17 Burst results for "Caterina"

"caterina" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

05:30 min | Last month

"caterina" Discussed on Conversations

"Period of time now of course local anesthetics different local anesthetics trait pain because they numb everything. And sometimes we add into the mix as well so we might have someone unconscious for the procedure but have an epi zero in. That's going to stay for several days after the operation. Do you ever wonder where people go. When they're under. I keep an eye on them. I make sure they don't leave the person that was. I once generalists that he wants to know what it's all about. I remember dream coming out of it. But of course i have absolutely no memory of that i have no memory of going under and i just wonder where all winter time do. You ever wondered that. Oh yeah totally. I mean. I've been doing this for a very long time and it never ceases to amaze me that no matter. How has strong and combative the patient might be. Eventually they will become unconscious on the end of the needle and when we wake up they come back again. It's an extraordinary thing anaesthesia. It really is. i mean. We're so lucky that it's possible if we dream while we're under anaesthetic or is it the brainwave go flat or something. No no the brain going flat bed thing. That people do people daydream The the what. I remember is difficult to know. I mean we can apparently hypnotize people and they will have different memories to what they might actually remember. I think the some evidence that dream and certainly some drugs won't make dromomania for us. Things like ketamine for pain relief. And we caterina's part of an ascetic regime that can give people all sorts of strange hallucinations. But hopefully they're not aware of them because we give them drugs as well most people just the next thing there are members are saying it's all over our becoming out all of the anesthetic and coming of surfacing into a bit of pain and i said pain i think out again and i think that put me out..

caterina
"caterina" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

Science Magazine Podcast

05:05 min | 6 months ago

"caterina" Discussed on Science Magazine Podcast

"You get your podcast. No we'll speak with katharina. Schmid research investigator at cold. Spring harbor laboratory caterina's new paper and science examines a subject that might sound a little tricky hallucination in mice high katerina. Hi thanks for having of course so. This is exciting. We're talking about this weird concept around maze and their brain processes. How do we know what meister thinking. Can you explain the purpose of this study. Why do we care how mice hallucinate. Yeah that's a great question as you might know. Hallucinations are false perceptions of a nonexistent thing such as a voice when no one's talking and why we are interested in house nation. Is they a central symptom of psychotic disorders. That just gets and because these disorders are often devastating and they cannot be treated satisfying..

katharina Schmid caterina katerina Spring harbor laboratory
"caterina" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

The gamingfixx1's Podcast

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on The gamingfixx1's Podcast

"Like I think that's the the thing is is. It's not an easy answer. It's not a if we if we ban games they'll be no no more violence and it's not if we ban you know we ban guns. There'll be no violence. Nobody will do anything like that. You know it's there's no quick and easy answer. It's something that people have to sit down for longtime and really think about right if they're going to come up with a solution and the reality is this kind of thing happens. People don't want well you know. In about ten years in a think tank we might be able to figure out a a real solution. They're like they want results right and a politician can say well then we should just ban this because it's easier to do that and say you know what we don't know and we're sorry but we really don't know we're just as shocked as you are. This is horrible and we don't really know what we can do or say so that's think the best thing right now is just you know. Listen to people And you know be be not necessarily well. Yeah I'd say the shore that they can cry on or come to whenever you know these types of things happen being ally. Wow that's terrible. I'm GONNA leave that cause okay so Yeah I mean through. It's IT'S BEEN A. It's been a very interesting time and with all that I think it must be time for some more music. Yeah Music Music also to. Let's go with something. Nice and calm. Let's go with. Why isn't telling someone's morning when you hear that? Yeah See. The snoring are saunas drilling something. It stopped so I don't know yeah I know that they are working on the The working next door so maybe he still working on the on the switcher on switch box. Yeah right some. You can't now I can't think of the name of All right I guess. We need to be more awake. Yeah we'll go with something actually stronger like my coffee. I don't have any coffee right now. But we're going to listen to some sabotage. Okay because yeah and it is a hot one today Lou boy so make sure you stay hydrated folks drink lots and lots of water. You drink all the water. Well not all the water. Lisa everybody else. Yeah and I'm not talking about hydrating yourself we gatorade because Caterina's lots of sugar.

gatorade Lou boy Caterina Lisa
"caterina" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The women light candles and sing a song prisoners sang in the camps. Cash who is Jewish says for French Jews? It's important that the much larger Muslim community understands the trauma of the holocaust. She believes these women. Now, do the didn't understand and they didn't believe no this. I think that, you know, not cash founded long gosh to farm alongside Asaba may best friend is a semi Eissa who is a Muslim. And we're very very close. And I trust her a love her. She loves me. I'm sure I wish everybody could be like us says Naccash Eleanor Beardsley, NPR, news Auschwitz. Tech companies decide to kill products and ideas for products all the time. Maybe it doesn't work. There's no market whatever. But what about when the tech is too dangerous? That's what Caterina fake wants Silicon Valley to consider more often the ethics of new tech. She host the podcast should this exists. And she joins us now from San Francisco. Thanks so much for being on weekend edition and thanks for having me. So you think about this all the time? But we thought about it because open I the research nonprofit announce they weren't releasing a text generator they developed because they feared it could be misused to create fake news. Did that admission take you by surprise tech companies? Don't launch products all the time. But it's rare that they announce that they're not launching a product, which is what has happened here. And the announcement of not launching this product is basically to. Involve people in the conversation around. What is and what is not dangerous tech? You are in Silicon Valley. You're the co founder of flicker one of the things that always struck me was at the beginning the conversation among developers. There was always like we are doing this for the greater good. This is part of a good for society. Has that conversation changed? I think it has for example, when we had first started flicker, we kind of understood that what we were building was online community online community is something where you show up. You are yourself you have to participate, and you have to negotiate the culture of the community in which you are participating in a social media platform. You are so called eyeballs, you are a product that is being sold to advertisers. It's a completely different dynamic. And when things switched from being very early on thought of as online community to being thought of as social media the. Dynamics of the entire software changed so in your podcast, should this exist. I mean, what kinds of questions are you grappling with right now? I'm sure you see things all the time. That are being promoted. And you think this isn't getting? I think it would be wonderful. If I were the sole arbiter of what should should not exist. But really we have been talking about this and the valley forever. But it was not getting a lot of attention. And there is a kind of a catastrophic change that happened. Think win unexpectedly too many of us the two thousand sixteen elections had results that we did not date for reasons that we could suddenly see what do you say to people though who say that any product or platform can be misused and that it's impossible to plan for every eventuality the important part of this is to acculturated people to asking these questions, and as we all know millennials and gen Z, and and the younger folk that are now coming into their own are much more thoughtful about what are the values behind this product or this program and. What does it do to us? For example, one of the last shows was about a product called woobox, and what it is. It's an AI driven bought their best. And as we know depression has increased which has followed very closely the introduction of technology into our lives their studies that show that kids specifically that are on a lot of technology and social media of feel more depressed more alienated from their peers, etc. Yes. And my initial impulse was gosh. Should we use technology to cure, the problems of technology that seems misguided? But by the end of thinking through some of the possibilities of this technology. I became convinced that in fact, this was probably a good solution for it. I feel as if technology can always be used for good, right? It has neutral Valence. It is the way that humans use it. And how we approach it. And how we think about it. That is what is the most important part of technology and technology in our lives. Caterina fake is a co founder of flicker a venture capitalist and a host of the podcast should this exist..

Silicon Valley Naccash Eleanor Beardsley Caterina fake co founder Asaba San Francisco NPR AI depression
"caterina" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:12 min | 2 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The women light candles and sing a song prisoners sang in the camps. Suzanne cash who is Jewish says for French Jews. It's important that the much larger Muslim community understands the trauma of the holocaust. She believes these women now do didn't understand, and they didn't believe and know this. I think that the understand that, you know, it's not cash founded long gosh to farm alongside Asaba may best friend is a semi Eissa who is a Muslim. And we're very very close. And I trust her a love her. She loves me. I'm sure I wish everybody could be like us says Naqqash Eleanor Beardsley, NPR, news Auschwitz. Tech companies decide to kill products and ideas for products all the time. Maybe it doesn't work. There's no market whatever. But what about when the tech is too dangerous? That's what Caterina fake wants Silicon Valley to consider more often the ethics of new tech. She hosts the podcast should this exist. And she joins us now from San Francisco. Thanks so much for being on weakened addition. And thanks for having me. So you think about this all the time? But we thought about it because open I the research nonprofit announce they weren't releasing a text generator they developed because they feared it could be misused to create fake news. Did that admission take you by surprise tech companies? Don't launch products all the time. But it's rare that they announced that they're not launching a product, which is what has happened here. And the announcement of not launching this product is basically to. Involve people in the conversation around. What is and what is not dangerous tech? You are in Silicon Valley. You're the co founder of flicker one of the things that always struck me was at the beginning the conversation among developers. There was always like we are doing this for the greater good. This is part of a good for society. Has that conversation changed? I think it has for example, when we had first started flicker, we kind of understood that what we were building was online community online community is something where you show up. You are yourself you have to participate, and you have to negotiate the culture of the community in which you are participating in a social media platform. You are so called eyeballs, you are a product that is being sold to advertisers. It's a completely different dynamic. And when things switched from being very early on thought of as online community to being thought of as social media the. Dynamics of the entire software changed so in your podcast, should this exist. I mean, what kinds of questions are you grappling with right now? I'm sure you see things all the time that are being promoted. And you think this isn't getting? I think it would be wonderful. If I were the sole arbiter of what should should not exist. But really we have been talking about this and the valley forever. But it was not getting a lot of attention. And there is a kind of a catastrophic change that happened. I think win unexpectedly too many of us the two thousand sixteen elections had results that we did not anticipate for reasons that we could suddenly see what do you say to people though who say that any product or platform can be misused and that it's impossible to plan for every eventuality the important part of this is to a culture eight people to asking these questions, and as we all know millennials and gen Z. And and the younger folk that are now, you know, kind of coming into their own are much more thoughtful about what are the values behind this product or this program and what? What does it do to us? For example, one of the last shows was about a product called robot. And what it is it's an AI driven bought therapist. And as we know depression has increased which has followed very closely the introduction of technology into our lives their studies that show that kids specifically that are on a lot of technology and social media of feel more depressed more alienated from their peers, etc. Yes. And my initial impulse was gosh should be used technology to cure, the problems of technology that seems misguided. But by the end of thinking through some of the possibilities of this technology, I became convinced that in fact, this was probably a good solution for it. I feel as if technology can always be used for good, right? It has neutral Valence. It is the way that humans use it. And how we approach it. And how we think about it. That is what is the most important part of technology and technology in our lives. Caterina fake is a co founder of flicker a venture capitalist and a host of the podcast should this exist..

Silicon Valley Caterina fake Naqqash Eleanor Beardsley co founder Suzanne Asaba San Francisco NPR AI depression
"caterina" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

Heather Dubrow's World

03:17 min | 2 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

"It's why why separate the grades do during school? I don't know. It's too much. So they have these academic awards and it's six seventh and eighth grade. I don't know why they don't separate them. But they do is like the maths department comes up, and then each math teacher gives one comes up and gives all the sixth grade awards and then won gives the seventh grade awards and one gives the issues for each department of the school. So there's or technology their science there's art there's this. So you have to get through all those and then at the end big through honor roll and then distinguished honor roll. And it's alphabetical and the kids up to come up and get the thing and whatever. So they say it starts at eight. I get there at seven fifty nine because of what happened right before we came in. But I get there at seven fifty and the places already packed. It's like everyone's been there since seven, oh, so crazy, and I left because caterina's part than they were moving onto seventh and eighth for the for the honor roll part, I left it nine thirty and they weren't not anywhere near dog. Oh my gosh. It's just so crazy. I mean, everyone is so smart at the schools don't like giving out five honor roll, right? It's like everybody. Oh my goodness. So this would happen. So so I get up. I got the groggy cocoa again. Everyone's up Nick, he's got he bought this really beautiful little necklace discworld, and it had engraved on the back the date that he asked her to homecoming. Oh, so we vary. Not a look at this time. Not a lock it. Like the like the was at first grade. Second grade fourth grade fourth grade, not like the fourth grade luck. Not not now just just that a really pretty and cool and very her because we were looking at different things together when we at the stores, and I was like, you know, because the kids like designers stuff right now. And I was like, you know, what about this? What about that? He goes she doesn't like designer. I was like oh cool. I like that. Yeah. So we picked out this really cool thing, and he had it engraved. And by the way, we were going to leave and come back. So it could be done. He wanted to stand there. He wanted to wait for it. He wanted to check it and made. Sure it was right? And then he got her sunflowers because she loves sunflowers, and then he got the hugest box heart shaped box of See's candy. Let's so Doral cutest thing ever, I'm like she weighs two pounds. How is she ever going to have candy frozen inter freezer for the next? So cute anyways. So did that and got everyone together. Got everyone out the door. And it's pouring rain. I mean, like torrential raining we get to the school and the school parking lot is pretty full because if these awards because everyone's getting one because everyone is smart, apparently, and then I parked my car, and I get out of the car, and I literally next to my car is there's so much water that it's above my ankles. And I'm wearing sneakers because I was intending on going to the gym right after I wasn't thinking like trudging through the rain. I was thinking parking lot into the school back to the car to the gym and home. Literally up to my ankles, my feet are instantly soaked. Oh, no, men, the kitten and cat and KoKo. The other kids used to do this the other kids when they were little Maxon Icke if we're sitting at a table and one of them spilled a drink..

caterina Nick two pounds
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

04:31 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"Welcome back to without fail at my conversation with flicker co-founder VC investor Katharina fake. I want to ask you about something that I think about a lot back back when you started flicker you found it with Stewart Butterfield who is then your husband my wife. She's not my co-founder. But she's she she worked at the company. She's on the executive team. She's like a big she's been apart of gamut since the very very beginning. And we walk to work together. We walk home together. We're meetings together all the time. Like we're talking about. Like, it's the company is is our life. And I'm always intrigued Chuck to other people who've been sort of through that like for you and your relationship. I don't know. How was that for you at the time? Well, I don't know. I mean, I have always found it to be a question that men are not asked and women are for some reason and. You know, I don't know how many times Stewart has been asked. So what was it like to work with your spouse? Yeah. Because women are women are frequently framed as their successes not their own their successes in relation to others. This. I wanna be clear I'm asking purely as sort of to trade notes for me. It's like such a concert, my wife, and I talk about it all the time. And it's exciting. Like there's like so many pros to it. We're always worried like, what's, you know? Is there another shoe that's gonna drop? It's just it's just a big. It's an interesting dynamic in our life. The fact that we're like sort of in the middle of this thing together once upon a time and in a pre industrial era, everybody's last name was Smith or Cooper and Cooper is a barrel maker in Fletcher is an arrow maker in a Smith is all kinds of Smith, but mainly blacksmith and the Weaver family had a loom downstairs end your brother would weave and father would weave. And that was the product, right? You made me made bolts of fabric, which then took down to the marketplace. And your last name was weird and your lesson was Weaver, and I'm one of those people who spends a lot of time. In thinking about the impact of technology on people, and culture and our behavior and how it can help us become more human and live fulfilled lives full of meaning one of the things that I think about a lot is how do you structure your life and your work in a way that makes you happy and thinking back to that time? There was a book that I read by Percival and Paul Goodman called communities, and in it, there was a graph of people's work in home life. And and there is this diagram that showed women and children were over on one side. And then there is this gap. And then on the other side was the workplace, and that was where the men were as written in the sixties. And I think there is a few feeling working, but my experience actually after I had a baby mapped. To this very strongly, and I felt that men's participation in the lives of their families and their children and women's participation in the work world were divided from each other. And that if you had a a kind of a life experience where everybody participated in living and the child rearing, and the work altogether, and it all fit together I lived at. And so I thought a lot about that. I think part of the reason that I'm an entrepreneur honesty is that I can work for myself and design my work life in a way that I feel very humane in a way that people many people's work life is not humane. Yeah. Yeah. Being able to walk to work, and you say you walk to with your wife everyday. Like, that's tremendous. Yes. That's tremendous gift. Yeah. To to to you and her end and your family, and it's very, and I think. Thing that happens sometimes with like, especially with if one person's on sort of this entrepeneurship sort of thing, it becomes it can become so all consuming and. When when you're in it together, like the downside is that all you talk about his work..

co-founder Stewart Butterfield Weaver Smith Katharina fake VC executive Chuck Cooper Paul Goodman Percival Fletcher
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"Well, we got this far, but the board and and Stewart were arguing like that's as far as we're going to get we should just like get out while they're getting out. It's good. Basically what we what were you afraid? You were worried just about the opportunity, but where you also worried about like, what will it be like once we sell our company and like now, we're now we're working for somebody else. Yeah. But you guys have actually did did sell right? Like, how was that the received wisdom was that? Once you're in a big company, it throttles you and you're no longer. It's no longer that feeling of. The Hollywood road movie scene where you're in a convertible in the wind is in your hair and your writing line and making your startup happening. Suddenly, you just hit a roadblock and there's toll booths and traffic, and you can't move. And so that's that's sort of the received wisdom, and that's how I. Feared it would be. And so being the irrepressible optimist that I I see myself as I decided that what I was going to do is. I was going to learn what I could there now. And that I was going to have a good time. If the U of today where to go back to those like 'cause this is your sort of your first big experiences like, you know? Vani company running a company, and like sort of like having this big fiddle decision of to sell TI who are not. And so you're pretty new at that point. Now, you've you're very seasoned euro VCU had many companies if the U of today where to go back and have those conversations where like the board saying we should sell. Stewart saying we should sell would you do anything differently? What would you have today do in the in that situation? The me of today. I'm not sure it was possible for there to be another way. I mean, I could I could have fought more fiercely. For my point of view. I'm not a big believer in these would coulda shoulda scenarios the way, I think about things is that that is what happened, and I try to live forward and not backward and reflecting on what you have learned. You can only bring into the future. You can't bring it into the past. So I'm always baffled by those questions. People always ask that, you know, if you could go back to your teenage self until your teenage self something. What would you tell her always baffled by this question to be honest, because I just don't I just my my, you know, I always think of that, you know, that your guard quote in that life can only be understood backwards, but it can only be lived for roads. Right. Yeah. And so I'm not sure it serves you to continually question. If you had done the right thing because you did what you did. And it turned out the way it did and probably in possibly could have had a better or a different or another outcome. But you don't know if that would have been worse. Coming up after the break. I talked to Katharina about the thing that nausea, and I talked about but working with your spouse and Katharina offers a very very compelling explanation for why it actually doesn't feel that a natural. That's after the break. This episode without fail is brought to you by we work. We were understands that as companies grow. They wanna space to call their own.

Stewart Katharina VCU TI Hollywood nausea
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

04:50 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"Welcome back to without fail in my conversation with Katharina fake. So when we left off flicker was considering an offer from Yahoo to buy the company was like an easy decision. Was it something that you wrestled with like how did he goes? How did that come about? Oh, I I was very much against the acquisition Stewart was very much for the acquisition. It was a it was a divided issue to be honest. How would that how would that division manifest in your guys day today? Would you like was it just sort of like discussion? I mean, I think what happened was does. He he made a examples of or a demonstration of the good that would come from this potential acquisition. And honestly, all of the investors were on his side. It was it was kind of me against everybody. And I remember we did a phone call. I was like, you know. Shudder. Fly is preparing to go public. Right. And I said, I I don't see why we couldn't be on that same path. And I remember they left the investors left us. Like, no, this flicker thing will never be like that. And what she felt I I was kind of kind of felt outnumbered. What what does it feel like? Just kind of bad. But I the other thing too. Is that I mean, it this was two thousand and four. Yeah. And there was you know, there was no money around. It was not a time of abundance. It was a time of scarcity, and it seemed I think to most people that this was the most reasonable outcome. I think it also like to me that story resonate so much with me because I feel like I sometimes find myself in very similar situations where I'm I'm sort of like, I have one view which is based on because I'm the artistic one or whatever. And I don't have the computer science degree at. I don't put the other power points with like matrices of decision points and stuff like that. Like, I'm the one who's just like, I don't know it feels wrong or at feels right? And I find myself in arguments with people who can sort of lake lay out like no, this is the case for this reason. This reason this reason, and it's just really sort of scary position to be in. Because it feels like the wrong thing to do. And you sort of one argue it, but at the same time, you're like what if I'm wrong. And also like I don't know what I'm doing get help like. And now, I'm probably projecting entirely into your situation. But was any of that going on with you? I do think that. Over time. I have. I mean, I often find myself in the same situation where I am kind of deeply intuitively against or four something. I'm presented with data. Right. Unequivocal? I will go with the data. Like, I'm not like the day. This is right. But a lot of but a lot is we make us entrepreneurs is in those exact grayer as where there isn't data. You have like you have a couple data. The future is a blur. Yes. It's it's not you can't really see it. They're kind of shadows being cast forward from the future into the president. You can't see it. Yeah. But somehow, I think you can feel it. And and I'm with you on that. I think that there are a lot of decisions that you have to make in spite of the data and in spite of received wisdom, and in spite of the fact that everybody is telling us that own a photo sharing is also up. There is photo shutter flying fish and their new room for you. Because that buck's has been checked, and it is all over and is done. And fortunately, we were naive and optimistic enough to ignore that. Right. And certainly Eva Tae and optimism and clueless. Ness. And recklessness and fearlessness makes these companies happen. Now, you you hear, you know, the kind of Airbnb of the world telling the same story, how dumb is that you're gonna put an air mattress on the floor of your apartment and rent it to somebody like how weird, but so you nor that for and we're initially very very successful. But then in a certain point when it comes to the acquisition by yahu that sort of that sort of thinking actually carries the day like, okay?.

Stewart Katharina Yahoo Airbnb Eva Tae Ness buck yahu president
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

03:43 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"And even then, you know, we were MAC credit cards were so maxed up. We're you know, we're we're going to Capital One man we were trying really hard. Stay of water. I take it. Like, I had bought I bought my first apartment and put a second mortgage on that thing, you know, it was like betting the farm, really. So this was two thousand four the company that they'd started had now officially become flicker, and it was growing drastically. But that brought a whole new set of problems daily. They needed more money. Lots more money to keep up with the growth, and for that they needed investors. But to get investors they needed a bigger profile. They were this little start up in Vancouver off the radar from what was happening in Silicon Valley. But there was a place that they could go to get themselves on the raider to up their profile to meet investors. It was the biggest most important conference in the tech world called PC forum. It was run by this. Well, known and respected angel investor named Esther Dyson the Team New if they could get into that conference. They could rub elbows with people who could keep their company. Float problem was they couldn't. Actually afford to get into the conference that didn't have enough money to afford the admission price to get to the place where they could ask the people for money. So they sent a personal note to Astor, and we wrote to her, and we said, we really wanna come to see firm, but it costs it will cost ten thousand dollars, which we don't have. But if our company is successful, we promise we'll come back and bring extra people the following year and got an Email back from Esther saying, no and about a half an hour later. We got another Email from one of her staff members who said, yes. And we were always astonished by this. And you know, we we said, well, obviously, we're going with the yes. Entrepreneurs here. No, no. No. No. No. When you hear? Yes. When you finally hear yes, you have to go after that. Yes. As hard as you can. So we took the this staff members. Yes. And then Esther the next time. She was in Vancouver. I think she was serving on a board for Vancouver company says she was often in Vancouver, which is where we were based. And she wanted to know who these people were who had somehow shoehorned their way into her conference. And so we sat down with her and had breakfast with her. And she at the end of the meeting said, can I invest how did that feel? Was it exciting. Yeah. I mean, it's exhilarating. It's exhilarating. It's it's amusement park rides exhilarating. It was big feel it after that investment. Flicker took off. They got other notable investors inboard people like Reid Hoffman who founded Lincoln and their use base kept growing. It was doubling month of a month and like with any successful startup. It wasn't long before other bigger companies started knocking on their door hoping to acquire them one of those bigger companies with Yahoo. And in two thousand five yahu reportedly offered twenty five million dollars to buy flicker and remember Katharina and her husband, Stuart founded this committee together this offer one of the money to do it. And one of them didn't how they resolve that what it felt like coming up after the break. This episode without fail is brought to you by Google home hub. So I'm going to hit something that I think probably has happened. Other people have gotten up in the morning, check, your phone looked at your calendar to see what's going on and walked right into a wall or door. Don't tell me haven't done that. It's embarrassing and painful, and you don't need to do it anymore. That's because there's Google home..

Esther Dyson Vancouver Capital One Google Astor Reid Hoffman Silicon Valley Stuart Yahoo Katharina Lincoln twenty five million dollars ten thousand dollars
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

02:33 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"They're a bunch of forces that were coming together at the same time, which were that more than half of cellphones were shipping with a camera for the first time more than half of US households were I'm broadband meaning that they could download photographs which previously had been a very, slow and painful experience. So we kind of felt as if there is a there is an inevitability to it. And it was also embracing the technology in a way that hadn't previously existed. So you do the pivot which wasn't going to pivot back. Then you muddle around. What is what was the first moment where you're like? Oh my gosh. This is working. It was growing so fast that we were constantly about to fall down. I remember there is this. Server software, graph that we would have where you know, this red line would be creeping up. You have so much server activity that your servers about to collapse, and we literally had this cell phone number of the customs agent down at Burnaby who would tell us when a shipment of a Dell server would becoming from Austin, Texas or ever dillas based, you know, the customers would call us. And then we, you know, we'd run down to the border grab the server run to the Colo plug in load up our software, and then you would watch the red bar go to green again, and we just we just did that over and over and over again, the thing was growing just faster than we could. We could keep we could barely keep up with it. And you couldn't literally or running out of server capacity, like constantly constantly. And I remember. We would pose. We would post on the blog. You know? Sorry. The site's going to be down for a half an hour, and I would play. There's that song. I think from the six is going to go go every day. Go into and I change it to go into the co lo every D, And then we put that up. There like we are the Colocation center Colocation centre like the server farm. And so I would put that up. I mean, like we're going to the Colo and plug in new servers so bear with us while we have some downtime. Wow. You couldn't just go and stock up on servers like we'd have Blake with what money with what money. We can only by wants to rid it's time..

US Burnaby Dell Blake Texas Austin
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

04:35 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"Web media startup called salon dot com. She managed community forums at Netscape. And then in two thousand two she and her then husband Stewart Butterfield decided to start their own company, a gaming company. They're living in Vancouver at the time that a small team and they built this game called game never ending which was managing to attract a decent fan base. There's just one problem we were broke, and we had spent the I don't know hundred and fifty thousand dollars that we had raised and we had two months worth of money with only one person getting paid because the rest of the team we were doing it for love and. The one guy who's getting paid was the guy who had three kids. So. Do you think about this? You read about like, the Donner party, and how it was a single man who went first and the married couples hang hung on for a bed, and if you had children, there's no way you're going to die. So it's it's a viral thing. Getting paid. And we were the rest of us reading Cup noodles. And and we were selling furniture to roll waiting to freeze to death metaphorically metaphorically Katharina and her team decided they needed to do something drastic change direction completely to something. That would actually get them all paid, and that meant pursuing this other idea that they had as part of the game they developed this interface where players could create an inventory of objects that they would pick up that inventory. Look like, this sort of shoebox of photos, you could drag those photos into group conversations for other people to see and you could annotate them, and you could share the photos with other people, and that was the idea that Katharina and the people in our team wanted to transition to they thought that could be a more monetize -able idea. But not everybody agreed everybody on the team had joined in order to build the game. And they were really into the game. It took some time to convince the team. To build this photo sharing thing which came out of left field for them. And I think our team consisted of six people at that time and three of us had voted for building the photo sharing thing, and you know, three of us had voted against. And so we basically bribed Eric the front engineer. To come over to our side. So we had to convince him, and then it wasn't clear that we were going to be able to do this at all because you're rapidly running out of money. And then this thing happened, which was we had not expected that we had applied a year before to the Canadian government for startup funding. So we had this end for the game. We got a rejection letter, and we kinda wiped her hands and thought that was dead. But then apparently we check the box that said re-submit for next year, and we had received the grant. So we got this letter. And I remember it was December twenty third. It was right before Christmas. And we got this letter saying, congratulations. We have given you and I don't remember the amount. But I think it was approximately one hundred seventy five thousand Canadian dollars. Which was huge. And that gave us about three months of runway. Of course, they gave it to us for the game. But we were working on this other thing, which eventually became flicker. And that was what made it possible. So is is Christmas present from the Canadian government. Wow. We're about to go under we'd we were almost dead. And so when this showed up, and you know as printers. No, it's just a matter of staying alive until you can get to the next level, and nobody called pivoting men. Right. And it was not popular actually with the few investors that we did have what gave you the conviction that this was the direction you need to go, though, your team didn't wanna do it. You guys. I'm sure had gotten into it. Because you like the game. Like that was the thing that you guys love your investors loved it. What gave you the conviction that like no we have to make this really? Difficult decision that nobody wants to make and go towards this other thing. In some ways, it was that we didn't have any choice. But also because there is something about this idea that seemed extremely compelling and somewhat inevitable..

Canadian government Katharina Stewart Butterfield Eric Vancouver Donner party engineer fifty thousand dollars three months two months
"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

Without Fail

05:15 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Without Fail

"Constant sirens. I won't go away. It's like a good metaphor for. Life. So so what you're saying that like, yeah, you've always felt like you can leave. Yeah. Always felt like I can I can leave. Like, I didn't realize what a. Freeing feeling that always was in my other jobs until now where like I can't. I could leave but I still wouldn't. Escape. It's like being the mafia. Yeah. Like I'd have to really leave to leave our family, which I don't want to do. You could leave, but it would deal. It would be like getting divorced. If you left to them. I would feel guilty leaving you. I don't know just being like SIA God. I mean. I feel the same way the same oppressive feelings of Gimblett and like it's dominates our lives. And like we go to bed, and that's what we talk about. And it's like, it's really annoying. I have to remind myself not to talk about like times when I want to. But the flipside is that it's very comforting to be to be on two together. I feel the same way too. I get it. I get it. I get it. All it's complicated, though. Yeah. Do you ever actually worry that that could lead to us that could actually damage relationship? Whom I God. I can't believe this is like the first conversation. We're having on tape that I don't think we've actually had like at all life. Do I worry at all that it could damage our relationship? Yes. I. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. Do you feel like it is now or do you just worry about it? I don't feel like it is now. Does it does it feel natural? What we're doing? Unnatural being married and being in. This thing wehrley doesn't. Does it feel natural to you? Don't. Yeah. That's weird. Why is that? I don't know. I don't know. Does that that part doesn't like people are always like? Oh my God. You are married and you work together. I could never do that the fact that we're married and we worked together it doesn't feel natural. It makes sense. Yeah. It seems it's fine. It doesn't feel natural. But it is pretty unusual. I don't know many people. In fact, I don't think I know anyone personally who's work life and home life are so bound together as mine nauseates, and that is just one of the reasons I wanted to talk to today's guest her name is Katharina fake. And today she runs a VC firm with her life partner earlier in her career. She was an entrepreneur and she founded a company with her then husband that company was called flicker during a conversation. She had a lot of really interesting insights on work and family and how those two realms can be merged. But as wanna talk to Katharina because over the course of her life. She's followed a really unique path today, she's widely recognized as one of silicon valley's leading visionaries, and I'm not just saying that she actually won a visionary award. That was actually what it was called from this leading Silicon Valley nonprofit called the Silicon Valley forum, but back when Katharina was just starting out Silicon Valley royalty. There's a last. A place. She expected to find herself, you know. I was this is actually my last career. I was a renaissance studies aficionado. I was I was I was planning on going into academia, I'm an accidental technologist. There are certain things that I loved about the internet that drew me to it. And it wasn't the technology itself. I had two major interests. I was interested in renaissance literature, and I was interested in postmodern literature, and I was reading a lot of bore Hayes. And then I got online. I started communicating with a bunch of for Hayes lovers and are Denmark. This is a meeting. Or his drew me to to my career's the internet, but it makes sense about it. I don't know if you ever read any bar, but boy Antezana the internet in his writing library of Babel able. Mabel. Yeah. Yeah. Internet thinking before the internet. It's beautiful. It's still these classic path to like being tech entrepreneur that I that I've heard. Yeah. Yeah. It's like the furthest away from my computer, science classes at Stanford that I think. Her. Joining us Silicon Valley began after college aside from being a renaissance literature expert Katharina was also a painter and after college she moved to San Francisco and used her art background to get a job designing and building websites. This was when the first big tech boom was happening in San Francisco and Katharina thrived. She ran designed at an early.

Katharina fake Silicon Valley Hayes San Francisco Gimblett Mabel partner Denmark
"caterina" Discussed on Rotated Views

Rotated Views

03:37 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Rotated Views

"Even if you fail you try it again, keep going your unit you obviously surpass it. So at that point, you're UV one point on stoppable on anything that comes your way. 'cause you're not gonna give in and give up you keep going talent. Everything becomes your way. By example, to the reason example, I use a Jaden was I had to take recertification tests one of my credentials to to do some specific pipework. And I wanted to take the test and forgot all my books to take the test. While was believe it was a two hour task wasn't a big ties about two our tests. I come back and jaded ask me. Hey, dad. How'd you do on the test? I said I failed miserably, and he goes really why I said, well, I wasn't prepared. I completely forgot my books. And so these are the things that I talked to him about when when trying to prepare him to have that on stoppable mentality. Look I fail. I just show. I showed him. Look, I'd I'd literally just failed two weeks later. I go back with my books and I pass with a ninety eight percent come back. And he's like, how'd you do this time? I'm like, well, I got a ninety eight percent. He goes, you're prepared. So that right there. It shows him that you know, what it's okay to fail. Yeah. But dad got back up and went back to take the test again. Yeah. So I think by example, is huge, you know, for sure and being transparent with your kids. So they can see that you do fail yourself. But it's not about how many times you fail and all that kind of stuff. It's it's really like, you know, what you got back, and you went and did it. It's a me. That's. 'cause my opinion kids are a lot. They're very visual learners. Yeah. Not just about, you know, look read this storybook. It's more like, you You know, know, what what? my dad just went through this when he's going to school. He fails something he knows that. It's going to be okay. As long as he keeps trying and doesn't dish dishes off, right? I like it. Perfect. Yeah. I think you now that there it is folks unstoppable. Like the close things out with quotes. I quote is by Kirk Cameron God steps into the suffering with us. He takes it on himself. He walks through it with us. And he uses it to create something in you. That is unstoppable. And the second one is by Caterina fake. It's fairly easy to know when you've succeeded because when you're kind of hanging on for dear life, it's such an unstoppable juggernaut. You're trying to stay on with your head above the water because things are moving so fast. All right. So there you have it folks unstoppable. And this episode. The crew welcomes back special guest investor and entrepreneur Gilbert Rodriguez, the crew talks about what it takes to be unstoppable. We cover topics that range from pressure. Having an unstoppable mentality failure confidence and much more. We wrapped the episode up with quotes from Caterina fake and Kirk Cameron. Thanks again for joining us guys. Don't forget to visit the website, Jimmy Lee, villas dot com. Follow the blog, if you have any inquiries or questions you like for us to answer on a future episode. Just Email us at info at Jimmy leave alleged calm, and on behalf of myself and the rest of the crew we wish you massive success. And until next time, I the oes. The rotated views podcast was produced for self development purposes. Thank you for the loan of insupportable, we truly do hope you enjoy the views.

Caterina fake Kirk Cameron Jimmy Lee Jaden Gilbert Rodriguez ninety eight percent two weeks two hour
"caterina" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

Heather Dubrow's World

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Heather Dubrow's World

"And he's got these bestselling books. Is it incredible? Author books are amazing. You can do anything you want. You don't want to pigeon hole, you put you in a hole and say, you can't do this because she's in singer, so you can't go if she wanted to sing. She's brilliant singer. Her she can go set. Interesting. Did you talk to max at all about it? Like hide you. That didn't go, okay. No, that was just her being a teenager and just being like whatever mom like I was just she wasn't. We're making fun of her and maybe in her mind they weren't maybe just laughing. And by the way, caterina's like me, she's very overly sensitive and so-. Max could have done absolutely nothing, but it doesn't matter. I just don't want to feel like 'cause she's always said ever since she joined this company. She thought max would be upset of, so she's very sensitive towards her feelings too. 'cause that's her. She's a very sweet child, so I'm not trying to paint maximum bad light. I'm just saying that Katharina was so worried and she felt like that couldn't be her thing. She said there was a song she wanted to sing and she was like, but maxing that saw unlike and so have twenty thousand other people. Right? Can sing the song. She doesn't own the song. She didn't write the song you can sing the song. That's so good that totally calm. Her down s good, then she felt fine. Awesome. Go, it's okay. Let it go. On. That's so good. You're good at this pep talks though, I guess, but you know, it's like I keep talking about this. So sorry. But it's just very hard with the twins because one minute there's so amazing. Right? And the next minute they're so not and the, you know, and they just take things out on me. Right. And then Terry's like the hero because he's dad and he comes home and Melvin one. Yeah. And you have to be the one to lay down the law and it's okay. You know what? I don't want to be the fun one. I like the spot I'm in. I just wish that the but you aren't fun though. You can't like yourself out to be like this bad guy all the time because you have the best time with them. One that you know your carbon, the pineapples and you're getting making them their, you know, opinion, virgin vehicle or whatever it is still Italy, no, totally with them. And I know that they appreciate me and they tell me in their own ways, right?.

Katharina caterina Max Italy Melvin Terry one minute
"caterina" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on The Fantasy Footballers - Fantasy Football Podcast

"Let's talk quarterbacks bull stream ahead i last week it was a twoman show so we had josh mccown caterina josh mccown lighten it up right now levin thranked fantasy quarterback on the year he's only had 11 yeah you can be one through one at 38 yeah 38 years young josh mccown as my stream of the week this week you still availing i'm stand where them okay have linda denver denver is 22nd against the pass on the year on the year now this is denver four touchdowns three three two two over the last five weeks i can do that math in my head as fourteen touchdowns over the last five weeks jay cutler just succeeded against them in a big way and josh mccown he's playing with a lot of heart he's got a lease uh that's that's what he is he is i mean if you if you could see his actual characteristics is heart is over a hundred percent yeah like if you were building a character in one heart ado courage the last time we saw josh mccown yuan lyon right after jake shut ler it worked out really well yeah lucky fats and that's your are you referring to the chicago here referring to the chicago bears where josh mccown took over for that team years and he was awesome and now you are using that logic he to explain why a completely different team flipflop thoughts from jayson more the look flop thoughts thoughts from the beach for thoughts from the b2 jason he's aching middletown i degrees out there i am at the out mccown i damn hard enver is is falling apart i have no problem with that at all i i'm going to go the guy who's almost my start this past week jamus winston look jamus winston does some of the dumbest things on the football field i've ever seen he did it last week and you know what he was still find for fantasy did he helped the tampa bay buccaneers win usually he doesn't cut that doesn't matter if you look at the season he.

josh mccown denver jay cutler jake chicago jayson enver winston tampa bay buccaneers levin linda denver football five weeks hundred percent 38 years
"caterina" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"caterina" Discussed on Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

"Ooh yeah he he kinda went there in a couple of things found you guys got quite the end of it right there is very great everything that happened with her brother halfyear an arm he he was out there what the rate it within like down natal eat on alert holding event at how it unfolded way on where kind head on her from power in her head what iraq from that well and i think the riot by lacked though in seattle lawyer rick kelvin madman who could be that everett loophole and i had a lawyer better lawyer faith vacated talking about it but y'all got really caterina conrete hindered after he ruled on your per motion own emotions were for guided franklin entory pirating getting ready to fire rather and like really do it he hit a hattrick and that he gave her the third reich mungoven garrity like gator once you make it in their career to pay in giveaway colmey hearing and it was like plenty to hear that i mean i knew they were but i didn't know how intimately involved he wanted her firing rat and giving way to drink get bang i i'll put their head guy i never heard of fair that jari factory fayette by five hundred people at the uw summit with cameras drawing are you are watching lonzo in october two one the she compared to measures in terms of hype it seems as if he is still sort of trying to figure all his jump shot in the nba i've seen personally different release points are you noticing any changes with his jumper nibs so is coming from a team coming for himself.

iraq gator jari factory fayette uw summit nba seattle rick kelvin everett caterina conrete