instead of shooing me away goose cellini made me angry effective communicators know how to get the response they want because they understand how to tailor a message to the person who's listening in on the second key to unlocking the communication code is that the meaning of a communication is the response you get cellini couldn't tell me his story i had to imagine his story for myself the first story i came up with was that he was simply a psycho goose trying to harm me for no reason i could understand second story i came up with after talking to my neighbor was the story of a dad protecting his soon to be hatched goslings those stories accurately describe what was happening but the stories lead to very different endings the saco goose may be angry the dad goose made me feel protective of goose selenium self in this book i call such stories maps and the world the stories describe as the territory the third key to unlocking the communication code is therefore the map is not the territory each story captures a different piece of reality no one story captures at all the key to affective communication is to find the best story for us to convey your understanding of the world to the greatest number of people in politics we tell each other stories all the time think about politics is really nothing more than a large set of stories united states of america began as a story that the founders and framers told about a society that could live in harmony around the principles of life liberty and the pursuit of happiness country was held together after the great depression and through a war by story told by franklin roosevelt when she called the new deal ronald reagan told a very different story one we're still in that he called the free market story in reagan story our corporate ceos should run our society instead of our elected representatives because as reagan pointed out and probably believed the best guy at minds or not in government if they were business would hire them away and a quote from reagan most of the stories we hear in.

cellini franklin roosevelt ronald reagan america
"cellini" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Can the men's perfect multi help with its high quality selenium zinc i mean this isn't cheap stuff right oh no we've got the pure we've got the combination this is the natural cellino excel combination this is with all the amino acid combinations so you have all of those wonderful selenium proteins all together in one combination and of course got various journals here showing you know selenium important for the cells that produce testosterone selenium important for the prostate gland maintain its function throughout your life so all of these studies show that cellini is critically important and so is zeke and as i said before you you can't get enough zinc out of your diet it's almost impossible and you need the cofactor selenium and be six to release it and absorb it again we need it in the context of great molly vitamin and if you wanna have prostate health guys we need to be working on it every day you know you want to get that zinc and you wanna get that cellini bill millions of us are deficient in magnesium or other vitamins and minerals and millions take a multi yet there is no multi out there that has a meaningful dose of magnesium well that is until now but there's more to this story if you're a guy who's what low or vitamin d or mega threes or boron for that matter these deficiencies can impact your health as well they can impact your brain function your cardio function and of course your testosterone levels bill you say you gotta fix these deficiencies i does the research back that up.

cellini testosterone
"cellini" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

Radio Free Nashville

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on Radio Free Nashville

"Confronting a very upset canada goose bob this head up down lifted his wings to make his body look larger and more intimidating iran's straight abby is seen and try to nip abby obviously observing this behavior my comedian friends swami beyond us steve berman was visiting us that week named the bird goose leany i had no idea why this psycho goose was attacking but there was melanoma steak that goes cellini was trying to communicate stay inside that house and now come out i got the message but didn't stay inside said every time i went out to water the plants on my deck i brought a bur a broom with me to fight off gustav leany i found out what was going on a week later when i learned from my neighbor the female goose it settled on her back deck just a few feet from our own and was sitting on a nest i realized that goose cellini must have entered the proud papa protecting his territory i stopped swatting adding with my broom goose cellini has a lot to tell us about indication strategies even though he was just doing what a gander does when he wants a predator to leave your attention to himself in a way his mate attack i ask questions later he was able to communicate the go away part of his message to me pretty well we all communicate all the time even when we don't give much thought to what we're saying or how we're saying it gets goose's leaney was unable to use what we would call rational powers of persuasion e communicated by going straight for the more primitive parts of my brain arts we shared as human in goose the center of our gut feelings first time goose cellini attacked i backed off because he was successful in communicating and intent to harm me which caused me to feel fear most primal and visceral of human emotions the first key to unlocking the communication code is to understand that when we can communicate feeling comes first emotions will always trump intellect at least in the short term this emotive form of communication however alternately didn't get goose selena the response he wanted on its own the attack wasn't very persuasive instead of shooing me away goose cellini made me angry effective communicators know how to.

iran abby cellini gustav canada steve berman
"cellini" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

WPRO 630AM

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on WPRO 630AM

"Forty thousand dollars do not organic by any means money money comes to town to progressive agenda pushes money when they walk well we're gonna we're gonna take chris and that we gotta get to those bills because we don't have much time and i really want people to understand what's going on to stay down chris thank you for holding thank you for having me on your in education are usually used as puppet push agendas that are really assisting throughout history if you look at stalin or pol pot or hitler they all use their powers to remove the right to bear arms and then you know stalin who killed thirty million people hitler killed thirteen million people after the right to bear arms was removed from the populist you know i'm a candidate for congress in rhode island my name's christopher young not even cellini obviously taken positions in favor of the right to remove the right to garo arms from citizens of the state of rhode island and throughout the country and we we we have to really educated people and reflect on that that you know throughout history when these powers have been taken away from people the government usually abuses its power on the people and so you know i'm facebook you know i was saying we were saying earlier how people who are uneducated used as you know there was a post on facebook and i spoke on it and irrational thought where they of the accused me of being a racist or i'm not a racist i grew up in south providence enforce part of south providence i i went to a predominantly african american school but these people will make these accusations like you're a racist or that you're homophobic or all these other things not based in any reality are facts.

chris congress rhode island facebook african american school stalin hitler christopher young cellini Forty thousand dollars
"cellini" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:46 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on WWL

"And this new men's perfect multi is kind of transformative i mean it's got all of the key vitamins minerals but it also has those vital brain nutrients you've been talking about vitamin b six b twelve plus magnesium all great for the brain for you know for cognitive purposes in fact a recent article talked about be six to promote and keep the brain fit so bill why is brain health vital well this is another big feature the product it's oxford university purity products licensing a wonderful combination of vitamins in the right dosage and relationship it's vitamin b six b twelve full of gas at all in the right range is so that we get an optimal effect they went through an oxford university tested this perfect combination of these thieves vitamins and they saw that well it really helped maintain healthy brain size and healthy brain function and it it's all been developed and tested it's just a small amount actually but it's all included in purity's new men's perfect multi and it helps us with our mental capacity it helps us perform every day and i know all the guys i've most of us are needing to stay active throughout our lives many of us working beyond our retirement years so we want to maintain i take good healthy brain function inherit is purity products went out and license this new patented combination of bvitamins from oxford university it's all incorporated in here 'cause guys yeah we got our muscles and we got our performance in the bedroom we got all those things but we gotta have brain function to so it's important purity products saw to it went out and licensed this wonderful combination of bvitamins to help our brain stay in the game as well let's talk about prostate health for a second or two this is a big deal for guys especially as we age in the men's perfect multi help with its high quality selenium zinc i mean this isn't cheap right oh no we've got the pure we've got the combination this is the natural cellino excel combination this is with all the amino acid combinations so you have all of those wonderful selenium proteins all together in one combination and of course got various journals here showing you know selenium important for the cells that produce testosterone selenium important for the prostate gland maintain its function throughout your life so all of these studies show that cellini is critically important.

oxford university cellini testosterone
"cellini" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"cellini" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Can the men's perfect multi help with its high quality selenium zinc i mean this isn't cheap stuff right oh no we've got the pure we've got the combination this is the natural cellino excel combination this is with all the amino acid combinations so you have all of those wonderful selenium proteins altogether in one combination and of course got various journals here showing you know selenium important for the cells that produce testosterone selenium important for the prostate gland maintain its function throughout your life so all of these studies show that cellini is critically important and so is zeke and as i said before you you can't get enough zinc out of your diet it's almost impossible and you need the cofactor selena him and be six to release it and absorb it again we needed in the context of a great multivitamin and if you wanna have prostate health guys we need to be working on it every day you know you want to get that zinc and you want to get that cellini bill millions of us are deficient in magnesium or other vitamins and minerals and millions take a multi yet there is no multi out there that has a meaningful dose of magnesium well that is until now but there's more to this story if you're a guy who's lo and zinc vitamin d or mega threes or boron for that matter these deficiencies can impact your health as well they can impact your brain function your cardio function of course your testosterone levels built you say you gotta fix these deficiencies i does the research back that up oh certainly and here i am i'm reading one of these research studies and it's talking about vitamin b six and magnesium and it's talking about them working together and it's talking about temp dems that guys had as they got older we need the healthy range of these wonderful minerals and vitamins in order to maintain our mood and of course you know guys we don't wanna get cranky as we get older important that we get all of the benefits of this from our head to our till.

cellini testosterone