18 Burst results for "Catherine Price"

"catherine price" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:26 min | 10 months ago

"catherine price" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Structure Out of rocks in a stream he like froze these rocks together to create this cool bridge and. To, me that would have been like being creative but not necessarily fun. But I actually truly believed that to John. That was a fun experience that he felt really connected there. He was being playful and he was in flow and I have read some examples from the funds squad anecdotes people have shared were like, yeah I think that that spirit is the same as what I'm describing and trying to get at me personally, my most fun is going to be with other people I can have. Some degree of fun on my own but my peak fund experiences personally all involve other people. Me To. You've got this acronym spark. What is what is that? I was trying to figure out how you actually cokes more fun into your life without attacking it directly right because. If you aim to hard at it is just not going to happen like if you force fun and we all know that. Someone's like really trying to get you play a game like I don't WanNa play this stupid game and it's like not. Funnel often sneaks up on us. So how do we sneak up on fun and so I was trying to think about things we could do that would be a little bit more concrete than playfulness and connection and flow to achieve playfulness connection and flow, and it came with this acronym spark, which I can go through. Quickly S.'s for making space for it. You've gotTa have space in Your Life Mentally and physically actually to allow them fun to happen I mean that can be in terms of your own stress levels like to clear out A. Bit of your responsibilities so that you can actually allow yourself to be free I. think then your stress levels will it's self reinforcing the more fun. You have the less stressed you're gonNA feel but you gotta make a bit of an effort to begin with and also reducing distractions because as we've discussed, we have distraction machines in our pockets at all times you're going to have to figure out how to create some actual space so that you can be fully present in your own life his. Any distraction is anathema to flow and flow is required for fun. So put those things together. You gotTa have fewer distractions the for pursue passions, and it goes back to what we were speaking about in terms of actually having something that you're interested in, and that makes you interesting and that is very active and I think that that is what distinguishes type of fun I'm talking about for more passive consumption like just watching a movie or scrolling through your phone, which might be relaxing enjoyable but is. Not really fun and that's something that I think you can do even in times when you can't have that type of human connection, you might want to like when you're in lockdown or when you can't be in a room with other people, you can still find things that interest you or skills you can develop that. Then we'll set you up so that you can hit the ground running when you actually are able to interact more with people the a is for attract fund. So become kind of. Like attractive person when it comes to fun one of the questions I asked him the funds squad is for people to describe someone that they know who's fun and just look at the characteristics of those people and a lot of it does seem to come down to a mindset like a fun mindset is what I'm thinking of it as where you're just open to experiences, you're open to spontaneity. You take playful approach to things you try to find the light-hearted angle to any experience that you're having. And I also mean that you can actually create structures for fun. You can actually create an environment that makes it more likely that fund will be attracted to it kind of like a salt lake for. where it's like, for example, one one anecdote someone share with me about one of their fun experiences this pie competition they've been doing for the past five weirdly to separate people told me about pie competitions and I don't think they know each other but it was this elaborate thing where there was a structure to it was a contest that had brackets like, March madness for the best pie flavors people got really really involved in it and took it very. seriously. They made impassioned speeches for like butter pecan or whatever like their preferred is that a pie flavor I don't have diabetes interview pipe, but you know whatever it might be and everyone had fun because of that structure of this contest the absurdity of it allowed people to become more playful and to let go a little bit because they understood what the rules were. So it's a weird. We're thought to have that you can create a structure for something spontaneous playful, but you can. And the ours for rebel and spark and that I realized is because God we're just in the escape from responsibilities is really a big part of this and so many people describe that when they're having true fund, they feel this lightness in the sense that they're escaping from their normal life. So I just was thinking like, how do you build in more opportunities for that in your normal life in a way that's not I'm not time rebellion go do with like cocaine or something I'm talking about like these was comes to mind for me. I feel a responsibility listen to the news on the radio because I'm a responsible adults in the car but maybe I don't need to do that, and maybe I can actually just turn on a song I loved when I was in high school and I can sing along loudly in the privacy of the car and not have to be an adult for a minute that is weirdly and surprisingly rejuvenating. As. So just these little opportunities to step out of your normal, even if something like don't follow the Google, ladies directions just go a different direction or take a five minute detour anything. It really doesn't take much which is kind of sad but it doesn't take much to have the sense of playful rebellion and the last one is K., which is keep added mean similarly to break up with your phone. If you go through the process, you are not done same with mindfulness, right? You're not like I meditated for thirty minutes today I am done. I have achieved is end or whatever you have to keep at it. You have to actually keep it a priority and keep working at it and continue to carve out space for this because if you don't the rest of life is just GonNa flow right back in and take the space that you.

John diabetes Google cocaine
"catherine price" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"catherine price" Discussed on 10% Happier with Dan Harris

"Have access to device and many of those devices have all the same things on them. They have your work email you know they have the Internet, they have your recreational screen time everything is on all of the devices and access to at least one of them at all time. It's very easy for boundaries to bleed earn just not exist at all. So one thing I recommend is trying to figure out like which device are you going to do those zoom calls on and only do it on that device or which device are you going to check the news on I mean We could talk about the news that's a huge problem for people always and especially right now. But if you feel compelled to check the news figure out what device and figuring out how many times a day and for how long because it's very easy for that to take over your life. So once you kind of create these guidelines and boundaries for yourself. Then it becomes a little bit easier to keep the parts of your life separate because that's the main underlying challenge. Right is all of our lives are blending together our roles parents are blending with the roles as professionally, and as you know partners like everything is all happening will actually in your closet right now. We need to figure out some way to to keep these things distinct and the first thing to do is think about how you can start to tease out untangle the various uses of your devices. Yeah. No, I like that the the sort of you can disintegrate some of this by. Giving devices designated roles, another piece of advice. One of the many reasons why I really click with you is you're interested in meditation, do recommend the use of mindfulness. Especially in leisure time where you're actually opting into screens what's your mood like? Can you notice what your mood is like when you're on screens and use that as a guide for me I? Really you know I made big changes to how I interact with technology. I've done some backsliding since working with you but what is it like in an evening when I'm hanging out with my wife either watching movies or for just talking what's it like? When I've got my phone there and what's it like when it's in the other room and it's very obvious. It doesn't take. I don't need a year in the Himalayas to summon enough mindfulness to see that it's better when the phones in the other room. Right. Exactly I think that that's a wonderful point, and so the you know I've talked about before that I try to emphasize technology is actually a wonderful opportunity to bring mindfulness into our daily lives and mindfulness is a wonderful tool to help us manager relationships with technology and I mean. I think of all of the stuff I've been doing all the work I've been doing is really just mindfulness and disguise. It's basically just trying to become better at recognizing how you feel about your experience in the present moment while you're having it, and then if you're not happy with how that experience experiences making, you feel gently nudging yourself in another direction. I don't think that there's any reason for us to beat ourselves up over our screen time especially now I mean come on, we need to have anything else to be anxious. flagellate ourselves about I don't think so so but with that said, we're probably not feeling our best selves at the moment right like. Physically if you're spending this much time, just sitting there staring at a screen, you're not walking you're not moving around as much. So I think that there's so many opportunities to just check in with yourself gently. Throughout the day and say how do I feel right now house my breathing house my body. How does my brain feel joy feel crazy or anything I'm going to make myself feel less crazy. That's a question I asked myself all the time and like you're saying then just make a decision based on that realization without worrying about what you just did I mean the fact that you noticed it means you're succeeding and then just gently choose a different activity or different use of technology I completely agree with you I mean. First of all really hard not to backside right now because of everything right. But then second is just the more you can get in this habit of just gently checking in with yourself. The more you realize you actually are in control and it really does feel different to be checking your phone while you're talking to someone checking your phone while you're doing anything else versus just doing one thing at one time and right now when we're doing so much multitasking. More important than ever to really hone in on that awareness. So you can try to create space and calm for your brain when you have the ability to do so. I was looking at a list of advice that you give and I've been working up at as we talk advice, you give for people who are interested in striking screen life balance at this difficult time and and I think this next piece of advice flows out of what we've just been discussing which is. How to notice when your stress scrolling or doom scrolling can you talk about that? All of us are stressed scrolling and doom scrolling right now because we are anxious and I think it's actually really interesting to talk about what's happening our brains when this happens. So just back up doom scrolling stress scrolling. That's when you're like, oh, I died guide. No, I shouldn't check the news. Not GonNa. Make me feeling good. But here I am announced forty five minutes later and I feel horrible but I just cannot stop scroll and it's not just the news it's just. Might. Just find myself scrolling through twitter. I don't really check instagram that much just because I got nothing else to do or I'm stressed in somehow I think that this is going to give me some dopamine. Yeah, I know I'm talking to a news man I should be careful when I talk about that no no. No. I'm not defensive about the news I believe titrate of news consumption is really important i. just think it's a broader problem than just the news yes. Yes. I was going for the doom aspect of it. scrolling. So whichever of your stress rolling, you know you're just scrolling through anything and you just you know and party your brain not making you feel good. But you feel like you can't stop and I think it's useful for people to recognize that when you're feeling stressed out the part of your brain that actually can help you make rational decisions..

Himalayas twitter dopamine
"catherine price" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

07:22 min | 1 year ago

"catherine price" Discussed on The Happiness Lab with Dr. Laurie Santos

"For the past month. Screens have been the lifeblood of my social connection. They've allowed me to see my family chat with friends and colleagues run my lab meetings and even conduct the podcast interviews. You've heard over the past few weeks. Screens have also been my key to entertainment news and even exercise while. I'm stuck inside the house but if I'm being honest staring at a screen all day over the past few weeks has also made me more depleted than usual. Just yesterday I realised I'd been sitting in the same chair for over six straight hours of zoom meetings which made my brain and my body fell kinda gross. The lockdown has also upped the amount of time I spend looking at scary news on twitter or apathetically scrolling through a sea of net flicks options or peaking at read it. When I should be chatting with husband I started to realize that surviving. This lockdown with my mental health intact requires taking a good hard look at my own screen time so I decided to put a call out to an expert Catherine Price. Catherine is a science journalist. Who wrote a book called how to break up with your phone. Ironically enough the only way we could connect during the lockdown was over zoom sweet. So once it's once you hit record let me know and then we can get started have record so gather. I feel like I've spent pretty much the entire last three weeks just staring at a screen. I mean is this just years something you can relate to. I certainly can relate to personally and I can tell you for sure. You're not alone in terms of the general population because I've been hearing from lots and lots of people about how they feel that they're screened life. Balance has gone out the window since all of our work life is now even more on screens and our personal life is shifted onto screens and our leisure time is enlarge spent on screens. So yeah it's something everyone struggling with and so you've argued that screen life balance is important in general about talk about why it's really essential during this time of covert nineteen. I think it's even more important than think about screen lift balance during covert nineteen specifically. Because we're spending so much time screen so to be clear. I think we need to realize that. There's nothing inherently wrong about this. I hear from a lot of people who are talking about. Oh I should spend less time on screens or should do this. You know what we should be doing. Right now is social distancing than like washing her hands as what we should be doing when it comes to our screens we don't need to be critical of ourselves or restrictive just for the sake of being critical restrictive. What's really important to ask yourself okay. We'll since I am spending so much time on my screens. How can I make sure the time I am spending on them? Is Making me feel productive? What part is necessary in which part is actually make me feel good or connected to other people because those supports you WANNA keep? That's the that's the beauty of technology is that we are able to stay connected and be productive during a time like this but there's also lots of pieces of screens that are making us not feel so great like getting sucked into endless cycles of checking the news over and over again or getting into social media. Spirals that go beyond just kind of a pleasant distraction and more into mind numbing kind of self medicating territory. I think this is really critical. Because your argument isn't that it's the amount of time we're spending on screens. That's a problem. It's not that we need to reduce our screen time. Generally it's just that we need to start paying attention to how these screens are making us. Feel yeah you need to be intentional about your screen. Time is what I keep coming back to so I I wouldn't get hung up on the number of hours that your iphone is telling you that you've spent on it per week because it's very likely to be higher than normal but I think you instead can just ask yourself okay. Well which parts of that screen time felt good and which parts didn't and that's the place to start to get curious about it and I think also it's a really useful skill to develop that you will be able to take with you after this because if you start to pay attention to how you feel in the moment when you're engaging with a particular behavior whether it's on or office screen you'll be able to make more intelligent choices about just how to spend your time so it can actually just really helpful and if you just have a little trigger in the back of your mind and be like Ha. How am I feeling right now? Does this feel nourishing and good or productive or helpful? Or is this making me feel anxious or upset or depressed or scared or sad or even more of those those things and if you do have a choice in that moment than just simply consider taking the other fork in that path? I think that's lovely. You also use this wonderful analogy in one of your recent articles. The way we think about screens should be kind of the way we think about food and nutritious eating. Do you want to explain that analogy a bit? Yeah I've been thinking about screen time in terms of food in the sense that there's many different types of foods so when people say always spend too much time on my screens. That's the same as just saying I will eat too much food right. But there's different types of food and you also will in the case of food you do need some of it but some of her screen. Time is necessary for careers. What have you so I like to instead say? Well what are your Kinda food groups for screen time? How can you break it down to think? About which parts are the good for you. Foods that Kale on the vegetables. Whatever which parts of the total junk foods that may be due comfort you make you feel better in small quantities but they make you feel really gross you know. How can you actually take care of yourself in? Nourish yourself screen time with a similar similar approach. You take towards food and for me. It's been really helpful because it's been able to break you know have a visual on my head kind of like one of those food permits of the different types of screen time that gives me a a tool with which to just make smarter choices for myself and I loved that analogy because I feel that too I feel like the nutrients of my panic. Scrolling on twitter is dislike. That's just like the most gross thing especially to a ton of time but like a zoom call when my mom we're like doing an online yoga class with friends like that's the Kale like I need more of that in my life especially during covert nineteen or that's like like K- kill doesn't seem pleasant enough for what you just described. It's like I don't know some kind of yet. Suddenly it's like a nice ball. Put Up Tucker keen was definitely involved in liquor really tasty way so one of the other things about noticing how we're feeling online is that you know what we experience. Online in terms of emotions can enter our real life too. I mean I noticed this myself when you I'm scrolling on twitter and I see some scary article about some twenty year old. Who's caught the virus and in the hospital now I'm anxious and panicked. And then I walk into the room with my husband and I'm transmitting all that anxiety and that panicked him when I didn't really need to do that. And so talk a little bit about how the how the kind of the stuff we catch online can come can become part of our normal lives in a way that we might not anticipate. I think we need to be very conscious about what we're exposing ourselves to. In general because just as exposing yourself to a virus can make you physically sick exposing yourself to stressful learning Zaidi producing content can really have an effect on your mental state and that in turn can be transmitted to the other people that yourself isolating with right now and if you do have a choice of exposing yourself to content that makes you feel calm versus twitter than maybe we could choose. The Com content is kind of like a person making a movie. Who's choosing where to turn their camera? There's a lot of different things. We could be choosing to put that camera on right now whether it's on our screens or off over screens. It's up to us to choose where that focus is going to be so the goal isn't just to reduce our screen time generally or just for the sake of it. It's actually in use our mindfulness muscles to make sure we're strategically using screens. In a way that's going to boost our wellbeing rather than hurt it and so when we get back from the break. I'm going to have Catherine dive into some more specific tips about how we can all debate at the happiness.

twitter Catherine Price Zaidi
Mom, stop looking at your phone!

Risen Motherhood

07:00 min | 1 year ago

Mom, stop looking at your phone!

"We just want to say up front that Lauren. I both use social media and we have found great benefits really like it and have enjoyed it So we want to. Yeah we want to kind of hear a lot of you probably thinking a little bit about your social media. Have it's probably and emily and I have had had so many conversations about social media. It's just it's just a very big reality in her is life and then we assume for many. If not all of you guys are thinking about about this kind of thing and actually we came across a recent study from two thousand eighteen that said that the average person spends over two and a half hours a day on social media so this equates actually seven years of time over the course of an average lifespan which is just kind of mind blowing that you would spend seven years of your life On social media at it it is mind blowing and I think when we hear two and a half hours the reality is most of us. Don't realize that we're doing that because it's pockets throughout the day. You know time in the New Year Air Ten minutes there twenty minutes there and you know when you're looking at your phone you're scrolling. It can go by so fast like I have one of those lymph things on my phone which we'll talk about later. That will I'll say oh I want fifteen more minutes. What about fifteen minutes ago I just I was just scrolling for a couple of minutes but if our ministry goal is to help MOMS understand scene and apply God's Word and the truth of the Gospel to everyday life than at some point we have to talk about these stats the fact that moms that we are spending potentially potentially an average of two and a half hours a day just on social media and we have to start asking questions of that lake? Is this helping us. Is this helping us. Look to Christ beef fall. Is this adding positively to our lives. Is it serving us or we serving it are we using it with thankfulness or freedom or have we become enslaved sleep to it and addicted we. We really have to ask those questions because it is such a significant thing for our generation. Yeah so we want to start off with just asking a question that Some kind of basic but we might delivering some something that you never thought about before so the question is kind of is social media really as neutral or benign as we think it is. I think most most of us would say hey social media in and of itself it's it's really just benign and you know that's how often emily and I think about it that it's neither good nor bad. It's just this. Modern tool tool gives us information. It's just like the radio or the TV or whatever in many ways. We think that is really really true because when we get on instagram or facebook or whatever on social media no one's in trying to make do really bad things are generally really not trying to make you do bad things but you're instead you're using it in a way of. Hey let's post pictures of my kids edit posts my meal. What I'm doing trip that I've taken stuff like that but I think Iman I have done more research? We're both growing more and more. Ah We're both thinking more about the idea. I guess of seeing that the creators of social media don't necessarily mean it for it to be this total neutral influence in our lives. They actually really want us to use it all of the time. Use it a lot. And they want it to gain a lot of ground in our lives to impact purchasing decisions are beliefs our attitudes our actions actions and so. I think that this is something that just needs to be talked about what we want to kind of bring it to the surface today. Talk about what is really behind social media but under social media the all APPS on our loans probably a broader issues a broader term. Here of APPS. Yeah and one thing that's helped me think about. This is just the fact that these are businesses. Yeah and a business has a goal and an end and that end goal for them. The true customer of social media is really the the advertisers right the MOMS with the profiles. You were posting. Pictures of their kids are not the customers we are the users of that and they actually. What's being sold sold being sold in the end to the advertisers? So no that's so good. And so what that means is that the creators of social media and the true through customers have social media. I put motives on them but they don't care if we spend a ton of time on her phone they actually want us to stay on social media. They want us to click on on things. They want us to buy things they want us to get sucked in and we're going to talk a little bit more about what that looks like but that was just a really helpful realization to me of actually the people people behind this APP. Want me to spend a ton of time on. Here's right Recently read this book called how to break up with your phone by Catherine price will link get in the show notes. It's not Christian resource but it is fascinating and she calls this engagement. She refers to as the currency of attention so so as emily was saying basically social media. APPS are after more and more of your attention because then they can turn around and they can sell it. They can make it revenue to make profit from the advertisers. And so what they want you to do is instead of living life they want you to pick up your phone and get on it and beginner active with it and so this is where to some of the research just gets crazy courage you. I think we'll link a few things but there are lots of books about this now. More and more research is being done. So we're not GONNA be able to cover the gamut or explain everything but I think it's important to just see that a lot of these things social media APPS Orsini interactive APP. They're designed with the purpose of addicting. You and this is where things kind of get a little bit crazy Wa. Yeah it is interesting so basically the way it works is that APPS are designed to give you a hit of Dopamine A. and Dopamine is at brain chemical that does a lot of things but mostly it makes us feel excited and happy. It's like a little reward and our brain and so they have designed the APPS in such such a way that gives us dopamine hit at just the right time that makes us feel addicted to it. It makes us want to keep coming back and there's another thing that happens on. Social media called intermittent reward awards so that is like I don't know if I check like what I'm GonNa find there sometimes. I'm going to find messages sometimes. I'm not sometime to find like sometimes I'm not and that not knowing and actually causes us to check constantly. It's something our brain is wired to do and speaking of brain wiring. There is something in kind of this APP design called brain hacking and basically there are interviews and research shows social media. Creators have actually teamed up with neuroscientist. You understand how they can rewire our our brains and our habits so that we will want to spend more time on the AXA. They are like actually on the offensive trying to figure out how they can make us do this more. Yeah we want to be clear to that. Like they're very nice people together in their entirely unable right but it's a business and it doesn't mean that they're wrong to try to do their job to try to get us to use our phones more. We don't want to make that out or have that. Be The main point. The point here is that in general these APPs are being created to addict you with that purpose of trying to get to to use them more and more and actually as you use them and not just an APP but your phone phone entirely Your brain is actually

Emily Lauren AXA Dopamine Instagram WA Facebook Catherine Price
"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

"The events that occurred in those sites, and it an this company that has his very easy to use like walking tour platform and made this happen. It's been so fun because the it's led to offline experiences. I never would have -ticipant it'd like getting to know the tourism community in Philadelphia his they didn't have an app they didn't have a walking tour app. And so they've adopted as. Adopted that one as the one that they promote to visitors. Yeah. Oh Oh my goodness. my goodness. This neat in. You know, got to meet interesting people. I love Philadelphia. I've gotten to meet people who also love it. And it's just been a really fun. Yeah. Fun side project. Very cool at is very cool and an example of positive use of a phone, Jack. Let's how we can use it for cool things. Exactly. Yeah. It's a good exactly what you're saying. You know? And I think that the one of the key takeaways there is that it led to offline experiences. I I also noticed that as part of the Joma project you run a thirty days of gratitude. And you talk about the scientific research that backs up the value of gratitude and so- gratitude practices. Something is something are something that we talk about often on the show. So could you tell us a little bit about the value of gratitude? And what it what it does to our brains assure I got interested in gratitude when I was asked to write a piece about it. I think packing like two thousand. Seven or something like that. I basically, I think it's just it's basically, you're reorienting you where you think about the world to be seen more through a gratitude oriented lens. And I think that's sounds so simple. But that really is what it's about. And I remember likening it to starting to pay attention to one particular thing in your environment. You never paid attention to before. Like, if you decide you're going to notice mailboxes yourself going to start seeing mailboxes everywhere and the same thing is true with gratitude where if you start trying to consciously notice things that you could be grateful for you'll start to recognize that they really are all over, and they don't have to be profound. You know, it can be as simple as the other day. I was leaving the gym. And I was thinking I'm so grateful to feel physically strong and in no pain. And then ironically that night I went to bed and my children I had surgery on eight years ago started act up and actually is totally messed up now. But for that moment, I actually was consciously cultivating gratitude and felt very. You know? So it's the we me with our daughter, actually, where we take three breaths before dinner in the we try to say something we're thankful for as she's three and a half. So this is like a bit abstract. I will say, but it's really I don't know. I think it's important to have rituals and traditions that that make us feel good and make us appreciate what we have since. There's obviously so much so many challenges in all around us. I love that me too. Well, I think that's a great note for us to end on Catherine where can people find you? So. Yeah. The book website is phone break-up dot com. I am on social media in the limited capacity of exactly this kind of thing like trying to really connect with people. So that is Twitter. It's at Catherine underscore price, an Instagram at underscore, Catherine price just to be confusing, but there's it's text books website. And yeah, I encourage anyone to reach out and to check out the resources there. Am budget new sites screen life, balanced dot com, should be up soon..

Jack Philadelphia Catherine Joma Twitter Instagram eight years thirty days
"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

"And if you if you re regress, it any point and get off the wagon. That's not your fault. It's because you're dealing with an addictive device. It's like you're trying to recover recovering alcoholic who's also trying to have to. Rinks night. It's just very difficult to do. So what I tell people is that to just have playful experimenting attitude toward it. Don't worry. If you mess up. You can't change what happened in the past. But you can just use that moving forward, and they tell them to start with actually asking themselves. What do you want to be spending your time and your attention on? Right. You have to know what you want otherwise it's just gonna feel like you're on a diet, and that's miserable. So if you figure out like, I don't know I want to be spending. I want to be spending less time on social media because I want to be paying more attention to my my kid or my relationship or my hobby then you have a positive goal. So it feels like you're giving yourself a gift by changing the way that you're using your phone. Another thing I recommend people. Do is ask yourself. What you love about your phone, or what's practical? And then what you don't love so much and really try not to see it as just one device it has hundreds of things in it. And some of those things are genuinely useful and others. Are not. And so it's it's great to divide those. So that you can then minimize the ones that are not useful or just feel like their second your life from you. But don't feel any compunction about using Google maps. If that helps you navigate so I suggest that people figure that out and then experiment with rearranging their apps. So that on the home screen, you only have things that are practical tools. You should not have temptation on there. Do not have social media on your home screen. Don't have your Email. I even say don't have the news. You want it to be so boring tool? Not attempt Asian. So for example, on my home screen. I have what do I have who Google? Yeah. Like maps the calendar. The sign up form for my gym. You also wanna make things easy that you want to be doing more of so few for example, when meditate put in meditation app on that front screen my point being that once you figure out your actual goals, then can make practical changes to help support those getting. Your phone to your bedroom is a big one a lot of people charge the phone next to their bed. And that means that interferes with your sleep.

Rinks Google
"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

"It is depressing in that. But you didn't create you're just giving us the information in a clear way. And also backing up scientifically, which I think is so important because you know, part of I think what I like about my phone as I can because it's still a phone. It's like, I can quit this. I can just put this over here. And I won't think about it. And I I'm that's not the case it really is a fully a beast that has taken over. Yeah. And I think it's important to remember though, that there are things that are great about phones. One of the reason we're so recent that we're so tethered to them is that they're designed to other us to them. But another reason is that they're genuinely useful in enjoyable. So I don't mean to be anti technology or say that we should throw a phones out. And there's also an aspect of it that complements what I was just talking about with the dopamine, which is that another reason we feel so tethered in have difficulty stepping away is the social education that comes. With our phones really foam the fear of missing out. So you can fear that you're going to miss out on an opportunity or piece of important information. But you also increasingly worry that you're going to drop the ball on some kind of social obliga- obligated like a text message. You're not responding to or an important Email. And I think it's really interesting to think about how smartphones with all of these different messaging type, apps, Instagram and Facebook, and what's happened. All these things you end up with all of these social, quote unquote connections often with people you've never met. But it's like way beyond what we would be expected to deal with in an offline world. And part of me wonders if our brains are just not able to deal with having to have so many different social threads. And that's part of the reason it feels so stressful. If you ever feel like your brain is tired when you use your phone. I mean, that's real it's your prefrontal cortex actually getting worn out, and that's the area of your brain that can make rational decisions and executive function. I it just really interesting to put together what we know about how the brain. It works and how the brain changes in response to different stimuli, and then apply it to what's happening with our phones. I thought it was so interesting in your book how you kind of blow up this myth that people are good at multitasking Mutu. An our phones kind of exacerbate this can you talk a little bit about that. Sure. I think multitasking is such a funny thing that we pray. We claim that we're so good at it. I remember seeing that on some resume when I was an internship. Very good multitasker, and what I realized based on my own scientific reporting the past is that that's basically another way to say you're easily distracted and actually inefficient because our brands are not meant to multitask. And there's plenty of research showing that when you think you're multitasking which I define as trying to do too cognitively demanding things at once. So I'm not talking like listening to the radio while you're doing the laundry. I mean, like if I were trying to answer an Email while I'm having this conversation wouldn't be able to do it. But we convince ourselves that we can have multiple browser tabs open listened to a podcast while we're doing EMA, whatever it may be and reality, that's that's what's called task switching which is rapidly switching between tasks and the easiest way to think about it is just to think about a car speeding down a highway in one direction. And then having to make a sudden turn it would have to slow down and speed back up again. And that's exactly what happens when you are multitasking. So that's just broadly. Why a good thing to experiment with is to try to close your browser. When you're not using don't leave Email on in the background. See if you can actually concentrate your attention, though, it's interesting in terms of phones is that while they're encouraging us to multitask. There simultaneously making us worse at actually focusing..

dopamine Instagram executive Facebook
"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

"Some kind of reward waiting for you a piece of new information and Email even something infuriating, there's something there. Dopamine is released saying that was worthwhile. And you want to do it again. And you get to the point where just the sight of your phone can be enough to trigger dopamine release and fascinating -ly, the dopamine that's released in anticipation of activity is actually twice as high as the dopamine that is released when you're actually doing it. So long story short if you feel you have difficulty resisting your phone cravings. You are most definitely not crazy. You're just human and the dopamine system in your brain, which is volition early except essential. Because it helps us remember to eat and procreate is being hijacked something. Not so great, which is to keep you on your phone. And these are these are all features not bugs like these. Smartphones were designed in these apps were designed deliberately to access. This was interesting because you think you're a raspberry Bush. Right. That's natural. That's it's evolved that way, but humans didn't have any control over what that Bush looks like the color of the raspberry over the years. It's it's now a color that people who can creatures that can see the contrast between green and red are naturally attracted to, but our phones are human creations and every single thing on the phone. It is the result of a decision made by human beam. So even just the color red that you see for notifications. The badges on your phone that's deliberate. I mean, it's not purple right in it's not purple because purples less attention grabbing than read is red indicates danger or something worth noticing like blood or a raspberry, or whatever it may be a boy. Nari. I've been depressing his notices good. No. You're not depress..

Dopamine Bush
"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

Forever35

03:51 min | 2 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Forever35

"Artist today is Catherine price, Catherine. Welcome to forever thirty five. Thank you for having me. We're so thrilled you're here. Let me read your bio for our audience, Catherine is an author and science journalist whose articles and essays have appeared in the best American science writing the New York Times popular, science Oprah magazine. The Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle Washington Post magazine, among others, most recently, she is the author of how to break up with your phone and her previous books include vitamin Lia, how vitamins revolutionized the way we think about food and one hundred one places not to see before you die. I feel like we could just talk because it was title. I know we've got a lot of work to do. I don't bother going. So Catherine were thrilled you're here because you have been requested guest for the podcast, and your book has been recommended to us many times because it's great. I specifically am a phone addict door do you identify as a phone addict? I think I have a phone addiction. It might not be as bad as yours. I don't think it is. But yeah, I mean a bit of a background, Catherine. I I was recommended your books so many times. So I got it. But I got it on audio book, which then just seemed to defeat the whole purpose of breaking up with my phone. So now, I have read your book in the actual paperback. And I feel like that was a much healthier choice. That's funny. Well, I will say I hear that from a lot of people, and I always liked to push back a bit and say that although I say breaking up with your phone. I made it in the sense of breaking up to create a better relationship with it not getting rid of it entirely. So when people ask about the audiobook thing, I asked them, we'll do that was that pleasurable for you, do you? Enjoy listening to do you. Enjoy listening to books, and if you do that's great, you know, so you should not feel shame or guilt about that. I approve support anything that feels like a good way to consume books. Oh, well, thank you. I feel very validated. There we go. Oh, could you kind of start by talking us through the scientific evidence of phone addiction? I mean, you do a great job in your book of essentially, the whole first half is like, yeah, here's why this thing is bad for you. So could you just give our listeners the cliff notes version? Sure. Well, the the true cliff notes version is if you think your phone may we have negative effects on you. You're right. That's the real cliff notes version, I wrote the book with the metaphor of relationships because it seemed more accessible to me and also because the term addiction can be very controversial people start to argue about the definition of addiction. Can you be addicted to a behavior at cetera et cetera? But with that said, I will tell you the behind the scenes view, which is that every addiction specialist. I've interviewed says, yes, we we are dictated to our phone sits the same circuitry in her brain that's being activated. And while it might not be as destructive. I would argue in most cases is not as destructive as for example, an opioid or chemical drug addiction definitely is destructive. And now that there's an official recognition of a behavioral addiction gambling as being an addiction. That opens the door for the widespread. Acceptance of other ones like that such as our phones, but to explain briefly why that is what happens in our brains are phones are deliberately designed to make us wanna spend maximum. Amounts of time on them, particularly the apps and particularly apps that are free and that make their money off of getting you to spend time on them. And those are in particular, social media, like Facebook, Instagram and also news sites, which are based on advertising and games. Internet dating the ones that you really keep going back to that. People can pulse Ivanka us to people really should be aware of that. The phones are designed in the exact same where that slot machines are designed to keep us engaged with them, which is very disturbing because slot machines are widely considered to be the most addictive machines ever to have been invented..

Catherine price Los Angeles Times Catherine New York Times San Francisco Chronicle Washin science Oprah magazine Ivanka Facebook official Instagram
"catherine price" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It as being fortified with added vitamins. When in fact, they were mainly just replacing what had been lost in the manufacturing process, but adding extra vitamins became such a successful marketing strategy that it grew out of control says, Catherine price, and you end up with great products such as schlitz beer with vitamin D, which I think they should still make one of my favorite examples is a proposal for vitamin donuts. Alongside fortification in the late nineteen thirties, the vitamin tablet went into production in the US it caught on straight away and one group in particular was the targets they were definitely marketed more towards women they were advertised in women's magazines. So there definitely was a message. I would say continuing till today that mothers should be very aware of the vitamin content of the foods that are serving their families. And maybe she's just top it up a little bit by giving their children vitamin supplements. Over the decades, the industry in the US has had extraordinary growth unhampered by regulation supplement sales there now worth around forty billion dollars. Yes, billion and Catherine price says is expanded way beyond the original vitamins. They're only thirteen human vitamins, but right now in the states, there's more than eighty seven thousand dietary supplement products on the market. It's not just vitamins and minerals. But also herbal products and botanical products and metabolites and glands ground up, glands and enzymes all sorts of things. So you basically use the halo of vitamins, the idea that these are substances that are naturally found in foods and vitamins are essential for human health to open the door to this giant industry and also to get consumers to eroneous Lee. Use those terms interchangeably..

Catherine price US Lee forty billion dollars
"catherine price" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

06:50 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"You know, I said Crypto to my course son dot com. I said to my son last night, we were having a conversation. Glenn? And I said, so what are what are the two words because he was talking himself down. And I said stop stop listen to yourself. And he said what? And I said listen to what you're creating listen to what you're saying. And I gave him the dad IM speech that I've said how many times if you hear it one more time you're gonna kill yourself one hundred times on the air. He said this. I started in this. And I said, you know, this and he said. I don't I said, I I've. Oh my gosh. Have I not told you this given told your own kids, but you told the national radio over and over and over again, and I realize that there are some things that we just think our kids here. And because they're around us. They just know they're going to pick up. I mean he's in American history right now. And you know, he probably knows more than some kids are most kids on a lot of things blow things are big gaping holes. And I realized how much of my time with my son. Do I think he gets it through us most somehow or another, you know, just because he's living here, and blah, blah, blah. And he hears me, give speeches and he hears me on the radio. And here's blah, blah, blah. He's there we it's maybe it's just me. I don't know. I if I'm just going through this. But my gosh, you have to be very very specific. And watch what you're saying. To your kids. And and be with them all the time. And what's frightening is the influence is so strong. And so sexy on the outside that it's the draw that they're just you're just black and white the everything else is color. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I mean one suggestion is. Jodi, foster movie, panic room, and she what she did is. She was able to lock herself in the room and have no outside influences at all. And I think. Family in there. And just say we're just in here, the black, and my color thing is interesting though, because we had a guest on this program before she's on wonderful world. Let's do as well, Catherine price. She wrote a book recently called how to break up with your phone and in the book just yesterday. I saw something on Twitter with her where she was talking about one thing that she suggested how to break up with your phone, which was turn your phone to gray scale. So you can do this on an iphone or an Android or whatever. And basically what it does is. It goes to black and white it looks like your old school black and white TV. Right. You're all the brilliant, vivid colors of your phone go away. And it's weird. Because you think well what difference would that make a lot? But when you turn it on it, there's there's something just pleasing with all those bright colors in your eyes. I decided to just do it. Because I, you know, there are things I have to do my phone, and you see my calendar. Need to be able to read articles need to be able to do a lot of things. I do for work are sword. On my phone constantly emailing and doing all those things that's important, and it's part of my job. But I don't need to there's times where you just flipping through Instagram because it's their right? And you put it in gray scale eight looks you turn it out. You don't get you get a disappointment feeling when you turn on your phone rather than a pleasing feeling. It doesn't give you that. Rush of like a wow look at all of that. And you don't even realize you're getting it until you go to gray scale because when you turn when you open up your phone, it just looks like junk. So let me let me let me ask you this. Have you heard of these devices? I don't even know somebody told me about them, and I can't find I can't find exactly what I'm looking for. Google has let me down. I'm looking for something that shuts all devices off of the internet at certain times gives each person, you know, and keeps that global record in one place and says, oh, you have used this amount of time on the internet. You've done this. You've done that you, you know, this shuts off at eight o'clock at night on these devices. I know what you're saying you're saying for like your kids for the whole family. Well, I I know there are options for that. There's one app that you can install on your on your kids phones. My kids don't have phones bright, but it'd be your, you know, your kids pick up devices. Yes. And you can turn things off or limit times through your device. So you can go on your on your side of the app and say, I only want this on for an hour, and it'll just turn off after an hour on their devices. Also, I know depending on what wifi router system, you have like we haven't euro, which is like one of those. It's like a mesh network. And you know covers the house, but you you may you you have no I have no idea, and it's a big room of Iraq stuff. But it through though, a lotta times through the new, wifi routers. You can go right through there. So it's the internet coming into the house. You're getting it, you know way before that you can limit all the content at that level, which is is pretty good as well. We're to the point in my house, where my my son is seven, and we're to the point now where like I need to start putting these printable things on all of the because before like he doesn't care. He's going to see you know, he's not looking for. I don't think. Now, he's looking for anything, but he could easily stumble on something. I was watching the the YouTube spot came up. It was a horror movie commercial. This is gonna make me warning what they will see and find and YouTube is you know, while they're busy with Prager university. Yeah. They're shutting them down. Because it's so dangerous for kids. My gosh. I mean, it's just they're just. Exposed to so much stuff. And we need the internet for homework and things like that. But you know, you leave the room and here comes YouTube, and I mean, it just need to it. So if anybody knows of a device that is a universal device in my problem is I've got professional equipment in the house to to try to secure us as much as we can. But and I anything I find is just not compatible with that system. I just need. I just want to find a way to be able to shut it all off you get only so much time on this. And that and shut it all off you don't have access to this after this time. A no access to this app. Ever. You can do that. I know there's also they walked through how to do this in the documentary the village. Family. Built.

YouTube Glenn Twitter Instagram Google Jodi Catherine price Prager university Iraq
"catherine price" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"To feel ashamed of it but once you recognize what you're doing it then becomes a pine you got to do something about it so i actually think it's really empowering to realize how much time is being taken by this device mendacity software wait i'm the human being in this relationship i can shoot there's nobody who can stop me we're putting my phone down so i needed to figure out what i actually wanted to using my phone and then you can sit down and it can be difficult because again our phones are designed to be really fun to us but i've been working on this for you know the project about three years total book came out of six months ago and it's really my my life is much better now four have much better control of my time both on and off my phone talker catherine price had to break up with your phone as her new book and you know you talk about that as you put this thing together over those three years what did you learn about how we use our phones and also how about yourself what did you learn about yourself as far as your relationship with your phone well you know i wouldn't say that i was a i fully addicted to my phone and actually yes i was in the sense that all of us at the same brain circuitry and phones tap into our dopamine systems and get us to release dopamine every time we reach for the phone dopamine is the chemical that tells us when something is worth doing again the really useful chemical because it teaches us makes us remember to eat appropriate or whatever but it can be also the cause of addictions and bad habits and i think what i realized about my own life i wasn't someone who was documents up in a basement and playing video games for ten hours a day but i did find my phone in my hand all the time without really knowing how it got in there twenty minutes of my life and i had the feeling that you get when you've been john junk food where it first you're like oh this tastes good even though i know it's kind of bad for me and then twenty minutes later you're like what did i just do to myself so i.

catherine price dopamine twenty minutes three years six months ten hours
"catherine price" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"You find yourself combustible be reaching for your phone it's actually in a way not your fault because it's designed to do that so you don't need to feel ashamed of it but once you recognize what you're doing it then becomes upon you got to do something about it so i actually think it's really empowering to realize how much your time is being taken by this device mendacity yourself wait i'm the human being in this relationship i can shoot there's nobody who can stab me for pretty my phone down so i needed to figure out what i actually wanted using my phone and then you can set boundaries and it can be difficult because again our phones are designed to be really fun to us but i've been working on this for you know the product three years total book came out of six months ago and it's really my my life is much better now have much better control of my time both on and off my phone talker catherine price had to break up with your phone as her new book and you know you talk about that as you put this thing together over those three years what did you learn about how we use our phones and also how about yourself what did you learn about yourself as far as your relationship with your phone well you know i wouldn't say that i was a i always ask myself was i fully addicted to my phone and actually get in the sense that all of us at the same brain circuitry and phone tap into our dopamine systems and get us to release dopamine every time we reach for the phone dopamine is the chemical that tells us when something is worth doing again that the really useful chemical because it teaches us makes us remember to eat appropriate or whatever but it can be also the cause of addictions and bad habits and i think what i realized about my own life is that i wasn't someone who was documents up and if he's been playing video games for ten hours a day but i did find my phone in my hand all the time without really knowing how it got gotten what i've done with twenty minutes of my life and i had the feeling that you get when you've been junk food where it i you're like oh this tastes good even though i know it's kinda bad for me and then twenty minutes later you're like what did.

catherine price dopamine twenty minutes three years six months ten hours
"catherine price" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on The Pulse

"It's just interesting to have this disease that's like an invisible disability where i look normal from the outside and i wouldn't want to not look normal from the outside i mean no one stares at me 'cause i've got diabetes but that means that they don't understand how hard it is one thing that's really stood out to me through the course of this conversation is how much we have in common and it's it's really interesting to hear someone else say things that i have nearly in the exact same words thought myself yes i believe so we are a lot alike which i thought that we were very different is far as tight one in type two diabetes that's kisha brooker and catherine price talking about living with diabetes katia has type two and catherine type one within thirty million people in the us deal with this kind of thing it's an epidemic that's sweeping the country changing lives and our healthcare system but other countries have higher numbers yet india has been called the diabetes capital of the world more than sixty million people there have this illness that's the highest rate globally barry popkin is one of the researchers trying to figure out what's causing this diabetes explosion he's an attrition professor at the university of north carolina he works at their school of global public health berry says that people of indian descent are genetically predisposed to developing type two diabetes which is related to body fat with specially fat around the heart and deliver what we call visceral fat that fat around your heart and liver doesn't necessarily show up on the scale sometimes we call this skinny fat or normal weight obesity or.

diabetes kisha brooker catherine price us barry popkin berry india university of north carolina
"catherine price" Discussed on The Pulse

The Pulse

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on The Pulse

"What happened to thomas was a safety issue and that quote we feel very strongly that we not treat him in any way unfairly or unlawfully greg poll is thomas's attorney he has diabetes himself the heart of the americans with disabilities act is to do an individualized assessment of a particular applicant or employee so companies are supposed to look at you as a person can you do the job if you're waiting tables can you can replace a food and serve customers just as well as anyone else according to the americans with this abilities act that's what companies should ask but greg says sometimes they just have a blanket ban on anyone with diabetes i have seen over the years actually letters that come out from employers saying you are not being hired because of diabetes grank says when people here are no like that that's when they might end up suing somebody here's an example a pilot is suing the federal aviation administration because the agency has a policy if you have five bts and need insulin you can't be a commercial pilot the general policy is no stay tuned that's being challenged right now alan you reported the story you're listening to the pulse i'm like god and we're talking about the cost of diabetes it might cost you your dream job but then there's also the social cost the way diabetes can interfere with your life how you spend your time and your energy that's something kisha brooker and catherine price talked about when they sat down for a conversation in our studio catherine has type one and kisha type two diabetes i don't go out much.

thomas greg poll brooker attorney alan catherine price
"catherine price" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Thing we know about race one looks white one looks black they're fraternal twins they in a nutshell our kind of the new normal of america in the world and yet racist still front and center in the way we deal with so much yeah i just wanna huzzah susan goldberg and the historian uva historian john edwin mason who she commissioned to study national geographic's racist history which actually the other interesting aspect i thought was the notation so horribly racist toward africans african americans most dark skinned people but then there's this weird idealization of polynesians of pacific islanders and the polynesian beauties so there's a whole collection of their photographs of polynesian beauty so they they focused on right and you can see them evolve over time i they write about south africa and they write about virginia by the way as if there is no problematic racist past racist present and then they begin to get a little bit more with the program in the seventies south just fascinating yes john what is your china so i have kind of a double chanter i is just as fun fact which shows some of our listeners may already know but stephen hawking when he died this fact came out he was born on the three hundred anniversary of the death of galileo and he died on albert einstein's birthday so for the renowned physicists there is some order in the universe my other is to recommend a book by catherine price called how to break up with.

america susan goldberg virginia china galileo albert einstein catherine price uva john edwin mason south africa stephen hawking
"catherine price" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Thing we know about race one looks white one looks black they're fraternal twins they in a nutshell our kind of the new normal of america in the world and yet racist still front and center in the way we deal with so much yeah i just wanna huzzah susan goldberg and the historian uva historian john edwin mason who she commissioned to study national geographic's racist history which actually the other interesting aspect i thought was the notation so horribly racist toward africans african americans most dark skinned people but then there's this weird idealization of polynesians of pacific islanders and the polynesian beauties so there's a whole collection of their photographs of polynesian beauty so they they focused on right and you can see them evolve over time i they write about south africa and they write about virginia by the way as if there is no problematic racist past racist present and then they begin to get a little bit more with the program in the seventies south just fascinating yes john what is your china so i have kind of a double chanter i is just as fun fact which shows some of our listeners may already know but stephen hawking when he died this fact came out he was born on the three hundred anniversary of the death of galileo and he died on albert einstein's birthday so for the renowned physicists there is some order in the universe my other is to recommend a book by catherine price called how to break up with.

america susan goldberg virginia china galileo albert einstein catherine price uva john edwin mason south africa stephen hawking
"catherine price" Discussed on FT Management

FT Management

02:13 min | 3 years ago

"catherine price" Discussed on FT Management

"Support for this financial times podcast comes from our friends at rocket mortgage by quicken loans home plays a big role in your life that's why quicken loans created rocket mortgage it lets you apply simply and understand the entire mortgage process fully so you can be confident that you're getting the right mortgage for you to get started go to rocket mortgage dot com slash ft hello and welcome to the ft business books podcast i'm isabelle barrick executive editor f t where can koreas and joining me today is my colleague emma jacobs were can careers feature writer pendant we have recording this series of the putt cost around the theme of how to live and work better and a tech driven age and we'll be talking about new books that author advice and practical steps towards that dream so l ahead of the launch of the 2018 f t n mckinsey business book of the prize this spring i'll second book is how to break up with your phone by catherine price a when we sort we knew we had to talk about it because the buttcover promises to help rediscount could i maple phone addiction in just thirty days and catherine offers up some pretty grim statistics hoffa vis chekhov phones in the middle of the night and one in ten people are a strength seizure americans checks their phone during sex catherine welcome asking a question you are an awardwinning science journalist what brought you to writing a book on this subject well what actually up out personal trigger a couple of years ago i guess you and a half years ago i had to a child and i went up late one night with her and i was looking at my phone as many new parents do i think maybe because i was so sleep deprived i had this momentary kind of out of body grants where i thought the theme as it would appear to someone in the room with me and it was my daughter looking at me and then be looking down on my iphone searching for entry door knobs on ebay.

emma jacobs catherine price isabelle barrick executive editor writer rediscount thirty days