17 Burst results for "Celeste Headley"

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:23 min | 4 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Think that honestly like looking at both of your books and reading through them. The consistent piece of advice that I found between both was put your phone down. Just as you kind of offer at the end, they're like those those little ways that we find things that. Frankly again to go a little Buddhist that remove us from the present moment whether that's the present moment of our interaction with another human or that's the present moment of taking a minute to recharge feel like we are taking a break and to let our brain slowdown and just kind of sit there at the at the at the table in the lunchroom and rather than kind of skimming. Through stuff that's mildly to majorly triggering as often happens as we just scroll through facebook, you're just sitting there thinking nothing or you're sitting there thinking about something you really enjoy or you're sitting there and reading a slow book they are just doing to have a good time like those are all little ways that maybe you can do nothing a little bit more does that more or less connect. Call someone and don't talk about work. Yeah great piece of advice. Yeah. I mean any of those things. So it can be so simple and he is funny I wrote a whole chapter and do nothing on is tech to blame and I really tried to interrogate it and what I found. Interesting when I was ready to that chapter is three quarters of it is explaining all the terrible things the terrible impacts, the tag has on our lives in our sleep and our wellbeing, and yet it is not to blame it's not There's nothing wrong with the tech is how we use it. Our our species has been using tools. I think the oldest Homo sapiens that we found was right next to a tool like that's how long we've been using tools. The problem is is that. When you get done using a hammer, you put it down. Right and we don't we're not designed. Our brains are not designed to hold a tool in her hands twenty, four seven it's not work that way. Yeah no I think that's a great framework and a great way for people to think about their own interaction with screens. So Celeste as we come to the end here again, thanks so much for taking the time to do this today, and there is one kind of final question that we'd like to ask people who on the show I'm really interested in your thoughts on that based on everything that we've been talking about today about talking if you had the opportunity to go back in time and talk to yourself as a child as a young adult somebody who is going through. Probably some pretty challenging formative experiences as we all do, what would you want to say that person like if you could leave them with anything what would you wanNA leave them with? I would say most people aren't thinking about you. That's what I would say they. They don't. They didn't notice you trip. They don't care if they did notice most people are thinking about themselves and they're not worried about you. Know that is a great piece of advice that I try to remind myself about two days. So thank you for reminding me with that Celeste before we get you out of here is there anything else you would like to let people know about any other projects you're working on? No not really I mean the the main thing I just launched an online training course the pandemic one thing the pandemic allowed me to do is me some extra time and I created a whole training course at how interview?.

Celeste facebook
"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

05:29 min | 4 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Full stop. Yes. So I I guess what I'm what I'm bumping my head against as I'm thinking about this Alaska's that you've given. A lot of great advice on. How to actually impact somebody's viewpoint if you WANNA do that form an empathic connection think in terms of their underlying framework don't argue get bogged down in arguing about facts create a safe space for them to change their opinion like if you're given a lot of consistently good advice here and speaking myself just like of my own frustrations may be kind of selfishly at the moment. But I just kind of bumping my head against the sensation of having conversations with people where they're using a bad source or they're quoting a conspiracy theory or they're proliferating some extremely unscientific opinion about something and. Yes people are you know prone to do this who are progressive and people who are prone to do this who are conservative and for me? It's not so much like a liberal conservative question it's like I. I don't know evidence based or not evidence based question, and we can all get into an argument about like who leans more which direction. But inside of that context where like there is a lot of that frustration around facts had how'd you talk with people about that? How do you to coach them out of that like Barrow Focus on but is it factual that I might be falling into here? So there's a few things that I do. One of the most important is I simply acknowledged the truth which is that we're not gonNA agree. Right I'll say so listen we spend all our time here arguing over whether that's true or not. That's not that interesting. So let me let me find out what we agree on. Sometimes I'll play the the common game, which is where I say okay I'm I'm I will bet you that five questions I can find something we we both agree on and it's usually like Tacos or dogs right but you can start there. I mean when you're talking about creating an empathic bond finding look it sounds facile because it's something we've been taught since we were in kindergarten right? It's sesame street. told us this from as far back as we can remember, but it absolutely is scientifically proven that finding those commonalities is the way to move forward. You know it's interesting I. Don't know if you've ever followed the account. Can I swear in this guest? Go ahead that's called My Dad says. Short lived comedy series with William..

Alaska William
"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

03:46 min | 4 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"Aisle they're sitting on is you have to people who are up on the screen and they're both spouses viewpoint and those viewpoints are presented as equal even if they may not be like kind of getting back to what we were talking about before it's sort of the both sides of something right where there's. Like certain things, I just kind of have a fact basis and certain things that Kinda don't, and it's all well and good to say, well, does it fit their frame and does you know what is their value standpoint that's underlying that fact faces that they're operating from but a lot of people just aren't operating very good faith or they think they're operating in good faith but their views have been of co opted by something or someone or something like that. What if you seat of that kind of at your work responded to it what's your take on the on the both sides at some? Yeah. This is an ethical problem. It's not just an album for journalists but it it has become a way to perpetuate racism sexism and yes. Yeah. Discrimination and all forms. So there's a few things that I've done when I launched my own show down in Atlanta I immediately instituted no pundit on policy I do not talk I do not interview pundits pretty much any avenue of my journalistic life. I don't have anything against them as people obviously they're making a living, but a pundit by nature is someone who's asked for their opinion on pretty much anything. Which means you're not getting an expert opinion. You're just getting and. As well as that that that's awesome and I the that's worthless me. It's worthless to me I'm smart but that doesn't mean you need to be asking my opinion about A. A vaccine. Don't ask me for God's. don't ask me about training a dog. I've owned. But I'm not an expert, right? So, consulting pundits who are financially incentivized to say thanks that are provocative and sometimes on the edge of truth. Is a terrible terrible plan and sadly at this point, much of cable news is almost entirely pundit news, which means it's not news. This partly comes from my work with NPR NPR an American public media and PBS, which is that we look for the person who's actually dedicated studying research and is at least on some level objective in that, they don't have a stake in their opinion. Right. If I, go speak to the head of a of a of a division at NIH, the National Institute of Health. They have literally been forced to divest themselves from any investment that's connected to their work writing so that in person is absolutely the right expert to go and talk to somebody who works for pharmaceutical. Company probably not. But. What I'm really talking about here is educated consumerism I don't expect the average Consumer of news. To know WHO's an expert and who isn't, but I expect them to be at least aware enough of how good the news source that they're they're they're consulting is so that they can rely on them to make that decision, right? If you are watching the cable news show and they get it. Wrong if they're constantly going to pundits if there's no consequences when someone says something that's not factual on the air. Then, you probably shouldn't consult them anymore even if they're telling you what you want to hear and it makes you feel good. I, think that's great advice. Yeah. That's on you and stop getting your news from facebook.

NPR facebook Atlanta NIH PBS National Institute of Health
"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

04:59 min | 4 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"The second point is the point about belonging what you just made, which I think again is so right on where it's really really important to create something inside of conversations if you actually want to affect view and again, this is kind of from the work I did way back when. I thought I was going to be a speechwriter when I grew up back in college and that's what I was doing my degree. Is You want to give people a sense of psychological safety in other words you WanNa make them feel safe. Moving their viewpoint and a lot of the time what happens is that the language that we create conversations exactly as you're saying is that it can really trigger a very, very strong stance of defensiveness in somebody else, and so what we're really trying to do most of the time if we really actually want affect somebody's opinion is move them as far away from that stance of defensive. This, as we possibly can and one of the best ways to do this as you're saying, creating a Pathak meant in earnest empathic atonement you're not just doing it to manipulate somebody or doing it because you believe it and then second create a sense of safety. Make it safe for them to change their opinion yeah. You're absolutely spot on. I. Almost have nothing else to add to that. Because you know, it's funny because years and years ago. I was asked to give the keynote at I've participated in the racial amity conference for a long time which was started. I think almost one hundred years ago my by the high faith to focus on the unity of races what we have in common e. pluribus unum right out of many one and I knew that the people who are at that conference are people who are already on board with this. Like you don't go to a racial equity conference if you. Remember the proud. There's a little preaching to the choir. So my speech focused on. Making it okay for people to make mistakes making it. Okay. For someone to ask to touch your hair if.

Pathak
"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

04:07 min | 4 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Being Well with Dr. Rick Hanson

"One of the worst is that smart people tend to think they're less prone to unconscious bias when it's exactly opposite. In fact, the higher you Iq goes the more biased you are likely to be. There's a number of reasons for that but let me go into the reasons why your hi- cues make you a bad conversationalist. The first. Is that human beings in general? Everyone smart dumb inbetween. We unconsciously choose not to listen to people who are of lower ranked than us and I'm using lower ranked in the broad sense of it. If we think someone is is dumber than we are they have a worse job than us what however your unconscious mind determined to says rank. If they are lower than us. We don't listen to them in general. Instead. We decide usually consciously that it's our. duty to enlighten them. And correct them and teach them something and when you're teaching, you're not listening. So that's a big reason why smart people are terrible listeners? It's because they're basically just not listening to a gigantic swath of the population. The other one is that smart people tend to know a lot right? We know interesting stuff, and so we WANNA share it. And so we WANNA talk about that stuff that we know and you know you may find that you end up telling the same facts or information over over and over again that's an early warning sign that maybe you're talking too much and you're a little bit into to enthusiastic about sharing what you know rather than learning what other people know. And the third thing there's more reasons than this but these are the main ones. The third reason why smart people have trouble in conversation is that we assume we know what's coming. So someone will say something like well, I'll tell you what I I I'm totally against immigration. Okay. So a smart person goes I know the rest of what this person is going to say and they stop listening to that person and they're just coming up with what their response will be to that..

"celeste headlee" Discussed on By The Book

By The Book

05:13 min | 8 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on By The Book

"Be those actually have a big impact on your mood, and in fact can lift your mood out of depression and give you a boost that lasts for a long period of time. We Ju-. We maybe weren't aware of that. But if you're sitting in isolation and wondering why you feel unmotivated, exhausted and a little bit down, it's possibly because you've lost. All of your social weak ties. These are all like things that are so easy and inexpensive to do another one is give yourself a helpers, high doom, one nice thing for somebody else. Else every day and I know that makes it sound like I'm Mr Rogers but instead of focusing on the good. You're doing to the world, although that's real, the fact of the matter is that when you help someone else's a number of things that happen inside your brain and body. It distracts you from your own problems. It gives you context, and it also gives you that rush of adrenaline. That is gonNA. Lift your mood again. They've even shown that. People who are offering cancer. If they if they in the hospital, get them to help out other patients in the hospital. It lifts even someone suffering from a deadly disease so. The first steps to do nothing you're saying are give yourself a break. Don't look at your screen. Be in the world in a way that you're observing nature and have little conversations with those people that aren't necessarily close to you and then also get a helpers I. Love All of those those are very easy things that we can all do. Even if we don't know how to step away from work, I, think can do those things. We are going to take a quick break, but when we come back, we have listener questions from you. All were Celeste, so stay tuned..

Mr Rogers depression Celeste
"celeste headlee" Discussed on By The Book

By The Book

07:49 min | 8 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on By The Book

"And other kinds of things. They didn't work that long. Before the industrial revolution, so yeah, it feels like this is always the way it's been done, and you're right. Our forefathers literally died to get us an eight hour workday. And would be disappointed. That were were voluntarily giving up, but the eight hour workday in and of itself isn't necessarily the way we naturally would do. It were not punching in and out of time clock. But you know you acknowledging your own book that going to work gives us a lot of psychological mental and physical benefits, and that when people retire, there's frequently decline all three of those areas, so that kind of suggest that doing less not working as much might be bad for our health, but that's not your point, right? Right I mean you have to separate out what you do for survival from what the rest of us are doing, right? A lot of us are not doing work. That's necessary for survival. Right. I mean we're doing extra were all extra. and. It's very difficult at this point from a research standpoint to separate out the disadvantages of unemployment that are in eight that are because we need work from the disadvantages that are caused by the fact that at this point in our history and our culture. We get are worth from our job. like your rank your salary. That's what gives status. When people ask you how you are, we say busy like that's become your status in life, so it makes sense that if you lose your job, not only are you losing income? But you're also losing status. You are in the eyes of our culture at least worthless, and so, of course, that's going to have impacts, but you're suggesting that maybe we work less than that. We do less, and that's GONNA. Maybe result in some of that losing our status and depression. What do you want us to do if we're not working as much, what would you in your ideal world? What would we do? We'd be doing instead of first of all. We don't need to be working the hours that we're working. We could get our jobs done in much less time. A lot of the work that we're doing of the habits that we have are actually making us less productive. They feel busier and they take up more time, but in fact they're wasting time so I want you to think for second. Let's imagine a an accountant in his in his Brown, polyester suit in one thousand seventy one right getting his job done and taking care of his accounts. And so fast forward to today. It takes so much less time for that accountant to get his job done and yet. He still working forty hours a week. and. You have to ask yourself why we know that technologically we can all get our work done in much less time. So why are we still working forty hours well, there's a few reasons one is that working extra hours has become the way to signal to our employers, and to our friends and family that were important and were hard working, and because we're hardworking were deserving. It is it is literally our our value as a human being that we are hard working. And sometimes that can become even more strong as you get more income this desire to prove that you earned it, so you work more hours, even the what's unnecessary. There's also a thing that I. Talk About in the book called Parkinson's Law which basically says that WORK EXPANDS TO FIT the amount of time. Allotted for it. So, if you have if your boss comes in and says you have two hours to write this memo, it'll take you two hours if they say you have until Friday. You Yeah but also interestingly. Only eight hours anymore I. I would argue that almost all of us have this computer carry with all the time called a phone where our bosses email us on the weekends, and on the in the evenings are coworkers do we are reached out to an a million different whether it's like taxed or slack? I just think like I. Don't really even have only forty hour work weeks anymore. I feel like my workweek is more like sixty or eighty hours a lot of the time. So this is the difficulty, and this is something that an institute. Australia calls polluted time, and it's what makes it difficult to track. How long people are actually working? We do know. Know though that. Technically, we're working fewer hours than our parents and our grandparents. E, even when you include the amount of time. We spent an email at home. The although that self reported so it's difficult, right? All of this is self reported, but we have been tracking working hours for a very very longtime decades, and so we know we're actually working fewer hours, but you're absolutely correct that because we're carrying our work with us, and because your brain does not distinguish between you doing online shopping and you doing work, your brain thinks that if you're paging through facebook, you're working that literally makes your brain and your body feel that you're working all the time. And people even take that phone with them. Like a third of people say they take the phone with them into the shower. I do that. Yeah, one in ten people say they've answered the phone or looked at a text while having sex. Oh No, yeah, what yeah? Yeah saw if you just think of that phone or that tablet or that laptop as an office, you just have to think about win. That is present and visible. You're in the office and therefore it's important to make time during the day when you're not looking at it. So in addition to cutting down on how often we're looking at our phones. What else would you suggest we do? If we are going to try to do less? Yes, the first one. I want to really emphasize that. Let's say that you know one of the things I tell people to do is make sure to take a break every hour because your brain needs it and we've tested this over and over the most productive brains, the ones that get a break, every forty five or fifty minutes or so. So that's the first thing, but if you're taking that break, you immediately, pull at your phone and start paging through things. Then you're not actually taking it breaks. As far as your brain is concerned, you're just continuing to work, so that's the first thing is take a break and take a screen free break, but you know what here's the beautiful thing. It's not actually all that complicated to give yourself a real break. We are so beautifully biologically designed to take benefit from simple inexpensive things. It's miraculous. If you walk outside for ten minutes without your phone and look at a tree, it boosts your mood. It lowers your heart. Rate Lowers your cortisol levels the stress hormone. You will take almost an immediate benefit from it. In fact, there are some studies showing that. If you look at a picture of greenery of a forest, it's it's not. Not as big an impact, but you'll still get an impact from it house plants, but again you have to make sure that you have removed the things that are causing the stress. which is you just have to turn away from your screen? Another thing is we know that just a simple conversation. It doesn't have to be zoom conversation, which can bring its own anxiety and stress, but the sound of a human voice can be very soothing. One thing that's interesting during the time of cove. I think people may not have really appreciated. What psychologists call the power of weak ties and those weak ties or the things like the the few? Words you exchange with the Barista or your grocery store, clerk, or the the mailman, or whatever it may.

accountant facebook Parkinson Australia cortisol
"celeste headlee" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

Best of Both Worlds Podcast

02:46 min | 8 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on Best of Both Worlds Podcast

"Just means that you're not active physically active at them time. Your brain is active, so we're never talking about mental inactivity, but a you know it's not being idle is not the same as not working. For example, a fisherman is idol while they're working and possibly active. Not, working so we have to decouple this idea of idleness and an activity from work. They're not the same and the reason. I say that you have to decouple them as because if you think that idleness is the same as laziness, it's GonNa give you feelings of guilt whenever you stop being active and I want to make everyone free from guilt. Because of activity I want people to be able to sit on their front porch for a half hour. And just sit and watch the world. Go By and feels zero guilt about that because oddly enough that time that you spend sitting on your front porch, watching birds. Is Very productive time because what's going on in your brain then. And why does your brain need that that right? Because the human brain, it doesn't persist it pulses it pulses between activity and idleness leisure I should say and your brain. A human brain needs to be able to not be directed in order to be creative and innovative right, so we have to I'm GonNa very much dumbed down. Neuro Science here. But there's in essence. There's kind of two forms of thinking right. There's your analytical brain and there's your. Insightful brain and your analytical brain if you're thinking okay if I drive the speed limit of sixty five miles an hour. How long's IT GONNA? Take me to get my parents house for Thanksgiving. That's an analytical brain problem. Obviously there's a persistent history of racism and discrimination in our society. How do we solve that at my own company? That is an insightful brain problem, and if you bring your analytical brain to it, you're GONNA end up. Making some of the GOOFS, gaffes and horrible mistakes that people have made in the past, which means you have to allow your brain to click into its deep thinking. You have to let it go into default thinking mode. Default meet thinking mode only occurs when the brain is not directed. So if you're sitting there folding laundry, it's a good chance that as long as you're not trying to multitask, and you're also listening to a historic podcast or also on a conference call your brain will start to wonder it will start to sift through the memories and information that you've taken in recently. It will begin to make unexpected connections because you're not forcing it to focus on task, and so it's just GonNa. The librarian is just GonNa Wander through.

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:54 min | 8 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This is one eight I'm Celeste Headlee in Maryland for centuries millions of Muslims have gone on the harsh a once in a lifetime pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca this year the hajj has effectively been canceled Saudi Arabia announced this week that the pilgrimage will only be open to a thousand people all from inside the kingdom and that's because of fears over coronavirus the last time the hajj was canceled was more than two hundred years ago and that was thanks to Napoleon this is the first time the high she's been disrupted since the founding of Saudi Arabia here to talk about that and the rest of the week's top news is more space nine he's a distinguished fellow at the Carnegie endowment for international peace and author of the end of power we say is always a pleasure to have you hi thanks for having me Robert Moore is the Washington correspondent for ITV news Robert welcome back to you as well always good to be on your show and Emily ten can is the U. S. editor for The New Statesman thanks for joining us thanks so much for having me well let's begin with the highs because this is huge news up more space what does this mean for millions of Muslims how are they grappling with this win is huge and the numbers are quite something last year two and a half million people attended the house of those one point nine million working from other countries so and and then this has occurred an economic dimension to it you know and again last year of these created a new fusion of twelve billion dollars into the local economy so we're talking about a major makes a major shock both due to the dynamics of a flick of the country and internationally and of course and there's an economic shock that I mention so Robert do we know what measures Saudi Arabia will take to keep those thousand pilgrims safe who are allowed to attend well I think they're doing ploy the same techniques is the rest of the world you know we both broke the review tools in our toolbox to make social distancing and **** you know that is why the the numbers we would normally expect to descend on Mecca Medina all being reduced so spectacularly and it's not just the economic impact you know you have homes will this of social and I'm spiritual impact is on you know worshipers around the world whatever your faith you know charges are close temples are closed the house is now being scaled back on a massive scale and you wonder you know what sort of waves of disappointment various you know sending out across the Muslim world across the world as a whole then we have what is the mental health impact we are a social species suddenly you know this great connectivity all rituals of life the mother of the year being really disrupted on a massive scale other news from that area of the world is that this week Israeli police shot and killed a twenty seven year old Palestinian student Akhmed Erekat at a checkpoint in Bethlehem argument was the nephew of the secretary general of the Palestinian liberation organization better known as the PLO Moore says what do we know about this case and and what led to the the part that what led the Israeli police to shoot and kill Akhmad it was a again I I I I know about the hit her lack the thirty two years old that suffer from C. here also is in general was also killed in the region and all of that that all of these killings now have a guard exemplified because they have the echo of the black lives matter protests both in the United States largely in the United States but also around the world and so there now did it the debate in in Palestine and Israel is about that the similarities and then there wasn't even a process of Israeli citizens against you know that demanding an explanation about these cases and the two officers at the one involved in working on administrative leave but there is a lot of turmoil around at two in the context of a very complex political situation in Israel to Robert there you know sadly this is not the first time Israeli police have shot someone especially Palestinian why is there so much international attention on this particular death want to close there is that relationship you know off my our account is the best U. S. firepower Caroline as you know a very charismatic Palestinian politician a man who's been at the forefront of peace negotiations when they were seemed a viable route so there is a connection inspired by Eric capital so I think you know that but the point is exactly right this is echoing you know protest movements around the world connected to the black lives matter movement you know it's not just about sort of technical chokehold it's also at the mantra of law enforcement around the world for greater accountability greater transparency I'm once again you know we have a Palestinian man in the prime of his life you know on the eve of his sister's wedding shop that at a news radio checkpoint with really completely contradictory accounts of what happened the family of the of the young man yeah I made clear that you know it seems most unlikely this was any kind of attack all non Israeli checkpoint officer so you know it's a mystery but it is one that highlights once again the lack of accountability all on Israeli forces as they try and you know monitor these checkpoints and then chokes for much of the economic and social life of the Palestinian territories I I have to get out of out of I had a very distant so it's a very it's a it's a insight into its one insight into our you know into a into a conflict that is getting kinda knocked off the front pages by the very nature of the pandemic and and and how little we're paying attention now to the the plight of Palestinians you mentioned the pandemic and at the International Monetary Fund has downgraded its global economic forecast for twenty twenty because of covert nineteen Emily the IMF now says the corona virus pandemic will cause a much deeper recession and slow recovery than originally expected the IMF calls this moment a crisis like no other what did we learn about the IMS forecasts from this announcement that's right originally the IMF it's said that global GDP would contract by three percent and now they've updated it such that it's more like four point nine percent what this tells us is that the impact of the corona virus pandemic on the world economy is worse than we thought even back in April obviously this is not good news but the part that I think it is not good but but the positive is that people are coming to terms with the fact that this is going to be devastating this is going to have to get this would have serious economic repercussions there's no longer any you know for any world leaders who perhaps were sugar coating this or worse saying that it was going to just go away or we're telling people that this won't actually affect them parted for a long time one hopes that this had nothing to disabuse them of that at that notion Moore says the IMF did have some praise they they praised as central banks like the federal reserve in the U. S. for providing stimulus to help financial markets but they also cautioned that we can't we we can't secure an economic recovery to that kind of support from central banks what do we know about the fifth defense plan and and whether there are other just sort of tools in the in the tool chest other than stimulus funds well that's exactly right when one of the surprises here is that the the numbers that a low numbers and and every session and and the streaking on GDP R. despite the massive gigantic new fusion of money eleven trillion dollars have been pumped into the global economy is in different countries and United States taking the lead in many ways in terms of the amount of money and and that doesn't seem to be annoyed if if I'm sure that these that prevented the things from getting even worse but surely it has not served to stimulate the economy then we have another situation which is that that one big difference from previous financial crisis is that the this one both emerging markets and advance countries are in depression and you know deep deep recessions so there is the school this single by an eighty that creates an ads difficult is because in the past whenever there was a crisis one resume served as the engine of the rest of the economy now all the engines older drivers so for economic growth are are stalling and stagnant what the fed did did say that it the fed.

Celeste Headlee Maryland Mecca
"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

01:57 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

"Reform I'm Celeste Headlee more for I guess and from you in just a moment the next fresh air as more cities open up we talk with Michael Oster home about where we are now in the pandemic and what to expect in this next phase he is the director of the center for infectious disease research and policy at the university of Minnesota and author of deadliest enemy our war against killer germs join us now on weeknights today on eighty nine point three KPCC it's pretty bad you gonna be lot of hysterical headlines the virus is I'm Lawrence Poland listened for the international perspective on the pandemic of possible legal implications of attempts to re stock sport plus the rest of tomorrow's news on BBC Newsday notes single BBC cameraman filming the farmer opens back of his van picks up a fumbled and threatens us BBC Newsday Sunday to Thursday nights at ten on eighty nine point three KPCC KPCC supporters include cedar Sinai committed to being right here for Los Angeles here they know keeping people healthy means keeping them safe with screenings at the door when they come in and video visits if they can't hear they've increased their cleaning and disinfection of common spaces here they limit crowds and they physically distance and reception areas here they wear masks and so the visitors here to reassure people that when they have health care needs there's a place they.

Celeste Headlee director Lawrence Poland Los Angeles Michael Oster university of Minnesota BBC cedar Sinai
"celeste headlee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hi am Celeste Headlee in the wake of global protests monuments and plaques and statues are coming down the debate over Confederate statues has been raging for years now but public sentiment in both political parties may be shifting just over half of all Republicans now say they support the protest and just under half say George floods killing is a sign of broader problems with race in America as more Americans grapple with our racist history could attachment to these artifacts also start to crumble we'd love to hear from you email us or tweet us at one eight live from NPR news I'm she Stevens Louisville Kentucky city council has voted to ban no knock warrants which allowed police to invade private property as WFPL Amanat you law he reports the move comes nearly three months after undercover officers kill Brianna Taylor during a no knock raid on her apartment former vice president Joe Biden is promising a plan to ensure the safety of re opening businesses after covert nineteen shut downs NPR's Scott Detrow has more on blinds remarks in Philadelphia Tampa's police custody but NPR stampede reports that trump's proposal is short on details nationwide there are calls to acknowledge identify and root out systemic racism where it exists within police departments president trump's message we have to work together to confront bigotry and prejudice wherever they appear but will make no progress and he'll know who's by falsely labeling tens of millions of decent Americans as racists or bigots trump is touting a four step plan to build safety opportunity and dignity in America it includes increasing access to capital for minority owned small businesses confronting racial disparities in health care an executive order in the works to encourage police departments to meet professional standards for use of force and a push for Congress to enact school choice something Republicans have long supported Tamar Keith NPR news president trump will formally accept his renomination for president in Jacksonville Florida NPR's don Gonyea has more on the Republican national committee's decision not to hold the event in Charlotte the move comes as a result of president trump and the GOP is frustration over pandemic related restrictions in North Carolina that would not allow for the kind of large traditional in person gathering the R. N. C. was planning for their the final week of August trump has been publicly attacking north Carolina's democratic governor Roy Cooper for insisting that cold mid nineteen prevention made approving a gathering of some fifty thousand convention attendees impossible RNC chair Ronna McDaniel said in a statement that they look forward to bringing the celebration an economic boon to the sunshine state Florida's Republican governor says he welcomes the move to his state don Gonyea NPR news this is NPR news dividing has released a plan he says can jump start the nation's economy the presumptive democratic presidential nominee is promising guaranteed coded nineteen testing protective gear for workers call back to their jobs and federally funded leave for people who get sick Biden also promised thousands of new hires to help track the spread of coronavirus the popular country band lady antebellum has changed its name to lady a as NPR's honest asieh seal because reports the group's members say they're embarrassed about not considering the loaded history at the word antebellum until now the trio now known as lady eight made their name change public on Thursday via social media they wrote quote we did not take into account the associations that way down this word referring to the period of history before the civil war which includes slavery they added that the unrest of the past several weeks open their eyes to what they called a blind spots in two thousand eleven however the group told NPR that they thought the name was country and nostalgic the band first had mainstream success with their song need you now which became a Billboard hot one hundred hit in two thousand ten honest as it still goes NPR news New York it has been an unnerving day for people invested in the stock market Wall Street shares closed out their biggest one day drop in months the Dow Jones industrials tumbled eighteen hundred sixty one points the nasdaq composite index slumped five hundred twenty seven points and the S. and P. five hundred lost a hundred and eighty eight in.

Celeste Headlee
"celeste headlee" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:38 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Celeste Headlee in Maryland protesters filled streets parks and public spaces in every state nationwide this week they're protesting police brutality after Minneapolis police officer killed George Floyd last week most were peaceful some turned violent tens of thousands turned out employees home town of Houston while thousands of others chanted his name in historical Lafayette square behind the White House but here's what is six year old daughter Deana said about him in a viral video posted to Instagram by Floyd's longtime friend Stephen Jackson whether or not she's right depends on how the rest of us react to her father's death she will likely carry this grief for the rest of her life and no child should have to cope with losing her dad to police brutality but she's one of thousands of people who carry that grief because a loved one has been killed by a police officer here to talk about this and other top national stories this week for the Friday news roundup we have Eugene Scott a political reporter with The Washington Post Eugene welcome back to one eight thanks for having me I need to Kumar's White House correspondent and associate editor with politico Anita good to have you thanks for having me back and any new Hauser is a freelance journalist former senior political reporter at vice news Daniel it's good to have you as well thanks for having me back so it understandably the protests have dominated the American conversation this week tens of thousands have marched for ten straight nights in protests often defying curfews sometimes clashing with law enforcement I wonder what do you see Eugene are are some overall themes or or trends begin to emerge from you for you yes I think one of the most fascinating things about this is just how different the demonstrators are demographically them past protests especially five years ago when we think about the killing of Michael brown Ferguson this current group it's so much more diverse racially and generationally I think when you look at some of the photos and videos in Minneapolis and across the country I mean you know we're seeing protests in Alaska and in South Dakota it it's not just inner city black Americans who are young and having you know negative encounters with law enforcement that are in the streets and I think that is in part due to what video and social media has has allowed in this moment it really has exposed this issue to new eyes and made people get involved and interested who previously were not Daniel is there also a kind of a overriding moved to the protests I mean it's it's not it's understandable that many cable news channels will feature the the passionate or violent moments but what do we see that's in common among most protests yeah I think if you compare these protests to other protests of the last couple of years say occupy DC or disrupt J. twenty you know when I was out there over this past weekend and watching them remotely throughout the course of the week there there is a different nature to these protests it seems there is a a resolve and a fire that we hadn't seen but but also I mean the protests are got out of hand midweek and and the the sort of the looting and the violence in the push back from the police has also been you know of a nature that that we hadn't seen over the last couple of years definitely an intensity to these protests that that stands out when compared to other similar protests and I need it we have heard that there have been a number of not just attacks journalist injured but some journalists are saying they have been targeted because they're holding a camera what do we know about the relationship in these protests between the journalists covering them and law enforcement we are exactly right we're seeing you know stories pop up all over the country really it's not one city or one one time but we're seeing you know probably these aren't that many people compared to all the people in the journalists that are out there covering these and and the protests they're out there but we are seeing them and I think one of the either one of the reasons it's resonating this time around is because of social media is because of these little video snippets that you can see of journalists being targeted they've been targeted at you know if they are essential workers and they can stay after curfews but in lots of places you know you saw the New York City officials talk about this you know in the last day or so that journalists can be out they can be covering this but instead we're seeing journalists arrested journalists pushed journalist told to get out of the way and it's really I think resonating with a lot of people because we are the eyes and ears of people on the streets and and they want to see what is going on and you've seen city officials push back on this but still we keep seeing these incidents come come you know come forward it's incredible to think that George Floyd was killed just last Monday and last week Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was charged with murder he knelt on George for its neck for more than eight minutes but protesters have promised a March until charges are brought against all four police officers involved in his death and when asked on Sunday what he thought should happen police chief Madera Dando said all four officers are responsible in his idea being silent.

Celeste Headlee officer George Floyd Maryland Minneapolis
"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:38 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

"Celeste Headlee in Maryland protesters filled streets parks and public spaces in every state nationwide this week they're protesting police brutality after Minneapolis police officer killed George Floyd last week most were peaceful some turned violent tens of thousands turned out employees home town of Houston while thousands of others chanted his name in historical Lafayette square behind the White House but here's what is six year old daughter Deana said about him in a viral video posted to Instagram by Floyd's longtime friend Stephen Jackson whether or not she's right depends on how the rest of us react to her father's death she will likely carry this grief for the rest of her life and no child should have to cope with losing her dad to police brutality but she's one of thousands of people who carry that grief because a loved one has been killed by a police officer here to talk about this and other top national stories this week for the Friday news roundup we have Eugene Scott a political reporter with The Washington Post Eugene welcome back to winning thanks for having me I need to Kumar's White House correspondent and associate editor with politico Anita good to have you thanks for having me back and any new Hauser is a freelance journalist former senior political reporter at vice news Daniel it's good to have you as well thanks for having me back so understandably the protests have dominated the American conversation this week tens of thousands have marched for ten straight nights in protests often defying curfews sometimes clashing with law enforcement I wonder what do you see Eugene are are some overall themes board or trends begin to emerge from you for you yes I think one of the most fascinating things about this period is just how different the demonstrators are demographically than past protests it specially five years ago when we think about the killing of Michael brown in Ferguson this current group it's so much more diverse racially and generationally I think when you look at some of the photos and videos in Minneapolis and across the country I mean you know we're seeing protests in Alaska and in South Dakota it it's not just inner city black Americans who are young and having you know negative encounters with law enforcement that are in the streets and I think that is in part due to web video and social media has has allowed in this moment it really has exposed this issue to new eyes and made people get involved and interested who previously were not Daniel is there also a school kind of a overriding mood to the protests I mean it's it's not it's understandable that many cable news channels will feature the the passionate or violent moments but what do we see that's in common among most protests yeah I think if you compare these protests to other protests of the last couple of years say occupy DC or disrupt J. twenty you know when I was out there over this past weekend and watching them remotely throughout the course of the week there there is a different nature to these protests it seems there is a a resolve and a fire that we hadn't seen but but also I mean the protests are got out of hand mid week and and the the sort of the looting and the violence in the push back from the police has also been you know of a nature that that we hadn't seen over the last couple of years definitely an intensity to these protests that that stands out when compared to other similar protests and Anita we have heard that there have been a number of not just up attacks journalist injured but some journalists are saying they have been targeted because they're holding a camera what do we know about the relationship in these protests between the journalists covering them and law enforcement we are exactly right we're seeing you know stories pop up all over the country really it's not one city or one one time but we're seeing you know probably these aren't that many people compared to all the people in the journalists that are out there covering these and and the protests they're out there but we are seeing them and I think one of the you either one of the reasons it's resonating this time around is because of social media is because of these little video snippets that you can see of journalists being targeted they've been targeted at you know they are essential workers and they can stay after curfews but in lots of places that you know you saw the a New York City officials talk about this you know in the last day or so that journalists can be out they can be covering this but instead we're seeing journalists arrested journalist pushed journalist told to get out of the way and it's really I think resonating with a lot of people because we are the eyes and ears of people on the streets and and they want to see what is going on and you've seen city officials push back on this but still we keep seeing these incidents come come you know come forward it's incredible to think that George Floyd was killed just last Monday and last week Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was charged with murder he knelt on George for its neck for more than eight minutes but protesters a promise to March until charges are brought against all four police officers involved in his death and when asked on Sunday what he thought should happen police chief Madera Dando said all four officers are responsible in his idea being silent.

Celeste Headlee officer George Floyd Maryland Minneapolis
"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

05:03 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

"Hi I'm Celeste Headlee today on one A. it's the Friday news roundup president trump told American cities that if they didn't call in the National Guard he would send troops to their towns that message came right before he used tear gas to disperse peaceful protesters so he could hold a photo op at a church several generals have come out against deploying troops including the defense secretary himself in Georgia a witness was startling testimony in the case of a mock armory and the Minnesota friends and family gather to remember the life of George Floyd we'd love to hear your thoughts tweet us at one eight live from NPR news I'm Jax beer amid the demonstrations around the country following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis a new NPR PBS newshour Marist poll is finding president trump's political standing is suffering NPR's Domenico Montanaro has details forty one percent of Americans approve of the job trump is doing as president but fifty five percent now disapprove that's a near record high disapproval rating beneath those numbers the intensity of disapproval is notable almost half of people in this country forty seven percent now say they strongly disapprove of the job the president is doing and in a head to head general election match up trump is losing to presumptive democratic nominee Joe Biden fifty to forty three percent dominical Montanaro NPR news Washington another Confederate monument has been taken down in Alabama after becoming a focal point for protest over the police killing of George Floyd NPR's Debbie Elliott reports mobile took down a statue overnight with no advance public notice the statue of a Confederate naval officer on a prominent downtown street had been vandalized during protests earlier this week mobile mayor sandy Stimpson says taking it down was not an attempt to rewrite history but intended to remove a distraction to focus on the future of the Gulf coast city Alabama's largest city Birmingham dismantled the giant monument to Confederate soldiers and sailors earlier in the week in violation of a state law intended to preserve Confederate monuments elsewhere authorities in Macon county near historic Tuskegee university are investigating a cross burning on a bridge over interstate eighty five Debbie Elliott NPR news the World Health Organization is issuing new guidance on how to make non medical masks the mask material should be functional and breathable NPR's ping Wong has more cloth masks level is three different layers that's according to new research commissioned by W. H. O. Maria van Kirk over a W. H. O. official says each layer serves a different purpose the inner layer being an absorbent material like cotton a middle layer of non woven material such as polypropylene which is the filter an outer layer which is a non absorbent material such as a poly ester or polyester blend that combination of fabrics can catch at least seventy percent of the droplets coming out of a person's nose and mouth with W. H. O. says it's important to avoid elastic materials which can lose their efficacy when they stretch and they also recommend using materials that can be washed frequently with hot water and soap long NPR news better than expected may jobs numbers sent financial markets sharply higher today the labor department announced that while the unemployment rate was still in the double digits last month actually had declined slightly the economy added two and a half million jobs the Dow Jones industrial average was up eight hundred and twenty nine points today the nasdaq rose a hundred ninety eight points the S. and P. was up eighty one points this is NPR and from KPCC news I'm Nick Roman with the stories we're covering it seven oh for several weeks of stay at home orders in California have helped push down the number of new coronavirus infections at the beginning of the outbreak one person infected by corona virus would transmitted to three other people that ratio is now down to one to one but Dr Christina galley who oversees the LA county department of health services says to David David collected last week shows more people are becoming infected if transmission has indeed increased then the model predicts that we will have a continued increase in hospital patient volume over the next two to four weeks and we would anticipate beginning to see that change happen over the coming one to two weeks Dr Kelly says LA county hospital seven of ventilators on hand but might not have enough ICU beds for covert nineteen patients if there's a spike in the next two to four weeks and then warning stands in contrast to this in a week California will allow schools day camps bars gyms and some pro sports to reopen always social distancing restrictions county health officials now have the state's guidelines and will decide when to move ahead still a lot of work to do the state says before schools and childcare centres can reopen it has to send a more than forty seven thousand no touch their monitors a hundred and forty three thousand gallons of hand sanitizer nearly two and a.

Celeste Headlee trump president
"celeste headlee" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

The Ultimate Health Podcast

03:09 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on The Ultimate Health Podcast

"Neither does your body. We know that picking up. That phone causes your heart rate to rise causes. Your cortisol levels often to rise. We know that facebook makes you emotionally miserable, and we also know that that phone is very. Very distracting and exhausting to your brain. We know this from a number of different studies. For example they have tested out brain activity while someone leaves their email inbox open on their computers all the time, so common that when you're working on a computer, you just have your email climate open in the back or maybe one of your tabs on your Internet is g, mail or something right, but we know that if you leave that email inbox open, your brain is thinking about it all the time. Your brain is preparing to respond to a notification that might come in. It's sort of like. Like a runner at the starting gate, waiting to respond to an alert, and so in point of fact, if you leave your email inbox open all the time, your I q falls by ten to twelve points rats. How like exhausting it is? That's how much energy your brain has to quit into thinking about that email inbox, and it's the same thing as when you're. You're using your smartphone as some kind of rate, or you think it's a relaxation device. It is not while you even talk about the fact that if the cell phone isn't being used, but it's within view. Docking Causes Cortisol. Cortisol response in a stress response in the body. Yeah, because again, your brain is thinking about it very good. One test distance make it even more personal rated one series of tests in the UK enrich. They had strangers sit down across the table from one another and have a ten minute conversation, and in half of those conversations. They just set our cell phone on the table. It belongs to neither person didn't make any noise and yet the people who had a conversation with that smartphone present were like sixty seven percent, more likely to say the other person was unfriendly, likeable and traffic for. Of, that smartphone is having an effect on your brain read. Most of us are just completely unaware of so doing this research and learning what you've learned. What are some of the changes you've made? How do you go about handling your computer and your cell phone? I assume now that you're independent working for yourself. You're working at home. So how do you go about managing that? There's a few things that I do first of all. All I I take plenty of breaks from Mike Devices I do not feel the need when I am watching Netflix to also be scanning device smartphone, and if I take a walk with my dog I will often leave the smartphone at home i. don't need it all the time. That's a tough transition to make, but just a reminder to everybody who's listening that I came out in two thousand seven right like it's very recent. That we were getting through, life cried easily without having a smartphone. Always present you know, remind yourself of that the other thing that's really important and I think this is important for people to remember there ever stuck at home for a reason for a long period of time is that you have to choose a space where you work your choose a workspace in other words. You don't want work claiming every part of your home in the same way that you want..

cortisol facebook UK Netflix Mike Devices
"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

15:05 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on KPCC

"Hi I'm Celeste Headlee today on one eight to borrow a phrase let's do the numbers with one in four workers now out of work the competition for most jobs is fierce and our labor market is changing those looking to return to their old jobs will find a different landscape design to meet different needs what are these new jobs where are they and what we already know about those parts of the country ready to rebound and those will find it much harder to come back we put together an economic brain trust to help us come up with answers so we need your questions tweet us at one eight live from NPR news I'm Jack Speer officials in Minneapolis are bracing for what could be a third night of civil unrest protests are growing over the case of George Floyd a black man who died Monday after a white police officer used his need to pay him Floyd to the ground here's NPR's Adrian Florido Minneapolis mayor Jacob fry and other local leaders spent much of the day pleading for calm after a night in which protesters looted businesses and set them on fire there have been scattered reports of new vandalism and fires today including in the neighboring city of Saint Paul and officials fear the tonight's demonstrations will once again descend into violence Minnesota's governor has activated the National Guard protesters are demanding that the officers involved in George Floyd's death be charged with murder and say they'll stay in the streets until that happens local state and federal authorities say they are investigating the urging people to be patient in room thirty the NPR news Minneapolis angered by what he sees as efforts by social media company Twitter to stifle free speech president trump has signed an executive order aimed at curbing a liability protections for social media companies it comes after trump blasted Twitter for applying fact check alerts to some of his tweets those are made unsubstantiated claims that mail in voting lead to rampant fraud and stolen ballots what they choose to fact check and what they choose to ignore or even promote is nothing more than a political activism group for political activism and it's inappropriate trump initially threatened the companies with new regulation or closing but that would require involvement by Congress and the FCC to earn a statement called the executive order reactionary and politicized a doctor from Washington state is suing the hospital where he used to work saying he was fired for speaking up about inadequate safety precautions for the corona virus this will stone reports the lawsuit comes as health care workers around the country are raising concerns about risky working conditions in late March Dr Ming Lin lost his bid Ishant in the E. are at a hospital owned by peace health in Bellingham Washington where he'd worked for many years he was terminated after raising concerns on social media that his employer wasn't doing enough to protect staff and patients from the corona virus like requiring masks and doing temperature checks the American civil liberties union is representing Dr land is more than just a wrongful termination case for me this is about people in the front line being given the opportunity to speak out a statement from PeaceHealth said Lin's actions were disruptive in that he did not go through the proper channels to voice his concerns for NPR news I'm will stone in Seattle the U. S. economy is apparently deteriorated at an even faster pace than most analysts had thought that's based on revised first quarter gross domestic product numbers commerce department in revised estimate for the first three months of the year says economic output fell to five percent annual rate stocks lost ground today the Dow down a hundred and forty seven points the nasdaq fell forty three points this is NPR and from KPCC news I'm Nick Roman with the stories we're covering it seven oh four California nursing homes must now test all residents and staff for corona virus even if they don't have suspected cases KPCC's Jackie forty eight says the state health department ordered blanket testing as nursing homes continue to struggle to contain outbreaks until now individual county health departments determined if and when nursing homes with test staff and residents for Kobe nineteen the lack of testing likely contributed to more than sixteen hundred deaths in nursing homes across California and thousands more cases each nursing home must now draft a plan to test everyone in the facility and follow up periodically with additional testing KPCC's Jackie forty eight three suspected gang members are in custody charged with gunning down a twenty seven year old mother as he drove home last month from a birthday party Magali Alberto was shot at the stop light in south LA LAPD detectives say three men fired into a car the sage was not the target her family spoke today at a news conference police withheld their names to protect them until the end of our lives for them first that's what they are monsters who committed this crime to pay with a life sentence in jail and to never come out and to see the sunlight again that audio courtesy of our media partner NBC four and this evening only America our city and city council president Marie Martinez are calling on city councilman Jose Huizar to resign a day after one of his former aides agreed to plead guilty in the fed's corruption investigation at LA city hall seven of six support for NPR comes from NPR stations other contributors include the pew charitable trusts working to preserve wilderness restore biodiversity and increase understanding of ocean ecology more information is available at butros dot org and Americans for the arts Hey here's some good news join us in celebrating KPCC's regional Edward R. Murrow award for her role in grain California collaboration about aging in the Golden State no one has ever outright told her she's too old but I'm I think that's part of why she's not getting hired after time they'll even look at the application I have one now they just look at me did you know this sees that I'm older eighty nine point three KPCC rising to the challenge rise with us this is one eight I'm Celeste Headlee broadcasting from Maryland everyone has been burned by the covert nineteen shut downs but some sectors and some demographics have been hit harder than others I'm gonna throw some numbers at you these are all from the bureau of labor statistics are you ready okay in April during the height of the shelter in place orders the unemployment rate for women climbed to fifteen point five percent the rate for Latinos jumped to eighteen point nine that's the highest in the nation the leisure and hospitality industry lost forty seven percent of its positions and ironically the health care industry has seen record job losses one point four million her to put these numbers into perspective for it into perspective for us is only schooled she senior economist at the economic policy institute police welcome to one eight thank you so much for inviting me and Eric Hurst is deputy director of the Becker Friedman institute at the university of Chicago Eric it's good to have you as well a nice to be here so is where do we stand we just got more numbers can you give us sort of an overview of what of what our job numbers are sure the numbers are out astounding really when we think about how to even make sense of them I think one of the best ways to think about the unemployment numbers the numbers that came out today is to look at who is applied who is now getting those claims paid out who may be on the new pandemic unemployment assistance program which is now operational in most states although some states are still not reporting that that is up and running and how many have continuing claims if we put all those numbers together we're looking at about thirty four million workers that either on unemployment benefits are applied and are waiting to get approved it's a huge number yeah thirty four million people so let's if to put that in perspective that's more than one in five workers if you look at the all workers in the economy more than one in five are either receiving unemployment benefits are waiting for approval that's astounding it is astounding Eric is there a context for this I mean it the way everyone keeps pointing back to the Great Depression and I wonder if if that's a fair comparison you know that if we go a step before that to the Great Recession so just a decade ago which was the worst recession we had in U. S. history since the Great Depression Justin perspective in that recession from the start until about a year and a half in we lost eight million jobs so we're now talking thirty million versus eight so this is five times you know four times worse than already the the Great Recession and so then you have to go back historically then you get the numbers like this amount of job loss in in the in the Great Depression of the Great Depression was far more longer that was multiple multiple years this is you know a couple of months but the magnitude of losses is on that comparison so at least let's dig into the numbers and the people that these numbers represent we have heard from various sectors that women have been hit particularly hard by this pandemic any idea why women are seeing more job losses well I think there's a couple of reasons of maybe three reasons I'd say I'm one of them is that overall you're saying that the sectors that are getting hit are disproportionately you find women in them so things like a leisure and hospitality as you said education and health services those are two of the bigger sectors that were saying job losses also retail trade and so you're seeing them hit more because of occupational segregation where their jobs are you're also seeing them hit more because they are appear to be more likely to be some of the frontline workers as opposed to the higher level managers that didn't lose their jobs so historical discrimination would have put them at certain lower level jobs and men and so even in those sectors where you're seeing job losses they're getting a disproportionate number of their job losses and that's true in male dominated sectors as well so job losses in manufacturing there are more women than you would have thought given their shares of manufacturing jobs overall same with transportation and warehousing or professional business services they're just seeing more job losses the third confounding factor that might be affecting women is the fact that schools closed great schools closed across the country and women may have had to quit their job to take care of their young children and so some of the numbers may be reflecting that phenomenon women historically is that have disproportionately taking on more of the child rearing in family is more of the caretaking for young people for older people who may be sick and they may have had to leave their jobs for those reasons Eric when we saw you brought up the Great Recession in the Great Recession men tended to lose more jobs than women what's changed here it's been almost all the industry composition so historically men do lose more jobs than women in recession because the industries that tend to be most cyclical fall the most during recessions are industries like manufacturing and construction so if you go back and take a look at the Great Recession those industries fell far more than retail and leisure and hospitality and men predominantly work in those industries in in this recession again the the the clients were largest in leisure hospitality education retail where women where we're dominated more so almost all of the gap is due to the differential gap between this recession in the Great Recession is due to the industry composition what about different races and ethnicities where are the differences appearing there which groups are being hit the hardest if you see in all recessions you'll see black and Latino workers tend to lose more jobs than than white workers in in all recessions we're seeing the same patterns in this recession I think what is different in this recession is what we alluded to at the top it's just the magnitudes are so much larger just because the job loss overall is so much larger at least this is something that you're currently studying right now right how code nineteen has affected African Americans in particular what have you learned yes absolutely only think about we've been talking about job losses when I think about what's happening in the cove it nineteen a Connie I think there is being three main groups of workers first there are those of lost their jobs and face economic insecurity second there those are classified as essential workers and face health and security as a result and third there are those who are able to continue working for the safety of their homes and when you look at black workers in particular they are the least likely to be found in that last group so they're facing their they've suffered record numbers of job losses over the last couple of months along with the ensuing related economic devastation and they're also disproportionately found among the essential workers those front line workers in the economy today who continue going to work risking their health and that of their families because they're unable to sustain adequate social distance from their co workers and customers so they're really suffering either economic and security health and security or both and Eric I think it's fair to say that because of historic disparities in our economic system that tend to hit hardest on people of color if they were already in a precarious position and unable to sort of weather the financial storm that this pandemic has brought is that fair I think that's fair and I think it's you know it's it's broader in in the sense that you know inequality has been rising in the United States for you know decades upon decades and so we've seen that not only in you know transgressing that in this recession in particular in Soviet instead of looking at race you look at you know just low income workers in general so people who are paid you know fourteen dollars an hour or less in in this recession their job losses were somewhere around thirty six thirty seven percent of them lost their job where people at the top of the income distribution was about nine percent so again this is just the magnitude there are huge so this recession is really xcelerated inequality trends that we've been seeing it in the country for for decades an interesting wrinkle leads to what Eric just mentioned is that because low income workers lost their jobs and high income workers didn't that lead to on a rise in wages for April from the labor department correct right right I I would shied I would encourage people to look away from that wage growth those numbers because it absolutely reflects one hundred percent a change in the composition of workers so if you calculate an average.

Celeste Headlee
"celeste headlee" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

11:39 min | 9 months ago

"celeste headlee" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"Right. I want to see a show of hands. How many of you have undifferentiated someone on facebook because they said something offensive about politics or religion childcare food and how many of you know at least one person that you avoid? Because you just don't WanNa talk to them. In order to have a polite conversation we just had to follow the advice of Henry. Higgins in my fair lady stick to the weather and your health but these days with climate change anti vaccine. Those subjects are not safe either. So this world that we live in this world in which every conversation has the potential to devolve into an argument where politicians can't speak to one another and where even the most trivial issues someone fighting both passionately for it and against it. It's not normal pew. Research did a study of ten thousand American adults and they found that at this moment we are more. We are more divided than we ever have been in. History were less likely to compromise. Which means we're not listening to each other and we make decisions about where to live who to marry and even who our friends are going to be based on what we already believe again. That means we're not listening to each other. A conversation requires a balance between talking and listening and somewhere along the way we lost that balance. Now part of that is due to technology these smartphones. That you all either have in your hands or close enough that you could grab them really quickly. According to Pew Research About a third of American teenagers send more than one hundred texts a day and many of them almost most of them are more likely to text their friends than they are to talk to them face to face. There's this great piece in the Atlantic was written by a high school teacher named Paul Barnwell and he gave his kids a communication project. He wanted to teach them how to speak on a specific subject without using notes. And he said this. I came to realize I came to realize that conversational competence might be the single most overlooked skill. We failed to teach kids spend hours each day engaging with ideas and each other through screens but rarely do they have an opportunity to hone their interpersonal communication skills. It might sound like a funny question but we have to ask. Ourselves is there any twenty-first-century century skill more important than being able to stain sustain? Coherent confident conversation. Now I make my living talking to people Nobel Prize winners truck drivers billionaires kindergarten teachers heads of state plumbers. I talked to people like talked to people but I don't like I talked to some people. I disagree with deeply on a personal level but I still have a great conversation with them so I'd like to spend the next ten minutes or so teaching you how to talk and how to listen. Many of you have already heard a lot of advice on this things. Like look the person in the. I think of interesting topics to discuss in advance. Look a nod and smile. The show that you're paying attention. Repeat back what you just heard or summarize it so. I want you to forget. All of that is crap. There is no reason to learn how to show. You're paying attention. If you are in fact paying attention I actually use the exact same skills as professional interviewer that I'd do in regular life so I'm going to teach you how to interview people and that's actually going to help you. Learn how to be better conversationalist conversation without wasting your time without getting bored and please God without offending anybody. We've all had really great conversations. We've had them before we know what it's like the kind of conversation when you walk away feeling engaged and inspired or were you feel like you've made a real connection or you've been perfectly understood. There is no reason why most of your interactions can't be like that so I have ten basic rules. I'm going to walk you through all of them. But honestly if you just choose one of them and master it you're arguing enjoy better conversations number one don multitask and I don't mean just set down your cell phone or your tablet or your car keys or whatever is in your hand I mean be present. Be In that moment. Don't be thinking about your argument. You have to their boss. Don't be thinking about what you're going to have for dinner if you WANNA get out of the conversation to get out of the conversation but don't be half in it and half out of it number two don't pontificate if you wanted to state your opinion without any opportunity for response or argument or push back or growth. Write a blog now. There's a really good reason. Why don't allow pundits on my show because they're really boring if they're a conservative they're gonNA hate Obama and food stamps and abortion if liberal. They'RE GONNA hate big banks and oil corporations in Dick Cheney totally predictable and you don't WanNa be like that. You need to enter every conversation assuming that you have something to learn. The famous therapist Scott Peck said that true listening requires a setting aside of one self and sometimes that means setting aside your personal opinion. He said that sensing this acceptance. The speaker will become less and less vulnerable and more and more likely to open up the inner recesses of his or her mind to the listener again assume that you have something to learn Bill Nye everyone you will ever meet know something that you don't. I put it this way. Everybody is an expert in something number. Three US Open ended questions in this case. Take a cue from journalist. Start Your questions with WHO? What where when why or how? If you put in a complicated question you're going to get a simple answer out if I ask you. Were you terrified? You're going to respond to the most powerful word in that sentence which is terrified and the answer is yes I was. I wasn't were you angry. Yes I was very angry. Let them describe it? They're the ones that know. Try asking them things. Like what was that like? How did that feel because then they might have to stop for a moment and think about it and you're GonNa get a much more interesting response number four go with the flow. That means thoughts will come into your mind and you need to let them go out of your mind. We've heard interviews often in which a guest is talking for several minutes and then the host comes back in and asked a question which seems like it comes out of nowhere or it's already been answered that means the host probably stopped listening to minutes ago because he thought of this really clever question and he was just bound and determined to say that and we do the exact same thing. We're sitting there having a conversation with someone and then we remember that time that we met Hugh Jackman in a coffee shop and we stopped listening. Stories and ideas are gonNA come to you. You need to let them come and let them go number five. If you don't know say that you don't know now people on the radio especially on. Npr are much more aware that they're going on the record and so then more careful about what they claim to be an expert in what they claim to know for sure. Do that err. On the side of caution talk should not be cheap number six. Don't equate your experience with theirs. If they're talking about having lost family member don't start talking about the time that you lost a family member. If they're talking about the trouble that they're having at work don't tell them about how much you hate job. It's not the same. It is never the same. All experiences are individual and more importantly it is not about you. You don't need to take that moment to prove how amazing you are or how much you've suffered somebody ask. Stephen Hawking wants what is I q was and he says I have no idea people who brag about their accuser. Losers conversations are not a promotional opportunity number seven. Try Not to repeat yourself. It's condescending and it's really boring and we tend to do it a lot especially in work conversations or in conversations with our kids we have a point to make so we just keep rephrasing it over and over. Don't do that number eight. Stay out of the weeds. Frankly people don't care about the years. The names the dates all those details that you're struggling to come up with in your mind. They don't care what they care about. Is You the care about? What's you're like what you have in common? So forget the details. Leave him out number nine. This is not the last one but it is the most important one. Listen I cannot tell you how many really important people have said that listening is perhaps the most the number one most important skill that you could develop Buddhist said. And I'm paraphrasing. If your mouth is open you're not learning and Calvin. Coolidge said. No Man ever listened his way out of a job. Why do we not listen to each other number one? We'd rather talk what I'm talking. I'm in control. I don't have to hear anything. I'm not interested in. I'm the center of attention. I can bolster my identity. But there's another reason we get distracted. The average person talks about two hundred and twenty five words per minute but we can listen at up to five hundred words per minute so our minds are filling in those other two hundred seventy five words and look. I know it takes effort and energy to actually pay attention to someone. But if you can't do that you're not in a conversation you're just two people shouting out barely related sentences in the same place you have to. You have to listen to one. Another Stephen Covey said it very beautifully. He said most of us. Don't listen with the intent to understand. We listen with the intent to reply one more rule and number ten. And it's this one be brief. All of this boils down to the same basic concept and it is this one be interested in other people. I grew up with a very famous grandfather. And there was kind of a ritual in my home. People would come over to talk to my grandparents and after they would leave. My mother would come home to and say. Do you know who that was? She was the runner up to Miss America. He was the mayor of Sacramento. She won the Pulitzer Prize. He's a Russian ballet dancer and I started. I kind of grew up assuming everyone has some hidden amazing thing about them and I honestly I think it's what makes me a better host. I keep my mouth shut as often as I possibly. Can I keep my mind open? And I'm always prepared to be amazed and I'm never disappointed. You do the same thing. Go out talk to people. Listen to people and most importantly be prepared to be amazed. Thanks for more. Ted Talks to Ted DOT COM..

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