11 Burst results for "Catedral Museum"

"cathedral museum" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:05 min | 3 months ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"So. This is almost smack dab in the center of germany which means it's smack dab in the center of continental europe and in medieval times. It was an important spot for the bronze industry they exported works all over but the thing that really put it on the map the rose as with any good myth. There are a few different versions of this origin story. But here's a popular. Take on it back in the eight hundred. There's a guy named charlemagne charles. The great he was one of those old school emperors ruled over huge parts of europe and he was also one of those emperors who took his christianity very seriously. You don't have to know who the saxons are. But when charlemagne conquered them he decreed that the either had to become christians or be put to death his son and heir was called louis the pious and in the year eight fifteen louis was enjoying himself on a hunt in central germany. When he got pretty badly lost louis was trying to find his bearings when he happened upon a wild rose bush that was blooming right through the snow. We couldn't believe his eyes and his crew caught up with him. He told them he wanted to build a cathedral. They're dedicated to the virgin mary. In according to legend he was actually carrying. Some of mary's remains with him in the rose is very important and the story of the foundation of sign in combination with a reliquary with relics of the virgin. Mary and so. It was told that the virgin mary and is. We'll protect this place. That's kouadio director of the cathedral's museum when she says reliquary. She means the spot within the cathedral where mary's remains are held that and the rose turned hildesheim into a pretty big deal pretty quickly.

world war two March nineteen forty five hildesheim germany one five years more
The Thousand-Year Rose

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:05 min | 3 months ago

The Thousand-Year Rose

"So. This is almost smack dab in the center of germany which means it's smack dab in the center of continental europe and in medieval times. It was an important spot for the bronze industry they exported works all over but the thing that really put it on the map the rose as with any good myth. There are a few different versions of this origin story. But here's a popular. Take on it back in the eight hundred. There's a guy named charlemagne charles. The great he was one of those old school emperors ruled over huge parts of europe and he was also one of those emperors who took his christianity very seriously. You don't have to know who the saxons are. But when charlemagne conquered them he decreed that the either had to become christians or be put to death his son and heir was called louis the pious and in the year eight fifteen louis was enjoying himself on a hunt in central germany. When he got pretty badly lost louis was trying to find his bearings when he happened upon a wild rose bush that was blooming right through the snow. We couldn't believe his eyes and his crew caught up with him. He told them he wanted to build a cathedral. They're dedicated to the virgin mary. In according to legend he was actually carrying. Some of mary's remains with him in the rose is very important and the story of the foundation of sign in combination with a reliquary with relics of the virgin. Mary and so. It was told that the virgin mary and is. We'll protect this place. That's kouadio director of the cathedral's museum when she says reliquary. She means the spot within the cathedral where mary's remains are held that and the rose turned hildesheim into a pretty big deal pretty quickly.

Charlemagne Charles Continental Europe Louis Germany Europe Bush Kouadio Cathedral's Museum Mary
"cathedral museum" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy Theories

12:30 min | 1 year ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on Conspiracy Theories

"According to legend the spear of Destiny Pierced Jesus, Christ on the Cross in thirty three CE, three hundred years later, Emperor Constantine supposedly wielded it as he made Christianity the official religion of Rome nearly five hundred years after that it somehow came into King Charlemagne's possession. But after Charlemagne's death in eight fourteen C E, documentation of the spirit disappeared for a century, then in nine twelve c e a minor German next auto of Saxony died his third son Henry. The Fowler took the title amidst considerable controversy for six years, Henry face, disloyalty and treacherous plots, his greatest critic was the king of East Frankie A- Conrad the first but Conrad died in nine eighteen one year later Henry the Fowler became the undisputed Duke of Saxony and elected King of Germany, but the scramble for power ignited something in Henry's heart. He was no longer content with his title as King. Henry set his sights on becoming an emperor. At the time Germany consisted of a handful of independent Duchy's meaning lands ruled by a Duke through a series of negotiations and battles. Henry consolidated the Duchy's growing kingdom like Charlemagne Henry had his own chronicler bishop lead brand of Cremona in Henry's quest for power, lead Pran, documented and negotiation between Henry and King Rudolph the second, the ruler of the Burgundy now Modern Day France Henry wanted to absorb Rudolph's land into Germany without a war, but when Henry presented his bold proposal to Rudolph the Frankish king presented a counter offer. If Henry left his kingdom alone, rude off would give him a powerful spear. According to Brand Rudolph claim the spear held magical properties whoever owned it was guaranteed victory on the battlefield and authority over so-called spiritual forces. The weapon king claimed was imbued with the power of God Henry accepted Rudolph's offer. In return for the spear, he gave Rudolf some land and treasures, and allowed him to rule freely without Henry's interference Henry Spear was made of steel, iron and brass. If it was the spear of destiny, it had apparently been modified since Jesus is day. According to legend, the Lance was made of the same nails that held Jesus on the cross given the dispirit existed prior to the crucifixion. It's unclear how that happened. Nevertheless, it became part of the relics legend, unfortunately Henry never got a chance to use the spear in nine thirty six at sixty years old. The leader died from an unknown illness is twenty four year old son Auto. The I inherited the holy weapon and his father's kingdom like his father auto faced rebellion almost as soon as he took the crown. The first eleven years of his rule were marked by bloodshed. Tried to bring every German Duke under his heel. One of Otto's earliest rivals was Duke Eberhard of Franconia he led a rebellion in nine thirty seven, but auto swiftly crushed it afterward, Eberhard swore his loyalty, but broke his vow two years later in nine, thirty nine, Eberhard led a second rebellion. This time he allied with two others, autos, brother, Henry and France's King Louis the Fourth Hebrew hearts troops outnumbered Otto's. There was no escaping them. One day, while autos, troops boarded the Ryan River enemy soldiers ambushed his forces. It was the worst possible moment for a battle autos army was split. His advance guard was on one side of the river. Auto and the rest of his troops were trapped on the other auto could only watch as men fought for their lives watch, and pray according to brand auto dismounted right before the fight and knelt in prayer before his lance, in which was fastened the victory, giving mail from the hands of Christ, auto finished his prayer just in time to face another ambush this time on his own side of the river, the remainder of Abraham Army descended on autos troops, hoping to finish off the German king. Otto's men fought valiantly. They recovered from the ambush in slough the rebels on the battlefield. But even after beating Eberhard Army auto still had to defeat his brother, Henry. According to Prance Chronicles Henry was injured during the battle on the Rhine. He didn't mention who dealt a blow. Just that a weapon struck his arm Henry's armor prevented a serious injury, but his flesh turned black where he was hit. It wasn't a natural bruise. It was a sign that God mark. Henry with displeasure. In, other words, the Lord revealed that auto was the rightful king. At least that's how the story goes following the battle on the Rhine auto declared that these spear of destiny had brought him victory. He believed that God wanted him to rule the Kingdom of Germany and that the Lord would continue to protect his armies. He carried the spear of destiny into each of his subsequent battles, and he one time and time again as auto secured power the legends about the Holy Land Screw before the end of the year, even autos, brother acknowledged autos authority has a show of faith, auto part and Henry confident that he'd learned his lesson. According to lead print Henry really had learned his lesson. Months passed, but Henry's arm never healed. Countless doctors examined the blackened bruise, but none could treat it. Every practitioner concluded that the injury was spiritual a curse from God. Maybe, it really was a sign of God's displeasure. Maybe it was just an infection, but either way the bruise apparently killed Henry. As four auto, he's still had a kingdom to rule and expand with his throne secured. He sought to transform Germany into an empire. In nine fifty one invaded several Italian territories shortly thereafter, he married a widowed Lombardi and clean to consolidate power in France every time he stepped on the battlefield. He took the spear of destiny with him. Each time he won, he credited the victory to his holy weapon on February, second, nine, sixty, two Pope John. The Twelfth Crowned Auto as the Holy Roman emperor, after decades of military victory and apparent divine blessing auto gained a grandiose sense of his own importance, unlike most of his predecessors auto ruled from Germany, not Rome. But. That didn't stop him. From being regarded as God's emissary, his conquests were seen as righteous a means to bring Christianity to people. He considered pagans, heathens, and heretics, autos, crown, and spear were equally important symbols of his reign. The crown symbolize God's political power, and might on Earth Spear represented the holy hand of divinity and autos military supremacy. He called the spear lanky Rabies Latin for Lance of kings. When he died in nine seventy three C e, he left the spear to his son Otto the second. When auto the second died, he left it to auto the third, then in one thousand ce auto, the third gifted, the spear to one of his nobles, Boleslaw. The brave like auto the first before him, Bhola Slav wanted to be more than noble. He wanted to be a king with the spear in hand he won a series of battles and became king of Poland in ten, twenty, five with his conquests, complete Bala Slavs stored the relic and a cathedral treasury in crack off. He supposedly only took it out on special occasions. After bullets love the spears. History once again gets muddy. According to the Cathedral Museum in Cracow. The spear never left. It's still on display for tourists. Maybe this relic isn't the real spear of destiny. Some suggest that the spear given to Boleslav was just a replica, and the real spear was stolen, lost or borrowed. One account claims that Holy Roman Emperor Frederick. BARBAROSSA carried the spear. Into Battle in eleven ninety, but he dropped the spirit of creek and died within minutes. Another account says that in fourteen twenty four holy Roman Emperors Secrets Moon of Luxembourg had the spear put on display in Nuremberg in modern day, Germany roughly four centuries later in seventeen, ninety six. It was moved. Moved to Vienna for safekeeping as Napoleon Bonaparte Army approached Nuremberg of this version of the story seems the easiest to verify, but it's hard to say for sure what is or isn't true. Because during the centuries, the spear spent in Nuremberg in Vienna, a number of Christian treasure hunters claim they discovered the real spear of destiny in various corners of the world. For example in ten ninety eight, a group of Crusaders claimed they found the spear in Antioch Greece they described it as an unassuming pole made of iron, they made no mention of the brass or steel that Henry. The Fowler's weapon had another was allegedly found in Saint Peter's basilica in Vatican City. The spear had no tip. According to legend broke off somewhere in France in these seventh-century dispirit, the travel to Vienna in Seventeen, ninety six is called the Vienna spear to differentiate it from its many other claimants. It's wrapped in a thin sheet of gold and silver, which matches the accounts from Otto and Henry the Fowler Times, but it likely wasn't used during Jesus Crucifixion. Chemical tests suggest it was made in the seventh or eighth centuries hundreds of years after thirty three Ce that said the Vienna spear might still be the same spear that out of the I carried with them into battle, and some historians agree that the Vienna Lance is the spear of destiny. After all it bestowed military victory on several holy Roman emperors, it really did appear to have power, and for that reason it became a source of fascination for a cultists and mystics, during the years that the spear was on display in Vienna. It's legend only grew. And those legends are how it came to the attention of one Adolf Hitler. Coming up Hitler uses the spear to conquer Europe. Now back to.

Charlemagne Henry Henry Spear Germany Earth Spear Otto Henry face France King Charlemagne Brand Rudolph Rudolph Fowler King Rome Emperor Constantine King Rudolph Saxony Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Duke Eberhard Eberhard Army Pran
"cathedral museum" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

09:16 min | 1 year ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"This is Jordan secular. Oh, and I would encourage you just to really get involved in this issue. The whole world is getting involved. And that means you need to get involved. Now we've seen the United States Our Secretary of state Mike Pompeo, issue the condemnation. We've seen the U. N. We've seen the European Union We've seen the U. K. We've seen UNESCO itself because this is a World Heritage site, but now it is expanding. We need you to join in this grassroots effort. I'll explain how this why this is important. I was talking to our office in Moscow in our team there because they're many Orthodox. Therein. The Russian Orthodox Church actually 100 million Out of the About 140 million Russians who live in the Russian federation are Russian Orthodox and their patriarch has come out strongly in opposition to this move, and that patriarch is very close to President Putin, who also spoke to Erdogan on July 13th. And expressed the concerns of the Russian people as well. The Russian Foreign Ministry has come out in opposition said that they regret the decision of the Republic of Turkey's leaders to turn the GS Sophia Cathedral Museum into a mosque. And resume Muslim services. They're so you've got both Putin engaging with Erdogan. You have the Foreign Ministry making the statement for the Russian Federation and you have the leader of the largest religious denomination in Russia, who happens to be a very close adviser to Vladimir Putin Patriarch Aurel with 100 million plus members in Russia alone. It is over, like 90% of the population there and folks you can engage. As well. A C l j dot org's signed the petition because the world is coming together. Islamic groups are coming out as we talked about to condemn this, the United Arab Emirates, which is a again a country That is an absolute Islamic monarchy with Sharia law, where it's 99.9% Muslim. Has come out in opposition. In fact, their minister of culture, and you've said this, it should never neither be misused nor altered Haghia Sophia through change in a way that touches the human essence, especially for sites that air that inscribed underworld heritage by UNESCO. They have exceptional international value and are the common heritage of all peoples and cultures. Haghia Sophia has remained a global landmark with significant cultural legacy. It has also served as a bridge connecting different peoples and cementing their bonds, both Muslims and Christians. World's world Heritage sites have become the platforms from knowledge in exchange between diverse cultures and civilizations that involved in history across time. Aguila. Sophia is an important example of interaction in dialogue between Asia and Europe and should remain a witness too harmonious human history. Think about that. It is an architectural marvel Marvel. Ah, unique witness to the interaction across centuries. And who is this from this is from the United Arab Emirates. Minister of Culture. So a cabinet member. There you go. And that is a country that is ruled by Sharia law. Alright, Joining us on the phone right now is a very good friend of ours. He is a senior correspondent, Middle East correspondent for CBN news. Chris Mitchell and Chris You've been handling this. Tell us what you're hearing what you've seen what you're reporting in the case. Well, Jay and Jordan great to be with you. I think one important thing that needs to be reported, is what Erdogan put on his Facebook page after he made the announcement about the Sophie and he said this Idol of the Iron Sofia is a sign towards the return of freedom to the Alexa Mark here in Jerusalem. And you know, the elector marks is right on the Temple Mount. And the idea behind that is he wants to redeem not only the Sofia which is such an amazing symbol of Christianity here in this this region of the world. But he wants to liberate all the lands that were once under the control of Islam. This is an Islamic doctrine. He went on to say J enjoying. He said that the resurrection of the highest city is a greeting. From the heart to all cities from Bukhara Toe Andalusia, those that don't know the geography Under Lucy. It was one day Spain and Portugal. Bukhara is all the way to the East. It's modern date was Pakistan. So the idea behind that Is that he wants to liberate. Eventually, all the lands that were once under the sway of his long right now. I'm looking out my window in my office here in Jerusalem. I'm looking at the walls of the old city. They were built by by midnight. The conqueror back in the 15 hundreds. And so this is where land I'm sitting on was once Muslim land. So that's the idea behind his Facebook page about the elect Tomas. Above a car under Lucius. His ambitions go far beyond just Turkey. Andy. We talked about the fact that this is a conquering mentality that this is a conquest mentality. We also know that we can be victorious. We will be victorious. In Greek. That's nica say, I got a report on you, Andy, but But the fact of the matter is the fact of the matter is we are going. I really believe we are going to be victorious here but explained following upon what Chris said. Explain what Is the moment mindset here because this is history repeating itself. I mean, it's the same playbook. J. The mindset is Islam conquers and then appropriate for itself. But this is contrary to Islamic teaching when the mama Yes, Sofia, which by the way means God's holy wisdom, and I'll say that word again. IAEA Sofia The Church of God's holy Wisdom was conquered by McMath a conker in 14 53 he decided as a symbol of the conquest to converted into a mosque. But he also gave the patriarch at that time. You Nadia school arias horse and comparison did with colors and gave him his own cathedral. But he said he could not let him stay in the crown jewel of Christianity. But he gave him his own cathedral, recognizing even in the 15th century, the right of the Christians. To worship as they chose. It became a mosque and its state a mosque until it became a museum. But this attitude of Ataturk, as the reporter who just spoke said, is one of conquest. He is the new sultan. He is going to take over all the Christian sites that were is in Islamic lands. And make them into Chris into Muslim samia, which are which means into my temples of mosques. And this is the attitude of the controversy of the conquest. This is not a secular turkey. This is a conquering mentality, which we should do cry and condemn. We need a yes. Sofia to rain remain a museum. In the beautiful, incredible mo's eggs that Jordan and I have seen together. That are a marvel to Christianity that were covered up Jay by the Muslims when they took over. Yes, Sophia, we don't want those desecrated. We want to see them in all their glory. So that we, too We, too Christians, not a conquered people can marvel and worship at those mosaics of Christ. The Virgin and the Holy Apostles and Chris. I wanted to get into something a little geopolitical as well. Since you live in Jerusalem, where all of these different religious groups, including the Russian Orthodox, Greek Orthodox Protestants, Catholics, Jews, Muslims of all different backgrounds have places holy sites of worship, and Israel's done a very good job. I think of keeping those open for those specific groups. We see the Russian Orthodox patriarch, he said. This Today. The relationship between Turkey and Russia is developing dynamically at the same time, one should take into account that Russia is a country with the majority of population professing orthodoxy. And so what may happen to her G S Sophia will inflict great pain on the Russian people. I hope for the prudence of Turkey state leadership preservation of the current neutral status of gears of fear. One of the greatest masterpieces of Christian culture and a church symbol for millions of Christians all over the world will facilitate further development of the relationships between the people of Russia and Turkey. Chris these air the kind of religious leaders We know their relationship with people like Putin very close that when they speak, and they say that this is going to have an impact on our foreign relations, this is a big deal. It's a very big deal, Jordan. In fact, I know what one of the Russian Orthodox leaders said that the church I is Sylvia is the same comparison as ST Peter's Basilica. Some people in the West could understand the importance of ST Peter's to Roman Catholics. And I s a P has the same influence..

Turkey Sofia Haghia Sophia Jerusalem Chris United Arab Emirates Erdogan Putin Russian federation Russian Orthodox Church Russia Facebook UNESCO Russian Foreign Ministry President Putin Jordan Vladimir Putin Patriarch Aurel Jay GS Sophia Cathedral Museum
"cathedral museum" Discussed on WTMJ 620

WTMJ 620

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on WTMJ 620

"The door quick trip that they needed coins. So rather than take him to the bank. We just brought him in here. Quick trip says customer contributions have eased the problem. But elsewhere shortages continue. 7 11 in Michigan offered shoppers with $5 in coins, cash and a free Slurpee. Gangs. They're also asking the public to open up their piggy banks. If you have large amounts of point at home, take him to your bank and have them run it and then just get the cash. You still have the same amount of money and we have points to circulate out. Thie US meant has been able to ramp up production to 1.5 billion points a month. Federal Reserve expects the shortages to ease as the economy opens up more means each in a CBS News New YORK re imagining a world renowned museum. It's been called a treasure chest of the renaissance. Now, after nearly three months of Corona virus shutdown, defeat Si in Florence has finally been unlocked. Visitors get a quick thermal scan and new rules of the road about where to walk and stand standing six feet apart like we're doing right now. WHO feet See, director Michael Schmidt says the pandemic might have changed museums forever. In some ways for the better, but means that people actually won't just need to look whether coming close to a masterwork like BOTTICELLI's birth of Venus. They bump into somebody else or somebody else's. A selfie, but they can really concentrate on the work of art nearby at the Florence cathedral, social distancing necklaces are all the buzz, but it does allow you to enjoy the art safely, says Cathedral Museum director Timothy Burden after this traumatic experience, people Really need to return. I don't like to normalcy but to the nourishment that beauty and history can give that said. Obviously, it would be a cruel joke. That the monuments and the museum became in turn places of contagion, a contagion that so far killed more than half a 1,000,000 people worldwide and halted tourism here. A gut punch that's feared will cost the Italian economy 13% of.

director Florence cathedral Florence Federal Reserve Cathedral Museum US CBS Michigan New YORK Michael Schmidt Timothy Burden
"cathedral museum" Discussed on Spittin' Chiclets

Spittin' Chiclets

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on Spittin' Chiclets

"Me around a little bit showed me you know the places to go to church and you know those kind of stuff. Ah Churches in Montreal. You know then yet your the guys like a Mike mcphee Bryansk ruling G Carbonell You know those guys really kind of taught you what it's like. Ask to be a pro and I think for me. I felt really fortunate that had chance come in Montreal The history the class at that organization had the way they got people You Know Montreal. Does groom hockey players differently. I think than a lot of other organizations at least back then You know when I got out things kind of Mr Cory laughed and things have been different and I don't know now as much as I do. What do you mean by that? Like the way they would make force you to carry yourself off the ice the way you would be short to the rank and the way you would train strain and Yeah it's just it was it was an are about it. I mean you walk in that Locker Room. You see all the hall of famers in there from the rocket to Belva Tall. Those guys John belva would top in every once in a while and just talk to you. I mean there's not a nicer man that I've ever met John Rival You know there's just I You know everything they did was done with class in how you respect. I know every team respects the crest and all that stuff but what the history they had in the respect they had it just. It went along with the locker room even seems like feels like sacred. It sounds goofy. But it's true I it was I mean Though the forum that Locker Room there It was just it's it was. It was a Cathedral Museum Ghee Carbon or going into the hall of fame. I think in a couple of weeks like I'm assuming you. Have you have some crazy memories of seeing that guy compete and just play on both sides of the ice. Yeah I mean Carbo. A great happen. he really was he Levelheaded about about everything. Does everything was thought out In just such a smart hockey player You know when he watched him play He was two steps ahead. Everybody You know it wasn't wasn't a guy that he probably couldn't skate with half the guys that he was so much smarter and then he could shut them down Just a you know a great guy with mentioned in the entry or powerful you pretty much golden era of the powerful you. She any nearly all those guys. But before you guys. It wasn't really a phrase you'd never really heard. Who did you? Model your game. After the to become a powerful you became you know when I was playing in college and growing up a little bit. I played center a lot so I wasn't really trying to do.

Locker Room Montreal hockey Mr Cory Mike mcphee Bryansk Cathedral Museum Ghee Carbon Belva Tall John belva John Rival Levelheaded
"cathedral museum" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:15 min | 2 years ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on KCRW

"Welcome to the treatment office Mitchell. It's so interesting when you have now movie, but now a series of films that are about basically a man fighting find his own morality to find his own decency. And he's not the hero. He's the protagonist and the star of the movie, but he's not the will, of course talking about the John with films. Newest film is John wick chapter three para bellum it's director Chaz rails. Sitting across tell you, I went to my friend, Jason Mitsuko like a month ago. He went do you can't believe what I'm doing. The new John wick went do you died. He wouldn't. But his hands up, and that's one of the movies have going for them from David Patrick Kelly, and Tom's sit out ski in the first one to tomorrow in the second. I mean, people who give each scene life. Even if they're in effect, kind of Dave layers, you realize you make an emotional investment at every time these people come up, don't you? I try to for people that don't know. I it was I met Kiana. Oh, jeez. What was it ninety six I was stunt double on, on the matrix trilogy. So I ended up spending ten years of my life, working with which house at the time who in my mind are still some of those genius filmmakers that I've ever had the pleasure of working with, but they're big thing was world building, obviously with the matrix. They were very, very adamant about every little thing helps build the world are trying to create music, wardrobe props the coffee Cup on the table and one of their most important assets. They just didn't look as cast casting an actor. They looked at cast is world building. I love character actors, I always. Have you know way back from like, you know, the Peter Laurie types from from even Casablanca where they were almost characterizations of the qualities, you're trying to portray you know, from, like, Chinese opera, or some old westerns that you look at a lot of the back end. I get critiqued about this sometime that not all my characters are rounded out and filled out. I'm trying to do that. In fact, I'm trying to do quite the opposite. I want my, my I guess, my, my second year background cast my day players to have certain elements of what I'm trying to get across in the story. I take like a massive character say, it's my main characters Bob and fractured. Bob in five different pieces. And break those pieces down into John wick into the Bowery king into tick tock, man in each one of those characters gets a little piece of what I'm trying to say is the main character as opposed to all this, and I think even even the smallest smallest role has some way to paint paint the world. I'm trying. To get go to Harry pink Clarke Peters Ville. I mean, I've huge fan of the wire. So what we do when we're cast, John because they reach out to all the agencies and I'm like, okay, fine. Me anybody that, even remotely like, John wick, and see if they'd be interested in playing today. I don't think any role is too small. And I believe me, I, I had a lot of people. I asked that we're kind of like, what are you kidding me? This one line. This is insulting and like, you know, those, those allows people to work with anyways, but the ones like, you know, you call the Jason Peter savant of its or you know, Tom and they're just like awesome. Just come in and they're like, they, it's a gig. It's fun. It's like a yeah. They're getting off on it end. Just be in it and just to participate at that little 'cause they all know how we do it now. And they just want add that little bit of their own spice and they know I'm going to let him go a little bit. And that's the really fun part about casting this. I think this time I've got casting down a little bit better than it didn't want to. I literally love every member of my cast in parallel. Him and every member of my cast one to be in the movie. So it was almost a mutual they sought me out, I sought them out, and it, it, you know, you see every role adds something. But you talking about John, where we talking a little bit about that, before we sat down, and a lot of the best movies, how those actors who pop in one scene. And to me, that's what made the first John wick. So memorable as you have like I said, you have to kill you have Tom, you have, you know. Nyquist from two at the time it's, you know, it's it again, since it was my partner is first movie. We took a little bit of advice from counties like, hey guys, if you cast really good actors, you don't have to direct his heart. Rate idea. And then we were little embarrassed so you have to go to Willem Dafoe, or Michael, Mike various, tablet, people and John leagues as well. And go okay guys, we were just guys sir first directing gig. We're gonna kill about eighty people because this guy kills puppy. Okay. That's not that's a hard pitch to go to your to your theatrical thespians. And I remember going to lunch with Willem Dafoe, and my of Dave Leach, and I were sitting there where eating pasta his favorite place in New York. So let me get this straight, and he just pitches it back to us, and we're so embarrassed, like, yes. Yes, sir. That's what we're doing. And he goes, all right? All right. I can work with that. And he said. But you gotta find that accurate who really like stunt people actors who really worth their salt respond to that kind of challenge, don't they? Yeah. They do. And that's what we're learning more and more. It's like anything to branch out to, to have that creative margin to play is, and we're very collaborative will write the script will pitch it Halle Berry's role was loosely written. We know the direction we get we know what we needed to balance out. And when how I became fully involved, it became a complete rewrite for character for personality and really working with her, and I think actors really respond to that having an actual massively collaborative role into their own character is interesting, too, because there's so many things that show you talk about world building. Somebody visual details like the one place where we see John wigs vanity is the car from that Mustang that chevelle. He takes out for the day. I mean, the one thing that really matters to him is the motor transportation, that becomes a character thing. These movies, doesn't it totally? We. Always look at it like you know it just like we I know this is gonna sound weird is wacky is John McCain and his hyper rules, we make it we we've I a lot on basing the extremist with some reality things. You know, even though we do a lot with this gun fighting kwiatkoski. It's based on reload, and you run out of bullets and we do the same thing kind of emotions. We always say, like our passions are weaknesses of yet attract somebody down. So even the strongest of us in the toughest assassin and stuff, you know, he loves cars, and he's got us off for docs, but it makes sense because this guy, who's this hands and it makes sense that you've probably rebuilt that engine himself, some point, that's kind of subject. We put in don't wait. It's, it's the folks originally a whole big scene was cut from John wake one. We find John. He was a book restore classical. Restore we actually had this huge seam account as basement rebinding leather books like that was his gig just to focus. That's how we win then, you know, rather than origami. Or or gardening. We kind of went with the whole thing, and it was cars and books, and I just, I don't think our testing's got the book by we kind of kind of pulled back, not more. Steve mcqueen. And more into the Steve McQueen, Mustang than we did bookbinding. My guess is probably talking about the other Steve McQueen is Tatra hausky is news. Film director is John chapter three parallel. It's funny because the, the sense I get from you talking to you, but also seeing the films you paid a lot of tension to the way to move directed. You're on the set. And one of the tales really always stuck out for me is that first time he's alone in the house. We realize that they're two different coffee, mugs. And I thought that's a really interesting to tail and the movies fill that kind of thing that obviously, you about creating life in this world. So you don't have to spend so much time explaining so we can see it and get an idea what's going on. Yeah. You know it it's the show don't tell kind of thing again. Leoni crew? Saleh tarkovsky. There's trying to show you a lot. It's visual medium. So why not a three dimensional plug it and fill it with as much as you can. You know, I love art. I love film, the wall, I love arty films. It's just if I were to go and do a film about, you know this big. Character study and not do any action into the world of assassins, and really not show any action kills. I think that'd be very interesting to me to try and get that across. It's just I don't know if might see. So, you know we decided early on, like we're gonna this poppy, hyper real action buff movie, you know, for the people that really like action films, and we're gonna do it with these long takes not gonna cut. We're going to show off what we're good at, at the same time. We're gonna stuff it full of these nonverbal cues of things. We love the ballerinas dance the, the Vivaldi the Caravaggio paintings of all the music Hayden classical music, all these great film references and let everyone pick them up. And if you wanna look deep into the movie you're gonna find some deep themes, and you're gonna find some stuff like that. And if you just wanna turn something on and go with the, you know, Tyler Bates score, which is, you know, otherworldly defend the least John wick, you know, triumph over assassins, with, you know, animals, and guns and cars and motorcycles than cool. That's for you to, you know. So that's always a fun thing because I is interesting that that. This stuff for me. Pop so much in terms you're having your crap is a director because, for example, one of the things I always noticed these films to is the architecture for room that he walks into a room, you almost always make away showing us the layout. So you telling us he's he's examining room. He knows where the exits are. He's that's something you're doing, isn't it? It's pretty good. You got that it's two things. One, I like to shoot an animal lenses which are longer than why it just again. It's a little old school film, though. It's very. Screened we like to use the wise. The semi is the word we like to use but I also like my editor Evan shift and I we like symmetrical editing. So you'll always see when John Wilkes in the room I love to find big locations Grand Central station, public library. Cathedrals museums. So the I will always be wide of John walking in, and that's like, you know, John's just a little part of a big world. You always wanna make you feel miniscule in the world. Walk into then we'll bring you into the room, we're going superwide medium wide tight over the show. We'll kind of play in the tight ram little bit. And then when there's moment always jump back wide to see again, when it's decision making time John's going to be, you know, he's alone..

John John wick Tom director Dave Leach John Wilkes John McCain Steve mcqueen Jason Mitsuko David Patrick Kelly Willem Dafoe Peter Laurie Bob Halle Berry Chaz Clarke Peters Ville Jason Peter savant Harry
"cathedral museum" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:19 min | 2 years ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"In the green room that you were spending a lot of time in the garden with your dad. I'm what about your mom? What's the relationships with your mom, dad? But what is what is your dad was off working? Most of the time mom was at home tending to this complex. I think unusual rural environment. I I actually think of myself rather being alone or with my my next brother doing those chores on our own contributing to the household, Nick. How did you from from that kind of growing up doing the picking vegetables and all that how did you get into the arts? I'm probably the biggest influence comes from my oldest brother older by almost twenty years and his wife. He's an architect. She's a French professor. She was from Hungary originally. So there was the sense of new world's new dimensions. Dorothy told us this great story about a trip that your oldest brother took. Yeah. Just after they got married. So we're talking early nineteen sixties and they're off to live in France for a couple of years, and it was kind of this huge transformative experience of sort of waving them off when they got on. Laundry ocean liner to to go to Paris. But you kind of describe what sense that have on you as you depart. They departed totally doors opening to new worlds new dimensions living abroad. Speaking other languages. I got from them at least monthly wonderful, postcards. Cathedrals museums villages and anecdotes of their experiences. So there was this sense of dramatic sense of worlds beyond that, those four acres where I might early life was focused, and what impacted that have on your development in decisions about where he wanted to go to college. Well, that's two of my older brothers went to Yale college. And there was this sense of when when it was possible for women to go to jail. Well, sure, I'm going to do that too. But I have to go to college. I think there was some small question posed like, you know, maybe may take it easy. But I mean, I was determined to have the same opportunities in the same competitive thing going on with you. I think where we're coming from. Well, if you're the only girl in the you're the youngest there is the sense of. A determination to have those opportunities privileges or challenges just as well. How do you go from picking vegetables? I mean what what was your avenue your pathway to get from picking vegetables upbringing to the to the world beyond. What how did you get there was that through education? Yes, we can quote, my father education education education. So he was a he worked in restaurants. My parents didn't go to college. And there was this. He intoned the importance of that as a path forward. And how far did you go in your education? I have a PHD. So all the way all the way. The arts goes back to those doors that were open to me to see the the potential in the beauty of of the arts. I do believe that arts and humanities are basic. Public good education arts humanities. It's it opens doors for other people as well at what point did you develop that view? Looking back. In college after college. I think in college already or maybe even in high school. I ended up being the editor in chief of the paper. It was I took that very seriously. And when I look back at some of my editorial work, I'm surprised they published some of these things monthly in the lowering surprised, I think that first of all I used those views that passion about the importance of education arts the social impact. Very clearly. Wow. So you really you really had a vision for yourself as young girl. I guess I did John or the you said in the green room that you had to make do make more with laughs. How does that translate to your role as CEO and director the Phillips collection? Yeah. I think I am. It took in Mary seriously, those early lessons that I didn't understand then about preserving things and ecological soundness, no waste and the Phillips collection is a noble institution. That's woefully underfunded. And it's my job to find those resources. But also to encourage my staff to be nimble and creative and not be burdened by. Want of some resource? A job for you. Oh, believe me. Say you have the best job in the world. On the days when it isn't there? It's a passion for your passion. I think you have to be passionate because a big huge part of my job is fundraising convincing people of what I know to be absolutely true. And to be able to absorb people's knows. And what do you know to be true? What are you convinced them? Not to be true that a museum or library or a school is fundamental to the wellness of our society. Wow. And that's a lot of pressure. If you look back early on from eight to fourteen when did you start developing the ability to manage the pressure? Well, I I was very serious student that was almost a refuge for me in the sense that I think I grew up in a rather isolated way these friends or other activities. So I think I took refuge in books. And I built my my life. I built a way of existing with and despite the environment around me, and how do you deal with isolation of being a CEO for such a prestigious organization, that's a really good question. So I made a big switch from a life as a curator in the states and in Europe over many decades. And I decided I wanted to run a shop, and the people said, well, how's it feel this this new role, and the thing that I said surprised me the most was that relation. The what's the website address to the Phillips collection.

Phillips collection CEO Yale college Paris Nick Hungary Dorothy editor in chief professor France Europe John Mary director twenty years four acres
"cathedral museum" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

07:37 min | 2 years ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Or your role at the Phillips collection today? Attention to detail patience resilience, self reliance. Maybe perseverance and a lot of stuff there. Sharon. Start the in the green room that you were spending. A lot of time in the garden with your dad on what about your mom? What what's the relationships with your mom, dad? But what is what is your what was going on there? My dad was off working. Most of the time mom was at home tending to this complex. I think unusual rural environment. I I actually think of myself rather being alone or with my my next brother doing those chores on our own contributing to the household, Nick. How did you from from that kind of growing up doing the picking vegetables and all that how did you get into the arts? Probably the biggest influence comes from my oldest brother older by almost twenty years and his wife. He's an architect. She's a French professor. She was from Hungary originally. So there was the sense of new world's new dimensions. Dorothy told us this great story about a trip that your oldest brother took. Yeah. Just after they got married. So we're talking early nineteen sixties and they're off to live in France for a couple of years, and it was kind of a huge transformative experience of sort of waving them off when they got on this laundry ocean liner to to go to Paris. But you kind of describe what sense that have on you as you depart. They departed totally doors opening to new worlds new dimensions living abroad. Speaking other languages. I got from them at least monthly wonderful, postcards. Cathedrals museums villages and anecdotes of their experiences. So there was this sense of dramatic sense of worlds beyond that, those four acres where I might early life was focused, and what impact that have on your development in decisions about where he wanted to go to college. Well, that's so two of my older brothers went to Yale college. And there was this sense of when when it was possible for a woman to go to Yale. Well, sure, I'm going to do that too. But I have to go to college. I think there was some small question posed like maybe may take it easy. But I mean, I was determined to have the same opportunities in the same a competitive thing going on with you. I think so where we're coming from. Well, if you're the only girl in the you're the youngest there's the sense of. A determination to have those opportunities privileges challenges just as well. We go from picking vegetables. I mean what what was your avenue your pathway to get from picking vegetables and your upbringing to the to the world beyond. What how did how did you get there was that through education? Yes. Well, we can quote, my father education education education. So you know, he was a he worked in restaurants. My parents didn't go to college. And there was this. He intoned the importance of that as a path forward. And how far did you go in your education? I have a PHD. So all the way all the way the arts. Goes back to those doors that were opened to me to see the potential in the beauty of of the arts. I do believe that arts and humanities are a basic. Public good education arts humanities. It's it opens doors for other people as well at what point did you develop that view? Looking back. In college after college. I think in college already or maybe even in high school. I ended up being the editor in chief of the paper. It was I took that very seriously. And when I look back at some of my editorial work, I'm surprised they published some of these things monthly in the Laurie surprised. I I think I first of all I espoused those views that passion about the importance of education arts the social impact. Very clearly. Wow. So you really you really had a vision for yourself as a young girl. I guess I did John or the you said in the green room that you had to make do make more with laughs. How does that translate to your role as CEO director the Phillips collection? I think I I took in Mary seriously, those early lessons that I didn't understand then about preserving things and ecological soundness, no waste and the Phillips collection is a noble institution. That's woefully underfunded. And it's my job to find those resources. But also to encourage my staff to be nimble and creative and not be burdened by. Want of some resource? A job for you. Oh, believe me. People say the best job in the world except on the days when it isn't there? It's a passion for your passion. I think you have to be passionate because a big huge part of my job is fundraising convincing people of what I know to be absolutely true. And to be able to absorb people's knows. And what do you know to be true? What are you convincing them? Not to be true that a museum or library or a school is fundamental to the wellness of our society. Wow. And that's a lot of pressure. If you look back early on from eight to fourteen when did you start developing the ability to manage the pressure? Well, I was very serious student that was almost a refuge for me in the sense that I think I grew up in a rather isolated way these friends or other activities. So I think I took refuge in books, and I built my my life. I built a way of existing with and despite the environment around me. And how do you deal with isolation of being a CEO for such a prestigious organization, that's a really good question. So I made a big switch from a life as a curator in the states and in Europe over many decades. And I decided I wanted to run a shop, and the people said, well, how's it feel this this new role, and the thing that I said surprised me the most was that 'isolation? What's the what's the website address to the Phillips collection Phillips.

Phillips collection Phillips CEO Phillips Yale college Sharon Hungary Paris Nick Dorothy professor Europe editor in chief France Laurie John Mary director twenty years four acres
"cathedral museum" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

Biz Talk Radio

08:30 min | 2 years ago

"cathedral museum" Discussed on Biz Talk Radio

"Back. You're listening to executive leaders radio. This your host herb Cohen. We like to introduce Dorothy Kaczynski who is the director and CEO of the Phillips collection. Dorothy, what is the Phillips collection? What are you guys doing? We're a museum in Washington DC private institution. Founded almost one hundred years ago by Duncan Phillips, where America's first museum of modern art. Wow. And where are you from originally Yale's Ville, Connecticut, very rural part of Connecticut? How many brothers and sisters I have three older brothers? So you're the youngest of four and what was going on with you eight to fourteen years old. Going to school. Doing a lot of chores on our four acres picking bushels of tomatoes and plucking grubs from the cabbages kale. So how did that lifestyle affect your work today or your role at the Phillips collection today? Attention to detail patience resilience, self reliance. Maybe perseverance a lotta stuff there. Sharon. Yes. In the green room that you were spending a lot of time in the garden with your dad. What about your mom what what's the relationships with your mom, dad? But what is what is what was going on there? My dad was off working most of the time mom was at home tending to this complex. I think unusual rural environment. I I actually think of myself rather being alone or with my my next brother doing those chores on our own contributing to the household, Nick. How did you from from that? Kind of growing up doing the picking vegetables. And all that. How did you get into the arts? I'm probably the biggest influence comes from my oldest brother older by almost twenty years and his wife is an architect. She is a French professor. She was from Hungary originally. So there was a sense of new world's new dimensions. Dorothy told us this great story about a trip that your oldest brother took. Yeah. Just after they got married. So we're talking early nineteen sixties and they're off to live in France for a couple of years, and it was kindness, huge transformative experience of sort of waving them off when they got on this laundry ocean liner to to go to Paris. But you kind of describe what sense that have on you as you depart. They departed totally doors opening to new worlds new dimensions living abroad. Speaking other languages. I got from them at least monthly wonderful, postcards. Cathedrals museums villages and anecdotes of their experiences. So there was this sense of dramatic sense. Of worlds beyond that, those four acres where I might early life was focused, and what impacted that have on your development in decisions about where you wanted to go to college. Well, that's so true. My older brothers went to Yale college. And there was this sense of when when it was possible for a woman to go to Yale. Well, sure, I'm going to do that too. I supposed to go to college. I think there was some small question posed like maybe you take it easy. But I mean, I was determined to have the same opportunities in the same competitive thing going on with you. Oh, I think so where we're coming from. Well, if you're the only girl in the you're the youngest there is the sense of. You know, a determination to have those opportunities privileges or challenges just as well. Go from picking vegetables. I mean what what was your avenue your pathway to get from picking vegetables in your upbringing to the to the world beyond. What how did how did you get? There was that through education. Yes, we can quote, my father education education education. So he was a he worked in restaurants. My parents didn't go to college. And there was this. He intoned the importance of that as a path forward. And how far did you go in your education? I have a PHD. So all the way all the way. But goes back to those doors that were opened to me to see the the potential in the beauty of of the arts. I do believe that arts and humanities are a basic. Public good education arts humanities. It's it opens doors for other people as well at what point did you develop that view? Looking back. In college after college. I think in college already or maybe even in high school. I ended up being the editor in chief of the paper. It was I took that very seriously. And when I look back at some of my editorial work, I'm surprised they published some of these things monthly in the rowing surprised. I I think first of all I espoused those views that passionate about the importance of education are. The social impact. Very clearly. Wow. So you really you really had a vision for yourself as a young girl. I guess I did John are the you said an agreement that you had to make do make more with how does that translate to your role CEO and director the Phillips collection? I think I I took in Mary seriously, those early lessons that I didn't understand then about preserving things and ecological soundness, no waste and the Phillips collection is a noble institution. That's woefully underfunded. And it's my job to find those resources. But also to encourage my staff to be nimble and creative and not be burdened by. Want of some resource? It's users. I feel like a job for you. Oh, believe me. But people say, oh, you have the best job in the world except on the days when it isn't there? It's a passion for you. It was a passion. I think you have to be passionate because a big huge part of my job is fundraising convincing people of what I know to be absolutely true. And to be able to absorb people's knows. And what do you know to be true? What are you convincing them be true that a museum or library or a school is fundamental to the wellness of our society? Wow. And that's a lot of pressure. If you look back early on from eight to fourteen when did you start developing the ability to manage the pressure? Well, I was very serious student that was almost a refuge for me in the sense that I think I grew up in a rather isolated way these friends or other activities. So I think you know, I took refuge in books, and I built my my life. I built a way of existing sort of with and despite the environment around me. And how do you deal with isolation of being a CEO for such a prestigious organization, that's a really good question. So I made a big switch from a life as a curator in the states and in Europe over many decades. And I decided I wanted to run a shop, and the people said, well has it feel this this new role, and the thing that I said surprised me the most was that relation? What's the what's the website address to.

Phillips collection Dorothy Kaczynski CEO Duncan Phillips Yale college Connecticut herb Cohen museum of modern art director executive Hungary Paris America Sharon Nick professor editor in chief rowing France Europe
"cathedral museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Austria Audio Tour?s?

Rick Steves Austria Audio Tour?s?

07:59 min |

"cathedral museum" Discussed on Rick Steves Austria Audio Tour?s?

"Circling the exterior first off the little buildings lining the church. Exterior are sacristy. He's that is utility buildings for the running of the church next. Notice the entrance to the south tower. If you're up for paying admission and climbing those three hundred and forty-three stairs to the top you can do it now. But it's better to wait until the end of this tour near the tower entrance. Look along the church wall. The carved reliefs memorials and tombstones are a reminder that the area around the church was a graveyard until seventeen eighty. Now look up high above the colorful rooftiles here are showed that double headed habsburg eagle he looks both east and west overseeing the vast habsburg empire the initials f one or for emperor franz the first and the date eighteen thirty one is when the roof was installed hook left around the back of the church bear in mind that mozart once a block from here more on him when we go inside the church look for the bookshop past the end of the church. Notice the sign it says. Don't book handloom like with so many german compound words. It's easy to figure out. What shop this is. I already did. I looked through the window. Dome means cathedral book means book. Honda is an activity. Dome boo handloom cathedral bookstore. Well donka shane for that information. Hair besser visser besser visser. Let's see besser is better visser knowing. Oh mr know it all well. Yeah thanks lisa. In fact you are correct. E nine best servicer pause in front the bookshop. The dome book hundred From here you have a fine wide view of the unfinished north tower and the apps of the church from this vantage point. Notice the exo skeletal fundamentals of gothic architecture. The buttresses lining the walls shore up a very heavy roof. This allowed for large windows that could be filled with stained glass to bathe the interior in colorful light a veritable battalion of storm. Drain stand ready to vomit water and rain. Storms the colorful roof tiles. Show not the two headed single eagle of habsburg times as on the other side but two distinct eagles from nineteen fifty. They represent the state of austria on the left and the city of vienna just above street level notice the marble pulpit under the golden starburst. This is for huge public gatherings. The priest would stand here stoking public opinion against the ottomans to crowds far bigger than could fit into the church above the pulpit in a scene from around seventeen hundred a saint stands victoriously atop of vanquished turk to. Your right is the cathedral museum. It's collection of religious objects is frankly pricey and skip -able continue circling the church passing a line of horse carriages waiting to take tourists for a ride. These traditional two-horse buggies are called yakkers a twenty minute narrated clip klopp around the old center costs about fifty euros. You can split the cost with up to five others. Notice the stonemasons had. It's the blackie modern looking building huddled next to the side of the cathedral. There's always been a stonemason here. Keeping the fine stonework in good repair is a never ending task even today. It's done in the traditional way notice. How dirty the church gets this. Local limestone is quite porous absorbs modern pollution until the nineteen sixties stephens. Plots was a very busy traffic circle in winter. Acidic rainwater soaks into the surface and then freezes the stone corrodes and must be repaired. Your church entry ticket helps fund this ongoing work across the street just past the horse. Carriages is the archbishop's palace. It's where the head of this church still lives today. That's a nice commute. The north tower is two hundred twenty three feet tall. Half the size of little stevie. The tower was begun in fourteen. Fifty under emperor frederick. The third more on him later as you recall. It was left unfinished in fifteen. Eleven due to the ottoman invasions notice the tower entrance design reads out zig ziglar plummer in a cramped elevator takes you up to a mediocre view. End a big bell. The bill nicknamed the boomer or pooran is huge. Nearly ten feet across wing twenty one tonnes by comparison. Our liberty bell is four feet across and weighs only one ten. The boomer is supposedly the second biggest bell in the world that rings by swinging it stands as a physical symbol of victory over the ottomans. Sixteen eighty three. It was cast in seventeen eleven from cannons and cannonballs captured when vienna was liberated during world war. Two when the church caught fire that poor and fell to the ground and cracked it had to be melted down and recast these days locals know the poor in as the bell rings in the austrian new year and around. The corner is the cathedral's front door find a spot far enough back where you can take in the entire west facade the main entrance the main entrance this is the oldest part of the church from around the year twelve fifty. It retains part of a church that stood here earlier but was destroyed by fire before vienna was christian. There was a pagan roman temple on this spot. The roman fortress into bona stood roughly where the glassy modern building stands today. The church facade pays homage to that ancient heritage roman era statues are embedded in the facade. The two octagonal towers flanking the main doorway dubbed the heathen towers. They're built with a few recycled roman stones. The christians made sure they flipped the stones over to hide the pagan inscriptions while the rest of the churches in the gothic style. This older west facade is romanesque. that is imitating grandeur and style of ancient rome. Study the details above the doorway. Christ looks down triumphant over death flanked by angels with dramatic wings. He welcomes all ornate tree. Light pillars support a canopy of foliage and creatures all this intricate symbolism was rich and meaning to the faithful medieval worshiper. The fine carving above the door was originally painted in bright colors in the nineteenth century. The paint was scrubbed off when pure stone was more in vogue. Now move in closer to the right of the doorway finds some letters carved in the wall. It's about chest high behind the plexiglas under the first plaque. It says oh five. This dates from the nineteen forties. When austria was under nazi rule. Here's the story. When the nazis annexed austria nineteen thirty eight. They refused to call the country by its true name or strike. They insisted on the nutsy. Term host mark austrian patriots wanted to keep the true name alive so they secretly carved five as a code to their fellow countrymen. The host stands for or strike. The five stands for the fifth letter the alphabet e when an e follows the. Oh it works like new loud giving the oh it's correct pronunciation or strike. Enter the church remember. You can step inside the church for free but to seal the sites. There's a charge. go in. Let your eyes adjust. Well rick points out some sites near the entryway start by taking in the impressive.

nineteenth century Fifty fifteen fifth letter four feet Christ lisa twenty minute first plaque nineteen sixties twenty one tonnes two octagonal towers second biggest bell vienna austria two hundred twenty three feet two-horse buggies five third today