27 Burst results for "Casten"

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

02:06 min | 3 months ago

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Real name is Randy rainbow. I mean, I'm like what I thought that was a had to be a stage name. So man so God, what a great show, you know, like I'm so happy about today's show because it started off bad Carolyn Maloney had to cancel and I'm like, oh man, cuz I prepare all these questions. I wanted to talk about a month or one and a bunch of other things. So, you know, it was like, oh man, but but you know, we got through it showing cast. It was great. I felt bad, but I didn't want to be Randy waiting too long and I saw that he was waiting in the wings there and I'm like, all right, I gotta you know, you know, I gotta somehow, you know as Sean to come back so we can finish our conversation. So but again, Yeah, let me thank Congressman showing casting from the great state of Illinois in the 6th District Carolyn Maloney. I understand so you'll be back here next Saturday and Randy rainbow. Thank you so much for doing the show. I'll tell you some of the guests for next week. I have Glen Kirchner coming on the great attorney cow Sparks. I moved today because I had Randy I'm and I forgot about that. So how will be on a Tuesday and Army Major will be on and I think I have other people coming on. I think oh Adriana spell yet the congressman from from the Bronx and and and and I don't know, you know, I am booking them all week as as as I go. So Lauren is Epsom. You're welcome. And you know, please I mean, You know if you can come on and oh Jeff sites, thanks for reminding me Sally Beba. Jeff sites is coming on. He's he's running against Jim Jordan. Thank you so much. You know, I have some great shows that are coming up. So I'll see you all Tuesday at noon PST on the Stuttering John podcast Stuttering John saying,.

Jim Jordan Carolyn Maloney Sally Beba Glen Kirchner Randy Sean Lauren Illinois Tuesday next week next Saturday Stuttering John Adriana today Bronx 6th District Epsom Jeff one Tuesday at noon PST
"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

08:07 min | 3 months ago

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"All of the wage disparity Gap in the sense that the if if you leave the workforce for ten years and then you returned, you know, when you come back to the workforce, you don't necessarily get the salary that you would have had if you stayed in there and got promoted and you know, I've seen that with my own my own wife was delighted that she was able to take off time to raise kids, but it setback earning potential. Well now the reason the reason I say that's only part of it is that we have also historically paid a lot less money for the jobs that women have ended up doing that can work around those those exigencies and some of that is just pure discrimination and part of what we've done the paycheck Fairness Act up to say you can't you can't simply justify. If if you say as as we've historically done that this type of job District we pay is less and so and so therefore there is no discrimination. Well, if that type of job over whelming Lee served by by women that doesn't necessarily prove that discrimination doesn't exist, right? And so you think about you know, what types of jobs can you do if you've got if you've got a kid at home and you've got to manage and you've also got to do all the things well a lot of jobs like childcare like a lot of other of these jobs that have, you know teaching that women have historically taken on Pay a lot less than men and and some of that is is undoubtedly because of discrimination. So so the idea is let's go through and and you know do what we can to fix that but we've got a long way to come but we seemed you know, there are other countries do a much better job doing things like providing paid paternity leave huge, right? Yeah, because if you want to do right by everybody, but but you know, we have a kid and my wife gets a job. It's a maternity leave policy. But as the husband don't have that option for my employer that's going to exacerbate all those differences, you know across the whole society. So there you know, there are things that we can do to make it better and over doing get them done. Do you think at some point it'll you know, it'll even out like in the future I hope so. You know, there's a there's a really really fast and this is going to sound like a change of topic but I I find it personally fascinating there was a study done years ago and not quote me. It was one of the Scandinavian countries where they had mandated that their Parliament had to have equal gender participation and and these researchers went in and looked at the quality of the work that the parliament did so you know how many how many bills became laws, you know, how effective were these? You know, they had these various ways to quantify this and what they found is that when you mandated equal participation of women The quality of the quality of the work went up now as a dude, that's a little troubling right? Cuz I think I'm pretty smart pretty capable in the application. It seems to be the boss reducing the dude ratio increases the quality of work. But what they found is they dug into it was it wasn't that women were innately more competent than men to the contrary were all equally off. Yeah, but but what they found rather is that when you have conditions of historic discrimination and when you take those conditions away the first person you hire is not the average it's the most exceptional person who has held back. And the job that person takes is not the exceptional person who is already there. It's the bottom of the barrel, right? And so essentially you're you're taking the creme-de-la-creme from one pool and release replacing the Dutch from the other and what they found was that so again, it wasn't that the average woman was any more or less capable than the average man, but that the historic discrimination meant that we were not putting off. We weren't putting the best team on the field. And now that we expand the playing field, you know, the analogy I'd make us, you know, when when baseball broke the color line, they didn't take any anybody. They took Jackie Frank Robinson, really really good baseball player who lost it who lost his job on Jackie Robinson made the majors. You have no idea because it was a guy down at the bottom of the roster. Right? So the average Talent level in the majors going up and down better and I and I tell that whole story to answer your question because this this paper that this analysis they did the title of it was the tragedy of the mediocre job. And in their observation was that anytime we have reduced discrimination. It has been to the benefit of aggregate Society because we do bed but the cost of that is the is is to the individual who was propped up by the prior system and that you have to think through the political consequences of what happens to in their Apartments. I'm not sure I would use this as a politician but in their pilots what happens to the mediocre Matt, right and and you know, and I think we've seen that everywhere in our society when we've broken down barriers to discrimination when Martin Luther King said, you know a dream of a world where you know, my children will be judged by the content of their character rather than the color of their skin. Yeah. That's a that's a nightmare if you're a white man of low character. right So so the answer to your question is it will continue to be politically hard because it's threatening for some but but I think we should in striving for a more perfect union for purely selfish reasons. We should make sure that we're always putting the A Team on the field. Yeah. No, I you know, you know I totally agree with you and and now so now we'll get back to climate changes. I know that's your big thing. I mean God my daughter's going to be his thinking now that she wants to be an environmental attorney really really big into climate change and I think I told you like, you know, like she wants told me when we were on a hike Dodge. Yeah data, it's unfortunate that it's going to be my generation that's going to fix everything. But I mean are we moving towards? Oh, that's what he said. The green New Deal is coming off next week. Okay, I'd be surprised if that was coming to the floor, but maybe there's maybe there's something that she's working on order but it was something but I mean, what's the holdup is it is it is you know is is the GOP that like that they're in bed with a big oil. I don't understand the hold up. I mean, it's a girl. We happening. Well, so in many ways this ties to the last conversation. So let's let's just first state state a couple of truths that are are not upset often enough money anything we do to embrace a cleaner energy system is also an Embrace of a cheaper Energy System because because if you're if you are meeting your energy needs without having to burn fossil fuel that means you're also meeting energy needs without have to buy fossil fuels. So when you invest in efficiency when you if you can purchase an electric vehicle, if you put solar panels on your house all those things off reduce your marginal operating costs subject to you have enough money to make the initial capital investment, right and what that means is that the transition to a clean economy is a massive wealth transfer from energy producers to energy consumers, right? If you're you're probably pretty psyched if your power bills cut in half, right? Yeah, yes, but on the birth And your utility might not be right because that means you only pay half as much money and that in a nutshell has always been the real political challenge getting this done because the as much as we all as individuals or as businesses want to have more money in our pockets at the end of the day, right? And if you're spending less you got more money in your pocket. There are there are there are challenges.

Jackie Robinson Martin Luther King Jackie Frank Robinson ten years Matt next week GOP Lee one paycheck Fairness Act Parliament half years first person half as much first state Dutch one pool Scandinavian Dodge
"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

05:49 min | 3 months ago

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"All right. Well, I'm going to hold you know about the only other one. Let me see. How long our me major on for a little while and see if we get the arm major on. Let's see where he is. Cuz because my next guest is showing cast and and that's at I hope he's not getting cold in to the same freaking meeting cuz that would kill me. Let's see there he is dead. Let's see. Let's see. This is what happens live television live television. Let me see if I can get the Army Major to come in for a little while. As I wait the congressman Sean Casten and then ran a rainbow who is I'm getting worried because he didn't respond. You know, I got him the link I said I sent them the link and he hasn't responded. So, you know, we'll see what happens with Siggy John asked mark p to come on Sue Fields. Thanks for the three bucks. Well the meantime as I'm waiting I play another game. This is the one the Randy rainbow. This is the one that my sister told me. I should I have to watch so I hope this is right here. So is this the one says here we go. Desperate Cheeto. I'm joined Now by an old friend Donald Trump president. Still okay. You've had a rough week for about a year. Now. Why don't we start with one of the most recent natural disasters hurricanes. Actually, I was talking about your birth in your hair. We started with Texas and Louisiana. Don't forget Louisiana got hit hard and I went to Texas and I went to school and met the people and I think it helped and we got very high marks. We got 8 plus has good boy, and then the following week Puerto Rico got hit and if you remember it went in and out in and out three times. Well, well, let's not get into your sex life just yet. Let's first talk about all the negative press you received. When you return from your trip to Puerto Rico. I will say this page news. There's nothing else you can say about.

Donald Trump Siggy John Sean Casten three times Puerto Rico Texas Louisiana Sue Fields first three bucks 8 plus Randy mark p about a year hurricanes one Cheeto
"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

02:48 min | 3 months ago

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"They really only care about Ted athletes, but that.

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

07:16 min | 5 months ago

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Stuttering John podcast. It's very exciting show today. I got congressmen coming on home the great Sean Casten coming on the program later on. We're going to have Hal Sparks to come on talk about all that's going on in politics and all that's going on with the impeachment of the criminal known as Donald Trump. I want to say hi to Patty C Cups Joe Carter Canadian bacon with the badge Bettina Nikki be my moderate. I love you with the badge Marshall Janu took us fifteen and Diane Brazil good as gold. Hello. There's my PayPal link PayPal. Me slash John Melendez Inc. Kenneth Auto was he had came up with the badge and I'm surprised my mom is not here yet, but it's going to be a great show. What a great beer on the balcony yesterday with bass player extreme. In their Rudy sarzo, I mean you can't get you know a better. I mean a better beer in the balcony. So please be dead be a patreon subscriber a patreon, you know or a YouTube so do patreon.com Stuttering John so, you know it really would I'm telling you right now. You won't regret it. What a great show off Rudy sarzo opened up about the death of Randy Rhoads his everything about him and found his experience with d o Robert Plant Ozzy Osbourne. Just turning on some are I just got done with my hike. Okay now without further ado. Let me please bring on Sean Casten. He's a US representative for Illinois 6th Congressional congressional district. So here we go and it was born in Dublin Ireland. I could not wait to talk to him about all this but the great thing about this Congressman off. He's all about climate change and as I've said before he just got up I was about to bring him in and he just got off his chair. Anyway, he is very, very Into Climate Change proper climate change legislation, which as I told you is a very big issue to me. That's why I'm excited to have them Congressman. How are you? Oh, I can't hear you. I can't I'm not getting any audio. How's that? That's better. That's better. You know, we got so many of these wires and cords and things that Bluetooth one moment and not the next page Arizona Zoom are now less than I am. I applaud your work, you know, I've told this story before so a lot of my fans are sick of hearing it, but I was off a hike with my daughter, you know, you know in the woods actually in the place that they shot the TV sitcom match, but as we were walking I said Lily, she's big Into Climate Change. She goes to UCSB and a lot of her work there at school. She's also she's a paid employee there as you know, like an intern but she took a lot of it is about climate change. But I was talking to her and I said to her I go, you know cuz I have a younger son to in an older son. But my youngest is fifteen. I said, you know Lily I feel so bad that you are on going through the worst president. We've ever had your going through a a pandemic and you're going through you know, you know a senate page, you know, the Republicans you don't care about climate change and how the and and how the world is and and you guys are going to get affected by this and she said yeah data, you know what stinks it's going to be our generation is going to fix it. You know what she couldn't be more true. And that's why I applaud you for the hard work that you've been doing, but first before we get into that. I have to I have to address the elephant in the room, you know the impeachment now I thought they said that they were going to have witnesses now right before I started the show. They said they're not going to have them so, you know, I've been watching in real-time with the rest of you. I'm obviously not one of the impeachment managers and you know, I see that congresswoman Herrera beutler her statement was accepted was admitted as evidence and there was some negotiation that I wasn't privy to what's what's so tragic about this is There is no case that would have prevailed to get sixty-seven Senators. Right and that's not because the American people haven't been convinced right the American people overwhelmingly understand and those of us in that house. You know, I was there that day we all know exactly who was there we know exactly what caused it but you've got the the elected official Republican party and I got to clarify the distinction. There are a lot of good Republican voters, but the elected officials are Republican party have sold their soul and there was no path to get them done. And so I think in a question of what is the incremental gain of you know, trying to bring Witnesses in and negotiating the witnesses and the time that goes against that against the covid-19. We've got get through and I can only assume cuz I wasn't there that if we know that we're not going to persuade sixty-seven Senators to do the right thing for the country to uphold their oath and if we know that the dog Arkham people already understand what happened then you gotta make some some trade-offs and in an Ideal World we have infinite time in the world. We have we have limited time on the Senate schedule and that was the decision that was box. So all right, so they're not going to have any Witnesses now, so that's what's going on. I believe that the house managers just rested their case right before we started right now the the the office lawyer the Trump is using is making his closing remarks as we speak. What a ridiculous defense. I don't know if you saw where he said it was so embarrassing. I'm not going to bore you with playing it again, but wage when Martin Van Der Veen or whatever his name is said that he should depose Kamala Harris and Nancy Pelosi and they would have to show up in his office in Philadelphia. He says, I mean, aren't you just shaking your head? You know, you've maybe it's the nature of this job at forces you to kind of You gotta kind of rise up to the longer sweep of History a little bit here. The memories are short and these things will pass and the people who any of us who serve in this job. We're temporary custodian of a great job whether we're great. History will be the judge of that. The job is great. And I.

Donald Trump Nancy Pelosi Martin Van Der Veen Sean Casten Kamala Harris Lily Randy Rhoads Philadelphia Dublin Ireland Trump fifteen YouTube Hal Sparks yesterday Senate Republicans Ozzy Osbourne PayPal Republican UCSB
"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

03:28 min | 5 months ago

"casten" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"Off off off off off. Off off off off off off. Off off off off off. off off Yeah, baby, welcome to the world famous.

Delivering Biologics Orally

The Bio Report

05:12 min | 1 year ago

Delivering Biologics Orally

"Thanks for joining us. Daniel, thank you so much for inviting them. At least to be here, we're going to talk about Ronnie. Therapeutics effort to develop biologics orally the potential for this technology and the technology underlying this. What's the range therapeutics were talking about? How big a market opportunity are we talking about? That is a great first question to start with so. The the range of biologics there is no constraint on rich biologic. We can deliver for instance we can deliver peptides, insulin, or bt, age, human growth, hormone, or or Therapeutic antibodies like humira percent. Dick's in others. And other Larger molecules that are like factor aid. For instance for there is no constrained on kind of one accuser. We can deliver so therefore. The market that we address is merely. In? Hundred fifty billion dollars overall march that we we can. you know and can get a small piece of that. That great outcome. What's the case for doing this? What problems would be addressed and what benefits would there be? So you know when I started looking at this problem of the. Daily injections and Found that the people have tried turning. Insulin into oral formats or Even inhaled. Insulin end there. Other drugs people have tried. D- owning them in rural in fact over the last fifty years. There have been more than one hundred attempts main Trying to convert a few of these peptides into oil, and the vast majority of those efforts failed on the handful that have had some success in Rene. Say some success what I mean is. bio, absorption, or bioavailability, as it's called or amount of drug that is absorbed is Less than one percent so. compared to Subcu- injection. You're you're throwing a ninety nine percent of the drug. Because the enzymes in the gastric gi track really digestion breakdown in so the the chemistry approaches approaches that are employed cannot protect the drug long enough and well enough do get better than one percent absorption. have. There been other challenges to doing this. You know the the the significant amount of effort that has gone has gone into this chemistry based approaches Tried to block the enzymes with the enzyme blockers and. IMFORMATION enhancers that essentially the new the mucosal lining so. that. those those. Attempts have worked in very small biologic molecules to my knowledge. No one has tried delivering therapeutic antibodies with this approach and right after that will work well. Ronnie has taken. A mind-bending approach to the problem it's it's really fascinating to me as an approach to to problem solving it in the TAC. You've taken in developing the Ronnie Pill. What is the Ronnie Pill? Could. Let me start with the premise that. Led to this the asked a very simple question I. Ask. Why can't we have a pill? That goes into the intestine. and delivers a pain-free injection. and that was a that was the question I started with. And that question it has taken several years to answer that question. And we have. Great data so the a premise was. Created capsule. That is a like a tiny robot. Very low cost. And arrived the stomach acid. Goes into the casten and then. Transformed seven when injection delivers an injection in intestinal war. And The intentional water doesn't have the sharp pain receptors that we have in our skin, so the injection is pain pre.

Ronnie Pill Daniel Humira BT Dick Subcu
"casten" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

10:44 min | 1 year ago

"casten" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"The world Because the on any question that I have I can go and I can pick up the phone and I can get somebody who is super smart and knows a ton about that to come and talk to me and so when you know when things seem really hard if I say you know there's this there's this really important decision that's coming up and I have to know what it is and I don't know anything about this. And how did I possibly get this job? I can go and I can get super super smart people to come and talk to me about it in in learn where they are so sometimes that's people he probably don't know anything about you. Know I I get to spend time with you know Ben Bernanke. I'm sure he's a hero. The second the second grade class and had breakfast with him yeah. He's not he's not real popular a second graders but but I also get to meet people like last week. I got to meet Chris Evans. Do you know him. He's Captain America. Have you seen? Have you seen the Captain America Movie And I went to meet with him because he's doing sort of interesting stuff in politics and has an interesting view on how he can use his celebrity to get people thinking about politics. Yes yeah he's he's dragging his on a podcast right now bragging about a sure. Well I think that that's a coincidence. I mean he's in politics against the future of America and that's Captain America. It could be could be. He was also knives out which is sort of a more like a murder mystery. So I don't I don't know if that's about the future of America but but you do I mean it's a good question but the I think as long as you like learning things you can learn anything you want in this job and when things are really hard it's usually because you don't exactly know what the right thing is to do and so you can get smart people around to give you give you good advice and wisdom side of the question. That's a little more of a grownup question. But I think it's applicable to kids as well And that's you know you're you're in a district that flipped from Republican to Democrat in twenty eighteen But you're pretty Forthright and candid about how you feel about the state of the country. What's happening what you think? The right thing to do is at any given time you know and I know. Sometimes politicians are fairly careful testing the waters. You know not not sure what What to say? But you know what? What's your advice For for all people for for kids for adults about about being brave about saying what? The right thing is so developed a certain sort of philosophy of this job in the last year which look. Let's be honest comports with beliefs I had beforehand right. I'm not saying this is like a huge intellectual late but I think I've got a deeper understanding of where the country is right now and that's what I think. The our our founders created this democracy that works works perfectly if everybody understands the issues and and if you believe that the majority of people are fundamentally decent if you don't believe that the majority of people are fundamentally decent democracies a real problem and if you don't if your views are not aligned with the majority of people than democracy is a real problem for you individually and what I've found is that if you are if you're open candidate about where your views are in keeping in mind that that beautiful Edmond Burke quote when he said the the your representative and I forget the exact word but he said your representative owes you his judgment and he betrays you if he sacrifices his judgment to your opinion and I think if you're open about what your opinion is and you're honest and you share the truth in you trust democracy than what you find is that the majority of people are are kind of good people who have a similar set of values who do indeed believe in the principles of our constitution. And what you know what may seem brave for sort of standing up and saying you know. I. I disagree with you on that issue. And if you don't like that then you know that's determinative for you. Don't vote for me but I'm I'm going to be true to who I am. The people actually appreciate that for the same reason they appreciate that at any other line of work you don't you don't go into your office in the day and say. I'd like to know your opinion but I recognize. You won't share it with me because you're just going to echo what. I say you don't expect any line of work. I think the challenge we have right now in the country is that there are. It has become partisan to be committed to democracy. And there's such a huge difference between the values shared by the majority of voters including but not limited to voters who traditionally vote. Republican in the values are shared by the majority of elected Republican officials. Who are you know who are who are working actively to suppress access to information? You know every single Republican senator voted against having evidence in the impeachment case because they are nervous about what would happen if the American public was educated about me. No saying is that you know about the impeachment yet and about the hearing that the Senate did while the Republican senators said they didn't want any evidence should a trial have no evidence how to be a fair trial. It wouldn't even be a trial without him. That's what they it's exactly what they voted for. Exactly you should run for Congress getting better yet the Senate's but I think I think that it's hard to talk about that right because it sounds partisan to even say it but when you have people voting we had one hundred and three eighty three people who voted against the equal rights amendment What's what possibly is wrong with saying that we won't discriminate on the basis of gender. The Equality Act was a fairly partisan vote making fixing the voting rights amendment amendment. So that we can essentially undo the damage of shelby versus holder and recognize that everybody should have access to the right to vote was a partisan vote that's not partisan because the majority of the public is opposed to it. It's partisan because a majority of people who has access to power depends on making sure that not everybody has accessed information and not everybody has the same incentive to vote. And there's a difference there and so I think the I think in this moment it's not so much a the courage to stand up and be honest about your opinions as much as that. If you believe in democracy in this moment I think you have an affirmative obligation to redouble your commitment to it in in the out there. Educating speaking making sure people understand what's actually going on including some of the things that are going on our opinions that I have that you may disagree with but let's be honest about it. Let's not sit there. Try to use them weasel words to convince you that I agree with everybody Teddy. Can you think of ideas that we could get more people to know what's going on and and be educated about all the issues in the country? We could put all the evidence that climate change is real in that in that Donald. Trump should should be convicted in the news. Okay how would we get it to the news? Your representative right you could. That's why go on. Podcast like this to spread the word so everyone should listen to the podcast. Are there things that kids in your class? For instance will pay attention to enlist into. Well maybe you cartoon about all this a cartoon go. I would like a whole series about different reasons about all this that we're talking about. It's true schoolhouse rock. You ever watch that. You've seen how how a bill becomes a lot. Yeah Hussy de. We could make more schoolhouse rock about that. That's a good idea so you should check out what Chris Evans is doing. He's doing this thing called. This is captain America. I think it's called. Is it a better place to remember? He's about to release. It's coming out in March. And what he's doing. He's bringing on members of Congress just to speak about one issue that's really important to them and then building a whole website. So that people like you want to sort of understand what's going on. You can do it. And he's going to set up something after that where you can find an issue where you have a another member you disagree with in. You'll do video video talking like essentially responding to each other's points with the idea that you can have something where you know where teddy or something like you could save. Where am I got a real question about? Climate change or about what it costs to pay for schools so you could go and you can look on his website and you could find people talking about exactly those issues and sort of having organised so it should be hopefully pretty cool. What is your favorite thing about the Illinois six district my favorite thing about the Illinois six district? What's not the beautiful mountains? It's not it's not. It's not the skiing. We moved out here from the East Coast because the you know we had kids. We wanted to have good schools for them the weed. I was coming out here to start a company and and I wanted to be in a place where I could. They were like a lot of really talented people. And it was sort of affordable live here and this is a pretty great place to live. It's pretty great place to raise a family I'm delighted we moved out here even though I do. Kinda miss the miss the mountains in the scheme that I had when I lived back in New England. But you know my favorite thing about Chicago is Improv comedy. Have you been to the Improv comedy? There's a lot of us even a lot of good kids Improv. Comedy in Chicago is now an Improv. Right in the second district in Hyde Park and so I think we're GONNA sign teddy up person. Here's here's my recommendation. You know what we should go to Teddy. We should go to Improv Shakespeare. Have you ever been to that? They have. They do totally improvised comedy. But it's all a Shakespearean play so everything rhymes and they do a whole Shakespearean play that they just make up from things that people show from the audience. It's pretty neat. And it's kind of kid friendly. I took my daughters do it. You'd like it since right up your alley. Maybe how old regarding daughters are twelve and fifteen thirteen and my daughter just doing thirteenth? Another thirteen and fifteen any my questions that you have no not really anything else. You'd like to make sure we talk about. Thanks thanks for coming out to see daddy you too..

Captain America representative Chris Evans Congress Chicago America Senate Ben Bernanke Illinois Edmond Burke murder skiing senator Trump East Coast Hyde Park New England Donald
"casten" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

Two Broads Talking Politics

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"casten" Discussed on Two Broads Talking Politics

"Today through fifty. Yes we have a very special guest co host today and that is my son to Eddie. Hi letty high and joining us. Today is a returning guest of the podcast Who We have the rare privilege of getting to talk sue. Live in person today In that is Representative Sean casten from the Illinois six district low representative casten morning and thanks to Tedford for luring the out of my cave for this so this is pretty exciting. A longtime listeners will know that teddy is on the podcast frequently answering questions or doing introductions but this is his first time getting to ask the questions so with that I am going to turn it over to teddy thank you so what if I I question for you is. What is Congress doing fight climate change? What more can be done? So there's a lot more on the list of what more can be done. One of the one of the first bills that we voted on this year was to return the United States to the Paris climate accord and that was really important. But we shouldn't have had to do it because the only reason we had to vote to do that was because president trump took us out of the Paris climate accord that President Obama had put us in and what the Paris climate accord's says is that this is a global problem. Everybody in the world has to work. We're all going to agree to work together. And that seems kind of like the bare minimum but we. We voted to get back into that. I'm now working on the on the climate committee and we're doing a whole bunch of rules ranging from trying to make sure that the way the electric is regulated factors and co two emissions to some work we're doing to require companies to quantify what the impact is of their their greenhouse gas emissions so that people can invest money in appropriately to understanding how the banks are exposed to change in climate and this stuff is not really kid friendly. I grant you but we're doing. We're doing a whole bunch of stuff on those fronts but but we need to do a lot more And I think it's this challenge of four issues where what's necessary exceeds. What people think is politically possible. We need to count on people like you teddy to keep pushing us to keep working harder to make it more politically possible. Do you think the the technology is there are we do. We have the technology we need to to make these fixes it. Just a matter of political will vastly technologically and economically easier than we widely characterized as being whether we can get all the way to where we need to be with. Existing technology is a separate question but but to a certain degree. I think that the saying we can't do this because it's not economic or because the technology isn't there or saying that we can't do this because political will isn't there are all the last refuges of scoundrels because there are countries. Switzerland uses half as much energy per dollar. Gdp AS WE DO Thomas Edison's first power plant. That he ever built was almost twice as efficient as the. Us electric grid today. This is not fundamentally technology. Problem that's fundamentally a regulatory problem that we have we have over incentivized resource extraction in under incentivized efficient resource conversion. And what that means is. There's a lot of technologies we can use to convert energy more efficiently into useful goods and services which means that we're going to have more money in our pocket if we just deploy existing technologies and I spent twenty years running clean energy companies. Before I got here I never built a project that was less than twice as fuel efficient as the electric grid and I also never built a project that didn't rely on much of expired patents so we can get. I think we can at least cut. Co Two and a half with no change in technology and no economic pain. We need to go further than that. But my goodness let's at least let's at least do that. So you can figure out what was what kids do right now to make the world a better place will are you a if you're a cub scout or are we below or any of those things. I wasn't either but now all right well I had a lot of friends that were I say that because one of the things that one of the things that the boy scouts always teaches. You should always leave the campsite cleaner than you find right so if you go if you go camping don't just clean up your own mess but but walk around and if you see that somebody left a candy wrapper on the ground pick it up just make a little cleaner and we kind of got to treat the planet the same way so when you walk around do you throw your trash away at school or do you also say you know at someone threw some trash over here by the trash can clean that up when you walk through through a room and you turn the light off when you leave your room or do you go through and say on. My mom left the light on in her bedroom closet and I should probably turn that off to. Arthur usually lease Arthur. My brother but leaves the light on in different route into our bedroom and he didn't turn the light off on back into our diet. So here's the question when Arthur does that. Do you say Arthur get up here and turn the light off or do you just turn the light off? Because that's kind of what we gotta do is like go go through. Don't don't just spend our time yelling at people to just go through and like show him by our actions but the right thing is to do because then because then people copies tell him. Tell him that he really should remember to trim laid off but I still turn and does he listen to you. Does he say thank you so much for your wisdom. You've really turned me around on this issue. How old is Arthur? Okay all right so you're kind of like big brother. You can teach them what to do right now. So third thing I wanted to know is what should I do mouth? I want to be a member of Congress Sunday. That is a good question because when I was your age I really wanted to be a cartoonist. And then I thought I was going to be a professional. Soccer player may be an astronaut. And then if I was going to be a veterinarian and then I ended up being like a scientist and an engineer and then I ended up running some companies so I didn't really know that I was going to become a member of Congress. I think the most important thing is find something that you really really enjoy doing because if you really enjoy doing it you'll kind of dig into it and you'll get better and better at it and try to put yourself in situations where you have lots of opportunities because you never know where those opportunities are going to lead. But if you if you get really lucky you'll find yourself at points in your life where you said. There's something that I really like. And somebody is giving me an opportunity to do it and you never know where that lead. It might lead you to being a member of Congress that might lead you to be an astronaut. It might lead you to be in. You know more than just a failed cartoonist. Like me but but make sure you're doing something that you think is really interesting and when somebody opens a door walk through it. So what are some things that you find really interesting right now? Well I find Shakespeare Very Interesting Shakespeare Club at school really. What what what plays of Shakespeare's you like the most this is. This is the only one we've done so far as we didn't even get through the whole thing yet but Julius Caesar Yeah Yeah I don't know I think I read a little bit of that one to be one of the to be one of the characters in it. He's the under study for everything. All right. So have you come to praise Caesar or to bury him do that? Line RUDY SAYS CAESAR. It is ambitious yet. Bruce's audible me cried. Caesar Hath walked yet. Admission should be made a stir stuff very good. You know what I like. One of the things I really like about Shakespeare is that he somehow managed to understand. How really like fancy rich? People Thought King Henry Julius Caesar and then he also Kinda understood how you know the town bomb. John falstaff how he talked and he shakes had this ear of understanding how everybody at every level of society thinks and talks place. Oi Don't know but other people in Julius Caesar who are who are really powerful people. Are there people who are not very powerful people? Yeah and he kind of understands how both of them think right. Those pretty neat about Shakespeare. Your your fellow members of Congress. Do they have a lot of different backgrounds that Things different things they did before they came to Congress. So I'd I maintain that the that I am part of the coolest class that's ever been elected to Congress and I think that's a factual statement not just an opinion because our class has so many people in it who never never ran for office before but have a lot of other experiences that they were that they were there and like you know historically part of the answer your question Teddy. Is that historically the way you get to be a member of Congress is I you become you know local politician in your town and then maybe become mayor and then maybe you worked for the State House then run for Federal Office. I didn't do that and decided to run for Congress because I wasn't happy about what trump was doing and within our class. We have a whole lot of people like that. Who are doing really interesting things before Do you ever have ice cream super super tasty ice cream. Dean Phillips who founded Tanti Ice Cream was a CEO in a dilemma. And he didn't like what trump was doing and so he ran. So now dean and I are the two former company presidents. Who Were there. Johanna Hayes from Connecticut was the national teacher of the year so she was the best teacher in the whole country and then she said you know what I think should run for Congress and so she ran and she's there We have Two people in my class who were former spies they worked for the CIA Abby Span Burger and Elissa slatkin and they were doing really cool stuff that I'm not allowed to know about not allowed to know about. It was pretty cool. Abby told me that her kids love it because she has a really cool costume. Boxer had all these disguises. She had to wear select. Your kids play with it. Yeah well she doesn't have to use them anymore but now she's a member of Congress. There's all these people who really really interesting things before and felt like you know. There's things that I know about. I know a lot about something very specific that really matters for Congress and I think that there's some things the federal government isn't doing that a really important what I know so. Let me go and run for Congress. That's pretty I think it makes much Not as broad as some of the classes above us But much deeper cell by final question is what inspires. You wouldn't think seem difficult..

Congress King Henry Julius Caesar Arthur Julius Caesar United States Paris trump Caesar letty high Eddie Representative Sean casten Thomas Edison Illinois Switzerland Soccer president Shakespeare
"casten" Discussed on Off The Charts Energy Podcast

Off The Charts Energy Podcast

06:55 min | 2 years ago

"casten" Discussed on Off The Charts Energy Podcast

"Good reason there would be money-losing activity, and there's nobody building lots of other things that would be money losing activties, and in general, people built things that are money making committees and the power of carbon. Ptacs is that it is pre specified. It's not gonna move around as we find new gas deposits, or, you know, cheaper coal or things like that. So it it sounds it's permanent signal. Unlike resource prices. So we know Michael's policy preferences, carbon-tax condescend, if you were president Casten. What would what would the respected? We haven't actually covered congressman cast in emails me, with great regularity. What about just asking for money? A lot of your time usually in the form of the carbon tax. What would be your policy that you would send to congress if you're president? So I'm actually working on one right now, funny, you should ask the balked a little bit when you said cap and trade. And this goes to you saying about the carbon prices, and high enough, I would submit to you that from Reggie AB thirty two Kyoto it has always proved to be easier to reduce carbon than politicians thought it would be in as a result, whether whether through a, you know, all the pressure in a cap, and trade is to lower the cap in a way that won't create economic pain, and all the pressure to carbon taxes to lower the price to appoint which one crave comic pain, which means the political pressure, given as it has always producer, reduce carbon than we think it would be has been that we never quite reduce as much carbon in the prices never high enough because of the political process and within the cap and trade, contra construct. We've also gotten so caught up in the transition that we've over allocated allowances, which then flooded the market. And so. Oh, I had some colleagues when Reggie was being negotiated regional greenhouse gas initiative that we were sort of too late to the taste on states. Yeah. We were too late to the table to impact. But my staff is working this up to see if we can do it. Federally to say. Let's, let's number one, build on some programs. Like Japan has the top runner program for vehicle officiency that automatically ratchets every year. So that you're always readjusting as markets responded, you're not tying the improvement of the political cycle, and, and then let's do the whole thing on an output basis. So if we said, we will give everybody allowance every generator, we'll give you an allowance to pollute the allowance will be tied to how many megawatt hours you make. So if right now the grid is, is little bit less than a thousand pounds, go our CO two. Let's give every generator five hundred and we'll stipulate that it will be the lesser of five hundred fifty percent of the current grid, great emissions, now every solar plant has five hundred megawatt. Five hundred pounds that they can sell every coal plant has about fifteen hundred. They need to buy gas plant maybe has five hundred six hundred they need to by the end. You could then basically simply say, you've got to report your megawatt hours to Furger DO, we every year anyway. So we'll figure out your allowance and you can buy and sell behind the meter. You've gotten allowances to ease the transition in, you have a self correcting system that keeps ratcheting down over time, and you would give everybody a way to participant move forward. I there's some tweaks that you'd want to do to two factor. Thermal, you so that you, you'll co gender participate in pick up industrial sector, personally, I don't think you worry much about transportation because I think to our earlier discussion you affect transportation with the price of the vehicle, much more than the price of, of the of the fuel us, the name of this type of policy Anita. I need a really cool acronym suggest here green new deal. Taking or rebranded. Yeah. Basically, it's the way tradable permits really started before we got into all these allocation grandfathering auction systems. And you could you could make this stuff work. It's like a which is like a independent of the economic state. So, in other words, it would loosen when time to really good, because it'd be more megawatt hours and it would contract a little bit. You probably need to have some way to make sure that, you know, we need to lower the total CO two emissions, but it allows away for fishing to participate. It's technology stick, and it ended allows people enter into bilateral contracts because what I want is people who are in situations like me to go to their board. And so what do you have a twenty year contract from polluter? What's their credit rating? Okay. That will inform how much factor this in. That's very different than there's a tax next government. Keep the tax I dunno. Okay. So let me just be inordinately picky, which is Lee very bad as a host, since we are at the university Gago, and you our guest here, and we liked it. That's. I'm going to call that Kevin trade per megawatt hour. Okay. That's not very it's very. But, but why permit on our the planet doesn't care about what our only cares about Tennessee to and in Finnish thought pure cap and trade does not divide by megawatt hours? No. And it's an it's algebraic issued a convert it back. But I think getting to an output based emission standard. We have we have hugely pernicious impacts, that we don't talk about enough, the Clean Air Act right now, as it sits discourages energy efficiency, because because so much of our environmental regulations are affectively on an input basis parts per million scales with fuel use. So the more fuel, you burn, the more you're allowed to omit, tying to the output ensures that you get you get the out with. It's tied to your performance. It make sure that we're not picking technologies because I would rather have clean technologies running twenty four seven and one. That's running two hours a day. The end and I take your points fair criticism that you have to make sure that the total cap is reducing but that's to some degree. That's break issue of saying, how will we adjust in my example of five hundred every yeah, you'll be getting some emails from Michael about that. Well, I think we are out of time with the podcast, but I want to say thank you, both very much for sitting down with me, and I look forward to seeing that Bill in congress. Michael. Thank you. Thank you for listening, please. Make sure to subscribe to off the charts wherever you get your podcasts including on epochs website at epic dot EU, Chicago, that EDU until next time I'm Jeff McMahon..

Michael president congress Reggie AB Ptacs Japan Casten congressman Kevin trade Bill university Gago Tennessee producer Jeff McMahon Chicago
"casten" Discussed on ZigZag

ZigZag

15:36 min | 2 years ago

"casten" Discussed on ZigZag

"This zigzag. So Mallory Casten, she's voicing the so-called every woman, the hipster mom, more recently, the older mature woman, and then the jobs start drying up. Smelly decides she needs to be in charge of the work. She's doing her destiny. And the only way to do that is to be herself. So she starts writing a mommy blog exploring her own world parenting aging relationships now. She has a podcast called milk mothers. I'd like to know I feel a little conflicted about the mommy industry as people call it now knows I feel conflicted. So the day before I went to interview her, she sent me a link to a great article in topic dot com called the mommy blog is dead long live. The mommy blog by a woman named Liz lens parts of this article really spoke to Mallory. She.

Mallory Casten Liz milk
"casten" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

15:38 min | 2 years ago

"casten" Discussed on 710 WOR

"And welcome back to coast to coast. Our final segment with Len Casten as we talk about project surf, oh, and also the reptilians and Len once again where can people get your books? Available on Amazon, by the way stand going Frank chilly on there. Is that true? I've had Franken beyond belief, our TV show. And he is. Speaker, he really is. In the statement in his video on YouTube that the military has technology. And by the way, that jointly with the Germans, by the way, that is a thousand years ahead of what they've given us because it was handed to us, right? Yes, it was as well. Give it to the Germans, actually, but we got a joint program in Antarctica with the German. So we picked up a lot of it there. But anyway, he's amazing. I think you're gonna be amazed by what he says, as a good guy. Okay. Let's take final calls for you Len. Let's go to Tom in the Bronx. Hey Thomas, go ahead. I. Ran into a pilot ever plane pilot for the airline and I asked him about you, you will the devastation. Many and eat. Tell me that during World War Two. He was a pilot for the US air force in, in the civic, and they be flying along. And all of a sudden they see the diss come near them. And he told me that they used to shoot them down. I'm quoting him know that they'd actually shoot them down, if that's true. There must be a letter wreckage of these things in the ocean. Did you come across anything like that? Len. Talking about the foo fighters, which became well known in World War. Two yes and but I didn't know that they had shot any down. I'm surprised that they would be able to do that. We saw them we witness them, but I never heard a shooting down either. Some of us down exactly sad. It they had the cookbooks of an amazing amazing saucer. There were a lot of reports during the Vietnam war, had you heard anything about those. Yeah. I have I've heard some things about that. Yes, they were there you oppose with. They're probably the reptilians. I think the any other u foes, that would be coming into our airspace, another star systems would be friendly. But the ones we have to worry about and the ones that putting down the, the camp fails other at tilles. So those are the those are the guys that we're having the most trouble with they're the ones that want to control us, right? Well, yeah, they do actually they actually do control us, we would have otherwise, we would have a mazing technology, which we don't have do they have tails, alligators. Well, according to some of the some of the peace bakers, yes, some of them do so called Royal class. They're huge about eight feet tall incredibly large masculine. And some of them have tails. Yeah. Back to the calls. We go to Dan truck driving in Illinois. Hey, daniel. Go ahead. Hey, good morning. Morning. I had a couple of questions about jump. Nimitz have some involvement with that. And also didn't they also kind of put forest all away for what he said about it afterwards? They may have put forestall away wasn't didn't he commit suicide or something? Well, they say committed suicide, but he was pushed out was pushed out of the window. He was they had to get rid of forrestal. Involuntary suicide secretary of the navy, and when, when, when Attleboro came back and started telling congress about what happened to the man to I was in trouble. And did anything happen to Admiral Nimitz? Admiral Nimitz was was advised her on the entire high jump program. He yes he worked with the initial original planning operation hijab before they left. That's all I know about that all in Boston taken away, Paul. Go ahead. All right. Try just makes you don't wanna go to sleep at night anymore. I know it. Where does Casey, the ex head of the CIA died at the mid eighties, come into this Casey? Yeah. And the question is, there's a alleged Royce of, of fraud, type and city. Nj live on the knee. See article, and they got into a it was a group of Russian specimen drive a diva's and they try to capture the frogmen clean, I was on Neko. I never heard of that one. Have you Len? I heard something about its carry, I think Kerry Cassidy talked about it. I don't have all the details, but I do recall are saying something about that. William. Casey, the late CIA director, did you have any involvement in any of this case, he goes way back? He talked. He talked about the CIA that guy did he have any involvement with what with the serbo UFO's or anything like that? I know but I wouldn't be surprised because see I was involved in all of it. It's amazing how they were able to try to keep it so quiet for so long. And then bang. They succeeded very well. They did so you have to give them credit for that. Waning go. Go ahead. I'm sorry. Stepped on you there. Wayne in Tacoma, Washington, go ahead. Ueno good to have you with us gentlemen cigars and guess, wanting to, I guess make shirts team that I have a question for you. I read a lot about all of this, including the Montauk project and the Montauk project seem ten bowl time travel, and they claim that the reason that it was down in the books is that they were taking people on the street of New York street people and sending them to Mars. And there was setting though, sending them to the future, and the past and because they did have time travel and a lot of them did not never came back. Okay. Well covers that we also the Germans were involved in that and Montauk. Involved in all that, okay? Wayne anything else. No, I was thank you. All right, thanks, appreciate you. And your comments say Ed in Charlotte. North Carolina with us now. Hey Ed, go ahead. About forty some years ago, I went to meeting to gas broke up at Montauk and took pictures of campaign, headsets and stuff in the brush, and they saw a huge cable tiny going underground in those participants head young children's brains work better for that or something. They're getting ready to write a book. Some of the participants I heard Montauk in forty years. The reason I'm calling I wanna know this. There's a gentleman that would go in a river, lo fi last few years down in Texas. And when he's in the river, these space, people communicate to him, and he's gone to the fastest in places scares them, but he's saying that there's enough and I got on the computer, and it's their twenty twelve NASA took a picture of the pair. Mid in the sand blown off the base, and you can see the day twenty twenty three I think it is some, July or whatever. And, and he was told that the people that Bill, the payer, mid told him, they are coming back and they'll arrive. That date. And they're here to steal our energy. And then you would about Seoul's people getting sows in that kind of bothered me that sounded like, what have you heard anything about this? Well, the only involvement with souls has to do with the with the are cons, the icons would like to take ourselves but they can't and there's a lot of information about the are constant now coming out. They're very strange race of extraterrestrials that part that part, physical and part, Elio astral, and they are the ones we're having the most trouble with right now because they are race basically, but they're not the same as the ones that were dealing with here. It's they're like a related race their cousins, but. That's a whole other subject. The cons inland before the break you were talking about which is really a severe problem. So many people on this planet disappearing. I mean they're just gone. Nobody knows where they are. I know that was in the book, missile Politis. David polite us. Absolutely. And yeah, I think the numbers of something like a million people year all over the planet now just gone vanished booth. They're gone. Absolutely. Yeah. What are they doing with these people? Well, it's just like just like the book of timeshare, where they were taking on the ground, and they, they were they were used his food for the underground race story to serve man living under the earth. Do eight Uman plush and they drink him in blood. So it's the same as same as the time machine story. Well, David David, Dr David Jacobs says that their visitations here are not friendly. He could be right which is what physicians was he talking about just general UFO visited? He believes. No. That sure not at all any, any other. There are a lot of other and a lot of other races out there trying to help us and sometimes they do appear not skies and we, we shouldn't we should be welcoming those, but it's the reptilians that are doing the Chem trails. So those are the guys were having problems with. All right. Let's go to James Lafayette, Louisiana. First time caller. Hey, james. Go ahead. All right. I'm glad you have Mr. Tara stone. 'cause I wanted to ask if his book, the secret apprentice is redacted all by, if it's not redacted, and what do you mean by redacted redacted like project blue book with redacted were similar to stuff was blacked out? Okay. I get what you're saying. No, you haven't rejected anything when there's no reductions in my book, but of course, a lot of information, I was able to get whatever I could get in the book. And when you were writing all these books that you've written, which one startled you the most when you were putting it together. This last one for sure. I'm the one that's coming. I had no idea about the technology that the Germans have on Mars. That's is, is the most amazing story of all time, because they have quantum technology, they have quantum physics. They have quantum mechanics. And they can they can cure any, any ailment any disease of any. It's amazing. What technology they have, and that could be hours that could be hours, but they're not going to give it to us. No, they really aren't. Let's go to John Lorain, Ohio. Hi, john. Let's get you in. Well, I think that. That the Nazis, infiltrated the United States is sort of reversed, they to, to that things the other way around as you've been talking. The see I was controlled by Ellen Dallas. A pro Nazi himself, allied with the big Wall Street bankers. And I believe if you just Chit global research at CA, you'll have a lot of exploit here of that. But I believe the main motivation for this support by the big business in the United States, and the big bankers was to was based on anti-communism anti-soviet ISM. And I think it's the Cancer Society that is brought about toba militaristic imperialism the United States against career. Vietnam around the world, always based, I in the name of anti communism, and I think the only reason the United States, went to war against Hitler is that he double crossed is a big banker about people in the United States and England and move west before he moved against his main target, the Soviet Union was us assignment by the western Bank and his. Also, he had two year agreement was stalling not to right. And any double cost him. And, and invaded invaded Russia staan, but he was styled, buddy was ally, big mistakes, of course, was going into Britain. He should've just stayed out of that. They probably wouldn't let them take the other Baltic nations, but he kept going. You mean going to England you mean? They just backed out. They lost that ballet lost the battle of Britain. And but I mean his invasion of Russia was, was so unexpected that Stalin went into a deep depression, when he realized what that Hitler actually invaded Russia, because he thought they were friends, but that was his water wasn't that Hitler's Waterloo, basically. Was, what are the web -solutely, and they lost a million men? Not see the jemmy lost a million men and better another million in what taken prisoner and that was the turnaround that was the turn around point in early. Nineteen forty three after that the Russians much all away to Berlin. You're, you're still working on refining your website, right? AT dash secret history. Dynamic. Construction. I'm sorry about that. Okay. That's Len cast, and of course, his books secret journey to planet serpico alien world order and one that's coming out win win next year. Do you think it'll be out? Darkly. Sure. Be the next catalog that they put out and just finishing the editing process right now. Keep in touch with us. All right. Absolutely Lynn cast an amazing story truly amazing story that has a lot of teeth to it to be sure while stick with us. All week long as we get going. It's now my birthday we made the turn. So will pop up Tuesday, and I have a little brief celebration carry on with our show for you, and everything else couple little notes, we have a YouTube channel. It's free to subscribe, go for it. Just go to YouTube in type in coast to coast AM official, and you can subscribe that way link for you at coast to coast, AM dot com and take advantage of that anything that's free rabbits for Dan Galanti. Tom, Dan, Heiser. Lisa. Lyon. Lex loan hood, Sean law the sore..

Len Casten United States YouTube Montauk CIA Russia Admiral Nimitz Tom Hitler Casey Amazon Nimitz Franken Antarctica Thomas Wayne Nj David David Frank
Coca-Cola test burst

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:24 sec | 2 years ago

Coca-Cola test burst

"And welcome back to coast to coast Casten with us, of course, and his works include dark fleet, which will come out next year alien world. Order the rep Killian plan, which came out a couple years ago secret journey to planet surprised that came out in two thousand thirteen and both of my books are now in Germany, as well. Really? Excellent. We eat a lot of

Killian Germany
Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

Planet Money

05:52 min | 2 years ago

Why The Price of Coke Didn't Change For 70 years

"Was an eighteen eighty six a nickel in one thousand nine hundred still a nickel ten years later. Nineteen ten and nickel. Nineteen twenty a nickel. Nineteen thirty a nickel nineteen forty a nickel. Nineteen fifty a nickel as late as nineteen Fifty-nine. You could buy a six and a half ounce bottle of Coca Cola for one nickel and for communists. This is a total freak of nature kind of thing. Prices. You can read in any textbook are supposed to go up and down the price of gasoline goes up and down depending on how much is available. How many people want it? How hard it is to get out of the ground. The price of a television depends on how expensive the components are to make and the price of labor. The price of butter goes up and down corn cars houses, everything prices change. They adjust. It's the basic mechanism for how markets work and yet. Four seventy years. You could buy a coke for five cents. Gocha Gola is the best drink in the land men women children the country over drink more Coca Cola than any other. Wondering is the five cent Drake of the nation proof that Coca-Cola quenches your thirst refreshes your spirits? Throws your taste is nothing else. Yes. Yes. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm David Casten Val today. The strange story of nickel coke why it happened. What it says about the textbooks and? He. The. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from each raid with all the jargon. Investing can feel like a foreign language. Each raid makes investing simple by providing personalized support and guidance in terms you can understand they let you get started in the market with as little as five hundred dollars. And then help you learn as you go you don't need to be approach to invest at each raid. For more information, visit eatright dot com slash NPR each rate. Securities LLC member, sipc. If you listen to planet money, you probably love learning new things NPR has another podcast series. You might like it's called life kit. It's a collection of guides on how to get your life together from getting better sleep to saving more money. Just search life get to subscribe. It's not a secret that coke cost a nickel for so long. You can go to any antique store and see the old signs. If you go to the Coca Cola museum in Atlanta, the tour guide will tell you. And normally people on the tour will just not yet things used to be cheap. But one day a guy named Daniel Levy took his kids to that museum. It's called the world of Coca Cola and so his family's on this tour and the tour guide just mentions this nickel coke thing. And Levy thinks wait what the night heard that. I said can you say that again, and repeat that and I kind of grabbed my in my head, right? I should how can that be? Daniel Levy, you see is an economist and for him, this is a mystery. So he basically hijacks the tour starts asking all these questions. How could coke stay nickel for so long and the tour guides like, I don't know. I don't know. So Daniel goes back to Emory University where he works, and he finds Andrew Young Daniel did kind of walk in and say that he found this craze. Thing one day. And you know, I need a research assistant you want to help me out with this project is yes, ounds, really interesting. Let's do it the more. They think about it. A single price for seventy years, the stranger it. Seems this puzzle becomes really really amazing venue actually consider but has happened during that period, the great depression, three wars spanish-american World War One World War Two competitors, including Pepsi, hundreds of competitors prohibition. Various lawsuits and nano distinct made any difference. We're talking about basically like eighteen as six into the nineteen fifties all of all of these dramatic changes to the economy going on and and one constant through. It all was that you could get six and a half hours of Coca Cola found nor in a bottle or five cents. If you think that's just because Coca-Cola came up with incredible innovations to cut costs to keep the price down. This is not that story. It's a much stranger story that tour guide when Danny. Had been grilling him said you should go to the Coca-Cola archives. So Daniel and Andrew do and it has all this stuff posters. Calendars, novelty items. This is Phil Mooney. The Coca Cola company archivist? He says the company has saved everything metal sons magazine advertising radio and television advertising departmental records. The answer was definitely in there somewhere product files executive correspondence is the secret formula for coke in there somewhere that is one thing that is not there. So our economists start going through the archives Mooney. The archivist says he can't explain how nickel coke began. It was an attempt to attract customers late eighteen hundreds were the days of soda fountains. And there were lots of soda fountain drinks, they were primarily food flavored drinks oranges and grapes. And what was the cost of the competitors? Seven eight maybe ten cents somewhere five cents. But coke went very specifically to market itself. Self as an affordable product the first sale. We know is in Atlanta at a store on Peachtree road on may eighth. Eighteen eighty six. I'm reading from the Coca-Cola official history here, Dr John Stith Pemberton a local pharmacist produced the syrup for Coca-Cola and carried a jug down the street to Jacob's pharmacy where it was sampled pronounced excellent and placed on

Coca-Cola Coca Cola Museum Coke Daniel Levy Andrew Young Daniel Atlanta NPR Gocha Gola David Casten Val Dr John Stith Pemberton Emory University Securities Llc Phil Mooney Jacob Research Assistant Danny Executive
Why Are Sloths' Toilet Habits So Dangerous?

BrainStuff

05:31 min | 2 years ago

Why Are Sloths' Toilet Habits So Dangerous?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren vocal bomb. Here slots are known for their incredibly slow moving nature's. But it turns out that such sluggishness also carries over into their bathroom habits so much. So that they only defecate every five to seven days on average and actually lose up to one third of their body weight in a single movement. The stool is pushed out in one fell swoop so impressive that horrified and door. Transfixed bystanders can watch the animals, abdomen shrink. We spoke by Email with Sarah Kennedy, co founder of the sloth Conservation Foundation based in the United Kingdom. She said if you've ever seen a sloth PU you could only ever describe it as pure bliss. They tipped their heads back and smile. But the week long delay between bowel movements is not. Even the strangest thing about sloth pooping habits, you see slots are boreal creatures, which means they live work and play high up in the trees their chosen habitats. Are the rain cloud forests of central and South America? Most other are boreal animals like monkeys poop from the trees, but not sloughs. Instead, they make a slow descent from the canopy to do their business at the base of the trees and this despite the fact that it's quite perilous. Kennedy said this behavior puts them at threat to a lot of predators like jungle cats and wastes a lot of their precious energy, which they don't have much of it turns out that more than half of all sloth deaths occurred during potty time when these creatures are so vulnerable to predators. The process comes at a serious price zoologist and sloth Conservation Foundation founder Becky cliff wrote in a blog post, a slots entire lifestyle is based around avoiding detection and using as little energy as possible. It takes us Lafon entire month to digest just one leaf meaning they don't have much wiggle room. When it comes to expending energy. The laborious process of going up and down the tree is compounded by the actual pooping process. Slots do a little bench at the base of the tree to create a whole for the feces, and then shake their hindquarters once more to cover it up this process requires you guessed it, plenty of precious energy. A lot of theories have been put forth about wise lofts feel the need to expend so much effort and expose themselves to so much danger just to toilet one theory is that sloth moths which live in sloth hair actually, lay their eggs in the feces during the long poop process, then once they hatch and mature in their carefully prepared environment. They fly up to take residents in the host sloths for many experts though are skeptical of this explanation because the Slavs don't particularly benefit from the behavior and nature isn't generally known for its selfless, generosity, more likely. But as yet unproven is that these strange behavior comes back to reproduction as it so off. Does when living things are involved. Kennedy explained the main reason is probably so that other sloths can find them a particularly males looking for females. Usually this loss come down every five to seven days, but when females are in heat, it's every day. So it's likely to be mostly to do with reproduction. Indeed, it appears at sloth poop says a lot more about the animal than merely what they've been gnashing on cliff wrote fairmont's present in the urine feces can provide a lot of important information about the individual animal, if the sloth just let everything go from the canopy these messages would be easily lost we have heaps of data showing some really interesting patterns between a female's estrus cycle and the patterns of defecation. We'll be waiting patiently for the answer to this mystery because if observing sloughs teaches anything it's patients. Today's episode was written by Alya Hoyt and produced by Tyler clan for iheartmedia, and how stuff works for more on this and lots of other moving topics. Visit our home planet has stuff works dot com. He stuff listeners for all you fans of true crime investigations. There's a new podcast from glamour, and how stuff works Marcus Hanna. Devante Abigail, Jeremiah and Sierra were all black children adopted by two white women, Sarah and Jennifer heart. It looked as if the hearts were the perfect family, but their lives ended in a murder suicide car crash that shocked their friends and made national headlines starting seven fourth with new episodes. Every Tuesday co host Justin and Elizabeth follow the families fatal journey, even listen and subscribe to broken hearts, spelled H A R T S on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Sarah Kennedy Sloth Conservation Foundation Apple Becky Cliff Walt Disney Marcus Hanna South America Casten Vietnam Murder Jonathan Strickland United Kingdom Devante Abigail Co Founder Founder Fairmont Alya Hoyt Justin Jeremiah Elizabeth
Skim Versus Whole Milk: Which Spoils Faster?

BrainStuff

05:50 min | 2 years ago

Skim Versus Whole Milk: Which Spoils Faster?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb, and we've all had moments of uncertainty, and let's face it paranoia about the state of the food sitting in our refrigerators, you might be able to eyeball some of this suspicious items check for expiration dates on others and with some milk. Maybe you'll probably take a quick with and hope for the best. But if you've ever looked a shelf-life chart to figure out how long your milk might last. You might have noticed that skim milk is said to last a day or two longer than whole milk. But is that really true? And if so why before we really get started. I should state that there is by no means universal agreement on this issue. Some dairy scientists say skim milk lasts longer because certain fat loving microbes can develop as quickly in nonfat milk. Other say that whole milk lasts longer because free fatty acids might actually be natural preservatives. Still others say that maybe there isn't a difference in spoilage at. All it's just that. We noticed flavor changes more in one or the other. There's only been one major controlled study on these spoilage rates of whole and skim milk. And it was somewhat inconclusive skim milk was found to spoil slightly faster. But the researchers weren't exactly sure why bacteria that are psychotropic that is cold resistant are what causes spoilage in the fridge. And in the study, they multiplied at the same rate in both types of milk when the milk spoiled both whole and skim contained similar strains of bacteria. There was a pronounced difference in how whole and skim milk reacted when they were injected with the same spoilage microorganisms, but they affected the milk's taste and smell more than they did the actual spoilage rate whole milk for the record tended to turn sour and skim milk was on the bitter side. So for the purposes of your average milk consumer. There's really no hard and fast rule about which kind will spoil faster if whole. Ilk does last longer than skim the difference is so slight that any given gallon of skim milk could outlast any given gallon of whole milk. The spoilage rate depends on so many variables manufacturer production methods milk formulation plant sanitation storage, temperatures, ph level moisture content just to name a few a small change in just one of them could give any particular container of milk a slightly longer shelf life than another a couple of other factors make things even more ambiguous for one. It's pretty much impossible to pinpoint the exact moment of spoilage, depending on your sense of smell and taste and your tolerance for changes in milk flavor. You might turn up your nose at a gallon of milk that someone else might readily swig, and there's no federal regulation of milk expiration dates in the United States only twenty states, legally standardized, the date that's printed on the bottle, and those standards vary widely one state might mandate a sell by date of a certain number of days after pasteurization, whereas milk jugs in another state would be printed. With a used by date, the upshot don't base your milk purchases on which type might last longer. If you're concerned about shelf life, you'd be better off following a few simple steps to slow down milk spoilage. Whether you're a whole or skimmed drinker, I make sure your refrigerator is the correct temperature. It should be set at forty degrees Fahrenheit. That's four point four degrees celsius store, your milk on an interior shelf instead of on the door, which fluctuates more in temperature and make sure you put your milk back in the fridge as soon as possible after using it leaving it out on the counter for even a few minutes exposes it to light and heat giving 'Bacterial a chance to spring into action. Today's episode was written by Alison Cooper and produced by Tyler clang. Bonus fact for the episode, the origin of milk's, expiration date labels, and of expiration date labels general in the United States rests with a campaign started by Al Capone to learn more about that checkout. An episode of my other podcast. Savor the episode is called expiration dates best if listened by and of course for more on this and lots of other fresh topics visit our home planet. Custom works dot com. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and evolutionary biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join us every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Apple United States Walt Disney Casten Lauren Vogel Harvard Iheartradio Vietnam Twitter Katie Golden Jonathan Strickland Al Capone Alison Cooper Tyler Clang Milk Forty Degrees Fahrenheit Four Degrees Celsius
BrainStuff Classics: Why Does Gasoline Smell So Good?

BrainStuff

04:41 min | 2 years ago

BrainStuff Classics: Why Does Gasoline Smell So Good?

"I'm Jeff Rosenthal. Co-founder of summit a thought leadership community ideas festival, and I have a new podcast called art of the hustle. We'll be breaking down how the world's most fascinating successful. People have hustled their way to the top hearing their wisdom and understanding their ways of seeing with guests like Ireland Hamilton and Tim Ferriss, new episodes drop every Wednesday. So subscribe now on apple podcasts or listen on the iheartradio app or anywhere else. You find podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, I'm Lauren Vogel bomb. And today's episode is a classic from our erstwhile host Christian Seder. This one was a script in our old YouTube days, and we found that it was one of our most controversial why does gasoline smell so good for those of you thinking what gasoline smells gross, just believe us for some folks it smells delicious. Either. Gang. I'm Christian Sager and had you ever been to the gas station before filling up your jalopy when suddenly your nostril hairs twins with an aromatic burning sensation it's like the wise sages of Leonard Skinner once saying ooh that smell. Can't you smell that smell? I'm talking about gasoline people. Why does it smell so good? While the first answer is pretty simple actually gasoline or petrol as our friends across the pond like to call. It contains a chemical hydrocarbon called benzine used to boost its octane rating and benzene naturally has a sweet scent to it that our noses are especially sensitive to in fact, it evaporates so quickly that you'd smell benzine instantly. If you just put some in a dish in the same room, you're in it is so pungent we can get a whiff of it. If there's only one to five parts per million in the air, we breathe and benzenes not just in gasoline. We use it in plastics pesticides and detergents. It's also in a lot of mass. Produced toys. So it's possible. You're associating the smell of gasoline with that new toys smell from your childhood, but don't let it's odor. Get. It's enchanting hooks in you too far because Skinner also had it, right? When they sang that smell, the smell of death surrounds you. That's right. The smell of benzene can be fork. But it's also toxic. If you inhale large amounts of it it actually attacks your nervous system. Luckily, it's so pungent that we have plenty of warning before hazardous exposure. That's why it can start to make you nauseous or give you a headache after awhile and the consequences of sniffing too, much benzine and gasoline are not pretty inhalant abuse leads to loss of consciousness, seizures liver injury and distress within your heart and lungs keep going after that and you're looking at neurological impairment and straight up brain damage, the EPA OSHA and who also categorized benzene as a carcinogen the cancers. It's associated with the most are leukemia and. Mm foam and get this. There's possibly another less dangerous reason why we like the smell of gasoline so much. A study published in two thousand nine issue of addiction research in theory indicates that gasoline smells better to us when we're hungry. It found that people rate the smell of gasoline as being more pleasant and intense the longer it had been since they'd last eaten more research is obviously required. But there seems to be a link between our degree of hunger and our odor perception of gasoline. Maybe that's why gas stations make such a killing on selling junk food. Today's episode was written by Christian and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hebron's listeners today. I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you news stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Leonard Skinner Apple Jeff Rosenthal Iheartradio Tim Ferriss Co-Founder Christian Seder Ireland Hamilton Youtube Lauren Vogel Christian Sager Leukemia Walt Disney Hebron Epa Osha Tyler Clang Casten
How Did the Inca Knot Language Work?

BrainStuff

06:07 min | 2 years ago

How Did the Inca Knot Language Work?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten. Donovan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff Lauren Vogel bomb here during the bronze age the Incas built the largest pre-columbian empire in the Americas extending along the west coast of South America from Bolivia to Chile they not only thrived in the harsh climate and dry steep slopes of the high Andes. They also served up masterclass and technical road-building that would have made the Romans quake in their sandals. Thank created a twenty five thousand mile highway system that's about forty thousand kilometers complete with rope bridges across treacherous mountain chasms. They also engineered millions of acres of high altitude terraced farmland and constructed an earthquake proof citadel on top of a craggy mountain peak one point five miles that's two point four kilometers above sea level, the even figured out how to freeze dried potatoes, but unlike the neighboring Maya and as techs and the ancient Mesopotamia's Chinese Egyptians, the Incan never developed a system of writing what they did have were keep Lou or not at length of cord made from Lana oral Pakowal or cotton. They hung in rows like. A curtain from a thicker central rope, which was sometimes coiled up to resemble the string mop these bundles were often color coded, although most surviving keep who are now a uniform camel color and could contain just a few strings or hundreds when the Spanish arrived and wiped out the entire in Kosovo ization, they found keep who everywhere but destroyed many of them in the nineteen s a science historian named Leland lock studying the keep who at the American Museum of natural history in New York City discovered the knots and the key PU represented numbers and the bundles of textiles were most likely recordkeeping devices similar to Advocacy's probably used to hold census data or to keep track of the contents of storehouses or how many lamas were paid tribute. He realized that the height of a not and its position on its cord civilized units tens hundreds thousands, and so on and the position of a string off the main rope could denote things like specific people or villages, but even after lock cracked the code. He noticed that some of the key. He studied seemed. To be anomalies. He figured these were used for ceremonial purposes. There are however anecdotal clues that entire narratives could be passed along through keep Oooo a one seventeenth century Spanish conquistador reported meeting an in-command on the road. Who carried keep Oooo that he said told of all the deeds of the Spanish in Peru. Good and bad. Keep who couriers reportedly ran all over the Incan empire. The cords looped over their shoulders, but finding living people now who can help researchers unravel. The secret of the nuts has proved very difficult. If not impossible so research has made slow progress in the past century since the early nineteen nineties Harvard anthropologist named Gary Burton has been working to decipher what if anything the key booze that don't fit the normal mold of accounting devices might mean collecting database of over nine hundred keep who in the process has discovered that beyond the position and height of the nods. There are other factors to take into consideration. When reading Kiu the color of the string. The direction. The knots are twisted and the type of knots used through cross-referencing, keep Kiu in the Harvard collection with Spanish documents from the exact time and location in Peru, where they originated he has recently been able to prove that the direction. The knots are tied in could note, which clans individuals belonged to another researcher named saving Highland at Saint Andrews university in Scotland has recently found that some keep who still exist within villages in the Andes the locals there has shared. Some new information about them, for instance, that the different materials used in the strings is significant and their understanding is that the devices were used to tell stories of warfare Highland. Also reports evidence of network symbols in the strings, it could be for all their ingenuity the Incas never learned to use symbolic written language, but it looks like they may have been just a little more creative with their storytelling than any other major civilization to date. Today's episode was written by Jesulin shields and produced by Tyler clang, her more on this and lots of other historical, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. The end of the world with Josh Clark is a ten part podcast series about all the ways we humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out in the next century or two and yes that sounds scary. Dangerous place other. I mean, the the universe is is the house going to no care for life on earth and devastating that brings a tremendous amount of energy with flesh-eating the earth surface embroiling alive. Anything that can't take cover underground Newark. And mind boggling we accidentally trigger some sort of existential risk or are exposed to an existential destructive event that sort of for humanity. And it definitely is all of those things, but it's hopeful to and in need you to listen and understand. So you can help save the future of the human race. Join me stuff, you should know. Josh Clark for the end of the world an immersive podcast experience available now on apple podcasts. The iheartradio. Uh-huh app and everywhere you get your podcasts.

Josh Clark Apple Peru Andes Researcher KIU Walt Disney Donovan Strickland Vietnam South America Lauren Vogel Gary Burton Americas New York City Maya Bolivia Harvard Kosovo American Museum Of Natural
Can Cheese Actually Make Wine Taste Better?

BrainStuff

04:21 min | 2 years ago

Can Cheese Actually Make Wine Taste Better?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners in Leuven ad today. I wanted to tell you about one of our compatriot podcasts here at how stuff works Daniel. Or hey, explain the universe in which physicist Daniel Whiteson and cartoonist or hey cham- breakdown. All the amazing things, we know and don't know about our wild universe. They talk through some of the biggest questions in science like how did the universe begin? What is everything made of what's the Higgs bows on can we travel back in time? And where do my socks go after I put them in the dryer. It's recommended for anyone who wants their mind blown by awesome science or commuters who just wish they were out in space, new episodes, come out approximately pied vita by two times a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Even listen and subscribe to Daniel or hey, explain the universe on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, rain stuff. Lauren vocal bomb here. A wine lovers on the whole probably don't need any particular excuse to pair a glass with a rich cheese board. But a recent study in the journal food science shows what people have long suspected cheese improves, the taste of different types of wine. Researchers at the center for taste and feeding behavior in France asked thirty one French wine drinkers to taste for different wines. I on their own then with each of four different cheeses to see if and how the taste of the wine was changed by the cheese. The method used to evaluate the taste is called multi intake temporal dominance of sensations, which simply means that the drinkers were asked which taste sensations were dominant in length and intensity or in layman's terms, which ones did you enjoy? And why the winds were the same through all five tastings, a sweet white a dry white a full bodied red and a forty red in the first session, the tasters took three sips of each wine with no cheese. In the following sessions. They again took three sips, but in each session tasted a different cheese between sips all four cheeses ranging from creamy, two semi soft and stinky to semi hard too, hard or tasted with each wine. The study found that all of the wines tasted better after eating cheese less stringent unless sour and in the case of the fruity red, for example, that Ferdie flavor lasted longer the lead researcher Meribel Marini told the telegraph. We learned the duration of the perception of stringency of a certain line could be reduced after having cheese and the four evaluated cheeses had the same effect in short when having a plate of assorted cheeses, the wind will probably taste better. No matter which one they choose which is a relief to those of us who find creating pairings a clunky prospect at best the effect of the cheeses on the taste of the winds probably happened because the fat in cheese coats, your mouth, and reduces the dryness it might feel due to tenants from the wine a bit of tannin in wines and other. Things like tea or meant is a fun sensation. But too much can be puckering and unpleasant beyond making wine and cheese parties, a potentially less expensive endeavor. The researchers have a practical application for this study. To better understand how the taste of food can change when paired with other foods leading to new and possibly better meals as different foods are served together. Today's episode was written by Karen Kirkpatrick and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other flavorful, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey, brain stuff listeners today. I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you news stories of the trials 'em triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Daniel Whiteson Apple Leuven Physicist France Walt Disney Meribel Marini Casten Researcher Karen Kirkpatrick Vietnam Jonathan Strickland Tyler
Are E-Cigarette Liquids Safe?

BrainStuff

06:00 min | 2 years ago

Are E-Cigarette Liquids Safe?

"Hey, brainstorm listeners today I wanted to tell you about the new podcast the brink in which hosts aerial Casten. Donovan Strickland shared the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, tune into learn how Walt Disney bet his company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon, and how a refugee from Vietnam turned a door to door business into a chili sauce empire every week. The brink will bring you new stories of the trials and triumphs of people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams because sometimes things just don't go your way. But what really matters are the choices you make when the odds are against you. You can listen and subscribe to the brink on apple podcasts, I heart radio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to bring stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain, Steph Lauryn Boko bomb here, even if you're not tobacco user, you're probably familiar with e cigarettes from their aggressive marketing campaigns and popularity with former smokers there, the electronic battery powered devices that heat a fluid aka liquid or vape juice to create an aerosol that's inhaled in place of the smoke that conventional cigarettes produced by burning tobacco leaves these fluids can contain any number of compounds to create the puffs of aerosol their flavors and their effects, including nicotine, the active ingredient in tobacco east. Cigarettes are rising in popularity with ten point eight million adult users in the US as of two thousand eighteen part of the attraction may be that they're perceived as being less hazards to the health then conventional smoking since users don't receive the cancer causing tar found in conventional cigarettes and two that the allure of the sweet tasting flavorings available. For addition to the liquid and people such as US food and Drug administration Commissioner, Dr Scott Gottlieb, where he it may be all too. Appealing to youthful users. But that pleasant taste may have a downside. Researchers say in a study published in October of two thousand eighteen in the journal nicotine and tobacco research. Scientists from Duke and Yale universities found that chemical flavorings for vanilla cherry citrus. Cinnamon interacted with solvents such as propylene glycol and glacier, all in the illiquid forming new compounds called avatars, which can trigger irritation and inflammation when inhaled according to the Duke medicine press release the interaction occurs. Even before the liquid is heated. We spoke with Hannah Arendt repel a post doctoral associate at the yield tobacco center of regulatory science. And a co author of the study he said, we simply don't know what long-term effects these compounds and many other compounds in east cigarette liquid have on the Airways, many of the additives to liquids have G R A S status, which means generally regarded as safe, but that's based on ingestion and on d'ormal or skin exposure. There isn't much knowledge about what these compounds. Might do in the Airways and lungs, and that's true for all vapors young and old earth. Rappel added that scientists already know that further reactions take place during the heating step of vaping. All of this means that the initial list of ingredients for illiquid, quote is likely different from the final illiquid composition, which in turn is different. From what the user is exposed to in the generated aerosol, how that might affect vapors bodies isn't yet clear, but the researchers say that the irritant compounds will persist in the body for some time after a user vapes. Overtime that mild irritation could trigger the immune system and create an inflammatory response in your body. Which isn't a good thing for anyone. But especially for users with conditions like asthma and repel notes that the researchers have other concerns as well. He said if this reaction can take place that creates a more irritating compound or possibly more toxic. What other reactions can take place that might cause increased risk for users. We simply don't know I would add that term effects of aping on the air. As and the whole body are generally unknown, given how young these devices are independent of the final composition of illiquid. Abut the fact that these more irritating compounds form is certainly not reassuring in that regard. We also spoke by Email with Robert strongin, a professor of organic chemistry at Portland state university. Who was not connected with the Duke Yale study, he said that just as users aren't aware of these new chemicals being created an illiquid scientists similarly don't know much about the effect of those chemicals on the body quote. We know very little or nothing about the flavoring additives or even much about the solvents as far as their inhalation. Toxicity especially as chronically used in e cigarettes, a chemical safer ingestion are not necessarily safe for inhalation inhaled, organic solvents and flavorings bypass processing by these stomach and liver. Lung tissue is different. Just because we can eat flavor molecules doesn't mean at all that it's okay to inhale them. A repel says that more research is needed. On the chemical changes in illiquid 's and what health effects they may have a which will be a challenge CENA's how there are an estimated seven thousand flavors or more on the market right now. And that market is growing. Today's episode was written by Patrick j tiger and produced by Tyler claim for more on this and lots of other health, topics. Visit our home planet has two forks dot com. Hither listeners mango here fundraise is the future of real estate investing and the model is transforming the industry. Thanks to software that cuts out costly middleman and old market inefficiencies fundraise delivers the kind of investing power, you usually only see giant institutions bring real estate's unique potential for long term growth in cash flow to individual investors like you and me getting started as simple and usually takes less than five minutes. It's the future of real estate investing. So ready to get started. Visit fundraise dot com slash genius. That's fundraise F U N D R. I S E dot com slash genius. And you'll get your first three months of fees. Waived again, that's fun, drives dot com slash genius.

Nicotine United States Walt Disney Donovan Strickland Apple Steph Lauryn Boko Hannah Arendt Duke Dr Scott Gottlieb Vietnam Duke Medicine Cinnamon Portland State University Robert Strongin Commissioner Drug Administration
"casten" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"casten" Discussed on KCRW

"Of course, you choose the theme you different stories on that theme today show where there's a will stories of people who cannot stop themselves and trying to make things happen. The way they think they should happen in this world. We have arrived at two of our program to life is one sided coin. So the entire premise of our show today is where there's a will which peace supposes that we all have a will. Now, we all have the ability to decide something and take action in the world. But it turns out that there are people who take with that premise. I'm one of them is one of our co workers here at the radio show. David Casten Bom. Presents this minority report. Let me say up front I realized the ridiculous late night college dorm room nature of what I'm about to say. But here it is. I do not see how free will can exist. By free will I mean when you're staring at the menu, and you pick the salad over the burger or any other choice, you make bigger small we marry whether you keep listening to me for another minute free will the idea that you really get to pick. I'm saying, you don't I don't see how free will can exist. I'm someone embarrassed to be saying this for a while. I couldn't even talk with my wife about it. It's been on my mind because I was wondering if I should talk about it on the show today. We'd be making the kids lunches for the next day. There'd be a gap in the conversation at opened my mouth. But I just couldn't do it. I don't know why I'm thinking about this. Now, I think the last time I did was in high school, but I just moved on. It seems inescapable though years ago. I went to.

David Casten Bom
"casten" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

07:00 min | 2 years ago

"casten" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Up in the air. But it looks like it'll get no better than what would you say fifty four forty six in the Senate looks that way. Eric joins us as well. And Eric is working with many candidates around the country. How does your company do watching it? You know, it was a it was a mixed night. It was a it was a good night for for Democrats as you said had a had a lot of wins had a few losses had a few that are still up in the air and the Iowa governor's race. We made a mistake earlier. We gave it to your candidate. Yeah. We were up most of the night, it it looks like the incumbent governor Reynolds is a head by a point. Fred Hubble conceited last night. It was neck and neck race for months really a toss up. Is there an easy way to explain because I think people are troubled by this why a concession speech would come with many thousands of votes still be cast. Well, you can canidu- analytics and sort of see what votes are out, and if they're in certain places that won't necessarily turn to your candidate. You can kind of get a sense of where it goes like Georgia's the opposite where you have Brian camp ahead, but Stacey Abrams knows there's tens of thousands of absentee and provisional ballots that are still out and as we've talked about on this show. There's still a there's a runoff for visit if nobody's over fifty and camps right at fifty point five. Right now while here in Illinois, we had a couple of upsets. But Pat, were you surprised that the thrashing the Democrats gave to the Republicans? Yeah. I was surprised particularly with Raskin Hooker, losing in the western suburbs. And we lost seven in the house actually Rodney Davis is race. Downstate congressional race was a lot closer than I thought it would be I've let to learn underwear thing was interesting. It's a big story. I mean, she she really came shocked the world on that one. I mean that was not a race against Holkar than anyone saw common. She she was a dynamic candidate, the DOT that President Obama was at everyone said that she was one of the best speakers there, and she pulled it off in the suburbs. And that that district is a tough district for democrat to win. I think it's a much Trump by four six forty a tribute to Holker in not getting done. I think they were asleep at the switch, and I think too. Woke up a little too late in and Trump killed us out there. As I bet he didn't help in the Roskam situation dressed straight line from here. Two hundred miles west of here. That's the area that Trump absolutely killed Roskam and hawker Casten Roskam was particularly ugly. And but it was just saying afterwards. Several. Pop around all night watching the coverage because that's a kind of wild. And. Mid more than one occasion talking to people at the cast in party. They brought up the fact that Roskam didn't come to the district and cask cast. And will I talked about that on air and off the air? Are the Republicans in the house going to get the message or the Democrats in the Senate going to get the message that you gotta do town halls. You gotta come back and talk to the people. Yeah, I'm sure they didn't index in Peter roskam's one of the best people in that setting that I know that's that's in congress. I know I heard people say that they were casting supporters, and he had some very very strong support from certain groups. I still think though, the bigger picture was that people in that district cannot stand the president. The attorney general's race. I think we all thought would be fairly close. It wasn't. What's your take on that? I'm really proud of proud of worked for him. I think it'll be a terrific Turney generally ended up getting I think almost as many if not more votes than than brisker got which was a huge blow out. So. You know, I think it was just a testament to him being a good candidate. But also the year, and you know, when you have the top of the ticket the performed so badly it's really hard for these down ballot races to get competitive. I think herald did what she could. But I think she was she was had the wind interface, and she was up against a superior candidate in my opinion. And I think Kwami will be terrific attorney general now you flew around the state with Erica herald couple of days ago, Monday. What was the buzzer? Getting the buzz was we were getting polls, which are always wrong that had it tight and the Chad big gains among of, but she got creamed in the burbs, and you need to get certain numbers up there. You're not gonna win where polls not right because all these other people voted that don't typically vote. I think it came out last night. And I think this is I thought about this. I'm sure you guys said, it was an absolute sort of statement, and it came from a couple of different reliable sources, and they said Trump voters do not talk to pollsters. And if they do talk to pollsters they lie and that can screw up the math. I think the I mean we've been talking about this for several cycles. And I think every cycle it gets worse. I think the the polling paradigm is is terribly broken. I don't have a solution for it. I'm not smart enough to figure out what replaces it. But what happens in these cycles is we complain. And we say we'll that happens people lie of racial politics in Florida and Georgia tickling, Florida more. So than in Georgia. It looked like Gillam was gonna win comfortably. At least by the polling. The Abrahams won all the polling said it was a dead heat, basically is a dead heat. But polling broken and the way we do Survey Research in politics is has got to be revamped or or stop. Using or stop using. But what happens is, you know, everyone says it's the end of these cycles, then you get busy again in the next cycle. And no one has a better solution. So you fall back on it. Again, everyone starts playing the poll game again, what about rock, paper scissors? I think so. But did you see on meet the press Sunday, the democratic pollster African American guys pretty good? Very good. He belcher. Yeah. He goes don't listen to pollsters. We have no idea. What's going to happen? The ones that are honest with you. I mean, I'll tell you. There are a couple of races were we was what we were doing a lot of tracking. And they were like I'm going to report these numbers, but I don't believe him because I think we got a weird cell today. Because the math says, they know it's so hard to get look I I know this is boring technical stuff for some of your listeners. But in the seventies when the Gallup people were saying, we get seven out of ten people. We call complete a survey. What happens when it gets to five out of ten will it still be reliable? We're below one out of a hundred right now New York Times did that fascinating project where they're doing polling, and you can see in real time. How many phone calls they had to make? Just to reach people. There's only so much extrapolation you can do before the Mark of air takes up too much Spanish, and again, the fundamental fundamental reliance on polling is the people you're talking to are Representative of the people you're not talking to. That's why I've always been a rock, paper, scissors propriety. Our they're telling the truth. I was on the phone one day and has answered questions Julie's like what are you talking about giving all these liberal answers? If I'm talking to a poster. Hey. I'm a liberal Democrat. But i'm. The governor's race and more in Illinois and the national stuff with Eric Edelstein. At Pat Brady at a moment. The MVP is well, I seven twenty to see what's coming up still some races to be decided from the election yesterday. We'll have those for you at seven thirty plus an update on some other totals. Well, coming up from the WGN radio newsroom to better. Most of the roads. Twenty-six inbound.

Democrats Trump Eric Edelstein Peter roskam Illinois Georgia Senate Pat Brady hawker Casten Roskam Republicans Roskam attorney governor Reynolds Fred Hubble Iowa WGN Raskin Hooker President Obama
"casten" Discussed on Just Cases

Just Cases

10:04 min | 3 years ago

"casten" Discussed on Just Cases

"Welcome i'm melissa casten and this is just guy says oh no no fees we've heard scandal after scandal match corporations because the financial true crime sporting dot fuse some of the catastrophic consequences the idea and they don't from the gmc the banking world commission is stralia is highlighting how little has changed in some of our largest financial institutions and today we talking about the people at the helm of major corporations the company directors and we're gonna re want to know the banking scandals of over a hundred years ago and how it's got us to where we are tonight almost they've corrupted she's.

melissa casten hundred years
"casten" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

04:47 min | 3 years ago

"casten" Discussed on KSRO

"S r oh all right eight is a time for cannabis with nick casten and this monday we had he had a couple of guests but they had to back out because they had other things going on and last week was a fourth of july week everyone everyone wanted to extend that vacation by an extra days so next week we'll be talking with the folks from flow kana that are expanding their i yep so they're one of the one of the larger vertically integrated operators cannabis operators in the state up in mendocino county and they just completed around of financing to expand that operation so we're talking with them and then the week after that we'll have the folks from the california cameras tourism association and talk about a lot of the movement in in that world both were supposed to be in today and everyone got really excited on fourth of july and apparently is still recovering okay so we do want to talk about the runner parks asset seizure situation that the pd broken has been the writing about we'll talk more about it with tracy correo attorney on justice gone wild but nick knows a little bit about this too before we get into that what were you talking about with the legislature before we went on here you say talking about saved my ass well they're they're in a very nice summer recess right now but there's some meetings going on next week or something yes so when we're in recess like this the everyone goes back to their home districts and does town halls and meetings and hearings with it makes it a little bit more accessible to constituents so several those i think having around fire relief issues locally and then i know number of folks are really keeping an eye on the fires down in santa barbara and khalida in san diego as as they seem to repeat repeating many of the things that we've all been recovering from up here since october and unfortunately what i was saying i believe was the fact that july is very slow month for government because everyone's on vacation from the state legislature this month and then next month everyone's on vacation usually from the local jurisdictions the headline in the pd the other day julie johnson wrote the article the headline was ex rohnert park sergeant under investigation he earned a reputation with his highway one oh one stops now what really makes this bizarre to me is that he's a rohnert park a cop and he was driving up to county line mendocino and such and and stopping people and taking their weed in their money and yep this i mean this what's doing he's in rohnert park what's he doing up in mendocino yeah i think i mean when you look at this story and you look at the dollar amounts that run perk was taking in to fund their operations off of people that were not necessarily ever even convicted of any crimes one point two million dollars for the runner perks operational budget in two thousand seventeen which means that much more was seized which they point out in the article it's really one of the most egregious example of something that is unfortunately not uncommon throughout the country that's why you see the aclu and other organizations like that really focused in on this asset for for forfeiture issue because it's you know there's no due process there's no there's there's nothing to happen when people just lose their their property in their money regardless of whether or not they're actually committee trim lacked and what what enables them do these joint agency agreements where rohnert park and a bunch of other agencies all joining together in order to enforce these types of things also ones around human trafficking and other areas where instead of managing resources by jurisdiction resources by issue broadly seen as a good way to do this do law enforcement except for when you have financial incentives like asset forfeiture which then means that you know you're back filling your department's budget which of course pays your salary overtime and all those increase a perverse incentive for the enforcement and e runner perk is not a cannabis friendly city they reinforce their band last last year they they seem to be very much be going against even their own voters will when it comes to cannabis and offering so sadly it's not a surprise to see this coming out of rohnert park but hopefully the sunlight on it and.

cannabis nick casten two million dollars
ATF agent shot in the face was part of special force combating illegal guns

02:19 min | 3 years ago

ATF agent shot in the face was part of special force combating illegal guns

"December of two thousand correspondent christine romans takes a deeper look at the numbers here's what the job growth looks like one hundred sixty four thousand net new jobs it's a little light of what communists have been forecasting but still a bounce back from from march and february and march and april those numbers together are still showing you strength in the labor market then many employees say employers that is as difficult to find qualified workers but they have yet to signify a bump up in pay in most industries average hourly earnings rose two point six percent for a year ago authorities here in chicago are asking the public for help in finding a person who shot a federal agent during a dawn attack they describe as an ambush the atf agent was shot in the face but is expected to make a full recovery he was part of a newly created task course designed to slow the flow of illegal guns in the city police say he was working with chicago officers near forty fourth and hermitage on the south side what a man row ran out of a building and fired at the the f fbi us marshal service and community activists andrew homes have put together a reward of more than sixty thousand dollars for information that leads to an arrest authorities say about fifteen kindergarteners became ill after a shed aquarium visit and have had similar symptoms as more than one hundred high school students who attended a prominent the aquarium the archdiocese if chicago spokeswoman and mozelle says fifty two students from saint clement school visited the aquarium april seventeenth and says that they did not eat their ten days later more than one hundred students from andrew high school in tinley park became ill after the april twentyseventh prom there the health officials say it hasn't been determined just what sickened the students shedd aquarium officials say chicago health officials informed the facility that there were no outstanding violations of any kind in its katie restaurant facilities taping connected to chicago with bill cameron for sunday night at seven republican congressman peter roskam's democratic challenger sean casten came out for a tax hike everybody's for better roads bridges mass transit and water systems but almost no one who is or wants to be a congressman wants to raise the gas tax to pay for it sean casten is the.

Christine Romans Chicago Saint Clement School Andrew High School Tinley Park Bill Cameron Peter Roskam Sean Casten Congressman ATF FBI Mozelle Sixty Thousand Dollars Six Percent Ten Days
"casten" Discussed on Dudes Doing Business

Dudes Doing Business

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"casten" Discussed on Dudes Doing Business

"Do we are like within a week or i guess uh a month period we had dudes doing dairy scott cusack and then draft analyzer founder ted casten there you go all teddy teddy's guess my favorite episodes we had to and row that are really liked episode twelve which is titled mixing business with sports zach anderson oh yeah resident of ticket city dot com zack his tie i don't i thought was episodes wealth that was that had so that's crazy that without good at us on it was great him around a bunch too yeah i see him at the dell matchplay every year he gave a shout out at the end to any listener who want a job to just cinemas email address so if you're looking for work go back and listen to that uh number of third didn't you send your resume he told me that i did not a number thirteen was howard brothers cmo rick whitten breaker and i thought this was one of the best ones we did rick is a good dude are foam on twitter he is team fullback just for the record held brothers is a dope company were working with them on man outfitters other based here in austin and they make the gaucho scher gathered a really cool stuff and rick header a great conversation the thing i like about episodes twelve and thirteen is it was still when we were first getting started so these guys aren't very good at at hosting the show and it's funny yes i it gives me extreme anxiety to go back and listen to the old episodes because i not that i'm a spectacular podcast her now but i've improved substantially from dean absolutely horrible initially and anytime of gone back and listen to two super old episodes cringe the entire time let's get you know would be an exercise take like mushrooms or lsd and go back and listen to your old podcasts house miserable marty enough in my own had i don't need to be inside my head two years ago to rally leaking get better dave years muster runout zoff you run towards the resistance is what i hear mall dave i think there's only one question that you need to ask everybody there's only one would in this.

scott cusack founder rick austin marty ted casten zach anderson dell rick whitten dean lsd dave two years
"casten" Discussed on The Fifth Column

The Fifth Column

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"casten" Discussed on The Fifth Column

"Damning well that's interesting good and the fact that you have a list that includes everyone is often part of the problem this is the last one i'll make on this i didn't expect to sit on this for so long but i was having an exchange with someone who listens to the lot casten who who follows some of this stuff i do in media apparently which is which is kind of weird that that's a thing at all um but he uh he had listened to a conversation i was having with a josh steps like some weeks back and we were talking about racial profiling other specifically with respect to terrorism and whether or not there ought to be like racial profiling with respect to keep all of the islamic faith whether that's ever appropriate and i don't know i don't remember what i said in that particular conversation who's really good but in i'm sure it was bright and intelligence but but in the moment now as i think about it i mean the the case he was making was essentially a counter case to the one i i apparently mate he suggesting that will no i mean look if these people are more likely to do it then the police have to focus their investigative power on on this i mean look the statistics bear that out and in the bottom line is that dragnets who drag netting is not an investigation this looks like an investigation this looks like police work it looks like solving crimes it looks like keeping people safe it may in fact have the opposite effect and it may in fact have the opposite effect in many ways but there are one of their two prominent ways that it might have the opposite effect one is it squanders resources you end up catching people in the dragnet.

josh