13 Burst results for "Catherine Nicholson"

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:12 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Not as talking about the 19th, 20th century, but it goes back about 500 years we're covering through this selection back to them, the reign of Edward the 6th. Wow. There you go. And in terms of people putting in their images, what are you hoping for from those sorts of portraits? And because of course, if you think about women and going back with if women were recorded as much as men, I wonder what you have to say about that. That's interesting. So before we close, we close for the refurbishment. Around 23% of the portraits on display were portraits of women. And we've made a commitment to increase that need to decrease the gender disparity across the collection. And we're aiming for 40 60. Well, I'm in post. I hope it'll be 50 50, but there's a long way to go. But we are really making some positive steps forward to try and make the collection more inclusive. That's really the aim. So you will see on the website, a lot of those images will be of women, not just people who were celebrities, Elizabeth I Princess Diana. But other women whose histories have been overlooked through time. So for example, there's a wonderful woman called Lydia, who was the first mayor of bethnal green. It's a wonderful photograph of her in her civic regalia. Another photograph of a woman sitting playing a sitar. As she is nor in yet Khan, who was a special operations officer on secret agent in the Second World War. She was the first female radio operator to be flown undercover into Paris. She was captured and tortured by the Gestapo, but revealed nothing. Apparently when she was executed her last word was liberty. So this was fascinating stories surrounding some of these figures. We don't know much about two other women who are on the ancestry website marriage his home, elsie knocker, who were dispatched riders. They had a great enthusiasm in the early years of the 20th century for motorcycling. So they joined up moved van this flying ambulance corps. And they would treat on soldiers on the front line before dispatching them to the field hospitals. They were awarded for their bravery given medals, but again, this would have been written out of on history. So people might find these surprise connections when they start exploring these images online. If they don't, it doesn't matter because the invitation is to explore their own family portraits. And we've photographed an attic. Yes. So what are you looking for from members of the public? Who could submit what? Because some people, of course, have paintings in their house or pictures where they don't actually know who's in the picture, and they don't know very much about it. It can they still submit it or do you have to have all the information? I think it's open actually. I mean, I'll be one of the selectors with Simon Pearce, who's the ancestry expert on family history. I think we're asking questions and we want questions asking people to think about the longing connection legacy identity..

elsie knocker Princess Diana Edward Lydia Elizabeth Khan Paris Simon Pearce
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:55 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But as it stands today, no man and no woman can challenge president Macron. And his reelection seems to be not perhaps certain, but probable. If you look at the second round, really, that's the only issue here because there are so many candidates running in the first in the first prize and will have to leave any algo, the mayor of Paris and Christian to be aside because for the moment they're pulling numbers is what just a few percent. Michael will be challenged if it's very big because he's facing in the second round. It's much easier in a way. It is facing marine le pen or eczema or the two far right candidates as simply because France will be very reluctant to avoid them vote for them. So but Raleigh has been not on the far right. But sort of right wing. It will be. I mean, it will still win according to pause. Around 54% against 46% related. So it will be tighter, but for the moment nobody challenges and it's not a question of gender macro. Thank you very much for the analysis quite far outtakes. I understand and we'll see how that potentially changes or not Catherine Nicholson Agnes Poirier. Thank you to you both. And thank you for all of these messages today about love. Alexander says, you're on my mind today, although a thousand miles away, these poems only you can put my heart at ease and stop this fretting, tell me, please. Did I leave the oven on? Very important question. And another one here, I have MS and I've been in a wheelchair for many years now, my beloved partner Yan has been working from home through the pandemic I've been my stalwart. We have a lot of laughter even when it's grim. Here's my poem to him, my beloved man works upstairs, he cares for my every need, 50 years of love and smiles, even when I've peed. Thank you, says Sally in Sheffield. Thank you to you, Sally and thanks to Jan as well. Now you may have been online searching for long lost members of your family during this time, especially more time at home, trying to build that family tree, but now there's a chance to search for pictures of relatives too..

president Macron Catherine Nicholson Agnes Poirier eczema Paris Raleigh Michael France Alexander Yan Sally Sheffield Jan
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:54 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I'm joined now by Catherine Nicholson, who's based in Paris and European affairs editor for the TV station at France 24 and Agnes Poirier, the UK editor of the express. Catherine, if I come to you first at a field of candidates, female candidates here. Who do you think is the most likely who's causing the most waves at the moment? Yes, we've got a lot of female candidates here and as you say, we've got two of them jostling for the second place at the moment. So marine le pen who I'm sure a lot of your listeners will have heard of, she was in second place last time around, of course. And then she's from the far right and she's the sort of center right candidate. She describes herself as being one third Thatcher two thirds Merkel. So you can understand how she positions herself. And those two is pretty unclear at the moment which one of them is second place, they're sort of neck and neck more or less. But there have been polls that have put both of them into the second round in France. So because there's such a big field of candidates, there's always a first round. Emmanuel Macron currently polling around 24, 25% on that. And then he and the second place candidate, we expect either picres or le pen at this point, would go into a second round. Agnes are either of these women inspiring the women of France and the men for that case. Well, I mean, it's interesting we are obsessed with polls in France. So we carry them on a daily basis, especially before a presidential election. And there have been very interesting people by carried out by pulling institute about what French women voters want. And whether they have a different attitude towards certain ideas than men. And it looks as if it's going to be a tough not to crack for them. Myself included. Because they tend to be more socially and culturally liberal than men. Let me give you an example on animal rights on green issues on assisted dying. On, of course, you know, a gay rights minority rights in general. But on the other hand, they also tend to be more conservative. Than men slightly more on subjects such as security, justice, even immigration. So it looks as if nobody fits the bill for them. If you like, you know, they might be tempted by Picasso that is to say the right wing candidate. Ideas about security for instance, but then they will really disapprove of her stance on..

Catherine Nicholson Agnes Poirier France Emmanuel Macron Catherine Merkel Thatcher Paris UK Agnes Picasso
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:18 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And it's also why this service this framework is supported by pretty much all of the end violence against women, charities and organizations. This is a service that has support from all the relevant medical colleges. All the organizations that advocate for women, and I think we need to listen to their voices. And yes, I mean, I'm just minded to mention a message that's coming from Maggie saying the concern is that abortion by pill is going to be permanent. That would be detrimental to women who deserve better treatment than this. And other messages to say, well, this was only ever meant to be a temporary measure. What would you say to that? So the government committed to a consultation on this issue. And you know, they have all the evidence on their death to show that this is safe and this is effective. And you know, as I say, this isn't a service that is necessarily suitable for all women. But when it's gone, it's gone. And with it the ability of our nurses, our doctors and midwives to make a decision about what is best for that individual woman in the circumstances she is in. That's gone as well. You do not protect or safeguard women by forcing them into clinics when it is not safe or effective for them for them to be there. You don't protect women by taking their choices away and that's what effect to be the removal of this service would mean to just a final question. If you've had a miscarriage and you would like to, or you're in a position where you think the tablet may be the right choice for you to ensure that you can get through that process. Did those rules change? Did that also move to telemedicine during the pandemic? So miscarriage doesn't fall under the abortion act. So miscarriage services can be provided absolutely in accordance with what clinicians think is best for that woman at the time. You know, unfortunately, abortion in this country is subject to a whole different raft of rules and regulations. Which is why, which is why we need the permission of the health secretary in order to provide the service. But yes, but women have been able for a long time to use the medications for miscarriage at home. That has never fallen under the criminal law. But now, you know, when this service is taken away, a woman using misoprostol for a mist miscarriage at home will not face any criminal sanctions. She's, you know, that's in accordance with best clinical practice. Once this service is taken away, a woman who uses misoprostol for an earlier person drug. Same drug could go to prison for life under the offenses against the person act of 1861. That's how serious this is. And a decision, do you know when a decision is due by on this Claire? Well, I'd be lovely to have a minister, perhaps on your program to come and talk about exactly that. We always ask we will continue to do so. We'll see where we can get to clamor for the British pregnancy advisory service. Thank you. Well, moving from the politics of this country to another, a record number of women are standing in the French presidential elections this April across the breadth of the political landscape on the right, Valerie perks, on the far right, marine le pen, the left and hidalgo, the present mayor of Paris, and the former justice minister christiane to borrow, who will be the first black female president should she win all her hoping to unseat the incumbent Emmanuel Macron. It is the first election since the global me too movement and commentators are considering whether this could have an impact on the outcome of the election..

Maggie Valerie perks marine le pen Claire hidalgo Emmanuel Macron christiane Paris
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:45 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"What do you say to those listeners who have those concerns? So I think the point here really is one about being our practitioners being able to make a decision about what is best in consultation with that woman for her in the circumstances that she is in. And the problem is at the moment, is when this is removed, it is removed for everyone. Now, at the moment, you know, lots of women will be seen in clinic for all sorts of reasons they may have clinical reasons why they need to be why they need to be seen in person. There may be safeguarding concerns, which mean we want to see them in person. But at the moment, we are able to exercise our judgment as healthcare professionals as to what is best for that individual woman. This is a really evidence based service. And the evidence that has been gathered about the safety and efficacy of this service has actually been used around the world. It underpinned the FDA's decision recently to enable women to undergo telemedicine to have telemedical abortion at home. You know, this is a world leading evidence based service and to remove it would be an absolute denial of evidence based medicine. You know, and I think one of the points is that absolutely, you know, you talked about my side, the pro choice side. You know, we are pro choice country. You know, we do believe in women's access to abortion. But it's fair enough that we can have that debate about should abortion be lawful. But the point is is that when abortion is lawful, women should have the right to be able to access the service in the way that is best for them. So yes, this isn't that debate your point is because abortion is not the evidence is legal and we are in this position to talk about how it's accessed. When you say we're a pro choice country, you're talking about the opinion polls consistently showing where people are on this. Is that what you mean by that?.

FDA
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:10 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"So it's going to be quite an odd thing all in, really. With the competition and then, as you say, no medal ceremony. Absolutely. I mean, she's practiced today and you couldn't squeeze another camera into the side of the practice ring. That is how many people are watching her every move here. And that will only multiply tomorrow when she gets onto the main rink here in Beijing. And you have to think, I mean, it's incredibly difficult for a 15 year old how on earth she can put all of this to one side and try and skate at her best tomorrow. And yet the irony is just going to say the irony is this decision has been taken because there is a thought that it would cause her harm if she didn't compete, but competing sounds like it's going to be extraordinary. Exactly. And if she were to win the gold, I mean, it's fascinating this situation, because a week ago, everyone was celebrating the fact that she'd made Olympic history by being the first woman to ever land a quadruple jump at the Olympics. So she was being lauded as this child prodigy and now she is that the center of this global doping scandal. And if she wins the gold, she can't be awarded the gold, and there'll be, you know, for many people, there will be an asterisk next to it. For the other athletes competing, I mean, there is this almighty distraction going on. And it just ends up being a very problematic, uncomfortable situation, which is left a very sour taste for many people and overshadowed these games despite all the amazing sport that's been going on for many people. These games will be remembered for this. Laura Scott, thank you very much for taking us into the heart of the story about the woman that everyone, or the young, the young woman I should say, if I can put it like that, the world is focusing its attention on for very different reasons this week compared to last Laura Scott BBC senior news sports news reporter there with the latest will keep you up to date on that. But last week, you will have heard about the prime minister trying to roll back coronavirus legislation in England a month early, legislation that, for instance, includes the requirement to isolate after testing positive. But also included in that swathe of new rules, which is that women were able, you'll remember this I'm sure to access earlier at home medical abortions after a telephone or online consultation with a nurse, midwife or doctor without going to the clinic during the pandemic or certainly during lockdowns and risking catching COVID..

Laura Scott Beijing Olympics Olympic BBC England
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:04 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"She's already made a name for herself in the world of professional ice skating, being the 2022 Russian national champion and set 9 world records during her career. But what could be the ramifications for a young woman being allowed to compete in a global competition after failing a drug test, Laura Scott is a BBC senior news sports reporter, joins me now, good morning. Hi, Emma. We've got this decision then. Why is this decision so significant? Well, this whole doping controversy has really overshadowed these games here in Beijing. It's both troubling because it involves Russia and doping when Russia is still serving a ban for a state sponsored doping program, but it's particularly troubling and perhaps unique because it involves a 15 year old athlete, and that has caused concern around the world about how a banned substance ended up in the system of Camilla valieva, and has resulted in this scandal which, I mean, we have had this result today from the court of arbitration for sport, but the controversy is by no means over. And I think also it's particularly such a big issue because she made Olympic history only last week. She's already won a gold medal here at these games. And she's seen by many as perhaps one of the greatest figure skaters of all time, even though she's only at the very start of her career. So she's right in the spotlight. She is only a child, but it is a really troubling controversy. Because of course, being given a second chance because she's a minor, many may feel that undermines the message of a drug free sport and clean games. Yeah, we've had that kind of reaction already today from the likes of the world anti doping agency, the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic committee, the global athlete body, all saying that they feel that this is a disappointing decision because of the message that it sends. You know, if you take the world anti doping agencies response, for example, they say that what the court of arbitration for sport has said, which is that because the liver is so young, that is an exceptional circumstance and to suspend her would cause her irreparable harm..

Laura Scott Camilla valieva Russia court of arbitration for sport Emma BBC Beijing U.S. Olympic and Paralympic co Olympic
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:46 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"That is a great theme also coming through on our messages this morning and I know that you acknowledge that in this collection. Yes, when people have always written into the knowledge that everything can change and it's even in the face of this that we still promise to love forever. It's an act of full heart in a sort of defiance, but we speak of love that will never die even if the lover or the poet does. And it's under that shadow that some of the greatest love poems become the most beautiful allergies. Yes. Well, the messages that have also come in have asked for some help. And I don't know if you've got any, but maybe a tip or two of how to do this, how to broach it and not feel perhaps you can't contribute something. I think I can really only say again that try to avoid the abstractions try to make it make the right from inside your body, try to feel the moment with taste with every sense that you have and write from that because to anyone who has ever loved the experience feels it's only ever happened to them. But the right words turn it into a language that the whole world understands. And the best love poems reach beyond two people to something more generous, something bigger, a space that's bigger than two. So don't be afraid also being specific in some of those details because that could actually help others feel like they understand it. It's the specific that makes the poem come alive. You are reading some poetry today. Are you are you reading it to someone or are you doing it as a performance? Tell us, are you serenading? Not well, it's a lovely thing since pancras has opened the space to us under the clock. The king's cross in London here..

pancras London
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Been getting in touch during that conversation while I'm sure listening to it with some of your poems, some of your expressions of love, how you express it, some of you also telling me what you've written only today or had written to you, I will come to those very shortly, but it is Valentine's, often slightly succor in dishes in those cards or whatever you manage to fashion, but we have real expert help on hand. We have the award winning poet in the excuse me darker who specially selected her favorite poems and a beautiful collection. It has to be said for the folio society called love poems. Their recent and ancient poems poems that talk about the animal magnetism of love, others, they display more profound devotion, but they've all been arranged carefully to speak across centuries and cultures. Good morning. Thank you for joining us. Good morning. I have to say, we've got some very funny poems coming in already. We've got some more profound ones. But why did you decide as a poet to focus some of your attention at the moment on love poems? Well, love poems, I think, especially now, is a time when we've all been reexamining our connections with other people's people and love becomes a much wider thing in a lot of ways. So what I was looking for was poems that are really life poems that poems about longing and living and desire and desperation and loss and these poems are not scared to talk about the car crashed relationships and the scaffolding of love because against impossible odds, lovers, and all people, they try to lose their boundaries in each other. And poets try to do the same with words. So there's one just a tiny one and anonymous classical poem Tamil poem from almost 2000 years ago, what could my mother be to yours? What kin is my father to yours anyway? And how did you and I need ever? But in love, our hearts have mingled like red earth and pouring rain. Now, that feels like the start of a huge conversation that goes on as you said across time and time zones because poems of love are also love poems to the whole world. I love that the idea of red earth in that way. It's really gorgeous. And there is just something also to be said, which I was my eye was immediately drawn to. Again, may say more about me than anything else, but there's one by Kim Moore called in praise of arguing, which I have to read that to you. I would love you to read it if you'd be so kind, please. Yes. I have to say very often is the women who see a more ironic than see the episode. In praise of arguing by Kim Moore. And the vacuum cleaner flew down the stairs like a song and the hiking boots launched themselves along the landing at one half of the house hated the other half. And the blinds wound themselves around each other. And the doors flung themselves into the street and flounced away and the washing gathered in corners and soaked and the bed collapsed and was held up by books and the walls developed scars and it was a glorious glorious year. It's a good one. It's a really good one. What I like this one half of the house hated the other. But I suppose it's that passion within love and the Discord that also should be reflected..

folio society Kim Moore
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

02:31 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I understand that point, but nipping in the bud would mean what as an example. You have those conversations with the Oculus commanders or the individuals that were in charge of those units that would say, actually, we are aware that you have a problem and that needs to be sorted. Which if they weren't aware, it would make them aware and then it would allow for them people that potentially making the complaints and seeking support to be heard and for those issues to be addressed. So again, so from your perspective, the removal of her or rather the effective resignation of her is the right decision for the Met at this time. I believe so. I believe so. And in terms of those who say, well, there's also the irony that the misogyny displayed by going back to that particular point, the misogyny displayed by some of the officers exposed, for instance, and the charing cross reports that we heard of those offices making those remarks in police state in the police station, a woman's been removed for the misogyny of men, some men, we should stress again and recognize we have lots of people who work in the police who listen to this program who do not recognize this behavior as their own, or those around them. And on our feeling pretty demoralized, I should also say, at the moment, really want to remember that. But what do you say to those who say there's an irony of a woman being held to account for that and being removed and there isn't it doesn't seem a natural successor? For me, policing has been around for nearly 200 years. And up until the day came, and it was all men. For some reason or another they were able to have a grip on the behaviors because this is always been the case in terms of misogyny, racism, sexism, homophobia, you name it. It's always been the case within policing, but they, in terms of magazine in charge of managed to kind of keep a lid on it..

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:43 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And on cressida dick herself, there were some comments if you like after the flurry of the announcement that started to reflect on, perhaps an irony of a man getting rid of the first woman to run the metropolitan police, a man saying she hadn't done enough. What do you make of that just as that particular point? So I am a fan of the in terms of what she has tried to deliver that actually if you're not delivering on what communities would want to see, then actually that is the mayor's that is the most thing to come in and say, look, you know, communities are not happy. There's a lot of confidence. The lowest it's been for years that actually that conversation needs to be had. And if you're not delivering, then actually, then it's right and proper that, you know, that should be said. And if the decision is then that she decides to resign, then so we need to have someone that comes in and understands the issues and puts those actions into place immediately. Do you think though there has been enough credit for her achievements and for what she was able to do, it's also been commented that she did have her term extended. I think there has been, you know, I don't think any police officer comes in to accept credit for doing the work. So in terms of that, I don't think there's that she'd want to think that there's been afforded to her. You come in, you do the best job that you are able to do. And then, you know, if people aren't satisfied, then you make a decision on that. But yeah, I don't think, I think people accept that she's building for 40 years. She's given a good service. But again, this probably was a bridge too far. I don't know. Misogyny was at the heart of a lot of the revelations recently there have been laid. Certainly I heard as the Met commissioner..

cressida dick
"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:37 min | 3 months ago

"catherine nicholson" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Are you in the mood for love this Monday morning or at least wanting to try and express it it is the 14th of February, I could ignore it, or we could make a virtue of having an excuse to try and express love to those in our life. The ones that we really do love, it doesn't have to be a partner. You may be so low that maybe choice it may not be choice. All of the above all of the below. But friends and family too. How do you express love? Have you ever considered writing a poem? Some of you are very good at this. I know this because I've asked you to deliver on this front before and you've got in touch in your droves. I'll be joined today by the award winning poet in nitya's darker, who's going to be joining us with a collection of love poems and perhaps helping you find your voice, are you inspired maybe to try and write a few lines? Go on, give it a go. If you feel that you could, share them with me today, share them with us all, get in touch on 8 four 8 four four. That's the number you need to text me here at women's. Perhaps you've also got some advice and share some inspiration. On social media it's at BBC women's art or email list through our website. Of course, I'm always in the market for the really bad words, the really bad experiences as well. If you've received some poetry, that perhaps you can remember or care to share that was truly awful. I'm also here for that. I'm always here for that. So do get in touch. Also on today's program, as you've just been hearing in the news, the controversial decision has been made that the 15 year old Russian figure skater Camila Valle can compete again at compete excuse me out the Winter Olympics despite her failing a drug test. But what could the ramifications be for a young woman allowed to compete in a global competition after failing a drug test? We'll get some of that shortly..

nitya BBC Camila Valle Winter Olympics
EU Asks Belgian Court to Fine AstraZeneca

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:59 min | 1 year ago

EU Asks Belgian Court to Fine AstraZeneca

"The european union and vaccine producer. Astrazeneca are attempting to settle their differences in brussels court today. The e contends that astrazeneca has been slow to deliver the doses of covid nineteen vaccines was contractually obliged to and that at least fifty million doses the e. You should have had were sent elsewhere. Astrazeneca unsurprisingly disputes. This cynical souls have suggested that. The eu is seeking to deflect blame for a generally slow rollout of covid nineteen vaccines especially when measured against the progress of recent. You abscond e the united kingdom. Well joining me now. From brussels fronts twentyfold europe editor. Catherine nicholson She's joined also by independent legal expert. Get vancouver who is joining us from leuven catherine first of all to the basics of the case itself. What is the use case here in what of i hoping to gain from this i say the european commission signed a contract with seneca supply Vaccine doses at the end of august last year and it paid two hundred twenty four million euros astrazeneca a full ingredients for these vaccines in september of twenty twenty so the commission is saying that contracts to astra zeneca to deliver three hundred million indexes affects seem by the end of june this year But it's now expecting to receive just fifty million even the listens per we remember that astrazeneca said earlier in the yet they have some production problems therefore saving issues as we know with experts being restricted from various places around the world the european commission. Oversees saying this is not what they contracts it. That's their arguments And they are demanding. That's more doses be delivered And it's essentially arguing that astrazeneca's failed to honor contractual commitments. To deliver vaccine doses. On the other hand astra zeneca says that this case is without

Astrazeneca Brussels EU Catherine Nicholson Seneca Supply Vaccine Leuven European Commission United Kingdom Vancouver Europe