7 Burst results for "Catherine Sheer"

"catherine sheer" Discussed on 60-Second Science

60-Second Science

06:39 min | 4 months ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on 60-Second Science

"We bring you up to speed on the science behind the most urgent questions about the virus and the disease we demystify the research and help you understand what it really means. I'm tanya lewis. I'm josh fifteen scientific. American senior health editors. Today we're going to talk about an oncoming wave of disabling briefs that could hit lots of people and we'll try and unconfirmed about the complicated new mask wearing guidelines from the cdc. This is a sad story but it's important people who've lost loved ones to covid are at high risk for a mental health problem called prolonged grief disorder. How is that different. From normal morning well it's paralyzing tiny. This is a high level of mental anguish that keeps people from leaving their homes taking care of their families and holding down a job. It's a recognized syndrome that can go on for a year or more without up ordinarily after losing someone close you can be anguished and then you start to function again in time but people with prolonged grief described their lives as simply waiting to die. The scary thing is that it looks like there will be a huge number of these people because of covid katie harman courage one of our siam dot com contributors crunch some numbers in a story. That's now up on our website about five to ten percent of bereaved people. Get this condition. There are almost six hundred thousand cova dead in the us and each one leaves behind about nine close mourners research shows. This means there could be a quarter million to a half million. People disabled by grief in the coming months mental health specialists sake cova desk make brief people particularly prone to this problem. The deaths are often sudden. Those left behind are cut off. From normal morning rituals says catherine sheer a psychiatrist. To columbia university plus travel and activity restrictions. Make it hard to make. Connections and rebuild lives at on economic hardship in general anxiety. And you've got a real problem and there are already signs that the pandemic triggers disorder research published earlier this year found indications of prolonged grief in nearly thirty eight percent of pandemic bereaved individuals in china. That is more than triple. The typical rate the disorder can also exacerbate suicide alley and substance. Misuse can people. Get help for this condition. That could be really tough. We're not ready for something. This big in terms of mental health resources grief disorder disorders usually treated with months of therapy. That works but we don't have therapists. There are about thirty psychologists and fewer than sixteen psychiatrists per one hundred thousand people in the. Us numbers are even lower in poor communities that have suffered the most deaths during the pandemic people in such areas who tend to be people of color often can't afford insurance to cover mental health treatment so there aren't easy answers. Experts say a safe return to morning rituals vaccinated or mask could help so could relieving. Other pandemic stresses like getting evicted or going hungry. That relief gives a grieving family. A chance to deal with the loss of a parent for example and the biden administration has promised two and a half billion dollars to aid state. Mental health services. But i don't know if that money will bolster the grief counseling. That's needed here. If you do need help if you or someone you know is struggling or having thoughts of suicide there are places to turn call the national suicide prevention lifeline at one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five or contact the crisis text line by texting talk t a l k two seven four one seven four one. The cdc recently issued new guidelines saying that vaccinated. People no longer need to wear a mask or social distance in most indoor and outdoor settings with a few exceptions like hospitals. What do you make of the guidelines and are you ready to get your mask. The new guidelines came as a surprise to many public health experts and to the public. Just a couple of weeks ago. The cdc was saying that vaccinated people needed to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor settings. So it felt a bit like whiplash. Some accused the cdc of caving to public pressure. But the cdc says its new guidelines are based purely on the evidence that vaccines are extremely good and not just preventing people from getting infected but also from transmitting the virus to others. Still some experts say. The guidance was premature as angela. Rasmussen a viral adjusted the vaccine and infectious disease organization at canada's university of saskatchewan pointed out in a recent article in slate. It's not so much the science subject to the vaccines really do protect people. It's the way that science is being communicated. The biggest problem is. There's no way to know if someone who's not wearing a mask has been vaccinated or not. It's basically an honor code and that could leave unvaccinated people including young children or immuno-compromised people vulnerable to getting covid plus it makes it virtually impossible for businesses to enforce mass guidelines which could make essential workers feel unsafe. And we're already seeing some places that are getting rid of their mask. Mandates even though more than half the country is still unvaccinated tanya. You asked our siam colleagues. Many of whom are now fully vaccinated about if when and where they're going to keep wearing their masks. What did you hear many told me. They were happy to ditch their masks. Outside uncrowded areas one even said she felt near giddy but they were planning to keep them on indoors in places like grocery stores or public transit. They wanted to set an example of protecting others and also protecting their children are loved ones who are unvaccinated others said they were happy to comply with state or local guidelines. But we're ready to stop wearing masks in situations. Cvc says are safe especially the people who are glasses who were constantly having to fight the fog. Personally i've been happy to take my mask off when i'm outside away from other people but i plan on keeping my mask on when i'm in most indoor settings with strangers at least until more people are vaccinated in the number of cova cases much lower. What about you josh. I keep mine in my pocket. And i put it on when i run into crowds indoors or outside. Sounds reasonable for my part. It's not that. I think the vaccine won't protect me. Though no vaccine is one hundred percent effective. It's more the fact that given so many people are unvaccinated. Guess whether or not i am. It's not a huge inconvenience to where one if it helps model behavior that keeps other safe and happy to keep it on. Now you're up to speed and thanks for joining us. Come back in two weeks for the next episode of covid quickly and check out. Sam dot com updated an in-depth cova news..

china tanya lewis Rasmussen Today two weeks more than triple about thirty psychologists each one katie harman thirty eight percent a year one hundred percent two and a half billion dollars earlier this year one hundred thousand people about nine close mourners couple of weeks ago ten percent fewer than sixteen psychiatris canada
"catherine sheer" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

06:30 min | 6 months ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on BrainStuff

"This episode is brought to you by discover. Wanna hear something. Amazing discover matches all the cash. Back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically with no limit on how much you can earn. How amazing is that in fact. It's even more amazing because you can earn cash back on every purchase groceries clothing and in the past year probably that new streaming service and when your first year wraps up only discover will match all the cash back you've earned at the end of your first year learn more discover dot com slash match limitations apply. Welcome to brainstorm production of iheartradio brain stuff. Learn vauban here at some point in our lives at multiple points we all grieve in ways personal and public in ways silent and loud these days though grieving has taken on new forms because of the coronavirus pandemic we can't yet safely soothe. Those who have lost loved ones with a hug. An arm around the shoulder. We can't yet for fear of spreading the virus. Gather safely to say goodbye. We can't be there for others physically and others can't be there for us. An expert say that being there is one of the most important parts of the grieving process. It's been devastating for the article that this episode is based on how stuff works spoke with catherine sheer a professor of psychiatry in the columbia school of social work and the founding director of the center for complicated grief at columbia university. She said. I think that i would say we're probably on average. We're probably doing okay. One of the things we're doing is acknowledging it which is huge often is something that we kind of have acknowledged as a nation sheer says it took the us sometime to face up to the very real impact. The pandemic is having. She points to memorials that. Joe biden and kamala harris held in washington. Dc initially as president and vice president elect and later as president and vice president as important if somewhat belated first steps sheer said that kind of thing. We're not doing very well with and we need to do better because it's very helpful and of course we're not doing well with the disparity issues either. Were subjecting some of our most vulnerable populations to grief as well as death but the spotlight on grief as the pandemic has worn on has intensified. And that's good. She said there's been a massive increase in the interest and understanding grief and helping the public understand it and deal with it in that way. I think we're doing very very well. Finally were paying attention to something that is always important in our lives. People are so much more aware and respectful of grief and they were a year ago. The amount of grief that has accompanied the pandemic is staggering in itself. Around five hundred forty. Three thousand people have died in america alone and close to three million worldwide coupled with the restrictions put on us are grieving. The damage to the living is compounded. Those normal rituals of grieving things like funerals wakes family meals. Family and friends gathering are extremely important. Sheer said they help. You feel like you belong. Everyone is joining you. It's something familiar. It sort of brings you into the living world. It acknowledges things have changed for you in a big way. There are so many benefits to those we have to simultaneously. Accept the death and honor the person who died and also move forward in our own lives without those rituals especially early in two twenty at the beginning of the pandemic people felt lost but as the pandemic has stretched into a second year have found alternative ways to grieve video. Chat funerals can be attended by people in different homes cities states or even more distant support. Groups have flourished online online. Church services have helped many phone calls between and among loved ones have been used with great effectiveness. The centers for disease control and prevention suggests that family and friends can honor those lost by reciting a poem or religious verse within their own households. Loved ones can be remembered by launching blogs or memory books online with friends and family contributing sheer said. I think many people are being quite creative and trying to do textually the usual rituals. And i do think that's helpful. It still not quite the same. So it's a challenge. Shears center for complicated. Grief focuses on several steps in the road toward healing using the acronym. Healing honor your loved ones and yourself. Discover your own interests and values ease emotional pain. Open yourself to emotions both painful and pleasant ones a trust that you can deal with emotional pain. It doesn't control you accept grief and let it find a place in your life. Learn to live with the reminders of your loss. Integrate memories of your loved. One let them enrich your life. Help you learn. Grow narrate the stories of the death for yourself share them with others and finally gather others around you connect with your community let people in and let them support you. Creativity and finding safeway's to work on these steps is key until vaccines are more widely available sheer said one of the basic premises. That i work with is that we all have natural adaptive capacity specifically for adapting to loss if you think about it. Loss is ubiquitous in human experience. If we couldn't do that if we couldn't adapt we couldn't have a human race basically because when we're grieving intensely it's very very debilitating. When things open up. People will have the opportunity to join with friends and family to honor the person who died. Maybe it won't be a funeral per se but we can have a memorial and that's something we often do later anyway. We'll be able to more easily. Visit the cemetery in those things will be able to re engage with people. Of course all of this is to say that an important part of coping with grief after the loss of a loved. One is taking care of yourself. Grief can be overwhelming both physically and mentally and maybe more so the pandemic so doing what you can to eat well exercise.

Joe biden washington america kamala harris three million Three thousand people a year ago second year One first year columbia university columbia dot com one first steps iheartradio both past year five hundred two twenty
"catherine sheer" Discussed on In The Limelight

In The Limelight

08:10 min | 7 months ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on In The Limelight

"It's difficult producing episode. I kept going back and forth about whether this is a question about healing from grief or helping yourself feel less lonely. The truth is out. It's a mix of both so we're gonna touch on both. And really explore how they're intertwined and related. Some forms of grief can be very long lasting and can require special treatment but also loneliness is incredibly common part of grief and loss and isn't necessarily indicative of a medical condition at all. So let's dig deeper. I we're going to define some terms. Let's start with grief very simply. It's the reaction to a loss to a meaningful loss. It's your body and mind kind of even larger than that your spiritual response your social response. It's the whole thing is grief is what we call grief. This is dr catherine sheer. She's an internist psychiatrists who founded and directs the center for complicated grief at columbia university. She's been studying and treating people with grief for more than thirty years and over that time. She seen a lot of different. People have very different experiences of grief and she says all those experiences can be normal. We talk about grief as the form loved when someone we loved is and if you think about your love relationships or everybody's love relationship not tour are the same right. There are some commonalities but the commonalities or not so much in everyday life as they are in the what we call the big picture or thirty thousand feet. So what we're dealing with is going to be a little bit different each time. Dr share often deals with patients who are experiencing what she calls prolonged grief. This generally means consumed grief that's experienced for more than a year but there are more tests to determine what is and isn't prolonged grief. It's a kind of form of grief that stays very strong and very pervasive for years and years. After someone we loved is so grief doesn't ever totally go away resolve if you will but it does evolve over time as we adapt to a world. That's very changed. After someone we loved is it's not center stage anymore. We we regain our ability to connect with other people and to engage in our lives in ways that can give us really satisfaction. Enjoy in our lives again. This is one of the things that defines grief actually and makes it distinct from depression when we're depressed we. We actually have an impairment in our ability to experience positive feelings. And we really don't have that in grief. We sometimes feel survivor guilt. So we kind of don't want to experience positive feelings but we actually can. And we usually do their exercises dr sheer suggests for maintaining a connection to pleasure simple rewarding things that can be done each day but that can feel a lot easier said than done especially because of the loneliness that often accompanies grief. I will say that loneliness of all the of all the things that people feel. I think it's one of the in a way one of the last kind of recede. It's one of the hardest to deal with indiana originally. Wrote to as she said. I am a partner. She told us that her husband was her. Everything i asked dr sheer what happens. When you lose someone so vital in your life in dr sheer said that zing. Anyone is hard of course but it can be particularly difficult. Lose someone so important to lose that person. You feel safe around. Who makes you feel confident. Who shares your pleasures and your sadness and so when you do lose someone like this we just feel the absence of that person and it feels like no one else can possibly be anything like that even if we have other people that are sort of like that in our lives but when this person goes it's very threatening and And needless to say terrible and we feel like again like no one else can fulfill that role in. We can't we can't get ourselves even to connect with other people. So how can someone move forward after a loss. This monumental one way. Dr sheer says is to find somebody else. Ideally another partner. But it doesn't have to be a new spouse. It could be a really good friend. Someone who can listen who wants to listen. Who's really interested in your experience and can listen and kind of validate what you're experiencing can be. They're walking by your side and maybe can help you a little bit with coping with some of the things you might be coping with. But we know that that's really hard especially during pandemic and it's not the only option. Something dr sheer has seen help. A lot of patients actually is discovering a new way to express themselves. We've run into people with complicated grief who've had a long standing interest in in playing the piano and they never for one reason or another they never learned in so. Can you learn to play the piano. Can you learned to paint. If that's what i mean. You don't invent something for yourself but you look into yourself as best you can in think about what you really. What would be really interesting to you or what you what something that. You really truly value that. Maybe you're not doing right now. Either one of those things. I think that that also can help with loneliness because again i think the main thing i think that is important is is feeling like you're able to communicate out right That makes you feel much less lonely when you can when you can tell someone who wants to listen to you. Dr sheer told us repeatedly in order to start healing after loss. An important step is to fortify your relationships and yeah maybe even start a new relationship. I think that's the best way to overcome loneliness. Because that's what it's about this way. Easier said than done and relationships of all kinds can go haywire after a loss so after the break. We're going to talk to somebody who has seen that darkest lonely as part of grief before and we're gonna get some advice on finding your way through. Thanks for listening to today's episode of self checking in when our team started working on the podcast. We asked self readers to submit questions and in a year like this one. It probably comes as no surprise that there were a lot of questions about how to manage stress. One quick and easy way to de stress is to take a deep breath pause those annoying calendar notifications and try stepping away from your computer. Once your screen. Free try a hands on minds on creative escape with lego sets you can build an inspiring work of art or global monument or pop culture legend. Let lego sets help you slow down and decompress this year learn more and get inspired at lego dot com slash adults and take your screen free escape to the next level by telling your smart speaker to open lego moments now back to our show. Lego don't welcome support for this. Podcast comes from progressive. What would you do with an extra eight hundred dollars by plane ticket paid on your student. Loan treat yourself to those shoes. You benign with progressive. You could find out drivers who switch and save save an average of seven hundred ninety six dollars on car insurance get your quote online at progressive dot com and see how much you could be saving national average annual car insurance savings by new customer survey who saved progressive in two thousand nineteen..

seven hundred ninety six dolla eight hundred dollars thirty thousand feet both Lego today lego dot com more than thirty years catherine more than a year this year lego each day each time one reason two thousand nineteen progressive dot com one of One quick years
"catherine sheer" Discussed on Airplane Mode

Airplane Mode

07:46 min | 7 months ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on Airplane Mode

"It's difficult were producing episode. I kept going back and forth about whether this is a question about healing from grief or helping yourself feel less lonely. The truth is out. It's a mix of both so we're gonna touch on both. And really explore how they're intertwined and related. Some forms of grief can be very long lasting and can require special treatment but also loneliness is incredibly common part of grief and loss and isn't necessarily indicative of a medical condition at all. So let's dig deeper. I we're going to define some terms. Let's start with grief very simply. It's the reaction to a loss to a meaningful loss. It's your body and mind kind of even larger than that your spiritual response your social response. It's the whole thing is grief is what we call grief. This is dr catherine sheer. She's an internist psychiatrists who founded and directs the center for complicated grief at columbia university. She's been studying and treating people with grief for more than thirty years and over that time. She seen a lot of different. People have very different experiences of grief and she says all those experiences can be normal. We talk about grief as the form. Love takes when someone we loved is and if you think about your love relationships or everybody's love relationship not tour are the same right. There are some commonalities but the commonalities or not so much in everyday life as they are in the what we call the big picture or thirty thousand feet. So what we're dealing with is going to be a little bit different each time. Dr share often deals with patients who are experiencing what she calls prolonged grief. This generally means all consuming grief that's experienced for more than a year but there are more tests to determine what is and isn't prolonged grief. It's a kind of form of grief that stays very strong and very pervasive for years and years. After someone we loved is so grief doesn't ever totally go away resolve if you will but it does evolve over time as we adapt to a world. That's very change. After someone we loved is it's not center stage anymore. We we regain our ability to connect with other people and to engage in our lives in ways that can give us really satisfaction. Enjoy in our lives again. This is one of the things that defines grief actually and makes it distinct from depression when we're depressed we. We actually have an impairment in our ability to experience positive feelings. And we really don't have that in grief. We sometimes feel survivor guilt. So we of don't want to experience positive feelings but we actually can and we usually do their exercises dr sheer suggests for maintaining a connection to pleasure simple rewarding things that can be done each day but that can feel a lot easier said than done especially because of the loneliness that often accompanies grief. I will say that loneliness of all the things that people feel. I think it's one of the in a way one of the last kind of recede. It's one of the hardest to deal with indiana originally. Wrote to as she said. I am partner. She told us that her husband was her. Everything i asked dr sheer what happens. When you lose someone so vital in your life in dr sheer said that zing. Anyone is hard of course but it can be particularly difficult. Lose someone so important to lose that person. You feel safe around. Who makes you feel confident. Who shares your pleasures and your sadness and so when you do lose someone like this we just feel the absence of that person and it feels like no one else can possibly be anything like that even if we have other people that are sort of like that in our lives but when this person goes it's very threatening and And needless to say terrible and we feel like again like no one else can fulfill that role in. We can't we can't get ourselves even to connect with other people. So how can someone move forward after a loss. This monumental one way. Dr sheer says is to find somebody else. Ideally another partner. But it doesn't have to be a new spouse. It could be a really good friend. Someone who can listen who wants to listen. Who's really interested in your experience and can listen and kind of validate what you're experiencing can be. They're walking by your side and maybe can help you a little bit with coping with some of the things you might be coping with. But we know that that's really hard especially during pandemic and it's not the only option. Something dr sheer has seen help. A lot of patients actually is discovering a new way to express themselves. We've run into people with complicated grief who've had a long standing interest in in playing the piano and they never for one reason or another they never learned in so. Can you learn to play the piano. Can you learned to paint. If that's what i mean. You don't invent something for yourself but you look into yourself in is best you can in think about what you really. What would be really interesting to you or what you what something that. You really truly value that. Maybe you're not doing right now. Either one of those things. I think that that also can help with loneliness because again i think the main thing i think that is important is is feeling like you're able to communicate out right That makes you feel much less lonely when you can when you can tell someone who wants to listen to you. Dr sheer told us repeatedly in order to start healing after loss. An important step is to fortify your relationships and yeah maybe even start a new relationship. I think that's the best way to overcome loneliness. Because that's what it's about this way. Easier said than done and relationships of all kinds can go haywire after a loss so after the break. We're going to talk to somebody who has seen that darkest lonely as part of grief before and we're gonna get some advice on finding your way through. Thanks for listening. Today's episode of self checking in when our team started working on the podcast. We ask self readers to submit questions and in a year like this one. It probably comes as no surprise that there were a lot of questions about how to manage stress. One quick and easy way to de stress is to take a deep breath pause those annoying calendar notifications and try stepping away from your computer. Once your screen. Free try hands on minds on creative escape with lego sets. You can build an inspiring work of art or global monument or pop culture legend. Let lego sets help you slow down and decompress this year. Learn more and get inspired at lego dot com slash adults and take your screen free escape to the next level by telling your smart speaker to open like moments now back to our show. Lego adult welcome..

lego dot com Today thirty thousand feet both more than thirty years Lego more than a year this year One each time catherine lego each day one of the things one reason years indiana one columbia university
"catherine sheer" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on KTOK

"Attention is turning to the struggles of the people left behind new research shows just how severe the aftermath is and it's different from other kinds of loss people who lose a loved one to suicide already greater risk for posttraumatic stress disorder and suicide themselves Wall Street journal reporter Andrea Peterson goes in depth on the most serious issue and is found that the grief can be searched a longer lasting and more debilitating injury what are we learning as probably many people have heard the rate the suicide rate in the U. S. has risen quite dramatically in from two thousand seven to two thousand seventeen it's up twenty four percent according to CDC and among young people ages ten to four twenty four it's up to fifty six percent in that same time period so researchers and mental health professionals are increasingly paying attention to the people who've been left behind the lucky ones the family and friends of those who have taken their own lives and they're finding that there's some some things that are particularly different about this kind of grief that it tends to be it can be more intense it can be more longer lasting and debilitating it is it's just it's different than other kinds of loss there's these unanswered questions they these yeah there's some feelings of guilt of maybe hello what could I have done what should I have done that might have prevented this from happening why did my loved one to this that can really be quite difficult to come to terms with a lot of people may have symptoms of PTSD on the other some people have actually found their loved one in the aftermath and and but even if you even those who haven't I talked to one medical professional who said that just knowing the method by which someone die by suicide can just can can generate an image in the mind that can act like a trauma memory wiles so people who have lost a loved one to suicide it made me need treatment for PTSD soon smart so what about these emerging treatments that are offering hope as your reference of the story right the one is just think knowledge meant that PTSD is something that survivors of suicide lost yeah maybe maybe dealing with and so treatments at target that might be warranted there's another people who have lost one by suicide are also more at higher risk or for a something that's known as complicated grief which is this persistent intense yearning for the person who died really impairs functioning and there is a relatively new treatment that was developed by ache Catherine sheer who is a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University in New York and it's a sixteen session treatment that focuses on helping the person except the loss and find possibilities for satisfaction in their life moving forward in one part of the treatment it actually uses a technique that is often but the true doctrine from its use for her for people who have PTSD the therapist actually record people telling the story of the moment when they learn that their loved ones and then they'll have the person that play it play that tape recording water at home and that can actually help lead to sort of an acceptance of the reality of what happened that can help people to deal with it and and move forward thank goodness for speak with Andrea Peterson reporter at the Wall Street journal her story is called as suicides rise more attention turns to the people left behind you reference to a couple of different family dynamics here one family was one that had lost a child at the age of right right about twenty five and then the other profile was a family who had lost a father who committed suicide because he got in some ways of deep financial trouble does the does the grieving change depending on say the family member that's done it it's interesting sometimes people I've talked to said about the loss of a child just as the it is a particularly deep devastation of that and and what often helpful for people is actually connecting with other people who have had similar kinds of a lot of things injury wallstreet journal reporter Andrea Peterson twenty minutes now in front.

"catherine sheer" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Is turning to the struggles of the people left behind new research shows just how severe the aftermath is and it's different from other kinds of loss people who lose a loved one to suicide already greater risk for posttraumatic stress disorder and suicide themselves Wall Street journal reporter Andrea Peterson goes in depth on the most serious issue and is found that the grief can be searched a longer lasting and more debilitating injury what are we learning as probably many people have heard the rate the suicide rate in the U. S. has risen quite dramatically in from two thousand seven to two thousand seventeen at the up twenty four percent according to CDC and among young people ages ten to four twenty four it's up to fifty six percent in that same time period researchers and mental health professionals are increasingly paying attention to the people who've been left behind the loved ones the family and friends of those who have taken their own lives and they're finding that there some some things that are particularly different about this kind of grief that tends to be it can be more intense it can be more longer lasting and debilitating it is it's just it's different than other kinds of loss on thirtieth unanswered questions they these there's a feeling of guilt of maybe and what could I have done what should I have done that might have prevented this from happening why did my loved one to that that can really be quite difficult to come to terms with a lot of people may have symptoms of PTSD on the other some people have actually found their loved one in the aftermath and and but even if you even those who happened to one medical professional who said that just mailing the method by which someone die by suicide can just can can generate an image in the mind that can act like a trauma memory so wild so people who have lost a loved one to suicide it made me need treatment for PTSD soon smart so what about these emerging treatments that are offering hope is reference of the story right the one is just think knowledge meant that he kept the if something that survivors of suicide lost yeah maybe maybe dealing weapons so treatments at target that might be warranted there's another people who have lost one by suicide are also more at higher risk of something that's known as complicated grief which is persistent intense hearing for the person who died really impairs functioning and there is a relatively new treatment that was like Catherine sheer who is a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University in New York and it's a sixteen session treatment that focuses on helping the person except the loss and find possibilities for satisfaction in their life moving forward the one part of the treatment it actually uses a technique that is often at the turn of a doctor components used for service for people who have PTSD the therapist actually record people telling the story of the moment when they learned of their loved ones that and then they'll have the person in the play it play that tape recording the water at home and that can actually help lead to sort of an acceptance of the reality of what happened that can help people to deal with that and and move forward thank goodness for speak with Andrea Peterson reporter at the Wall Street journal her story is called as suicides rise more attention turns to the people left behind you reference to a couple of different family dynamics here one family was one that had lost a child at the age of right right about twenty five and then the other profile was of a family who had lost a father who committed suicide because he got in some ways of deep financial trouble does the does the grieving change depending on say the family member that's done it it's interesting sometimes people I've talked to about the loss of a child just as the it is a particularly deep devastation of that and and what often helpful for people is actually connecting with other people who have had similar kinds of a lot of things injury wallstreet journal reporter Andrea Peterson twenty.

"catherine sheer" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"catherine sheer" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"You people have been left behind the loved ones the family and friends of those who have taken their own lives and they're finding that there's some some things that are particularly different about this kind of grief that tends to be it can be more intense it can be more longer lasting and debilitating it is it's it's different than other kinds of loss there's these unanswered questions they these yeah there's some feelings of guilt of maybe what could I have done what should I have done that might have prevented this from happening why did my loved one to this that can really be quite difficult to come to terms with a lot of people may have symptoms of PTSD on the other some people have actually found a loved one in the aftermath and and but even if you even those who happened to one of the health professional who said that just knowing the method by which someone die by suicide can just can can generate an image in the mind that can act like a trauma memory wiles so people who have lost a loved one to suicide it made me need treatment for PTSD soon smart so what about these emerging treatments that are offering hope as your reference of the story right the one is just technology meant that PTSD is something that survivors of suicide lost maybe maybe dealing with and so treatments at target that might be warranted there's another people who have lost one by suicide are also more at higher risk or for a something that's known as complicated grief which is just an intense hearing for the person who died really impairs functioning and there is a relatively new treatment that was developed by ache Catherine sheer who is a professor of psychiatry at Columbia University in New York and it's a sixteen session treatment that focuses on helping the person except the loss and find possibilities for satisfaction in their life moving forward in one part of the treatment it actually uses a technique that is often that the to the doctor confirmed that the use for service for people who have PTSD the therapist actually record people telling the story of the moment when they learned of their loved ones that and then they'll have the person in the play it play that tape recording water at home and that can actually help lead to sort of an acceptance of the reality of what happens that can help people to deal with that and and move forward thank goodness for speak with Andrea Peterson reporter at the Wall Street journal her story is called as suicides rise more attention turns to the people left behind you reference to a couple of different family dynamics here one family was one that had lost a child at the age of right right about twenty five and then the other profile was a family who had lost a father who committed suicide because he got in some deep financial trouble does the does the grieving change depending on say the family member that's done it.