20 Episode results for "Casimir"

Vitamines and Vitamins

A Moment of Science

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Vitamines and Vitamins

"In nineteen twelve a Polish biochemist Casimir funk published an article all about food substances that could prevent diseases such as Berry Berry and scurvy. FUNK's analysis showed that these disease preventing food substances might might be members of a family of chemicals called AAH means these substances were vital for a healthy diet so funk called them vital AAH means or vitamins vitamins spelled like vitamins but with an e at the end that was nineteen twelve by one thousand nine sixteen there was evidence that these disease preventing running food substances might not actually be what chemists call means the name vitamin was thrown out in favor of the names fat-soluble Hay hey and water soluble be only those two types were known at the time in one thousand nine hundred twenty another chemist wrote that the names fat soluble able a and water soluble B were unwieldy he suggested dropping the e from the old word vitamin and calling the substances ince's vitamins whatever the substances might turn out to be the name vitamin would

Casimir funk Berry Berry ince Hay
Deported to a country that's not home

PRI's The World

46:02 min | 1 year ago

Deported to a country that's not home

"For the world's podcast and the following message. Come from legalzoom running a small business is a lot of work. It takes time and money, and you on all the time and money you have to go towards growing your business. But what happens when legal hurdles pop up along. The way legalzoom is there to help get advice for running your business from vetted independent attorneys and tax professionals available in all fifty states. The best part is you won't get charged by the hour since legalzoom is in a law firm checkout legalzoom's business legal plan at legalzoom dot com now and get special savings when you enter the word world at checkout. Legalzoom where life meets legal legalzoom dot com. To a place that is not home today on the world. I'm Marco werman Klaudia Rojo sent back to Argentina recently after nineteen years living in the US, his family stayed here when he was deported right now to be honest. I feel like a tourist in Argentina because my heart is still in the US with my family. It's like I haven't quite landed in Argentina yet. We'll get an update on cloudy a story. Just one of thousands of people caught up in President Trump's immigration crackdown and has Trump signals. He wants homeland security to get even tougher on immigrants. What's that mean? For a department created to focus on counter-terrorism. We've got a lot of issues that are not being addressed by the department because of its focus on unlawful immigration. Those stores are more today here on the world. I'm Marco werman. It's the world. Good to have you here today. President Trump has made it clear he wants a tougher approach to immigration, and he's making big changes at the department of homeland security to get there. We'll hear more on that in a moment. Let's remember that at the heart of each and every immigration policy story is a person someone like cloudy row. We introduced you to last month on the show cloudy is an immigration activist and the protagonist of the new documentary. The infiltrators we came out of the shadows and stopped a few deportations. The new plan get into the Broward detention center and give people out. The film is about immigrant activists who get themselves thrown into Florida's Broward detention center on purpose in order to organize other detainees. It shows how row and others were able to win their own release. But just days before the film's March premier in Miami row houses taken into custody again. And although he has no criminal record and spent nineteen years living in the US last week. He was deported to Argentina. We reached him today in Buenos Aires what container memento machines over more. She Foita on three in. She ended up memorial man right now to be honest. I feel like a tourist in Argentina because I I don't feel like a citizen here because my heart is still in the US with my family, and I was used to living there. And that's where my life is. So it's like I haven't quite landed in Argentina yet. Why do you think you were deported cloudy? Oh, what what? Do you think about what's happened to you? Why don't you send a one? But relationship I lived in the US for eight years the work permits and permission to live there legally. Si, yo they necessarily, and it was only after the movie the infiltrators was released that I ran into trouble. So do you think you were deported because you shared your story through that movie? I mean, do do you think that maybe the deportation is a form of reprisal mcdermot vegetable in the moment on tomorrow? And I have no doubt and left it only that scenario because there's never been any other explanation. Given to me it is because I told my story in the infiltrators that this is happening, and you're pursuing now a lawsuit to try and return to the United States is that right? Dondo and how each of those were always, but right now through my lawyers. I am putting in a request for a visa so that I may be allowed to return to the US. I've never been given an explanation. Why that shouldn't be the case? In fact, when I was arrested my had already, presented visa requests. So the government the US government already has it and cloudy, given your suspicions that you were deported because you shared your story in the movie, how hopeful are you that you'll be successful in your lawsuit? What? Just wanna fit on the beach. I am hopeful that this request will go through. But given the way that I was deported. I have many reasons not to be hopeful as well. Are you in touch with your family here in the US, and how are they dealing with us? Doug, the one and shows us your I'm in contact with my family every day. They're not doing. Well. It's not a good time for them. Imagine what they're going through not having the the head of the family there with them do you or do they regret your appearance in the infiltrators? Ed, that's almost unit on KOMO human. Do we don't anymore? My family always had mixed feelings. I had mixed feelings about this. But I always had the feeling that I was participating in something that was good to do because I was disappointing in a project that was denouncing the irregularities by which a lot of people were getting deported under the Obama administration. So I thought it was a good thing. I didn't think that it would lead to this. Of course, things have gotten tougher under President Trump, and we hear potentially bigger changes ahead to US immigration policy from the US government. Are you worried? How tougher rules will impact you and your family it up. What did you got the shit? Don't you get in a this this zero tolerance policy, which is what President Trump says he wants it doesn't just have the potential to impact family. It has the potential to impact many families, and and even legal residents of the United. States. Thank you very much Muchas grass. Yes. No, put it did the euro. And the thank you for your time. And God bless you. We reach out to ice for comment on Claudio row houses deportation. A spokesperson wrote is to say ice cannot comment on the case. The word purge has chilling political connotation, so I was struck to see both in New York Times and the Washington Post use that word purge to describe what's going on right now in the department of homeland security top officials, including secretary Pearson. Nielsen are losing their jobs the received wisdom in Washington is that they were not being tough enough. So what's going on? Juliette? Cayenne was an assistant secretary at the department of homeland security under President Obama. How'd you see the shakeup at DHS Julian? Well, it is shake up, and it is real you can call it a purge. You can call it, and you know, an eye cleansing. But what we do know is on the other end of this secretary Nielsen who was the name and face of the cruelest immigration policy. In recent US history. The family separation policy was not harsh enough for the president of the United States and the replacement team. Whether it's at the secret service, FEMA customs and border protection. Or in the secretary's office will be those who are more focused on ideological purity rather than operational success. And what I mean by that is going to be people who talk the talk of Trump's tough immigration line. And who do not care about any of the normal metrics that would determine whether a policy is useful helpful or even moral. It's been widely reported that several agencies within the ditch us felt the need to send out a memo last week. You pros reported on stuff that they need to follow the law and could be personally liable if they broke it by doing what Trump apparently said to some of them last week, the basically not let migrants in and if judges give them trouble about to say, sorry judge. We don't have the room do. Do you seriously think it would happen that Trump could push DHS staff to cross that line? No, look, it is never good. When the president of the United States says defy courts. And and do what I need you to do based on. You know, I, and I'm honest with you about this. I mean, just based on sheer cruelty it is not like the family separation policy was successful unlawful family crossings have gone up since we started separating family. So this is a bad thing to have the president doing it is it is consistent with the presence autocrat tendencies it challenges our constitutional norms. But why why do I think that he will not be listened to? And why do I think that that leads to his frustration? And the reason why is because the department of homeland security was often reminded when I was in the department as a political appointee. There are two hundred fifty thousand of them in only one hundred of us. The math is that these agents and agencies needs to do what is unlawful because they will protect themselves. What what would happen to agents and staff did just who do cross that line? They would be they would be personally liable. In other words, if if a CB agent violated the law and knowingly violated the law, so it'd be worse than negligently violent. And if you knowingly violated law, you're not gonna get any protections because the president said to you in passing break the law, and what's your defense are the president said in passing to break the law. You know? You know prosecutor is going to say and you believed him, right? This isn't to say there aren't agents that seem to love the president or seem to love the whole, you know, close the borders thing, but I actually think the closing the borders drama that we went through over the last week where the president says, I'm gonna close the borders. Everyone has to jump because the president said it, but then you saw an entire apparatus role. It's is, you know, get the Senate Republicans to tell Trump to back off and he backs off again, a sign of weakness, not a sign of strength. So I think that the agents note, the agents know that this administration to will end, and they will not make themselves personally liable for the whims of a president who will not as they've seen who will not defend you if in fact, you are arrested what it looks like right now. Juliette is that Trump seems to be pushing DHS to focus entirely on the border not getting attention that could be. Be real security problems for the US. Yeah. That's such a great question. I think so important. So the president has done what the department had been trying to get away from for almost a decade. So though department is formed as counterterrorism department in two thousand two in two thousand five the department itself had a major course correction after the tragedy of Hurricane Katrina when we realize those of us in the field realized that federal apparatus to focused on stopping nineteen terrorists from getting on four airplanes. Again, a noble effort could not save an American city from drowning. And so we pivoted and we people like me who happ who were counterterrorism experts began to dry describe ourselves as homeland security experts. We we began to understand that and take what's called an all hazards approach. Trump has reversed that course, Perec Shen and he looks at homeland security. Through solely through the end of unlawful migration, which is such a limited end. So meanwhile, you've got climate change within ministration denies you've got a you've got a measles outbreak. As if it's eighteen sixty and you've got leadership in the White House, including the president somewhat skeptical of vaccination, you have cyber attacks and cyber vulnerabilities which have not been addressed in time for twenty twenty and you still have terrorism, but a different kind of terrorism, and including and especially right wing terrorism that we're seeing rear its head which is not being condemned by the president himself. So we've got a lot of issues that are not that are not being addressed by the department because of it's focused on unlawful immigration, but are actually in some ways being made worse because of the president's sort of lack of fact-based policy making when it comes to the climate to vaccinations to right, wind tear. Resum and to the Russians attempts to undermine us in our elections. A pretty hopefully list say Juliette Kayem assistant secretary of the department of homeland security under President Obama. Thank you. Thank you, so much Marco, disarray and big changes at the department of homeland security people heads of families deported in the Trump era, one symbol captures all of that a wall. The powerful symbolism of a structure that's meant to divide to keep people apart. People get it have gotten it since Trump. I hit the campaign trail and talked about build a wall little surprise at the wall would eventually lead to a song by three Latin rock bands that let's just say keep it pretty real. This is from the new album by Grupo Fantasma, featuring their friends from LA ozo- motley. And for Miami logos. Puerto wanna song called the wall. Said Senate too loud. If you. Punching the crab that ninety fifth. Your life. Liberty and Justice for complicity when it gets to everybody, ma'am. Please come and kidding me. Oh history, though. Even if to see that can of worms big and hosing legacy walls to fall expose stretcher potus. Bell tip best. Switch recipe. The. New music from group of phantasm and company the wall track from their new album American music, volume seven, not only title ironic Grupo Fantasma recorded at a studio called sonic ranch in the border town of toward Neo Texas, not long after the recording session rap tore Neo leapt into the news because it's the site of the infamous detention center where kids were kept at the getting separated from their parents. Nobody is a legal. Go the lyrics from group of fun Tasman, friends, you're to the world. I'm Marco werman. It's the world yesterday. We told you on the show about online regulations, they're considering in the UK regulations that would crack down on hate speech terrorist propaganda disinformation other harmful content. It's all packed into a white paper released by the UK government. Jeremy Wright is a secretary stay for digital culture, media and sport and one of the government officials who put together the proposal to regulate online content. He told us the U K is just the latest place to try and tighten controls on social media. Many many of the countries are experiencing exactly the same kinds of challenges. And everyone is looking for a way in which we can balance the need to keep a vibrant thriving open into that on the one hand with on the other hand keeping us citizens safe from serious online homes. That's something we're all struggling with. And so finding a way through that is something we're all interested to do. Other countries Australia. Most recently Germany before Austrailia have passed legislation on harmful online content. I I know some people have argued that the country by country approach when it comes to regulating. These tech companies is fracturing the internet. It will lead to a whole bunch of different rule sets that don't necessarily conform with each other. Do you agree with that will end Stein the concern, and it's perfectly true that the best way of doing? This would be full the whole world to do it at once in exactly the same way. But I think that will take a very long time to happen. And we have to make a choice. Do we either wait for everyone to agree before we act to tool? Do we set out what we believe is the appropriate way to deal with these homes and hope very much as I do that other countries will look at the way in which we propose to do this and may be able to find something in that approach that they think will work for them to it sounds mister secretary like you see the importance of unity in regulating social media across the globe. Is that the long term goal in? If that. It is why not start now. Well, we all starting now in the sense that what we are doing is setting out a path that as I say, I think others may wish to follow to. But my primary responsibility is to keep safe the citizens of the United Kingdom. That's what I'm obligated to do. And it seems to me necessary to act with gency to make sure that we can do that one of the thing I'll say with with very keen to make sure that we've taken on board views from those who are active in this space. You are concerned about these issues and have something to add to the conversation. Which is why we're consulting now. And we want to make sure that we, hey, what people have to say before we take the next step, right? It's a three month a public comment period. Though what happens after the three month period because there's a chaotic state of the British government prime minister maze. Potential resignation. Do you think these proposals? Stand chance of becoming law, but I wouldn't say, of course, there's a chaotic state in the UK government. We are of course, dealing with. Awesome unprecedentedly difficult issues in leaving the European Union, but government has to do more than just leaving the European Union. And I think what I picked up yesterday from the announcement of these proposals was a good deal of support across the political spectrum. So what we're going to do is we're going to go on and develop these proposals move towards legislation which will need to put many of these elements into practice. And I look forward to having broadly by support for that. Jeremy Wright, one of the UK government officials pushing for regulating harmful social media content. They put out a white paper yesterday outlining their proposals secretary, right? Thank you for being with us. Thank you a woman who sells wedding dresses, but she does not respect the institution of marriage. Thanks. It's backwards. It's a contradiction. But that's what this remarkable next story is about in Turkey, the coastal city of ease. Mayor is the heart of the country's bridal gown industry reporter Duri scarring introduces us to address seller who turned bridal gowns into a conversation starter about. Violence against women on the first floor of Goku wedding, dress thirty year old Dhillon Engen is selling a dream HARA polka-dot visible that this is the Princess model a sequined fitted bodice paired with a wide puffy skirt. Then there's the Helen style. More of a classic line. And the sleek shimmery Bollock Baluch like a fish on weekends. This neighborhood is full of brides and their families popping in store after store to find the perfect gown, but Engen doesn't actually like wedding dresses. They remind her of old gender roles. She says the idea that getting married having kids is a woman's only purpose in life. If you should meet him. AM like despite her own views Angan is a good saleswoman. Nejra on the floor above the showroom and gin helps out with the detailing measuring and fitting dresses and getting started doing this work to pay the bills after she finished film school in two thousand sixteen and it inspired her to make short documentary using the promise of a wedding dress as a metaphor. Enough is enough. Angan says it starts with the song effet send benefit month five years ago. She says she heard news headline on the radio as she sat sewing tiny beats on a dress. Rob you're done become engine. Aita bill. Do it was about a woman who was killed by her husband job Barragan. Then again heard this song by Bergen a popular. Turkish arabesque singer whose husband threw acid on her face and blinded her in one eye. He later shot and killed her. Shall be Nick dance in Ben nap hindia sold. Yeah. Madala need cure after listening to the song. I ask myself. What am I doing here? I'm so in the hopes of this woman her husband, and how should I say it? I noticed the paradox. I'm so in woman's wedding dress, but it could become her burial shroud. In the film, the women who work in the shop put together a wedding dress. As they talk about their own relationships divorces and the pressure to marry Cinderella the high ATM Oshkosh a real deal. I think about the story of Cinderella. She looks for the level her life, just like the rights, but the truth becomes whistle after midnight. Just like in Cinderella human rights groups, say more than four hundred women are killed every year in Turkey in a phenomenon that mirrors just about every other country in the world. Most of the victims are killed by their intimate partners or close family members in Turkey. There's a term for these killings. Says and gins co producer cer- touched Cohen, Joe coupling deniability women murders because it's very usual thing in Turkey. So it's a it's a category. We just say women were Angan and Korean Jew made their film Princess ballgown with small grant, they want from cinematographers association. It's now winding its way through the Turkish film festival circuit where they hope to start a conversation about violence against women in Turkey, mold. Hugh, mold. Because momma gives you the for now Angan is still selling wedding dresses, despite her own feelings about them. You know, you to some of the key. Will don't a bake Lantin hiding society, the wedding dress is about hope it's the expectation of a happy ending once? She finds a way and get says she'll be back behind the camera. She already has three more scripts ready to go for the world. Darius Garin is mere Turkey. I'm Marco werman polish. General Casimir Polaski helped America win its independence from Britain. History. Books will tell you that now his bones. Tell a new story about the revolutionary war hero, the skeleton looks very female, scientists say Polaski was intersects born with male and female anatomy, that story still ahead here on the world. I'm Marco werman. And you're with the world we're co production of the BBC World Service PRI and w h year in Boston. There is no question Cubans love their baseball. Not just announcers and fans it's part of the national identity for years. There was a steady stream of Cuban players to the US major leagues until Fidel Castro shut down decades ago. These days some Cuban players take enormous risks to sneak into the US that would have changed. Thanks to a deal that major league baseball made with the Cuban baseball federation in December a deal that would've allowed Cuban players to sign with US teams in exchange. The teams would have paid the Cuban baseball federation of fee, tens of millions of dollars in some cases. But now the Trump administration has put a stop to the Cuban baseball deal Julio Ricardo Varela is a co host of the podcast in the thick. Why did the Trump administration stop this deal? What rationale did it give? I think it was the rationale that you're not supposed to be doing business with you know, can't there's an embargo don't business with the Cuban government wasn't there. This other deal that was negotiated back in December. And why was that deal negotiated in the first place that he'll start with Obama? You know when? Relations between Cuban the United States were starting to get loosened. I mean, the last time you talked about this Marco, we kinda say that it's the Trump administration might not even prove it. So essentially before this deal, the only way Cuban ballplayers could play major league baseball is that they literally had to escape the island some of them defected. So for example. Yes, he'll plea place for the Cincinnati Reds. But before he was playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers, his story of how he was smuggled out the money that was put into pace Mugler's how he got away. I mean in a way kinda reads like a human it. Well, in a way, it's human trafficking story. So I do think that there was a part of major league baseball. It says, you know, we don't wanna be the league that you know, the human trafficking. So when the Obama administration began to open relations with Cuba and be took advantage of it. They negotiated directly with Cuban baseball federation and they set right. If we're gonna take on these players, we will give you a fee just like. A transfer fee. But this is very common. I mean, if you look at Japan, you know, these transfer fees for some of the top Japanese stars were always given to the Japanese teams. So it was kinda like instead of giving money to a teen. You're giving it to a federation. But critics would argue that that baseball federation in Cuba is actually just an arm of the Cuban regime. So there could have been millions of dollars for Cuba's that all they wanted out of this deal. Yeah. And if you see like what national security adviser John Bolton. And Senator Marco Rubio. They basically said straight up you're just giving money to a repressive regime Bolton took it another step further saying if we give money to Cuba, you're also going to give money to then as Walea because Cuba is running Venezuela. So it got into this sort of geopolitical, you know, where we're at now in in Latin America between the right and the left mart reaction. Have you heard from players and teams on other side of the Florida Straits? So in the case of Yankee reliever arrives Chapman whose Cuban who left right? He's the closer for the Yankees a relief pitcher he was asked on Monday about this decision by the Trump administration, basically said he felt bad for the young ballplayers because he said they're not gonna have the opportunity to play in the United States and Chapman. Basically makes reference to the fact that the way we, you know, his crop his generation of Cuban players the way they got to the United States. He said it was tough to say. At least. And he just basically, you know, this might not be a definite just gotta wait. And see what happens does this mean, you think that Cuban players they're going to have to resort again getting smuggled into the US? Well, I I mean how else if they really wanna get here. I mean, how many what other options I mean, it's too early to tell. But have we just back to where we started? Do. You think baseball is Trump's way of reversing Obama's Cuba policy and slow-motion. Yeah. I think so I mean. The problem is it's baseball. Why isn't I mean, it's like you going after the American pastime? This is what America's all about Julio. Ricardo Varela the co host of the podcast in the thick. Thanks. Thanks, mark. The White House hosted the president of Egypt today. Abell el-sisi retired army general who came to power in twenty thirteen. The parliament is now open the door to constitutional reforms that would allow to be president until twenty thirty four. The United States has a long history with Egypt. But what does Donald Trump's embrace of Cici say about that relationship? Nancy, oh, kale's executive director of the therere institute for Middle East policy in Washington and see, you know, the extent of authoritarianism in Egypt. You were one of a few dozen people working for foreign funded NGOs in Egypt and was convicted and sentenced to prison in two thousand twelve what were you charged with? I was charged with operating in office without a license. Receiving funding from a foreign government without unlicensed, of course, like those two charges were not based on any evidence. In in December of twenty eighteen we the forty three of us who are convicted in the case in June twenty thirteen we all got quitted with a justification from for the verdict from court saying that receiving foreign funding for civil society work is not a crime. So you were acquitted, but I mean in the aftermath the do feel like you had to leave the countryman was at the next step. I left the country in the middle of two thousand and twelve and that was in the middle of the trial, which took a year and a half. And I was sentencing Cynthia for five years in prison, and since then I have been living in in the United States. And what does your exile toes about your concerns about the presidency? While the situation is that there is a repression of all sorts of freedom of assembly reasonable, sociation freedom of expression. And of course, one of the biggest targets are the civil society organization, particularly those who are working on human rights. The other thing is that since two thousand thirteen and the declaration of the war in terror. There are several repressive approaches in policies that have been practiced under the umbrella of the war in terror. Of course, there are many people who are apolitical has nothing to do with the as limits. They might be just satirist or actors or artists who are now imprisoned under charges of terrorism and threat to national security. What successive you this administration of Asti to do to be America's? Broker in Lisa global war on terror, the U S his always framed relationship between the United States in Egypt his strategic relationship based on the role that Egypt play in the region as well as its ability to crack down and contain in eliminate terrorism or Slavic extremists. But this is no exception period. It has always been the case with you. As politics store, the Middle East and towards Egypt that as long as whatever is happening internally is contained in it's not having a spillover effect, which is the politics of containment than they would be okay with continuation of relationship with Egypt. Evidently by having the one point three billion military aid every here as far as Trump together at the White House. Today and their relationship does seem somewhat unprecedented. We saw them first bonding over that glowing orb with the king of Saudi Arabia. How would you describe Trump and ceases relationship, and do you see that relationship as the defacto US policy toward Egypt right now? So I don't have high hopes that President Trump would raise the issue of human rights or the constitutional amendments or the freedom of expression with presidency because Trump himself has been befriending a lot of authoritarian leaders around the world, but his note so different from the previous president of the United States. Again, if you look at the relationship between Egypt under the United States over the past forty years, you would see that it has always been relationship that at continued without any disruption. The photo up at the Oval Office is a stamp of approval to own. What's been going on inside the country? Let's kill the executive director of the therere institute for Middle East policy. Speaking with us from Washington like very much, Nancy. Thank you. The Ron's president Hassan. Ruhani condemned. The United States on Iran state television today as Imroz Mahboob yet. Simple as you should understand that today more than ever the is popular and beloved among Iranians Ruhani said it goes on to call the United States, the leader of world terrorism. This comes after the Trump administration took the dramatic step of labeling the Iranian Revolutionary Guard corps or the I RJ see a terrorist organization. Jared blank is with the Carnegie Endowment for international peace. He led the implementation of the Iran nuclear deal under President Obama. What is unprecedented about this Jarrett labeling another country's military's a terrorist organization? It's very early unprecedented in the past the foreign terrorist organization designation has been used for non-state actors and not for state actors, but the IRA g see Iran. Other aspects of the running government are designated under dozens of other thirties, including terrorism the thirties. So. So that the administration is making a big deal about the exceptional nature of this step. It's kind of a piece with our policy toward Ron since the nineteen eighties. I mean, this announcement has come down a lot of people are talking about the I R G say what position does it occupy exactly in the Iranian military. Well, it it's a it's a part of their on military during the Iran Iraq war, which is really the formative political event. I think of the Islamic Republic it played a critical role in mobilising relatively untrained unequipped popular support to hold back Iraq, and it has expanded its role ever since plays a role in a domestic regime. Preservation plays a role in defending the borders. It plays a role in aggressively asserting Ronnie and interests in the region and abroad. And of course, it's also assumed a fairly large role in Iran's economy. I sometimes think that when when people say the I R G C, they're really kind of using shorthand. That in the United States. We might call the military industrial complex. Well, that's a really good point. Because it's not just about the military security, Iran. The one thing I found when I was in Iran a couple of years ago was that something you did not discuss with anyone was the business interests of the revolutionary guard. So why is that such toxic issue? Well, because it's extremely unpopular in Iran. And so the juicy has wanted I think to establish that position of power and hasn't wanted a lot of debate about it. I would also say that to the extent that there's a way to change the rule in the Iranian economy. It's gotta be long term at. It's certainly not what the Trump administration is doing. I think that we were starting to see and there's only a total evidence of this. But I think that we were starting to see under the implementation of the joint conference of plan of action with your own nuclear deal, the reducing its position in Iran's real economy selling off industrial assets and putting that money into real estate or or other things, and there's a reason for that. Which is that winner on is under very very severe. Sanctions. There's a huge benefit to having a partner or an owner that's able to work in the black market or the gray market. And the does that when Iran is under looser sanctions? But the irony is still sanctioned, which is what was going on under the nuclear deal. Now, you've got a reliablity if you're owned or partnered with the because if a European auto parts company wants to work with you, they can't. And so there's no longer the advantage of working in the black and gray market. And there's a huge disadvantage of being being partnered up with toxic entity a move like this labeling the terrorist organization. It's been debated for years. Why now? That's a great question. And I'm certainly not a plugged into the high levels of the Trump administration to be able to answer it it, you know, it's been debated. I think largely because as almost a sort of semiotics point, it makes sense, the is a terrorist organization, but on the other hand there risks there risks that Iran might rise to the bait which they have not done for previous provocations at Washington and lead to in school, Tori cycle. There's also a risk that just at some lower level. A commander might see this rhetorical back and forth and say, hey, we've got we've got a terrorist on the other side of battlefield. Whether that's in Iraq, Syria, and the Gulf or elsewhere and provoke a flare up that neither side was really intending. So I mean, do you see this as any kind of pressure on Rondo a designation like this? I do not think that it is meaningful pressure on Iran at all the see the government of Iraq on our sue substantially sanctioned already that I don't see there being any new pressure here. What are you going to be watching for next year? Well, again, I think that it's entirely possible that adjust ends here. Both sides have made their point. And we move on with a bad, but not the tier eating relationship. I think there's a big question about what this means from Washington is this an indication that the hardliners in the Trump administration have won the debate. And they're going to keep reading until they create a crisis alternatively is an indication that they've lost the debate. And this was just sort of a not particularly substantive sop that was thrown to them. Or finally, this is an administration that has real problems with internal policy coordination is this just a decision in a vacuum. That doesn't tell us anything really about what comes next with her on. Joint blank is senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for international peace. He was the State Department's lead coordinator for implementing the Iran nuclear deal, President Obama Jarrett. Thanks for your time. Thank you two things. You should know about revolutionary war hero Casimir Pulaski. He's the father of the American cavalry. And he was intersects born with both male and female, chromosomes and anatomy that aspect of his identity wasn't known during his lifetime in the seventeen hundreds but several years ago Casimir Polaski skeletal remains were exhumed in Savannah, Georgia when the monument they were in was in disrepair that gave scientists chance to do a full forensic workup. And that's where Virginia Hutton esta. Brooke comes into the picture, she's an anthropology professor at Georgia Southern university who worked on the Polaski case. And she says when they XM the skeleton they discovered something surprising. What was discovered then was that the skeleton looks very female for all of the point. It's that we use frenziedly to look at sex all of those points skewed in the very female direction. There some geometry of a female Hollis that basically widens the birth canal area a bit sort of ways these things are expressed all very female looking these female traits. Tell us then about general Casimir Polaski what they tell us is that there is some level of female pattern developments happening in Polaski in this person that we have his Mwale records from end he's baptized as Casimir he'd baptize the son of parents and this linguistic difference in social sciences between sex and gender actually comes to pretty good use here, his gender was absolutely macula throughout his life. There's no question of what his kind of soc. Sial role was from birth on. And because he was baptized as a son there's early portrait's of him that clearly show facial hair and know, even some little like hair milk boldness thinning going on. There's definitely features that show some presence of Andhra jen's happening in his body. So this is where we get the intersex idea. So what would all of this have meant back in the seventeen hundreds as an anthropologist? You have any sense of how someone who was intersex perhaps in the seventy numbers would have been viewed by I don't know their family their colleagues in maybe more importantly for customer Polaski his troops under his command. We've tried to look a lot in written records about him in letters disea-. There's sort of anything about that that we can really see manifest in any of his relationships willing. We do know about Plaski was that he was never married. There's discussions of him being. A little removed from people to possibly a little bit aloof. But again, sort of grain of salt with this that he really didn't speak English very much coming here. So that's, but he was obviously very amiable chatty. Especially to people he could speak French with and things. So what you find compelling about this discovery? So from an anthropological perspective, what's really important about. This is that we really don't know how intersex conditions of fact, skeletal development, that means that we just don't know what intersex looks like if there are any kind of diagnostic telltale signs that we should be maybe looking for something that I did not really realize going into this was how common intersex actually is just in the population. It's one in fifteen hundred births and possibly as common as one in a hundred if you cast. Slightly wider net around. What is intersex condition versus not? So this is actually relatively common thing that we've not included these stories really in our interpretations of the past which makes having the skeletal remains of individual that we know a lot about his life so unique. And then there's the whole Polaski side of this. That makes the story interesting to that interesting because I read this news, and I was fascinated by over the weekend. But I kind of came to the end of the story, and it was like, well, so what if Polaski had a pelvic bone that was more female, what does that actually do to our understanding of a revolutionary war hero or of the time? He lived in. This doesn't really change. What Polaski did or, you know, his legacy? What this does change is that intersex people who've been largely erased from any kind of history. This is the presence of at least one that we know about. So this is an individual. All that has been celebrated has lots of streets in highways in cities and counties named after him that could possibly be this intersex hero and be relevant for a new group of people that he really hasn't been sort of terribly relevant to in the past brook is determined now for sure that the customer Polaski was intersex for sure what we have the early is that this is Polaski in this installment. What's also fairly certain is that this skeleton has these very very female features. And yet we have this life of Polaski that we need to reconcile with those very female features. You know, the best hypothesis currently is that it's it's intersex coming to some kind of idea of what kind of intersects or figuring out what the sex chromosomes are is not currently possible. At this time. So we were unable to extract any nuclear DNA from these remains that would sort of really show which intersex condition, and what's going on chromosome only the monument to plus is still there in savannah. Yeah. Oh, yes. Yes. And plus key is no longer buried inside of the monument. He's buried alongside the monument there's marble slab that almost all of his skeletal remains are buried underneath. Do you think the plaque? I'm assuming there's a plaque the mom you should be rewritten. At some point. It's a hard thing to say what what should be on the plaque because at some level. There should be an acknowledgement of intersex. But also his accomplishments for not that he was intersex is accomplished. That's that. He was Casimir Polaski the guy who created a really really functional American cavalry at a time when this was like, cutting edge technology, and was this charismatic leader that inspired lots and lots of people around him. Him. Maybe it's just a PS at the bottom of the plaque. By the way. He was intersex. It's. It's kind of a thing because you don't wanna plus story just to be about the dinner stack because that's really most of his story. That's just kind of like this extra little tidbit. But, you know, this is also this tidbit that might completely cast a different light on aspects of his story that we haven't really thought about or haven't really looked at in such great detail in examining his biography is maybe you know, we could or should have in the future Virginia Hutton mess brook is an anthropology professor Georgia Southern university. She's been speaking with us about Polish-born American revolutionary war hero, Casimir Polaski. Thank you so much. Great to meet you gosh. My pleasure will. Thank you fascinating. Discover there and that's the world for this Tuesday from the nanna Bill Harris studios, a W H in Boston. I'm Marco werman. We'll see back here tomorrow. Our public radio international.

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S1E19: John Catsimatidis: Success Stories From A Serial Entrepreneur

Steve Forbes: What's Ahead

42:24 min | 1 year ago

S1E19: John Catsimatidis: Success Stories From A Serial Entrepreneur

"This is what's ahead and I'm Steve Forbes in a moment. You'll hear my conversation with John Casimir. T._D.'s John and I've known each other for a long time. He's been a remarkable man. Remarkable career born in Greece came over here at the age of six months. I think you'll find this conversation and lightning on many fronts but I is. I look at the week ahead. Here's what to expect more fallout from the democratic debates of the past week who's up who's down despite what pundits may say Biden came up because he didn't look like he was a mummy he actually had had some verve even though he was attacked on all fronts but continue to expect more grim news from Hong Kong that situation is explosive and doesn't look like it's tamp down at all and China China do a trade deal. I'm beginning to think perhaps not. They may think they can wait out. Donald Trump is the president said that will be a mistake but sometimes you only learn from making mistakes well today. We have a special guest John Casimir T._D.'s John. Thank you for joining us but thank you for inviting me well. You you have a biography which we're going to go over that would have delighted Abraham Lincoln. You came here as a six month old baby with your parents <music> only child and you understood from an early age the need for hard work because in those days if you came here your relatives had to guarantee that they were going to be able to take care of themselves. I blame my father for not being able to run for president. He was six months late. The the country's laws my two grandfathers came here in one thousand nine hundred thirteen and they were looking for the streets paved with gold but it took a one hundred years for family or found it. I finally found it or you didn't find it. You created it. Yes you're right but you had challenges from an early age. When you were a youngster they spoke Greek at home no English and then you had to go to kindergarten and you did not know Oh a word of English English was my second language and overs fully fluent in St Greek because of my parents and then in <hes> through my five inch Emerson Television Set I learned how to speak English watching how duty and all those good shows he must have come up with some interesting phrases but you have worked <hes> as a kid you went to Brooklyn Tech and one of the things you you did <hes> before you went in the supermarket? Business was interestingly. You had an internship with Congressman William Fitts Ryan one one of the most liberal members of Congress described the internship and then the fact that he gave you an appointment to west point well. I didn't know I did not know anything about liberal did not know anything about conservative in those days I was fourteen years old and <hes> I knew that I respected him. He was a congressman had a lot of respect for him and I worked very hard for him during whatever he needed me to do in his the office and <hes> when I was seventeen <hes> he gave me a congressional nomination for West Point but you decided instead to study engineering engineering at N._Y._U.. My mother cried my father yelled. I was an only child and then they wanna see me go away so I respected their wishes and stayed domestic and went to N._Y._U.. And came home every night so described the circumstances of of your <hes> coming to going in the supermarket business you had an uncle and a cousin and you're working there and <hes> they didn't get along very well well. I went to work. My my mother. Got Me a job. I I was all set when I graduated Brooklyn Tech to sit on the couch and watch television the wholesome my mother went to a friend of hers we call them cousin but he wasn't really got me a job hub working in the local super and my mother threw me off the couch and says you got a job go to work and I was getting paid a dollar. I looked ten cents an hour and the reality of what a dollar ten cents an hour was. I want to learn how to drive and driving. Being lessons were twenty seven dollars an hour so I had to work for twenty five hours to drive to pay for one driving listen and so he probably learned about taxes with taxes taking money out of that dollar ten. You probably had to work thirty hours probably driving lesson listen but <hes> your family came with nothing. Your father started as a busboy so <hes> work was imbued you at an early age but now you also had your I I for real opportunity. You're working at the super et the uncle and the and the cousin did not get along very well well well. I learned he learned early in life. When partners make money they always love each other when partnership doesn't make money they yell yell at each other so they weren't making any money? If you were yelling at each other and Tony came to me that was cousin the younger one yes same the same speeches. I don't want to argue arguments in the family. You gotta take over my half of the business here Siamese ten notes thousand dollars a piece. I I five thousand dollars a piece. I even know if I can make a thousand dollars. The pain and it was ten notes times thousand dollars and I went to work in the store with his uncle and mean his uncle never had one argument. We started making money. You exhibited diplomacy at an early age. I learned I learned leadership when I went to Brooklyn Tech and I learned diplomacy dealing dealing with all my vendors and <hes> relatives early age and that really helped so you had fifty percent of the business and eventually you had a one hundred percent well. He was a matter of fact we were starting to earn a thousand dollars a week each and in nineteen sixty eight thousand a lot of money and your miracle worker when it came time to graduate in college I can go to work as an engineer for one hundred twenty nine dollars a week before taxes or working supermarket for a thousand way. I chose to work in the supermarket so describe you at N._Y._U.. Your eight credit short of graduation and you broke the news to your parents parents that you were going to go to work not get the diploma and this time you went your own way to Sunday fault me any yelled an scream and a hollered and my mother cried we sent you to the university to become how molly a her molly was a Greek Turkish word for people that would carrying crates on their back so she thought you were going down instead she she thought I was specializing in being a ham molly now. What are the things you did was a great name? How did you come up with <hes> the name route I wanted a name that was synonymous all American name synonymous with Apple Pie and Vanilla now ice cream and so we quote it right up and you started to create other stores by the age of Twenty three twenty four I had ten stores and we almost making almost a million dollars a year and because I started accumulating mentors and every time I speak to people I say mentors a very important to young people and all almost of my mentors were all Jewish because the whole food industry was Jewish and they put their arm around me and I learned from them and I learned a great year for them? One of them was Sam Stein and I respect salmon that loves SAM. Sam Stein was a lawyer Stein Rosen and Wetstein. He was my Roy then and he owned filigree foods a wholesale grocer so every time I wanted to open a new store Sam will pull the controller Saretta and said to him give John More money he he wants to open another store. I did I opened another store. He did more business for the wholesale. Business and Sam Stein was brothers of Lou Stein who is chairman of food fair at that time and that became useful ten fifteen years later where aircraftsman ron prominent pantry pride and they sold me all the supermarkets in Florida that would y'all food fears his pantry pride's amazing now as you well know. There's nothing tougher than the food business you are phenomenally successful but <hes> describe how you learned that the Lease was up the landlord was king now wanting to be king from someday. I ended up buying using using excess cash flow from the supermarket business and buying all the real estate Ross stores were in and this was one thousand nine hundred seventy seven hours too stupid to know that we were in a recession and the real estate market in New York was in the sewer because we were controlling the real estate we were buying by supermarkets and our supermarkets were doing well and I would borrow money from the supermarkets pits and before the end of the year I would borrow money from Chemical Bank at that time and nickname comical bank yes and they would take I would take the money from Chemical Bank as a mortgage and pay back money I borrowed from supermarkets to buy real estate and and we did that for about five consecutive years so you exhibited a great foresight because at the time people thought New York City was doomed to <hes> and then <hes> one of my other mentors Irving Rosenbaum I sit with him on Thursdays and he would say hey. You're doing the right thing John and one day you're GONNA wake up. You're GONNA find that you're rich and all that real estate we bought. Maybe we spent five million six fix me seven million in nineteen seventy seven seventy eight when I woke up in one thousand nine hundred eighty and the walker turned around all of a sudden that real estate was worth a hundred million dollars so you expanded again in business use <music> you always wanted to fly and you went into two aspects of the Mike call the airline industry described I buying your first jet and learning how to lease it. I really wanted to go to the Air Force Academy Not West Point and I always want to learn how to fly an airplane so I started flying Ryan airplane on to after two afternoons a week and then I wanted to buy a jet so so the first jet I was <hes> November full four Romeo doctor. That was a call that is four a four day was a citation jet and it belong to Roy Disney. That's what the idea was and I hide my first jet. Pilot pilot guy named Jim Jacobs Jim Jacobs went on later on. We'll tell the story to run netjets running eight hundred airplanes and selling out to Warren Buffet for fifty million not bad for a pilot and but we we started with one jet Atlantic City started opening up and we started surfacing the casinos because if you lived in New York Philadelphia brought you into the casinos by limousine we said to the casinos won't bring him in from a five hundred mile radius radius by corporate jet make them feel important making lose more money and we became very successful built that business up forty eight corporate jets and I used to fly them all I had four thousand hours when I quit and we sold it into San tooling which was started the beginning of that jets and Jim Jacobs stayed with him and that's when they went on to <hes> do netjets and sell out the buffet but but people knew I was I loved airplanes and Nelson happy in one thousand nine hundred eighty three tape to me. It sold me capital airlines. You went in the airline business and we won in the airline business so I was headquarters was smarter. Tennessee just outside of Nashville Nashville is a great great town great city and I would get to the office on in in the morning and there was three different reasons the airline would not fly that day I had to solve all three reasons by ten and we survive for a few years but then we saw the handwriting on the wall when People's express the biggest fraud of of those days enter our markets forty nine dollars to Miami Ninety nine dollars to Los Angeles we couldn't even put fuel in the reapply for that so I had a partner at that time I said to him you know time to sell if we can't even put the fuel in the airplay for that price time to sell we sold it to Nick Senator Nick mackerras of Puerto Rico Trout majority leader of the Puerto Rican set it and he wanted to use the airline just for Puerto Rico because he owned the Old San Juan Hotel Hotel and the old Americana Hotel and we sold it to him kept the airplanes as collateral he was financed by Drexel Burnham a number of Puerto Rico and off. We go well six months later machine kaput the airline goes bankrupt and we go to bankruptcy court to recover our air pranks was we kept the airplanes as collateral and we get underway bankruptcy court the same trustee that had also had the oil company that had filed how bankruptcy I went to I went to bankruptcy quick to recover our airplanes ended up buying oil company. I was very sad because I was I was in Nashville. I was running a worldwide business the whole world and I had to come back to New York to run a couple of supermarkets op. It's you're probably the only man in history who thought coming back to New York was a it was going down in the world and you were depressed and bored and within within twelve twelve months we bought the Oil Company and refining we bought Pantry pride supermarkets from Ron Perlman and we've worked prestige from from the Thompson Brothers of south land so I found some excitement and what did we use for money or credit lines at bank. Distrust is trust because of our real estate. We're able to buy pantry pride where able to buy <hes> Chris. T._D.'s we're able to by United Refining Dining and also chemical bank at that time helped out and united refining was in bankruptcy. We go to bankruptcy court. Are we go to the creditors committee and the guy at Chase Manhattan Bank was the head of the credits committee says Mr Cats but he's what what do you know about reading company. MAZOLA oil oil crude oil oil. He didn't appreciate that but I proved to him within ninety days because I took over a C._e._o.. Of Your Company you paid what six million dollars that's what I paid for. The company stock and bankers trust lend me six billion to buy it and I proved to him in one month we made seven and a half million dollars not bad for bankrupt their plan. We only owed him. One hundred million describe the marketing campaign you did and when you <hes> sold the gasoline made from the oil that the oil was homegrown North American well by all guess all our crude oil from North America from Canada. We're when candidates biggest importers of crude oil through pipelines and ED <hes> You you know coming back to supermarkets member Apple Pie and and Vanilla ice cream. I came up with a marketing campaign that our oil is made from one hundred percent American oil American crude oil from Canada and made by American workers in in Pennsylvania. We came up with a marketing campaign or gasoline is one hundred percent American oil oil and we doubled tripled our sales and we were very successful because those times where Saudi Arabia was not so good to us Venezuela was not so good to us and people appreciated buying American oil and you also also got three hundred convenience stores with this transaction by one oil company get three hundred sixty convenience stores for free sounds like a good deal but on the real estate side you mentioned <hes> buying when others didn't <hes> one of the things you did. <hes> was <hes> going to Brooklyn Clinton when people thought Brooklyn back then decades ago. It's not the hot spot that it is today. What drew you to Brooklyn buying those <hes> that real estate on Myrtle avenue as you know I look at a good deal? I went to Brooklyn Tech High School which was only six city city blocks from Myrtle avenue. That area was always busy but it was a tough area very very tough but how can you by three city blocks in a busy area for six hundred thousand dollars. I I just wrote a check kept. My mouth shut among the things you've done were three projects there. We building or buildings yeah I one you named after in the Andrea Afghan order and you wanted to do your son but your wife Margot said you got to change the name a little bit well we get. We couldn't call it the John Nobody wants to live in the John John so we said how about in Italian John is Giovanni All the the Gio van and then we built another building clothing Margo and the last building rebuilt on Myrtle Avenue was the Eagle legal the I got I got nothing named after me. I should learn from trump trump names everything after himself well the the eagles though wasn't just a project described the architecture very unique architecture. I always wanted to build buildings that I was proud of. I learned that from early in life I wanted to always live in a while building where you look at the building and say wow I wanna live there and the Eagle made it so beautiful. It was a wild building as you used an unusual architect well yes we did <hes> and <hes> we now building twin towers on Coney Island right on the beach and we want to build three more buildings in coney island if we can get to the right permits and the right <hes> deals zoning from from the city so I've I've told the city which is true. I'm either going to spend the next three hundred billion billion in coney island or I could spend it in Florida which is a growing Saito so we have a choice having the foresight I with Brooklyn then with Coney Island which was <hes> an area until recently seen as having a pass but not much of a future <hes> one of the things <hes> that made coney island. I guess available at a cheap price was transportation in Brooklyn subway stations nearby but one of the solutions you've <hes> I think have come up with is <hes> shuttle buses but shaped after San Francisco cable cars well. It's going to be called trolleys the coney island trolley alley playing the appropriate music for Coney Island not the San Francisco tuned for San Francisco and we're going to charge a nickel but but if you don't have the nickel we'll let you slide great great marketing so you've gone on a lot of other businesses and including the jewelry jewelry business entrepreneurs always <hes> never never baseball player never hits a thousand entrepreneurs. What did you learn from that experience that Nice Ice Creek kitchen not being the jewelry business so when I was only six percent Jewish you had yeah you had your genetic testing done yes so <hes> one of the areas though <hes> your again trying to try being foresighted is <hes> <hes> throw going into medicine pointing out that there's nothing more personal than health and if you come up with something this is truly recession resistant describe forays into medicine? I believe we're making a lot of investments into medical type situations and I believe that the future everybody wants to live longer poker and they are creator. Never gave us the manual of how to fix our bodies so we have to learn slowly and between stem cells and D._N._A.. Etc etc <hes> we are learning how to fix our bodies. He's better and I think medicine over the next twenty years is GonNa be the hot investment <hes> and it's never going to go out of style. People will spend whatever they have to spend to live another five or ten years so you're going in all all aspects medicine medical devices anything that makes us better yes and <hes> we recently <hes> we're going deeper into the media. <hes> we bought W._A._B._C. Radio who I grew up with and it was a number one station growing up described the broadcast ass reach of W._A._B._C. phenomenal well. It's a clear channel fifty thousand watts goes back to the nineteen thirties when the government wanted to be be able to communicate with their citizens so at night W._A._B._C. reaches my Ami Kansas City from New York the Minnesota Minnesota it goes halfway through the country and it's it's a great asset and I described buying that asset for the price I paid for it. Similar to the price. George Steinbrenner paid for the Yankees and Donald Trump paid for mar-a-lago. So how did you get this great station Dacian only twelve and a half million dollars to have a lot. I losing money so I have to absorb the losses as I turn it around so I'm willing to do it. I'm willing to write the check and it's a great asset and it's an asset worth saving. You're looking at other stations to there are others when I did this. The oil in word got out. I must add one hundred phone calls so you're trading in waters that others fear to tread well. I think media and and radio and television is here to stay. You might listen to your radio through your computer in the future and you might watch television through your computer and if you but I do that all the time you know what I do at night I'll get up at one o'clock in the morning revue my emails from four hundred emails behind four hundred emails a day but in the background I'd that'd be listening to the radio or watching television on my other set of computers and you're one of the points you make is that <hes> you're going to try to bring back the distinction between News News and opinion. I think so when me and you Steve Growing up Walter Cronkite told the truth ninety two percent of the American people people believed Walter cronkite whether he was telling the truth or not they believed him now media. Nobody believes anybody and I. I believe that that the truth has to be spoken and if you're talking about news you gotta be telling you the truth. News is the real news CBS. If you want to speak your opinion that's fine but let people know it's European you got <unk> got directly involved in politics. What made you decide to run for mayor of New York several years ago and <hes> you've indicated there? Maybe one more campaign campaign left in you but made you take the plunge. Why did you want to become the Fiorello Laguardia Great New York Mayor of the twenty first century? I Love New York. City New New York City made a big difference in my life and I ran the same way <hes> woody Juliani run ran John Lindsay Ran <hes> Bloomberg ran as a Republican liberal. Even though I had been Democrat for little while because you live in New York City you got to be a Democrat to do business business <hes> Bill Clinton was I admired him and I do a lot of work for Bill Clinton in one thousand nine hundred ninety s <hes> but Iran is Republican liberal pro business pro people but the liberal side helping to kids of the inner city just like Mr Morton through taught me and that we have to work hard to give those kids a better education and make sure they all have big brothers or whatever is needed to make a better life for them. <hes> I ran for for the Republican nomination. I've lost because Rudy Giuliani supported his old deputy mayor Joe Lhota and how wasn't running against Joe. WHO's a fine gentleman? I was actually running through my mistake. Maybe I shoulda ran a the liberal side and retrained Lotta and me and De Blasio on the democratic side who who knows what would have happened. What are the ideas you had? When you were running for? Mayor was what you call up zoning you pointed out the transit system is worth a trillion dollars. Why not up zone the real estate around near a train station and use that to help vitalize the city? People people didn't realize the value the subway system we have it would cost a trillion dollars to replace so my my recommendation was the same way worked out on Myrtle avenue. Road Labute is three different subway systems running within three three or four blocks from our Myrtle avenue development. He take areas in the Bronx or Queens warned Brooklyn and you up zone latte means you could build them higher and the people that live there have access through subway system and making go for the jobs in any borough in the city accepts that Nyland I had a I had a plan for Staten Island tope up zoning and transit oriented development was very important so people live near a subway system they can go go to work any place in the city and my idea on Staten Island but I didn't become mega was used be Verizon Donald Bridge and put sidecars lightweight titanium or aluminum side close to connect into the subway system or the transit needs a system Staten Island and Brooklyn and make Staten Island part of the five boroughs great idea and <hes> perhaps <hes> some day soon you may be able to bring it to fruition in addition to foreseeing what was GonNa Happen with Roland you also said several years ago one on energy business. You know something about you said in two thousand thirteen we'd be energy independent by twenty twenty. You're right on that you also pointed out that the two great areas of New York several years ago story AH and Long Island city an Amazon on so what you so now one of the things that you've always emphasizes the need for middle class rents rents that middle-class people can afford what do you see for the future of New York now all this talk of reintroducing rent control and just going back in the old treadmill. I think there's there's a lousy system to <hes> is underground <hes> poison going through political system and and it's very dangerous there's no checks and balances on <hes> on what's going on in Albany or New York City and are people with a few dollars to invest are choosing to leave New York City and invest it in states where the not tax overtaxed I remember those words taxation without representation and you have an and I'm not against Democrats but you have a democratic executive offices. You have democratic state Senate Democratic State Assembly Democratic City Council and it seems like that the people getting elected are the people that want to give away away everything and they get elected easier in their response then give him you know two cars in every garage or skim whatever but nobody all these people that a lot of these people that are running. You wouldn't let them run your local supermarket doc some of them are really dumb and you know and if you won't let them run a supermarket you're letting him run billions business of billions of dollars of economy and there's kind of up we had Bloomberg for twelve years. Do I agree with everything he didn't know but he had common sense and he did the right thing for the citizens of New York Woody Guiliani eight years but now we are going backwards a little bit and <hes> the extreme left is is is taking over the Democratic Party and even the moderate Democrats a lot of them are decent people are scared of being thrown out so we we have a challenge and somebody would strength during the next election has to stand up and say enough enough is enough enough. We're taking New York City back that going to be you. You haven't been hope we find somebody younger and better but I'm still a younger than Donald Trump's. You never know we'll sit think they'd have a hard time finding somebody who knows the city as well as you and has the executive experience that you've had so <hes> you have your older your daughter. Your oldest child is taking on the difficult task of being <hes> heading up the Manhattan Republican can party inches also vice chairperson of the New York State Party and <hes> she grew up and I I scare her. Sometimes she's holding Clinton door sign when she was two years old is that just got back from the convention so no she grew up as a Democrat but learned that having common sense and being a Republican might be better you brought her up. Well Hillary supported Goldwater that she she picked early. Yes so <hes> in terms of the future will you you run run for mayor but you still stay involved. You started a radio show podcast called <hes> cats roundtable <hes> describe that and and <hes> I guess that ties into your W._A._B._C. acquisition well. You're communicating when I ran for Mayor <hes> even though I did not become Mayor Bob. My popularity rate was in the sixties so I said I want to stay in touch with the public. So I started my own Sunday morning. Radio Show <hes> took communicate with the public eight thirty to nine o'clock was local and nine o'clock to ten o'clock was national and on a national show we have we have to tell the truth. We have senators. We have congresspeople. We have have a secretaries of state etc etc that talk to and my system I have Democrats and Republicans and my system to me is to give the people a chance to Tau and say what they want to say and not ask them questions. Will Oh force it into maybe lying to you you want to get information. I wanted information. I want the people of our country to hear hideous information and to listen <hes> make up their own minds and then I had my other subjects. I love talking about medicine so we either have a medical program talking about new developments in medicine every week or we have a show on animals. I I love animals. I believe that we have to work hard to make sure our animals survive elephants in Africa <hes> and and <hes> it's important to me. <hes> Wales also talk about our kids. We talk about charities all of the above and and it makes you a well rounded Sunday morning radio show where you're if you're drinking your coffee. You should get to like it one thing before letting you go. You know your supermarkets are two percent of year business now <hes> but <hes> when whole foods came along which you pointed pointed out is nicknamed whole paycheck one of the things you did to compete was <hes> describe a bird and fresh fruits but charge less well that we you know the purpose of supermarket is to have a y a wide variety of products not just whole food products when whole foods I open they wouldn't carry Pepsi Cola Coca Cola or any normal project and we carry the whole thing and then we started carrying organic foods fresh fruits organic meats organic dairy and are organic sales over the last five years has quadrupled and a- gives the American Erkin consumer a choice that you could buy organic food so he could buy the normal food and being in a supermarket business says I'm GonNa say something. Nobody wants to hear. I'm going to say it anyway that the large national companies when you buy it watch out look at the ingredients because what the large national companies worry about how good does it taste and how long long is GonNa last on the shelf. If you die from it collateral damage wow final no question is America still the land of opportunity that it was for you. I think America is still have opportunity. You've got to work harder at it and I remember somebody things. I say to kids when I talked to them or address them. You approach it. Failure is not an option you if you WANNA work eight hours a day forty hours a week. Don't go into business. If you want to work a hundred hours a week you can go into business with he added to failure is not an option. If I have to work one hundred ten hours I'll do that one hundred ten hours and you have to be able to dedicate yourself. I think Lincoln would approve John. Thank you very much for for being with us. Thank you so much for having me on and we'll catch up again. Real look forward to it. Thank you and and now my reeds of the week the first one is called stable. Value is our monetary goal not stable prices is written by Nathan Lewis at Forbes Dot Com. He's an expert on monetary policy better than anyone I know and he makes the point prices go up and down in response to the marketplace that that shouldn't be a government policy of trying to manipulate prices with the government should do is make sure the dollar stable untrustworthy and all will be well or much will be well oh but Washington being what it is the Fed being what it is. They can't leave well enough alone. Good short piece. Everyone can grasp it understand it except those who are in this Federal Reserve. The second piece is called Hong Kong is a flash point in the new Cold War written by getting Rachman at F.. T. Dot Com Financial Times F. T. dot com gets to the point that this situation is getting more ominous and serious <music>. Thanks for listening to what's ahead. I'm Steve Forbes looking forward to next week and if you could rate reviewed subscribe to this show we had Forbes sure would appreciate it

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CRUSADE Channel Newscast March 4th 2020

CRUSADE Channel Previews

07:13 min | 8 months ago

CRUSADE Channel Newscast March 4th 2020

"Ralph Waldo Emerson. Once said Goofy is good for Thailand but Genius Waltz prow. Well that's funny because when I finished morning prayers. I do want coffee. And what little genius I have tells me to choose. Crusade Captain Dark Roast. Our coffee is custom roasted from the finest fair trade coffee beans and bag by the heavenly Rose Coffee Company order your supply a crusade captured dark roast today by browsing to Mike Church Dot com forward slash coffee. That's Mike Church Dot com forward slash coffee or call eight four four or five crusade news news you can trust because the truth can be trusted trump crusade channel news desk stacey Cohan Good Morning Crusaders. Welcome to Wednesday March fourth twenty twenty. I'm Stacey cohan reporting from the Crusade Channel News Desk at the Cohen Ranch in Winkelmann Arizona. This report is brought to you by the prey. Latin prayer cards company. These top quality prayer cards are available at my Church. Dot Com slash Latin learn Latin pray Latin because the devil hates Latin. Here's what listen for this hour. Super Tuesday's delivering some real surprises. Your time has come if you want to refinance your home or even by one and an elderly couple talks about their death and five minutes later. The wife dies former vice. President Biden swept to victory and a slew of Super Tuesday contests in the south and elsewhere while Senator Bernie Sanders from Vermont. Scooped up wins and more reliably liberal territory. Giving up the map on the biggest primary day of the season and indicating type battle between the two. That is likely to drag on for weeks or more. Closer had been forecast to win Minnesota in her exit from the race could actually help Sanders score. Some additional delegates the state is worth seventy five pledged delegates Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren and former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg have openly suggested. They could stay in the running until the Democratic National Convention Biden support has resurged in recent days as establishment leaders and one time rivals including Pete Buddha judge. Beddoe rourke and Amy Klobuchar backed his campaign an emergency rate cut from the Federal Reserve the ten year Treasury bond yield at historic lows. So if you've been waiting to refinance or buy a home. It appears your time has come. According to Mark Hamrick senior economic analyst for Bank rate. It's definitely a good time for someone looking to buy a home to get financing home. Prices have risen and it's rough for those looking for a bargain but the financing has gotten better and there is an opportunity for rates to go lower still. He said if you're trying to look for the silver lining in the midst of the current climate said Hamrick. The mortgage interest rate is close to the top of the list. Coming up are saying of the day. He was committed to God from childhood rejecting even ordinary comforts. He slept little spending his nights in prayer quota. The day there is no place for selfishness and no place for fear. Do Not Be Afraid. Then when love makes demands. Don't be afraid when lev require sacrifice. Pope John Paul the second. You're listening to crew sage Channel News. Hey it's my church reminding you that life's biggest challenges can be conquered by prayer. Well here's a little secret. Brain is made more powerful when you pray in Latin but most people are horrified of even trying while you're not alone. That's why I'm proud to introduce you to the prey. Latin Prayer Card Company. In no time you'll learn the our father. Hail Mary and Glory be prayers in Latin Latin prayer cards available at Mike Church Dot com forward slash Latin learn Latin Ray Ladan because the devil cakes are saying the day is Saint Casimir. He grew up in a world where life was not his own as a prince of Poland. The second son of King Casimir the fourth and Elizabeth of Austria. His life was scheduled to cement. His father's authority increase Poland's Power Casimir was committed to God from childhood rejecting even ordinary comforts. He slept little spending his nights in prayer though his father must have wondered about him he must have seen in admired Casimir strength. He showed that he misunderstood this strength when he sent him as head of an army to take over the throne of Hungary at the request of some nobles. They're Casimir felt. The whole expedition was wrong but was convinced. Go Out of obedience to his father. His father however was furious. He banished Kasmir to a castle hoping that imprisonment would change his mind. Kazimierz commitment to what he believed was right only grew stronger in his exile and he refused to cooperate with his father's plans. He died at the age of twenty three and fourteen eighty four from lung disease. He was buried with his favorite song. A Latin him to marry because of his love for the song. It's known as the hymn of Saint Casimir though he didn't write it. Kazimierz patron saint of Poland and Lithuania Amazon is informing employees that one of its seattle-based workers has been diagnosed with the corona virus according to a mass email for all staff members in Seattle Bellevue Washington. The employee infected with the novel Corona Virus became ill on February twenty fifth and has not been back to work since that time. The company said it has directly notified all co workers who had been in close contact with the patient. The worker was based at the downtown office building. The company refers to as Amazon Brazil according to the email the novel. Corona virus has killed thirty two hundred people the vast majority in mainland China. There are now over ninety. Two thousand global cases with infections and more than seventy countries twenty five people have been killed after devastating tornadoes ripped through Nashville and other areas of Tennessee flattening homes tossing airplanes and downing power lines. According to the governor. The tornado in Nashville was just one of three. That hit Tennessee early Tuesday. Nineteen people died in Putnam County Tennessee. According to officials fatalities were also reported in Wilson Davidson and Benton counties. People remain unaccounted for as of Tuesday afternoon. A state emergency has been declared in Tennessee. This is a love story. Kind of a weird one. A couple WHO's been married for. Nearly fifty years just enjoyed a cocktail on their deck when they were talking about their inevitable deaths as they walked back inside the Vermont home. A piece of ice fell off the roof and fatally struck seventy-three-year-old Linda Freeman Charen Berg in the back of the head. According to the couple's daughter Sharon Berg was knocked unconscious. She fell into the snow face. I the paramedics worked to revive her for about an hour and eventually determine them you know even if she did wake up she wouldn't have cognitive function will sitting on the porch. Her husband said he didn't know how he was going to be able to live without her. Can you imagine just talking to your loved one and then boom they get hit and it's over you never know. Send Me Your News. Tips to news at Crusade Channel Dot com stay tuned to the crusade channel with live breaking news updates all day and the best life. Talk Radio anywhere up next. The Mike Church show continues. I'm Stacey Cohan for the crusade channel seeking news and finding truth.

Saint Casimir Stacey cohan Mike Church Poland Tennessee Senator Elizabeth Warren Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders Ralph Waldo Emerson Rose Coffee Company Mark Hamrick Casimir Nashville Biden Waltz prow Channel News Mike Bloomberg Crusaders Linda Freeman Charen Berg
Unearthed in July, Part 2

Stuff You Missed in History Class

44:19 min | 1 year ago

Unearthed in July, Part 2

"This episode of Stuffy missed in history class is brought to you by Westin hotels and resorts at Westin hotels and resorts their entire reason for being is your wellbeing which is why their wellness offerings or curated with one thing in mind at that is you. There's has an email menu crafted with fresh ingredients and on demand fitness gear lending program that lets you pack light and stay fit and the heavenly bed that helps you conquer the day by giving you a restful night all of it just for you so you can rise explorer four at Western dot com a member of Marriott Bond Volley welcome to stuff you missed in history class a production of iheartradio's. How stuff works hello and welcome to the PODCAST? I'm Tracy Be Wilson. I'm holly frying and it's time for unearth July part two we got a lot of the favorite favorite things in this addition including the edibles and potables and the shipwrecks and just <hes> some weird stuff is all grouped together because it was all Kinda odd and some other assorted findings I think weird stuff deficit great category but we are going to start with edibles and potables a team in man tie in Sri. Lanka believes that they have found the world's oldest clove estimated to be one thousand years old. There have been other clove discoveries that were older within that but at this point they're believed to be miss identification. 's clothes are not native to Sri Lanka though they grow in the Maluku islands which are about four thousand miles away so this is not just the oldest clove but it's also evidence of a wide ranging trade in and spices that dates back at least one thousand years in this is supported by pepper corns of about the same age found at the same site which probably came from the Indian subcontinent archaeologists in China's Jiangsu Province found a jar full of eggs in two thousand five hundred year old too and that led newspapers around the world to make a lot of jokes about thousand-year eggs also known as century eggs. These were just eggs. They were in very good condition considering their age. Only one of them was obviously obviously broken. Although the team did report the material inside the eggs would have been largely decomposed by now they planned to conduct some x Ray Studies to determine exactly how many eggs were in this jar because they were way to delegate to handle without the risk of damaging them they are not certain by the eggs were placed in the two whether this was an offering or if it was more of a symbol of rebirth or whether the deceased just really liked eggs in wanted to make sure that they had some eggs in the afterlife. I want want eggs in the afterlife. Yes please researchers in Saint Thomas in the U._S.. Virgin Islands now believe that the presence of very small snail and clam shells in archaeological sites there are evidence of children helping their parents gather food through foraging previously the conclusion had been that these types of shells were evidence of people who were really close to starvation and we're just eating whatever they could find but this team looked at shell maidens dating back to about sixteen hundred hundred years ago and concluded that the adult forager's we're focusing on large shellfish that we're really worth their time and effort to crack into while the children were picking up whatever they found that was small enough for them to handle easily. This is all all sort of speculative but it's also similar to research taking place with current populations of islands in the Pacific where foraging patterns have been the same for generations and where children routinely gather with their parents moving on to some other foodstuffs a team excavating a construction site in Ontario Canada found some charred keen Wa- seeds from species of the plant that was native to eastern North America as is extinct today these seeds date back to around nine hundred B._C.. which isn't the oldest King Wasiyu ever but it is the farthest north that they have been found that far back in history by a lot the previous northernmost sample of this keen wa was from Kentucky and then the next oldest crop found in as part of Ontario is corn that dated back to five hundred B._C.? So four Hundred Years Younger this is technically a twenty eighteen find the seeds themselves were unearthed in two thousand ten but the excavation they were part of had collected one hundred forty eight thousand of them and most of them were charred so it took years to go through all of them to find out what was what so it was late twenty eighteen when the findings on this were published today people think of keen wise coming from South America and it does but this is a species the food crop that was living at the time in what's now Kentucky Illinois and Arkansas in similar news team of researchers from universities and institutions in the U._s. the U._k.. China and Lithuania has cross-reference the findings of hundreds of studies of charred food crops like rice millet wheat barley to create a massive map of how these foods moved around the prehistoric world and what they found was that these staple foods moved a very long way between eight thousand fifteen hundred B._C.. So wouldn't necessarily put Alabama into the prehistoric bucket wheat and barley were carried from southwest Asia into Europe China and Indian subcontinent rice spread across much of Asia Millet and and sorghum originated in western Africa but moved to the eastern and sub Saharan part of the continent as well as across the Indian Ocean and then different types of millet started out in eastern Asia and moved West all the way to Europe basically although people might imagine that food became more globalized after European started traveling to North America that whole thing really started much much earlier with ordinary farmers trying new crops and strategies just to get enough food now we have several things about beer researchers in Peru who are crediting a beer like beverage called Cheetah with keeping the worry civilization stable in that part of the continent from about six hundred eleven hundred ce. This team has done research into pottery and the residues within the pottery vessels suggests that these pots and the teacher that was being made. They're all being made locally with people travelling to what was essentially taproom for festivals in for more casual gatherings. The beverage was also made with drought resistant pepper bury's. I use which would have helped ensure a steady supply of beer even when other ingredients or much harder to grow a lot of headlines about this was like the secret to along live society is plenty of beer in other beer news in eighteen eighty six. It's the S._S.. Oregon sank off Long Island there were no fatalities but sadly a load of beer went down with the ship and this year a diver brought three bottles backup from the bottom and gave one of those bottles to serious brewing company who planned to see if they could extract living in yeast from it and the diver was one of the breweries regular customers staff at the brewery also tasted this fear just a few drops of it according to the breeze owner bill filter quote it was nasty I mean I feel like we could have said that without tasting it but that's probably a few days after the story broke about serious bruins plan to Bruce Shipwreck beer another story made the rounds that Saint James Brewery in Hobart Long Island had already been making beer with east extracted attracted from a bottle from that same for at least a year that beer uses both the shipwreck east and the modern strain and owner brewer. Jamie Adams was at the time planning a beer with only east from the wreck to debut at the New York state brewers fest so after getting this news that another brewery had already been doing the thing he planned to do filter shelves his plans to make a similar beer out of respect for Adams having done it already basically the to New York brewers trying not the horn in on each other's beers. The seems like a pretty amicable resolution especially since it I Adams thought about filing a cease and desist over it so hurry for brewers be cool yet the whole saga about this shipwreck beer and in one laughed piece of of Beer News scientists in Israel have extracted yeast from pottery that was up to five thousand years old and maybe that to brew beer. We got a note about this one from Listener Chana who mentioned that the yeast had come from an archaeological fine we had talked about an unearthed in two thousand eighteen. I think that's actually a much older find. The pottery that we talked about in that particular thing was much older but it's totally possible but we did talk about the same find at somewhere in a previous unearthed because just when I looked at keyword searching the past scripts for the word Beer we've talked about beer and almost all of them. I'm waiting for the giant vodka discovery since I'm not really a beer drinker <hes> okay so this next one is not exactly about food but bear with us. There is a lot of variety in human speech but a prevailing theory has been that most speech sounds have existed for most of human history not really changing all that much so even though some sounds like <hes> are common much of the world while others like the clicking sounds in some African languages are more localized that all of these specific sounds have actually stayed pretty much the same over time but there's some new research from the University of Zurich Eric and to Max Planck institutes that suggests maybe not hypothesizing that some sounds like and are relatively new and they only came about as the shape of our human palate changed with the changes of the pallet coming along with changes to what we eat so basically early humans had a diet that was full of tough foods that were difficult to chew so by the time people reached adulthood there upper and lower teeth meant edge to edge but over time people started eating softer foods. It's shifting their pallet so that they had a slight overbites with their upper front teeth slightly in front of the lower ones most of the time and that may have made it possible for languages to start including sounds known as Lahya dentals in which you're lower lip touches your upper not these sounds exist in about half of languages worldwide and they're especially prevalent in European languages apparently rising with advances in milling and other technologies that helped people produce softer foods. These aren't the first researchers suggest this connection but earlier linguists have been a lot more cautious that this could just be a correlation rather than a causation and now we're going to take a quick breaks tracy and I can make lots of weird noises with our mouths and figure out what we're doing and if that that is pallet related through history he'll be back in just a moment hiring is challenging but there's one place where you can go where hiring is simple fast and smart. A police were growing businesses connect to qualified candidates that. Places ziprecruiter dot com slash skill ziprecruiter send your job to over one hundred of the Web's leading job boards and they don't stop there the powerful matching technology to scan thousands of resumes and find people with the right experience then then inviting them to apply to your job as applications come in ziprecruiter analyzes each one in spotlights the top candidates so you never miss a great match. ziprecruiter is so effective that four out of five of employers who post on Ziprecruiter get equality candidate through the site within the first day and right now you can try ziprecruiter for free at this exclusive web address ziprecruiter dot com slash skill. That's ZIPRECRUITER DOT COM slash S. K. L. L. ALL ZIPRECRUITER dot com slash skilled ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire okay. We have a couple or three discoveries coming up basically confirm existing oral histories first up archaeologists in Nova Scotia have been using ground penetrating radar to try to confirm whether Fort and is the site of an Acadian burial ground. There's a known British cemetery at that site but it's also believed that there are at least two thousand Acadian people buried there as well without any sort of marker remaining for them. Preliminary evidence suggests that this is the case. Hey this radar study found very regularly spaced disturbances that were arranged in lines at the same depth every time so if this is accurate it would confirm that acadian belief that they have ancestors buried at Fort An this ground <unk> penetrating radar work really happened at the end of December but it was just making news at the start of this year now also note that we do have the Acadian expulsion on the idealist for future episode don't know and it will happen. Archaeologists have confirmed the oral histories the Lake Rabin first nation in northern British Columbia Canada something the nation had asked to have done according to the nation's oral history there were fishing villages along the shores of Lake debbeen before the arrival of European colonists in the area the team team found evidence of these villages one of them quite large along with wooden fishing weirs which would have been used to catch sockeye salmon and in our last confirmation researchers have also discovered that first nations people in the northwestern coast of North America were farming clams for about three thousand years longer than previously thought and that study had focused on clam beds that had been recorded in native oral histories. We are now moving on to one of my favorite things art in this case Cave Art and Rock Art <hes>. There's a massive collection of which marks in a limestone gorge called Creswell Craig's in East Midlands in the U._k.. Staff knew there were some kind of markings down there but they didn't really know much about them and they described them to visitors as Victorian graffiti but a couple of cavers remarked on them last year leading experts to take a closer look what they found was not the two or three markings that they were kind of expecting there were as many as a thousand thousand marks. These were meant as wards against evil they included marks that looked like Avi to stand for the Virgin Mary and shapes it look like crosses and the letters p._m.. Which stands for Paci Maria these types of marks were or common in the area from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries? Although it's not completely clear exactly when these particular marks are were made or exactly what people were hoping to keep out or for that matter in by making these marks yeah these are some are that you will really seeing a lot of places like not just in the U._k.. If you go to all like colonial era homes in North America a lot of times there are visa and crosses and things in places that were meant award evil away. This is just an astoundingly large collection of them and I I am really curious of like. Did you think there was a hell mouth down there. What was happening? Researchers have also recorded and interpreted a set of Cherokee inscriptions options in manatee cave in Alabama the first of these inscriptions dates back to April of eighteen twenty eight so that was just a few years before the Cherokee and other native peoples were removed from the area under the removal active eighteen thirty and also just three years after the Cherokee adopted the Turkey Silla Berry as a system of writing for the Cherokee language the inscriptions and the cave document things like stick ball game and the religious ceremonies surrounding it stickball is not a simple sport it has important ritual significance within Cherokee culture and religion and there are also inscriptions on the ceiling of the cave written backwards as if the reader is somewhere within the rock so this research team included European Americans as well as members of the eastern band of Cherokee Indians the United Kabua band of Cherokees and the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma and they all work together to determine both how to interpret what the inscriptions mean and to decide what should and shouldn't be published an academic works and some of these inscriptions. We're just not meant to be read beyond the Cherokee. This work was also important because there's not a lot of archaeological evidence of a Cherokee presence in the area. The cave became a tourist attraction in eighteen eighty eight and other physical connections to the Cherokee were removed destroyed at that time moving on archaeologists studying indigenous petroglyphs in Australia have discovered that cruise of nineteenth century whaling ships added their own carvings to for the same area as well sometimes right on top of the existing indigenous art. Some of the carvings in the dampier archipelago are up to fifty thousand years old and the wailers additions are for eighteen forty one in eighteen forty we nine the team found carvings from crew members of the Connecticut and the Delta both of which were wailers that hailed from the United States. It's not clear whether the whaling crews interacted with the local population at all or what their motivations nations were for choosing these particular carving sites it could have been an intentional signal of disrespect or they could have just thought they were adding graffiti to place that already had a lot of graffiti on it at this particular study also noted that the interactions actions between these wailing crews and the indigenous people of Australia's something that warrants further study because a lot of places. It's not clear whether anybody came ashore whether they had any contact with anyone but it's also clear that the native people knew that there were wailers off the coast of Australia so there's lots of room for more work to be done moving on a team has determined that cave art found in the bulk in peninsula in two thousand ten is the peninsula's oldest known figurative cave art so that the oldest known designation as what happened this year the paintings date back about thirty four thousand years and they include a bison ibis and what may be human figures researchers at the University of Barcelona have also found a piece of Paleolithic Litho art carved into limestone that they're describing as a very early example of narrative art the pieces about twelve thousand five hundred years old and appears to depict to people chasing two birds which appear to be an adult a young crane and there are only three scenes founded Paleolithic art so far that depict humans alongside birds so next step. We have a whole collection of findings that in some way are connected to like a technological acronym so wits things like DNA and C._A._T.. Scans and lighter stuff like that I up researchers use DNA analysis to study some chewed up pieces of pitch that were unearthed in western Sweden back in the nineteen eighties. These were about eight thousand years old and at the time they were being used to make weapons that people would heat up this pitch and then she wanted to make it really soft and sticky and the news little bits of it to do things like attach points to weapon shafts the D._N._A.. D._N._A. Analysis suggested that three different people had chewed on this pitch to female and one male and they may have been quite young based on the size of the tooth impressions as young as five years old but they did not find any weapons that were made with this this particular pitch so it's possible that they were just kids chewing on the same stuff used to make weapons and we're not weapon makers themselves and another discovery in previous installments of unearthed we have talked about Vikings a lot and we have also talked about horse burials a lot and now we have both at the same time we knew that Viking warriors were often buried with their horses and now thanks D._N._A.. Evidence we know that most of the Viking warriors were male and so we're the horses that were buried with them. The nineteen horses that were studied in this particular project eighteen of them were male. All of them appeared to be healthy and well-cared-for before being killed apparently for the purpose of the burial in two thousand sixteen researchers perform C._A._T.. He Scans on a group of mummies at a hospital in Madrid this year. They announced their findings that one of them was a priest named Nesper may do who was Vero Ptolemy the seconds I dr possibly also ptolemy the thirds eye doctor although that is a matter of dispute <hes> and they made this inclusion based on a collection of plaques from within the bandages one of which was thoss God of eye doctors. He has a designation because of a story within the mythology of replacing somebody's eye after it was knocked got I think in battle in previous installments of unearthed we have talked about the use of ground penetrating radar and other noninvasive technologies which has led to the discovery of massive cities and buried structures and South America and in Europe similar similar discoveries have also been happening in Africa where light are scans and a South African nature preserve have pinpointed the location of the city of quitting which thrived from the fourteen hundreds until the late nineteenth century. It's basic location Asian was already known but this pinpointed it more specifically and this new study also suggests that it had about three times as many buildings as previously thought it's likely the city was composed of between eight hundred nine hundred walled compounds sounds housing as many as ten thousand people a team from the University of Cincinnati have discovered evidence that suggests that the Maya did more than a subsistence level of farming growing surplus of things like cotton to trade all around the Yucatan Peninsula <hes> this research has involved satellite imaging and lighter studies that have revealed drainage and irrigation systems along with roads in the words of Nicholas Dunning a professor of geography who is part of this research team quote. It was a much more complex market. Economy than the Maya are often given credit for and laughed. We have a little lengthier Fine D._N._A.. Testing has been conducted on the remains of Casimir Polaski. Polaski was an immigrant from Poland to North America. He became a General George George Washington's continental army. He's considered now to be a war hero. In both Poland in the United States scientists who examined his skeleton a couple of decades ago found that his pelvis looked more like what they would expect on a female skeleton. They were surprised enough by the pelvises appearance that they wondered whether his bones had been replaced with someone else's at the time they plan to compare DNA from there remains to Polanski's living grammy's but the technology in Nineteen ninety-six was not yet advanced enough to give a truly conclusive answer that is not the case today and this year researchers concluded that yes the bones really are Polanski's so this evidence also suggests that Polaski may have been intersex acts or had physical traits that don't clearly fit into a binary of male and female so in Pulaski case this includes that his bone structure appeared more female while he also had male pattern baldness and facial hair facial hair is not an exclusively female trait but his pattern of facial hair was definitely more masculine. This news led to a number of articles suggesting that Pulaski might have been female or that we might need to refer to him with she her pronouns instead of male pronouns but that also doesn't really match up what we know of Polanski's life he was recorded as a boy when he was baptized and he really doesn't seem to have gone outside the gender norms for men during his wife if he or his family thought anything was unusual about his body not that is not recorded anywhere so taking all of our cues from Pulaski himself. He remains the right Pronoun- yeah we we should not reassign people's pronouns based on D._N._A.. Evidence contrary to how they actually we lived this was also part of Smithsonian Channel documentary which to be clear. I have not watched. I don't know what it says in there. It's called America's hidden stories. The general was female question mark and maybe we will have an episode about Polaski at some point in the future seems really interesting. This research is also really interesting and it's also always interesting to have another potentially intersex person <hes> in our library of episodes and the last bit before we take isn't directly related to Casimir Polaski but it does follow on with this practice of trying to figure out sex and gender based on a person's remains the idea of researchers figuring out a person sex X. based on their skeletal remains. It's pretty frequently on our unearthed episodes and in other episodes of the show but this is a really difficult task in cultures that practice cremation in a paper published in January Claudio Cavazzuti of Durham University discusses cusses analyzing the cremated remains of one hundred twenty four people which were buried along with gender grave goods as in a grave containing weapons probably belonged to a man and a grave containing a yarn spindle was probably a woman's they cross-referenced referenced twenty four different skeletal traits with the goods those remains were buried with to see if they could find anything that seemed to predict gender out of these twenty four traits eight of them predicted the grave goods gender with an accuracy rate of have about eighty percent or better which is comparable with the methods that are used to evaluate uncommitted remains so measurements of specific parts of the bones like the thigh upper arm the jaw and the big toe among others seems to correlate with the grave save goods. Even after the body had been cremated. There is still a lot of room for uncertainty in this though it all rests on the assumption that a society had very clear gender roles in which people did not really deviate from those roles and that people's grave goods were closely connected to their gender. It also assumes that there's a close correlation between gender and sex in the words of a press release on this discovery quote anatomical sex determination is possible in cremated it remains though they cautioned that the measurements identified in this study differ from those used to sex modern cremated remains indicating that sexually diagnostic traits differ between populations across time and space but it is still an interesting potential new source of data now. We're going to take a quick sponsor break before getting into some other things. This episode of Steffi missed in history class is brought to you by the Hulu show for weddings in a funeral for weddings and funeral is a new Hulu original series produced by mini cailing relationships are forged in broken political scandals or exposed London social life is lampooned love affairs ignited doused and of course there are four weddings and a funeral. You can catch all the drama in four weddings in a funeral new ROM com series produced by Mindy cailing premiering July thirty. I only on Hulu the next up we have a whole collection of things that were repatriated or returns to where they came from. I up art detective Arthur brand returned to Spanish reliefs that were at least two thousand years old handing them over to two officers and to museum curator's at the Spanish Embassy in London. These release had been stolen from the Santa Maria Delara church in northern Spain in two thousand four and then a British couple bought them. I'm having no idea what they are or they have been stolen. The British library returned three historic documents that had been removed from Greek monastery in nineteen seventy nine authorities in Greece had traced the illegally traffic documents to the British library which immediately returned the documents through the Greek embassy in London and another similar story a Bible that was stolen out of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and the nine hundred ninety s was found in a museum in the Netherlands and returned the Bible was four hundred four years old and it's theft had gone unnoticed for several years until auditors surveyed the rare books room where it was housed there were three hundred fourteen books missing from this room allegedly thanks to Library Library archivist Gregory priore and Caliban bookshop owner John Schulman who were in on the job together. It appears that the criminal case so the two of them is ongoing yet as as I was looking at this there was there were a lot of indictments and hearings and things like that added. It doesn't appear that there have been convictions or acquittals gets unless I missed something. This is not the only huge document or book theft that we have to talk about because in similar news in the nineteen eighteen forties herald e Perry who was a clerk in the Massachusetts State Archives meticulously stole and extensive collection of historical documents and then covered his tracks by destroying the records of those documents in the archive catalog. This is just evil archivist day a lot of these letters were kept in bound book and he also clicked out the index page of the book that listed the documents his crime came to light and he was arrested in nineteen fifty and he received a suspended ended sentence in exchange for helping track down the material that he had stolen and then sold last year authorities track down one of the documents a letter from Alexander Hamilton the Marquee Lafayette written in seventeen eighty during the revolutionary war the F._B._I.. Ultimately seized the letter from an auction house in late twenty eighteen and in May of this year the U._S.. Attorney filed a forfeiture complaint in federal court to try to get the letter back into the Commonwealth Archive. That process seems to still be ongoing. A relief found in Australia's Macquarie Museum has been repatriated to Egypt after it was discovered that the peace had been smuggled out of Egypt in the Nineteen Ninety s the fragment was initially unearthed in the nineteen seventies eighties but then officials at the store house where it was being kept discovered that it was missing in one thousand nine hundred five now. We're shifting gears to talk about the remains of people in April. Germany began the process of returning the remains of Aboriginal people able to Australia. These remains had been removed from Australia in the late nineteenth in early twentieth century. The April ceremony was the first of several described by Australia's minister for Communications as quote the largest number of ancestors returned from Germany any to date in Australia attempts will be made to confirm the identity of each so they can be returned to the appropriate people and for one last year shift in this section in opposite news to all of that and April Greek President Copious Palabras called for the British Museum to return a collection of two thousand five hundred year old sculptures known as the Parthenon Marbles which were removed from Greece by Lord Elgin in and are now in the collection of the British Museum so Greece it has been requesting for these marbles to be returned since it became independent in eighteen thirty two. This is also a developing story with protests taking place over at the British Museum in June. The museum has maintained that these were acquired fired through a legal agreement with the Ottoman Empire which ruled Greece at the time and has so far return refused to return the marbles now are doing a bigger gear shift to kind of nuttier topics stuff that was just weird together because it's weird the couch potato chip factory so there's your clue. We're really shifting gears at this point in Hong Kong has been using French potatoes to make its chips and one of its shipments earlier this year contained not a potato but an unexploded exploded world war one hand grenade define. How do you do <hes> the grenade had been discharged but it had not been detonated and then it probably just lay in a field until it was accidentally dug up along with potatoes? A bomb squad detonated it needed onsite. No one was injured. Then the news reports. Call it a bomb tear which is great. Yes if you do not speak French. puppeteer is what you call potato. It means apple all of the earth yet but this is a bomb to tear. I'm not usually really into the puns but the fact that this when combined the French that delighted me a plumber and machine operator in Aalborg Denmark pulled Medieval sword out of the ground in February having just founded on the job the historical museum of Northern Jutland was called in and identified the sort as probably dating back to the fourteenth century they noted that it was very well made and was the type of item that normally would have been buried with the person who owned. Owned it so they speculated that may have been lost during a battle and then it just stayed where it fell for the centuries that followed this is not the first just discovered sword that we've talked about but it's been awhile since we had one that wasn't in a lake at team at the university. University of York has unearth an account of a nun faking her death to escape the convents but register that contained this account was in the archive the whole time so the book itself was not lost but this was part of a marginal final note and one of them so somebody had to actually read all the scribbling to get to it it dates back to thirteen eighteen archbishop William Melton wrote the none Joan of leads was after the way of Carnal Lust but really that may you have just meant that she wanted to leave the religious life behind and get married he wrote this she quote out of a militias mind simulating a bodily illness. She pretended to be dead not dreading for the health of her soul and with the help of numerous of her accomplices is evil doers with malice aforethought crafted a dummy in the likeness of her body in order to mislead the devoted faithful and she had no shame in procuring. It's burial in a sacred space amongst the religious of that place he he later described it as a scandal of all of her order so in the reporting about this professor Sara Rees Jones described this as being like a monty python sketch and so far no one has founded update about the resolution to all of this yes. We don't know what happened with Joan of leads what happened with the rest of her order mystery. I hope she had a very fun life. According to a paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science Iron Age celts in southern France may have tried to embalm decapitated heads. They came to this conclusion while studying skull fragments that dated back to the Third Century B._C.. E with the fragments likely coming from people who were decapitated after having been killed in battle they found traces of resin that are not present in animal skulls from the area suggesting that the resin was applied intentionally probably to try to slow down the decay process. Lee Skull fragments were also found within the walls of compound so are they suspect that this was done for the Fort's own warriors as a mark of respect maybe to display them not to preserve the skulls for display outside as a warning to their enemies. I guess maybe if you were really into it. You might I preserve your enemies skulls and hang them inside to look upon them in victory is just a little less preserve this head and keep it indoors all I can think of his Futurama's head museum yeah or they just keep heads alive so that you could talk to former presidents <hes> we are once again moving into a new area of discussion. Now we are to a fan favorite which is shipwrecks Yup who doesn't love shipwreck story <hes> an anchor off the coast of Cornwall maybe abby from the merchant royal which was ship that wrecked in the seventeenth century and is described as the most valuable shipwreck of all time a fishing vessel called the spirited lady caught the anchor while trawling separately Alexandria universities cities archaeological mission found several submerged anchors off the coast of Egypt as well a shipwreck found off the Mediterranean coast of Egypt in what was the sunken port city of what I think is pronounced sonus directly on <hes> that is a guest this has confirmed Harada description of type of boat known as a Barris. These ships were used to say along the Nile and Herodotus wrote a lengthy description of them and their construction in his history. He said that they were using planks arranged just like bricks and connected with Tannin's with beam stretched over the planks with a rudder and Keel and the whole thing made waterproof with papyrus so he wrote this description about twenty five hundred years ago but this is the first time anybody has found the the exact type of vessel that he was talking about. I don't know if anybody's super doubted whether he was being truthful. In this account of boats there are plenty of questions in Herodotus history but it was nice to have it validated in other for news. An Astrolabe was pulled up for the rest of the esmerelda one INVESCO commish ships in two thousand fourteen this year it was confirmed to be the oldest astrolabe ever found the Gama had left the ESMERELDA off the coast of Portugal in fifteen. Oh three three and the ship leader sank in a storm. This astrolabe was so warned by the time it was discovered that it's markings were no longer visible to the naked I it just looks like kind of a corroded disc so it took laser scanning in the construction of a three be model to actually confirm what it was a whole bunch of shipping containers fell off ship in the North Sea at the beginning of this year. Some of those contained hazardous materials in the area is ecologically delegates so salvage crews got to work trying to track them all down and they wound up finding shipwreck that dates back to fifteen forty and is described as Dutch maritime histories missing link because it represents a bridge between medieval maritime technology and the Dutch golden age. This is at least fifty years older than the previous oldest Dutt ship and researchers are hoping to use it to learn more about how Dutch maritime technology evolved an ancient shipwreck off the coast of Greece has been opened up as a public underwater museum and it's not mark all that uncommon for shipwrecks to become dive sites. I mean we talked about beer brought up from shipwreck earlier in the show but this is the first ancient shipwreck in Greece to be open to the public. It's the ship that went down in the late fifth century B._C.. It's very old it was carrying a huge load of enfor filled with wine. So divers can see the remains at the ship and these jars that are all over the seafloor plus of course the sea life that makes its home there now and then our last thing is just a cool thing that tracy found and I love it. I thought you might archaeologists from Washington. State University have found what they believe is North America's oldest tattoo tool it dates back about two thousand years to the ancestral Pueblo wins in what is now Utah and it is made of a Su- Mak Handle Yuka leaves and cactus spines and those cactus spines are stained black at the tips. Yeah wonder what that Tattoo was. That's a good question and that has been unearthed for July twenty nineteen. We'll have some more unearthed in the fall see how it goes in having the more than twice a year <hes> in the meantime while we ponder what that could be like <hes>. Do you have listener meal for US I do it is another listener mail about tiffany stained glass and so this is from Nathaniel who says hi Liane Tracy. I'm a longtime listener first-time writer. I just listened to your recent podcast on Hapshetsut. I was aware of her existence but not much more than that and I'm amazed at how much more there is to know about her in the mystery of Peut thank you the reason I'm writing. That was the letter you read at the end of that episode from a listener in stained glass artisan Christopher. I loved hearing what Christopher wrote and I wanted to add more information in that vein. I'm also a great fan of tiffany stained glass. Put me down as another plus one request for an episode on that or an adjacent topic and wanted to let you know about an even bigger tiffany treasure trove close by like to thank Christopher having so many ts in that sentence the Church of the Covenant at the corner of of Berkeley and Newbury street just one block away from the Arlington Street Church in Boston which Christopher named in his letter has not only an enormous intact collection of tiffany stained glass the church sanctuaries whole interior design was entirely done by Tiffany to coordinate with the windows and includes an enormous tiffany chandelier that was displayed at the 1893 Chicago world's fair. It's the largest surviving church that tiffany ever did unchanged since completion apart from maintenance Manson is now a national historic landmark tracy since your fellow Boston area local you might want to know there are open tours of sanctuary offered in season most days you want to do an episode on Tiffany or stained glass. I'm happy to put you in in touch with someone at the Church of the Covenant. If you'd like although not a frequent churchgoer I grew up attending covenant and married there a few years ago in I'm still a member I would be thrilled to be helpful to you. <hes> then Nathaniel passes on a the topic suggestion about the invention in history of pipe organs which is also really fascinating and then concludes. I love the PODCAST and love history. Thank you for helping me discover fascinating kids knowledge about the world you make me a better and more nuance person warm regards nathaniel. Thank thank you so much nathaniel. There's a surprising amount of tiffany glass and tiffany designed stuff in Boston and I'm sure and a lot of other cities to the way back when we first talked about tiffany stained glass on the show one of the things that I have stumbled across and Mary short succession was that a a whole building that was originally designed. The interior design was all done by tiffany and there's this huge restoration project going on because it's a building thing that changed hands a lifetime so unlike this church like a bunch of stuff is covered over and moved around and they've been trying to put it back to what it used to look like so there's there's so much so thank you nathaniel for that note and to everybody who has sent us lots of email lately if you'd like to write to us about this or any other podcast history podcast and how stuff works dot com and then we're all over social media at missing history. That's where you'll find our facebook pinterest twitter and instagram. You can also come to our website missed in history dot com and find show notes all the episodes holly and I have worked on together. This one includes links the original stories for all of these things that were unearthed. You can also find a searchable archive it every upset ever and then up at the top of the page where it says live shows you can see information formation about our upcoming live shows and tour and you can subscribe to our show at Apple podcasts the iheartradio APP wherever else you get podcasts stuffy missed in history classes. The production shouldn't Iheartradio's how steph works for more podcasts for my heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows television network decades of pioneering engineering television broadcast once and never seen again. There was nothing else like this on early television generation of American musicians completely forgotten. There hasn't been a guess culturally they matter there's.

North America Australia Greece Liane Tracy Long Island South America Tiffany Egypt Polaski Europe Casimir Polaski apple Alabama Westin hotels United States Nathaniel theft Sri Lanka Christopher
George Sand: Novelist, Muse and Gender Bender

Stuff You Missed in History Class

44:49 min | 9 months ago

George Sand: Novelist, Muse and Gender Bender

"This episode is brought to you by Milano cookies. Look sometimes that long Zen Yoga classes just not in the cards so maybe a cookie is pepperidge. Farm Milano believes leaves. You should make some time for yourself once in a while. I know I have a particular space in my sewing room that I like to just take a few minutes. Every day I sit there I think about things. It's kind of like meditation and Munching at the same time. You can get that Yemi beautiful. Cookie flavor makes it luxurious and delightful and I always feel recharged Milano. Cookies are truly a treat worthy of your meantime they are delicate and crispy with luxuriously rich chocolate in the middle. You really want to keep these just for you. So remember to save something for yourself with Pepperidge Farm Milano Welcome to stuff. If you missed in history. Class A production of iheartradio's how stuff works. Hello Hello and welcome to the PODCAST. I'm holly and I'm Tracy D Wilson. I will apologize right out of the gate torch voice. I think sometimes people wonder why we don't Maybe postpone recording. If one of us is ill suddenly I sound hoarse and I'm not even the person who is. We already cancelled last week completely. Yeah like where we're at the point of no return. We have to record an episode. The good news is I will tell you. I'm mostly better like I'm not suffering through this. My voice it just hasn't fully recovered yet. I'm at like eighty five to ninety percent. Good yes I just sounded a little froggy. Yeah and I'm fine but for some reason the moment when I got on Mike just now my voice was like you know what I think i WanNa do is have sympathy for Holly Right. You're sympathetic frog. I understand But we're GONNA a carry on because that's what we do. We're going to talk about somebody that's been on my list forever. which is your song and the Popular Image of George Saunders? Sort word of this sexy artiste of early eighteen. Hundreds Peres not entirely off base But she was above all else a writer of incredible output and was in her time incredibly famous her behavior and her personal style were almost as talked about as her novels and all of these factors combine made her into a figure that was admired. Eggert Bhai many despised by some but it seems like fascination with her was almost universal and We should mention short sound was involved automatically with a lot of people. She was kind of a serial monogamist. should kind of bounced from one to another and that was a big influence on her work and she wrote a lot of different works. We will not list them all because as we said. Her output was astonishing. We also will list all of her paramore's or Oliver writing titles but just know we're giving you a brief version. Am I still think it's a pretty full love of saucy adventure and writing. Yes so if we if we omit your favorite Britt book or your favorite romance type personal. They're just a lot of them. Don't worry Chopin is in here. which is what everybody thinking right right now? Right they're not gonNA show pen now. I think that's actually how How she wound up moving finally to the top of your list was we had been brainstorming for thing about how people described as muses and there was the yeah for a whole separate thing and I was gosh? Spend my list forever. Although I had already started rooted in episode on her you know how do that. I'll start an episode right a few hundred thousand words and be like I'm GonNa move onto something else for a little while and then that episode sort of weights in its germination stage until they come back around on it so in terms of what we're talking about today we'll start. At the beginning. As we often often do Lucille do pen was born on July first of eighteen and four in Paris and her family and friends normally called her Aurora. Her Father Maurice. Japan was an officer in the French army serving under Napoleon and her mother was Sophie de Laborde who was a bird sellers daughter bird bird selling is the profession. Just kinda delights me a little bit. He's a sophie. Imerese had been together for several years before Aurora was born but they only got married a month before her birth. The two of them already had children both with other people and together Marines refused to acknowledge his son from prior relationship that was shut their own. Although Marissa's mother made sure that the boy and his own mother were provided for and move them into a house in the family property. Sophie had a daughter from a previous relationship named Caroline Dilip Board and the children that Sophie and Maurice had together before Aurora had all died in infancy so there were a lot of members of the family but also in terms of two of them together was the first surviving child correct and just before a return four four. Her parents had another child this time. A son named Auguste Louis in August Louis was born in Madrid as Sophie had traveled to Spain to be with Maurice. That was where Napoleon had stationed him and then they all went back to France. Shortly after a roars birthday. That was a trip that took them through rural France during brutal famine. And it was is something The images of that trip released stuck with aurore vividly for years. The Baby August Louis died on September eighth of eighteen. O Eight. That was was just shy of three months old. Marie had an accident and died eight days later after falling off a horse and not long after that Sophie had to relinquish custody aurore to her grandmother because she just wasn't able to provide for her Aurora then spent most of her childhood in no aunt in central France and this was her family's he's home and she spent a lot of time there on the family estate with her grandmother. Sylvia did not leave her daughter's life though even though she had relinquished custody she still would spend time it. No aunt at the Chateau each summer in Aurora would also sometimes travel to Paris for visits with her mother as well so are spent her formative years in the Adila rural the environment of nuance and that's believed to have informed a lot of her writing. She was tutored by a man named Jean Francois De Chartres as a child that was the same person who had educated her father and he was something of an eccentric so she got a little tap hazard sort of an education. It probably wouldn't qualify as a formal Komo education in any sense of the phrase see also had lessons alongside her half brother although it was unclear to the children exactly what their relationship was to each other for quite some time. Yeah they're reading about Asia. Suadi shouts his involvement in her. Life is sometimes glossed over in this weird sort of way. About what a weird education she got. I read one thing that suggested that he started dressing her in boy's clothes because it just made more sense to him to have a pupil that was addresses a boy because he was only used to educating boys. I don't know if there's any actual value in that information or fact to it But it is pretty widely accepted did that. Whatever education she got from him was a little bit Kooky and then she reached early? Teenage years are are started as many kids do to rebel. Her grandmother was very old fashioned and she expected ladylike behaviour and that was simply not in a roars nature so the child started telling her grandmother. No that was she wanted to do was go to Paris and live with her mother. Feel like this is the tale as old as time right like yeah. You're not my real mom. I'm GonNa go where I can be me not so much yes. There's some speculation that Aurora's mother. Sophie may have supported herself with sex work when she was a teenager after her parents had both died and it seems that grandmother chose this moment to tell Aurora about her mother's alleged profession in the midst of this rebellion. Presumably family is a way to try to shame or scare her into abeyance and the end result of all this conflict because are still was not going to be happy. Staying at home was that at the age of thirteen. She was sent to a convent in Paris to live with the English Augustinian sisters and shifting from country life to being immersed holy in a religious environment in the city had a very profound effect on the teenager. She became deeply interested in mysticism during this time but though she seemed very very happy the convent and even considered becoming a nun herself. That was a little too far for what her grandmother had in mind. Her grandmother brought her back to know on just a couple of years later when she was seventeen Aurora inherited the family estate after her grandmother died Sophie came back to retrieve for teenage daughter brought her back to Paris but at that point Aurora was really not interested in answering to her mother so she got married because she thought that was going to offer her some more independence. This is another another story that I feel like comes up in all kinds of modern tales and short zone. Did this before anybody else. I'm sure there were other people that did it before her. But she got married to a man named Casimir Devan on September seventeenth of eighteen twenty two and the couple were married in Paris but they moved to know to settle down and do devote was nine years older than roar. He was the son of a baron who was born out of wedlock but he was acknowledged by his father so in marrying him aurore became. The Baroness Baroness doodle. The couple had a child in June following their wedding. The Sun they named Maurice and for the next year they traveled eventually settling in Paris at the end of eighteen twenty four. They kept traveling a great deal. Though including going back to know for extended visits in initially it kind of seems like Aurora was trying to make the best out of this marriage but over time she grew restless and unsatisfied in her life would do and she started to exhibit signs of what we would probably categorizes depression today. CASIMIR was a poor match for her. For a number of reasons. Aurore was a devout reader and the stories that she read made her long for more than her domestic life. Casimir was not that he was not so much into the life of the mind and he tended to find solace with other romantic interests that he found less complicated than his his wife including their housemaids. And this kind of seems like one of those cases where a couple with an age gap gets married because initially the older partner seems cool to the younger partner partner but is the younger partner matures it turns out that they grow beyond that older partner Because she was pretty done with him within a few years and eighteen twenty five they. We're traveling in the Pyrenees and Aurora met a young judge named jean-pierre or alien displays and the two of them were immediately attracted to one another but he was engaged. He said that he found his fiancee. Beautiful but dull and Aurora who was smart and insightful was just fascinating to him The two of them exchanged love letters over the next five years and what's often described as a passionate but platonic love although there is debate about whether the platonic part is really true. Yeah we don't know this. Experience of having such an intense connection to someone made it abundantly clear to a roar that her marriage by comparison would never offer her the same kind of excitement or be very fulfilling and she told Casimir about her affection for says and that they needed to figure out some sort of way to make their household livable in eighteen. Twenty six a man named Stefan. Bon adjusts owned a Gra Sonya reentered Aurora's life and he had been a tutor of hers. Earlier on but when the two of them became re-acquainted intense attraction between them led to a physical relationship. He was probably the father of Aurora's daughter. Salaj who was born in September of eighteen. Twenty eight in the year a year. After her daughter was born aurore began writing in earnest. She penned a travel memoir Lama Hyphen. That's the godmother during this time as well as his wild Aldo which is story of a dreamer that particular book was never finished in the summer of eighteen thirty Aurora. Another man this one seven years younger than she was. He would really catalyze a significant life. Change that then. twenty-six-year-old Aurora had really been longing for this was Ju- Sandhu who is an aspiring writer. Here and the two of them seem became romantically involved. I feel like that phrase the two of them soon became romantically involved can just be repeated so many times throughout this episode This is a really really significant turning point though for so we were gonNA pause here for a quick sponsor break before we get into how her life changed this episode of Steffi missed in history classes as-as brought to you by me undies. I know not. Everybody Adores Valentine's Day but there is still a lot of awesome adorable stuff. You can get for Valentine's times day including the latest prince from me undies. ME UNDIES has not one not two but three new Valentine's Day prince this year and it's a great opportunity to show that special someone that you're ready to take it to the next level with matching pairs match me. So I know it's real is the motto this year and it doesn't have to be your partner you could match your. BFF You could match your dog. All still counts. I love my Mondays. I have my very favorite pair that I always wear to the airport which I always talking about but I also Oh really love their lounge wear and someone has told us that biondi's has some new lounge wear that you can wear out and about so. Keep Your eyes peeled for some cozy new additions to to get your fifteen percent off your first pair free shipping and a one hundred percent satisfaction guaranteed go to me undies dot com slash history. That's me undies. Dot Dot com slash history. In in early eighteen. Thirty one aurore moved to Paris. was you'll Sando leaving behind her husband and her home. She had made an arrangement with Casimir regarding guarding this move. Though that arrangement was not arrived at in a particularly amicable fashion the dude of all household had as Aurora became more and more restless. Become a place of persistent persistent. Strife has been wife argued constantly and they only ever seem to be happy in relationships with people outside the marriage so in eighteen thirty thirty one. The decision was made that aurore with spend half of each year in Paris switching out with life at noon. Every three months enduring roars times in Paris the children were split up so her toddler daughter Solange with stay in no along with Casimir and Maurice. Their son was cared for by tutor. Aurora started to more seriously focus in writing in Paris now writing under the pseudonym jules son or sometimes just J. Song that work was published in La Figura which was a periodical. Run by Ariella to shoe would become one of Aurora's closest friends. Latouche and you'll sometimes see his name as dilettantish basically asked Aurora to write these tirico pieces as a freelancer and that marks the beginning of her professional career as a writer. There's ongoing debate about these pieces. They are generally believed to be collaborations between between Aurora and Usual Sendo. But it's unclear about exactly how much of them contributed. Yeah the how much either of them wrote of any of those pieces will probably be debated forever. And this is also the period of her life when Aurora began wearing menswear and she would write of this shift in her attire later quote. I had a sentry box coat made of rough grey cloth with trousers and waistcoat to match with gray hat and a huge cravat of woollen material. I I looked exactly like a first year student so this was scandalous to some people but it's also more important to note that it was flat out illegal women in Paris. Were supposed to get a permit to wear men's clothing. That was a law that had been issued an eighteen hundred. If a woman could prove that she needed to dress in menswear player for a medical reason she could get a permit to do it but Aurora and a handful of other women. Did it without a permit. They didn't try to get a permit. They were whatever they wanted. Without not much in the way of real consequences that law was actually still on the books in Paris Not really enforced though until twenty thirteen. Yeah if you look back could articles in two thousand thirteen. They're like finally women can wear pants with their writing is a joke because of course people had been wearing pants forever And this was a time when it seemed Arar was truly defining the woman that she wanted to be and she was establishing her unique identity. She wasn't necessarily wearing men's clothes to cause a stir. Sheep found the more practical and more comfortable than wearing dresses but she did also enjoy seeing the different way she was treated when she was wearing menswear. Her figure was not especially Shauwie curvy so she was sometimes mistaken for a man and that was something which she seemed to quite enjoy particularly when she could reveal to the confused observer that in fact she was a woman she wrote a first novel called Indiana at the end of eighteen thirty one that was published in May eighteen thirty two under her new pen name which was eventually she grew tired of jewel sendo. She broke off their relationship and moved into a new apartment nearby. Her daughter salons moved in with with her yeah. That boy's salons was a little bit older than her her toddler age and she would have needed more constant attention so it worked just fine. Indiana is not not surprisingly a story about a woman dissatisfied with her marriage. She longs for passion and adoration in in that quest. She puts her faith in the wrong man. A spoiler oiler alert. This is one of those classic troops where the right man was in front of her the whole time and the to do eventually end up together and this novel wasn't instant instance. Success this is when Aurora became famous and became publicly. Known as George Sean. So we're going to change over to addressing her by that name initially. She chose the pen name because she wanted people to appreciate the writing rather than marvel at the fact that a woman had written it but soon it was really common knowledge. Take Yeah that was written by a woman and she just kind of rolled with it. You have to wonder if her like constant love of revealing like in fact I am not a student but a woman Didn't didn't help you. Know kind of dissipate any anonymity she had been hoping for Indiana was quickly followed by another novel. Valentin in November of that that same year and at that point Georgia's kind of the it writer in Paris so keep in mind that this is a time when novels were sort of equivalent to film or television today in terms of their prominence is entertainment so she became something of an overnight celebrity following Indiana's publication. The volunteers of this novel is the story is heroine. And she's Aristocrat who falls in love with a poor farmer. In addition to the theme of true love can never be actualized because class disparity. This book also serves as a a feminist critique of the poor standards of Education for women Volunteers prepared only to be a wife and nothing more and even if she were or to end up with her farmer love she would not be prepared well for the rigors of that kind of a life in early eighteen thirty three George sewn had a brief romantic relationship with a woman and this was the actress. Marie Doro this was a heady time for some newly famous and free from the domestic life that she had sled she really had her pick of suitors in eighteen. Thirty three was also the year that George published her third novel Lelio and not long. After she began her relationship with door. Vall Saundh met fellow writer Alfred who also became her lover and with whom she had an on again off again romance that would rival any fiction. Laleia gave readers a heroin. He was a lot like saunders self an icon class. Who did not care about societal convention? The titular character finds happiness neither with her many love affairs nor in being celebrate when Laleia tells her courtesans sister of this whole situation. The sister suggests that lately it should become a cortisone herself. This catalyze a plot that it involves a poet who's in love with Laleia whose life falls apart after she tries to seduce him and then betrays him not read this book. It sounds very complicated. Lelio was also panned by the breasts. Yeah and again It it in some ways. She is pulling from her own life in her. Her various relationships like it is not a surprise that at a time when she has met. FBI with whom she had a very volatile relationship that she was also writing about these sort of complicated romantic matters The end of eighteen thirty three and the beginning of eighteen thirty four were very chaotic and fraught it George and we say decided to go away to Italy but that trip turned very sour and this really sounds like Telenovela plot. Things went completely arrive. First when George got dysentery Mazeidi then begin having episodes of delirium because it turned out he had typhoid fever. Then Georgia began an affair with the Italian doctor who came to treat musee his name. Was Luigi Pay Jello and when they recovered enough to return to Paris song and decided added that she would stay behind in Venice with her new beloved doctor. Three months after his return to Peres also felt as though she could go back to France particularly to see her children so in June of eighteen thirty four she left Italy for Paris. She brought the doctor with her but not long after getting their search split up up with him to return to museum although the reunion lasted less than a month I certainly would not recommend it as a piece of of historical information but if you have ever seen or have not seen the movie impromptu which is about phoned in which the incomparable. Judy Davis Plays George Mandy Patinkin he's museum and he is spectacular You get a sense of all of their levels of drama when the two of them are together onscreen throughout throughout all of this drama. Though in her personal life song was writing in publishing. She published a series of stories in the Literary magazine reviewed do Moans during her. Turbulent turbulent eighteen thirty four including Leone Leoni and Jacques and at the beginning of eighteen. Thirty five zoned reunited one last time but but their relationship was completely over by March of that year post moves as George began seeing a lawyer. In known named Louis Michel the next big event in Georgetown's life was finally legally separating herself from Casimir Devan. This was significant legal battle. Her lawyer paramore. You're a more could not continue their relationship. He was married. He did not wish to disrupt his life with a long term affair but he did manage Georgia's legal separation gratien before they split up. Getting significant judgment wins for her in July eighteen. Thirty six the separation although it was not a divorce was finally settled old the two key aspects of the legal decision that Her lawyer Louis Michel had fought for. Were that a George got custody of the children and and be her chateau and property in known reverted entirely back to her her son. Maurice would have been thirteen at this point and Solange with seven on the verge of turning eight and once she had married to devote he had become the controller of the family finances so she'd been given an allowance out of what was rightfully her own inheritance. So that was what she was seeking to to reverse at this point even after the separation SOM- did provide her husband with an annual income around around. This time son met previous podcasts subject Franz Liszt and his paramour Marie Doug Franz Marie traveled to know want to visit signed twice in eighteen thirty seven and it was through this friendship that George met the man she's most often associated with who he referenced back at the top of the show Frederic Chopin. The friendship with Marie in particular would disintegrate in time it was revealed disorders that she'd Been Gossiping about her. And generally scheming against her her son eventually wrote quote. Your understanding of friendship is different than mine. You just won't give up being beautiful and Witty Women Who Slaughters and smashes has all the others and well solved was instantly taken with Chopin when she met him largely because of his musical skill. That interest was not initially reciprocated in a letter that he wrote to families. Chopin wrote something about her repels me but by May of eighteen thirty eight. The two were lovers. They stayed together for nine years and both of them were incredibly productive during their romance. It's kind of considered like their golden period for both of them as creators their relationship was perplexing to their friends at I. Shou Pao was quiet and reserved with delicate health. He was the polar opposite of George who lived. She wished and was unafraid. Of just about everything. There were whispers and their social circle that the match might take toll on Chopin who was perceived to to be pretty fragile and during their first winter together. She took him along with her two children to stay in a monastery. The weather and the meager accommodations. There were really rough on the composer. He coughed up blood throughout this whole. Stay after that debacle. They returned to Noah where George Doors fawned over Frederick and nursed back to health. In addition to show Pam. Sol's friendship with list and Doug. ooh connected her. To many of Europe's most popular writers and artists. Many of those people spend time with her at the Chateau in no including on our Zach and using della who employed her son Maurice as an apprentice for the time in April of eighteen forties or Ceann tried her hand at a different kind of writing which was theater and this did not go so well her play goes Zima which was also titled La. Honda more hate in Love was a flop in eighteen forty one song. She found herself in a battle with the leadership of the review to do moaned owned over her new novel. Horace the periodicals editor had no wish to publish this work. And this led to George solemn developing her own literary periodical Review View Independent in which Pierre Larue and Louisville Aldo were partners. This offered her a vehicle to Publish her own work whenever she wanted and as she saw fit she had an increasing interest in political matters at this point and so short assigned was inspired in eighteen. Forty four to start another periodical while review. Independent was an outlet for her romantic literary work her. Second Paper Look Clearer. which is the scout gave her a place to print her increasingly political and particularly Lee Socialist writing in eighteen forty seven after nine years together? A permanent rift formed between stoned and show Pam in February of that year. Sawn in her daughter salons sat for sculptor Auguste Closing Yay and Solange and the sculptor fell madly in love. This was a little bit complicated because Solange was engaged to someone someone else but she broke off that relationship to marry lezignanais three months after meeting him two months after the wedding which George had not really supported. Did the writer got into a huge fight over money with her daughter and her new son in law class on. Ya pulled a gun and threatens zoned. In the midst of this high tension family family conflict it was Salaj not jurors that Chopin ultimately sided with. He broke up with by letter. And that's signs version. In at least Chopin had come to think of Solange as his own daughter and he was not willing to cut her out of his life when the composer and the writer did see each other again the a year after their break-up that's kind of written about as though they kind of ran into each other. Accidentally Chopin gave George the news. This only had given birth to a daughter that it was to be the last time that zone and Chopin saw each other. Japan died on October seventeenth. Eighteen forty nine to regular basis Clinton J. Actually he cast his death mask. Georgetown did not attend Chopin's funeral. Many people actually blamed her for his death even though his health improved considerably during his time at no long after that first lightly disastrous Winter Saum did however later reconcile with her daughter next. We'll talk about Georgetown's life life after Chopin but I going to pause for a word from one of our sponsors because we could not do this show without them a hey Ali we have some exciting news. Yeah I am wildly excited and People will have another opportunity to watch cry at ARC's have you sounded so calm and it's not a calm situation at all. Our trip to Paris last year was really successful. So we're doing another similar trip this year but this time time to Rome and Florence its May fourteenth through twenty first twenty twenty and like last time it is with a company called defined destinations. Who is planning blading out this whole trip for us? Yeah during that week long trip we are going to see some of the great art that we've talked about on this show many times including Michelangelo's David. We are going going to go to Tuscany. We're going to visit Saint Peter's Basilica we are going to the Sistine Chapel. So it's going to be a fantastic trip. You can get the whole list of places this is that we are going and information about booking at defined destinations dot com. Scroll down to the Roman Florence Strip with Steffi missed in history class or oh come over to our social media we have posts about it there to The wave of revolutions that began in France in February eighteen. Forty eight led to the overthrow of King. Louis Philippe and the rise is the second republic the Second Republic which SOM- believed would be closely aligned with her own personal ideals drew her back to Paris and she started another new periodical. Michael Their La Casa di pupil the cause of the people. She also wrote for a number of other socialist papers during that time but in the months after the overthrow of the monarchy it became clear that the new government of France was a lot more conservative than son had hoped it would be. She was completely disillusioned by this turn of events and she went back to where she spent most of her time for the rest of your life. The rustic short novel from swallow shall be was published in eighteen forty eight. It is the story of shelby that is a nickname. I'm that translates literally to little mushroom but in this context it refers to a country orphan. This book was very popular and in eighteen forty nine it was staged as a play at the Odeon theatre in Paris and unlike her earlier foray into theater. Sawn met with great success with friends Soi on the stage for Christmas in eighteen. Forty nine unsown son. Maurice invited his friend Alexander Months. Oh to know. Aunt months-old who was an engraver moved into the chateau permanently as Georgia's companion in and for the next two years. They greeted in the serpent of visitors and know what they put on shows in the parlor theater there in eighteen fifty two after Napoleon the third came came to power yours used her considerable influence to broker pardons from the new emperor for many of his political opponents. She continued to advocate politically with the Bonaparte family. On behalf of peasants and the Working Class and as a consequence she actually became pretty good friends with Prince. JEREM NAPOLEONIC the cousin of Napoleon the third in eighteen fifty. Four George's autobiography eastward them. Avi Began Publishing in installments in the Journal. Press story of of her. Life's pulled out over the course of a hundred and thirty eight installments and then it was published in its entirety in book form over the course of twenty volumes. which which gives you a sense of why we're not mentioning all of the individual? as she approached her fifties. George wanted to ensure that her family would be taken care of long term after her death and she began to work on selling the rights to future publication royalties for her work in an effort to secure financial stability for the family family family. Life itself remained complex in eighteen. Fifty Three Salange had entrusted George with the care of her second daughter. Zhan who went by any and mm-hmm is the marriage between solange and her sculptor husband. Broke Down Clinton J showed up but no one to take the child from stoned catalyzing. A custody battle over the five year old old and those sound was able to get custody of NIIMI. After a month long legal fight the child contracted scarlet fever soon after and died in eighteen fifty five sand who had continued to write prolifically throughout all of these personal dramas signed a ten book. Deal with Shet three years later. She also made up with friends. Swab Lewis who was the editor at Revue du Mal but she had fallen out with years earlier. The Literary magazine once again started publishing her work starting with Dylan as or the snowman and eighteen fifty-eight in eighteen fifty nine song set off a minor literary war when she published and a LE- that's her and him him in installments and this was a fictionalized version of her romance with Alfred Zeh years earlier today had died two years prior to sewn story coming out. Keep in mind. This whole thing was more than twenty years after their relationship and we had had his say when he published his version of their story in eighteen. Thirty six six but just the same. So story earned the ire of moves as brother who wrote his own book titled Louis and once again represented his brother's others side of the story despite the skirmish over her past romance in eighteen fifty nine sawn remained a celebrity to success at the end of that year. One of the first first celebrity licensed luxury sense was created that was owed. Is George stunned for the body and for the Hanky yet another illustrious writer writer was still to step into Georgia's life and that was gustave Flaubert. The two men in eighteen sixty wellstone was visiting Paris later became friends and went on to exchange letters letters for years. This is perhaps a surprising friendship. Since Flaubert's Work Madam bovery which came out in eighteen. Fifty six seemed to mock the very sort sort of women George Saunders writes about in her books and indeed presented herself as sound like her heroines was obsessed with romance with emotions is with the search for passion. And if you've read Madame Bovery you know that Emma bovery is ultimately consumed by those very behaviors. It is not always terribly flattering of her And we should note that. The interpretation of Flaubert's intent had been argued since the book's publication and that quote the often see attributed to him Madame Bouvier same same Wa might indicate that he was perhaps less condescending about romanticism than it might appear at first glance regardless the writers seem to adore each other. Despite despite the obviously different points of view that were represented in their correspondence flaubert refers to as dear master at one point as they debated politics. He wrote quote odd. Dear good master if you can only hate that is what you lack hate. In spite of your Great Sphinx is you have seen the world through a golden color. Their letters which you can read online are absolutely darling. Some of them are It's a very playful and sweet correspondence. Indi- it kind of reminds me of the texts that you might send you know your your best friend and back and forth the two of them. T's and chastise each other and at one point in eighteen sixty six flaubert suggests that if they stop joking in their letters sewn will become instantly board with him and they often just seemed to be trying to figure out times when their schedules Intersex so that they can have dinner together. But it's all peppered throughout discussions of the human soul and the afterlife and the nature of art and as I said it's a very charming read an eighteen sixty one shores and Salaj had another falling out this time George accused salon of basically allowing a man to pay to keep her her. The two women had continued to butt heads over money and salons had confided her financial problems to her mother. She got a less than cordial reply by letter that read in part quote you should live simply or learn to work to anything anyone ever says to you. You reply that it's impossible. My only advice is this this both privation and work acquire strong will and when you say how boring. I've got nothing more to say. As a result of these disagreements. The two women did not speak for four years. Yeah they Classic mother and daughter Conflict Relationship. Georgia's son Maurice. Also you had some sort of falling out with Alexander on so that is his his friend who had become Shawn's companion and lover and he asked that his former friend friend leave known? It is unclear why this ultimatum was given. It is possible that Maurice who had married in eighteen sixty two suddenly saw Manso as a freeloader freeloader in his mother's world but we have to give them on so his do. He was absolutely devoted to George Zoned. Many men had fallen in love with her during during her life but men so supported her in ways that few people ever experience in a partner son was a constant and prolific writer. She turned out twenty pages a day eh every day because the Chateau had constant guests that had needs and cost money and because she paid allowances to her children and rented places in Paris Harris. She just needed a constant stream of income so she wrote even when a party went on at the Chateau until the wee hours. She would then right and right until sunrise an and when she would sit down for a long session man so would bring her everything. She might leave her paper and her inker cigarette papers and tobacco any refreshments she might. I need the actually purchased a small cottage nearby for them to escape to when the Chateau got too crowded with guests for her to be able to write in short he enabled her to to continue her career uninterrupted in the years that they were together. Yeah he was in like a so supportive leg would everybody dreams of in a a partner or that supports in and keeps them going and unconditionally loves them. He was there for all of ABC. So when Maurice insisted that men so had to leave no on. That is exactly what happened and Georgetown left with him and after they traveled for a bit. The pair landed in Palaiseau just outside of Paris man so died of tuberculosis a a year leader. But it would be two years before George Sewn would return to know. The last ten years of her life were a mix of the life that she loved so much. At at Noah and travel and politics she criticized both the radical Paris commune government which ruled for several months. Eighteen seventy one and the toppling of that government because because of the violent and bloody conflict that took place. She and her family fled briefly due to a smallpox scare and she entertained loads of visitors at the Chateau Toto as always she still wrote constantly along with all of that at sixty nine she wrote cont Dean Greyer tails of a grandmother in late eighteen. Seventy seventy five southbound organized all of her work so it can be published as a complete collection and she wrote a preface for it soon thereafter. She started work on a new novel. Add being and fury. She died on June eighteen. Seventy six just a few weeks shy of her seventy second birthday in her lifetime. Sandra more than fifty novels more than a dozen play her extensive autobiography and innumerable pamphlets essays and letters in eighteen forty four Elizabeth Barrett Browning wrote a poem poem titled to Georgiana a recognition and celebration of the controversial writers ability to carve out her own exceptional life. That defied gender norms. Here's how that poem reads Thou large-brained woman and large hearted man self called George Saunders who Seoul amid the lions ends of Daytona senses moans defiance and answers roar roar as spirits can. I would some mild miraculous. Thunder ran above the the applauded circus and appliance of Dino Nobler natures strengthened science drawing to pinions white as wings of Swan from thy strong shoulders others to amaze the place with holier. Light that thou to women's claim and man's might join besides the angels grace of pure genius sanctified from blame till child and maiden pressed to thine embrace to kiss upon my lips a stainless fame. Was Your Song. I love you so oh my worker. It's funny because I I don't Super Love Her novels. Sure this is not not my jam but I love her as a person in her biography. I think she's kind of fabulous in the way that You know saucy woman who sets sets out to make her own life very much outside of the norms of societal mores. This is pretty fun and Yeah I can't say I would. I would want her romantic life. That sounds exhausting. But she's still very fun. There are moments like that. Sounds like a lot of fun and other other moments are like okay. I'm tired right down. I mean I love the idea like Oh that's another good time travel thing. I would love the chance to visit but no on in lake. Hang out at some of her epic like perpetual parties even going on there with lots of interesting funds. Smart People Right. Can I just hang out at no with delicate for awhile. That sounds great. I have some listener mail. That is not about your song but it sort of about another woman that I'm a fan of in history story this is from our listener blaze and she rates highly and Tracy. I was in a thrift store in a small town in northern New Mexico recently and I came across the enclosed postcards related to Queen Victoria and her clothing especially Hollywood. Enjoy them so I'm sending them along. I've never been to London but I'm glad someone. None of us have ever met went to the Museum of London unbought postcards that they never managed to send. I hope. You also enjoy this card from the Albuquerque Balloon. Fiesta balloons are a big deal in New Mexico. Thanks for all your hard work and sharing history three with the masses. I've been listening to this show since two thousand thirteen and you and the previous hosts have helped me through some really lonely times. I appreciate you all the best blaze. That's so cool blaze. Thank thank you so much there Beautiful pictures there are. of Queen Victoria some of her later in life garments. That were on display a at the Museum of London at some point in time. Nineteen ninety-seven her jubilee portrait which I love some Bonnets from the era they are are the only known examples of Queen. Victoria's bonnets before eighteen. Sixty one which are beautiful one of them has a beautiful rose. Rose Ruben Trim. Anyway I love these of course because Thank you so much for sending those those are awesome. If you would like to write to us you can do so history podcast at iheartradio DOT com. You can also find us everywhere on social media as missed in history if you like to subscribe to the show. That sounds just grand. You can do that on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or whatever it is you listen. Stuffy missed in history classes the production of I heart radio. How stuff works for more podcasts? For my heart radio. visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows my name is Sebastian. MANISCALCO got a scalpel and P Cory Ali and this is the Pete and Sebastian podcast. This is a show with just two guys. Hey I'm comedian. Pecorella and go. This is comedy gold old. All right listen to the pizza. Bashan show on iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

Paris Aurora writer Maurice George George Saunders Georgia Solange partner Frederic Chopin Napoleon France Sophie de Laborde CASIMIR Aurora Indiana Milano Tracy D Wilson Pepperidge Farm Auguste Louis
Do Dietary Supplements Work?

Stuff You Should Know

58:33 min | 1 year ago

Do Dietary Supplements Work?

"I'm Dani Shapiro. My new podcast family secrets just wrapped up its first season. And it's filled with stories about the secrets that are kept from us secrets that we keep from others and the secrets we keep from ourselves. If you've been waiting for the right time to binge them. All now's your chance. Check out the episodes along with bonus interviews and stories and keep an ear out for the next season. In august. You can find out more at family secrets podcast dot com. And you can listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to step. You should know a production of I heart radio. How stuff works? Hey, welcome to the podcast. I'm Josh Clark. There's Charles w Chuck Bryant there's Jerry over there. This is stuff. You should know. The podcast. Are you? I'm good, man. Good. I'm good great. Let me search down in my soul. Yes. I'm pretty good. How about you? Well, you know, I'm tired everyone. I'm back in my house after seven months of renovating, and I had a probably a week long move easily. And that's with hiring movers. Right. You know, like, they moved the furniture. But like movers can't move everything. No, they really can't. I mean, I guess they can. But what's weird is the smaller and easier? The thing is to move the less likely the movers to move it. Maybe and I found myself wondering at one point like had a rich people move as they don't move like this. They just go to a new house and buy new stuff and leave the old maybe a Ritchie's do because I thought when I heard a move. I was like the big time because I'm not asking friends to help me move. Right. But then I was like rich people still don't move like this. They're not packing things and moving things and pick up truck thirty times. No, another not they've probably have never even seen a pickup truck in their life. Someone probably handles all of that. And it's probably really really really expensive. I think it's less expensive than you think you may not have just been shown the correct pamphlet zero. Where you the next. The next the next echelon was where they pack your stuff. I don't know that it's I think it is. Definitely I'm sure more expensive than than what you paid to not have them do that. Yeah. Yeah. But I don't think it's like prohibitively expensive. If you're already shelling out that much money for Joe vers. You know what I mean? Yeah. So the two things the two stereotypical moving. Things have happened to me, which is toward the end of the boxing up when you're first all careful about labelling and everything and then at the end just shoving things into boxes into like a garbage bag pretty much. And then on the flip side now that we're in our house. It's that thing where you know. I have the worst B oh right now because I can't find my DOD rent, Jerry. And I can attest to that tired. Go to five minutes away to buy the odorant just like choosing to stink. Thank you. Sure. For making that choice, not just for yourself. But for me and Jerry two. Oh, yeah. I'm too old to be moving, man. I'm no more. Okay. So this is the last. I told him I'm gonna die in this house. This is the Val just hopefully, not soon or you could shell out for the one where they actually pack your stuff up the rich guy. They just pack me up send me out to sea. They liking funeral. Okay. That'd be pretty cool. Yes. So obviously what we're talking about today's dietary supplements. Yeah. Might as well, which I can't believe we've never done this one. We have done one called does the FDA protect Americans right which after researching this, I'm guessing we concluded. No now, maybe I do remember talking about the litter might in there. So I think we were like, yes. In some instances. They have protected people. They don't so much more. But I'm surprised we haven't done it. Especially with my dad having been the herbal Elvis. That's right for so many years. On that. Now, she's the herbal Queen. Or does she on? Well, she's not on anything. But she's she's not buying supplement. She's growing plants and distilling her own plants. That's really cool. Yeah. Like, we have a big copper, whatever it's called story still. Yeah. Yeah. You have a still in your house. We have a still that your wife puts unspecified plants into. Well, you know, it's it's herb she's growing in the yard. And then putting them in the still then we get liquid out. So so, and then you guys are taking it like the extract like as a panicle supplement. Yeah. Yeah. That is fantastic at school. That is great. So what kind of like is she she's going to the trouble of like, making sure the dirt is growing in is like, amazing and all that. Yeah. Okay. That's great. I wanna bottle is something. Yeah. I'll get you, bro. Or get you bottle of something. Okay. I don't even care. What it is. Like a Queen just in check me. All right. I'll take some chick. We'd a whole that under my tongue for thirty straight seconds. So K. So your hip you understand what dietary supplement is well on the herbal side. But I don't know like I've never been good about vitamins and stuff like that. I'll I'll get on a thing where I'll be like I'm going to start taking a multi-vitamin. Right. And then you know, there's six bottles of ninety five percent. Full multivitamins familiar. Yeah. Yeah. I've tried to start taking b twelve in D. Yeah. Yeah. And I'm okay about it. But I forget frequently. It's never like autumn feel like taking that. It's just I forget, well, you know, what they say. Spoiler alert. Besides just eat good food. To take this stuff. Yeah. Food. I is what that's called. Yeah. It's all in the food. So most people Chuck do not actually go to the trouble of distilling. Their own extracts their own botanical extracts for dietary most people buy it. And then like you said forget about it. But because so many people are buying it. Whether they forget about it or not it's something like a I've seen anywhere between a four billion dollar industry and a forty billion dollar industry now in the United States. Yeah. And growing like fast. Yes. Which is that's a pretty big spread actually. But it's significant that there is a lot of dietary supplements that are being taken especially in America. And there's this old adage that Americans have the most expensive urine in the world. Yeah. Because a lot of people say aren't really doing anything a lot of the pills that you're taking are just passing through you. And it's harmless because you're not absorbing the stuff or there may not even be anything in there. There. You just paid a bunch of money for some some pills that don't actually have what they supposedly haven't it? And if you think that, you know, that's hilarious and you laugh for a little while. And then you stop laughing and you go, well, wait a minute. Why would that be the case? It turns out the FDA actually doesn't regulate dietary supplements that entire four to forty billion dollar industry, basically exists on the honor system. Yeah. And is it turns out, and we'll get to the specifics later there are things in actual plants that help absorb the the good parts of the plant that the supplements. Do not have. So in some cases, maybe it is coming out. You're right. So when people think about dietary supplements, the first thing, you think of vitamins. Yeah. Or I think of like have no idea why because I don't ever have. I've never done this. But I think of like weightlifter guys right that like make shakes and things three eighteen and then like like a pig extract of some sort of like land thinking. You. I is it really. Yeah. I have no idea. That's why some some bodybuilding supplements or are glandular extracts, which sometimes you end up with like, a bacteria or hepatitis or something like that in your supplement or a hoof growing out of your back and again because there's nobody watching the people who are making this stuff. Right. So anyway, back to vitamins turns out member electro execution electrocution. Yes. Vitamins is short for vital aid means did you know that is it really swear weezer naming in aiming is a type of protein. I believe what is vital. It means that you really need it. It's important. And it was it was coined back in one thousand nine hundred by a polish biochemist named Kasmir Polaski other. You're going to me or portmanteau Casimir funk. What I'm not kidding? So so I'm about to walk out of here. The fact of the pockets way. This April Fools vitamin is short so hot in here. I know vitamin short for vital a means a term that was coined by polish biochemist Casimir funk. Back in nineteen twelve. All right. Well now Josh's leaving everyone because my smells glandular, smells, right? All right. So I did not know that I did not know that was a portmanteau or is that more in abbreviation now. It's a portmanteau. It sounds like it. Yeah. Fitting that a combination of words, a belief setting so too. But people have been doing this for many many thousands of years. In fact, some of the first inscriptions in Sumeria on clay tablets talked about herbs. This is nothing new, and that's why it's very popular now because I think people are saying, hey, they've been doing it for five thousand years. Right humans have been looking to plants to heal us. Yeah. I mean, there's a lot of people who kind of say, well, wait a minute. We were using like botanical z- vitamins minerals long before medicine was around. I'm kind of suspicious of the medical establishment getting in between me in vitamins. Yeah. A lot of people are very severe. Fishes of that. And I think that's one of the reasons why this up the dietary supplement industry has boomed is because a lot of people are it appeals to the average person the idea of just taking something natural in your body healing as a result. It feels good to treat yourself like that, you know. Yeah. And here in the states. What did you say you're on DNB twelve? Yeah. Well, d- is is one of the most after the multivitamin the most popular, of course. Yeah. Along with C and calcium and then as far as the specialty supplements, and this is a big one omega three fatty acids must see a see those all over the place. Yeah. Like good fatty fish. Of course, this is the extract of that the squeeze them squeeze at salmon hurrying out of them. And then throw the shame and back could of salmon juice. What else probiotics? Yep. Fiber. Of course. That counts, you're right. Which is kind of surprised me, I guess, but dietary fiber it makes sense. Basically anything that grows from the ground or that you can get from animals is technically considered a dietary supplement. Yeah, everything's surly vitamin there's only thirteen vitamins. Yeah. But like, garlic, and ginseng and things like that they all fall into that banner, but they are not vitamins yells, and like, garlic, and jeans ginseng plants, those would be considered Fido medicines or botanical 's right, and then you've got minerals like iron, zinc stuff like that all of them. If you really want to put them all under a banner, whether it's a dietary supplement or not those are considered micronutrients because you need very small amounts of them for your body to function as opposed to macro nutrients, fats carbohydrates and proteins pizza, which you need a lot of right in some of the confusion comes in with the fact that there are many studies on both sides that say completely contradictory things about very specific vitamin. So it can be tough for a consumer just sort of. Weed through all that. And know what the heck is going on especially because of the lack of regulation, which I guess we might as well go out and talk about what happened in nineteen ninety four hundred. Yeah. Wherever you I was in Athens. Be there yet us probably hanging out in Athens on my way up there. I wasn't there quite yet. You're in. What was it down between? I was in winder. Yeah. Everybody. There's a town between Athens in Atlanta called between. Oh, is it? Really? Yeah. I didn't know it. Yeah. And it's called that. Because it's between Athens and Atlanta. Sure, it's they're big claim to fame apparently that in being a speed trap. Don't speed through between. I've never heard that before. Although half the town calls it betwixt Milly don't. I'm just kidding. Okay. You got our Cain with that. Joe? I know so in one thousand nine hundred four a big change happen in in congress. They pass what's called the dietary supplement health and education act and previous to this. There were there was a lot of tightly controlled regulation by the FDA and all of that change in nineteen Ninety-four and was this because of like just some sort of general deregulation of with consumers and push. No. It wasn't. No, what happened was Senator Orrin Hatch of Utah, which was home to a lot of supplement. Producers the hatch and hence a lot of supplement producing donors Orrin Hatch. Saw this thing through said, no, we need to open up the supplement regulation or supplement industry and the best way to do that is to remove regulations on it. So it was a big deregulation push. But specifically to the supplement industry because of one Senator. Oh, no, no, no. I get that. Okay. But I just meant sort of that typical. Yeah. Hey, let's just let people run wild and make money, right? Yes. Yeah. Exactly. And it was because Orrin Hatch. Gotcha. And technically Tom Harkin did too. He's from Iowa. And one of his biggest donors was herbalife to kind of join together and got this. Historically, bad Bill pushed through but remember, this is the congress. Sorry, everybody realizes like nanny state trigger some people. But this is the same congress are virtually the same congress that prohibited. The CDC from studying gun violent, right? Like, this is the kind of mentality that was writing on at the time. So what happened during that the passing of that act is they kind of set up some agreements, which was looser regulation for sure. But if you make some of these supplements, you cannot make claims like, hey, this will help cure a disease, you can't make like medical claims like that you also have to be very specific with your labeling had to be labeled a dietary supplement, and you can make a claim that hey, it could have the positive effect on your body. But you can't say it like cures anything. And then you also had to tag it. With the statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This. Product is not intended to diagnose, treat, your or prevent any disease. Right. So those that was the big tradeoff. Yeah. Was that they were. But it almost sounds like they're saying, well, okay. They can't claim to be drugs. Right. But there's also some semantic trickery there because if they're not claiming to be drugs, the FDA can't regulate them like drugs, right? So basically, congress it is what congress says it is. It's not a drug. So it's not a drug, right? As far as as the United States goes. So in doing this. They basically said FDA you can't regulate this stuff anymore. Yeah. Everything that you've used to to get pharmaceuticals that out to market that have been proven safe and effective. We're going to do the opposite. These things are presumed innocent until they start hurting people, and then you can intervene, and then even when they intervene. They're they're Goto technique for a dietary stuff. Climent that was proving harmful was to send a letter to the producer saying, maybe you should recall this and the producer could either say sure, let's do that. Or here's the finger FDA you have zero power over me whatsoever. Right. Let me look at my ledger sheet. See if I want to shut down my company, right? Pretty much a while. I'm on my yacht. Yeah. Yeah. And I found a study from I think this past year that found something like seven hundred forty six recalled or adulterated dietary supplements in the US, right? These seven hundred forty six she's so this means that they have been found to have anything from actual prescription drugs in them that aren't on the label, right or other things that aren't on the label like fillers things that people might be allergic to write it might have some sort of chemical in it. That's not supposed to be. Who knows very little of what it says it has in there. Right. That's a different kind of adulterated pharmaceutically adulterated. They they found seven hundred forty six of them had been flagged as adults rated only three hundred sixty had been recalled the other ones were just left on the market because the company said, we're not gonna do that. Yeah. We're gonna keep selling them. And this this journal of the American Medical Association study found even further that the I think of the three hundred sixty something like ten or eleven percent, we're still on the market even after being recalled while so that's kind of the state of affairs with dietary supplements, which everybody takes two we take a break. I think we should. I think we've just lost about a third of our listeners the conservative ones. All right. Well, I'll go find my daughter at and I'll be back right after this. We need to talk about something Chuck. Yes. Constipation abdominal pain and bloating. That's right, man. You tell yourself. It's not that bad. You take laxatives modify your diet and exercise routine but thinking about it all the time is frustrating. Yeah. Do you? Find yourself making up excuses instead of admitting to people that you don't wanna go out because you're really worried about leaving home despite your best efforts to feel better your symptoms. Keep coming back is this right? Yeah. Man. This feels all to relatable, you are not alone if your symptoms return again, and again, and again, you don't know why it may be time to seek help like thirteen million others, you might have a real medical condition called irritable bowel syndrome with constipation or IB S C. Yup. To get more info about your symptoms, and I SC go. Oh, my gut dot info slash podcast and learn about your constipation, abdominal pain and bloating. And if you're ready. Outweighs to talk to your doctor or access one online. That's my gut dot ie NFO slash podcast. Okay. So we're back in. I'm totally calm. I still smell and people are still selling supplements that are tainted and otherwise misleading unregulated. That's where we are. So the FDA for their part supposedly has established some manufacturing practices. But again, it's I guess just voluntary. Whether or not you adhere to these absolute. But there are I guess there's a page somewhere on their website that are letters that go out to say, here's what you might want to do yet. It's like manufacturing good guidelines basically practices for manufacturer. And there are independent organizations that do tests things a couple of our one called consumer lab dot com and s f not NSF w. Weird like. NSF international and then one called and this. I mean, I'm sure this is great. But it sounds so like something from a movie US pharmacopoeia. Sounds like something like future company from a movie exactly that does not do what they say. They do. But those three I mean, like, they're they exist because they're fulfilling the role that the government should. Yeah. Or I mean, I guess if you believe in government oversight the government should write in a way the fact that those businesses that make money off of this exists. It's it's an example of the invisible hand at work. You know, like there was a need that came along, which is people need to know that what they're buying actually has the stuff and that it's safe and these companies that make money off came along in fulfilled this need. That's what an Orrin Hatch might say. Like, look, not not only are they booming. But we've created all these other companies we used to do right? But from what I understand US pharmacopoeia. Yeah, there they have a really good website. I believe where they basically say this has been tested. As pure has what it's supposed to have in it in the amounts is supposed to have in it. It doesn't have any extra stuff in it. You guys can buy this. And they put a label on. Yeah. The bottles. So for sure look for that. This is something you're already do. You're interested in trying out. Right. Like definitely do. Some research is not the kind of hobby. You want to just wait into by walking into a store and going. This sounds great. Right. But a lot of people do that for this stuff. Yeah. And then bear mind also, I don't know about US pharmacopoeia. But I know that consumer labs goes to stores and gets their samples that they test. And they say, hey, just send us some stuff. Right undis-. You're absolutely purist back rust attest and give you a seal on they actually go to stores, and so their their ratings and reviews are based on tests that they've done independently. Right. Not the stuff they sweep off the floor and put in capsules. You know that was supposedly what when I worked at golden pantry in college. They had the, and you probably know this is a former smoker, but the really really really cheap cigarette heard that before and they always told us it. That's just like literally stuff they sweep off the factory floor. At like Winston, Salem or whatever camel whoever makes cigarettes that seems like one of those urban legends that I think it's really true. I think. Yeah. Like, not all urban legends are wrong. That sounds that. Totally true. Yeah. Because like are they cheap right basics? Remember those? I don't remember basics. But a sold a lot of bucks. I had a big they had a big deer on the front of it. Sure. Like, a big deer buck, and they were I mean, this is when cigarettes were I don't know what say two dollars in these were like, seventy five cents or something. Yeah. How much cigarettes now they're super expensive? I think they're anywhere between five and twelve dollars depending on where you are. I'm fifteenth. I know New York has like like they had twelve dollars packs of cigarettes five you believe people will pay that much money for cigarettes at man. Yeah. All right. So that's why we need government prevent us from smoking cigarettes. So regardless of the fact that let's say you find a supplement. It's got the seal of approval, you still should like do some research talk to your doctor. It doesn't mean everyone. Everyone's body is not the same. You shouldn't just be downing supplements. Because you think oh, well this sounds like it's good for me. Right. Everybody needs different things. There is a list here of supplements that are more likely or most likely to be safe for you and might be effective based on based on overall science and research and studies that have been done on these things. Yeah. So we'll just tick through those calcium cranberry. Fish oil glucose Amine sulfate, which I get my dogs. Lactase lactobacillus. That's the probiotic right Cillian. How do you pronounce that my piji him? Yes. That's right by GM get old Sammy. Adina sill L Mitha methionine. Yes. Saint John's wart and then vitamin D, which by the way, get this about vitamin d. So if you're a vegan a very frequently people are like, you should take some extra dietary supplements, and they're like, I take vitamin v. The the problem is not all supplements are vegan, right, especially vitamin d the reason vitamin d is very rarely vegan. Boy, this is where most vitamin specifically says vegan vitamin d Ono it is extracted lanell in from lambs-wool. Oh, that is sent what did you think? It was gonna be don't know some sort of testicle. Oh, no, no. You gotta pay extra for the testicle. Yeah. So they extract land Lynn from lambswool send it to China where it's exposed to UV light to mimic sunlight. Wow. Because that's where we get a lot of our vitamin. Exposure to sunlight, and then it's put into pills, and there you go. So if you're vegan you you wouldn't want to eat an animal product eleven and really have to look out for that kind of thing. Well, and also one more thing about vegans vitamins. Yeah. One of the big the big controversies that that proved to some people that you're not supposed to be vegan is that we need be twelve quite badly. We need it for believe bone health. I can't quite can't keep up seen so many like different things that vitamin through a couple of days. But we need be twelve. How about that? Okay. B twelve is only gained as far as we know from animal sources if so facto we need to eat animals to get be twelve the way animals could be twelve is gut bacteria in their guts produce b twelve. And then we the animals that have the b twelve built up in their tissues. Right. So that's how people eat meat. Don't don't have B twelve deficiencies. But. Vegan say where are the animals at Cowes getting that b twelve right from their bacteria? Where's bacteria coming from? They say it's from the soil. So there's this big controversy is the b twelve producing bacteria actually in the soil. And if so are the factory farming methods like washing produce that use actually washing off the b twelve that you would get enough of as a vegan. Yeah. Man. It's fascinating waiting into these waters, so perilous we've gotta do a plant based diet episode sometime. Yeah. You know? Who was at coach Seattle Seahawks. Coach Pete Carroll one of the older coaches in the NFL, but one of the more vital old guys. He switched his diet to completely plant based like raw foods diet. I think within the past couple years now, he's good. He dropped it on the spot. Now, he said, it's just an a, you know, he's not the only person obviously in the news talking about the stuff. But I just read something recently where he was just like, you would not believe the change in my life and body. And I was like, yeah. I imagine if you just eat raw vegetables that would be great thing for your body. Sure. We'll find out and I'm not saying with a sneer as that would be hard for me. Yeah. You know? It's probably something. I should do should just eat raw vegetables for the rest of my life. You know, Chuck, I don't know that it's healthy to deal in should cz. So there are also. Supplements that they say should be avoided because there are links to side effects that can be pretty serious that list. You just read like a half hour ago. Yeah. About ones that are probably okay for you. And probably actually are beneficial. They came up with the opposite list of that too. That's right. Right. Well, it was the same like study. Yeah. That came up with the double edged sword, bitter, bitter oranges one and that one can be especially problematic because from what I read that that can just sort of ramp up your sort of speed in some ways. Yes, specially when you mix it with caffeine or speed or like meth like, well, this meth is giving me a real nutritional deficiency. I should probably start taking vitamins, that's what most most meth addicts too. Well, bitter orange so something people do use to lose weight, and it can lead to heart attack and stroke, if you take enough of it and usually in we'll talk about this more, but this. Combining with other things is kind of where you can get into problems. Right. I saw lady one time at a restaurant where I was working pass out on the middle of the floor. And it's because she had just we learned from her friends after the ambulance came. She had just come off of a week long. Like, I'm doing nothing but heating Cayenne pepper in lemonade. No, but just like water in vitamins or something. And then to celebrate the end of the week. She was like drinking and eating steak. Oh, good. And she just hit the deck. That's a real problem, repeating we're going to do an episode once on this man who who didn't eat for year. And we're going to do that yet. Yeah. They they were smart enough to figure out that like he couldn't just start eating disloyally like. Yeah. Food back in but you can die from that. After a lawyer fast. If you don't repeat go through the process correctly, you can just drop dead. Like, you have a heart attack basically from eating food. This lady was fine or I'm assuming she was fine. Because as they were wheeling her out she did the thing that pro athletes to she just gave the thumbs up. She's alright everybody. He's okay. So what else is on their shepper all colloidal silver? That's a big one blue. That's wouldn't it a Senator somebody. The timing guy with a beard, the blue man, I think there was a congressman or Senator that turned blue sometime permanent is it. Yes, I saw that it tends to be permanent. Boy. Yeah. Term blue. You. Don't go back. Colts foot which I had never heard of before supposedly good for asthma. Also linked to liver damage and cancer right drain Eum country. Mallow that has the federal. Yeah. City Mallow is great country maller. No, good kava. It was so dumb. And what else you him bay? You'll him bay frequently used for rectal dysfunction, but unfortunate really, it's an MA. Oh, which means that if you drink like, orange juice on this thing, you can drop dead. This list is is obviously it's not comprehensive. And also I wanted to say one more thing real quick. So I am not attacking supplements. I take supplements myself idea of of taking something even synthesize. But that's based on scientific investigation into nature nutrition. And all that I find that endlessly appealing a love that you're anything that can help you be healthier person. I'm in favor of so I don't I don't want to give the impression that I'm just like gleefully shooting holes in the idea of people taking supplements because I take him. I don't think that's coming across. Okay, good. You seem like you're in a good mood is all because I gleefully shoot holes in a lot of stuff. Oh, sure. I'm just not doing this. Now. So here's the thing to to this article points out these are having a good, listen Abadla says all well and good, and it can be helpful. If you don't know what's going on with you know, and you it you wanna start at like zero. And learn a couple of things that is good. But it's again, you have to know your body and. Talk to your doctor about stuff, and like what other medications are you taking? What's your end goal? Yes. So you want a doctor who is not opposed to supplements and who's knowledgeable with up laments. Any good doctor worth their salt, especially when that came around post nineties should be all about supplements. And should know what supplements work recommend to you? Also know what what you're on the what you can't have interacts poorly. Yeah. I think finding that doctor in the middle ground, though, can be tough these days because on one end of the spectrum you have what he calls the hokey pokey, which are like, oh, no, no, don't take any form. Suitable medicines. Ever. Sure. Only take these plant things. And then at the other end, you have doctors that are like I believe in science. So only take prescription drugs don't mess around with any plant basing 'cause you're just gonna pee it out. And I find that it's hard to find someone in between. Right. I think also even if you do find one that is in between in. Irrit-? They might not have all the information. Yeah. Because you know, you you touched on earlier there's a lot of conflicting and competing studies. Like, this this article from how stuff works says that back in two thousand thirteen after years of being told that they should take vitamin d and calcium for bone health. Yeah. That postmenopausal women were told stop taking those things not only do they not help you. But the the additional calcium may lead to everything from heart attack to kidney stones because kidneys says are typically made of calcium deposits, right? And then another study, I think came out that same year and said, no, no keep taking those things. Not only do they help you. They probably actually don't produce kidney stones, and you know, that like if you go onto like CNN or NBC or Fox News or whatever and their websites. They have both article screaming both. Headlines the opposite. Nobody ever goes in follows up, and everybody's kind of shouts whatever the new studies finding so it's really confusing even if you're trying to pay attention to this. And if you dig into trustworthy sites, like say an FDA site or the national institutes of health site or something like that there's plenty of links, but they say very minimal amount. Yeah. Because there's so little substantial science that conclusively says this this actually helps this doesn't help. And that's the thing too. There's there's nothing there's very few things that say this does not help. You are totally wasting your totally. So they can't really say one way or the other. It's all just really middle ground right now, we actually need science more than ever to really study this stuff. But I mean, it is they are studying they're coming up with differing results. Somebody just needs to God needs to come down and be like. True. Just pointed the bible. In vitamin church like playing the answers or with an didn't that say vitamin church and a healthy does vitamin sure that's great one thing. We do know is that and this is across the board. Everything I researched said this if you see anything that says, this is totally safe says, no side effects. This will give you an erection for sure this will make you lose weight. Like, those are the big or, you know, this is going to transfer all your weight to your record. Or gentlemen, like when you would you like to last longer like anything related to sexual performance, and like weight loss is just super Hanky. Well, it's not only that the claims are frequently Hanky a lot of times the claims are correct. Like like, this this crazy like botanical for a rectal this function works, really, well, but don't drink orange juice. No it's because they they use Viagra. Right. Like, the one of the one of the ways that bodybuilding weight loss and sexual enhancement supplements become adultery is they have actual pharmaceutical rugs in them that aren't on the label. Some companies have figured out that the FDA is totally powerless and a really good way to sell cheap. Pharmaceuticals. Generic pharmaceuticals to Americans is to put it in a supplement. Not put it on the label and go basically around the FDA by going through the. So are these sold by the actual pharmaceutical companies under sort of like a sub business, and I think it's largely five by night companies and do they partner with them? Or are they just by a ton of IRA? They know guy in China who hounds of like cheap generic via got Prozac is another one that up especially in weight loss. Yeah. Yeah. Steroids, some some drugs that like were up for F D A approval as pharma soukous FDA said too dangerous. They turn up in in dietary supplements, and like it's one thing to waste your money and just peo- expensive urine. It's an entirely different thing to take prescription drugs unknowingly. Yeah. And without any sort of medical supervision because the government agency that's supposed to be keeping an eye on this stuff is is expressly forbade from doing that. Yeah. They're also you need to like when we were talking about the high fructose corn syrup the fact that that's in everything. You don't even know it and sort of the same thing here. Like, you're the foods you're already eating maybe good enough. If you know chances are if you're eating really good, like whole foods and things like that. You're probably not diving headlong into the supplement thing. But if you're already getting a ton of item in D in various foods that you don't even realize, and then you take it on top of that or God forbid, if you think I'll quit taking my medication because I think this will help like none of that is a good idea. No. And then we should probably talk about federal really quick because that was very big deal nineties fight a gas stations. Yeah. And it was it was marketed as a weight loss thing, and I'm probably worked in that capacity. Gives you a real good buzz at said on the package didn't really probably they're probably some it said in like a bolt of lightning or something. Well, fifteen deaths were attributed to it by nineteen ninety six. And then do remember in two thousand four the FDA finally banned it, and it wasn't necessarily because of this. But a very high profile death and major league baseball happened tumor. Who was yeah. He was a pitcher. I think is Steve Steve Boeckler, I think and he died think during spring training if I'm not mistaken, and they linked it to a federal. And they finally were like, maybe we should step in and do something here because America's pastime is at stake. It'd be like if an apple pie just drop dead from federal get rid of the apples. Oh, no, no sorry. The other way around. So let's take our second break Chuck. Yes. And then we'll come back and talk some more food. Okay. Yeah. Let's do. Okay. Let's talk about sexual performance issues. Josh, let's him, and it's more common than you think. Like over twenty five percent of new e de cases are guys under forty years old and forty percent of men by age forty struggle from not being able to get and maintain that erection. Yes. Well, luckily, there's something called four hymns dot com. A one stop shop not just for sexual wellness. But also for hair loss can care all for men. You're going to talk to real doctors and get medical grade solutions to treat erectile dysfunction. Well, known generic quivalent to name brand prescriptions to help you combat E D, no snake oil pills or anything that you give them a gas station. It's real prescription solutions backed by science Yemen. No waiting room. No awkward in person visits. It's so easy. Just answer. A few questions chat with that doctor for confidential review, and then products are shipped directly to your door. It's a rectal with. Thout the dysfunction for just five bucks. We'll get you started for just five dollars while supplies. Last. Restrictions may apply. So see the website for full details. But this would cost hundreds if you went to the doctor pharmacy, go to four hymns F O R H I M S dot com slash stuffed S T U F F E that's four hymns dot com slash S. T U F F E D. He Chuck high before. So we're back. Yes. Before we talk about food. Let's go further back. Okay. Hundreds of millions of years. Oh, goodness. Okay. Yeah. It's a big surprise. So we're not even the way back machine. We can just tell. Yes. Mentally, we've become injured dimensional beings. Yes. So we have figured out that vitamins were around in the early earth. I don't know if we said originally, I think we said your body needs these things micronutrients, but your body needs it for all sorts of things they help in like all manner of chemical processes from like, helping your cells divide to your bones to grow like, really important stuff. Yeah. Which is why we need them and your body makes some vitamins, but we have to get them from outside sources a lot. Yeah. Thirteen vitamins are essential to humans, and what we need other animals don't necessarily need like dogs. Don't. Vitamin C because their bodies produce enough, right? We are buddies don't pretty enough. So we need vitamin c from other sources, but what they figured out is that in the ancient earth bacteria and other life made vitamins on their own and then over time as we evolved into higher and higher forms. We apparently lost a lot of that ability not all of it because we can still make some. But to the point where we need to get it from other sources, so more sophisticated animals started eating more primitive animals to get that source of vitamin right? Yeah. And that's where the whole process began where we started to evolve co evolve with other life on earth, and we are bodies realized well, we can get this vitamin from this plant, right or we can get this vitamin from this animal, and that's how this kind of food web developed was basically a for a reliance on vitamins and other things like fats and proteins and other nuture, but this nutrient exchange that that. Has win one life sooted eat other life, that's kind of where vitamins came from. And it wasn't until the beginning of the twentieth century that we figured out how to synthesize vitamins. Yeah. That was a game changer. Sure. Like, the twenties and thirties, and that thing he sent about cereals, just mind blowing. Yes. Yes. So so if you keep going, we the fact that we synthesized vitamins allowed the processed food industry to boom. Yeah. Because it's like here. Now, we can put things back into food that we synthesized and in the case of cereal like what I'm saying there some vitamins that are sprayed on right to the end product. Yes. So if you see something that says fortified or enrich sure that's what that means. That means that they dump some vitamins into the dough or sprayed it on the outside of your cornflakes mention that just spraying cereal with like give me a can of vitamin d right? Just spray it on. Well, the hypothesis is that without. Out enriched foods would all be dead from like rickets in other sorts of horrible, malnourishment disease blind from lack vitamin A all of the things that can happen to you. If you don't get enough items. What happened to the average American because of what we eat, well, processed foods, right? Yeah. But the reason it doesn't is because they put vitamins back in right? Some people say, you know, you might even need supplements. Forget eating whole food, but they put so many vitamins in processed foods that you could conceivably live. Okay. Except for the added sugar, and the added salt, you could live vitamin wise. Fine. Well, sure, that's a sugar in the salt things of caveat. It is a big caveat. Because at least other problems like cardiac you're saying like, you could maybe get all the vitamins you need from processed food. Right. But that's not what we're commending because we're not doctors. But Dr say are we to now? Yeah. Like food food. Sure. Also, one more thing I want to shut Carl Zimmer who wrote vitamins old old edge in. I think the New York Times. Yeah. Yeah. He did a great job about the history of vitamins that for nears. No. He's like a great science writer remember blood type zone. Sure. That was live in Atlanta. Right. Yes. It was based on his article on blood types. Didn't we take? Do a blood type test on stage. Yeah, I turned out to be a positive, Jerry. Aren't you a positive th- right me and Jerry of the same blood type? So no, one gets a leg. Imputation? The other one has to cough up some blood. I know and I'll be right there to manage the whole process give but you to just be arguing the whole time that someone would bleed out before you settled on an arrangement same the same thing though. But it just sound like an argument, and I would just as you both drifted off into the great beyond say, that's so you guys. All right. That would not be good though. Because then I would have no career and admits my friends, they get Secondly, so eating foods that the you know, that mother earth gives us sure to contain these things is clearly the best thing to do allegedly. Studies have shown that we absorb synthetic vitamins better than the stuff in food depending really Saul that but again, scientists all over the place. Well, yeah. Well since you brought that up and like I mentioned earlier in the episode. There are a lot of studies that say that you actually don't absorb those as well. I guess there are counter studies vitamins. Yeah. That I'm sure there probably were does the funding come from. I don't know, you know, studies. I don't know. It's a really good question. But phytochemicals they plant chemicals that have properties that can help really help protect you from disease. Those aren't in the supplements though. No. Phytochemicals are what you get. When you eat the raw, broccoli, right? I think you can get supplements. Very high ends up really have phytochemicals in other stuff in the rich people with so like, you know, in the future. They're like here's a meal in a pill. What they're kind of hinting at is a full fully fortified like pill. Yeah. And that like in the vitamins, we take now if you take vitamin d you're getting vitamin d Scherf. Whereas if you drink milk, you're getting a whole bunch of other stuff along with that vitamin jury lactose, right? And those things worked together in your body. And so you're giving your body shot of things that work really well together. And that's the argument for eating the food. Oh for sure phytochemicals. They think enhance what's called bioavailability. And that's what we've been talking about. Which is how much you're actually absorbing. And I guess just pick a study 'cause one might say UP it right out in another might say a supplement in another might say, you don't that's where it's just. Maddening? You know, it is one of the things that I think US pharmacopoeia one of the one of the that those groups they they test to make sure that the pill or the vitamin supplement actually dissolves in the stomach. Right. So that you actually are you do have a fighting chance of absorbing the nutrients in there, or does it say on the bottle don't pee for three hours after they just totally just pinch? It. Here's another study from the university of Pennsylvania school of medicine. It showed that mega threes in fatty fish like salmon, let's say there were better able to maintain proper blood pressure. People were I'm sorry, mice were than with that same omega three supplement the fish oil pill that you will take. Yeah. And that's you know, that's a that's a big deal. There's no substitute. I don't think for the real thing. Well, they found found like on the actual like level of your blood vessels that the natural naturally occurring DHA holds open your blood vessels. Whereas the synthetic version doesn't and it actually fights the the natural natural version in your bloodstream too. So, but I mean, that's just the H A in you know, that doesn't necessarily extrapolate vitamin d your twelve. Well, that's why you gotta really like dig in. If you want to start taking supplements research, but I think the the idea that there are such things as phytochemicals that we don't necessarily need to live, right like, resveratrol and grapes or Lou teen in in spinach or like like of big one that you find in tomatoes things that give it a plant. It's flavor it's odor and its color. Yeah. Those things those are phytochemicals, and those are the things that act as antioxidants they regulate hormones, they do all the stuff that we don't have to have to function bright. But the actually take like that you go from surviving to thriving. It seems like when you incorporate phytochemicals in your diet. Yeah. You want a shiny coat and glowing skin. Exactly you need that stuff. Here's another thing to RDA. And I think the RDA it's not just with. The recommended daily allowance that doesn't just cover supplements. I mean, that's kind of for calories. Yeah. I mean, that's a whole range of things. But amazingly has not been updated since nineteen sixty eight. Yeah. Which was it was a different country back then too. There are a lot more farmers. Yeah. And it's recommended for. I mean, they trying to cover all of America. So it's not like the the RDA for each person. They liken it to a sweater in this article that you said it's like trying to create a sweater that would fit ninety seven out of a hundred Merican 's Americans Americans. Yeah. Yeah. And this is not possible. No. I mean, they the this author Catherine pricey wrote vita mania, she's putting it like ninety five Americans will find it too large. It'll one it won't fit, you know, four of them. But it'll it'll fit kind of some real over some people, but it'll be wrong for him. That was her point. Yeah. And supposedly they're going to update the RDA from nineteen sixty eight win a couple years twenty twenty next year. This what I saw we'll see I'm interested. I can't sleep behind schedule. I can't wait. Oh, the other thing to be that you gotta wonder about sometimes is if like what the long-term effect of of something like this might be you know, it's like taking taking vitamin d for a year or something is different than taking vitamin d for twenty five thirty forty years. Yeah. Throughout your life. Yeah. So like, there's something. Called hyper vitamin OSA cyber leaf which is basically Odeon on vitamin. Yeah. And some vitamins it's really hard to do others. It's a little easier. But this author Catherine price is kind of putting out this hypothesis that we may be existing in some kind of sub toxic state where we're not it's not acutely toxic. We're not feigning in vomiting, and like our livers and shutting down right, but we're suffering from diseases. We might not otherwise suffer from that. We haven't linked to the fact that we're taking too many vitamins. Yeah. That's like this low level sort of poisoning. Interesting. That's enough. Like, you could you could survive, but you might die something you wouldn't have died from if you hadn't taken vitamin A that you didn't need for thirty years. You know, and it's high it's not proven. But I've seen other people suggested to. Yeah. And poison control to oh, it's a big one. That's a huge one. Every twenty four minutes poison control centers in the US. Get a call about a supplement reaction. It happens a lot. There's about twenty three thousand ER trips from supplements in the US each year. Yeah. I mean, you think poison control is just like swallowed something with a skull-and-crossbone on the label. But that's that's really not the case. And especially true with kids like, you should treat these things like, you know. It's sounds harsh to say like it's poison. If you got a toddler in the house, don't leave your supplements down where they can get them. Just because it says all natural, right? Yeah. Yeah. That's part of the problem is they have this kind of. Veneer of wholesomeness because they are natural. And this is stuff that it's reported to poison control. Right. You supposedly can report something to the FDA. But how many people are doing that? No. A lot of people if they do suffer an adverse reaction will contact the company the manufacturer and the manufacturer on papers supposed to report the incident to the FDA. But again, it's it's on the on our system, right or you just go to the doctor, and they say, maybe she lay off the whatever you're taking the wacky Tabacchi. Yeah. Vitamin church w. Yeah. Maybe lay off that. And then you never report it. So the long short of it is I think they said something like ninety percent never get reported to the FDA at. All. Right. So I I mean, I don't really know how to wrap this one up because the just so so out on so many things I mean for the most part, it does seem like you're going to do little more than waste your money on something you don't need. But I think that the movement today is to say no just before you really start a supplement regimen before you go all Ray kurzweil. He takes two hundred and fifty pills a day really day every day. He's a futurist chief imagine years something like that. No. That's a Disney term. He he takes two hundred fifty pills a day before you do anything like that the the the kind of the the recommendation do your is try eating a more of a whole foods diet. Yeah. Like, go spend all of your money, a whole foods. I just. Faze us is driving that one. Yeah, I agree. This is a tough one to wrap up. And I believe we will get equal parts E mail saying from people who swear by it. It's almost takes on a religious quality to people that are think it's complete bunk and a couple people saying leave Orrin Hatch alone. Well, since I said leave Orrin Hatch alone. I think that means it's time for listener, man. It is. And I'm gonna call this Josh chucker feminist. Hey, guys. I'm consistently impressed by how clued up you are on feminism by I mean, equality in general because you always point out times in which men struggle in society to from my point of view, you also regularly look through a race Lynn's disabled lens and Galeone's, although I cannot speak for how well you are doing there to me it seems incredibly inclusive in sympathetic. Thank you. Welcome. Gotcha. I think you to maybe the only two adult men I've ever heard speak the way you do. And massively respect you for that is so important to have influential men speak in these ways. I don't think that you ever really push those arguments down people's throats, but instead matter of factly, stating these issues during an informative podcasts and a man's voice. Let's have an influence in and in his having an effect somewhere. Even heard he criticized some second wave, feminists ideas and Trump them with third wave feminists ideas, I think it was in the makeup sewed. You guys were discussing feminists, the seventy shunning women who wear makeup, and Chuck said, I think they may have got that one wrong, and then proceeded to have the most progressive chat ever about. How women aren't just wearing make up for the purpose of pleasing men makes my head explode with excitement guys to eat their own keep doing what you're doing that from Alice chip NHL Kiwi living in Edinburgh. Thanks a lot. Great. Agreed great country to New Zealand. Yeah. I mean, she's winning on both fronts. That's where a lot of the sheep landline and vitamin d comes that New Zealand. Thanks a lot of else we appreciate that was very nice to hear if you want to give compliments manned sentiment. You can find us all over social media. Go to our website stuff. You should know dot com. And as always you can send us an Email to stuff podcast iheartradio dot com. Stuff you should know production. I heart radio how stuff works for more podcasts. My heart radio is iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Welcome. Welcome. Welcome back to the Bob left sets podcast. That's right. We're back with all new episodes with your favorite musicians, comedians promoters, and behind the scenes people just like my newsletter where I analyse the issues I'm gonna go deep with the guests. So if you wanna know what's going on in the entertainment industry, you've got a tune into the Bob left sets podcast on the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your podcast.

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Trying Out Detroit's Leisure Soda Casamara Club w/ Jason LaValla

Daily Detroit

35:24 min | 9 months ago

Trying Out Detroit's Leisure Soda Casamara Club w/ Jason LaValla

"It's the weekend. Welcome to your daily Detroit for Friday January thirty first twenty twenty. I'm Jerry stays. Look this has been a a busy long week. Lots of things happening serious conversations issues that affect us all but today's episode friends ends. Today is not that no. It's the weekend so we kicked back cracked. Open some Casamayor club and talked to Jason Levada. What what is customary club? Well what's called a leisure soda. That's a concept. I wasn't sure about it. I I mean after all my uncle got married in a leisure suit but now I totally get it. There Amara soft drinks made with actually natural ingredients founded here in Metro Detroit. Now this this isn't some intensely venture funded backed operation crazy thing. It's a few people and a bubbly dream. That is becoming case by case reality and that hard work is something that I always raise a glass to San Gustafsen joins me for this conversation with Jason. Right after I think our members on Patriot who make gap US holds like this possible where we kick back and highlight the offbeat little guy. Thanks to Alan Seth Leslie Nicholas Matt and all of our members. We're looking at at least sixteen more of you by our five hundred episode and word episode for twenty-seven that would be quite often to do and we have some time. But let's do this. You can pitch in for just a few bucks a month or whatever amount your heart desires at patriotair dot com slash daily Detroit. All right enough babbling it's time for some bubbling joining us in the studio. Is Jason Levada. He is the founder and president of Casimir Club. We will make sure to ask him about how to join. That exclusive club a little bit later Jason. Welcome to daily Detroit. Thank you absolutely Kasim club. You guys a little bit of a niche product. So you've got going on your sparkling morrow soft drinks. Yeah I would say it's a yeah definitely a little bit niche. I sometimes wonder maybe worry is a better word. Too much of a niche but I Dunno I think for me. The goal was to take a need that felt like it was real. Oh and big and growing and find just a fun way to address it. That was maybe a little bit out there in a little bit challenging. What I love off the bat is the design of what you're doing doing and I admit that I am basic times and I buy wine off the shelf because it looks cool same? Yeah Yeah always. I'm like sitting here going. This is like a poster from the Sixties Seventies. I travel poster like amazing looking thing where I'd like. I would buy this based on the design alone and now is exactly easy inspiration. We wanted something that would feel kind of transport. It was the the word that we were always using like. How do you without telling people in words words but this is how they might feel Or how we hope they might feel when they drink it. So let's talk about what's in the drinks and specifically tomorrow foodies and people who like food and drink no tomorrow is but a lot of people don't right so this is sort of like a liqueur almost. Yeah it's inspired by that sort of soda but out tomorrow is exactly. Yeah Yeah Amaro. In general is like this big sprawling category in Italy of these bittersweet. He drinks There before dinner after dinner type drinks data are fairly bitter and they get all of that from botanical 's like roots and citrus peels thousand and all sorts of other stuff to Kinda create a really complex and occasionally strange and kind of fun flavor generally drunk by themselves themselves right but also sometimes in cocktails. Yes I think you're seeing like over the last few years especially more and more bartenders incorporating Amaro into cocktails more often Finley I feel like when I go out to a bar around here these days. It's almost hard to find a cocktail that doesn't have tomorrow and now and like I love that. So it's it's absolutely really great. I was just at Kiessling the other night. And there's some cocktails tomorrow. There and I actually introduced someone to the concept. They were very excited. They elected a lot. Jason How did the company get it start. How did morrow form the basis of this idea for for a soft drink when this sort of idea of crystallized for me of like drinks for when you're not drinking I was thinking a lot about bidders and soda because that's my? That's my favorite thing to drink. If I'm out at a bar but I don't want a real drink and so I started playing around with bidders recipes and and all along I had been making Amaro at home just for fun Just as the thing that I look at your own not distilling I was buying spirit and and infusing running out to sort of those weird esoteric markets and picking up like barks and leaves and flowers and just. He's just putting all of that into a jar with school with some grain spirit or whatever else I could find and it hadn't really occurred to me. Despite the fact that the processor is are very similar for making Amaro or making bidders that I could do sort of an Amaro version of a bidders like take some of the the flavors. Where's that I love from this? Like world of Italian Amaro and put that into something that we would think of more more the way that we think of as a bidders as very intense flavoring component. And so I kind of tried to build it that way because I love bidders and soda but I also really love morale. How some of the advice that I got early on when I was starting this was was to do something that I really loved and because otherwise never be able to sell it That is true. Yes that is true of any like independent business I think and when did you start the company like. When did you decide that? I'm going to make this new business. That was the the late summer early. Fall of Twenty S.. Seventeen God so yeah. Yeah we didn't sell our first case until when you're the end of two thousand eighteen that's why it sometimes like scares me when I do the math. Yes sir. Yeah you're based here in Detroit our bottling and making it and everything here in Detroit. No we We tried to find a bottler in Detroit. That could do this for us there is. There's one here that was just way too big for us us There was another one that was small enough but didn't have the equipment that we needed to not use preservatives and so slowly expanded the search We were able to find awesome. Great guys down in Pennsylvania who were able to do the bottling you speaking of no preservatives. I'm taking a gander at this ingredient list and it is really cool and it's definitely like much more in the natural world than say like a Coca Cola. That's for sure. Yeah and that was. That was something that was sort of personally really important to me. I think in sort of the soft drinks industry in general. There's this lined adherence to being all natural which as I started to work through his project. Relies doesn't actually mean much of anything for a while. coca-cola was calling itself all natural and they've already good argument that it is based on how the FDA defines all natural so there's the FDA definition and then there's like taking it to another level. Yeah and that's a big part part of the reason that I didn't WanNa put all natural or anything like that on the label. I really just wanted the the ingredients to be able to speak for themselves and to not even rely on on this sort of like natural ingredients that you'll even find like a lot of cocktail bars around here if they're carrying something they might use his citric acid malic acid to recreate a lemon or lime flavor favor without having to worry about that spoiling in the keg at least not in the same timeframe gives a much longer shelf life. But I didn't even want to do that because I think vink when when the ingredients are so up front and out there for people to see if they can read through that list and they can have a little fun reading through it and saying. Oh what's what's that. That sounds weird by but scary because it doesn't it's not a chemical it's not yes ethylene whatever you know fourteen different syllables. I don't think anything on here now. I'm looking the largest number of syllables is Mediterranean. which I think sounds? Well no preservatives in here right and it's also low sugar. That's one of the big thing and that was just another thing where I don't really drink soda. I might have a ginger beer or a coke once every three months. But ah I'm out and like half the reason that I would drink bidders and soda when I was at a bar is because I didn't really WanNa think about all that sugar the galleries like I would like it was the issue of. It wasn't good for me but then they started playing with these and I mean there were. There were early versions as I was coming up with the recipes where I used a bunch more sugar. There were some where I just did none because that's another sort of long standing trend of just being able to say zero sugar but found about four grams to be the place. Where like I found my my preferred balance between the acids and the sweet and the bitter and one of the reasons? I'm excited to try. This is that I love love the taste of cocktails. I love the art of cocktails. I love the it's like it's its own experience in itself plus the booze which I find to be really valuable however I cannot drink every night I I liked drinking. Don't get me wrong. Yeah if I had a different life pass where I didn't have to be up in the morning. I'll I could put you on a different life path if I could go towards that path but I'm not going to end but I still want to have like that experience of enjoying enjoying things because I think food and drink is one of the like simple pleasures that I don't think enough people embrace right they say I would fully agree with that and sort of finding these his ways to. Maybe I'M GONNA. I'm GONNA sound like a snob. If I say elevate these legs sort of everyday things. But that's really what I wanted to try to do is like Mak- soda that I could drink when I'm out having a nice time with friends and not feel that that guilt. I don't know everybody feels it but if you're not drinking and everybody else is and they all kind of look at you. And they're like Oh why aren't you drinking. Yeah right that like peer pressure almost if it will yeah like you're somehow bringing down. They're good time. Because you're not participating in this ritual. Because I think that's the thing it's about that communal experience and I think that's even more important because you're seeing so many people that I know. I have lots of the friends. I am in my late thirties. Who are moving towards? Frankly there's this thing I won't use the last word but alcohol-free AF AF am yet because as they have kids they have work. They've made a series of decisions over the years or they've just decided to make that choice for them but a way to like have people what kind of fit together and and be communal over these food and drink things. Yes I in a large way. It's not as necessary to go out to a communal space anymore. You've got you know Netflix. You've got instagram. You've got all of these other ways to sort of keep yourself nominally engaged at home and especially if people alert drinking less and you have all that going on like which is a national trend. People are yeah. I don't know the this more and more I feel like were hopefully giving people away to don't feel like they can go out and be social and not have to worry about that weird weird pressure. We were just talking about at the same time. I'm guessing that these sodas are pretty good mixers sixers and cocktails. Yeah that's A. That's a fun one because I really was resistant to that idea. When we first launched people asked about mixing and my response I was generally like? That's that's your business but now that I've actually tried some some really good ones and they had one on at Kiessling for fairly recently Had won over at the skip awhile back and those are just the Detroit spots. I'm thinking of off the top of my head but I've tried some really really cool stuff that I I may. Maybe just didn't believe was possible because I got it in my head but I made these this way because I wanted them to be this way. We're not messing with it. Have you found that to be something a lesson. You've learned being an entrepreneur kind of like as your product becomes other people's. Yeah and that's you know what. That's I think before. We went on the Mike and you asked i. Is this this your product and I I kind of hesitated and it was exactly that feeling of like not really anymore like I started it but so many other people I think are are starting to feel Ownership of it and it's this really kind of surreal. Really Cool feeling that like. I don't know maybe we're building a little bit of a community through a through a soft drink. I'm telling you you should do the pop up and you should do pins or something so people can see each other at the bar that they're you know they recognize that they're both into the same thing and they can start a conversation kinda limited conversation and all. I really like that yeah. I wasn't even thinking about the pen as a way to lake. Hey you are in the club right exactly joined the CAST Samara club get a subscription. Yeah well I don't know about you but I'm Diane to crack one of these bad boys open and give it a try. Let's do it. Yeah it Kinda started off as I. I really just thought there was gonNA be one flavor. You guys are familiar with Campari Circle. Great Big Negroni fans love negotiates button case listeners. Don't know what is Campari. Campari Pari is. It does have like a really strong. I'd say great pretty flavors but with the Campari I I think a lot of that comes from. And they don't tell anybody that recipe all all of this is speculation but my understanding in the way that I built Alta which is sort of our. I think it's our flagship. I don't know if I get to decide that but it seems to have been the bestseller consistently so far but the the main ingredient in that and I believe Campari is this bitter orange. Inge called a keynote. Oh and those grow in Italy and the peel has this like intense bitter floral grapefruit thing. That's I think for a lot of people it can be it can be fairly intense and But as I sort of got used to that flavor and came to love it as well all that should be a soda. I came to find out I wasn't the first person to have that idea. A bunch of those in Italy but they tend to be a lot sweeter and so I think we are are still maybe doing something. That's valuable to the world in just having less sugar in it because I don't know I just can't enjoy something when it's that syrupy syrupy sweet. It's hard to have it with a meal. Hard to get the flavor out of your mouth kind of like the these these don't linger longer than they ought. I too and the first one I just happen to pull out is how do I say this the Sarah Es de yes. Yeah and it's got A it's a beautiful bottle and tell me a little bit of the story in the inspiration behind this flavor the inspiration for this one. So the the Kinda mating main ingredients in this one are grapefruit peel and cinnamon him in and and some baking spices and the idea was to create like sort of an apple. Rawal spritzing type thing. That was just deeply infused with cinnamon And actually got that idea from over at Grey Ghost. I I don't know if they're still doing this But the my Paloma they use an apple cinnamon infused apple And that just like that idea just really really stuck with me. Why not how you love your upper offspring? I do love me some apples birth. Yeah I make them mm slightly different than the recipe as as directed on the bottle. I do I I do a little bit of just angst or bidders sure other bidders will be good okay and then instead of an orange wedge I do orange or an orange peel nice. I like it needs a little bit of bitterness to counteract the sweetness and the Opera Abroa- I think my favorite Spritz is cookie Rosa so same ratios same. I I like the peel as opposed to the wheel or the wedge But for some reason that one just seems to strike the right balance of like bitter like Campari better well. Let's get a shot all right friends normally when we do these taste tests were drinking something boozy. Well usually we can't record another segment. After arrays tests. We were singing at brewery face on. We were singing on the way home. Right you guys record at the brewery a lot of times it will come men. I mean that one. We went there because we were like. You know. You can't bring your beers to us really but we've done that we're in. We have people that. Come to know Robin Cleveland. He Does Norden doc of. Yeah Yeah Yeah. He came in and brought a bottle. And we we need more of that Norton we drink soda or during the afternoon which was nice. The the Norden and Ulta were two of the ingredients in that skip cocktail that I was talking about Nice so super interesting on the nose. I almost smell like kind of GIN. Like botanical is the grapefruit. I definitely pick up. Yeah Yeah I think I get I get a little bit of the grapefruit but a lot of what I get from. This one is is the cinnamon I think a really deep. It's got Jim Botanical. Without the juniper trees right right and yeah without the Christmas tree rhubarb a little too. I know there's rhubarb in there. I I always forget to say the rhubarb. When I'm talking about this one but I I do think it adds a little bit of that that snap? Yeah that's that's nice. I mean I'm a big fan of sparkling water which I know. Some people think sometimes is boring during. But I like the fizz without all the sugar and everything and this is nice because you really. You don't really notice sweetness yes. The sugar very very in a lot of ways is not not there to this. Might sound like a backwards way of thinking about it but it may be is how I've come to think about it. The sugars not really there to sweeten the drink. It's there to sort of like provide had a backbone to the flavors sort of bring them to life a little bit. Yeah I can imagine. It's got a lot going on on the tongue. It's really it's nice. I really like Jillian trusting. I'll also say that this is the best time of the year to be doing something like this because these are just been sitting in my car and they came out like the perfect temperature. So what is the perfect temperature to to drink these. In your opinion I gather you don't like to thrown ice and pull him out if they're too cold you'd miss all the complex flavors going on in here you do. And that's part of the reason that I like pouring it into into a glass nine times out of ten. I'm just drinking a bottle right out of the refrigerator and I still love it but this feels I mean. I couldn't even guess what temperature terrific but maybe like ten degrees warmer than that. Yeah I think I'd just one of the reasons that I appreciate a glass is it allows it to sort of come up to temperature a little bit faster even if you are pulling it Out of a a refrigerator so this one is the Ondo which I saw this on your website and I I copied it because I liked it. You described it as Unda is a funky blend of lemon sage and rhubarb that. Lets people know you read the New Yorker. I forgot I said it's it's definitely the it's sort of the Weirdo of the bunch. I liked to get weird me too. It's definitely my favorite. It's also probably the one that it may be the most love from sort of like hospitality industry folks but it also is the one that may be sells the least overall also. There's kind of like a fun. I feel like the crowd is like a small little I think the New Yorker description then is very very apt right because like the The the critics love it. But it's not exactly as widely read as you think it is. Yes critically acclaimed out really sort of the audience score there ain't no USA Today beverage. Yes sorry Nathan. All right here we go smell it while it's still fizzing. Let's get I mean you know. Fans of Negro knees and apple spreads. Like this sodas right up your alley. It's right up my alley. That is weird. I like it in a good way. uh-huh it's cool to drink a soda and it has the complexities of tomorrow or some kind of like a fine wine where the flavors are lingering and changing and morphing on your tongue like while while you're digesting it you know it's it's a lot more complex and interesting than typical sugary soda. Thank you and that was something that I I was really hoping for. It was too. It's not just one flavor that's intended to sort of hit all over at once The Way I think a lot of soft drinks with natural flavors are intended to like really just target you in particular way whereas this I just I wanted it to sort of play out for people the way a good a good drink can. The sage is really cool. It's like it's subtle but it's it has a really interesting dimension to it. Yeah and I think that is the thing that makes this one polarizing. I think some people they catch the sage. And they're like this is the weirdest thing I've ever had. I love it. And some people catch it and they say this is the weirdest thing I've ever had pour it out. I mean the people who just dig their sage and so like if you dig that like this is your. This is your jam. This is the one that I got the most pushback from people on like before we launched they were like. Are you sure you should think it's great. I find nothing objectionable whatsoever. It's really nice. Thank you it's just the the thing is about this and I think this is the thing for listeners to kind of paint a mental picture for you this is not verners or Dr Pepper our coke that has such like the flavors here do not punch you in the face they kind of give you a back rub. And it's the carbonation is a little less less aggressive. I think that a lot of sodas too you know. It's it's so hard to tell. I sometimes wonder these in particular. Maybe just because they're a little bit warmer and reporting them into a glass like doc. I I get feedback on the bubbles all over the spectrum. Some people are like I love that the bubbles are intense and some people are like I wish there were more bubbles. So I just I never I never even know what to I. Don't even know what I think anymore. Letting in those kind of situations I think you just kind of let let the chips fall where they may yes right because you can't it always. The customer is often right but not always. Yeah and I think to the extent that like people sort of ballots and experiences right. Give me anything again. Be Any eh like there's so many variances and bubble of such a preference thing. Yes all right Jason Dealer's choice which one's next let's IT Capo. Next we can finish strong with Alta are right. I like it's got the Green Kinda going on dip another kind of mountainscapes design on the on the label Pretty this this one. We sort of wanted to communicate something a little bit more of I think a lot of the the other three. Maybe imply that were by the beach. I wanted this one to feel like we're sort of more in the the mountains were away from the coast I feel like that if you live in a Mies van der Rohe home in Lafayette Park or something on this on principle. I think that's right. Ah I hope long with a subscription to New Yorker. Tell us what's going on in the Capo. So with the Capo which is like a term for like a like a Mafia boss or something. You know what it can be for all of these names. I wanted them to be tired. Open to interpretation they all you can read them. A couple of different ways Yeah with Capo. It's kind of fun because it means that it means Like a a Cape that you would wear. It also means the Cape by the Ocean Ocean which brings us to the inspiration for this one A? It's a southern Italian Amaro called Vecchio. Amaro del Capo. That was just one of the very first ones that I've tried before we get into this. I just want to say I want to tell. People were buckling up for Camomile and liquorice route and peppermint leaf and Carter Motley. This heiferman. I get that yeah. Yeah and I get. There's a lot of floral essence going on uh-huh yes I would say. This one is sort of the the counterpart mirror to own in that. This is definitely the least objectionable actionable right like I could see somebody who likes just like a like a mellow Ginger Ale. This is not as nearly as effervescent as verners button like a Canada. Dry If you're into that you would like Capo. Yes it's like. Justin Trudeau went to Italy and came back with a bunch of flavors. Yes exactly what we were going for like people tell me when I'm doing like grocery store demos they'll say like Oh this fancy sprite and that one hung with me. The first time I heard of it could see A friend of mine now says he prefers to call it a low sugar mountain dew. I get like Ginger Beer From some people. It's all over the place but I I think maybe the defining characteristic thing that brings all of those little notes together is that there's something comforting about this one. It reminds people of of something that they've had before and way that the others are a little bit more their own thing. This is almost like the on ramp. Yeah yes absolutely And no caffeine in any of these not in any of these I think if we ever did a cola or anything like that a little bit I would love to try Casimiro. Tamara Club Cola. That's got a cool name to it to triple. Yeah I'm having a that one's I'm I'm having a hard time with because so much of what I associate with. Like the flavor of Coca Cola and Cola generally is phosphoric acid. which I really don't WanNA use and so now I'm trying to figure out? How can I recreate that? With real ingredients yeah You know to me I feel like you lean a little bit more. You know here. Here's here's a starting point. which I know is going to sound weird because it's cheap cola but I had town club uh-huh day and it's a very unique cola taste? I felt like it was like. Oh something in more of that neighborhood would be more interesting disting- As a cocktail cola because it's got this different like trail at the end of it. I can't even describe I was like it was in my like Palette for like five five minutes from like there are some out of town club but I did and I was like this is different. I gotta try that. Because that's a I've been I've been trying to get out in you know. See I mean it's all of sixty nine cents so I think I can. I can probably even expense that. Yeah it's research exactly all right and and the Alta yeah and that kind of brings us back to where we started the conversation with this sort of Lake it started as comparing inspired thing and then I added some junipers or so maybe you could call it in a grown inspired ooh knows knows forward. ooh That's a lot of that is the Conoco I think that's the Italian citrus. Yes these are all pretty similar in color. It just kind of a Pail You know like very lightly colored. I'd say like ninety ninety nine percent of the color just comes from the lemon juice and one percent from that just the different extracts that were working with a lot. I mean I I love. I love that Campari that you know. I love that flavor. It's a lot less assertive than you would have seen. Campari yes but it's nice. Yeah I mean. It's like it's fruity. It's yeah almost almost like it veers on like Berry fruit a little bit. Almost my favorite tasting that I've ever gotten on this one was Red slurpy Brits. I actually read pop briefly. Came to mind okay. Yeah Yeah Okay so this is going to sound like a crazy story but I spend a lot of my time growing up in the village at my grandmother's house and we would always do brunch. And like all the time it'd be a rotating brunch and this taste like and there was so much fun and I was in my like seventh eighth ninth grade. I drink my first MIMOSA in middle school. I'm sure and I I'm not housing. This is a Mimosa but this like this tastes like my Indian village memories of and I love that deep like I feel like this belongs longs in like the bar in the study. Yeah where it's like this is this. Is The jam underage Mimosa at Grandma's house. Yes okay. That's my new favorite tasting note. I like it though I I really like it. Also has juniper Berry Mandarin Peel will our pie all spiced berry and clove bud see. That's what that's what's coming through for me and my grandmother loved to do cloves and there's the mandarin I and the juniper is something I am one of those crazy people that loves Jin okay. That's delicious I love that one. Thank you this is this is there are there are really good. They're really nice. Iceberg drinkable So it's just you and you have one partner in a company's yeah yeah an old friend Who happened to be each? She was working at Italy at the time was quitting because she just was like kind of tired of working there and was looking for something to do that. Might feel a little bit more more room to explore so to speak And maybe a way to sort of focus on some sustainability stuff which. I'm really excited about Yet she came on January first of of last year. We had the conversation on New Year's Day. Okay so just about a year ago and She's in Brooklyn Anderson. Yes yeah yeah which I I lived out there for about eight years Before I moved here she was just the I I wish that we could sort of work together and see each other every day like the sort of pen pal. Business isn't always easy but She's just like easily the best person then for for the job and somebody who's just like ready to for really by an so You Know How's the business going I mean are you finding traction Jenner are you. Are you getting people to you know like hey I'll try this. I don't know what the obviously there's no you don't really have any competitors in the US market or at least not Michigan. I mean I'm sure you have. Competitors editors some level but there are definitely some people that are working on maybe similar similar projects And I'm excited to see how those go i. I would really like to think that there's room in the market. For more of those create a category rats the right because the forefront of a category. Because it's to me I look at go. This is its own thing. I mean apart and separate from so much else that I have tasted in like the soft drink world I mean look at White Claw and this is way way better in my opinion done that garbage. A random engineer randy so our our audio engineer people at home don't know loves his white claw in fact he's even gone around bars with Gandalf. The white claw had like duct tape around thirteen thirteen cans of white claw. That's too much happens when you drink at Hamtramck. Sometimes yeah okay. I think one of the only times I've ever had white clouds in Hamtramck. Maybe that's a thing I it is a lot better than just to be clear. There is a lot better business. Amtrak yeah do you think That sort of like it I think White Claw and Casa Mara Club maybe share in some sort of like strange way lineage with Lacroix sherve served that leg almost no flavor sparkling water me sort of took it you added flavor we added flavor and they added vodka. The and I don't think he'd like they both have a place in the world. Sure sure sure I don't love the taste of Whitelaw but I kinda. I love the way that people love it. it's just. It's a fun brand yum Sir Jason Where can people find Camara club around Detroit? Like what are some of the you know main market some your big accounts I I've seen it at West market in Ferndale. Yeah okay. Yeah Yeah Western market. It was Was One of the first people to bring us on Holiday market up in Royal Oak. Rocco's another one In Detroit that that really really really just I mean they were starting out too but they took a chance on us. And I don't know if I've ever not seen their cooler stocked. Since the very first cases that we sold them anthology she called fees got four packs downtown or I guess eastern market Paramedics got it. I Oh God odd ochre is one of our just like all-time all-time and ochre is one of those places. By the way the listeners don't know they should know about it. I know it's come up under the radar the national scene super-quick and I've known a bunch of local folks are like what on Earth did this come from. But then if you look at their lineage of course they're doing this well Oh yes. He got so much talent with their team. Yeah and they just I. I don't know the first time I walked in there. I was like. Oh it's A. It's a coffee shop and bakery and then to find out they have lake doc just world class food like one of the best brunches that you can get anywhere. I mean literally like all the magazines now yeah deserves to be up up and Of course you know there's always just good old word of mouth right like just ask your grocer if they don't carry it like. Hey do you ever think about I mean I. You know I've been to a party store. I remember my old party restore back in my old neighborhood in Detroit. I couple fifteen years ago. I said Hey. Do you ever carry bell's beer. And he said what what. What's it called any got a piece of paper and wrote wrote the name down and next Milwaukee in there the cooler stocked with like bells? Beer you know I mean it's like yeah. Yeah you know a good retailer will listen to his customers and go. Oh you're curious about this. Listen if enough people ask and there's not to stock it and there's also because it's not alcoholic there's also the Internet yes. Yeah Yeah I always forget that one on you can always get it online. CASIMIR CLUB DOT COM right. Yes well Jason La Jolla. Thanks for coming in and Not Getting drunk but Sharing your story and some of your wonderful. Amaro Sodas. Thanks so much guys. This was great. Thank you before I let you go. Next week is a big week. Journalist Care Swisher joins me on the show author Michael Dory and has a new book out. He'll also here. And of course all the stories you could fit into a two and a half liter of Fago at the liquor store right here on your daily Detroit. We're all juggling multiple things to make this thing go. Daily Detroit is made by Sven Guston. Cheyenne no Sereni Randy Walker and you at Patriotair Dot com slash daily Detroit. Well I'M OFF TO PLYMOUTH tonight for dinner super cute suburban downtown. That's for sure. Also a shutout to Kiessling for a wonderful time for me. An engineer Randy last night. They didn't give us anything for me to say that but excellent service with that. I'm Jay z's to care for each other and I'll see you around Detroit.

Detroit Amaro Sodas Italy Jason US apple Kiessling Casimir Club White Claw founder and president Jason Levada Alan Seth Leslie Nicholas Matt Kasim club engineer Jerry Casamayor San Gustafsen Netflix
How Much Money is Enough? with Mike White

In Bed with Nick and Megan

1:02:49 hr | 8 months ago

How Much Money is Enough? with Mike White

"This episode is brought to you by sleepnumber. Sleep number beds. Allow you to adjust on each side to your ideal firmness comfort and support and with sleep. Iq technology inside the bed attracts. How your sleeping and gives you personalized insights for your best sleep. Stick around stick around later in the episode to hear a special segment from US and sleep number my research the F. Anne. How the potty all right well welcome everybody to a new installment of number one world's most internationally beloved podcast in bed with Nick and Megan starring Nick Offerman and featuring Megan Malala with this week's very special guest star Mike White for pro Mike is Heroic Los Angeles screen writer and director and Creator Television shows and actor and Reality Television Star. So we're GONNA talk about pretty much mostly reality television. We're GONNA throw a bone at the fine works of art that my created. Hi Mike thanks searching our here. Welcome to the first person to wear are complementary socks. I thought I was like I think. They want me to wear the socks. They don't mean dirty on the bed. Now we didn't. It was because we had a guest who didn't have felt comfortable having their feet exposed so we had to run out and buy socks. We're on our bed and you know a lot of people shoes Fox look. We're all trusted so I'm going to listen. I just want to show you God. I've been I run sock software. Hausner should something pretty good right now. I have these beat up like mystery areas because I want to find out if it's okay you would prefer me and socks just assume. Yeah I guess I think you feel like Mike White can take head and asked me not to listen. That was communication. We did nothing to be ashamed. Aston answer as your feet. My couch an Wayne Needs. I'm number tutted with you. And I need. Are you in memory of both of you? I think my thirtieth birthday party Ida Thirtieth Birthday Party old. It was pretty popular like Mediterranean restaurant on Melrose that was like had like a bar and then in the back was like outdoor seating. It was a popular place. It was right near Fairfax. But it's gone now but I had my thirtieth birthday there. If we didn't know you yet why would we your friends with Jack with lax? Yeah and Laura and I think it was will and grace on a thin. Yeah it was. It was two thousand. Yeah that was there. We met actually so anyway. I remember yeah you were there together at my thirtieth birthday party. But I don't think we I mean it wasn't until much later that we actually were like conversing but I but I- holding up really well birthday. What time of the year date June twenty eighth? What Dude you two days younger than me? Nine thousand nine hundred seventy six nineteen. Oh my God that's June phrases. My Dad's birthday and it's Aubrey Plaza. And its positive. Angie's birthday birthday to Schwartzman Paul. Thomas Anderson Arianna `grande only now Arianna `Grande or Paul Thomas Anderson. No we're talking about people. We SORT OF NARROW I. It's weird I don't I mean I grew up in La. So I have to now astrology. It's really at some point. You have to say so. I don't know if I really believe in it all. They've done all that it is weird. How like the people that I know their birthdays cluster? In in times where I'm supposed to be about all of those people like I know like a ton of people like in the last week of June and early July birth thirty two. Yeah and like a ton of people in Nevada tober early Nova Scorpio's so yeah it's yeah so sa- doesn't surprise me like I literally have the friends I have are are cancers at Scorpio's that's really funny. Yeah I and I must say I loved A lot of my friends are Los Angeles natives and I love the people who grew up. Here it's funny because I really I've done I haven't done at all. I mean as far as like new kids just at some point you have to like I. Yeah you have to go your you know. Ironic strategists is just like. I mean. He can't live here fifty years. You know you can't get your vehicle registered installments. I actually do street. This is how Eliot I'm like. I don't really know anything about astrology. That'll be my like how Chicago you're fifty years old. You know your sign you. There used to be this amazing metaphysical bookstore in Los Angeles on. Melrose called the body trade of course and every Betty Mrs that it's been closed now for ten hours just wandering the buddy change in the book just like licking in the aisles. And I also went through a period where I would do like every personality. Like the any Graham Myers like all like there's so many different ways to think about yourself. I've done it all any gramley. Those there's the nine personality. Oh Oh I find you. All of it has basic stuff. Megan I would say you're probably a three and what's it. Three three is like a performer. I'm most people in our. I mean they're also like they like they like to. They want to be seen. I'm I'm three. I'm mighty casts eight and a half hour gives us harder for shovel. Yeah there's a lot you should. I you know what I can give you the link where you can do a couple. Take one hundred questions but after you you you get your results in like three different interest. That's for sure and actually when I was one of the things in was funny when I went on Amazing Race. Survivor is the amazing race. They make you take all of these standardized tests. And it's I mean that's just like that's in. I can't think of a more fun way to spend tired of this. That Hollywood or survivor or they do on survivor. What was funny. What's funny about it? Means that you do it with your partner. You take the tests separately. Obviously but then you get your results together and each time in classic. 'cause you can see the show is like these people are all crazy but the two partners. I had both failed their tests jab the psych test. After my first partner it was over. You know it was like this guy was a screen writer. His name is John Casimir Larry Cousin's son and he's done some movies on us to and he we were GONNA go neurotic. Like I duNno Agoraphobia screenwriters which I'm not really that but I was happy to I want to get on the show. This is my dream and I was like I'll get on the John because he's perfect. He'll be funny. Because he's he's like Woody Allen Lake scared of leg everything it'll be funny and so then he took the test and they were like Gosh. She really score off the charts in a anxieties. I know are you afraid to fly. Yes but what I'm really afraid of is just being in a room with someone other than myself and my bowel movements won't be regular and I was like you know if you don't mean you have to go to this place. Which is you? Don't go home go to. It's called elimination station or something Tang. And it's like a resort. It's Nice it's weird. It was on Costa Movie. It was not like some you know wasn't like Dungeon and he's like I know I'm worried about that too and I was like John. We're not going to lose. We're going to win. And then he looks at me to realize how crazy you sound anyway back to his free therapy session here and so then they were like yes or they didn't let us go. I was so mad at him and I was like dude. I mean I could have chosen somebody else and it was like it was weeks from. We're down to like the last fourteen teams and it was like something I really wanted to do. And so I didn't speech them for like three weeks like so mad. I finally had dinner with him and like we had dinner and he had like all these like third degree burns. It looks like on his elbows in his face and stuff and I was like what happened. He's like well after the whole fiasco with the amazing race. I felt really emasculated and I went and got a treadmill and I put it in my house and I fell off the treadmill and I got caught between the thing and I got burns all over my face and I was like. Oh my God. I can't be mad at this guy. He can't even be on a treadmill house. Little trowel around the world and then I went with my dad and he took the test and he failed to let him go anyway. He scored really off the charts for paranoia and he and the woman saying well. We're not you know because of your age we're not afraid you're gonNA poke anyone and she kept you poke poke anybody so they let him go through even though he he failed the test. I mean. So you're you and you guys want so now. He didn't win. We got we got far. I don't know I guess the essay. They don't be responsible if he was violent but like he was like I don't understand why why. What does it say? Dad was he was he was a. He's a former minister. Evangelical who became who is gay and came out and became a gay activist and he would go to all these churches and and people would. I mean even some really crazy crap like people would spit on him and like W- death threats and stuff and so by the time we did amazing race. He was full on. He'd been really on the frontlines of and so the woman was like well. You you know here. It says people are trying to kill you. He's like well people. Are I get letters all the time? They're threatening my life and she's like well here. It says that you have had visions. He's like well once. I was arrested for my activism. I went on a hunger strike in after three days. I saw my heroes in the jail cell. Whitney Martin Luther King was there and then Gandhi. I mean I know they weren't there but it was like they were there. You know what I mean like. Dad What do you think? And then he's like. Well what does it say about Mike? And he's like well he comes off pretty well. He's like she's lying. Appear to be really astonishing speaks to the force of your will that you then succeeded. You made it on the show and succeed. It was. What's that being on the main thing rates for my dad? 'cause MAY HOLD. My Dad's will trip was since he was a kid was like he just wanted to prove that he was like normal even though he's gay and like you know and he would go to these churches and try to you. Know he was working out whatever his deal of his parents the religious community which obviously was a big waste of time. I mean I think he did help people who are gay and those communities but he you know he did suffer a lot from feeling just constantly rejected like he was basically just kept reopening the wound you know his wounds of his parents rejection of him because he was gay and it was funny as being on. Amazing Race Kaz. He isn't very lovable leg. He's like such a you know. He's very charismatic. Appealing guy and so. I don't know the reaction he got for being on that show in a weird way. I think is Cathartic is I was aware of something. I was like what he'd been looking for. You know in his own his own way just to show that you know he was a bad guy. A huge load of approval and just like people saw him as the cute guy that you know father that he you know. It's funny how those reality shows like they're married. They're silly but they can have deeper impact. The Real I mean we love specifically survivor is our favorite. And and that's mainly thanks to Megan's Accu men from the get-go she was like this show is pure and true and really well constructed and really clever and has has proceeded over twenty years. It's been on or so thirty some odd seasons now. It's almost forty two years so twenty years. Yeah it's continues to you. Know add attempt to reinvent itself and stay fresh and sort of stay ahead of the players strategy linked up harp. You don't like the way they produce it. No I ain't doing good job but I feel like he gets you know to me what I always liked was the social experiment. Part of it was just like I mean I remember seeing the first season I was like you know the very first episode. They vote off the sweet lady who plays the guitar and I was like. Oh my God. And she's gone over. She's dead and there was like an and that's what I liked about. Survivor was kind of a ritual. Like collective murder was like Shirley Jackson's the lottery. Like someone has to die. You Old lady dough and there was like outside leg. Yeah it was just it was so like you know soak you know there's something just so yeah to me in the characters were just re out of control and so like so to me. I. I'm less interested in like the game part of it except as it relates to that. Just you know the person and you know like the personalities when it gets to when I feel like I'm just watching a game show. I get less interested. But then when I'm watching someone starving wishing death upon their whatever the crazy stuff but like the shows about how people act under like you know when they're deprived of stuff about part is why. Watch it next inning of breaking down very logically but the truth is that. We've been toying with the idea of Nick actually being on survivor for years. And it's sort of like a real possibility and goes in Guinea pig. I mean obviously more famous guy was but But I I mean I don't know this is the I mean. This is the reason I did the show like it's like at some point. It's just fun to play a new game. You know. Wait a minute. So what was the best? Were the best parts of doing. The whole thing was just I? I love every second of it to be honest. I thought it was GONNA have a real problems with the starving and all of the. Because I've done you know choose. I mean I'm La. Like I said like I've done juice cleanses. I've had the KALANICK's like I've had like where you're like starving and link and I can't even make it to the afternoon without being you know bitchy unhappy and so I was like this is not gonNa be good and also I wanted to be fun and funny or whatever and I was like. I'm not funny when I'm starving. I'm like actually just elected crotchety bit. She just sits in the corner. Like you know it's not gonna be that entertaining gonNA suck but I was like all this stuff that was like the sort of depriving parts of it actually turned out to be not that bad. I mean it was bad I lost twenty five pounds and I. Am You know your mosquitoes are biting through your clothes? But it is kind of like you like having the you know the survey where you signed up. It's not a surprise and it was funny. How like the younger people who are like stronger? Obviously than me in many ways were like just like falling apart like immediately like what do we do like it was like you know like there was a guy who is in the corner like you know he could like cut down trees and chopping boo and we did all these things and he was like do horn review? It was funny how they were falling like flies so the hardest was. I don't know it was it was the hardest was just. Yeah the hardest was when I first got there and you realize you know it's like I'm again. I'm not it's not like everywhere I go. I'm recognized but I feel like I'm I'm Yusufu I Dunno whatever I've done in this business has has made has lubricated the SOC my social life you know what I mean we're I don't I'm not feeling like I always have to justify why I'm somewhere like you know what I mean. I feel like you know people come to me and I'm not you know I. I don't feel insecure usually when I'm in social situations but like being there the first day and you realize like okay. These people like they don't care you know what I mean like. Maybe and they're all younger. These are all you know. I was on the tribe of the buffs bodied people and I and I felt like I was back in like religious summer camp where I was like. I do know like how to connect with people and I was like trying to tell stories that maybe sound cool about being on private planes Jennifer Aniston or something. It was just like you know trying to see if that would get me in with them and just feeling like a total like that part was that was also part of why. I wanted to do it because I feel like. That's the part when I like playing the game it's like and I it's like at this age. It's like I feel like I'm I don't know like to be unburdened by my own luggage and my own sense of identity is something that is. I crave it a little bit. You don't feel like you know here in La. I've always like wait in line. That place or you know you know everything becomes easier. You start seeing. It's like you know we need. That's what's fun about. Traveling is like you just. You don't know how to Orient Everything. And so you're kind of liberated from your own leg limited way of thinking about things and so you have to like take everything in a new way and that's what was fun about Sorority. Where it's just you know you're you're divorced from your old self and and you can play a new self rule in your head a lot of success with film working. Tv work where that in a way that has its own sort of cage where people come to expect certain things of you or they know your voice and so you you can feel hemmed in by like I live in this world there there it has. It's certainly ruts and it sounds like it's really liberating to break out of that and I mean it's yeah it's I'm sure that's why you know you guys take on different kinds of not just rolls but you know mediums are ways to express yourself and I think that that's that's the part that I definitely am feeling more than ever in terms of the business and being living here. Is this feeling of you know it's like you. WanNa live in interesting life. You WanNa have respect for yourself as far as like the choices you made like who you how you live you know and and I just don't WanNA use things out of a compulsive just because that's what I do or that's where I get my approval and that's you know it's like he want to have a more. You know inspired way of looking at how you spend your time. You know what I mean especially as like for me you know like obviously i. I wanted to make enough money to live and all that. But that's covered you know and now it's like you know it's cool to have make movies and people like him or not like them or whatever but I know I know all the feelings embark on. It's like you know this is a cool new thing but I already. You know it's like it's like I feel like I know how I'm going to you know feel all the way through it or they know what you know? I don't know it's something if it just feels familiar in some way and so it's like the rush for me is when you're like you know you got your your your Yeah you standing in front of some new way of thinking feeling that you can't control and you you learn something and I don't know so those are the experiences a I want to try to seek out but sometimes you lazy Nassar just. It's just easier to take the job or burgess. Do the thing that you know that you're you're good at doing you know but I think l. Everything is relative because you know every everyone is allowed to get to a point where they feel like they've you know come to a crossroads and maybe they want to do something else. And why are they questioning? You know where they're where they're at and continuing forward with the same thing they've been doing. I think it happens to everybody at a certain point right and it's also to me. It's it's it's really more. It's just about saving money and attack the certain kind of attention that I get in this industry is is not the value is not the metrics for how I value my life will. You've had the good fortune to learn that that doesn't pay the dividends. Yeah the audience might suspect it. Would I would just say to the audience. Who sticking that trustee to go through all this so learn the lesson now. You can't you don't unless it's just like anything like I can't tell people what it's like to be on survivor. But I can you know it's like trust me like it's nice doesn't I think this is a delicious conversation about the human experience because it's applicable to anybody's life where it's sort of boils down to the question In your case of like do I do. I stay in this world of opportunity where I can write myself to happiness or I can create you know Through your work you can you can create a sense of fulfillment or should I step away from that and allow my way. I live my life to create that sense from it. Should I live the movie or should I write them and movie or is it? Is The answer balance of the two? And it's something that I you know. Megan and I from the get-go had a student teacher element because she's been through everything in the business a decade before a just because of age difference and her she's been cast as the lead of stuff soon soon as she showed up to her first audition whereas I was more like. How do you guys have room for a donkey in this production and so in our in our lives together in our house? We'd we definitely feel very lucky that we get to make our living being creative whether it's doing stuff with her band or working as actors or writing books are doing a podcast but that is a constant you know something that it's hard to fathom once from the outside. It appears that our dreams have come true. It's hard to fathom that you're still human beings with all the insecurities and neuroses whatever So even even if you're you know handed a five picture deal as a superhero from marvel or Disney. Whatever they're called now Everyone's dream it's yeah it's actually truly the dream of many or what you would think a. Hollywood dream would be in. It's pretty. It's pretty easy to fathom once you get remotely close to it how it applies really practically where you're like. Oh that okay so not only my signing up to play the superhero but I have to work with a trainer six hours a day like my eating is going to be is torturous for the next seven years. I have to fly to Tokyo withdraw of a hat for junkets and so forth like once you begin to understand the the many the myriad ways in which it takes over your life suddenly. It's not so much a dream as like a really complicated life choice and I think it's healthy that you are in that you are able to ask that of yourself rather than you know. What's the answer? Well we were talking earlier before we started recording. You are saying that you are at a point where you're wondering how much money you need to have before you can stop. Yeah Yeah So. Let's talk about that for a minute. I mean is there a number? There's an there's a commercial that has like you know if you seen those commercials where it's like your retirement number. It's like in like a million and that's like I think that's funny thing that there's a number but I but I I I don't know I mean it's funny I look at my parents and and this is pretty personal but I doubt they'll listen to this by like my dad has always had this need to feel special. Which is definitely I. Don't know I I'm that's my malediction by like I but I you know it's like and he has lived his life like needing to be seen in debt. None all this stuff and there's a lot of Sturman wrong with that and my mom is not really been like that. She just has a community of friends and lay. And as I've gotten older it's like look at my mom and like she has her an-an-and she's just it's like she's she's just put roots like deeper and deeper in the roots are our really strong and that seems like. That's what you are doing. Which is you know it's like create. You know how creating really creative community and and I don't know how well that's one thing about doing this podcast is you. You know we're talking all different people so far. They've all been people that we know. But it every person has made me think about different subjects like this and things that I think he can always relate to everybody's experience but I think that's a cool off. Shoot of the of doing this. Podcast is that it makes you. It makes you think about a lot of things in relate examined where you're at. Yeah I mean specifically in your case the I feel like you're really good the thing I love about your work so much as your ability to insert these questions Front Center in your films in a Bread Status Beatrice dinner and enlightenment spring to mind where you're putting these existential questions. Like what are we doing here? Like what what life choices can I feel good about or yeah or will I drown ray? How can I avoid that regret? Yeah Haynick Hi. Are you ready to turn your dream into a reality? Sure with squarespace this a square space. This is your dream. Your dream was literally to do. I got I got into podcasting so that I could do. A squarespace had can read this overview squarespace makes it easier than ever to launch your passion project. Whether you're looking to start a new business showcase your work published content sell products and more square spaces the tool for you sound just like Conan with with beautiful templates created by World. Class designers world class designers. And the ability to customize just but anything with a few clicks you can make easily you can easily make a beautiful website yourself. It's going great. Here comes my big finish listen. Squarespace empowers millions of people. Millions squarespace. Listen to this everybody's stop. Squarespace empowers millions of people from designers to lawyers artists to gamers even restaurants and gyms to turn great ideas into something real. You had to squarespace dot com slash bed for a free trial. And when you're ready to launch us the offer code bed to save ten percent off your first purchase of a website or domain that squarespace dot com slash bed offer code that skinny squarespace to launch a website about reading squarespace. My big break he nick. Hey honey your eyes are kind of glossing over what he's thinking about just thinking about some fresh meat that I was going to get out of the fridge. Fan from grass roots co-op Today we're going to have some bacon. Now let's wait is that is that like a farmer's cooperative check this out you know how we've learned about industrial farming of animals. That's so gross. Like when we drive up the highway passed a Akao factory. You can smell it for miles away and it's horrible it's gross. That's the bad kind of meat. Production but grassroots is a farmers co op that raises animals in a healthy grass. Fed Way they take care of their animals and they lied healthy. Happy lives as They're raised in pasture in a pasture. one hundred percent pasture raised in fact and you can actually get a hold of the company and find out where the pastor was where your meat was raised true it's true farm-to-table eating right simmer down So do they use nasty chemicals? No Chemicals? They butcher every single piece of meat by hand. They have the highest standards across the board. One of these things. We've given up our agency by not knowing about where food comes from and we've gotten into trouble it's unhealthy for us for the animals and the planet so climate change chance it does they practice regenerative agriculture replenishing the nutrients in the soil rather than depleting them like a big corporation does are they transparent. They believe in transparency. That's right they're the only meat producer in the USA that allows you to trace every product from pasture to plate plus there's no subscriptions necessary. You can just order what you want whenever you want you order the order. Yeah I mean I I ordered I ordered. My first box was a grab bag. I got lamb got steaks. I got a few different kinds of chicken. Got Bacon and Ham and it is delicious. I mean everybody knows that if you're if you're animals are raised on grass that has much healthier and more delicious and much better than animals raised on grain right. Well sounds like everybody's GonNa love grassroots. Call up and Right now or so I heard because I read I read minds and I just read yours. They are giving our listeners. A fantastic limited time deal which is forty. Dala off plus free shipping. It was a huge deal. It is so if you want more details dear listener you can get those and you can place your order right now with this great offer by going to our special URL which is grassroots C. O O P dot com slash bed grassroots coop. Dot Com slash. Ben TRIGGERED IT OUT. Enjoy the meats. I think we need to talk about the show you did. Hbo and lightened. Which is why. I'm nick and my all time. Favorite shows two seasons and we were so. I told you this before but when I found out that it wasn't going to have a third season and I told NECK. He started crying. Well it was very dusty grain truck. We were in the back of rain last much. We love also. Yeah so what I when you said. 'cause I don't think I ever realized until now that you are from Los Angeles and so then you know we. We did talk a little bit about all the Tarot Card reading channeling aspects of being from here and just this little subculture so how that now the idea of the show is taking on a whole new meaning but I really am that woman. You are that beautiful blonde. So let's talk about that a little bit like did did you go to them with did you go to? Hbo With the idea. Or did they approach you to do a show to do? Laura and I Laura dern and the idea was like she'd had a version of the idea I was. I was you know the time of. I didn't want to TV again the last time I did TV. I was actually hospitalized because I lost my mind. I was like I literally have like the beginning of enlightened. She's like at her work and she's like call. You don't know what happened to me. I was like burn it down like sent the email you copy everybody in Hollywood legs and it was like an apartment was just a stray. It was like a literally a Fox a Sitcom and and it was just it was Jason Schwartzman and Molly Shannon and Mike White Bridge Burner called cracking up. Ironically yes I just had the worst experience on that and I felt like I was throwing this party. I had all my friends come and then the party sucks and then it doesn't end and it just every day you're like sorry. I know this sucks. What to do is still pretty young was thirty three or four and I was in and so yeah I had this like basically like a nervous breakdown and I was. I went to shrink like had sent a letter. I was hoping that they'd fire me. And instead like I I got a call. And they're like Gail Berman's in her office and she's crying. She's never felt more betrayed by a writer. But where's the script and like it's not over more hostile and so I like I started feeling like I was having a heart attack and I went to a shrink that my dad was a connected me too and he was like. Do you feel like you're you know have any suicidal WanNa throw myself in front of a bus by like. That's not new really and then and so the next time I'm being checked into Las encinas in there and it was like and I realized I was going to have a room and I was like you guys. I'm not like crazy under stress. The fuck out and this is not necessarily going to help me and like so then I literally am chased out of loss like they run after me. I'm in I get to my car. I locked the door drive office. These people are chasing my mother's with them and she cries Hewlett on. What's going on you had to escape in other words? It was like I know as they were doing all the paperwork I was like no fuck this and ran ran away drove and like and then I'm driving and turns the shrink had called the office and was like Mike's not coming in today or anytime soon. He's gone away to get the help he needs. And so like. There's like ten messages on my machine. From all of these people who had been living hell by the way like all these produces like crying like. Just get the help you need. Forget about the show I was. I was on my way back to work. That had that sort of Shit. The bed work experience and I was and then I after that it was like the best year my life because like they cancel the show and I was just like I'd been under so much pressure that I was just like everyday like I was on cloud nine so happy to be alive with Mel Fox show and so like and so then trauma side. That was baller amazing race training right there. You mean running away from the psychiatry. Oh yeah no I've that's one thing. I am good at running away but anyway yeah so I was just. I thought I don't want to do in their show but I was like it'd be funny show about somebody who's totally shits the bed at work and then has to come back and then it's like suddenly like. I've had all this help and I'm gonNA help you guys like because that's how I felt like I was like I'd go by the people are in the show and I'm like everything's Great Jersey ordinary people that there is a senior of Timothy Hutton. Where he meets one of his old friends from Shank and she's like Conrad. We're GONNA have amazing summer. That'd be the best summer ever in the next scene like she's committed suicide and he's like yeah it's great here the other side but yes so that was. That was the idea that that was my that was that was excited me about doing the show. It was like somebody who's like she's totally lost their mind but lacey's comeback. She's done some self help and now she has the answers for the company and everybody was like. That's me such a brilliant show and she keeps try she's keeps trying to be a role model and be spiritual and just crashing and burning at every. Turn and you have your your so great at Castaing. I must say really have such a great. I mean that was written for Laura. She's obviously can do pretty much anything. But you know we have a really good mutual friend Molly Shannon. And you're the first person to cast her. You didn't indie movie with choose. The leader in called year of the dog was avoided about two thousand seven. And you know that was really the first time that people had. I know I was friends with her before that and and I remember having lunch with her one time insane I for some reason so see you doing dramatic stuff too and we had you know hall. She was really you know molly molly some amazing and filled with humility and I mean real humility but I she was so great in that and that really opened doors for her to do all the incredible more dramatic work. She's done since then will she was the personal. I felt the most. I felt bad about everybody that I'd let down on that show but she that's how I knew her was that Fox show and then after that was over I was like I gotTa make some tamales. Somehow it's also she is such a you know she's such a uniquely. It's like I wish I could. You know whatever she's got. I wish I could just take a pill about every morning or something. Yeah and you know. Because she's got such a good attitude about. I don't know she's very grateful all the parents that I've known friends of mine. She's the top. She's the best mother or it doesn't get any better. She's she's a great great. I wanted to write something for and I also thought you know there's something about her. She's I mean I do think that movies funny but also it's you know she plays these sort of big you know when she was on Saturday night live. Obviously what people have known her for. But there's something else that really funny Matt Ryan. She's being real leg. You know super simple and quiet or yes so I I. I let me rephrase that It's not a drama. I mean there are dramatic elements and she plays a real person. Yeah and I think that that allowed people to see her in a completely new school the mice and also you did that movie the good girl Jennifer Aniston and two thousand early. Charleston's yeah and I think also that was at a time when You know people only knew her from friends and you saw her in a different way. What's I've always? I generally find that people but I feel like sometimes dramatic actors or dramatic actress because they tend to be a little more humorless. Yes there's like. And so that's not why tribe because you'll give actors a bad name. I mean drama his drama. And you know I got by like if you know something. I'm writing or whatever it's like it just sometimes it's like there's we're not connecting were and so like but with comedians. I feel like obviously. I think there's a lot more my feeling about to see you know. Generally working with people seen as comedic actors is there's less Vanity first of all. And then there's just it's like they're trying to go for the truth whatever. It is obviously get the comedy but I think I honestly think drama is easier to do than you know finding the nuances that you. I don't know it's like that's to me. That's life is like people in general are absurd at the same time they go through real pain. So it's like you know you need to get all the colors. Yeah Yeah we were saying that the other day that most almost all of our friends and the people that were drawn to come from comedy area due at the same time never did that show and why was such a disaster was whatever the their idea of what comedy was was something that was so I felt so uncomfortable. I wasn't able to deliver on something that is just you know like you know. Just funny like funny like they would be like. Turn the lights on. Like I just want to go to that house and turn on all the lights and it's like when she looked sad hind sad like less than the music that makes them seem. Sorta crazier something. It's always. I don't know what I'm doing. What are they. So it's like a some for me and I always want to give. I don't know something it's this is my. This is the problem of my whole as far as trying to be successful. A super successful is that. I don't WanNa give people what they want. You know it's like if you're trying to win a popularity contest and then you win just sort of like you know. It's still not easy to do but it doesn't. It's like it's like you know I want you to love my ugly baby right. Don't you think uglier the beam here cut out for Network Television magazine? Yeah there was something to you. Don't want you don't want them to reward you for what they wanted. You want to supersede that by them saying Oh you gave us your ugly baby and that was thank God. You stuck to your guns. 'cause that's obviously way better than are stupid corporate baby. I mean it's the same as just how you go in life where it's like. Oh you know if I'm charming and rich and like you like me. Yeah sure you like me no neck. Hello listen I'm in a little bit of a hurry way to therapy. But did you know that you can get counseling online No I did not know that I'm not saying that you need it but I'm just saying for now particular reason that you could get counseling online. Well I mean I feel like I don't know in general. Sometimes there is something interfering with my happiness or preventing me from achieving my goals Is this online counseling kind of thing? That could help with that. It is it is absolutely the kind of thing help with that. It's called better help. Better help and you can go to them and you can find a professional counselor and is it a licensed professional counselor. Yes it is yes it. Has They specialize in depression anxiety relationships? I mean not that your relationship is anything less than one hundred percent perfect trauma anger family conflicts shut up. Lgbt Matters Grief Self Min your self. Esteem is pretty low. I think we can say well. I mean you know self loathing I think is something that occurs to everybody but I mean these are all these are all pretty great things and I feel like you know. We know a lot of people besides ourselves. That sort fall into these categories could use a little help one way or another and even though it's online it's safe and it's proven and everything that you talk about is completely confidential use. The cool thing is since it's online. You can probably set up appointments to do it at your own time. I mean I don't know if they're going to do it at like two in the morning but you could do it. Premature on time in your time So yeah you just do it over the phone. You can do video chat you can text. I mean there's all kinds of ways that you can do it So and if you're you find a counselor and you're not happy with them. You can request a new counselor time you want to. Yeah so look I did look into this a little bit because I'm a little worried about you only because you have to deal with me. Let's face it you can get ten percent off of your first month with the discount code bed. Bvd WOW so why not? I mean it is half your podcast so that sounds pretty affordable. I mean in general probably rather than hauling myself into some fancy therapy office. I guess I'm going to go there and fill out a questionnaire and see if they can help me assess my needs and get masked with a counselor that I might love. I write well. You gotta go better dot com slash bad and You know that's I really need to do and I'm sorry that I've been such a handful and that you need to go to therapy but I'm glad that there's a resource for you. We're all in this together. It is a really important. I don't think it can be overstated to try to work with. You said your tribe as much as humanly possible. I think that's the key to happiness in your job. I mean I've had jobs that went on for years where I realized. In retrospect that those people absolutely one hundred percent didn't get mad weren't interested in finding out you know I think especially if you're there as an actor too vulnerable to that can really I mean I've known wires on like you know hit shows and at the same time. They have felt like the worst about themselves that they've ever felt or something you know again for our audience out there on a hit show that. I remember when you're on survivor. You're talking about the fact that everybody is the most impressed with when they find out that you wrote School of rock. That's what everybody wants to talk about and yet that's not necessarily your I mean I'm sure it's got honestly little rock had been unseen like you know streamer was best straight to video. I would be like. Oh you like school. You know school right. It's like a we make something I don't you know a for me. It's not like once it's out there. It's like if it almost feels like it's not mine. It's it's really just in the making where you feel really alive with it. And then it's I duNno. It's like you know I don't I don't know yeah with acting. I think once once its mouth takes on jeff feel. I do want to ask about your reign of terror in Norway with Aubrey Plaza. Just got back from. How Long Norway? We were there for like ten days days. Just the two of you different people. I I have a goddaughter who we went to Sweden. You're before Aubrey Knight. And at some point we ran insult God daughter. Who's like eighteen years old? She's very like like I don't know I was like. I gotTa keep her away from Aubrey and then she ended up very interning in Sweden again this summer. And so we ran into my goddaughter's part of my God. I mean Aubrey ignore way by storm. It was I what happened is I ended up going. I am did all my just like I do. My and my astrology. I did my DNA and like found my ancestors. I have like you know like all of this family from Norway and so like through all that I found a cousin who is like a like a thousand times removes who lives in Oslo and so like He. He's rich. Which is you know the best if you're finding like old. It's like all the poor relatives all your life like you're like I'm like I'm like I've been trying to ditch these relatives now. I'm trying to find the new ones on answers. I'm just kidding. But there is a rich Norwegian realtor. Now we gotta go out there and he'll take us out and say like we re hit the town in Oslo and it was like one of those nights just like you can't is I don't I don't know. We just partied ended up in restraint houses and it was just like back. That could really rocking. I love that. How do you know Aubrey? I just met her at a party. Wants Aubrey. I don't know a lot about Nordic police techniques but was it was it hard to cover up. Aubrey's murders while you were there part did she. I mean do you think you've got We left the bodies. It's funny because we stayed at this hotel around is hard for digging the fact there was a we. We stated this like old seriously old hotel in the middle of nowhere and it was haunted like they literally had like a dose in the hotel that they serve. They put out a plate of food for every night. They all have seen it like they. I mean like and these seem like normal people but they like. Oh Yeah. She's she walks. The halls was like it was like excuse me found her home. She was all girls party and Aubrey stood at all. The women were down in the yard in the backyard. And there's a we have a duck. Aubrey stood on the deck and gave a witches incantation to the entire Party and it was so right. She's found her calling for sure. It's funny because I'm always trying to get. I don't like I mean obviously I apart I still drink and but like I found that like what was funny as if she was really jetlagged so I'd be like she would wake up every morning for like the first five hours and I was like you need like a cocktail or something and so like the whole week like I'm literally like pushing her to drink the whole hire and she's like I can't think drinking like this. I was like believe we need your drag. You're going to like parties but then see parties. She's like there's literally no one funder like she will just. She's like Punk Rock Zero Fox and that's how I like to roll that. Let's all go to dinner. Let's call brand volume student. What's funny is I don't ever see one time I saw. It was here at your house. I we only see each other in Scandinavia. I think on that note about this episode started catered to the Scandinavians. You left in your wake. Hurry dear listener. Thank you for listening to another very very special episode of the number one. Their nationally acclaimed hit podcast in bed with Nick and Megan starring. Nick offerman would featuring Megan Melanie who shoo with are extremely special. Guest Star Mr Mike White. You for having me love him all right everybody in bed with Nick magazine ear wool production. It's produced by Meghan. Malala Kevin Bartelt and Michael Injury Executive produced by Collin Anderson and krispy music by Nancy and Beth which can be found at. Www DOT museum dot com. If you enjoyed in bed with nicking Meghan make sure to rate and review the show on Apple podcasts. Pinnock or hello. Guess what what's up. This episode is brought to you by sleep number. Oh that's crazy listen Do you feel that. I'm trying to change you. Yeah well I mean no. I'm into small ways like sometimes you asked me to change my facial hair situation or you seem seems like you'd prefer that. I wore nicer clothes. Sometimes I guess but I mean those are pretty small ways. I don't feel like you're usually trying to change. The core of May think about what happens in the bed. The sleep number bed okay. Well we we have found that our bed has adjustable comfort Ways in which. I might want to change you in sat bed. Oh like when I'm storing and you want to change the position of the bed. Yeah are how I wanted you to stop snoring. And so we gotta sleep number bed and then you stop snoring right because it has a thing called partners nor technology where if your partner's snoring you can actually move their mattress position. Not Yeah and like because of the because the mattress can be firmer or less firm depending. There's a certain like mattress number. Oh shall I saved forty five? That keeps you from snoring as much magically pretty. That's pretty cool and you want me to stop talking in my sleep because it was really getting kind of crazy it was like pretty much like just long long loud monologues all night long. It was really interesting. That was the problem is I wanted to know what happened. And you never you never finish. Well I found a number thirty five. I don't talk at all in my sleep. I found it number sixty five. I talk in my sleep. But there's a beginning middle and well I if you WANNA entertainment you can put me at sixty five. Yeah I mean I want you to get a good night asleep first and foremost and using Sleep number's sleep. Iq Technology we can actually look at our personalized insights and see how our sleeping we can get a printout of one were sleeping right on receiving wrong and how we can improve that using the adjustability of our cool mattress. Yeah I don't want to judge the way sleep or high sleep but I think if you have improvements you'd like to make on your own then that's great but also having said that there are times Where it comes in Handy. Because if if you're tossing and turning a lot the sleep in our sleep number bed will actually adjust to accommodate you so that you get more comfortable and don't have to. Jangle around as much much pretty crazy. It is a little Kooky. It's very you know jetsons future trues now and our bedroom in so many ways but not the least not least of which is our sleep number bed. Discover Smart Effortless Comfort with the sleep number three sixty smart bed. This is not a bed. It's proven quality sleep. Come in now and save up to six hundred dollars on select sleep number three sixty smart beds for a limited time only at sleepnumber store or sleepnumber dot com slash in bed. Hey Neck I honey listen. You seem fine but I just wanted to tell you that. In case you're suffering from depression or anxiety or trauma or grief grew better help dot com can connect you with professional counselor and it's safe and it's private as online. Wow that sounds great. Where do I find that I I all right yeah? I mean I'm going to check it out. I think it sounds healthy. Okay yeah well you can go to better help dot com slash bed and you get ten percent off of your first month with the discount code which is bad. B. D. all caps. And you just you can fill out a questionnaire get matched up with a counselor that you're GonNa love or career thanks later. Oh Gosh we okay but you know you can do over the phone. You can do a video chat. You can even taxed right. Yeah listen running out to Well it's confidential right. Tell me about it but it's it other than that. It's confidential okay. I'll record myself doing doing you know but I'm going to check it out. What's it called again? Better help dot com slash bed. Okay see you later.

Nick Offerman Mr Mike White squarespace Los Angeles Mel Fox Laura dern Hollywood writer Megan Aubrey La partner Jennifer Aniston Aubrey Plaza Mike White Molly Shannon John Casimir Larry Cousin NECK Hbo Nevada
October 24: Painfully familiar

As It Happens from CBC Radio

50:56 min | 1 year ago

October 24: Painfully familiar

"You Welcome to party lines this is the podcast where we're going to try and get you up to speed on what's happening for the federal election a new episode every Thursday the Hey I'm Rosemarie Barton and I love politics you don't possibly mean that elevated mood tonight tweet about politics but I don't want to this is a CBC podcast Hello I'm Helen Man Hello I'm the Nabet Dunkin this is as it happens the podcast edition authorities in Britain say all thirty nine victims who died inside a truck container were Chinese nationals the news about these thirty nine bodies being found inside this truck container the first thing that came to mind was ABC legislation giving first nations free and informed consent on projects affecting their lands he's hopefully it will change things in the province seeking safety thanks to American scientists who built rodent operated vehicles as it happens the Thursday edition radio that avoids the rodent less traveled five day long journey to the UK we reached him in the midland's UK Mr al-Rashid what was your initial reaction when you heard this very disturbed which could have made it a peeping automaton and the squeaky wheels while most rats scurry around and garbage a select group are learning to drive mm point seven billion dollars our guest who predicted it's virtual collapse is left disgusted a long overdue bill one of the architects order police haven't released any details about the victims identities why they were in the truck or what their final moments would have been like but our guest can imagine sir it brought back this memories of being stuck in the back of these lorries trying desperately to get out and knocking an tonight painfully the memories that can back to me when I when I was in the back of one of these trucks Back in Kelly in front ameliorate for a Syrian refugee in the UK the news of thirty nine bodies in a truck trailer brought back horrible memories because it could have been him when he made the same journey the container was found yesterday at an industrial park in Essex in England southeast it had traveled to the UK from a port in Belgium. The driver is being held on suspicion of the in two thousand fifteen better business bureau it looks set to blow up but it imploded instead and as the CO founder of the company we work leaves with me camps in Iraq you check in it checks you out a high tech Japanese hotel apologizes to gas over security flaw in its in room helper robot doc model Rashid is a Syrian refugee who now lives in the UK when he escaped the bombardment in Aleppo he hid in the backs of trucks during a grueling fifty five in numbers Turkey and the US say the ceasefire in northern Syria is permanent but Syrian. Kurds aren't convinced so they're paying to cross the border and get to refugee even for me I remember like the the two hours that I spent in the back of this Laurie container it was one of the most horrific experiences of my entire life almost freezing to death not being able to grieve container middle container trying to knock trying to shout scream bleed for Hell Agean their experience was for me it's very difficult to imagine I mean I eventually ended up being rescued but I think I'm pleading for help it's hard not to be haunted by the thought of these people the three men and women going through that what do you mean doc someone to let me out but eventually someone came and they let us out unlike what happened to this unfortunate thirty nine people those yesterday Moore's to get somewhere safe where later on family would be able to join me can you tell us about the process of what brings you to all you're thinking about at that time for me was was was was family because everything I did at that moment and the entire journey the porpoise and I want these trucks and leads you on this dangerous route people need to know underlies that the vast majority of people making these decisions and these many of you are in that refrigerated container so I've been into quite a few of them I mean in one of the Times was seven one of the Times too what did you say to each other in those moments most of these people don't know each other you know you really you don't speak I mean just look the is you know and and and and sleighs for me to be able to to get where I wanted to get so the only option that was left was through this criminal gangs you know smuggled involves green go online facebook chats and trying to find the smugglers which was you know horrific because unfortunately there's no other legal pad that this is not like taking a walk people feel that they have no other choice but knowing the threat of death on these trips is very real these are forced this kind of voluntary like people going for the Walker train going for an adventure for me the process was a very complex process because truly it across the spectrum sometimes you find them you know they're trying to help and support but sometimes you know they're coming with knives and guns and they will be it's not all publications or lies all they care about is money and on the money and how did this Mugler's treat you during the trip it gets it their true colors remember in Turkey and Greece and even in France there were show you pictures there's going to be FIS issues going to be super easy smuggler's went crazy started beating this man in front of his wife and children I live all terrified because they were armed with guns and knives to alls the first thing that I've witnessed after the bombing started was a mass grave of bodies of people because there was no time to to bury them in a dignified again one of the Times I remember when we trying to cross from Turkey to Greece and there was an Iraqi man because we were promised to go on a boat and when we were what makes one take that risk is the alternative I mean one of the reasons why fled Syria was because the bombing during the shelling that I saw let me bring you back up to the current situation in this tragedy in Essex involving these thirty nine people who please confirm were Chinese nationals news and they they reach out to you and then and you know they they give you lots of options and loss of alternatives you go with them and eventually you know the shoe we spoke on the program yesterday with a conservative MP in Britain Andrew Mitchell he said among other things that his government needs to do a better job of warning people about the dangers of into the beach it's an art it's a rather donkey and Iraqi man with his family's this is cheating this is lying to call the police and we're about eighty eight people and who do you blame for the deaths of these people I think it's it's not an issue about claiming I think it's looking at the reasons of why this is happening I think being trafficked so that they are deterred from making this kind of journey to begin with would that have stopped you would stop these people do think from making the Eh to come dig a hole and put all the parties in one mass grave but also their time you had isis you had bombing an chilling and terrible things happening activities but also trying to come up with some of the solutions the minor entirely solve the problem but at least could ever be the situation and turns of attorney I think raising awareness is key is very important to tell people about the risks and the dangers but also on the other side and on the other hand we need host into that dingy that type you know the the things you're describing I have to wonder what drives people to take the risk I know you've said You'd house destroyed your future completely gun I don't know how much you would have trust in some of these systems so it's really a very very complex issue finding legal pathways for these people you know innocent of giving these monies and and all taking all this risk with with these smugglers in Toria Ms Casimir what was the atmosphere like maliciously today's is bill was tabled. I thought it was electrifying. People are fulfilled by BBC law. Today's move comes after similar legislation died at the federal level when the election was called but one of the authors of the BBC. Bill says she it's more than a decade after Canada voted against the declaration on the rights of be seated in eastern Aleppo. I don't have access to them than I don't have an auction to but to move forward I think I would still do this this if you're in a situation business people's at the Um British Columbia's provincial government has tabled legislation to implement it in dividend leaders including MP. Jodie Wilson rebelled outgoing MP Romeo Saginaw chiefs elders all filled the gallery and the floor of the legislature for the historic moment which will ensure that the basic human rights of indigenous what was most significant of course was the tabling the legislation around the United Nations Declaration on the rights of Indigenous Peoples My pleasure thank you very much can't buy buy Hochman doll. Rashid is a Syrian refugee who lives in the UK we reached him in the Midlands has has on the one hand great symbolic significance but in practical terms how do you expect the legislation will change the provincial governments relationship with I is hopeful it's fate will be very different Shero Casimir is a member of the political executive of the first nations summit and architect of the new legislation we reached her in V to realize that some people are so disparate that if you're in a situation of despair you know and the whole system is failing you you've seen your loved ones killed it's always easier to point fingers while trying to address the main cause of why these people are fleeing what are the ways to help you know still this Clinton needed extra special in terms of the fact that we were able to address the Legislative Assembly that doesn't happen too often I think the it's not an easy thing knowing what you know about the dangers that you went through would you do it again would you those trucks this is a very tricky question because as I said no I'm sitting in England somewhere quite safe it's always easier to say yes and no anew speculate about it I mean going back now with the standards of the United Nations speculation so that's going to change it significantly now it's not going to happen overnight for sure once they ends with nations or groups of nations or hereditary governance systems or whatever the case may be that expense nations in British Columbia well the legislation is a framework that's going to provide for the provincial government to align their laws whereas the declaration calls for the recognition of indigenous groups and to enter into discussions with those indigenous groups going to be an exercise of reaching consensus now a bill similar to yours had been tabled federally but it died in the Senate when the federal election was called relation nowhere in there does it say anything about veto it talks about free prior informed consent how do you reach that you reach that through first nations interact well who the government is going to deal with that in itself expense because typically the government was constrained to entering into negotiations or discussions with India knock bands sincere dialogue the the will to establish strong relationships with the indigenous groups get in Syria and Syria and again for human being regardless if it's a Syrian or adding nationalists who really the aim is first to survive and the government would be having these discussions with so when we're talking about consent it's going to be a lot of work because it's Zito what is your take well throughout this process of of developing the legislation the the framework legislation comes into a fat the next step for us of course is to develop the action plan that is part of the work and as I said in how they how they seem sorry how they want to organize themselves so you know having conversation and very emotional you know we're doing something that's never been done before and they were just so many things that took place that project affecting their lands or territories and other resources BC Premier John Horgan has said that that that that consent is not the same as disperse and you don't have much to lose and then Your Life Mr Rashid I'm glad you are well and I appreciate you sharing your experience with us thank you take us some time to make sure that we get it right can you give me though an actual example of a kind of scenario where the legislation might change how the province ball federally we'd like to see something because as you mentioned earlier Romeo's private member's bills you know died on the it's province and and basically halting the whole economy per se and our message to them is that if you take a look at the forty six articles in the United Nations government the government and they have the right to say yes or no just like a municipality has the right to say yes or no or just like the province has the right to say yes or no but you just and we recognize that there are definitely some interest groups who were really scared and concerned about whether this means veto to giving veto to indigenous groups and the requirement for free prior and informed consent and the answer is no how is that different than veto well first nation I don't believe so so if if I mean the same question could be asked about the province and of municipal exercise that has to take place in order to reach that level of consent but if consensus can't be reached I guess I'm just wondering where the France is going to happen have we been able to ensure that our interests are being protected mitigated you know there's a whole huge I'm from where I'm sitting there I think it was a very dangerous and was a crazy thing to do I think I should have never done that by going back at the same moment or family being don't do that Willy Nilly they're you know there's there's a stringent process in place in terms of you know having that conversation about at what and as I said to to come to an agreement or an arrangement that is going to be beneficial for all parties involved but if there is as a as an indigenous government we have the authority to say yes or no just like any other government those laws that currently exist are stems in denial but the United Nations declaration will afford that to open up to be able to be reflective of these standards which with that bill there was significant debate over the UN declarations call for a free and informed consent prior to the approval of US Canadians. I'm angry and quite frankly really disappointed can look at all the missing woman I have Senate for Minister Justin Trudeau said that if they were to be reelected it was going to be a priority to introduce something oh I don't know what the difference is between what they do on a regular basis from what an indigenous government would have to do on a regular basis. I'm just saying that I understand it okay bye-bye the opportunity all right Cheryl Casimir is one of the architects of Bill Table today in British Columbia. The new legislation is hoping to take a bit of a post-election media break but the liberal environment minister was back in front of the Mike Microphones this afternoon overnight someone had painted similar and so we're we're definitely going to you know hold them to that Casimiro congratulations again and thank you for for help allows for a different relationship what help do you have that other jurisdictions in Canada are now going to follow British Columbia in implementing something like this Catherine McKenna said she was someone would do this like I don't even have words to describe what kind of person would do this the discussions and how both online and offline we can stop us this abuse I don't think anyone should be subject to abuse not just me we see it sure with the message sense too that this isn't about me it's about what kind of politics we want in our country massage and a six slur across the front window of her campaign headquarters in Ottawa Centre reporters asked Minister Mckenna about her reaction this is really the issue goes from there then I guess somebody's going to be saying though does sound like a veto that sounds like something different than what Premier Oregon saying it's the same as the trolls on twitter needs to stop I always think there's something good out of things it's a little anyway I am a bit shaken on look I'm tough but I I'm really serious change his lab at the University of Richmond rats learn to drive now don't go patriots those little creatures driving life-size Ferraris or anything like that polities as well do they have veto rights veto powers they have to make decisions as a government as you know every day that was environment minister Catherine McKenna in Ottawa this afternoon overnight someone spray painted a misogynistic slur across the front window of her campaign headquarters these were small plastic containers on wheels that the researchers called Aro vs rodent operated vehicles obviously the results steering copper bars at the end and they go up to the plate and they grasp the bars and that turn the car on and they drive to their fruit leap rewards hobby people read study with the enriched environment is just a forward driving it takes four to six weeks to train them reliably we train them about five or ten minutes today the over the weekend and serious older scientists just laughed out loud they smiled you know I think this day in time maybe we need some rat drivers driving rats to me act when you tell them that you and your colleagues teach rats to drive a serious nerdy neuroscientists but I have had the best time I presented this at the Society for neuroscience for all sorts of women that go into politics but all sorts of people that have been involved in politics Gosh we see at Greta she's sixteen year old girl who's just fighting for the planet additional form of behavioral training or conditioning called shaping how long does it take to teach a rat to drive so we had two different versions but the the Shen makes bc the first province in Canada to formally implement the UN Declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples we reach Miss Cows Mer in Victoria we moved the tree they're going and somewhere they haven't been before so they are really using it as a tool which is very interesting and it's an opportunity to ask them different types of questions Virginia Professor Lambert for those who have not seen the pictures what are these rodent operated vehicles look like though their homemade rat cars are made find me on my campaign I have girls have young woman older woman or experience maybe as we'd say out of a plastic container like you put breakfast cereal and we took the lid off so the rat can jump in the car and then we put a little aluminum plate and can get it wherever you get your podcast from I don't know how we're going to end it out can we literally drop Mike and operates conditioning or shaping so you have that reward which is the fruit loop that gets their attention and then in the study that was published we wanted them to jump in on their own so when they got close to the car we'd give them a reward and then we'd require them to get closer and then they need to jump in and then they would need to enter the position hard right now because this just happened but I think if there's a way that everyone can reflect on how we wanted to politics better and how we can we're the life all but they were informative too and some of those results were published recently in the Journal Behavioral Brain Research Kelly Lambert is one of the authors we reached her in well so maybe to speaking of the person who did this are the people who spread to hate and vitriol online maybe the first thing I was the person should do is think about whether now that we know we were teaching each other the rats in the human investigator it's not just going forward it's actually steering the vehicle not a steering wheel though in the traditional way right so they have bars in the front to go forward and right or left and they have to turn their bodies to go in the position they want to go but they can steer and unique positions and he's that kind of language for your mother your sister your girlfriend's your daughter and if you wouldn't maybe don't use in other people flex steering study and then the other eleven we looked at the some of them are in the enrich hafer in an enriched environment and Hafer in a standard laboratory environment and tearing kind of a proof of concept study to see if we could get them to turn and right left or forward directions that took several months We were doing oh you had seventeen rats in this study were some of them better drivers than others those were to to study so six those were the females that were done we use those in the because small but there is a more serious side to it how do you teach rats to drive I mean clearly the fruit loops are part of this process yeah so we use some old fashioned on what was really shocking to me was an that enriched engaging environment they all learned to drive to criterion which was four straight drives themselves on the plate then they would need to grasp the bar hold onto the bar so gradually getting them and they would have to go longer distances to get that reward so it's a very crawling there we started with a joystick and then went to the steering so we train them about eight or nine months but we could probably get those searing and closer to four months and none of the standard rats standard house rats met that criterion so none of them get their driver's license for this study host so just let me clarify what the difference in your environment the standard upbringing Iran question so usually on standard laboratory cages. They have everything they need food water a smaller space for more C._B._C. podcasts Goto C._B._C. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts within parachute but that seems inadequate to describe the soft landing given to the CO founder of the startup we work the former silicon valley darling some CEO's leave their failing businesses with companies only surviving with a lifeline from Japanese investment firm today it was reported that the company plans to cut four thousand jobs but co founder Adam Newman to revolutionize shared workspaces we work was once valued at forty seven billion dollars now that house of cards has come crashing down and the L. E. Lambert is a professor of behavioral neuroscience at the University of Richmond in Virginia that's where we reached her and could be walking away with a one point seven billion dollar payout Scott Galloway is a business school professor at Nyu who rang alarm bells about the company a years ago we reached him in Delray Beach Florida Professor Galloway before we get into exactly what went wrong with we work I would love to hear what you advocacy so we're going to start to look into that as a model of of human self efficacy as well these were of course lab rats do you think rats out in the writers just passengers and the drivers had healthier DHEA level so we think that driving may give them a sense of control or agency yourself together and regardless of whether or not they were in the enriched or standard group they all receive training and that training itself move those stress hormones and healthy busier and they can interact with the environment and more interesting ways and we think that this bill neural networks and probably transferred and allow them to learn something gave them were animals together and we put different objects like hollowed out logs or little ladders to climb on or bells so that they I think most people have been pretty impressed with their abilities and rats don't have a great reputation so they need some image control loving I don't know do you feel that as we think that the training itself is enriching so they had healthier stress hormone in a previous study we compared drivers and tells you tested the rats poop what did you find very glamorous job we have we can we can look at stress hormones and we were looking at think of the one point seven billion dollar payout that it seems Adam Newman is now in line for when you think about just the sheer size acquire tape how one of the most successful payment platforms in history for one point five billion I mean this is a budget greater than the budget for the national and make them more flexible so yeah so the rats with the enriched upbringing were better drivers but there is more than that after the trial we're trying to simulate in the lab they may even be better than are enriched rats if we could get them to feel comfortable in our lab I'm not sure that's a comforting thought people on this wild could learn to drive theoretically yeah because I think there there would be stressed we brought them in but their their world in the wild is more of the enriched environment and we have these images around do you think people are gonNA feel differently about rats hearing about your research maybe so I I think that they it's also interesting to hear that there's function in terms of studying their neuro science so thank you so much for telling us you're welcome bye bye um in central hallucination between investors and founders hoping that they're chasing sort of halcion effect of trying to I era in which is a stress hormone and then the Ata that is kind of a buffer and more of a measure of resilience we look at how the the ratio of those are any stretch of the imagination this is an unprecedented payout. Well how does it go over with those employees what are you hearing the stock plummeted and not only ensembles that decline in value is walking away with one point seven billion dollars and probably a good portion of the twelve thousand employees are wondering if they're going to have health insurance light at forty seven billion dollars what made the company so attractive to investors well there's sort of what could be best described as a certain level coming to the arts or the Peace Corps combined so one point seven billion dollars comes out to about eight hundred fifty thousand dollars per employee that is about to be laid off at we were differently well lab rats are different than sewer rats aren't they I think a lot of those images of the rats and the cars a lot it was very amusing do those people many of them hold I guess equity in the company they may be losing their jobs well sure you get you can only imagine that the individual who's probably most so I would imagine there's a great deal of animosity towards Adam Newman from from that the employees who are kind of left behind clean up the mess at one time we work with and to some extent Helen this victory of the markets because the markets refused to let this company go public what was it that drove the was numbers I it looks like it was a real estate company would lease I think office space maybe by some up rented out to others sometimes tech entrepreneur the next Google or facebook but realistically even though South thank may have valued internally we work at forty seven billion dollars and they headlined bankers who were about to I it vicious something else that called itself the the largest physical social network in the world but I'm wondering how how you get the value from that a registered one hundred and twenty million dollars for taking the company public and so they propped up an analyst who GonNa Validate that valuation arguably the company was really never worth that this was a company growing very fast growing seventy eighty percent a year but it was also scaling its losses just as fast and then they use the word technology one hundred twenty three times in there we'll be continued to try and position themselves as technology companies replaced profits with top line growth but I think the markets have finally said this doesn't make any this one I'm trying to trying to position themselves as in fact a technology company so as long as the markets are willing to buy that story companies are willing insurance does not a technology company make did it ever actually own any of the workspaces now the as a matter of fact one of the reasons companies probably worth less than zero is that they have forty two billion dollars long-term lease commitments over the next fifteen years and they leased other people's office space as a matter of fact at that forty seven one hundred percent now I mean the closest to technology was they had an APP for reserving conference rooms so no it's you know a website and an APP that helps schedule from her lab from an individual who took advantage of a moment in time I think Adam Newman will go down in history actually is one of the greatest poker players negotiators I used to poke holes in the company back in twenty seventeen what was it about we work that made you skeptical at that time so I brought a core competence to the situation called Malaria's to the theranos story Sarah knows was outright fraud I do believe that that you do need to distinguish between co restricting FDA factor history who was able to lose seventeen billion dollars in someone else's money and get a ten percent commission on that or even a twenty percent commission walkway with two and a half billion dollars we'll hear other than basic arithmetic this company never made any sense it kind of buttresses the notion that a lot of these unicorn companies are conspiracy between their founders and they're ask and I just saw a company that was for every dollar in revenue it was taking it was spending two dollars so I don't know I don't claim to have any special nine dollar number it meant that the one floor at least say a ten story building was being valued more than the entire building they released in one floor so this never made any sense do you see he's trying to pump the company up with corporate communications executives a very charismatic CEO and incredibly compelling story in the foist quite frankly all refer to as their Unicorn feces on winning public market investors and I think that market is having an overdue immune response so what is what I'll call we reached him today in Delray Beach Florida the company that saved we work Softbank released a statement saying that it has quote decided to double down on the the music has stopped and there's obviously too few chairs here so this might be coming to an end you mentioned a technology company did it was it ever a technology company bailing out the company are taking it over why are they doing that given the valuation questions that you're raising here I think some of it is cultural and stop back look thank you very much for taking through what's happened here thanks for your time Scott Galloway is a business school professor at Nyu words unquote and you can find more on the work saga on our website just go to CBC DOT CA SLASH AI h the US President Donald Trump has announced a permanent ceasefire in northern Syria but that has into the barter ash refugee camp that camp was recently empty now it's reaching capacity leaving officials in Iraqi Kurdistan rushing to meet the demand but it would be a tremendous loss of face but this wasn't an investment we work as much as it was an investment in the reputation and the and the face saving Masayoshi Sonnets to stop thousands of Kurds from fleeing the country since the Turkish incursion in northern Syria started thousands of Kurds sought refuge across the border in Iraq flooding has Masayoshi Sun the founder of one hundred Billion Dollar Vision Fund which is the largest growth fund ever assembled the have his largest investment be taken over company by providing a significant capital infusion an operational support we remain committed to we work its employees it's member customers and landlord Yoga basketball in the UNICORN FECES SOMEBODY's private market companies you mentioned Softbank misses the the Japanese Investment Bank that's that's basically and mark McKinnon is a senior international correspondent for the Global Mail he's been visiting the camp and Syrian Kurds crossing the border we reach Mr McKinnon and dough Hook Iraq really five years ago for people fleeing the rise of Isis and they had just dismantle best refugee camp earlier this year another having to put it back together again there Latin American banks and sold for pieces are sold prescribed I think would not only be at the End of Vision Fund that there's a to fund which they still have hopes that raising as ten thousand people now and while I was there are nineteen more buses that arrived in a row delivering each thirty more people so when you see that many people rose global mail and that border point is closed from the Syrian side from the white and it seems as a result of that these refugees are having to pay small their own land you spoke I understand it to some young men who had very specific fears about what would happen to them if they stayed in the area a secondary just scrambling to other camps open because they expect people to keep coming right so at this point I is there adequate food and water or is there enough shelter at this point within bothered us they are doing well they were giving out three meals a day the refugees I spoke to were happy to be somewhere safe what did it take for these refugee mark you were at the Bar Herash camp yesterday what did you see the first thing that struck me is how often just keeps happening by the Dutch count built but a very strong one you've got families that are running away because they've heard or seen the violence is the Turkish offensive took place and that's right now on pause and could restart for the last eight years there's no economic opportunity so what money you have a sort of tucked away is presumably for this moment very tough decisions decide trust someone that you don't know driving What is the impact how crowded is it well at this point today or tomorrow or tonight will run out of space this is a camp that I answered it turns what could have been a couple of hours drive into you know a day to day journey and really the only people that are able to do it or those who can afford to pay the smugglers who are charging smuggle you and your family out of the country with all the money you have left US President Donald Trump has declared what he says is a permanent ceasefire in the region and he points to allow Turkish forces to enter the northern part of Syria we've seen people throwing things at the American of vehicles as they move through the what he calls a safe zone that has been created if there is this safe zone Why are Kurds leaving for this camp any time now we also have people who saw videos online real graphic videos of things being done to Kurds who were in the areas being captured by Arab militias that are allied dude area when you spoke to some of these Kurds what did they tell you about their own feelings towards these American allies it's not just among the refugees from other parts of Syria most of the Arabs who are currently living in Turkish effigy camps and moving them in to this safe zone so the Kurds feeling like they're not supposed to be like they're being driven out the word safe zone it is one that none of the courage I spoke to his using because the safe zone it arguably Turkey sense of safety and that they're driving under cutter seven hundred dollars per person wow that's a lot of money for these people absolutely I'm in that region of Syria has not had really anything but were this militia the Wi fi g away from their border but that's the deal struck between Mr Erdogan and President Putin of Russia envisions taking some of the million googlers to take them further south into Syria through the they used to be controlled by Isis cross into Iraq point further south had come back up north through Iraq too right preventing Turkey from going too far into their territory they're not being drafted into the forces of Bashar al-Assad who many of them have been fighting against for the last few years he's to make it all the way to this camp well this is what I spent part of today doing is I drove down to the border where you'd expect these refugees to cross and this'll be in tomorrow sissel happened really quite quickly following president trump's decision earlier this month to withdraw the majority of American forces from from this area being under the de facto American protection since the fall of Saddam Hussein suddenly they read what the next tweet will say what could happen to them are they as safe as they thought they were we saw the commander in chief of the democratic forces which is the opposition to the Syrian government tweeting praise on Mr Trump for his capacity is twelve thousand people they pass ten thousand yesterday they're expected on the seventeen hundreds night so they're on the Kurdistan regional great efforts to bring about a recent ceasefire what's he doing there I think at this point the white PG doesn't know who to trust and when they look at aw in male we reached him in Doe Hook Iraq situation I thank you very much for talking with us thank you very much all right take care bye bye mark McKinnon is a senior international correspondent for the globe their options they they have said invited the Assad regime back in but they don't really have a relationship with them or with the Russians and they and they certainly are fearful of the Turks Turkish army and they have a third group of people who are getting men of fighting to were worried that the White Fiji has invited during regime back in a way of they hope and enthusiastic at a time of day when most people can't even say a half sentence as the host of CBC Toronto's Morning Radio Show Metro morning now on both sides of you there were just these fence Dan refugee camps full of you know ten two thousand because eighty refugees who don't feel safe yet returning to their homeland which is just where people who fled to isis a few years ago they're still here and they haven't felt safe to go back up right now they feel that was obviously the right decision it's difficult to hear about this oh he's going to get to sleep late by his standards anyway when he takes up a permanent seat behind the Mike at the current this afternoon Matt spoke with CBC News Network about his the border ash camp these refugees as you pointed out drove past camps that continue to house

UK BBC Rashid Syria Helen Man Iraq CO founder Aleppo Rosemarie Barton Turkey Britain ABC Kelly Essex Belgium US Aleppo Um British Columbia Bill Canada
How to leverage the power of relationships to crush it in Tech Sales with Benny Rubinstein

Network Yourself to Success

58:33 min | 2 months ago

How to leverage the power of relationships to crush it in Tech Sales with Benny Rubinstein

"Now, here's a question everything about professional success in Israel. It's related to connections and when you know how do you build them in such a network? Especially, if you're starting from scratch this podcast, the answer whether your job Siegen enterpreneur social activist unique a community behind succeed you need to network yourself success especially if you're not just looking for e career Rather de Korea. My is your name and I believe networking is a craft anyone coins master because the mean coons trust does not really matter whether extroverted on introverted. So this talk Casimir dive deep into how to creed nurture and strengthen for professional relationship now fending in genuine manner. So. Here's the question everything about professional success in Israel. It's related to connections in you know then how do you build them in such a network? especially if you're starting from scratch, this podcast is the answer whether you're seeking enterpreneur social activist unique a community behind you to succeed. You need to network yourself success especially if you're not just looking for a career but rather Korea. My name is Johnny Newman and I believe networking is a craft which anyone colognes master. winning. Mean currencies trust does not really matter whether you're extroverted. So in this podcast. Deep into house creed, nurture, and straighten professional relationship you know fending and genuine manner. So. Welcome to the network itself to success podcast I'm happy here today with Benny. Rubinstein. Hi Thank you. How. Are you doing? Great I'm amazing. So So basically I'm very because Benny is really has experienced both the corporate but also from the star world, he's been Microsoft zoo founding team member of fifteen years in in Microsoft corporate as building sales team globally in them. Really in the in the management part and also also been into startled world and you know everything about sales development and Cobra networking in that sense. So I WANNA give it to you to introduce yourself a little bit more. You'll liberation and the were you sitting today of course. Thank you so much for. Everything I, I I, don't think we'll ever know everything. But I I've made enough mistakes that can share a lot of less dark Ya. Ya, my name is Betty boop. Originally from Brazil. Bachelor degree in Computer Science Engineering from the Catholic University of Rio I moved want the US where up my MBA? School. Join Microsoft I I'm back in two thousand one or or does he right ones make in mobile management? Each and a developer tools division responsible for visual studio. Head lots of defined roles, boring career Microsoft's while thirteen years. Eventually, became part of Microsoft Research and I was of two three difference Initiatives around a service and cloud computing. Over ten years ago when it was a real, you're awfully. Eventually. Resigned for Microsoft in two, thousand, fourteen was at a I'm. The CMO for cloud business anita us of. and basically became we'll founder and managing director for a partner might survey agents or. Microsoft for stocks. In Latin America. So basically beals from scratch Next for stops we actually deal to funding rest be was myself if you WANNA co co-founders and we had? You Know A. Is also investors Microsoft while dangerous in Latin America. The government agree you in what local VC's So few years invested in twelve he's ready gray stops some of them will. Come to market SFJAZZ Atanas. The agricultural. Space. Investors also. company usually set called sense robotics fabric juice lamaze not. Meant. So after all that experience, I think my passion Brazil has forties. Screened upbeat louder and eventually merited Israeli also moves to Israel. Since Two Thousand Sixteen I. I three years. Beckett Microsoft's was out of the Middle East quotas. Based vying united are ever it's role in Africa, and that does you mentioned not a new a sales position for Microsoft. Also, for Azure but be focused on. What's called today teacher transformation in vehicle solutions for. Industries my left, Microsoft In two thousand nineteen. word actually as it is a cleantech subtle hearing in north. Obvious. And? Eventually decided to take a different path Abuna. Actually working mostly independently is a is a strategic advisor several. Elgin startups. some corporations in Brazil and abroad. Okay, great end them. So throughout the your your whole career, obviously a also seemed like that, right he seemed like a people's person and what is your take on network any power of building relationships to to get business to reach business goals in reach success? What is your perception of that? I like to question answers are not the most conventional. What feel. Own Ideas. Although I guess elected in talk lots. In every every psychological or leadership s Microsoft a personality base. I was in a small corner of the diverse, and then everybody will noses at the corner of Zanger Oxide. Yes I'm many traverse. So what it means is that For me. Regionally wasn't so natural chew as they are very beat oriented. was really about the debt for the quality of the relationships not so much about the breath and depth lists both good and in a challenging as you imagined as Wayne a global corporation managing multiple partners and customers might make certain a very, very deep relationships but I wasn't very. would. Definitely, not a master on broadening I think that site change. was. and joined a business school with or tonight I. Built a community global shows? No. NBA. Touch twenty years now. and. There's lots and lots of things that I both learned and practiced to Just. One. which sounds acording inches the basic needs. A Something that actually for granted a dog enough. I think especially. PEDANTIC. Joe Market could heat of course, will move from five percents twenty percents. Is Natural. Dr Phil Taylor survived it he took a job that he her. On a stocks. And he tends to look at people on how? Healthy, I don't go hey, join his buckets watch record video become more popular or. There's nothing wrong to death no human nature suvival and we have stealth. But it doesn't help is extra newark. Nobody. Really likes. Cue Word that I I learned his Jordan especially in Microsoft from Zeeshan. Laid. Data, which is You know brings out onto the mindfulness constant and. And we did word is empathy right? I wasn't empathetic my career I was doing I can't. Go to work I'M GONNA do whatever the case not that was anything wrong or unethical legal. Looking for yourself and Demille rate salespeople degree it networks I took me a while to learn that had great coaches, ingrates, trainers, plus. The genuinely care about others like they would be look at you and try and find ways to help you try to find ways you avenue and by. Is Not, only an ultra each. Act is a selfish act because if I really help you value much more and you won't like. W, you'll have to help you any how. So it's a given an en- gats and. One of my favorite professors Morton. Nobody famous. Very Very I. Is. What am I a bibles on give-and-take exactly, and then again, it's a very simple basic briefly can from the Terai and learning from business or whatever he wants. But. I think fundamentally transforms. They may network where you those relationships. So okay. Threats Great Year you mentioned that s also it's true that you hear all the time, but it's The challenge and this is like it's against against the what do you call nature in the sense that usually? To spend a lot of time on the nurturing and and fostering a relationship with long-term goals right because you don't see the goals right now and you said, as you mentioned, this is person you need to finish quarter. You can you can deal with. This also worked in sales and he's like six months nine months save. Okay. You should keep in contact with them but you know you have to finish the under the accounts they can close this quarter 'em in them. So it's Kinda like a it's am I am. Really satisfied that you say that the. Greatest salespeople they know how to do that but it's kind of very difficult intrusively goes against your tuition that you have to focus on long-term. Satisfaction and hold off something. That's short term am. So am how do you do that and also there's also taken for granted at again you basically what he did say give give the people. You don't know if there's ever going to come back and says right so. So. How did he know who to focus on You could say Yes and that's a great point. UNEDITED is so. Intuitive. And strikes work. I think my experience in. multiple different sales organization Microsoft and outside, and luckily experienced also related. Technology is that just pick up you know the traditional modest not only. As an example, I was act. Two thousand wanted I joined that was actually non sales. But if you look at that time Microsoft in most copays exception of it was more in the cloud, the Amazon, they had servers in the hands chronics and needed to be sold and deployed, and you know you bring an article from accenture catching wherever to. Prosecute a couple years and what I'm saying that is QS guy at a tight or was going to be inclusive was mainly around Dowry Large Complex negotiations. It was a transactional meaning a forest customers sheeting bank XYZ and I have. Agreed for the next three years going to spend six months and that's what I also love. You can naming the deal. That deal and means my. Get their bones that we're not GONNA get to to Hawaii whatever over the crowd. So. Those were actually by design very short. because. deals now pressed forward can fifteen years what we are today microwaves. To the cloud which means not only have to convince gus literally bar the entire. Swimming. So I had to butte digitally negotiation mode. Yui sanded mottos that's not on his own. Whether. I was the first SOUCI for myself. He starts to help space stand in club or before Azure even existed and we didn't have the right licensed. The right incentives for the sales people who say, okay. By selling spanning we also help yourself as a mind was the opposite. I will travel the candidate who comes to launch the and Wyoming by spreads was puzzled why is it that those countries are? Leaving the twenty seven salesman, they can't sell it after beauty a real trust them and spend time on the road down in heavy. You know not only did get his book Shisha Sexual Ambient. We realized that he said, Benny. Something is strategic for the company or a CEO whatever sounds great. They're looking at stocks best five years. From my next by the way I, don't get any goals if I still. Is a matter of fact your. Title Competitive from because sell your thing. I'M GONNA sell less of microbes which have order for and they budgeted does. Jeans you're actually Joe Paradisea. My movie to hit my water. And there was a moment of a tactical or bricks amplitude a guys. Thank you so bad niels when. Because, not only not making money on us, they are losing money on us. So that's clear. Is Why they elaborate and after the initial shock they we understood and I said is not just about being with friends instead I. Relationship, but I can't do that voting allowing. So. So now too long the story to illustrate is today has four. At the time the company had auto club products today everyone has sale azure or. and Bill sales are not enlarge old sales close comeback in two years and a half to make sure finding you. It's you have to make sure they actually not only bite it but. Because now you pay us, you use it. If I sold you a license of Agitating Soda Daiwa and after eleven months realize pay fifty, thousand dollars. I don't know what Emma Stone has something better or so many competitors on the market. That's what he's saying and bless again, you setting a lot for jeans you can do anything. But when they can do anything bids also likely that nothing gets. So unless you actually stated that doesn't understand the real pain points this industry you understand the challenge you understand decade you're. You're. You're you're you're proud of their service when they don't give you their profitability whatever charm and either not be directly helping to Pacino's they'll give up on you. And so today those relationships they have to read to reach US sales people and also change some of the salespeople will change adoptable because those guys need to real trusted advisers gus, they can't be who she died and just want US force the Congo to the throat. Yes. They still oneself worse but they need to be what we go coastal sales they need to go and EDF validating. Lita a meeting by the saying I learnt something new in this media is helping me. Before you even find commercial. Agreements. And that's also the the growth of customer success success customer success relationship, right so you have this new positions especially in Israel there's really really being Papa Laura and need avid. SA-. Basically, you have the sales have the post sales who making sure checking all the time that the customers really know how to use, and I, think success and using the product. You're writing and to be honest on a win about salvation for example, when we weren't as joining of getting a unit. So you know we have can roles that we actually closed sales pre sales, and we had some people of course was Orlando on, but mainly those people were more technical. Support were. Reacting Bertrand proactive exactly. Exactly. At That's common is a noise in. Gomez A. Success of H will probably leaking user disclosed Davis tweet customer success people have friends as. As technical support people and Functions, and because that, because of the nation s is to make the customer such as which is not only sold that can go problems they need to make them get valid want to consume more and Debbie is also business you all. So. But you feel that that is basically just reframing old concept already been been there and say, say you said Microsoft you always been using that kind of man that mindset anyway, and now it just became like a position in itself a old career in itself absolutely, and that's why for example, I mean myself said example but. Be benchmark against any other players but. Those defined out there groups for their county unit that's more in terms of the actual relationship because learn especially, C. Unit which is more around the you know re understanding deposited acknowledges anyhow than our as. Punishment. So those have multiple roles vendors, Samora active Christie's marketing abuses but as a team, the all collectively old in pious cycle for the customer doesn't handle the sale and then he's a lot of orchestrating again, we're talking about a large corporation but. We would beauty to see his wide. Now. People or even the same I on what? Does success a management enjoy and my mission was to adult the revenues of the. Mandate to hire a bunch of salespeople scored aggressive U. s but then realize by. And say look what happened to those locks they were closely two years ago we cannot carry much. VATELOT Immature Anything charm what discussing? Char. Is Way worse. than. Just know one of the new opportunities we need to, but we get much to maintain those grow up. So I visited structure between so that we actually align gone not just the outbound or. The sales. Also retainment. Also we have a logical. My cycle covert by an account management, not just technical or but be really trying to make sure you get this hour. Okay. So do you feel that it's up to speed like you? You've been around this of course. All right but you feel it in sales the way they did these rated companies startups incorporates a building sales teams coming up to speed with were the world like a in the way you manage you bill safe theme or or do you feel that we add up? I'll be like in front of people behind where we? Hey honest I think be I think that's Again Zone. Generic ruled. A blighted Pareto eighty twenty. What I see talk about nations scale up digits abysmal vowed stats on the provident acknowledged site. I think we are ahead of the game is big indicators of that wake up in marketing. From my experience observations corrected many many small stuff because ovation UC's. I think we're way behind the wheel. Behind and when I say that I'll give you two main reasons. First of all get back to, my high, McDonald's. Microlight Microsoft where we're building forget the Metro sedating. For example, what is starting to set the visual stuff service at? Six I started office in life knew talking about we were seventy five people worldwide. Running US sales engineering everything, right. So it clear for us that we the few salespeople has we couldn't get couldn't reach him. A wreck was obviously not feasible. So by before we specialize in microsurgery special customers in forging strategic alliances. How when said it's not just an opening websites those arborist because of finding program that means nothing. Will be that we actually have. Grant very clear given at least and I, said, my key on is okay. What are you want to choose what you need from us is what I need from you. How can again it's Not just conversation West said he went to office but have. Key is it irregular cadence of? When we actually evolves us. On training incentives it's extra. that. I found very few companies with few ores are already. Very. Late. stage. Passy but immodesty, it's very rare to have a startup. That's. The experience or even the. Efforts thinking long term with. He noted stage are little bit like this deal is if be described. The next horror over the vessels what is the growth? So this guy was Route well, guess what he? Will do that now you left behind and if you haven't done any. Big One when I signed. Date rather than night and most saints in programs and things as you would it be number two also so I think that's one of the mainly as a is not such a great on our shoots. And others PENSA. Is. but also see a tendency that the TAB is that Israeli companies as you say, they build a started bill, the product amazing building technology count like. Em they high out with is not selling, and then they always go for the US of course, the market, and then they hire someone dare right who is locally there and could build relationships there. So it seems like debate is just outsourcing to sales. Do that that's a great strategy or is it like ACC? Disconnect with the company itself or. that. Asif most things in life, and that's a that's a great question that has many many. Opinions before they answer is always Egypt depends but to give a less wishy washy answer I, cross wasted no problem with that I actually. Opposite of nights I've avid students You'll before amazingly covy as being in project, but it can also be a blessing for many things and respected gun was blessed. I exactly that was helping, which was very, very honest S. Itchy should be based here. Israel should be India office and have coffee together and and while I understand you. Again Rico vs and heavy is phone game relationship can have real benefits. Of course, has you work in a workspace data? The problem with that is an felt that also the national. Up I wasn't exception like. Resigned the identity. Well, my career my results was a corporate guy was causing wrote and I didn't want to offend quality example by state too much reynolds. I will have less family to mark. Was Ours I need to be Denmark into Brazilian diesel. I don't need to be here in Redmond Wash. that. And it goes to you know. In in a way. Of course challenges, monitoring it and beauty do morale is. An I. Know Make Overs von Dame Edna's. Challenging the employees you can. Find. Influences us. Had unusual but you know what? That's somebody to work on because not able to or teams remotely and viewing even coaches time zones, defense, everything they would never ever since you as a global company I. think that's one of the few years I've seen. Done really well, but the majority. Okay. So you up on something that's also very relevant. How do you build an out of network and build new business relationships when in times of Corona and so let's say when you already have relationships with old costumer, all client than, of course, it's easy go and and you can continue that but you can. You can be replace the physical being one one. No matter how technology becomes right you can never really place that whatever that creates. So. Do you do it in grown at times in online you have to create new relationships new. Relationships How'd you? How'd you? How'd you reach out of your great them? I mean, if someone can't go to the conferences anymore, you can go to meet ups. You say this both things but I see more minuses than pluses here. Or. Let me think something is, is it is it easier because people are available more? Yeah again I don't want to be pony on a that. Optimistic on that ended Okita some reasons for that. s instead of everything. Life like. Treatment, damage when. You asked at Motorola. A, personal sacrifice. Fly. Enough. Your own family and you know as downsizes well, personally my career I tried to avoid as much as they could not because I enjoy miles butts because you said you know spending a week in Japan or Korea America or Euro a week two weeks on the road when it came back You like two or three months of of real accomplishments as you say, it's not not only reasons done in abuses meeting and sometimes. Customers cultures culturally you know. In France. Great restaurant. Wide and all that. So those are not beating around the only water. I guess on the desk that he says, the ideal I am a pragmatic idealistic and incredible how the Three like I'm GONNA. I love for everyone luggage be heavy agree to that. But it is not the case an essay idea. You'll be anywhere with everyone now to be more practically before copied I was managing a team across countries and no matter. The fact that I was flying seventy five percent of the time I people that behind and look. Out For them when Mexico teams in. Whatever. and. So I think that the Kobe game to of grab you don't pressure on fact yes. Ideally, it'd be aerospace face for for for productivity perspective quite frankly view sometimes. As laseyette. Work requires to be productive revolt actually seen a presence. For example we secrecy across. Four Marcus over and. Over. What is way you're gonNA get a marvelous. And Plans and organize something again that our company is we. Still have to prove. taint, which is wonderful innovation but yesterday ovationhair into perceived and he's not despite Momento I discovered life. Eighties producers and. Germany very well we not. The America's very well and. So I think that's as question. Yes, we can't be noticed golfers chairman for a fugitive health summit. Just happened neighboring practice lava we had to change with each advantages ninety but let. Ended by David. Greek behold Edward. Their this'll leads. Directly Joy. Greater scientists yet from dogs from that most robotics atop out several. In a great. and. Get straight off lack of what? We need to. Elect a urine as doesn't matter what's candidate raiders network working to was Tomorrow as something else happened. You're in the worst movie was beginning to adoptable and I think that's You know on the plus side I had the lineup of people to answer your question that I wanted to know where or vaguely practical reasons. That interesting discussing things some? Logos. and. God's people were on planes or were needed meetings opinion events twenty thousand Theo available. My car. And I'll have. To call people that I had to wait three months and they say how about Sunday? Just having three days so i. Know, how to use of course, they have less zoom in teams allstate Showers dacians again have a very live discussion Jessica hugging shoulders. Now he says. Can candidate vapor document again be placed human touch it'll never replace it but I can use the. Way. No, please call them a better. We'll be able to hug it and never physically again. Greg. So on shift the such a little bit and we've been talking about, of course, how you managed relationships with clients and I think we got a good feeling of that like. What about them? What is your? What is your advice for someone junior salesperson starting out in sales stability account management in a you built sales teams from scratch where you first of all, what are you looking for when you are when you are hiring gop pro specifically and and not only it also like a little bit few years more experienced. In, them, where's your advice for them to looking for jobs in four, four Guanshan of networking themselves to a job you could say. Just starting out. Yeah Okay so I love the question because again I'm I don't have any academic big rally eat human resources, but I, I say quality and a great France were experts. Other structured in that. First of all especially through hobby young. As more INFO level, gonNA watching your roles. It's a anonymous procedure obviously blanket for us the agent and the years of experience you're not necessarily looking for somebody who has done for. Running. Said I love Mendis. Come to me in, he knows Malim Wannabe wants eight. junior entry level job. They asked me five. Seventy Express. Joe What people. Want everything. was off is proper unfortunately and so. Of course. Know. Defensively example. Team. Africa I was giving a very interesting because administer short renovated. Funny. The area vice-president was not coming from come into a sales organization. It's Eventually Florida, you very experienced sexual. Joke that goes. Riding, presuming he does go in and he says. What do you call problem? You call an expert from IBM, will stand a Guy Twenty five years of experience or ends in Mexico is send you a twenty five year old and it's the joke. Receiver. But somebody is that we really believed in talented potential. And noxious on the experience or that he must have experienced as well. So number one attribute was his personal is eight. Self migrated right people got is a cultural personality. They kind of wanted to the job and get their payments but they're not necessarily like really passionate tubes and that's a challenge because it's a don't already have all this deals in probably easing or they have to be up and run up weekly eating current demands on Schanche. So somebody they showed the number two is ability. To playoffs. had. Always top attributes. Hired and you can look at. Twenty twenty number one is adopted. doesn't manage a great network he could twenty years you should not adopt. His less. And and then combining all related but but he's also. Capable right and and. Young people. That is even though there's all these stated ice of Orlando's it's extra. They have their opinions, but you are with coach they would probably they might argue it might challenge ahead of them and chemotherapy young. But laying genital. Be Productive Discussion. have. Challenge everyone. Young, we learn and grow. and talking like demanded was to summarize his. After the energy drive eight be. Own. But also absorbed very quickly. I, think that's that's that's wheel rocket sizes. None of us was born knowing good science or no sale knowing helped network learn. So I, think the ability to learn fast and than and these that something you see candidates you. Because eligible each appoint were you now thank you know your job anywhere any become slightly arrogance That can become a real shock even qualified. And so how what is it good advice for you to for for someone applying then to show that show that he's fast lawyer showed these adoptable. How can he practically show you that in a? You. Assume that you have a gut feeling of whether he's that kind of personality conversation with him, but it's a sunny you can do to ally in no joy in his application for eating CV your in as the way he does anything starts interview with or any. Any way you can do that. I am A. Being that one. In Google vices make or Kayla in my opinion, it's it's it's intellectual. Curiosity the actual. Effort to research and analysis such as just find an article is think about. So give us. and I told people that some people resist get come on up to ten jobs and I wasn't humanity. A. Came in and did know exactly who are to do what he does on the? And of course, it comes from the outside. You can you should have questions but we have have been ref must have gotten sergeant and Rizal Leaving Award. Known formation is an excuse we. Me Formation. A limited sites and Discussion but I think that Burson. Attractive, personally, a force on a short of they do their homework they show their commitment not words I'm agree learner. Is. What even But but but it may be impressed me when he owns a candidate look I see that you've done. Excellent. Understanding at this stage, you already have keep. In mind the standings based on what I read this article that you're trying to gauge this market and I you could see by. Lie You know he's share some. Can you elaborate more on that I I? You actually Jimmy Care and moreover thought about it and you thought about how you feel fit into the teacher and Greens in the a productive session now he coach. Obviously people I do that and ask must be specially if you just go on the homepage representing seeing. What? Are you don't hurry us. At least the west side. So he didn't take the chance to do that. How can they trust you that he ninety days onboard garrity is up quick. For coming here and so again, I think it's not excuse. jovis usually. On it, you'll find nine. Laws when I played a day. Will come out. Positive so you'll time wisely. Showing. Real Value Grease this impression professionally as. Preparations Comfy for meeting. New bigger fashionable. Who Sharp. Yet. And he's become. that. Doesn't show any commissioning. Okay. And it doesn't matter if even you suggest the if you suggest something that's I. I could imagine you have a you have a yoga. Your challenge in this area and I think that I could make a confusion. If you completely wrong like you, you know what I mean. You can make a suggestion and it's like, no, we don't have a challenge that area. But he's not a problem, right? It's like it's okay to be wrong thump shins just the fact that you're thinking about right that's the whole issue executive. Exactly. That's that's how scientific thinking of. Even the studies you? Read that's it is was INC s constructive questions and. Okay M.. About technologies like. How you how you manage your your relations on day to day, you have a personal crm system or is it more like manually? That's a a a shaming question announcer you I think to be honest my career, I learned lots of things. I won't gaps. Great Mentors in. What am I, these personal challenges was management. So much in. Two and I'M GONNA. Keep you organized but I think. You know. For for that will learn. So I don't short don't house season. Shame. Way but but I stopped he that some. White Cillian people ask I admit us how to manage your retired these then. I managed by. Own To say, but I met my life's outlook. Whatever Commitment. I use. Ob. Look I learned a sequel. which at first I thought it was absolutely pathetic. Today. It's more than ten years ago. Or something anyone son. Colorful system. So what I do is I talk for myself some hypotheticals, for example. example I WANNA be, touched the investment. Community so I set a goal you know X. hours a week or month I'M GONNA network. We've VC's or whatever those things are at that. Time, for ninety on which to training dean of something. Read an article citing something. So I actually have for. Executive, you know block off time reform. Have Codes and a lot of force life happens in need to move things changing but I. Vote is looking at. Either Gordon. Was Fine. But. That I planted well, India should go more. It's A. Visual, I don't need to go in the deal the lyrics. But I can actually look and say, Shit I'm spending too much time study and other much time network or whatever that is exercise in leaving personal there. And that's how it manages its very vigil Dot Greater Stews you the next also for. Secrecy Hammerstein's. Or social media those. For read on his donahue down so often. My. Is My wakeup. Imagine time wealth will have enough time to this week shine through something even next in that. That's how I manage. A. So many positions where they ride native English or mid. Level must. So how do you convince the company to get your attention? Even if you're in pretty good about, it's just not native levels. Languages is or well? No, it's not the only thing, right? I mean I've done business. Right. Which I went to Denmark and it went to France. Is. Today for sure to always be. Their ways especially to another language that she could you sleep like. Imagine form again, I think as for Auntie jobs with the language, a site it's it's it's like it's like a shoe or or matching dating at right. You'll never find the this exists run away your mail yourself own. Review Eagle Butts. But. But he also doesn't is I think that's your case. For Lange's you audit you a job description or whatever it is expected from you To the extraction by the way. There will be gaps gaps. Particularly example, some language can use languages. Doesn't matter. I come from a family of Doctors Nightmare Dad's physicians clubs around by Authors Masonite wanting to find a gift for cancer be. Both of us fantasy let's realize long it'll be a disaster. Area, we're never going to pick any money. So action. Was Leasing Brazil I'M A, I'm a I'm a computer, each year old business, but eventually, I found a way to Microsoft Research Madrid job, which was a health. And, he was knowledge for House. Now it all sounds great. But I moved to the were ten. Nine downtown big elaborate on how gray streams excuse to fit. The Tesla explicitly said ten years of healthcare. It experience and Golden complied start shaking. I really want this job. It's my dream and the manager to become a manager was really Nice Guy American guy. Experience at the end. He'll. Came out so few looks at the end of his. Okay. So how is health united ucs you have and it's Thirteen sixteen. Talking. Through Not and he's looking at me like I mean some sort of we are awkward moment like a joke or Eggleton deal I've shown you that ninety percent of all you need s job. I WANNA learn something you every job I do if I was. And and as much as I learned many things that fascinate showing you know results and I didn't know for a minute learn about healthcare. Wait. Talking to doctors and people that I know and don't and alert but you. Someone, the same analogy a- applies to joke and reading well angled job, but I struggled to learn like. Two. Weeks. I get so. Stand right if you don't know the language so well, but can get by conducted look a medium grade speaker, but I can ride. Those shortage of tools that can help Greta. Grammar. Of course, I do anything I can be greeting. Best. Presentations. Whatever you will find your superpowers whatever those aren't that great connections I know. Too, and I'll see you. Broken English language doesn't. As long as you were forms of the outcomes, you told them I will give it those out of going. Don't have all required patience. Dylan be okay. Taking the with regard showed them this user experience you have such as reloading fast units were you have a great fight record of success and they might give him the benefit of dissolved say okay. So I will never find somebody two hundred percents. Increase. Your skills in Katie's also your coarse language whatever. You were very transparent O'Brien. News explained I mean this level? Have a plan and I think he's also. Say I know that they're gonNa have analysis showed my boss is his image and. He announced get your and I need your help will be this and gathering appreciable January's. Mature in. Professional. Does a great advice. Great Advice. Great way trick to attribute a great strategy for getting out of that. Always there's always going to be that thing it's going to fifteen percent. You don't have it is, but he's intriguing. Ethical trick you could call o.`Neil, trick and. So, am I want? To Walk Questions and and the thing that we are about bud. Let's Alex go to the stage where you got the job and you're working there but you wanna move in your career in sales and so of course, how do you? Deal with clients that's one thing. But how do you create great relationships and network? And you always have to probably looking out for opportunities also look networking in. Attractive for for managers a higher up in also floor looking for opportunities in other companies. How do you? What did you have a some ideas for how someone can do that too again, badges career through relationships and not just clients I mean. Corporate colleagues or managers. Yeah a couple of them I mean one of damage again does autism grey lines. You know. Coming boy is what for myself for years left and came back and? But you know. Me Need it for about. Johnson. As long as lousy. As in all covered to have them. Might Things one. Working. At beauty sales organizations that have. Partnered with season. So. I helped love Microsoft. Rate Cards. Managing partners. Gray Client was cracking division relationship expected you face Partner relationship, which gives you can also get. On. Interesting again was some grey lines of is in general. It can also be a great relief to learn like my part is working. For example, you might resolve may Michael out to a trade secrets, of course, the respectful Ishani but he? gave the grounded experienced difficulties in are ever get out of view of the marketing teacher thinks. sodomy that offered me a job ended up turning down. Part of his Asian. in general, the also a things in. My mind. That's one thing. Is. Just volunteer I I believe you voted for for different reasons. Elvis. But you'll. You'll mentor or with everywhere. That you should. Give. Them a time but he actually get to and by coming a Jarido I. Lean probably, challenge also decriminalization you end up. Great now, our you end up meeting people who? Actually senior are connected who might reconnect well of you and over referred job opportunities that vital asking people. Actually didn't know about a were on board of a musicians to urine. Settled, game maybe exclusively you so. Again when you give open abuse and get out of your. Day. Deaths. Can let causes organizations. You how much you learn on she game I want you to go now we're even practically like. All this weekend get people's. But sometimes people we reach out to say, Hey, you work for this company. Advice and he's been twenty. By that person. Will. The. Second. The last question will going into a little more. Is. A different corner here. But let's say I'm thinking about all about winning reach out to someone cooled and I think about A. Client thinking about a customer. That's one thing of course being in cold calls and cold emails to customers than outbound calls I'm thinking about more. We job-seeking and you're looking for new job between employment opportunities and you kind of a networking cold. You could say you find someone who's very interesting profiling thing and you reaching out to him you have a formula for how you doing two or M. I. Keeps up tricks as. Many as I mean personally I I could call. Michelle. To people directly general and. REQUEST LINK IN For St for. That I have is you will do and I know. that. Connection I usually like this one sense I gather hundreds of. Usually. Except some of them I don't I don't know why connected. So if you say, Hey I watched you today love to connect either easy. You can go now we. Go. The are not just as a Lotta. People. there. Okay. When I connect with experience or if interest say the call. US. Starting any. Just say look I I saw that you work with this company so or whatever. To get some perspectives from you. The nominates it when action in. Anything. From there. So that's one Yukon be overwhelmed blade requests and stuff. So. Why do we? There's there's exceptions for everything but I get a keen just A. Four President I get this straight forward as always ready ultra but there's a liking being direct and being like the. Not, so. Of. Our to go into. Hey, interesting. Job there s to aggressive but who says look I think it's called me is amazing of related things. Out Loud to spend fifteen you on the phone on to ask a few pressures. Of Not Everywhere. But many people's Insurance Wayne what's and then you can. There's a in his job interest. You can actually say nothing wrong with you say jokingly referred me but don't only go off. Awkward. Thing related to that is although Are Going to people if that I don't have a action. A second connection. Would try to find a second production actually go to someone deselect damage. Actually is. Also, connected in owning on them, you to see is grand whatever. Michael Make many production and I give the decks anyway I don't make them. I Say I'm GonNa say this I'm betty would like to ask. You. Might. Five seconds versus. I'm hearing for his own and therefore I should answer betty. SUPPO things but. Again to the. Side if I'm asking somebody produced Domain as you want. Seattle just as a as a a former. Manager ahead of the US toby to helped me help you. Good. To go out there was my internet with just unstable why? When you're saying a very important thing you said that When you reach out and not go straight for of course, asking Hey, as he does interesting job in your company. And say am. Interesting background and connections can we? What was your line? Can you just repeat? Is, I'm not not. I'm not suggesting that they will be directed studios flirting. You WanNa be direct but not too much so so sometimes. Jong Company. Often. But that's okay. I if somebody buried all Getting recommended JOE I. I would look there again back to the research point again, I would go to. Profiled. also. I see that you won't is today, but whatever it is five something of common interest. Absurd. I started you create she just. I. Wanted to meals just give me some insights. Exactly what he wants Why not find? A nominee be next week. And that you can. You know I think it's just more like. The Art of Seduction. Nothing Asian it'd be intrigued so-so secrets. I. Don't need to throw his you WanNa, buy you for these of. To. Brazil, you go straight up to a woman in Brazilian Essay Tele to marry you are. Do you want to go out with the exactly? So there's a there's a was Lena conferences at. Even The. Great election. Cools the. But chose yesterday alone. Looks. And says, I fly walk walk Gets. Lie. In run walk can't walk craw or whatever you do just keep moving and. Powerful because. He not have to cross Oh y'all maybe a step at a time and that's Amazing. So I think that we will end will end. The interview of the podcast is we have were talk for a long time actually very interesting guy love inside lot of good tips look mindset to to to. The lead as useful especially report for lean but also for sales. People looking for a career in sales and business development everything. So thanks a lot for your advice for your time Benny. You're more than welcome and. One final piece of advice. or a people and injuring sales. Again, Look consultants had customers have. Quarter Day for products where you accommodate for. You need to understand what your customers. Hurricanes aren't. Just, assume that you know the perfect solution for that dog, even the Senate province. So you it's Ok was you shouldn't be asserted but like more important than having the right answer is asking the right questions. So beekeepers asked him questions share in science research share thank God formation with them. As you gained trust of more licensing versus discussion. So again. Out of the of the of the tank radius you to move so they. Amazing. Based off billy.

Microsoft US Israel Benny Brazil Africa Orlando founder and managing director Microsoft Research Korea NBA France Joe gus Zanger Oxide partner Denmark Michael Middle East
Making Progress with Christopher Ryan

Forked Up: A Thug Kitchen Podcast

1:43:09 hr | 1 year ago

Making Progress with Christopher Ryan

"Thank you for listening to this. podcast one production available on Apple podcasts. And podcast one. Don't wait for Black Friday. Get get to old navy today. The gifts they want most aren't incredible fifty percent off. That's right get fifty percents off all jeans fifty percent off all sweaters. Fifty percent of all outerwear today. Hey gene started just fifteen bucks adults ten bucks for kids. Everyone's favorite styles are on sale today. So don't wait. Korean for fifty percents off all jeans. Sweaters Outerwear Pat old baby and old Navy Dot Com and soon valid eleven twenty to eleven twenty six excludes in store clearance gift of the week. podcast one presents four kitchen. podcast the show that is does food politics and pop culture all while trying to give a fuck and now for your host. Michelle Davis and Matt Holloway. Welcome to forks exact your go-to podcasts. For All these pomegranates paleontology and progressive politics. I'm Michelle Davis and Matt Holloway. Today we're GONNA be talking about Funky funky vitamins. Big Milk is bankrupt and the Pope is pissed twenty nineteen and a nutshell. We're not even talking about what I'm talking impeachment hearings this other stuff these are side quests. Oh my God you guys you guys are getting bombarded with impeachment self for not here for that. Yeah I mean we are here for it. But privately privately primarily for later joined by Dr Chris Ryan talk about the price of progress since eighteen. jollies the basket folk. Sharpen knows knives. Its fourth out of the kitchen. podcast what is a potty. How y'all doing with miss show? Oh shows Impossible today. What up just I'd say the world did you do that intentionally? Hail now I just put on acute asked outfit walked out the door looking like an icon Gould. Her like you just need like the little saw. Aw Did she has now. I know I mean frankly. I even have the hair juice spot on Kim possible. I you know this is just my natural state of Kim possible because play the yeah what is what are we going on this. We Greece still doing week before Thanksgiving be useless fees. You guys should check that out at the recipes. y'All went crazy for the fuck in Brussels route keen wash it. We were talking about last week. Or I dunno lager them because we can't control how much which are audiences are content. Yeah we have big followings but we reach a very small percentage that because social networks. Try to throttle unless you pay and they. You won't let us pay people. Facebook were like. Why don't you should anymore? I'm like well first of all. FACEBOOK is mad lame so we're not here anymore. So uh-huh Cheryl your boomer memes. Kitchen is quietly getting off a facebook. Yeah are we getting onto tick tock. No so. Don't worry we're laying on another platform on our site. You guys need need. Hope trying to plan Thanksgiving Menu. We got you covered. Got All the side dishes main salads desserts cocktails whatever your level of like bringing something to the get together as we got you. Did you not thank. You could do a signature cocktail before the dinner for your family could be your contribution attention to the meal because you can. And that's fucking easy. Very easy. Very nice. Thoughtful knows about everything that was so nice of him. And you're like cool because I can't fucking cook and let's be real your Cancun. Yeah but you can mix so this week. We posted the Thanksgiving having leftover lasagne. which is you won't talk about the levels for that? It was a fever dream that I was like Matt. Two words Thanksgiving lasagna. What do you think? And he's like walk me through leftovers for sure fucking leftover dish noodles in between takeaway. The red sauce add add gravy. Okay and then do every side dish as a level of LASAGNA. 'cause you're going to have tons of leftovers. Oh you now I made it from scratch which you can. Do you just want to do all of the Thanksgiving foods as one dish you could make from scratch. And that's the recipe we're GONNA have online but it's so customizable so the bottom layer. I did SCALLOP potatoes between two layers of pasta tons of Fuckin- gravy than I did Sweet potatoes More warn gravy more noodles then I did doffing layer and then more noodles gravy and then oh I did more potatoes gravy and then I think with staffing and Brussels sprouts the very top and then what did I do. Matt occurred in great covert engrave. Swimming agree yeah so check that out because I mean work with a layer cranberry sauce. If you're doing Turkey or some kind of meat you could do a layer that with the gravy you all any and all of your sides can be a layer in this lasagna. I've just created the framework for you right other than the LASAGNA Because it is that time of year you guys should cop a Hoodie. And the the third kitchen store Amazon dot com slash kitchen hut. He's back in stock back by popular demand very comfortable very soft. We should a photo of the new foster of Bosco enough office. A boss Bosley Aka the big old baby. He's a big baby. Yeah so we have our foster right now. His name Bosco he is a four year. Old Staff He is housebroken. He's great the kids and other dogs and he is. The kindest is the biggest baby most of a rental dog that we've had as a rescue rescue. He just want everyone his best friend he just wants to sit and have his belly robbed and put his head in your lap and look at you adoring. He's all the Standing outside in the yard yesterday and the mailman walked up handed me. The emboss was on the porch and he ragging still didn't bark nothing. But your friend Ah. Meanwhile the neighbor's boss is great. So if you guys are are interested you can check out L. A. Animal Rescue for the adoption details and Nath. Let's go now with you That's spas life all all right. Well before I get into the stupidest product I found on Amazon this week I wanted to briefly becoming. Oh absolutely doing certain. Anti feedback on the anti ad from last week. But I just wanted wanted to touch on so you know we record the pot on Mondays and this morning there was a shooting in Dunkin Oklahoma. The Walmart there and you'll might have remembered from last year of even listening to the podcast for a while I have family in Duncan Oklahoma. I everybody is okay. I'm yes that Walmart. I have bragged on that walmer because they had fucking Dope Ashby collection that I was like shocked that I was able to get a bunch of cool as shit that Walmart my cousin in and everybody out there is fine but you know it's another reminder that thinker broken Shootings have just now. I know Santa Clear last week. Like it's just yeah it's a lot and it can obviously happen anywhere even a quiet town like Dunkin Oklahoma surprise me because I mean I mean I feel like I don't think you you can't can be surprised anymore. Yeah that's fair. Yeah it's it's always like man. I can't believe what happened there but I guess it doesn't matter where all of our gun. Yeah there was a time twenty five years ago where this was ridiculous future to imagine just a reminder that beings of gotten far more out of control than they ever should have and that since it hasn't always been this way it means it doesn't always have to be this way while that is. Oh bummer yeah we should. Let's let's turn this around anti-saddam Oh my God brought to you by that. That aid cookers would've rapid cooker. I was just I get what the August this. Okay so it's just like it looks egg-shaped and it makes sticks. It cooks six eggs at once. Looks like a pot on the stove. Sir It's an incubator kind and retails around fifteen dollars and eat has eleven thousand reviews you holy Shit so the dash rapid a cooker. So apparently would you need right okay. So rapid ache. You haven't fucking emergency. People like to eat even if you like to eat multiple hard boiled eggs at a time. How is this easier or better than boiling water on the stove and people like okay? Here look fucking have deluxe version. That's a double decker. Did these are harmony as a double that twelve. There's twelve eggs. Yeah you gotTa Egg emergency that you need to cook twelve eggs fucking stat. Excuse me I'm so tired of standing there and watching the the water and boil and it's like that's not how boiling water work. There's a whole new user careers. screeches like a bat and a fire alarm and an unholy baby like this thing screeches four stars Eh one star for the violent screeches the come out only so stupid guys and again how someone has tricked you into spending fifteen dollars to make something you can make it home if you have one pot. And they're like oh it's faster it it takes start to finish. It takes nineteen minutes. You're telling me that's faster than boiling up like four cores. Water on your fucking Stove League. No it's not. They've tripped. You said rapid it's not nineteen minutes is not no no somebody said. Oh I timed. It was eleven minutes for this one again. That's that's not any faster. Yeah what are you know. Fifteen dollars fifteen dollars. What can fifteen dollars get John Amazon? Fuck can one of our bucks at least or definitely this is turning into a plug. Oh my God okay. Hold on pierce the eggs at the right amount of water and walk away. A and then you don't come to hear the BUZZER. Guess what guys that. The exact same thing is boiling the water putting the egg and setting a time. I don't I never cooked enough eggs. I don't understand why this is somehow a inventive. It's not it's been it's like microwave popcorn. We we were tricks to think it was hard to make popcorn on the stove top spoiler. It's not right at all right but now everyone thinks they're too stupid to do it. These people think they're to fucking stupid to boil water that you need to put one thing in et that you need to put this little fuck in Jurassic Park incubator on your kitchen plastic like are you fucking kidding me like no. This is not great It is rapid but not consistent I'm really loving this so worse than said the eggs were so bad. Her turtle wouldn't eat them. She bought it for attornal. That there's a lot of back story there that I'm not gonNA get into why this person has been trying different AAC cookers. They've spent hundreds of dollars. This is your life. The you're spending hundreds of dollars. What is your house? Smell like. Talking point eggs left in. What's wrong I don't know how to clean it? They're putting the whole fucking thing in the dishwasher own. No don't do that. y'All it's plastic. Come on nine. This is why we can't have nice things usually one pot preferably annalong home cookware. Boil that it said it and forget it set a timer. y'All got you snot a notary. They're they're legit swamp but also you get an eleven piece at a fucking and fifteen dollars on a cooker come. On I didn't WANNA undercooked eggs. People are cooking omelettes in this. You can't these photos WANNA treat go to Amazon rabid orbited cooker and look at these look at this. I bought this product thinking it would be perfect for my morning schedule. I'd never really got hard boiled eggs but thought boiled was okay the more I used the softer my yokes were the last time I bit into my egg yolk squirted everywhere. Jesus Christ how how. `Bout you just cook some eggs the night before. Also why are we just eating eggs. Hey I'm concerned I'm concerned. The big version Obama go back to that page could wake the dead but it makes okay eggs. Four stars that anyone who just takes down one star like manslaughter shit but Four Stars would recommend. Oh my God Of why are you guys doing this. Also boil and what is somebody took a a photo of it and they have their prescription in the background. Juvenile non prescription it. I don't know but it may cause dizziness doesn't have the name on it I'll bet it's better than antidepressants. The president of your life is consumed with having an egg quickest possible so even if it's not fully cooked through and you get jokes quitting you probably need some happy in your life. It looks so gross. Looks miserable got enough food. Can you imagine just being like no honey over there. I gotTa take some egg photos. What is that did it blow up now? She taught five stars with a two it stretching the ability of my eyes to understand She could a bunch of eggs while her kids were in the in the TUB. I don't know why I needed to know. Someone's doing scrambled eggs. That takes little minutes. It's fucking what you don't need a device to do that. You have everything you need at your home to do this. While people are doing in boxing videos of this she says I. I don't understand. Apparently the bottom Ross rusts like right away They're showing us. How do peel an egg now? Is that a spider. We're in the spider snus. What are what about another prescription bottle? Different person guy your in your eggs in your medicine cabinet anti-depressants different kitchens different. Oh my God what is up up with fucking egg. I could do this all day. So don't buy this. This is an insane product for a person to have. If you don't have a pot the only scenario scenario I could see this being helpful As if you live in a place that does not have a kitchen and you like to eat hard boiled L. Daggs for if you do not have the ability to have a hot top of any kind. I like in my dorm room. I had a rice cooker right because you can't have high tops. Yeah I was a very popular person. I did circumvented the rules. I bet right now. There's no rise cookies either. Yeah well you know Michelle Davis is a triplets. Yeah I guess I get that but I I've known one person who they're they're sort of kitchen here in Los Angeles was like a sink in a smart Fridge Riddick. There Kinsley justly. It's called like a bachelor. Yes for like that. Maybe but also like. I don't know this lonely as a man I mean. What is that crop? Somebody not quite like somebody tried to photoshop. There's and it looks terrible. You know they're trying to do this. This is the viewer. They're trying to photoshop. All the antidepressants like well. I can't possibly a get rid of all this stuff. It's another fucking thing in a Pez dispenser Sir. Who are these people? That people who need eggs is soon as rapidly. They need rapidly. And they don't know how to set a timer timer and they WANNA be screamed at by Banshee egg cookers. So so this podcast is brought to you by the rapid cooker. If you are depressed than you need need X.. In your life you need him now rapid cooker. If you foster photo to their Amazon Review Page please hide your prescription. I didn't think we had to say that but apparently we do. That's enough of that. Let's let's move into something a little bit more interesting. What do you got food history? It is now time for this week. It food history with this serious this week in nineteen sixty-seven Casimir funk died despite being the man with probably probably one of the coolest names incredible name yes he was Mr Funk Casimir funk Catha Mir funk doctor Casimir funk other therefore they Polish American biochemist who was the first to determine that there are chemical substances in our foods that are required for good health house like vitamins he discovered fucking vitamins. Darby funk invented vitamin he before before nineteen sixty nine hundred and sixty six and before all that no vitamin in nineteen sixty seven. Well that's that's when he died doctor Dr Funk or that's when he passed Dr Funk he he got funded della gun US got vitamin SCRUMS vitamins. He discovered vitamin B.. One B. Two C. and D. vitamins contributed to the normal functioning of the are hormonal. Donald System His work led to the prevention of rickets scurvy and all the other diseases caused by vitamin deficiency. He was able before they were like. Oh it's holly the strikes and it's the grain and it's citrus but they didn't know why At he was like here's the why he even coined the word vitamin in his nineteen twelve paper. which is what was the discovery of vitamins? Dr Fong Vitamins. Vitamin Zeman's although he is obviously remembered primarily for his work with vitamins funk got funky all over the scientists he was instrumental in advancing studies on hormones. Cancer and diabetes. His contributions DISCI- included the development of accurate views of the relationship between Diet and health that led to advances in child and adult nutrition and extended the life expectancy of people throughout the twentieth century. And beyond like he didn't he didn't just improve life he's save lives. He stretched lives his science led had to probably millions of people being alive. Today that otherwise wouldn't have He also contributed into getting proper nutrition and nutrients into into manufactured foods. So like when you see orange juice fortified with vitamin D or milk fortified with all these different vitamins. It's because of him He's the one who's like okay. The the the process of making the food is making it less nutrient dense like we need to fortify it and that's the battle hymn. They should call for five foods. Funky some some funky. Orange juice has got that vitamin D. How did we let this man's name get lost time? Yeah like how bad asked you need to be like he's bad ass enough. y'All other contributions made by funk include finding the connection between vitamin B complex and carbohydrate metabolism discovering that vitamins influence the speed at which cancer cancer grows and separating vitamin D from cholesterol and realizing that bacteria are necessary. Part of our diet. y'All he figured out how people work uh-huh why don't forget fucking Dr Fong. Don't don't do the Funky nece man. He died this week and he made us be alive alive so shadow. DEFUNCT SHOUT OUT TO CASS Amir. Yeah so that's my food history which recalls this weekend total recall vegetables onto the planet. Welcome ready for the last week as a sausage company based out of Columbus Ohio. Ohio as well as a sausage company. What do you think they make cat twice? Last week. They announced recall of over twenty five five thousand pounds of sausage products due to steer Terry. If you've got some sausage in your fridge might want to check the USDA logo and if it says eighteen thirty eight a well buddy you are so not that dreaded in eighteen thirty day move move the rapid cooker sausage steaming. My sausage in my rabbit. Eight cooker I don't know why so you either need to throw that shit away a return it from wherever you bought it there have been no reported illnesses UNICES but this is a class one rico. What a weight so twenty five thousand pounds of sausage when he five thousand pounds of sausage sausage products? Excuse accuse me Oh okay. Not just not just links not there were there. Were probably some Maybe some Patty's sausage patties some. I'm not gonNA say Jimmy Dean. He had his own recall earlier this year. I think I did the Jimmy Dean. So there's just a bunch of little poo- like logs down a river somewhere dumping them in the river. All the middle chickens recall river. You tell you what do you think. Recall rivers located out you know we. We rename that recall wherever He says but yeah I mean that's that's a waste of Lot of pork. Unfortunately animals in Nafta Dr while speaking of food waste. I've got some news radio or yeah The Pope as fucking head it with food. Waste y'all okay. Yeah and I'm here for it so last week. There was a conference held at the Typical Academy of Sciences and the Vatican where scientists academics economists and United Nations representatives. Meet to address. It's the worldwide problems such as like food waste and discuss how to best cut that amount in half within the next decade. That's the goal so they got together to pontificate got it. I'm getting cloud booth. I got it. I don't endorse it. I'm not cosigning anyway. Pope Francis is is dead serious about this issue. y'All in a statement from the conference. The leader said we call on our leaders and on all of us to deepen our commitment to action towards having food loss. Awesome and waste by twenty thirty an achievable goal based on existing knowledge and technology the Pontifical Academy of Sciences Continues Quote. We note that many good actions Sion's to reduce food loss and waste are already in place in many countries but so far they do not add up to global impact enjoy learning which is such a good point because they're like some people are doing in a great job but y'all acting like no one succeeding and not into implementing all this shit. Get it together so at the conference the Academy said that in order to reach its goal of cutting food waste in half this is all over the world it would require better education better behaving consumers and cooperation between governments environmental organizations companies and religious groups and the pope is doing his part by directly letting people know exactly how immoral our current food system is he and he has some great quotes quote quote whenever food is thrown out. It is as if it were stolen from the table of the poor Pope Francis wrote in his second and most recent and cyclical earlier this year. He also said while speaking to the leaders and volunteers at the European foodbanks federation quote to throw food. Away is to throw people away. It is scandalous analysts today. Not to notice how precious food is as good and how much of it ends up being used so badly. Last month Pope Francis also spoke to the Director General of Food and Agricultural Organization and said quote it is cruel unjust in a paradoxical reality that food could be wasted or discarded especially when there are so many who did not have access to it which is a basic human requirement. So what do we think do you think this commandment number eleven. Yeah the thou shall not waist. Don't be don't be covered in your neighbor. Shit don't be fucking you neighbor's husband wife And quicken food away but I like cutting down the rain forest awards to throw food away is to throw people away. I thought that was such a a beautiful way of saying it because it is. You're saying that you're not seeing the immorality of our extra in relation to the poverty of others and when we throw food away were saying that it is too much work to feed lead our fellow humans. No which you know. We Adjustment Crow on She's connecting those dots exactly and she's telling us remember she is the Creator CEO founder of good which is connecting businesses and repurposing their excess food to help help people who are experiencing food insecurity but yeah exactly she's so? Don't throw these people away. We have solution. This food can go to somebody buddy who will eat it yes exactly so. Do you think more religious leader should speak out stop maybe having Over and actually do some shit lose the Talk about this. Because I'm from Houston. Church is five minutes from my dad's house and it is insulting to everyone who listened to conway talk about capitalism When that motherfucker selling fifty dollars socks that just said the word Chonnam fifty dollars for socks and he soon ah faster ticket to hell than sell in March for your own personal prophet? Jesus on it I just I you know. I'm just saying it's so hard to tell if he's trolling Roland. That feels like a golden calf situation. Like we're really skirted some lines. y'All like I don't really know there was a cut going around twitter of him just sort of which allstate talking uninterrupted and it reminded me a lot of like always sunny when Mac talks about the Bible. He just has this idea. And he's he's like. Oh you know because Jesus. It's all over the place in Wisconsin mental illness. A hell of a thing. Everybody go to your doctor get some help. Show some compassion for con. I do I don't know what the Hell Oh he's doing by. Don't take the money of good people for your own personal gain like they have it hard enough from these fucking shifty ass. Mother fuckers Joel Oil Stain. They don't need you to Connie listened. Yeah I know her. CH- Leaders Fried flying in fucking Gulfstream. Six fifty's doing all fuck. y'All that doesn't sound like Jesus to me. Ole seen as popular with very few people in Houston because when I mean bank account for a lot of reasons but one being that when the heartache Hurricane Harvey hit is it jolting the Guy who bought Compaq Center which is worth rockets. used to play. That's that's how fucking big this churches is it. The Houston Rockets used to be the Compaq Compaq computers used to be compact Senate and he fucking bought it and now that's his church. They didn't scale it down around if anything has gotten bigger and he locked the doors when people were fleeing the flooding the catastrophic flooding that destroyed all these people sounds he locked. The doors. Boris his church was not open to help. People does not help people. It helps them a humor. CH- well yeah. I want to make sure I got the price of the socks for fifty dollars says Jesus walks folks on one pair in this church socks on the other fifty dollars per pair. How're you GONNA spend one hundred sixty five dollars on a t shirt or a long-sleeve crew neck sweatshirts this holy spirit and think that God would be cool with that. I mean I'm not saying people are asking to get smited but it sounds like you're asking Fono really and then you're telling me that if I have exposed shoulders like I'm being the like imbecile. Now now it's a weird cherry pick. Now I'll show up with my belly button ring out. Thank you very much. If we're went sweatshirts Jesus on them of how to be a better Christian to cherry picking large getting some bad names just some good kind folks. Speaking things going sour. The milk industry is certainly go. Bad you know I. I haven't looked at it in a while and it's been in the back of the fridge. I thought it might be pretty Chunky as I'm cermony y'all saw me celebrating on twitter. You loved the Sea Folks Dean Food. The largest milk producer in the united in states filed for bankruptcy protection. Last week signalling to the rest of the dairy industry. That the good old days are long mucking gone. You Melt your last Titi. Oh God almond milk utterly predictable. She's this is right. The company whose portfolio brands include True Mu and Li. Hi Valley said it was in talks to sell dairy farmers of America which is a marketing in cooperative Milk from thousands of farms. It's just a blood bucket. Just Mix Allah. There's another always sunny always. It's just one big fat there. Stern Turnaround Mantra Calvin report in that two percent chocolate. Who Cares now? This trans probably not news. y'All especially if you listen to podcasts. Regularly we talk about the slot. But I think it's important to recap since this is big news. So in recent years consumers rumors have actually moved away from brands and even entire categories of food that once household staples the millennials are ruining the milk industry. The the decline of the milk industry has emerged particularly stark example how these changing tastes a challenging major companies whose products once crowded store shelves sing with canned soups soups and other highly processed foods. Why don't we link can't opening more? Should we ever liked it. millennials deliver. We don't like things on the shelf. Krause south and beef consumption is also down burgers. I mean speaking of millennials sort of ruining things with industry. I don't think it's necessary millennials. I think the millennials are probably the first view. Hey move production. It's kind of fucked up so I'm going to drink almond milk. Well I think it's also just people realizing licensing. We don't have to have canned soup. We don't have to drink dairy milk. Like there's other things to drink and you're not going to scare me by saying soy milk. It's GonNa make me grow boobs or that that all men shut up drink at the guys. The guys who are worried about soy products are guys who do not work out like and also and also the science of it aside you understand how much soy product you would actually have to consume for it to affect saucer. estrogens are real absolutely replant. estrogens are a real thing. But I'm sorry. Are you only eating like male animals. No no are we not concerned about the actual estrogen in some of these mammals. That were eating. Oh no you're not that's crazy that's insane. Do you only eat the dicks fucking animals. No you don't show put up. Some stupid. Do think that they were going to be able to innovate or sort of A. I don't know that these massive corporations like it might just be time that they get broken up I'll these companies are refused to change their business model. They're like well made money like this for seventy years. I'm not gonNA do Campbell Soup. They don't WanNa make less money. Yeah exactly okay. And they I mean. That's the capitalist model like you know it's a it's seen as a loss you don't make more every quarter. I'm sorry I think a lot of these companies are going to go bankrupt and if not they're going to just push through frivolous lawsuits and legislation like we've been seeing what some of the limited use of the word. What male Milk Burger Cheese as in yogurt because the instead of them Actually paying attention market trends and trying to trying to adapt and evolve. They they just want to fight competition with legislation. They WANNA squash verbiage exactly so like all I'm GonNa get them -opoly on this by silencing this so call it oatmeal Colorado shut up. People aren't confused. But you know like some companies are They're even like buying their pipes. Competent Tyson is an investor. In what beyond me and a couple other food companies like you're just beyond now do beyond chicken. Maybe it's still beyond me. Yeah but I'm just saying like some of these big food. Giants giants are just investing in these startups. Two minutes. SMART IT smart. Thatcher's that's the if again if attention market trends and you see where the money's going you see where Consumer Sumer keep flocking to it ain't you e should go with the direction of the wind exactly like you know the money still green even if it's for moms so while the collapse of the dairy industry might be progressive. Not Progress is great. And that's why we brought Christopher Ryan here today as our guest. We have a fascinating conversation with him about the past present and future of human nature. y'All GonNa WanNa hear it stay tuned. We'll be back in a moment with more forked up. A thug. Kitchen podcast podcast. Don't wait for Black Friday. Get to old navy today. The gifts they want most are an incredible fifty percent off. That's right get fifty percent off all jeans. It's fifty percent off all sweaters. Fifty percent of all outerwear today gene started just fifteen bucks for adults ten bucks for kids. Everyone's favorite styles are on sale today. So don't wait. Korean for fifty percents off all jeans sweaters outerwear had old navy and old Navy Dot Com and soon valid eleven twenty to eleven twenty six excludes in store clearance gift of a week an autopsy not only reveals how a person died but how they lived. I'm Dr Michael Hunter if you like what you're hearing checkout more dark mysteries on your TV unreels channel. There are shocking real life and death stories in world's evil killers like the fight neighbor nicknamed aim the Scorpion after he bludgeoned. Nine women to death with a hammer and Rodney Alcala. The serial murderer best known as the dating game killer then check Out The latest episodes of autopsy that reveal what really killed screen to music. Legends like Walt Disney. Tom Petty David Cassidy and Batmans Adam. I'm West you can find heels on your TV. At reels DOT COM THAT'S OUR E L Z DOT COM and. Check the top of the screen to find grills in your the guys. The holidays Amir that means cooking cooking and more cooking. See you're GonNa WanNa take this minute and hear about our responser so you actually have an pots and pans to cook for all of your guests. You're one FRY PAN will not cut it. This holiday season the anal on advanced collection and has been in the market for fifteen years and has consistently evolved its products especially with their brand new innovation. 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Today is a psychologist speaker and New York Times bestselling author. He hosts a podcast called Tin. Generally only speaking in is currently living in a van down by the river. You can check out his new book civilized to death the price of progress available everywhere right now. It is a pleasure to have with us today. Dr Christopher Ryan what the fuck up thank you thank you. We'll get to the van thing in the Middle East calling me. Dr Nice me nervous. Really Start asking me to check your prostate. So there's a panel my hd through all the the hard work of PhD. I don't WanNA diminish their title by not calling like it's a it's a gray area. It is weird I mean first of all my phd is from like the school. You've never heard of I mean it wasn't stanford or anything so it wasn't that much work and they sort of. Let me do what I wanted to do and But the the the thing that really gets me is like their actual doctors who went to medical school and like dealt with Cadavers and sure you know blood and and and there should be. It was a lot of homework there should be a different word for noxious when someone insists on becoming like being call all doctor constantly in polite conversation. Do Your dentist not a doctor of philosophy. I'm fine to give review the initial doctor. Like if I'm like doctor. Can you pass the salt like no. We're not doing that saying it's like this grey area. You don't no who yelled at by one anyone who insists on it can go fuck. Oh absolutely absolutely. It's fair dude. I've been a big fan of yours for years. I he legit. I have known for a long time listeners at home so I listened to your podcast it. It was one of the very first parkhouse. I ever listened to When I got into listening to podcasts was your podcast tangentially speaking and I got district which is now the cover of your your book but you can get it on? Christopher Ryan's website in my mom sends out. Your mom gave this to me so much more. Specially it's so great people like in the order order for them now. There's like a comment area and they'll be like. Hey Julie Yeah. She loves it and she always forward to look another nice person. I'll say this this very fast shipping. She was on a good at her job for what she gets paid. But some aww podcast you also wrote a book called sex at dawn and it sort of examines the history of human sexual behavior in monogamy and marriage and family You your if you listen to podcasts. Like I was reading your book and I I was like remembering pass episodes where you talk about some of these concepts in civilized to death breath in. It's it's a really good case against progress. You're not you're not like you're not anti progress. You just think that there's a there's a point of diminishing returns turns. I think progress would be a great idea. I'm looking forward to it. You know it's just not a GIG economy. I mean look just every day like once you get into this mindset of questioning whether things are actually getting better than the whole narrative starts to fall apart like how do even quantify if I that eat well. Yeah good question This morning I was watching something on the news. I forget what it was. And and they said A third they pointed third of children In the world or malnourished right now half of American adults are pre diabetic tea's taste like how's that progress. My hunter-gatherers there's no obesity in hunter gathers no diabetes nutritionist far better. There's very little tooth decay. Okay at all Gum Disease Heart Disease. High Blood Pressure. I mean just pick your malady. And hunter-gatherers generally. Don't have to deal with it now. The the problem is my point in civilized to death was to look at this from two angles. First of all looking past are are looking at the past and establishing that life before civilization was nowhere near as bad as we've been told so this whole struggle for survival level. The Neo Hobson thing that life before the state was solitary poor nasty brutish and short. That's wrong on every count and And then to turn and look at the the president say okay but the presence fantastic right there. Everything's great here and you know the the bit that sort of solidified or crystallized this whole way of thinking for for me was this Louis C. K.. Bet He did resent the airplane. And you remember that the wife I go back exactly like we should all just be going. Yeah at the end of that bid he says these days. Everything's is amazing but nobody's happy. I thought man. That's exactly what I want to write about in his book. Why aren't we happy if things have been getting better and better for what ten thousand thousand years since the Adleman of agriculture wake? That's a lot of progress. Yeah so why. Aren't we thrilled. And why when you look at hunter gatherers are are they. Totally uninterested in joining are amazing way of life and we just had shameless Blackley on and he was talking about He cultivated the ancient Egyptian Egyptian yeast and baked these breads. And he's like this idea that people in ancient civilizations eight worse and wanted worse things and all that that's not true like that's just a pat ourselves on the back I think they're eating. Shitty stuff is incorrect. Like they were eating the best of whatever the world had to offer at that point. And you're doing a discredit to people in the past to think that they didn't thrive at the very high level that they could willing also the your not. There's no there's no reason historically to believe that the things available to us are better than the things I have bananas for example right so here we have you know you go to trader. Joe's you get all the bananas you want but it turns out that there are dozens of different species of banana and at some point United Fruit Company company. Decided I think in the United States there were five or six different types of bananas. The you could get But there was one particular type that was much easier to the Trans fat and they worked out this process where you pick them green and then you ship them and then you Put them through some sort of chemical process gassing or whatever it is that makes them ripen and the United Fruit company decided. That's the banana Americans are gonna eat despite the fact that that was the one that tasted worse and it's the same same thing with pears and apples like our modern system. We talked about this with a pass. Gas To wrote this book called Lost Feast the same thing where it's like The seed catalog from nineteen o five here in the United States. We've lost ninety. Seven percent of the varietals of Broccoli. One hundred percent of the apple's like all these things because what we view as like this free choice is that we have of all this prototype available. You can't see what's missing right exactly. You don't know what you don't know. And so that's known known and the unknown unknowns smartest thing every time we will get it. Listen I don't agree with his politics for the month. Fugger he makes a point. I agree I agree. I thought I mean I don't know that I want to write any more like big idea books but one that I've thought about over the years Because I've researched this so much like there are things that scientists no we don't know about their specific field but that The lay person thinks is known. Yeah right so Yeah and I've I've sort of come up with all these examples over the years so I thought it'd it'd be an interesting book called the known unknown to write about things that okay physicist know that this particular point is totally mysterious. But we all think they know at our archaeologists archaeologists. An example is You know we think that we have Access to archaeological evidence that shows shows how humans lived. Typically you know through our Canary Pass. The problem is that humans came out of Africa and spread around around the world along coastlines. All right they crossed into like the over the Sea of Suez and then went around the Middle East and then down into into India along the coastlines. Right problem is coastline was two hundred feet lower than So typical human settlements we have no idea. It's all lender water or have gone ground up by the sand and this is so the things they find. Are these unusual atypical hunting parties. That went up into the mountains and something happened or up along a river somewhere. These are not typical sample size. As far as long as it's all gone what we've written about about people then we just extrapolate from that point and then all of a sudden our whole historical record is fucked. It's like how they assumed all the lake remains that they found buried with spears were male because the men are the hunters and then now. They're discovering that some of these remains are female and it's like well up our whole thing that we've been saying you're eh not gonNA edit that to say these skeletons head titties. These don't fossil. Yeah Yeah and there's so much resistance to re configuring our understanding but that when you introduce an idea or you question of foundational the idea in one of the sciences men of vitriol that comes back at you is pretty impressive and for people who deem themselves so factually minded well but if all facts are you know influx in ninety six. We're always looking for the best answer you you know not the one that we're comfortable. Yeah in our kind of get. The people sort of dig in is to what if I'm a scientists aren't spent thirty years here's proven something then somebody comes along. You know thirty years after my progress and then they can somehow disprove that. I'm not going to sit there and be like God. Damn what a waste of thirty years. I'm GONNA DIG in and I'm going to defend and my shit even though I know it's probably not teddy skeleton. Yeah no it's tough. I'll tell you one of the examples. Thousands of intellectual integrity that stands out for me is France divall is this great primatology. He's Knows as much about Timpson. bonobos is anybody in the world And when I was writing sex at dawn there is a section most of which I ended up not using but there is a section section. where I I just sort of took a couple of pages from one of his books and responded to each paragraph? Now that's what you got wrong there. But Matt's what you got wrong and I am the some upstart nobody's ever heard of me so I'm sort of picking a fight with the big guy you know and And Anyway I. But he's such a decent guy and I love reading his books. And I've seen all these interviews and he's just this really Nice Dutchman you know and I started feeling Kinda like a a little weird about like attacking this dude so I sent him an email saying. Hey you've never heard of me but I'm working on this book it's going to be publishing a few months There's a section in there where I criticize some of your work but I also use a lot of your work. Your research to build this theory have I feel it would. Only it'd be fair to offer you the chance to look at it before it goes to print and he said okay. I'll look at it so I sent it to him and he wrote back and he was like okay. Well you make a good point at the beginning here but if he considered heard this and that and so he went back and forth a few times and at the end he was like. I don't know you might be right as you make some really interesting arguments there. In any case this is a this is A Perspective people need to to see so. I'm glad you're books coming up and I was like dude. Are you kidding. I was trash Jinyu but that's true intellect into a smart person says it's like Oh quest for knowledge and I appreciate it and let me know when Nah you're super right and I'll switch teams well and also I mean okay. Here's how she key I was I was like well. Thank you for that can I can I unquote you publicly. And he said sure you can use it as a blurb on your book if you want wow so you look on the back cover of sex at dawn. There's a blurb from friends devolve that all started with me saying hey Mr famous scientists. I think you're wrong. I mean to me that that's the way we should be right. Facts are always in flux. Yeah half the yeah. We talked about emotionally wound. It comes to politics is like this is what I believe and if you believe that your right convince me because I don't WanNa be wrong can convince me that your argument is the right argument. Well question mind and I'm willing to listen. Yeah make me question my beliefs and if you're unable to do that in my beliefs aren't it's my brain is elastic move around. Don't worry about it I like it in my mind blown. Shit what else. Don't I now stubbornness doesn't really a big growth. Yeah so honor here. But you're a big believer in connecting with nature. Hr To and ensure you talk about the hunter gatherers a lot. Well that's the thing. It's you know if you're looking looking at our species and saying okay we're unhealthy healthy. There's no doubt right. I mean I was listening to the radio on the way over here newsom show an NPR. They're talking about millennials have higher rates of asthma autoimmune auto immune disorders. Like all. These like. You know it's like it's a mess right now. Why because they grew up with all these screens they grew up with all his technology? Supposed to be wonderful supposed to be improving life right and yet people are suffering back to the Louis. CK thing everything's amazing. Nobody's happy so the question seen as if your if your dog is freaked out and you won't understand why your dogs tearing up the furniture and shit in your bed. What are you GONNA do? You'RE GONNA study study canines in the wild. How do they behave? What are they pack? Animals their hierarchy. You know any dog trainer will tell you you got to look at Wolf suit. Wolves behave house. A Wolf Pack. How many couches a year does a wolf chip? Berlet will be the first to be like. Oh well it's a natural for for a dog to be in a Condo all the time all day flick Yep but US natural. That's where I'm going right. We're animals so you were animals so you WanNa look at our our primordial example of our species to understand how things should be for us. How the conditions in which were going to be most healthy and happy so in the case of a dog he wants to be in a pack? That's how dogs are they. They want that social group that hierarchy. So what what about in the want to run right. If your dog never gets any exercises GONNA go nuts because dogs move a lot to cover a lot of ground. So they're all these different things that you look get the natural Context in order to extrapolate out from that and say okay. Well how is this. What conditions will make this species? Happy the house so there's no reason not to do that with us and you see it happening all over the place now in like little like isolated segments right evolutionary psychology collagen evolutionary medicine. You've got the hunt you know the prime or the primal diet and you know the Ketogenic Diet and all these across cross fit to sort of a return of nat natural movement right. How did we move? We jumped. We climbed we lifted heavy. Things enrolled them around right so all these different areas are saying. Okay okay. What was the human body and mind designed to do what were the conditions in which it evolve? Because that's obviously the place in which it's GonNa function best right if you're if you evolved in the ocean you know a fish out of water doesn't live long right so it's the same thing with us. So it's it's not just like get back to nature you know hippie you know Birkenstock Ernestine. It's it's that environment is where you came from. That's he's home and it's the same with hunter-gatherers and social groups. How did we've oh you've solved with no more than one hundred fifty people? We knew them how we love. They loved us. They took care of us. Was that magic number called a Dunbar Dunbar. Under fifty years right. Yeah that's the the highest number of people we can keep track Govan actually know in a deep sense. Do you think ten million in Los Angeles were pushing a little. And that's why you know when and the lady in front of me at the red light doesn't go as soon as it turns green. I'm all pissed off because I don't know who's on our her connection guy. I don't know what she's going through. It's just come on bitch get going. And she reacts to me and an old ruins it's not right and just being around like passively it being around this many people all the time like you feel it. Strictly it's like laid back This distress mall ways happening about your money. You don't notice until tell you remove yourself from the situation and you're like Oh fuck well that Albatross was heavier. I didn't think about airplanes right. How annoying everyone is on an airplane? You know the kids crying if somebody's puts their seat back in front of you. I'm surrounded by assholes. Yeah well but you're an asshole. Seoul two hundred airplanes. And it's not our fault. It's the airplanes fault. Yeah we're not. We're not supposed to be in a metal tube traveling eight hundred miles an hour. We're not supposed to do that leaving recycled air extra two thousand dollars for the seat. The size of human asks designed to seven Gin and tonics the fly. But you. Yeah you talk about that a lot in your book about sort of getting back to nature and you you make a really good point right. The you're like why. Why why do you think that rich executives who have all the money in the world and all the time kind of fuck off and do whatever they want? Why do they love golf courses? So much like a a love being around that that we do feel at peace when we're out in the wilderness shore and golf courses replicate Pretty close to the environment in which Our species I came down from the trees and evolved into Gosse plane. Yeah but I mean we are in our quest to kind of mold. The environment to our needs are losing like the wildness of places. And then we're losing that Like there's an education gap in like a language gap between like say are great grandparents generation us in terms of how to live more within the environment because now people will have no fucking idea how to do anything they buy their pancake batter out of a spray. Can like at least of all the fire. If you're like me you're right. We've gotten an away from hunter gathers definitely wanted to make their lives easier. That's why we developed weapons. That's why we started farming were farm. They grew up on farms right. Yeah but we know wouldn't try. But at what point does that sort of progress to making the hunt a little bit easier. We're Cooking the meat a little bit easier. Storing the foods that lasts longer. Do we get to the point. That we're not leaving our couches and everything comes or front door and we're just like slamming sodas and that's not how we're supposed to live which that that tipping point you think were were there. The tipping point away from living a healthy life toward where we are. Now I I I mean I locate that at the advent of agriculture. Yeah you know you know you said something. Earlier he said we hunter-gatherers wanted to make life easier which is why they develop farming. I would argue that. Life got much harder when farming started more maintenance Much much longer hours of work. Hunter gatherers were lower yield Lou depending who you are righteous of course when slavery started that's also in slavery's urged sorry when farming start when slavery started So yes there was A. It's a much less efficient way to live. What it allows is rapid population growth? Because you get more calories as per acre By far than under gathers do but that see this is one of the central conundrums of the book. That more members of species doesn't mean the species is doing better. He sees made some weird that the members right Yeni example apple. I use in the book as chickens right there. Are there were. I don't know how many hundreds of billions of chickens in the world right now but would you wanna be a chicken like no not enough. I'd rather be like the the old wild chickens running around in the in the jungle right so first of all this idea that population growth Indicates Happier better quality politic life for the individuals that's nonsense but if you look at the indicators of Health hunter-gatherers were all healthier then the farmers who came the first farmers who came after they lost about six inches of height Men and women did You see all sorts of indications Gatien's of famine of nutrient deficiencies in. You can see this in the skeletons in the bones and the teeth The quality of life for farmers dropped precipitously Disley from what it was for hunter-gatherers. Hunter gatherers work even in the Kalahari Desert They work in air quotes Roughly about twenty hours per week take to maintain life the way they have it the way they like it and most of that work are things that we do on vacation right hunting fishing to relax right now. We're trying to get back to it's in our DNA were hard coded exactly. Why are those things relaxing to us? We we have no fucking we act like. We don't know no. Yeah Spinning fifty weekend in office. Under fluorescent lights got wind muscle fucking depressed you uh-huh and you talk about depression in your book and Yeah You make that point that you said earlier. It's like everything's amazing. Wise every profoundly unhappy. You seem like a pretty happy dude. I'm pretty happy you don't like you. These are some pretty heavy topics. But you don't you as much as you known as much research as you've done you seem pretty mellow Saw Act on fallen apart in size in the Well you know I have adjusted my life. His much as possible to these sorts of principles and not not out of some intellectual sense but just as they feel better as as you were saying right so oh yeah I spend about half the year right now. as of last year in the Van which is Great? No because I'm it's it's it's replicating a hunter gatherer life in a lot of ways. I do what I want when I want to go where I want. I'm sort of going the third year I've done basically the same route route and saw him drop in on friends I've made in providence visits. Oh man it's so nice. I spend time with people have little kids so get to hang out with little kids which is great. Because I don't have kids and they're in a lot of kids in my life now and it's wonderful it's it's really enrich the world in different ways through the eyes of all these different when people in different places all over this country drop in on their lives. You help them out when you can. You know you'd share experiences with them and then you roll. He moved to the next one and I make a point of a friend of mine Aaron and either first year she had a little book and we wrote out the principles of Van tramp been. She called herself. Event Trim Work and one of the first principles was van. Morrison roadies already ready. Had Japan Irishman be caviar especially if you're surrounded with one of the first principles is when you see a river averred that you feel like jumping in you always pull over and jumping you know like you never in her. Never be in a hurry. And that's the beauty of the van like we're not gonNA make tonight. Well let's just pull over there and crash you know. Let's Amin a city street or in the middle of nowhere in the country or find a spot next to a river So it's it's a nice van like I'm not like the Chris. Farley joker maiden all representative was a sprinter stand up in it. Yeah Yeah you just got it painted yesterday my buddy and I did it. Oliver and I did it This weekend was that texture you guys are put into the bed liner. Oh Yeah I was like like so you have that like wrapped around the Van now spraying. Yeah Yeah Yeah. It's all goes rubberized stuff that made just put on pickup truck beds call and you can like throw toolboxes. This is in whatever in English is get fucked dude. It's amazing and it lasts forever total protection against rust never after wax it hence. It's cheap I we did it. It was like for the whole van and he has windows as a passenger so But I think like nine hundred bucks for the materials. Nothing in my buddy and I did did it in two days. Yeah Yeah I was looking at that on. Your instagram story. Looks bed liner. I've always wanted to make sense. I dare part of this country tree that you visited on your van tramping that you did not think that you would enjoy because a preconceived notion van for apology. Anthropology Detroit Yeah Yeah actually I had a a really great time in this tiny little town in Texas and I had bad feelings about Texas I'm curious what was the town. Or what part of text us. Way Down South on the Rio Grande do the Rio Grande. Valley's beautiful yeah. Yeah it's So the story. It's kind of a funny story. I was We were going to go into the big Bend National Park and we got there like four o'clock in the afternoon and the guy at the entrance was like hey sorry campgrounds are full. You know whatever I said okay. Okay which I do. He said we'll go back. There's a little town down the road here. Few Miles called turn Lingua. Go there and come back tomorrow morning and I can hook you up okay. Great so go to this town. It's like dusty little town one. Stop Light Chinatown and I remember that one of the beautiful things about this. Traveling is that People follow me on social media when they see where I am though right. They'll say hey I see your coming through here. You should stop them my place you can use my take a shower and you Love to make you dinner or you know. My uncle's is really interesting. Dude you should go check him out or anyway it really enriches the experience because all these people are like trying to help out your connected with your audience in such a way that I feel like a lot of people are kind of freaked out by You totally embrace it. which I think is awesome? I I love it. I'm at the sweet spot of fame where it's like people Loki famous low key at. Yeah I'm like My friend aeneas who were flying the other day and we were we were in in coach but we had the extra legroom seats and she's like this is your level of fame the coach g of a little a little bit of luxury. Well David David Letterman said the best part of being famous. It is that it made the whole world of small town for him. Because everyone's like Oh. Hey Dave I'm like the you know they know your preferences to what you're saying like with your engagement with your audiences that that you're making a tribe of one hundred hundred people because they know you and they're like oh here. Let me let me offer this a let me tall true grew and and nobody I mean I know there are a lot of people. Think I'm an arrogant prick but they don't listen to my podcast right so they listen to a one. I don't think you're that at all your pretty humble. Well Yeah and there are lots of reasons to not like. It's yeah I'm sure but but they don't they just go away so my point is like everybody who approaches me. They're they're already cool. And Yeah my sense of cool right so anyway. This guys like this dude had written to me the and said Hey I see you're in Texas. I've a buddy in a town called her lingua. You should look if you find yourself there so suddenly I'm there. I'm here so I remember. Remember this came in a week or two earlier so I find the D. M. Irate as like the guys names Tony and I was like. Hey Tony your ears said I should look Yup by Minter Lingua. Why do a podcast? And whatever if you're at Tony writes back. Hey Yeah we're having beers come on over with this big deal so this restaurant and there's all these guys those people sit outside aside around this big table and hey come on. You laid pitchers so We're talking to him and I hear one of the guy says look how dirty my Mug Geus is disgusting. I'm going to die and another guy says Shut up it's good for your microbiome and I'm like you guys know about my crew Komo. His I'd had people partic- did like fecal transplants. And I'm interested in microbiome 'cause it's this example of nature interacting with us and how love messed up. We get to clean and sterilize. So I've been thinking about this on our podcast. We ran about cleanses all just how like. We have to supplement matt being Vegan with like with supplements just because the richness of our soil has been so depleted where we could have gotten b twelve and other things from the by parts of the soil royal. But we don't get that anymore because we fucked up the earth and we're not out there eating dirt Washington way too much but anyway felt so so I'm like oh I'm Gonna I'm GonNa impress these dudes with one of my wild stories right so I tell them like. Hey you know a few years ago I read. This article is written by anthropologist who is living with the Hodson NSA people in Tanzania hunter-gatherers and he's he's studies microbiome and he wanted to see if he could get hunter-gatherers microbiome. Going in his own gut hunter gathers microbiomes far more diverse and interesting than art so he took some shit from Hudson Guy and He mixed stood up and he blasted it up his own asked to see if he could get this call in eight. His own. colonnade is call and and I'm telling him this and I'm expecting him to be gathered so grocer other people and instead he says that's him a word and he points to them table Holy Shit Do. There's this guy at the end of the table sitting back with his exit with this big smile. Listen to let you talk about. I say to her famous guys named Jeff Born for this the Jeff Leach. We became great friends. I did a podcast with him the next day. He's one of the most famous scientists in the world studying stuff. He spent half his year. You're in Tanzania half is you're in this little town in Texas and it's fucking kidding me. Yeah Yeah so anyway. That's a long answer to your question. That is so beautiful. Because we all have preconceived notions about different parts of this country in different populations and from Texas who people like. I was in Texas on. What can we do here? This headline nobody has a monopoly on intelligence or excellence or any of these other things. You know it's just Opportunities is that are not doled out. Accordingly Yeah Yeah I like to make fun of Texas. Oh so it was humbling for me because they put themselves up to it. Well they're you're so fucking proud to be Texan. You know it's it's it's an ownership is the only state I'm from California and I always joke because they are like don't don't mess with Texas along the stuff was like California's Shit. The proof in the pudding like I don't have to defend anything. Thank you could talk all the shit. You want him like cool now. They'll fucking failure. I don't know I grew up in Pittsburgh so A Win The steelers and the cowboys were this huge rivalry. And you know Terry Bradshaw and Roger Stomach And so in when they started calling themselves America's team mm-hmm. Yeah Fuck you America's Tino and ask for this and also the hats in the boots in the Larry Hits and all that lake it. Is this a costume party or yeah. They definitely punch out because I had when I was probably like fourteen ahead mark cousins who about same age as live from California. They came out to Texas. visit me my sister for the summer and they were amazed they like we lived in a fucking house with driveway. They were like you were were there in West Texas We have property and went out West like here. We live in a Goddamn city. This is Houston like as a major metropolitan sitting in their minds. But yeah there is that sort of lure about texts you lean into it sure in Texas the only state that's just like so proud of itself like no one no one asked absolutely no when mean Texas is like like fuck. Yeah what's like an American thing taken like. It's like the cream of America. His Americans Rola good fucking American. USA USA shot up and then the Texan is just like taking it to the next level. So out America America uh-huh I wonder if Texas partly responsible for that which you think I like the nationalism of like America or like Texas like because Texas always been nationalism. Some I Texas second because like like the cut of that you WANNA go go. Take an Alamo L.. Almost funny like how. How do you like getting your ass? Kicked Arza belong to the Mexican army to do. Yeah there is as a miseducation in Texas like the way the way I was raised. Is this like those dudes. We're just shilling at their fort art and in Texas and the Mexicans came in and they slaughtered us. Yeah and that's why I remember the Alamo and then later getting into high school and college and like out of the State of Texas and is being. Oh No that actually belong to Mexico. And then a bunch of Texans who were kind of outlaws and looking for pardons they went to this fort kind of gain favor and then they you know they ask for help and they didn't get help and then they got steamrolled by the Mexican army. That's kind of what happened. Adiyaman yeah so I look back on that and I'm like Oh wow like yeah. They had a common word. Well I I do have a food crushed about Texas young. Yeah exactly do you like up no given what you know about people. What do you think food culture? There's going to be like you know moving forward. You know talking about how we've gotten away from the hunter gatherer model and now were so you know removed you from the way our food is actually cultivated and people are losing knowledge of even understanding. What kind of plant a tomato comes from home? We have garden at our office and people were always amazed. Gross stuff people act like it is a wonder or wouldn't we bake bread one of the oldest things you you can do as a human is like. Make that kind of food porridge and people like that. Amazing it's like we've lost so much what you think. Our food system is going to like going. Fourteenth monoculture is going to continue to just and famine war. I think that's part of a bigger question as to where civilization is going and in at the end of the book I I mean. I didn't even want to get into that but publishers really want you to like have a takeaway trust me. You know so you know but I wanNa make the publisher happy but I also want to be honest so I sort of looked at three different scenarios right one is we just keep going the way we're going which is sort of the Elon. Musk vision of the future. which is a continued canoed merging of technology and biology So and we're already pretty far down that road right. We've got our titanium hips and knees elbows we've got our pacemakers stents and are you know. Wanted to what point do we start. Calling them. cyborgs Yeah Uh we talked about this on a podcast in the past like I'm of the firm belief we are the last generation one hundred percent that won't have implanted technologies. It'll it'll be like how grandma doesn't have an email will be doing not I mean I'm wearing glasses right That's it you know. I've friends with titanium joints. I have friends with breast implants I have friends with my wife as Contact Lenses surgically implanted in her. Is You know you do that. Yeah apparently it's an old thing in in Europe highs will You know so there. You know we've already got a lot of stuff you know taking Viagra you know. That's that's not technology but it's we're taking drugs in order to to make us function in ways that you shouldn't really need drugs to function you know So I don't know that we're one hundred percent Biologically pure But yeah so. That's that's one scenario and if that happens I think will be eating laboratory Tori grown everything Just because the natural world the soil as you know is already so depleted without constantly adding Petroleum Liam Fertilizer. Now all the antibiotics that we're putting on our crops least of all our livestock is getting into the soil raising the water table like yogurt. What's happening? The fisheries stories are collapsing insect populations collapsing bird Bibi. And I'm going to pollinate the plants that are there so the name of progress again better so that's one option. The other possibility I see is sort of a Mad Max dystopia collapse. You know in that accuse will be eating each other which you know is there rump. steaks Yes we have to give up veganism problem. We always joked as it is that only animal's. I'll eat them for me. It's always going to be mean I will fuck and eat you. I don't even events that Instagram fucking trend people will dislike posts in about a plateful of human fingers. Listen we eating tonight on my last nerve but it's like finger finger. Yeah Ah we really workshop. That Michigan's don't have zone. Yeah Okay Yeah exactly just opium future where People in cockroach. Oh yeah that's another one and then the third one. which is you know if I appear to be relatively happy guides because I'm thinking maybe we can do? This is taking this knowledge of our past and Redesigning are present in such a way that were actually happier in the book. I talk about like we're gonNA live in a zoo right. There's no way around it. We were GONNA live in. An artificial environment are are descendants. Ants are gonNA live in an artificial environment. So what's IT GONNA be. Is it GONNA be the San Diego Zoo or the Calcutta Zoo. Yeah I liked when you talked about that in the book doc and sort of the idea of like invisible bars around us we are. You know. Maybe we're already. They're creating our lives from public consumption for viewer cultivating activating a viewership. Were inviting people to the case we ourselves right but you were. You said you were at the zoo. In Calcutta now is actually Bucatini Book. Yes or mantra and they were you know you were talking about wranglings. Dissolve fucking unhappy. They were Because they just didn't want more of the same literally anything else Yeah it's it. Is it going to be that zoo or we we already. They're like why they didn't go. A lot of people are right. I mean you think about people working two or three jobs jobs. You know as you said sitting under fluorescent light in some cubicle moving papers around you know doing a job that has no interest to them. That drains their life energy mostly talking about our engineer. Steve Right now in the studio there are no lights on poor. Steve is back there light. There's a glass window so we can get him. We're not we're not used to it. He's like he's in an Aquarium Korea using don't take on the Glass Eggers the Steve But a lot of people working in mines. Yeah I mean it's just like they're they're a lot of fucked up jobs. I've worked in ion factories and stuff. That's that's horrible drains. Your energy gives you nothing back but enough money to survive and you go home and you rest have a few beers and then go do it again you know so. I think a lot of us are already in a really tough spot. The thing is it's so unnecessary. That's the problem with. We're doing it to ourselves. You know the court. The question is the people feeling like that's their only choice flaming but we can run the system. That is forcing that choice that we think that you know you've been given three options and you think that those are the only options sure in it. We have adopted to capitalism sort of the demands of it. Because you know coming from who we are as a species. We're very much and you make this case very democratic socialist. Like if you're one hundred gathering and you go and you kill an Elkin you bring that Oh pack you. That's just for you and your family. People going to be fucking pissed goddess share. You gotta be part of the society in when we're in in these little boxes. Talk about sucrose. Can you explain to the audience. What Zuko sece's Yukos refers to the sort of a whole bunch of different psychological diseases diseases and and also physiological diseases or abnormalities that animals in zoos suffer from so they get crazy they do? They had very anxious. Che's they do Let's repeated impulsive compulsive behaviors that tigers paced back and pace back and forth. They rip out there for that. You know they you do the self harm all sorts of things and of course they do and so how do you. How do you deal with that? You do with that by creating an environment and in which that animal is GonNa be happier and more comfortable. How do you know what the environment looks like? Well you study that environment in the that that animal in the wild right right where does it come from. tiger comes from north at north India. Let's say what's it eating. What kind of animals do is solitary? Is it a group living in how were their temperature. Ranges that it deals with is their water nearby. Does it swim or you know. How does it clean itself? What so all these things you have to understand? And so when I'm hoping being will do for ourselves finally is create the San Diego Zoo for ourselves create an environment where we're going to be happier and healthier and one of the ways to do that is to take you know I. I hope that our species is on this. This journey like the hero's journey that Joseph Campbell talked about where you know like in the Odyssey every just Campbell explained that every society whose mythologised for for people don't know his most famous book is called a hero with a thousand phase and he talks about the hero's journey He pointed out that every society has the same origin myth breath which is that a young person goes out into the world has a bunch of experiences near death experiences and challenges and they learn things they learn really important things about what life is what other people are like what other cultures are like and then eventually they turn and go back home with this knowledge and the return turn with the knowledge to the place where they started and they really understand it for the first time. I hope that's what we're doing and it feels to me like we're at an inflection point where we're turning back toward home like I said earlier. They're all these different areas diet. Exercise Medicine Psychology. That are all turning now and looking at prehistory in order to understand what kind of animal we are and how best to move forward so I hope we're at that a point where we've gone furthest away from where we came from and now we're turning to go back in the spiral which you with the knowledge of our mistake well. Well not only are mistakes but are accomplishing like birth control. We understand you can have as much sex as you want. You don't need to have babies. Yeah when you talk about that in your talk and I don't know I saw vendors and I was like I don't think it was the bad guy. Raise some very fair points. We have a finite limited resources sources in space. And maybe we shouldn't just be cranking out kids but I say that as somebody who singled and have kids and it refers back to that question of like more or isn't always better. In fact often more is worse. Because there's a limited amount of quality of life to distribute and so if there were five hundred million of us on earth we could all live really well and there'd be much less impact on the fisheries and the soil and everything else and and like you know. I'm not advocating genocide. I'm just saying let's know your incentivize people not to have kids and north control and like actual family replanning like I know a couple people back home in Texas who they keep having kids because they want a specific gender kid in there at five kids is non. They still don't have their gender to just not place a premium on biological children. You're sure you know there's a lot of ways to build a family. There's a lot of ways to have a family maybe opening up our definition. Both you know culturally and like governmentally Would allow people to scratch that same inch but feel the a social reward that you get from having biological children. We'll also questioned the supreme AC- of the nuclear family. Don those a big part of that argument like you know. I said earlier. One of the joys of these anthropology trips is I get to check in with friends and their kids and spend time with those kids. I I don't want to have kids myself. I never have but that doesn't mean I don't love kids they don't value that of course and they enrich my life so you know one of the ways that we can replicate our hunter. Gatherer lives is to You try to try to set up a situation like I'm doing right now now. I bought some land in this little town in Colorado and graduation. Thank you yeah and like some of my best friends but land right across the street last month in who get this cook forty nine people. I one sly eat Matt once-feared but the idea isn't like Oh we're GonNa put our money together and it's not like that it's just like we wanna live live near people we love and who love us and hey when you want to go on vacation I'll take care of your house. You got dogs the shirt. I'll take your dogs. They can come hang at my place there. You're for half the time anyway. You WanNa go for the weekend. Like I'll I'll watch your kids. Sure you know when I take off you take care of me. That's the way we're supposed to live. That's we've always feels intuitive when you start living that way or when you're in that environment it's such a shame that we have to put so much effort into creating it now because we have so far away from although you know one of the good things about technology I love podcasting chapel. I love the fact that we're here saying whatever it comes to remind using whatever words we want and you guys are going to push a few buttons and boom. It's out. There's no company saying you can't talk about that you can't say that you can't have that guy on you know that's amazing to me Another thing that's amazing. Is that so many people now are location independent. Yes right you can go anywhere a Lotta I to the Internet. Oh yeah a lot of people can ask so why not do this. Why not get together with people you love and trust trust and say hey you know what we all live wherever we want? Why don't we find a place? We all love and move there together. We can share vehicles vehicles. We can share washing machines. We can live much cheaper because there are a lot of places where land is super cheap. Even in America right now a lot of you have cultivated. A specifics affects skill. That like the friends who've moved in across the street they have chickens. There you go and they love taking care of chickens and eggs and the great okay. Could you talk we got. We got the chicken folk. They're part of one hundred and fifty years. You've demonstrated your utility so yeah and a and if you don't have the skill it it will inspire you to develop one because based on what people need like none of us really understand solar energy. Well let me let me think about that and figure that out and maybe because we want to contribute to our community WANNA be upset with one of the things that Oh struck me was. I was looking at health. Statistics right the number one factor. For how long you'll live and how not surprisingly housing Louis how happy you'll be in your life so the same factor Which is interesting if you're happier you live longer kinda makes sense right? If the food's great you'll probably eat more rain it's it just makes sense anyway. The number one factor is not the quality of your Diet. How much you exercise? How much money you have? It is whether or not you feel embedded in a community of people who love you and respect you That's the number one. An anecdote only a lot of people who've had a parent who was very devoted to their job a lot of grandparents or parents that each like your father for example office like one of those guys a career guy who's just very into that's his life you guys are the secondary part of the story When they retire they're not long for of this world? Always you know they were there meaning. That was their community. You know like that was their structure of their life their family they love but that was the secondary that was the the side story story and those those men die five years into retirement. Not because like you're saying ill health or anything else said that their purpose that they had called for themselves was gone and they didn't feel like a needed part of their community exactly their status. The it's so important and again why. Well that's the kind of animal we are right. Who Solitude Twenty five five percent of Americans live alone right now? The highest percentage ever technically one person's booth. I certainly don't. I don't think that it's material or or financial. I mean money can certainly help alleviate some things like when we sold our first book we got health insurance. That was a huge thing for us is. He's not yet not like if anything happened to go to hospital. And it's not going to destroy me. Find One of those latent stressors that felt so nice it off our back but like a When I first moved here I was an assistant and I've worked for a couple of billionaires like these people who have all the money in the world? They got access to anything that they could want any our day. They got a small army people working for them and they're the most miserable fucking people people people in like on fucking happy with their lives and it's like you know you the toast of the town. There was a fucking great article about you today variety like. Why are you looking at your desk right now? Like for me. That was less than like. Do not chase the material because these are the people who have worked their entire lives and they have everything they could want. You'll find a new problem in the world or the people who who have the least now. Yeah you know. The hunter gatherers they. They're objectively and I talked about some of these measures objectively the happiest people in the world. Well once you have once you feel faith and you are fed and there's no illness like once you hit those markers then happiness can fall out of friends. Yeah you you have people that you can count on. Yeah there's a great expression In Africa the best place to store extra food is in your friends stomach. Oh No yeah. I think I've heard some variation of that. Sort of sums sums it up. Yeah there's a section in civilized death-ray talk about Miserable rich people now the rich asshole syndrome. And it's not that I don't blame them either and that was why really wanted to include that section. Because like you I know a lot of people were very wealthy and I see them suffering ferring and you know it's easy for us to say I fucked that guy in his yacht you know in the Ati wrote on right but it. It's like their sufferings offerings real. And I think the big there to things that are going on one is. They've been told that if they got money they'd be happy and then they got the money and they're or not happening never came true right so then they were like not enough money. I need to make my money more and more You know casually you'll meet somebody who's like Oh wait. Money doesn't work I'm out like The the other day I did a podcast with this Guy John Walker. who was in a band called panic at the disco and he left the ban Dan out there three years tons of money fame the whole thing and he's like I'm good? I'm not happy there's too much tension. There's too much stress there. This is in the kind of art I wanted to make. So he quit. Yeah but you know how many of us get the opportunity to do that or have the strength to walk away from that kind of So you know temptation but the other thing is I think that's really important in it gets back to what we're talking about here this sense of community when you have more than the people all around you eat it separates you from absolute. So who are your friends now. You're a billionaire who your friends. You'RE GONNA go hang out with Bill Gates and Mike Bloomberg a your voice just fucking miserable as you sit around the table and complain about billionaire and how many hours a week or you work into hold onto this his billion dollars that you got right. You're not chilling. You're not in a Hammock you're busting your ass all the time you distrust everyone around you because everyone's got an agenda and They're coming to try to get something from you. They're pitching something. There's nobody in your life who's just there because they like you right. So what can I is that that I mean not not no life are we up. Michael Jackson is like the King of Pop as well as miserable. Yeah I mean he's the most lost and yet in our culture that's like that's it. That's that's the top of them. It's ingrained into us. This sort of like hold that you know the Michael Jackson example. It was so unhappy. Like look at everything that he he did with plastic surgery and where he lived his life and he wasn't solid yet but that that model of success is so much easier. Understand you know for people then then to kind of wrap your mind around in this capitalist society that having last US material wealth could actually be a path toward success. That's that goes against the whole economic structure if success right and if you're working for jobs you don't have the bandwidth at the end of the day to think these isotopic thoughts and all these outside of the box kind of ideas. You don't have time to entertain that to even question the system that you're in because you're trying to say exhaust run on that wheel but I do see. I see signs of hope right. I see things like the a tiny house move. Yeah right where people are saying. I don't need this much stuff. And if you look like a heat map you receive those studies. They do a heat map of a house. And so have. Are these mcmansions. These you know five car garage twenty thousand square feet use hundreds. They just go from the bathroom and kitchen into the bedroom. That's it the rest of the house is like it. It doesn't he do exist. You could like like when the Star Trek era down starter. was that twilight zone episodes like just make it all disappear disappear. The person would never notice right so yeah. We don't need huge houses. We don't need to pay these big league mortgages and we don't need to go to university in most cases. Maybe that's why I'm sensitive about people calling me doctor. I don't want people to think you gotta get a PhD to be smart raided right roof. That you're smart is nothing to do with it. Yeah yeah there's a million different ways reached the same training and intelligence or not the same thing. Yeah that's for sure and curiosity you know and and I mean I tell people on my podcast all the time and if you WANNA be a pilot or a surgeon like yeah you gotta go to school but most things if you really WanNa do it do it find someone who's doing it. Make yourself valuable to them. Re You know reach out. There are ways to get ahead in life that that don't require you going into debt yeah Anyway my point in our culture seems to be in some some aspects of it. Maybe it's thanks to podcasting. You know the minimalists are friends of mine You know Wim Hof doing his ice plunges and doesn't cost a lot of money turn the cold water in your shower. You know. They're all these different things where I think people are starting to see value being separate from cost. Yes yes someone I think is some Oscar. Wilde may be said these these days everybody we know the cost of everything and the value of nothing that feels very after a while. He said all the goods. The Guy John Steinbeck all had great closer. I know you're I know me too like I feel like anytime I read anything. I'm just there with a highly josh. She's taught me something really important in one of I mean important. Whenever it was her autobiography about growing up in Pittsburgh I forget what it's called but she talked about her mother and how her mother would always think outside the box do things her own way and she pointed her example was that her mother lick the envelope and stuck the stamp on it? Yeah there you go so you don't get Lou on your tongue that's smarter. Isn't that amazing. Like how much glue have we had in our times in. It never occurred to us. Dude Lick the envelope. It's got poison but your point of your point of Like living in communities and all that stuff Andy Dillard had a quote that the impulse to keep things to yourself About what you have learned it's not only shameful. It is destructive anything you do not give freely and abundantly becomes lost. You Open your safe and fight ashes. This written or the Buddhist say what is not given away is loss for different. Yeah so guys get this book and then give it away to Hello Christopher Ryan civilized the death the price of progress available everywhere. It's a fantastic read. I tore through rural fast asked. I'm a huge fan of work thing. I read the audiobook too. If people don't have time to read I am they like my voice. I I read it. I mean you're already already a podcast. Good radio Voice. Get your face for radio. That was when I heard that awesome old screen at all. It's always just enough but grabbed the audiobook. Grab the hard copy. Get on your kindle. Whatever you need need and expand people's to check out the other book sex dawn is fantastic? Thank that is our show this week. We'd like to take a moment to think gar sponsors. Bring this podcast. y'All free every week. Specially our homeys. He's over at advance on cookware. Where food slides out easily night after night they sure grip is that you you got a firm grip so you're moist food attention? The pens are nice. And we'd like to thank Frank. Vertebra suffered the theme music. We we would like to thank Shaun and Steve in the booth zoo for entertaining. Yeah I said the booth sue. For keeping US happy healthy well-fed hydrated waited all of the above and last but not least the potty aunts. Thank you for coming back every week and listen to our silly fucking jokes. We talked about eggs for almost ten minutes. I don't understand like I hope that are dumb. Shit makes your commute a little bit better better. I'm not I'm not over this fucking six. Ad Lifestyle. What are you a fucking salamander? who eats eggs like that under turtles? Snakes do things I don't understand. Well thanks guys. We appreciate We'll see you next week. Thanks for listening to fork up a kitchen. PODCAST check out new episodes every Thursday exclusively podcast one dot com the new podcast one APP or subscribe on Apple. podcast join me for afternoon cyber. I'm your host stand Johnson or put vice president of Microsoft's Cybersecurity Solutions Lucians Bourbon. Each week. I will talk with leading cybersecurity experts and influencers to bring security decision-makers insights on implementing but in your tax. You know when I kind of looked three dodge eight percent companies one tab. Some type of chat book implemented that they're saying next generation security arrests even though we're in the Industry Rian run ten industry when not necessarily being thorough be and the current and future state with a cybersecurity security industry afternoon cybersea with an Johnson is available in apple podcasts. And podcast one.

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April 8: Flight risks

As It Happens from CBC Radio

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

April 8: Flight risks

"This is a cbc podcast you know what's crazy not using smarter tools to manage small business you work too hard to work this hard collecting receipts v eighty are you making a call from a payphone later spreadsheets are you rockin a radical perm right now quickbooks gives you a smarter set of business tools that do all the hard work for you it's easier than rewinding vhs before returning it you earned it we're here to make sure you get it quickbooks backing you hello i'm carol off good evening i'm jeff douglas and this is as it happens the podcast addition tonight like risks warlord launches airstrikes on the tripoli airport and a former u s n boy born libya could soon be in a full blown civil or a put down they won't put up with a british woman faces charges in dubai they could lander in prison for two years because on facebook's she called her ex husband's new wife a horse not the strongest suit is on cuts down a visor tells us that they've justin trudeau wants to change the channel on snc threatening a libel lawsuit against opposition leader is not the way they do it skeleton t the history books say customary polaski was a revolutionary war hero who say george washington's life now research on the polish general bones shows he was intersex or a woman a crime against nature don't deserve great that lots of things but scaling cliff there's not one ism which is why is lucky that to humans came along to rescue a dog who got stuck end the diamond in me extremely raw a connecticut town gets it's fifteen minutes of play more wins some locals decided to win baseball fielding gasoline and set it on fire as it happens on the monday edition radio that remind them when you're fields throwing he you're pitcher cat tripoli is a city under siege tonight the libyan capitol what's supposed to be preparing internationally back meetings doing courage cooperation between the countries well armed factions but this afternoon the leader of one of those factions launched airstrikes against tripoli's only functioning airport his name is general khalifa half tar and on thursday he ordered his troops to take the city by force jonathan winer knows khalifa hof tower from his time as united states special envoy to libya we reach mr weiner in washington dc you say liner how long do you think the situation in the libyan capitalism eight now oh it's highly volatile the question will be whether this is a short term move by general half card or a pro bowl at establishes his credibility or whether this begins a broader civil war where they siege of a aaa of the general after are deeper three years raj again for two years and during so who is general halftime let's yep to general after helped overthrow king you dressed in nineteen sixty nine were catastrophe he was cut off these chief general for a while was captured on chad a document abandoning me was picked up by the cia moved united states in the reagan administration which part of some efforts to overthrow kutowski spent decades in ignored isolated and forgotten in northern virginia came back after the revolution expected to be on top and in charge wasn't declared i call in february of two thousand fourteen on television like duffy hit on nobody paid any attention 'em then he went east found some sponsors some support from egyptian this outings he's from dammar rotties and using that support relatives credibility with his three year campaign had been ghazi one of the most important cities olivia lazy up to eight now oh he wants to reverse the arc of history so all those years the he wasn't x filing alone that's all a race and he a with him instead of coffee adding five achieved that he said the military leader of the whole country for the rest of his life he makes his family rich maybe a son succeed and that's his vision i believe who is behind who is backing general after at this point the russians providing a lot of money last few years billions of dollars worth of of money in state currency which he's not have to been accountable for anybody and that's a lot of the bill patrons networks you got some 'em according to experts reports on planes from egypt he got some a rear calls from emirates back in two thousand sixteen it's not claire me what he's gotten same sport is quoted me is that he basically is doing what he's doing a pretty much on his own he may have gotten a acquiescence firm wonder more other countries that's interesting maybe russia maybe some other ones but this his agenda what role is fans plane i think 'em the french have a supportive half jar in his taking of been ghazi a they supported him and legitimising him as a major player cozied up to him whether it's more that i doubt roles united states playing united states is told have to cut it out just stop and when i wasn't the government united states did not provide any support support after we made it very clear that the condition for us to provide support it'd be part of the legitimate government and not being ordered his own independent force when i met with him i made that very clear try to get him to a compromise deal thought i made some progress but quarterly and those encounters you had less hashtag did he make it quite clear that he sees himself as someone who should be in charge of libya yes he made it clear that will be us politicians from his point of view are all worst one and there shouldn't be any politicians the country should be run by the military until will be mature enough for democracy he would appoint people on the civilians could run a civilian these things like healthcare and education and he would make all the decisions if people might forget that canada played an important role in that nato lead campaign in twenty eleven they overthrow moammar gaddafi people said at that time in this country in your country that after the war is over after moammar gaddafi was toppled that libya would become exactly this will become a failed state if it wasn't support if you didn't get on the ground and start to rebuild that country who is responsible for the state that livia isn't as it proceeds comfortably to civil war 'em first every country with nutrition libya try to provide assistance on the libyan systematically rejected didn't want it wouldn't accept us so the libyan spare the most responsibility more than any foreign country second the countries that sponsored various forces in libya and maybe thought they could control those forces were shaped those forces all bears some responsibility for doing that every international communities all lined up until libyans you have to deal with one another there'll be a very little optional dinsdale with one another and by contrast you're patron and you have clients libyans will play you off and that was the constant risk and the constant here when i was doing my work we need you're getting a government is national he plays because every country whether the ones who supported the kutowski saudi islamist you struggle well i have zero there has not all of a sudden you gotta do this you're gonna put you're prejudices aside and deal but problem worse after that deal was done people make when you get just a little more a little more when you consider the possibility of civil war we're now seeing so many refugees coming sue libya refugees were stuck there this is an international crisis at some point doesn't international community have to say look we need to step in here we we have to play a larger role whether the warlords want us to her not are you out of the problem is is that russia has supportive after at is tremendous opportunity for russia and get a foothold hold in north africa and if he wins russia comes out looks great and if he loses in his just screwed everything up it's harder on europe and russia is comparatively strengthened so getting international unity is gonna be very important as long as the russians keep providing a counterfeit dinners the hacker using she wants she got a risk of the whole country fragmenting and i'm very concerned about that i don't know how committed they are to that a time will tell required constant communication and when i wasn't the government people working nonstop to try and get interest aligned that's very very difficult it's impossible people have their clients miscellany we leave it there will be following this policy i appreciate speaking with us tonight thank you sure how by jonathan winer the former united states special envoy to libya we reach mr winery in washington dc you never knew were there a once again today be snc lebanon out fair dominated question period and you think to the very people who would love everyone just stop talking about it prime minister justin trudeau and his lower the prime minister has threatened eight libel suit against opposition leader andrew scheer because he says mr sheer falsely suggested did that the pm had actually interfered in any criminal prosecution against snc mr sheers response bring it on here's his exchange with house leader barters checker for now their prime minister has done everything he can to avoid accountability in his handling of snc allowing corruption scandal now he's indicated that he intends to sue me just stop my criticisms of here's a government so can the government in for now on what dave will these court proceeding they are will push these conservatives end frankly there earlier how the history making i'm true and defamatory monocle being loyal letter in december the conservative leader deleted tweets that were defamatory to administer of innovation again statement he really needs we know that it's a liberal house later british tiger responding to andrew scheer today peter done olo served as director of communications for prime former prime minister shown chris jim is now the vice chair with hill and bolton strategies we reach mr denault low in toronto peter i'm sure the liberals loves to put this snc left behind them as this legal action helped no at prolongs it i mean it's one of these a left me scratch my head i'm sure a lot of other people be a fair with kind of petering out and and they've kind of extended by several days sounds like it was very rockets in the in the house of commons and it kinda violates one of the first rules of politics in my view that being a rule of holes i call it when you're in one stop digging would there be any benefit to mr to do this i mean is it could possibly prevention mr share anybody else from continuing to stay the same statement said that they're saying i slanderous and libelous or is it effective in any way at all i don't i think it's particularly effective when political leaders resort to the courts to a you know as a as politics by another means there's no question that andrew shares a rhetoric has been overheated i mean from the very first day he he jumped the shark when he talked about saying the prime minister or should resign i think everyone saw that is ridiculous overreach meanwhile the by the same token the governor was too busy shooting itself and its own foot a you know a different stages of this i think liberals are tired of being a on the receiving end of a ton of attacks and it's natural to wanna kind of washout i don't think it's a fairly strategic but now you mentioned the hyperbole and exaggeration that means that the again the same things is what is in this a notice of of of possible suit which is that he's he accuses him of lying of covering up he's asking you to investigate he says this is corruption on top of corruption on top of corruption is it possible that there are ways of trying to lower the temperature have mr sheer stop being so over the top of this may have been in effect on effort to chill him if they were gonna do that it would have made more sense a rather than sending him a copy not not releasing it to the media do what stephen harper did in the past when he threatened the law a lawsuit against defending our what kathleen winded inherit here and ontario patrick brown which is not just send a letter but actually tell the world you sent the letter and released a letter and put them under the frosty glare i think even then that would have been a mistake but if they had done that at least what happened a week ago as opposed to now and we wouldn't be and you know in week number whatever this is eighteen of canada held hostage but as you mentioned this to other examples threatening the lawsuits that you there's one other one jackass in nineteen ninety eight he's threatened to sue reformed party leader preston manning that's right just the threaten the house shut preston rounding up so there you go so i mean this is not i think this could be a useful tool in the toolbox and again and again that we forget with that one was even about i think it was about a senate appointment so it wasn't not it wasn't the final straw long drawn out controversies that have the government on the ropes three months earlier in this whole kind of a fair they were trying to smear of the reputation twenty wilson rebelled a and that backfired on them every time like wiley coyote in the road runner the plan would blow up right in their faces a this time it's a blown up but it's extended it unnecessarily for them their number one priority oughta be changing the channel there are plenty of other controversies it would wedge in the government's favor a and that would cause havoc on the conservative party and they should be moving on those you worked very closely with justin trudeau is he he lives in twenty fifteen election getting him ready for the debates watching so you got you got to see how he was kind of man he was how he responded to very tense situations what do you make of how he's reacting to this do you think that he is in skin there's been a lot of adulation directed his way ever since twenty fifteen election when he defied expectations and won a majority government absolutely the kind of nasty personal unrelenting attacks and he's come under a in this whole affair have to be unnerving he's like you know it's unprecedented the body count in this controversy to cabinet ministers gone quickly privy council v his top advisors so so he'd be lessened human if he wasn't unnerved by this a weather not he's lost his mojo i think it's too early to tell we saw some examples in the last couple of weeks with the heckler at a liberal fundraising event he doesn't have that very well a but you know he's got the best e q few of any politician i've ever worked with and i've worked with some of the great leaders in canada who have all had strength but he's got a particular strikes and i hope he finds his voice again i worry that he's been a very scripted in the way he's handled it and sometimes that scripting has been in congress with the kind of tony should have had you know i think he's a phenomenal politician but he needs to get his mojo back you know you mentioned how they this is a chance to change the channel there have been many opportunities everyone thought it was over and then it would flare flare up like some grass fire once again at the end i think kevin clark southern gulf mills a day that discussion point where he mr share himself must have wondered why this is still going on he was ready to put it never was ready to move on and they keep going on is it i mean you a lot of canadians and saying this like why can't they get a grip on this i just think of this is so compelling because then here there's everything there's something for everyone the hate you've got a comeback company you know the reputations comeback companies and government largest you've you've got you know he was a champion of a of both of feminism and indigenous reconsiliation and yet the two most prominent female ministers in his cabinet out the door including the first ever indigenous justice minister and it went on for for for some weeks but now i think it would became clear with dirty wilson rebels telephone conversation transcript last week but there's no more used to confirm her there's no more new information this she's put on the table she said as much herself there's no more new facts so why create you facts on the other side when you're accusers are providing any we will did it that peter appreciate speaking the thank you thank you peter done although his vice chair with hill and knowlton strategies john jansen former communications director we try when you're climbing in the west kidneys of british columbia you might expect and it should expect to see some wildlife bald eagles perhaps mountain goats and if you're lucky or unlucky i guess depending on you're proximity maybe a cougar but jared smith and hannah stephan saw more surprising and yet more domesticated animal last week as they scaled a rocky cliff face near capitol gar british columbia we reached jared smith in rosslyn british columbia did when you were scaling really into less clear what hannah say she was seeing the top of his class yeah so we just switched over from me league climbing to her league climbing she got maybe about halfway through the picture and then she yells down there's a dog and i wasn't like a hundred percent sure what she meant i looked down at the base and they were like dog's playing and i go okay whatever like that's cool there's a dog like let's keep going let's get out of here and then she's like no there's a dog and there is a bit of confusion i didn't really understand what you're talking about so i just told her keep climbing and then eventually she got to the top it was my turn decline and then i'm like oh there's a doggone the cliff where was it could you describe exactly where this dog was on like a little bit of a cliff floods probably only about two hundred meters off the ground and isn't someplace where the dog would not be able to get to get away from they probably could have like explored around that little clip stand but it couldn't have made its way up any further and i couldn't have gone down any further this is a female dog how what she definitely no no energy a very tired very very skinny like you could see every read you could see the headphones in her spine on stuff how did she respond when she you so she really knowledge me too much but then i had a bit of a cliff bar in my backpack so i took out the cliff bar and gave her a few small pieces just kinda show her that i was friendly and then after that she kinda was like okay with me i started telling her but you could tell she have any extra energy despair like she stayed laying down her tail wasn't wagner anything so whether you're a tag could could you see any denying any indication of who might be owner so there's no actual like metal tag but there was a phone phone number richard in permanent marker on the caller but i was able to decipher in cali owner and we did we did you understand when you called so i pretty much called i'm like hi this might be a weird question but you mentioning a dog monday owner on the other line was like really me kind of saying like yeah like oh well like i found her she's alive and then as soon as i said that she started crying on the phone like just so happy that someone found her and she's alive how long had the dog we missing so gone for about three weeks and it went through some pretty cold weather in those greedy influencing so what how did you get did you manage to get the dog off the cliff well it took a bit of a trial and error at first i tried like cradling it in my arms but she squirmed up the wrong area she would've just fell out of my hands on it but nothing stopping her how big with the dog i would say probably around like thirty forty pounds and if you were to climb with her you'd have to do you you were when you were holding onto a rope right here on the side of a cliff climbing so you'd have to carry her while you're climbing listen wrote yeah so i was all tied in like we were being safe hannah had me on the lay at the top left and then hannah from the top with looking down and she reminded me about my ikea bag that i used as beg just one of those like big blue tote bags she's like jared put her in a bag so invents tied not a little above me in the rope so i could click her and to the rope and i can kind of use both my hand but then the problem with vegas really old not the best condition ikea beg so you could see her nails poking through the bottom of the bag and i get the whole bottom of the bag what's gonna wrecked right out there not designed to carry a forty pound dog crap clear how long did it take you to get her to safety maybe like ten minutes but it was more let me just supporting the bag with one hand climbing with each other and i would inch the bag up a little bit get hannah the kind of hold the weight on the rope we kinda just inside our way up to the top okay she got into safety and then we tell us how you manage to have the reunion lucy owner when i called her on the phone she asked like where i was i'm like oh i'm climbing the brilliant bluffs like we're just past the peak and then she ended being right at the peak kind of saying her final goodbyes the dog there wasn't much hope that she would be found alive so as we were climbing up she was kinda there waiting for us and then when we finally got the dog up to a little more of a level ground i guess the dog could hear her kind of trying i got super excited and jumped out of the bag and ran to her like wow way only energy then and this was i mean had been three weeks to the owner had gone up to the top to say goodbye she figured she was never gonna see don yeah yeah it was either she what she was telling me is either someone in her family friend or herself would come up everyday looking for the dog just seeing if maybe a kind of turned up it's waiting at the top for it did she tell you how the don king yeah she was saying that they were out hiking and there is one of the goats were on the top of the mountain and i think the chase the goat a bit and unfortunately the goats are a little more maneuverable on mountains and dog so i have a feeling maybe jumped down something not gonna jump back up well after nothing to eat too cold nights in no water i presume three weeks and that dog was a whiz whiz well if you if you hadn't found her i mean probably not much longer she could've lost it up you know especially we got some nasty weather an after show and i really appreciate the cheaper than you got that doug saying thank you for talking to us oh no problem a i'm just glad i was there the health and had everything i needed forget the dog out there safely thanks so much shit cy no problem by jared smith is climbing partner hannah stuffing rescued a dog from the side of a cliff nbc's west tuesday mountains last week we reach mr smith in rosslyn british columbia it was not rudy marconi's faults by ties the representative of the municipal government of ridgefield connecticut it did faulty him to try to explain it he was diplomatic but he's got a couple of things that are telling for instance explaining the one person had done it before an he said quote unfortunately it was not a very good idea in theory if down a plausible i guess to those who participated unquote okay well first we know when someone proposes some being utterly ridiculous they always say i've done it before and when that ridiculous thing is an absolute disaster they always say weird at always worked when i did it and we also know they i never did it second yes it must have deemed a plausible but unfortunately no it was not a very good idea to douse local high school baseball field in gasoline and set it on fire on saturday morning the richfield tigers were scheduled the play on the field but it was a wet and somehow out of oh leap possible options they chose to do a thing that one person claimed to have don before to make the field nice and dry they poured gasoline all over ninety leaders twenty four gallons and then they lit it so instead of baseball players first responders showed up and then expert tied to remove the whole top layer of contaminated dirt the whole debacle will cost at least fifty thousand dollars to fix and that local politician mr marconi had some words of warning for his townsfolk end really for all of us quote what's important to remember out of this is that if something doesn't seem right or doesn't look right in all likelihood it isn't right unquote they didn't they didn't they didn't they didn't do it in the in the in the in the in the united states mentioned in in in a british woman is facing two years in prison in united arab emirates in helping her ex husband's new life on facebook live show that was arrested last month when she traveled from london to do by with their teenage daughter to attend her ex husband's funeral she was stunned when police met her at the airport in took her infra questioning she had made the comments about the new wife several years ago while living in britain well now she's out of detention staying in dubai awaiting a court date her daughter paris is back in britain living with relatives rod sterling is representing his share of us she advocacy group detained in dubai bridgman sterling in monrovia spain what exactly did lau they shot of as say that prompted her arrest in dubai she found out the husband was suddenly married and she wasn't forewarned and she sort in a social media post on facebook and she responded lifestyles i suppose which she regrets but she said you idiot she married a horse that's it that that's absolute yes and when i first heard the story i thought that she said something was when i investigation more ice oh my gosh that's all she said she said course and this is simply by no way crime in western countries trees nothing that you could face jail for so it's about sort of shock i think is most shocking for her is that this post made three years ago in england not even in the uae and yes it cases opened the gangs in the uae he fight the new wife who is offended by the comment and it just sat there on the polices books until the next time she visited she visited last month we could do because her ex husband had suddenly died of a heart attack tuck it any fifty one a the daughter wanted to go and pay their final respects and visit his grave as it is and she decided to do that and they were both taken into police custody the moment they arrived for this comment you married a horse you idiot absolutely i'm not joking about the uae cybercriminals is you can be a rest of the most outrageous things on twitter all social media for example sharing a charity online even sharing an amnesty international fundraiser it's against the law but she is to statement she made should i hope you go under the ground you idiot damn you you left me for this horse and she said you married a horse you idiot to comments on facebook it's the horse comet that's got her into the trouble not hoping her husband is goes underground where he is wrong when but it and so what what had happened she said she she left out she was just angry what led to that well let's is i mean she had returned london they would still married at the time when he was visiting i want some in the uk and promising to return now als if the blue an unexpected to hire she received divorce papers within just a few moments ago she had no idea why but it's a obviously assumes that he'd been having an affair with this woman and then suddenly she sees a picture on facebook it's been a big marriage and this is after eighteen years of marriage it soft a you know a child that was apparently a miracle child they had little trouble conceiving they've been through a lot she's still loved him and it was just a an absolute tops the system and you know it's completely understandable that she would say some comments at least in the end you know it seems almost is not even veered so much more of a jokes in anything the woman who is accused of looking like a horse was the one who made the complaint right so that's what led as soon as she arrived with her daughter since then showers arrived in dubai for the funeral of her ex husband ex husband's wife had complained about this remark and that's what led to her arrest absolutely and when they were taken to the dubai police station vice her and her daughter shot and the police tried the reason wisey complainants code and said you know you won't drop the charges this is kind of silly and also be a british embassy apparently cools the woman pleaded to drop the charges she absolutely refused to and she put out some comments about the reasons she's refused to she believes it it was just unacceptable behavior and it should be punished to the full extent of the law and it's really damaging the country that they even gave her the opportunity to proceed but the prosecution given the kind of damage that closes the tourism i mean it it's not really helping to make themselves look like a motion safe secure destination when you could be arrested for facebook posts calling someone a homeless she's now i understand forced to stay in dubai waiting for this court process to play out how's he doing so right now she's basically waiting in a high towels struck sing ause imagining the on says she's gonna turn up the coach and be rest is well taken into custody and she may face two years in prison and fifty thousand pounds about seven thousand dollars fined fifty thousand pound fine and if you can't pay that fine and she said mccombs ford fun like that you would be stuck in dubai until you did pay the fine so so most people who don't perceive diplomatic conventional darn good the pricing highlight that case that could be stuck there for years on things like this they a family members were saying that she was he doesn't have much monday her job is in jeopardy her apartment back in england is in jeopardy she can't afford to stay where she is i did she have any support in the country nice doesn't have french doesn't have sport she's completely lunches separated from it till sunrise after the oldest father has died say i mean the doors using apps such distressed ready at the moment the whole family offing speaking to them on a daily basis and they oh and t is it's just devastating hinder british authorities do anything to help her actually jeremy hunters the foreign secretary in the uk has come out today and said that he's providing the highest level of diplomatic intervention like he did with matthew hedges who is release long jim 'em they don't usually intervene dana end a coating lovie extensive their assistance is being provided with at least a boy is so she saw his goal cost of jeremy hunt saying that he's providing this diplomatic assistance and she's very came to know what that is and received contact the british government but she hasn't received anything directly a we will leave it there we're following this story on sterling i appreciate you telling it to us thank you my pleasure thanks very much have a good night rod sterling is the head of advocacy group detained in dubai we reached her in spain as a baseball player henry hank aaron broke record's as a black baseball player he broke boundaries in forty five years ago today mr aaron did both when he hit it seven hundred fifteenth home run surpassing the record's set by babe ruth in nineteen twenty seven on the road to that milestone was a long one hammer and hank on and off the field the rightfielder faced racism and bigotry most notably in nineteen seventy three as he inch closer to breaking that wreck heard of babe ruth that year he received almost a million letters including hate mail letters mr on later said changed him as the season closed he tied be brutes record babe ruth rickard in the following april in atlanta facing pitcher out downing on the mound hank aaron changed history for the wreckage from april be eight of nineteen seventy four here is been scully's call about monumental home run for henry aren't he means the tying run at the plate now those downing god doubts about delivered danny's law go on to the front one ball and no strikes aaron waiting their outfield seal beach and straightaway fastball is a high fiber defeat that centerfield sign up today marvelous for baseball marvelous marvin florida and the state of georgia marvelous moment for the country in the world a black man is getting a standing ovation in the deep south both breaking a record of all time baseball idle but the first time in a long time let's hope you're based on the pro man this green andrew leap of water must've been like deliberate for the past several months is over at ten minutes after nine in atlanta georgia henry how's it marked by babe ruth from forty five years ago today that was vin scully calling hank aaron's recordbreaking seven hundred fifteenth home run hank karen went on a hit a total of seven hundred fifty five home runs over his twenty three year career and that recor stood until two thousand seven when it was broken by berry bonds let me pull off ski was he's famous polish american general during the revolutionary war he has gone down in history as a hero end as a biological man but according to new dna research general polaski will likely intersex having both male and female sex characteristics it's even possible that the general was female researchers have suspected in four years based on skeletal remains but were never able to confirm virginia hutton after brooke is an assistant professor amount apology a georgia southern university and one of the researchers we reached her in savannah professor broke what did you think when you first saw these polls this of this general plaski when you first saw so would it look like yeah so what i thought was wow yes i totally see what is being said n y you know other people who looked at this think that this looks very female because it does look very female there were years of people trying to figure out if they these remains were buried were actually general plaski tell us a bit about the history of trying to figure out who he might have this is really him yeah so the initial confusion along time ago was there were historical accounts plaski the buried at sea and there is this oral traditions one family the polaski was buried in their plantation and so these plantation remains had been exumed and put into this monument but this had been met with a lot of skepticism at the time of it continued through the twentieth century when this monument was actually needing to be refurbish 'cause the foundation was falling apart a little bit and so there is this idea that they were going to take out these remains that were inside of a metal box inside of the monument and actually figure out who this was whether this is plaski or not and that's where they hit the first roadblock which was that these remains look very female but there were other features of these remains that were consistent with plaski so things like age a death then heights and some healed injuries that were consistent with you'll injuries that we'd known about a firm plaski all of these things looked looked very plaski ask except for the whole female female skeleton thing happening but eventually you were able to determine i guess through dna that this is almost definitely general polaski so we'll see a man or a woman so general plaski was a man so by this is where you know sort of social science distinctions between sex and gender is actually really important because everything we know about last you like lift existence as a person bob in through life is that he was baptized as the son of his parents and recognize as masculine all through his life so there's no doubt that his experience was as as a man what's interesting sting is that the skeletal remains that we have are showing that there was clearly something else going on that he may or may not have been completely aware of what's the factors the plaski was never married he didn't have any children but again there's other sort of historical reasons for this he was in exile for awhile from poland and you know he spent time dreamy american revolution and he died very young died at only thirty four years old because you're only dealing with skeletal remains you don't have have any oregon's petition you can't see if there is a there was a uterus or gonads alive because you don't have anything of that nature so general plaski presented it as a man do people know that is there anything in the history that suggest he was intersex not really i mean what the history suggests is that and obviously be baptized as i thought he would have had to have exhibited at least male enough looking genitalia tally is a baby that they made that choice on he clearly had facial hair from all of you early portrait show him with a mustache an even sort of a bit of receding hairline male pattern baldness stuff so i mean those those features would have been consistent mocked him as a man during his his life i mean what we do we do have some discussions around sort of he was fairly aloof if you didn't really have a lot of like close associates and he was very very popular and people admired him but didn't necessarily have people that were close to him but whether you know that's not necessarily you know diagnostic of intersects experience but it is you know relatively consistent with experience with a lot of people who are intersex there's this sort of separation but again we really don't know how this affected his life we know that at as today but there is still a great deal of confusion as to how people who are intersex 'em or transgender gender which are different things should should liv what's intervention should be if there should be any at all it's still confusing now so what was it like in the seventeen hundreds how how general plaski been a treated if it had been known that he was intersex at the time the only people who were recognized as intersex you know the at least knowledge of that is made its way down and historical wrecker on where people who actually showed two distinct kind of genitalium you know that was part of you know sort of this idea of like medical marvel at the time so i don't think there was even a diagnosis at the time they would have necessarily described what what's going on for plaski just knowledge of this information change history of though it depends upon how you wanna think about this so at at one level it doesn't change anything we you know we know about polaski polaski accomplishments and his legacy and it doesn't you know sort of diminishing in any way it does potentially give some representation of intersex individuals who have not really been represented in the historical record much before there's lots of racer of of intersex because sort of socially and also sort of medically we didn't really understand what intersex was for so long so you know at some level it doesn't sort of change what he did but another level it opens up his story to be a story that can be shared as a really relevant story to a group of people that don't necessarily find themselves well represented in the past very interesting story professor after book i appreciate you telling it to us thank you oh gosh my pleasure well thank you so much for talking to me by the by virginia houghton at the brooke is and assistant professor amount apology at georgia southern university we reached her in savannah and we do have more on this story on our website that is cbc dot ca slash h you've been listening to be as it happens podcast our show can be heard monday friday on cbc radio one sirius xm you can also listen to the whole show on the web just go to cbc dot ca slash h and follow the links to our online archive thanks for listening i'm carol off

jeff douglas libya dubai facebook justin trudeau tripoli george washington two years three weeks forty five years ten minutes three years fifty thousand dollars seven thousand dollars fifty thousand pounds fifty thousand pound thirty forty pounds twenty four gallons two hundred meters
How To (and How Not To) Research A.I. with Intels Casimir Wierzynski

IT Visionaries

38:59 min | 3 months ago

How To (and How Not To) Research A.I. with Intels Casimir Wierzynski

"Much a child experiencing the wonder of life for the first time there is still so much discover when it comes to artificial intelligence, the technology is still in its infancy, and those in the industry are trying to work constraints that allow a I to constantly learn and gather information, but give it boundaries or rules to keep it honest. Casimir was Sqi is the senior director of AI products for Intel, and on this episode of it visionaries. He discusses some of the ways companies are working together to corrode the technology, plus he explains how encrypted data is leading them down new house, and the importance of an open source ecosystem enjoyed this episode. It visionaries is created by the team at Michigan Dot. Org brought to you by the salesforce customer, three sixty platform, the number, one cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience build connected experience in power, every employee and deliver continuous innovation with the customer at the center of everything you do learn more at salesforce dot com slash platform. His podcast is created by the team at mission dot Org. Welcome to another episode of it. Visionaries and on host of it. Visionaries of we are joined by special guest. cavs. What's going on? Hey on him, you know it's a great day and we are excited to talk about some of the really cool stuff that you're doing it until a little bit about your background and career, but I how did you get started in technology? That's a great question I think. I got started on my parents apple to way back when reading games like Hong, Oh yeah breakout, and things like that I eventually. Of got into electrical engineering and computer science took a bit of a detour into a financial markets, actually and I was a derivatives trader for about seven years on Wall Street and then I was always interested in ai so I, said you know what enough of trading on Wall Street I think I wanna go work in the basement of a building and clean up after rats and do neuroscience experiments, so I did that for five or six years ago. My PhD in neuroscience, still always interested in AI, and around the time when people wanted to start building ships that were modeled after the brain. So I got into various rnd projects around what's called neuromorphic computing? And then finally came into Intel around the time when they were building out their products group, and really starting to build dedicated hardware fray I which was really exciting. Yes, so tell me a little bit about that. What's the scope of of your role at until? So didn't tell I. Look at kind of Nexgen ideas around a I, and it can be starting almost at the foundational levels of. What are some new ways of building transistors? That might be useful for AI chips. All the way up to what are the latest algorithms that people are GonNa be using you know maybe possibly besides deep learning new ways of doing deep learning. All the way out to what are the ways in which people are going to deploy AI systems, and about is telling. You took prepare for that. and. It's in back last mold of questioning and researched it. We really start to look at this question of privacy around Ai. And, over the last couple of years we've just been watching this looming almost kind of collision course between the needs and the promise of AI which. In its modern flavors is based on machine, learning and learning from Beta. And the fact that these data are private and sensitive and people. Maybe don't necessarily want them. You know flying around You know uninhibited anyway, so that's kind of what brought us to this line of work. Yeah, so expand on that a little bit like when you're talking about these type of of projects I. It seems like every you know. CIO CTO technology leader we talked to we talk about Ai. We talk about the impacts that Ai will have on the business. We rarely talk hardware and what that means like. What does hardware look like in? Ai. Well one of the. Most exciting. Techniques to come along in a and especially the the machine learning flavor of AI is deep, learning and deep learning is essentially using. Models known as neural networks to. Learn a function. You know some kind of relationship between. A certain one set of data and another essentially. And in order to learn dysfunction in order to figure out what the parameters of this model are from the data. You have to do a lot of number crunching, so you have to blast through. In some cases, billions of data points you know to extract a model that might might have millions of parameters. one of the ways in which the field has come to this exciting point is the fact that we have these very large data sets available to us and all this additional computing power. So there is kind of a direct link between the ability of a systems to do a good job, and how much data and you if you have available to build the systems, so that's why you kinda end up looking at. You know having big companies like Intel look it hardware specifically. This flavor of is because it's it's successes so time to computational power, and then as you're working with. Organizations to kind of harness that you know obviously Intel famously inside computers everywhere. How does that work? How would those types of like machine learning capabilities and hardware? Fit into a broader spectrum of you know things that companies are using. Is it going into? What are what are the types of of companies that are leveraging that technology while at varies quite broadly I think so i. don't WanNa. Give the impression that. Suddenly, every single company that wants to make use of AI has to themselves by some huge pile loads. Hardware otherwise. They're not GONNA be able to make any progress, so there is a kind of a very exciting. Ecosystem that's growing up around this phenomenon where you have companies that will go out and take very large data sets build a model, and then they make that model available to other companies as a service for example so like. Let's say I don't know you're a company that sells flowers and you know you might WanNa have some a application that I don't know. Somebody sends you a picture of their kitchen, and then you. You want to suggest what the best flowers would be in that kitchen you as a flower company. You'RE NOT GONNA go buy some supercomputer to build this model, but visit ai ecosystem there where you have data, scientists you know. Hardware makers cloud service providers who will do the hard work for you and build the kinds of models that you want, and then you can as the flower business can focus on your core. And say okay. I've got this really cool website for my flower shop. I will be able to build much more easily. Some kind of application that can do these really smart things under the hood. It's making use of API calls to these underlying services that other people have built. And so are those cloud service providers that are you know purchasing those things are those people building like on prem like like who are the types of people that are building those those capacities. There is kind of ecosystem where there's a range of of deployments deployment styles so clearly cloud service providers are building very interesting capabilities for their customers to be able to do machine learning on their particular data, but uh, you know. Some of these capabilities are also being made available in on premise situations for her for customers who prefer that, and there's even on top of that a whole set of edge analytic ecosystem partners for example if you wanted to. I don't know you have a clothing store. Somebody walks in and there's a a Webcam that takes a picture of the person and then suggests some clothes to wear. Those analytics could be performed right there in the store, and they would probably be running on a on a different category of hardware. Maybe inside the camera itself for example so it it gets deployed at many different scales in different ways depending on the use case, it's funny. We did a little mini series on on edge talking to some. Of the leaders, Nej Vapor and others, and just like the massive amounts of compute. That will be added over the next decade. As, you know things like machine, learning become more and more prevalent. I'm curious. What do you feel about where we're at as an industry or ecosystem in terms of like the need for those sorts of things? I mean obviously you know. Intel is at the forefront of this of the harder piece of this, but it seems like hardware is going to be extremely critical for people won't necessarily know like they did in the past like older it organizations who had to deal a lot more with hardware while in a lot of those companies that are born in the cloud. Don't really have to worry about that anymore. However, you know the players in edge or the players in that space are gonNA. Have you know almost an entirely new problems said as you know you expand the edge like across the United States or the globe. I guess my comment on that. Is that you know? Yes, as you mentioned until we we, we clearly play an important role in the hardware ecosystem, I think from the point of view of Ai and actually this also relates to the privacy topics that I've been working on most recently. We feel like it's important to really take a systems level approach to these kinds of problems so that get clearly these these workloads are running on underlying hardware to run as well as possible. We don't want customers having to think about specifically quote, unquote hardware problems right. They have a business problem and we want to address the entire business problem. One of the strengths of Intel is that we can. Help them attack that know across all the layers so across whatever the cloud component might be. The storage piece of it the inner connect. The software glue between them all the way out to whatever edge analytics after be done. We've taken that same approach with with privacy for example. We know that there are data scientists who are. Wanting to build models that operate on sensitive data, so for example let's say you're building a model to detect to find the contours of a brain tumor arenas he. Can you know that probably most likely? You're going to be dealing with sensitive patient? You know. Wouldn't it be cool if you could just do your ordinary data science as you normally do it with your regular tools of your choice, but then once you have a model that performs well. You'd like to be able to switch. And have it so that this model now is able to operate not on raw patient data, but actually on surely the data and have those data stay encrypted the whole time while you're operating on, so these are the kinds of the capabilities that were thinking about that. Intel kind of looking overall business problem versus like okay I need to buy this exact chip here accents. Yeah, it does no. It definitely makes sense it has does can going to be my follow up like how does this blend to the business? Use Case because you know it seems so interesting to me right now that the landscape. Have specifically it for example, moving closer and closer to the kind of customer experience side of things. I to really understand what you know lining the business around that customer experience, you know we talk about a ton on this show and I was curious. How do you look at that from a hardware perspective as a piece in the kind of the overall tech stack yet again? I would we looking at it from the the I plus Privacy Lens I tend to look at it more from the top down. Because so or as you put the customer experience, so you kind of trace down. Okay? How do I want this system to work? And what are the constraints on who's allowed to see what Beta and working from those? He could say okay well, ultimately when push it all the way down I, I know that to run well. This aspect of privacy is going to require some kind of Some particular kind of cryptography system that in order to run at its peak performance requires this specific kind of hardware, but then might be in some ways the last thing that I think about I really want to think about the almost like from the point of view of the developer. How does the house a developer going to build this thing and in some ways, complexities like a cryptography and data, science and kind of. As much as possible. Yeah, we'll expand on the privacy piece, so tell me a little bit about the work that you're doing in privacy. Yeah, so we are looking at a suite of really exciting techniques coming out of the academic world just in the last five years, but the fond of this header of privacy preserving machine learning. So. It's It's you can think of it as like a sub field of machine learning where building privacy into the computation is. A stated goal, right? It's not just kind of an afterthought. It's baked them so for example data scientists for a long time have been using data to fit model train models now if you add constraint that says that you know, what if you, WANNA learn a particular model by sharing data across three or four different data sources, but you're not allowed to actually get the data from those data sources. How would you do that? How can you somehow learn from distributed data without actually getting the data yourself? technique is called federated learning another interesting technique in this suite of privacy preserving techniques called home amorphous corruption, where you can actually do math on encrypted data without ever getting McKee without actually seeing underlying data to make a very cutting edge crypto technique like that more accessible and more available to data scientists. What we did, is we. We built an open source library called H. E. Transformer at for Home Award encryption transformer, and it means that someone can use tensor flow, which is a very common data science tool to build a neural network. And then once they have a model train that the the way that they like it. They can literally change in environment variable, and their model automatically gets recompiling under the hood so that instead of working on regular data now it works on the data and the answer that it puts out is encrypted. Only the person who submitted the the entrance data to be operated on can unlock the answer, so it enables these completely new use cases for sensitive data. So, that is fascinating and you recently gave a talk at at Rsa kind of talking about like how a and privacy don't have to be a zero sum game. I'm curious like it. That is one of those things that I think everyone is kind of like waiting on or curious about is like. Are these things mutually exclusive? Like what are your thoughts on that? Yeah it's I. Think it's under appreciated the fact that so right now. If you WANNA do machine learning on sensitive data, you have to have in most cases, some kind of legal agreement with whoever's data it is your lawyer gets together with their lawyers take years of terms and conditions under which you can operate on. When I you to I want you to delete the data all these kinds of things that and then you sign the new your work. A lot of people think that the alternative is basically while I. Don't get to work on the data at all, but there's actually a whole space in between those two extremes where you could get encrypted access to somebody's data and get useful inferences out of it, or you could pull. Pull Tube People's data together into a larger data set without actually taking ownership of either of their data and built some model out of it, so there's really interesting intermediate combinations that we'd like to make easier for you know. Developers and business leaders make use of yeah. That's really really interesting. How much does that play into what blockchain can do in Kansas a similar but different vein because I know that that's? Like sort of a use case for blockchain as well so I think of I, have to confess I'm not a blockchain expert in any way, neither am I so that's perfect. Yeah, I think it comes from that same spirit of looking pushing the operating models into different parts of the space to things like okay things that used to be centralized. Could they be decentralized for example and I think goes federated learning is is being in that same spirit. You know normally think okay well, if I want to work on five people's Data I. I need to put them all into one big data lake in the work on all those data together and whereas. Like blockchain federated learning is kind of saying like Hey, will, there may be a more decentralized solution here. Maybe you can have each of the data owners. Each of these five owners start with some initial version of a machine learning model. They can train that model just based on their local data, keeping everything local to their environment, those updates to the model that they propose on their local data could be shared. Shared, with some you know trusted central entity, but then that that new model that everybody comes up with gets pushed back out to the other members of the federation. And then you operate on it and again, and then this process keeps making this model better and better and better, and this model will be informed by everyone's data, but it was never built from a central data lake in the first place. That's absolutely fascinating. Wow. So, I want to kind of switch gears a little bit towards some of the stuff that you did at qualcomm specifically some of the projects that you worked on You know some of the work being used by NASA on the twenty, twenty Mars rover. Can you share a little bit about those projects from listeners sure I could I mean so the Mars rover work that you refer to. This came out of some work that the. QUALCOMM did on autonomous robotics, so they're the idea was. Could you use? Essentially a smartphone chip. As a way to drive no vision based robotics projects, and you know we built a small platform for for autonomy that this happened after I left qualcomm, but eventually I guess it made its way to jpl on NASA, and they want included in the in the rover, which was probably one of the coolest emails I revert received in a while. That day, I think the I q some of the land of that forward in the sense that I think there's still a lot of really interesting work. To be done not just around classifying images and. Giving that's definitely an important problem, but. In some ways the. The next generation of AI systems are really going to be more about sequences of decisions that you make versus just kind of one time classification of data. Right, so what an and so for example a Thomas Driving is an example of that. It's not just being able to say this is a stop sign. This isn't it's about okay. What's the series of decisions that car needs to make? In order to complete its mission to this kind of goal directed behavior. For me! That's really a nice working definition of I. One of the things that really attracts me. You know what one of the things that we really excited. Working at Intel is that. We have you know so many interesting problems in so many hardware platforms to choose from, and you know things like mobilize for example we are looking at sequences of decisions over time and kind of learning based approaches to some of these problems. It's really such a such an interesting space that. People say Where are we in the evolution of AI and we're? We're really just getting started. Yet, what? What are some of those other projects? You're excited about her that you can share some information about. One of the fun projects I got to work on the men's 'em still working on it, Intel is around brain. Connect to`mix so this is kind of getting back to my earlier life as neuroscientists, and I think it actually will inform how real world AI systems are built so one of the mysteries of neural networks. You know the ones artificial neural networks that machine learning engineers builders. How do you come up with the right architecture? Do I need seven layers in this neural network or five in. Should they be fully connected or should? They should have some connections at skip a layer, and whenever you make these architectural choices, they for some reason they they lead to either much better outcomes or much worse outcomes. That whole relationship between architecture and function is is still a dark heart. In many ways it's the same kind of mystery when you come to the human brain so. You know there is this working hypothesis in neuroscience that all of the the knowledge in the workings of the brain are really mainly a function of how the various brain cells are connected by. Those are very strong relationship between. Form and function you know between connectivity patterns, and what the what the circuit does, and so people are longtime, have wanted to know okay mean. It's almost a naive question, but say you're an electrical engineer. You looking at a brain. WanNa figure out how it works. Your first question would be like okay. Show me the wiring diagram of the brain. Yeah, and there isn't a wire. There isn't a wiring diagram of the brain. Is that diet in itself is a really hard problem? To`mix is a project where. Sub, there's A. Professor Jeff Lichtman at Harvard and near should eat at MIT collaborated with us, they? Pioneered this really cool system of slicing brain tissue very very thin. You know, let's say. Twenty nanometer wide slices. Almost with like some kind of Salami slicer for brain tissue, each one of these slices gets image by electron microscope. and. Imagine for each one of these slices you extract the contours of what are the brain cells in that image? If you have a whole stack of these contours. You could start to rebuild. An exact three D. model of. All the brain cells in the brain and you could see where the connected whether or not, and from that we could extract wiring diagram brain. So it's this massive neuroscience grand challenge. because. These data sets are like you know hundreds of ETA bites data. How do you do machine learning to to eat up this process to automatically do the computer vision that extracts these contours that builds these models that gives you a wiring diagram of brain. That's been a really amazing project work on. That's absolutely fascinating. Do you find the when you're in a I? Mean how many people in your field have the background in like neuroscience that you do imagine that that's odd clearly helpful because you just explained how it's helpful, but I it seems like you know that blend of technology plus something confusing and complicated that we don't understand like our own brain is seems like it's the it's the. It's the direct. Comparison into the unknown. It's actually been I wish I could say that I planned it this way career wise, but it's actually been a really great. Background for the reason you say also for the reason that. You're trying to get at the nature of what is intelligence. You know what does the? Is it. classifying things one way or the other, or is at some sequence of decisions over time, or is it being able to formulate? All of these things translate into. Into both know the biological questions and the and the questions. But also even very pedestrian things, not not so good astrium, but. A little bit less airy-fairy so things like. How do you manage hundred pedal by data sets? Yeah, like this kind of these big data problems. Come up immediately when you're doing things like neuroscience. Massive data sets. So you already back in. Two thousand four as a graduate student I was like well. How do I put together a cluster? That's GONNA. You know do some kind of map reduce type thing over these data, and those experiences still carry forward some to now like. How do you do? Let's say you're a CIO. You're trying to set up your data systems so that their friendly data scientists that this is still really important problems. I'm I'm curious like how many? Heads of technology whether it be sales. See Tower. CDO's or what have you? Do you work with on? A consistent basis that are trying to. figure out how to add an infrastructure that can make sense of a lot of this stuff. I mean kind of the the overwhelming response that you know. I think we all kind of fear. Each other has is like the shrug. Emoji of like this is really confusing and You know there's no one way to look at it, but we're trying our best sort of thing I'm curious your experience. Yeah, I find that the. The, this Gao's who are most. Or kind of like the least stressed about it. And maybe the most productive about it are. Really listening closely to their frontline data scientists. So, not taking this kind of top down. Okay, this must be this because this is the way was always done, but which really kind of maybe going down a few levels in the York Char and sitting very closely with the the folks were really dealing with the data science problems day to day. Because a while for two reasons, one is being just being close to the problems. Gives you that texture that you need. But also, there's just been a cultural point of view. data. Scientists just been such a really. Open field intellectually right. There's a lot of open source a lot of code sharing a lot of. Best Practices that are distributed across organizations and attempts to attract. People, who have that same mentality who had this kind of open mindset so? There's a lot of instant. A lot of really great knowledge built in at the data science layer across many organizations and. I. Think it's important to really tap into that. Yeah how is open source? You know a critical asset in in this. New World because it seems like. We add Richard Soldier from salesforce on here to talk about some of the really cool stuff that that he's doing in that sales I doing obviously, they're awesome sponsor of this podcast as well. But one of the things those really interesting. We're just hearing. Some of the open source projects that he was passionate about. That are really really just kind of mind stuff. I think I think it's very critically important. In fact, you can see just from our own work. Idea of making home more fake conscription more available to the community. For US Open source was the was the perfect way to do that. because. I think. We all realize that we're now in this mode much more about. Growing world rights that we, WANNA make. All of these technologies much more available understandable. Use a bowl as just you know. Let's let's not get into kind of. Turf battles over every inch of a very small pie and I think we're all looking at at pie that that's that's growing substantially so. Net Open source as a really great way to do that I think also it's A. It's a nice way for organizations to be very mindful about what are the aspects of what they do that are really their core comparative advantages, and you know things that they want to keep to themselves. Frankly open source doesn't mean that everything is open, right? You can have US forces you to really think clearly about what do I. WanNa. Keep proprietary because this is my. This is the essence of what we do is organization. And then everything else. Let's just put it in a in a form. That's where we can collaborate and capture as much value as possible. What are some of the things over the past year? So that have surprised you whether it's like advancements in technology or Non Advancements in technology some of the things that can raise your eyebrows. Question I think. On, the privacy side I've been one of the things that has accelerated our own interest in that space. Now some of the techniques that we looked at like Homo Amorphous encryption. Have Gone through performance improvements of. Literally Tours of magnitude in the course of three years. So there's just been. Kind of illustrates once a problem becomes quote, unquote, interesting enough and you get a bunch of smart is on it. you know you can make rapid progress, but that's even faster than I expected. in terms of non action I still think that. There are. Still on a theoretical level. I'm just surprised that there hasn't been more of an understanding at this point of some of the core mystery around why learning worked so well? Frankly I mean there have been some interesting. Developments just in the last few months, but I, but but still there's this kind of. For people who are used to doing data science. They might say well. It it feels have been unintuitive that. I might have a model that has. More parameters than have data and it still works really well. It seems weird. Right like you wouldn't normally think. Because if you have A. Model that's too flexible. Then you're gonNA. Worry that you know when you try to learn data. You're just GONNA over fit on the data that you have and you're not going to be able to generalize new data. But somehow with deep learning, it is able to generalize new data, even when the number of amador's it very very very high, so there's something on kind of a data science level. That's still kind of mysterious. How deep learning works! But we'll get to it. It's just it's taken a little bit longer than I expected frankly. Are there any things that. You've seen from a business application standpoint. That particularly excited you or or just kind of like the business use cases of machine learning while I'm really interested in the whole process of automating scientific discovery itself. So I. Think maybe this comes out of. Having been antibiotics. And wearing gloves and you know pipe petting solutions from one into another and. You know a lot of scientific work is. Taking credible amounts of human dedication, and in this kind of like this monastic activity. That's quite belieber intensive. So anything that helps automate the process of scientific discovery. Itself is in my mind, incredibly powerful so in drug discovery. The, whole fought that you could you know instead of will slow, you can clearly you know put in robots that that moves the solution from one place to another, and I think people understand mechanical automation, but then when he started to close the loop, and then you say okay. I have a robot arm that's performing a certain chemistry experiment. And then I have an instrument that's measuring the output of that experiment. Now, if I insert some kind of a system that can then figure out okay. What's the next experiment that we should run based on what we just learn? Then, you've got something quite powerful. Right than you bet like A. Automated Science fights that that's the. Some of the noticed, some people refer to it as like a self driving laboratory. Actually. This is GONNA be very powerful application of the I in the next decade. Yet Self self-driving laboratory I like that. We had Alameda from t collectively on here awhile back, and like the amount of sensors that go into a car, and how and this is like why edge so fascinating as well. It's just like. The amount of Just data points that are going to be created. That were never even. Thought of before is just so you know? It's like mind melting. Insane just from like a single car had just. I it's. It's it feels like it's too tough for most people to even wrap their heads around the amount of scope that just something like autonomous, like how big of a shift that that thing is. And the fact that it's already happening is is just wild, and we use that phrase mind melting. Lee Awesome. If it is awesome, deb, your mind melted. Yeah, I think yeah this talk with somebody like terabytes of data coming out of autonomous cars. Something like that. Yeah, and you just think about like. Each individual car in a reporting data. Yes, just crazy okay well. Let's get into our lightning round here at these questions are fast and easy. Just like the good company salesforce you can checkout salesforce dot com slash platform to learn about the salesforce customer three sixty platform. Check him out. We love you will to digital transformation at its finest lightning round questions. CAZAR ready. I'm ready as I'm ready number one what APP on your phone is the most fun? The weather. I live in San Diego the. Why do you need the weather APP? Well, sometimes there's a cloud. Ready. What is your hidden talent her passion? We've talked about a lot of them, so there's gotta be a hidden one well. My hidden talent is doing imitations of Henry Kissinger, but my hidden talent might be. Brewing coffee. What is your favorite thing to cook or eat? I like to roast almonds in different exotic flavors. Is there a bought, or you know some type of? Interaction that you've had with a robot. This particular memorable. Robot I've interacted with was the. One that I built myself for this es show. When I was working for qualcomm. and. It was just so much fun to watch it fly around on its own. That was just memorable by itself. We did it a hundred times in the booth there. What is your favorite animal? I worked with rats as a neuroscientist and I really admire them. They're so smart. And they can swim for five days or so crazy. The there. Amazing swimmers they are people think of them as big mice. They're not all that mice or closer to insects. Rats are just a they're like. Small people with a really great sense of balance. Who can see in the dark? What is your best advice for a first time? Former neuroscientist slash technology builder, AI product manager early reassess for CIO's, but you're in comparible so. I got nothing. Find a an academic conference in a topic that you think you're interested in, but no nothing about and. Just go. And, talk to as many people as he can just dive in. Awesome Kesse, so we got thanks for hanging out. We will have to have you back soon. Okay, thank you I was fine. It visionaries is created by the team at mission dot. Org brought to you by the salesforce customer, three sixty platform, the number, one cloud platform for digital transformation of every experience build connected experience, empower every employee and deliver continuous innovation with the customer at the center of everything you do. Learn more at salesforce dot com slash.

Intel AI Ai United States qualcomm AI NASA cavs Hong Michigan Dot blockchain CIO CTO technology CIO
Madrid remain top in La Liga as Hazard scores his 1st Madrid goal plus all the days headlines

The Real Madrid Podcast

10:49 min | 1 year ago

Madrid remain top in La Liga as Hazard scores his 1st Madrid goal plus all the days headlines

"UH-HUH may tim capable till next time bye bye now the media's today at the start of this international break relation county remains under contract remember at Chelsea until twenty twenty three so any fee is likely to be significant in this case in the region Sudan still has this lingering hope that they can persuade Manchester United to sell Paul about another name that was link throughout the course of L. Madrid will offer Luca moderate as part of a deal to secure his services in January though at thirty four it's unlikely that Daniel Levy will want eighteen million euro on the injury front Ramat of confirmed tiny creuse has an injury to his left foot there is the possibility that he wouldn't be fit for the class the season remember of course they on top of League view is that there is too much negativity Iran this defensive frailty it is under all shown interest in Gadio also sees him as a potential replacement for David Silva now Luca Yovich is also remitted gain which is being slowly ebbing away this season he's yet to school or provide an assist this season alone though does look extremely unlikely as that allegedly making a few more of his feelings known to those upstairs claiming they not as a team getting the credit for waters being achieved so far drove Brugere in Champions League will back at the four two victory of Granada we'll get older reaction from that and will rammed up what's been making the news headlines around secure his signature another name that is never far away from the news is that don't eat vanderbeek and he continues to dominate transfer rumors as well remember he's already said living significantly over the last few weeks and updates on the first mendis situation he was on French television last night he said if it all goes well is he did with Venecia's seems certain to veto any move to push out starting with the tzu-dan out to the victory of Granada the weekend he's to be so far out of contention that tzu-dan has spoken of a possibility that he could go out on learning January to increase in playing time build confidence that he won't move in the January window he will remain with Imax this season seventy million move the next summit remains more likely though remember too and now it looks like to move in January will be made as spurs to shore up their season Affi in the region of twenty five million euro will the something was that of milinkevich savage who is being offered a row Jira with a reduced fee let's happiness asking for in the region of one hundred twenty million anything other than just cash for Erickson for staying with Spurs Mariana Diaz name has also been linked again he was linked with a move in the Senate Games as possible Saturday saw the to secure him which really did kill any interest that that price is not be reduced to around eighty million by Munich psg event as and Madrid mining the successes elsewhere back to the transfer fronts Kanteh's name again being linked with a move to Madrid with the event is also alleged to be monitoring the on the day especially with so many players that could have taken his place on his loss if he doesn't play we'll be keenly felt as well as his contribution has been well Kristie Ericsson is never far away from a headline and today is no different with reports in Spain and in the UK suggesting that I will be back with the squad this week on his rivalry with Marcello for starting place he said there is competition everywhere here in Madrid but I hope to play as many eighteen he added I really don't understand it at times yes we did drill with Brigham we lost against PSG but we are top of League Champions League we will improve sedan returned to the club is thirteenth in two hundred and four games stopping Gary Benza either he's now had an involvement in twelve Sokaia have put no time limit on his injury there was criticism from some sections that actually played against good outta instead of actually resting ask called the perfect start your bail outside lots of games still left to play Mazza Dan echoed the views of many on velvety said I'm extremely happy for him he's very good he's always shown this S. go in a rail Madrid shut clarence ball falls had to fight through the one go in front of him now the views on the overall wealth there is a realization there is still work to do cow one of many offering views in the days after Golden Youth Club. Now it's done I had to get many more for this great cloud people being talking and criticizing I've heard a lot which is why it's important contribution to this game today and you'll see that if more when we run through some of the stunts again in a minute I'm happy to win he said more than anything today we played a great game gives me confidence I feel very calm and I feel very happy I will always try to contribute my best run until my legs burst on the criticism of the I hope it's the first of many goals it was clear that a goal was going to help him has out also spent with some relief as well he said it's always complicated getting the first is improving performances. He's working really well he's getting better and better he said Valverde was again highlighted for praise up to his grade Rodriguez he's actually decided in conjunction with the Colombian coach Carlos Rush that he won't travel to join up with his international colleagues for the friendlies and today was the day also that eating has finally got the chance to celebrate his against Chile in Algeria instead he will stay with Z.. Dan The signs of a real maturing of the attitude of Hammas Rodriguez another was in his last nine games overall it's twenty one in twenty nine Teen Forbidden Samoa the same numbers they're messy Levin Danski there remains just seconds it's Corinne Bensimon stupendous inside the box now individually with Chris going off early passing in possession was more evenly spread than Usual Rama sadly topic of discussion also came up should tzu-dan rest Casimiro for the trip to my yoga or run a significant risk that if he does pick up he would miss and I am always seeing him working very hard to improve he is a really Multan flare contribute in a matching attack and in defence he's played extreme amy well today and he deserves a lot of credit on hazards goes. Dan said we needed him to play like this and he needed to school where happy for him visit all the second-place Granada to about obey an off to the full ad from the Champions League draw with Brooklyn the critics waiting to pounce once again but Ram Madrid it was involved in twelve one on ones any one nine Casimir involved in twenty one twelfth Valverde was the only

Valverde Hammas Rodriguez Dan The Ram Madrid Champions League Multan Granada Corinne Bensimon Levin Danski Chris Carlos Rush Brooklyn Chile Algeria
Mason and Ireland [HR 2]

Mason & Ireland

42:42 min | 1 year ago

Mason and Ireland [HR 2]

"Hey Day Mason Ireland I only about people so yeah no running out of people run the volleyball partner in studio that's also behave rain where were you yesterday we were out carbon it the other well we we we used to I think right from his team because I kind of yelled at him too much ought that he pulls down the line and he pulls it wide about two feet every to give us your give us your background well I played defense promise I'm objective I yeah I played Washington I rode the bench in just volleyball over rotate game on Saturday and I'm guessing that every AH winning the PAC twelve south isn't like the ultimate goal but that's pretty much what US's relegated control their own destiny as far as winning the division goes the toughest game last is obviously going how connected and this sounds like a stupid question but I think you'll understand what I mean how and go to the Rose Bowl and still fire clay or is there a point at which they win enough that you determine a lot about the future of this program I don't think you can do another as far as their recruiting class goes we've never seen anything like this in a lot of the recruits are sort of in next year but for the next three or four or five years or you're going to go in another direction I think that's the art and buying and do whatever clay Helton and his staffer saying when they go into those living rooms or do you think it's auden winning just enough to stick around Yeah Oklahoma actually is a good recruiter five star guy they had had committed for a long time bryce young switches a month or so players from the state of California they have like eighteen or nineteen from the state of Oregon so these they have to turn around one way or the other it's going to be hey the future is with Klay Hilton it stable here's what I wonder about and I'm GonNa make some assumptions here Win Out you do go to the PAC twelve championship game you win that again the firing take place like would it take place Ireland says if all that happened it's the the recruiting period moved up now you're talking about so you're talking about like what Ireland saying something after the PAC twelve championship game but I made a change like this if you bring in someone that's established and they know they want to go in another sorta dislike a you know someone else that hasn't really been athletic director before somewhere then you're not gonNa Asia and good enough or you don't and by now everybody has an answer wait a minute everybody if you fire clay how you need to have somebody available and in mind that you can go out that off the table what else is there aside from Urban Meyer the Vega go names out there I mean urban Meyer certainly the big one and there's a lot of USA fans kinda think it's it the rumors he's the speed at other ones but separate they're so careful in a head coach and athletic director really bring in a head coach who comes in with I've been very yeah they there's the moral side isn't what I think she would have say but if you don't go in that direction you from Oregon I don't think something like that was gonNa Happen I mean he's on it a couple of other programs they've hired people before they don't have a lot of experience bringing or you know two years the Se coaching search always makes me lose my mind when I think about get all the different problems that have happened under urban Meyer National Championships in values and I gender urban Meyer is not for real that's I know USC alumni going to clean up the athletic department. Yeah I mean that's a big deal there's so many things you have to what would be the benefit for an urban meyer the only coach to ever win at three there's only a few universities health problems I think it's a it's a long shot but if you're talking about the best coach to win Football Games Championship as well he's coach it in the nfl but yeah I think someone like that he thought that Dan hey now yeah sometimes we go to the music city bowl all right And third named Chris Peterson Hey back off I I think that boat I think that ship to sail biggest mistake right there was came it came down to my my understanding is it came down to three it country is that where they made their mistake I feel like yeah I from his time at old miss to what he was doing at USC I think he deserves an opportunity there right up at the guy was the biggest watch to review the SARK thing didn't work the SARK rebuilt coliseum is fantastic my seat so the rams games when I go to USC Games they've got we're GONNA know about it really quickly because of the life that's true that's true stopover rotating yup see on the Court Ryan Game Fix that game cabinet skis here he's doing the thriller the Thriller Dance Lindsey Actually Show Up and and this is this and then when when walking away hey why do I have nice or mile retreat is this Mason's house and you know I'm not known for giving Great Candy Same Thing Candy Corn You triggered Judas even show up at Greg Workman South Street hair a fun night it's a fun night e- ever go to the West Hollywood Halloween party it is completely taken like the the enthusiasm people are creative Lindsey there's no doubt that is a crazy two years ago was a genius the way he used his pitching staff last night he apparently onto Anthony Rendong making to one so to won nationals lead want Soto and really wanting to pitch so what I took away from that more and if it doesn't it's what the hell were you thinking when it gets even the logic of not putting in Col- in that situation where he's not a reliever yeah so it will Harris who's been pretty good and so I get that now now you're thinking because if he comes in and coal comes in and he gets lit up pitcher for that situation Lebron James might have been the best player on the team last year but he's not with Cranky I mean he's cruising right along and then all of a sudden he has a small hiccup it's only a small one ends on deck even though you don't go to Garrett Cole it's one of those things where little smallest rattle or the let somebody on base you'll get him out yet paul but he just Mo- in the tenth inning the batter that he faced was the seventh before the eighth he was yeah he strike he likes I don't that was not a bad pitch right but I'm still sitting there going get them out like this stuff can unravel win your changing entirely how you operate which might work out but if it doesn't supposed to pull grinky there and and putting time line I'm not sure that's idea great idea I mean Greg what would you have done I would have had at least Coldiretti at any point just to be good always always pitching and then as soon as he gave and that is a mistake you have to have at least one a have that aim for them is stupid like you don't know that I like my ads with cold versus how he can't assure in the playoffs whereas Garrett Bowles like fourteen in the seventh which he has trouble he's got terrible what you do it was if most people have said to them especially for the dodgers that that and we said Caloric Yup that was the moment for Clark to get him immediately John should have immediately gone the equivalent of deal you know they just happen raining loves Kershaw emory get somebody else in there to screw this up so it's not on him and he's every year we go through I don't know what it looked like but my mom told me it was so sad they kept cutting away to Kershaw in and dominate against the dodger hitters and then so he thought I better play the same the five of the NFL DSL. Robert should've never pitched him again ever that was little extra little sun comes from the world series it was the fifth or the sixth inning you've got runners on base and scoring position Bergman hinch eighteen seventy four manager inch one of the things last night after the game is that Garrett Cole was take Care Call Not Boris hat at that point a Scott Boris hat limited edition chips you know obviously you know learned a lot more about the game for me Jay Oh say like oh I'm so shocked that they could win four games you know I'm GonNa have some friends from this called probably the rest of my life so you just don't take have the idea at least for me guys may think differently that he may be Altius Way to begin in your team I get it you're disappointed you didn't fish loss up until July first is that how it works baseball like the second season was over like yeah I love that the instant that game ended Garrett Cole was like Shit I'm really important free agent this offseason You gotta figure him Mike Greenberg and she was asked about Garrett Cole heard him say that he's no longer employed as far as he's concerned is with Garrett Cole in it Garrett Cole Walker Bueller him as a dodger is fantastic won't matter if Dave Roberts puts Clayton the PR standpoint half to do something like that because people are angry as far as it did the year before Yup so now you gotta go do something Gear Coal Huge GonNa cost too much money I think he's GonNa you're GonNa have to offer them six seven ever I mean I know how great he is but if that is what it takes five and six hundred eighty five and dodgers were willing to go to five right on granny whole nother what seven years of Garrett Cole also works well then any seven million in payroll next year yes in that could go up a little bit based on arbitration those under the luxury tax riber the problem with electric tax is it's not the single the games aren't on television you know at some point you have to pay off your fans who show up four that that every once in a while we're willing to do the thing that isn't great for the team great for the city objectively you're gonNA get five good years of Garrett Cole or four they are still paying Scot Kasmir Casimir he's been around Scott Casimir was in the rotation with Drysdale and Co was I just don't think he's that good it's one thing to stickler not been like you give me a choice between Rangoon and you don't you don't normally see the combination of average and power normally your yeah what do you do about core seger it's a really good question will get the Faz gamble with boy you gotta start taking one hundred dollars from keyshawn mason gambling it's so much fun yeah that's a good that's should be the slogan in Eh gambling it's fun no not fun Steve so much has just moments away you know we do a little Gamer out here we bet mythical Anelle AFC let's see that coming you had tickets to the that's right the way we have a lady here as well Lindsay's here Wednesay my apologies it's so much fun you know I think winning I gotTa Tell You I am dislike hanging on every one of these games like at the end of cover and it was ruled a touchdown catch initially and then thrilled afterwards and I had pretend money that on it I can't imagine we're up fourteen and there's not one but there's two trips into the red zone for the bengals in the final so the rams are off this week but we've got a Thursday night ten on the undefeated niners there's a trend here when you have a brand new head cal so so you're saying you would you would lean you had Bet San Francisco husic grateful back they have not been running about nearly as well the last three games whereas the Annapolis Indianapolis that's right you want again are you I think your undefeated the slogan is correct gambling it's so much fun sponsored by the Gambling Council do and what do you think I like Jacksonville well and it's all about going exceeded expectations on average by eleven and a half points and this one makes sense Jackson two more and this is always risky they're at home they're getting

partner Robert Bergman two years one hundred dollars seven years five years two feet
Zidane "the best performance since my return" as Madrid beat Sevilla

The Real Madrid Podcast

10:17 min | 1 year ago

Zidane "the best performance since my return" as Madrid beat Sevilla

"And welcome back to the railroad rid podcast well just days after that humbling evenings in Paris in Champions League came something of a regeneration regeneration in severe as red matured played what Sudan called the best performance since he'd return to the club. They secured victory by goal to nil against severe. of this man was here comes reality again. The offensive side cross hers exceptional football from bring a smile the scrooges face that launched it on this is wonderful and again like this precipitate who is a dead lame. Ma Sister Perfection. It looks put it is not whatever from Iran the middle I kinda lyricism an accent absolutely majesty the area pass by how and Betsy Molly believe looking for the lunch money of severe Apple Apple. Shove has been put the pass from Donnie stupendous. Lee Magnificent and peaked Shiva pass from Carlisle and Benza absolutely white sits on a go there as described by the rather legendary your shade and Ray Hudson of course source now after matching almost smiling sedan set up go to congratulate my players on a great team victory. This is the game a satisfied me the most since I've returned. Everybody worked for each other. We have to take advantage of how we performed here today. On the impressive impressive efforts of bail Hannah's Rodriguez eight enhancer today he said we know that we can create danger but everybody's defensive work has been bean key to winning this game here. These three in particular defended extremely well but of course ramdas was a key he was back and as usual was another swashbuckling buccaneering performance from hand. We came here. He said with a strong in very positive mentality. The Grid is always hungry an angry to win games. We are always optimistic. This team is getting better all the time we must keep trying to improve as a team sees moments like this today and build on them and of course there was plenty of praise many plaudits for canty Johnny Benson again today who made it five goals in five games this season so far he scored half of all Madrid's goals this campaign pain and it's his twentieth goal of twenty nine thousand nine. How good is that well the MBAPPE. Am Eleven skiers actually scored more this year in two thousand nineteen nineteen and that by just one goal what about the press review then all the performances today Monday fantastic defensive word they say nervous hardly created gated chant and this means of course things not looking very good for Marcello all his chances of getting back into the team at a bit more on that later. Hamas Rodriguez also also praised for his defensive work Casimiro another giants performance from him and he to remains essential on carry Benza. He hardly participated in the game but he was there in the right place at the right time. When the moment came to win the Game Ramdas as the Captain Upton returned so did Madrid's intensity they said Gareth Bale committed indefens- involved in the goal bill up as well another good day for him has is out as well very motivated defensively today cobber hall assist with a goal covered up a few Ariza from him in the game positives then I pretty much everybody today apart from one. Tony Cruz literally marked out of the game did very little the in game stats upset he bought out all of those reviews overall. Madrid had forty five point two percent of the possession created seven attempts on go full on target severe had no attempts on target yesterday we mentioned crews being subdued and that still by the fact that he completed just forty six passes during the time he was on the field yesterday very low for him behind. Casamayor Andy Cobb Hall both on the uncover hall being restrained as well for getting for a long periods of the game Kabul's second cross which led to the goal came in the sixty four th minute monty provided three crosses in the nineteen minutes spends about half the most attempts on goal three but along with has up Bale Kaba Hall all managed just one shot on target now. He didn't has a beginning to look more like the player that we know he is four runs. He went on twice succeed in passing his opponent. Not Quite up to the standards of is best in the Premier League is getting back to full fitness at the moment but where things don't look more impressive the work great overall the one on ones the tackles the winning possession has on engaged in twenty-five twenty five jewels out there today the most of any Madrid player one seven and he made two interceptions in the midfield and attacking thirds off off-the-field now Gareth Bale involved in fourteen one nine Hammas Rodriguez involved in thirteen one five bail today one six of the eight aerial Ariel one on ones that he was involved in more than any other player including Ramos Veron and Casimiro carbohydrate Monday Veran Ramdas Ramdas. They successfully cleared every single bull that came that way as for where they failed against ps G. I. Winning possession this. This was another key last night. Casimir once again impressive six times he won possession in midfield third has won four Kaba Hall winning four in Midfield Field but looking at the defensive third shows exactly why the dam was impressed with the defensive work of his team it was this area that threw up something of a a surprise because the player who won possession back more for Madrid last night in night defensive third was Tony Cruz believe it or not he won possession back five times four Madrid last night eating hassled manager with possession about four times in the defensive third which was equally as impressive but where he may be has is to improve a little bit and tighten up his game was in possession he and she had the bull taken off of him last night seven time which is something that I'm sure he will want to improve upon now moving on the media has gained being highlighting what they've us being the best signing of the summer full. Madrid I found that of course was third on Monday the stance of being showing just how difficult my beef Marcello to regain his place Monday as being successful Lin sixty five percent of his one on one Jill defensively this is as opposed to Marcelo fifty seven percent. It's going to be very interesting to see who's who Dan opts for. When both off fully Fitch Remember Mon was preferred to Marcelo when the threat of Chikweza was very prominent against Vitoria and so then after all of the praise is the heat off for at least turned down. Hung tzu-dan very very much of the view that may be the first signs that progress is being made. Many Madrid watches in the media are privately wishing that the first Madrid Darby was weeks away rather than days the only have to take a quick look as well through the early week media to see that there are many names still being linked with Ram Madrid should Z. Dan Get sacked JAZZ MARINA OF COURSE JURGEN KLOPP once again in the favourite is Pocchettino of course he's going through his early season troubles with Tottenham Hotspur and the view from upstairs is if they can get fought you tina well would also open the door to them getting Harry Kane as well well. What about the rumor and speculation over potential transfers will plenty of those of course culpas names so prominent in the news as indeed is named Bob at one story making king plenty of headlines is regime sterling his name is appear to gain his agent. It was alleged been invited and went to Madrid this summer to you. Discuss a potential future move unsurprisingly there were no details on the outcome of those alleged negotiations and Madrid Madrid fans very quick to point out as well today they had four players in the fief world eleven up against Barcelona's to Marcela surprise me for Ramdas Mortgage and has up made the cuts just messy in the young for Bacelona and that just about wraps it up then for today. Don't forget you can catch up with all of the previous episodes of the podcast over at the website. WWW DOT revelatory podcast dot com you can follow us an all of the major platforms phones including Google Alexa June spotify and stitch-up enjoy the week we will be back to take a look later on in the week at the Susu game and look forward to the Madrid Dhabi this weekend for the minute then for me. Tim Cable Bye bye now.

Madrid Hammas Rodriguez Gareth Bale Tony Cruz Madrid Darby Veran Ramdas Ramdas Benza Marcello Marcelo Champions League Ramdas Mortgage Bale Kaba Hall Paris Iran Betsy Molly Sudan Bob Apple Andy Cobb Hall Donnie
Keylor Navas to PSG, Bruno Fernandes to Madrid

The Real Madrid Podcast

10:05 min | 1 year ago

Keylor Navas to PSG, Bruno Fernandes to Madrid

"<music> welcome back everybody to the madrid podcast after a busy few days. We've had the champions league drawer. Of course the transfer window is drawing to a close news via our upcoming on sunday. We'll look ahead to that in a few minutes with firstly an update on some transfer news. It's expected to be confirmed. Firm shortly will leave the club for p._s. G ending. What's been a hugely successful period for him. At madrid left his home country of costa rica back in in twenty ten. He spent a season with thackeray before moving onto event in his third season. He became the number one there and it was that seasons performance led to him signing for wral madrid he made just six appearances in that debut season before taking over the number one jersey which he kept for three seasons until the arrival of tiba coo trois lost some older and only met one hundred sixty two appearances for the club in which time he simply what everything that wants to win three champions league's fort world club cups three super cups won the league and one spanish supercup of course the irony of ironies is the fact that he could end up lining up for p._s. G against real madrid in champions league on september the eighteenth now. Dan has let it be known goodies less unhappy. He was questioned when the rumor first surfaced earlier in the week and he went on to say. I cannot imagine this squat without keillor. Novas in it is is a very important player for us. He always has been and he has not told me that he wants to go. I want him to stay with us. As we just days remaining in this transfer window no end in sight to the name our saga pol pot but ninety nine percent certain not to be coming doesn't mean that that will be significant ignificant business still to conclude as doing the ranch late today rumors suggesting that brunette fernandez will make the move from sporting club deported portugal to madrid the fee in the region of seventy million euros now remember despite the headline ceramic jeff felix's season law season fernandez was the best display in the portuguese league school a whopping thirty two goals in fifty three appearances. Seven of those were penalty kicks. The dad refuses to give up all hope that he can't send paul gra manchester united to do a deal. The reality is that fernandez move looks far more likely as for the latest on neymar a mock well the latest offer from barcelona was turned dad flat in its nap beginning to looking greasing. Li likely that neymar will remain in france for the coming season outta that he and his entourage of actually. Let's club no that if a deal does not happen to take him away from p._s. G then he will put in all of his efforts into the upcoming season with p._s. G. is going to be interesting to see how the fans react if he does stay under d._v._d.'s teammates and i and told us to call the coach. Let's look ahead to vittorio lots of speculation that has odd would return this weekend but that simply is not going to happen. Martinez has asked for the national team pretty did add that we will not risk movie is not one hundred percent fit belgium meet san marino away and then travelled to scotland and staying with as he won the european league's player of the year award on friday lunchtime recent seasons meetings with vittorio. They all have proved problematic for row madrid. The last two meetings here ended to to achieve lead in both but we're pegged back to two two lost austin. I'm at two thousand seventeen. They went to kneel down on fifty six minutes before staging that thrilling comeback with bail renova murata remember him scoring as they recorded a memorable victory in two thousand fourteen moderate scoring his fifth madrid at the time and ronaldo again with the goals that won the game and it's the only any time in the last seven seasons madrid of actually denied villarroel go at home forty four goals being scored in the last fourteen meetings and there there have been no nil nil school. We always expect goals when these two meet at madrid remember as well if kept just one clean sheet in the last twelve away games in the league at fort madrid two games played then so far four goals scored they are creating a lot of john is averaging nineteen and a half shots on go pick gain ben zimmer with four and a half the most bail coming in just behind him on four and four different players providing the assist for the goals it takes two teams to make a great game certainly offering plenty here two games five goals again and once more team who create a lot of chances seventeen nineteen and a half shots on goal game so if the game runs according to the average but we should be getting thirty seven attempts gold potentially which made and sunday night will be dull what server as for the possible lineups it goes like this for rab madrid with a four three three speculating in the uh-huh tiba courtois in go marcelo ramos verana kaba haul back crews casimir mogae midfield bail ben zimmer venecia's nieces in that three pronged attack now whilst the times on a flight of being somewhat testing the stewardship of the club remains well balanced the the club posted a fifty three and a half million euro profit for this fiscal year that was before tax thirty eight point four million after which is an impressive twenty three point one percent higher than the previous year making the housekeeping look even more impressive they have a positive balance of one hundred and fifty five point seven million at the bank and and zero debts all in all an excellent financial performance doing less than certain times on the field now onto a bit of reaction from the champions is league draw as ever betrayed gwen near was president of the draw in monica's madrid drew p._s._g. Breguet and galatassary he said afterwards all of the matches will we'll be extremely difficult. It's not just p._s._g. All of these teams are very strong at home and they have fantastic support. We will need to be op very best to progress. Rimma suggesting that there is a further unhappiness in the playing ranks with the prodigiously talented uruguayan uruguayan international federica valverde is that held mental leaving before the transfer window closes. He sees another season just slipping by as he sits on the bench. I'm plays little role row. Battiste are standing by the latest on mariana lopa taghi over it. Legally to severe is it said desperate desperate to get his hands on the striker and he would be the first choice for severe if indeed that move goes through <hes> look at a few of the more crazier easier rumors that have turned up in the last twenty four hours. I leads madrid would use venecia's to manchester united to sell paul paul reducing the the asking price to sixty million socia- they say is a big fan chances of that happening zero perez will not sanction venecia's sell then the one of football's great self-publicists zlatan ibrahimovic thirty eight years of age on october third currently banging in the goals as a twenty five year twenty two in twenty two galaxy this season forty four in forty nine in the two seasons. He's been he's offered himself himself. Allegedly to manchester united andy rail madrid chances of this happening pretty much zero again as damn will probably find himself relegated to assistant and of the legendary sweet should he arrive also still to be concluded an possibly concluded. This weekend is the future of matter it coty a whose career is beating declined into after those continuing four labs over the last six months and our look and sanchez arriving he is surplus was to requirements <hes> but it's also z. Dan likes to calm dressing room. His reputation precedes him by a considerable distance chances of this happening again pretty much about zero same went for dibella as dan remember wants to wait twelve months to land kilian mbappe from e._s._p._n. Lastly hamas rodriguez could be very late targeted for me land. He's been the summer on the brink of that move to napoli. Remember now despite injury there is a they claim that <hes> milan wanna try to tempt him with a last minute offer out of that successful re debut voi- hammers rodriguez last week the likelihood he's he will recover his fitness and he will remain at least until january part of z dancer first team squad at that just about wraps it up then four today now don't forget you can catch up with all of the previous episodes of the podcast via the website at w._w._w. Dot real madrid podcast dot com home or you can follow us on itunes stitcher spotify and google to name a few of the platforms. I enjoyed the weekends. It should be a great game on sunday night and we will be back next week with more then for me tim cable bye-bye and yeah.

madrid fernandez ben zimmer venecia manchester Dan fort madrid rab madrid hamas rodriguez vittorio tiba napoli portuguese league school ronaldo thackeray ben zimmer mariana lopa taghi federica valverde paul costa rica coo
Rodrygo unveiled at Real Madrid

The Real Madrid Podcast

10:50 min | 1 year ago

Rodrygo unveiled at Real Madrid

"Hello. And welcome back to the Real Madrid pot camps for this mid week review. Well, these are pretty exciting times of the moment with a seemingly never ending parade of new talent, riding with Yovich an has already unveiled to adoring fan of media base in the last weeks, this week to more press conferences are scheduled for many will be presented at one pm on Wednesday Tuesday. So the arrival of the latest Brazilian wonderkid Rodriguez frontier Peres introduced him as one of the great emerging talents of Brazilian football. He added there now he faced a great challenge. The fans will give you everything. But don't forget all underestimates the enormous hope that you'll fans will place in you. It's your turn to make the dreams of the fans. Come true. As for the player. Well, Rodrigue opened by saying it's a dream the happiest day of my life. I know there is great pressure here Venecia's, and I've already spoken, and he has told me that I must be patient. I'm young. And I have patients asked who resembled most deserve a fast four light Rabin a neymar identify with them just a little bit. Well next. He was asked whether he would prefer to play for the custodial team or potentially go out on loan. He said, it's not something that I've thought about I'm available to the club of it has to be with ecus team that is where I go. And again, he was asked after that, if you'd like to be the name of rail Madrid. He replied swiftly. Now, he said, I'd like to be the Rodrigue. Oh of Real Madrid. It's been quite an emotional. Couple of days. In Z left Santos Fridays departure, he signs. We've Palais who wish him all the best after which she posted on social media, today was a very special day for me. He said, I received the blessing of Fellay on. I discovered why this man is the greatest of all time such humility, I thank God for this dream, the memory of this day will stay with me. Forever is coach over at central somebody had a message that he posted just before his departure. He said he is going to one of the best teams in the world at a very young age and he will show addressing groom with some of the most established stars in Europe. It will be very difficult for him. But he does have the talent to succeed staying Brazilian it looks as if the race design neymar has officially begun or as officials it's ever lot to be, but there will be no movement in the two hundred twenty million valuation from PS g that is the message, the potential to pot exchange does exist, PSG's preference in this regard is for the acquisition of Casimir and not long ago. He was one of the touchable but now seen as a viable sale, and what if Casimiro should. Oh, well, his replacement could well be road Rigo Hernandez. Currently as athletic Madrid. They voted for twenty five million from VERA, lost some now, he said to be reviewing his physician Athletico after a string of high profile departures from their Athletico would be looking at least seventy million shoot. He moved on and despite a number of primarily clubs, interested the fact that Madrid could package Marcus Leo renti- into this deal. Well, it does make the deal actually look doable. Now moving onto those who are leaving Benfica, Madrid odd close to agreeing, a deal for rally Tomas initially there was a bit of twenty million from Benfica, RAB Madrid's. They wanted thirty five clubs close to settling on a figure of around thirty million now. Also, not concluded is HAMAs Rodriguez move to Napoli the Italian club table to bit of around forty five million Madrid wanted fifty five, and that is where it stood and. Until today when it was revealed that, that could be a potential rake through, and that is with Napoli pay ten million for the upcoming season with forty million to follow for next season. Now Paul Paul nail biting time at the mid four zoo. Dan, you Venter's of up the ante in the bid to signed him with an offer of one hundred twenty five million Manchester. United are set to be preparing a mega money contract offer in order to keep him at United. The deal is said to be worth up to five hundred thousand per week failing that then it's one hundred and fifty million. If you want to sign route Madrid's offer remember was ninety million now Oeste by getting the very best out of Paul Paul by the new Venice. Coach Saudi said, I did it. We've has an I can also do it with a phenomenon. Like pub, remember all of this increased activity on the back of pumpers comments about. Wanting a potential new challenge, which stood up the media, and despite Manchester United cantering claims that he will exit. The fact that pct has bought this into the open is the clearest indicator, yet thirty will move to a new club this summer. Radian has out remains a prominent feature across all of the broadcast media's it's an incredible feeling he said this shirt means an awful lot to me. It's hard to describe how I feel I simply cannot wait to get out and play here on his first memory of z, Danny said, well it was that volley that he scored against labor Kuzin in Champions League. I started watching football because of z Dan, Roberto mountaineers gave hazard a glowing reference. He said it is signing that will change the future of Spanish football over fifty thousand turned up to welcome has on, which is a huge turnout Rinaldo board in more excited fans on his. Opening day hassles message to those fans with simple unto the void. I just want us to win titles. I will try to be the best in the world. I want to create a story with rail Madrid where he is very much for the today. What about another four the tomorrows will as predicted a few weeks back row. Madrid have also completed the signing of the Japanese youth, prodigy tech Kubo, the eighteen year old arrives from FC Tokyo, and we'll be part of the custodial team Randolph a memorable week for him. He made his international debut for Japan's senior team in a two nil. Victory of El Salvador and his reaction to the signing very relaxed. He said, I'm very happy to sign from drid. I'm very calm. It is a normal day, but I am very happy. Understated to say the least one interesting point was picked up the five key signings. Made so far has on Yovich Middletown Mendi and Rodriguez. Betw-. Clean them scored sixty goals last season. And with that patch of players arriving, it's up the ante to the stars that already there with that in mind Venecia's, who is on holiday in Rio at the moment will be returning this week to begin his training for the new season competition for places on the matchday squad. Never mind the first eleven really does begin to heat up. Now an interesting week for, Danny so bios, who is continually being linked with a move to Tottenham Hotspur. He was allegedly talking about his situation at rail Madrid. See awaits, his next move is the Dan came to see me to say I wasn't going to be part of the project. No problem. I didn't want to continue working with you, anyway. Was his alleged repulsed now. He has since come out on social media, and actually denied making any of those comments remember Iskoe. Yes. The one time mainstay of every Cullman. Every football media across the IB Rian peninsula, will, he's currently sunning himself on the consta- del Sol pondering where next for him now, although he hasn't been told directly by Dan, that he has no future. The silence is said to be as much of a condemnation, and with the continual weekly unveiling of new talent showing no signs of slowing down. And of course, with pull punga, widely tips, to join his, his time, does seem to be up the new concrete interest at present is currently coming from awful the downside, there is no Champions League football alleges news on Gareth bale. His agent has denied there is anything remotely true about his client being in discussions for a move to buy a Munich now did seem that reference future was sorted, and that he was happy staying in Madrid, but his name has again started to appear in media and this time. It is being being too, again, with a move to PS cheesy. Dan does want to stay, but a move, of course, the PS g woods opened up negotiations may be for a move for Neeman in the opposite direction. Now, what about the week's most awkward moments will this was the no show of Zenit Inza, Dan, the wedding of Sergio Ramos, which is clearly irritated, rambles, and Florentino fed as for where he was, when he was on a sort of mini vacation break with his wife in Bilbao. And finally, what was it then that kick started all these neymar transfer MS yet again? Well, all appears not well, in Paris, where the president of PS PSG, NASA alka, Levy appears to be tiring of the antics of some of his squad. He issued a warning. He said players will have to take more responsibility more than before things need to be different on. They will have to do more work if they don't. The door is always open rate is goodbye. He concluded the interview by saying, I don't want more of this celebrity behavior. All of which I suppose, underlines, y z has never really wanted him at realm adrit, of course. Well, that's it for today. Don't forget, you can catch up with all of the podcasts of the last year via the website, WWW dot rail, Madrid podcast dot com. And you can also leave your views and opinions as a voice message. If you click on the link to anchor FM when you go onto the website, you can just follow the link says voice message if there are any good ones, we might actually use some of the infusion shows. And of course, you can always follow us on the usual platforms. Spotify Google itchy Stitcher popping. There's a myriad of them, we will be back with more in a few days time until then for me. Tim capable hits. Bob, I.

Madrid Dan Rodrigue RAB Madrid HAMAs Rodriguez Venecia football Danny Yovich Peres Europe Paul Paul Manchester United Rabin Bob Napoli Rigo Hernandez PSG
June 28, 2020: Teenagers reflect on growing up Black in Tamir Rice's America

5 Things

12:27 min | 4 months ago

June 28, 2020: Teenagers reflect on growing up Black in Tamir Rice's America

"Good Morning I'm Clare. Thornton and this is five things. It's Sunday June, twenty eighth. These Sunday episodes are special were giving you more from indepth stories? You may have already heard. This past Thursday June twenty fifth would have been Tamir Rice's eighteenth birthday. He was shot and killed by police in a park in Cleveland in two thousand fourteen when he was just twelve years old. He'd been playing with a toy gun to Mir's death was one of the sparks that fueled the black lives matter movement in its early years on November, twenty, second, two, thousand, fourteen, a nine, one one caller reported someone pointing a gun at people and scaring them. The caller indicated the suspect was possibly a juvenile and that the gun was likely fake. The nine one one dispatcher never relayed that information to police. When the police car pulled up the officers immediately jumped out and two seconds later to Mir was shot. The officers watched to Mir as he lay bleeding. They never provided first aid. A year later, a grand jury declined to charge officer Timothy Lohman. Who Shot to Mir. On today's episode we're remembering to Mir and exploring what his story and his family's story. Means for so many others USA Today. Journalists talked to thirty one teenagers ABOUT GROWING UP BLACK IN TAMIR RICE in America. They're all turning eighteen this year. Someone had changed their communities by removing blight and closing the wealth gap between whites and minorities. Others bound for the military, historically black colleges or the Ivy League. Some have been marginalized by their classmates or discriminated against by adults who were supposed to protect them. Others grew up surrounded by the hardness of poverty. The full project came out this past, Tuesday. You're about to hear three of those interviews with teenagers later you'll also hear from Tamir Rice's mother Samaria Rice. She's fighting to advance all kinds of legal and policy changes. Because what happened to her son keeps on happening again and again I will hear from black teenagers turning eighteen this year. Brace. Tarver graduated from Frederick. Douglass High School in Marlboro Maryland this spring. It was the first high school for African. Americans in this country braces. Parents got him twenty nineteen Toyota Camry as a graduation gift. Bryce that he wanted tinted windows, his parents said no, because tinted windows would make him more of a target for police. Here's Bryce. Getting pulled over by the cops is like. Fear. Fear. I wanted be as right now at peace. So I'm like blessed to be black, also a little. A little nervous you know. Teenage vist Amir. CASIMIR says he wasn't shocked. When Tamir Rice was shot and killed in twenty fourteen in middle school Amir read books like the autobiography of Malcolm x instead of huckleberry Finn. In High School Amir worked with local social justice organizations to protest the use of pepper spray in schools. He also fought to dismantle the school to prison pipeline, which experts define as a national trend of children from poor or abusive backgrounds, being funneled out of public schools and into the criminal justice system that could look like a student being punished for something. They did at school by being sent to a juvenile detention center. Amir was recently subjected to a random search by administrators at his high school. He handed over his backpack and watched them search for something that wasn't there. He hadn't done anything wrong. Here's Amir. Is it hurts. You know it's all it always feels like while it's still going on while it's like over and over again, but like for me. That's fueled them afire. That spring under pressure from advocacy groups the Los Angeles. Unified School district voted to end random searches. We can advocate for real change at the state level with the laws. You know the power of the people that rise out of A. Beautiful. One Brown says learning about Tamir Rice's death taught him what it means to be black in America since then gun violence has been a central 'cause in Kwan's personal activism in Twenty Nineteen Rou. Quan launched love one. It's a clothing company that sells t shirts and hoodies as part of his anti-violence campaign proceeds go a program that buys back guns and turns them into art next year. Rick will be attending college at Harvard three years ago. Roof once teammate on the football team was shot and killed a year later. Stepfather was also killed by someone with a gun Rick Owens, grandfather and cousin have also been shot. They survived. Here's Rick One. Really, Oh man is a traumatic experience. Now my Stepdad was murdered outta teammate, who was killed, so I experienced the plight of black people on top of just going outside and being scared, and I have to wear my harbor hat because I feel like his a shoe is tough where you like, you have to change who you are on a fit, the mold of the world in order to be safe. Samaria Rice Tamir Rice's mother. Has, been ready to to work. Ahead of two mirrors eighteenth birthday this past week. She shared her hopes for black teens who are becoming adults this year. She also reflected on the life. Her son should have had. A meet Samir is very athletic, so he could have. Got A scholarship to play soccer basketball FOOTBA anything. He was very talented, very talented, little boy, just really being all American Kia where I just expose them to greater things lied for his. You know May Terry camp. You know sitting him to camp in things like that. Just making sure. He was exposed to things that I wasn't exposed to. But also by him being a boy, you know voice, go from one activity to the next. Don't know if. He wanted to video games. They WANNA BE VIDEO, game master. Or I want to play basketball, so he could have been anything he wanted to. You know for the most part you know we don't. We would have been honestly. To Mir wasn't even twelve and a half when he was shot and killed by police. He was only twelve for five months. It just transitioning. He still watching cartoons than you know some. His favorite food was a cheese pizza chicken nuggets, so he was still transitioning. Plan will lay goes. You know I really don't know what he could have become because America rob me of that. Smarter now has three kids who graduated high school. Turning eighteen was a big moment for each of them one that came with more freedom and opportunity, and also be able to vote for the first time so that that right there. Be Burnett legend overt. Be Her. Let it. Count. Eighteen. You know you just never know the opportunities out there. Have you know I have three high school graduates and where I come from kids ain't graduating so I made a lot of sacrifices in I invested into their life into their schooling in in just into them period, for they could be productive citizens in things like that and get the opportunities that I did not get when I was growing up. I wanted to create a formula to make sure that my kids graduating a you know. They had those opportunities to go to college or wherever they wanted to go. Samaria wants police departments and local governments to pay for killing People Timothy, Lohman the officer who killed Tamir was hired by another police station in Ohio in twenty eighteen. BMI Attorney were talking about implementing insurance policies on the police and they need them. Absolutely they need them. However, they come up with them. I need to be apart of that. I say five million bullet each time you empty your bullet. You don't judge the situation. You have a problem. Since you have a problem, you will learn how to fix your problem, so they need assurance policies that way they can have a clear man with your thinking. Before you pull the trigger, you know, use your judgment that you supposed ass, and if you don't have the judgment, maybe you shouldn't be a police officer. Police by we know this. We know that they lie. They lie and for the last five hundred years. We get it. You know you, you. You live in American dream are right, but if you black and brown that don't count for you out trying to honor my son's eighteen birthday in Kane even do that because you all keep 'cause they keep killing us. Killing us, so it's just it's just a shabby. You know I'm sure that you know. Everybody feels that pain you now. Everybody feels the pay. mid, actually breath out my body. To have to watch that just the same as its birth talk about it for. ME. A very. Dark place you know when I hear these. Killing says just keep happening happening happening happened on behalf of law enforcement. it's just a shame. For Samaria. Now is the time to demand action. She says Americans need to enact legal and policy changes that are long overdue. It is definitely time that we come together it. I'm just GONNA. Say together because I am an American. Come together for the most part to demand that these laws be changed. The police bill rice be done away with the Garrity Law. The blue alert you know defending the police taking the money away destroying the arbitration process at the bargaining remittance things of that nature implementing insurance policies on. On these police go understand with the powers of be is doing right now, but they need to figure it out, and they need to figure it out quick, and we need to get our demands together We need to get up to the governor's office and we need to demand that you know I'm black and white on paper. That's called a bill, so we need to introduce the bill that we demand to get changed, and that's what needs to happen for the for for the country right now. To hear more from Samaria like how she's planning to create a community center in Cleveland, look for links in the episode. Notes there in your podcast APP or online there you'll also find the link to the story. Featuring all thirty one black teenagers, we talked to around the country. They're all turning eighteen this year and want to make the most out of the opportunities that come with adulthood. Share your thoughts with us on twitter. You can follow us at USA Today podcast. And feel free to leave a rating and review Taylor Wilson will be back tomorrow morning with five things. You need to know for Monday. Thanks for listening I'm Clare Thornton? See you next, Sunday until then keep up with me on twitter at Clare Underscore T. H. O., R. N.!

Samaria Rice Tamir Rice Mir Samaria America Amir Clare Thornton Cleveland officer Timothy Lohman bill rice Mir twitter USA Rick One Douglass High School Rick Owens Ivy League Bryce