20 Episode results for "Casey peg"

What does "Idaho" actually mean?

Ridiculous History

26:42 min | 1 year ago

What does "Idaho" actually mean?

"You know, sometimes you just don't get your way. But what really matters are the choices that you make when the odds are stacked against you. Well, we ridiculous history would like to introduce you to a new show from how stuff works called the brink wherein hosts aerial Casten and Jonathan Quist are Strickland. Share the stories of entrepreneurs who took a bold step without really, knowing if solid ground would be on the other side, give a listen to how Walt Disney bet company and his house on the world's first feature length cartoon or how a refugee from Vietnam turned adore business into a chili sauce empire. Every week. The brink will bring you new stories of trials and triumphs about people who didn't let adversity stop their dreams. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or ever else. You listen to podcasts. Welcome to the show. Ridiculous historians longtime listeners amongst us. May remember that some time ago? My co host are super producer Casey peg room. And I decided that we were going to hell or high water do one episode for every state in the US, and we're sticking to our guns or attempting to we're not gonna Sufiane Stevens this, right? Don't you say that every time? Then right. I know I just want him to make the other what forty eight albums. Yeah. No. I don't think he ever intended to do any of that employs, you know, to be fair doing thirty minute podcast on a state is a lot different than doing like a, you know, an album. So let's give sufi on a break. You're right Nolan. Perhaps it depends on how much work goes into an album night is records are quite baroque. Yes, he's going for baroque every time. So today's episode is a little bit of a weird would we are talking about an origin story, but not so much an origin story of state as an origin story of a state's name yet. What's in a name turns out quite a lot and a lot of disagreement and a lot of a fraudulent claims and all kinds of stuff. This is you know on the surface seems could be a dry episode. Not the case, my friend. Not the case quite UC. There's a bit of a mystery here as well. I guess one of the best ways for us to start off. Today's episode is just by knowledge ING, something that is an unspoken truth here in the US state names are weird they feel relatively arbitrary at times. And there is not a ton of cohesive, coherent logic or uniformity involves right Nastro. Got like New York, right? That makes sense. There was a another York somewhere. And this is the new one clearly the better York. It's clearly it's definitely the the latest model. There's no New York. But then they're states like Mississippi, they're states like Hawaii their states. Like, I don't know. I don't know. How do you feel about this the states that are named in relation to other states? North Dakota, South Dakota seems like a cop out to me. There's no just Dakota. No, yeah. Exactly. North Carolina and South Carolina. Carolina believe was named after a monarch yet and then oddly enough, Virginia and West Virginia. Snow east Virginia, also true. That's weird. They could it's a weird thing. Well, because as it turns out, most of these state names were done by committee. So as as typically happens when things are done by committee, you end up with something convoluted that no one really likes that much. But people kind of settle on. Oh, yeah. Like a in the nineteen ninety six Olympics. Here in Atlanta, Georgia, creepy gut. Yeah. What was that guy's name? What's it is? He is he thank you. So sort of looks like a weird little is like blue drop is a blue like exactly like a blue droplet of water with legs Saturn rings around him and big tennis shoes through the Olympic reeks down. Sorry, excuse me. Of course, they are. How can I be? That's the point. It was so random looking. They didn't even read that way to me. Yeah. It was just the guided by committee probably some overpriced market agency. Yeah. So someone's gotta have shoes he's got to have the ring somewhere. He's got to be a weird little water droplet alien guy because people wear shoes they get thirsty and with the Olympic, and they love alien aliens is e that was his name. I forgot that completely turns out short for Israel. Is it now is it? But that is our wonderful IT guy. You heard how stuff works goes by Izzy which is short for Israel. Yes. That is true. I call the name I use. With is depends upon the severity or immediately of the requests. Yes. So it's it's is if we're just hanging out it's easy. If we're hanging out outside of work, and it's Israel if it's like in an Email. Gathered people reading escalate it he and I both have to be grown up. So the name Idaho that fits in right in this weird. Motley Crue of various fifty various names that came about for various reasons often she said by committee, but unlike many other states, it's difficult for us to figure out exactly what the name means. We're telling you the truth folks here in twenty nineteen one of the most intriguing mysteries of Idaho. History is the origin in meaning of the name the name of the state in which you might be listening to this episode right now. So no have you ever been to Idaho? No, I haven't been and you know, what I'm this is I'm gonna put it out there right now, in my mind, I sometimes confuse it with Ohio because of the name, and I know they are geographically couldn't be less related. I am not good at g. Geography, though, my friends I am here to tell you that right now. So Ben give us the scoop on the geography of Idaho. Sure. So I'd Aho is bordered on the to the west by Washington and Oregon to the east Montana, Wyoming and vodka in Utah to the south. And then at the very small attenuated top of the state boom it runs straight into Canada. I've heard of that. Yes. Yes. Casey, Casey peg room, super producer, Casey pay have you ever been to Idaho? No, my only I was just thinking about this. My only like association with Idaho in general is a early built to spill song called twin falls, Idaho. Wow. So my own private item. Well, but I think it was actually a beef to song for okay? Okay. Live in in your own private, Idaho. And the yeah, the builds bills like Christmas, twin falls I- ho sue pretty sad song actually Casey on the case. Yeah. That was a great deep cut to. I am built to spill fin myself yet. I have not as of yet traveled to Idaho that I can recall. I know it sounds sketchy. But yeah, yeah. I'm seventy percent. Sure. I haven't been there. But the past is a watercolor in the rain, you know, things blur. Which brings us back around to the speculation about Idaho's name. Even though it seems like it would fit in you know, it. It sounds similar to many other states, right? Turns out that we have relatively little idea of where the name Idaho came from. We have some theories we have some theories and the biggest most lasting theory revolves around a kooky mining lobbyist by the name of George. Am willing. It is put forth in the record that he suggested the name, Idaho and said that it was a native American word that meant the gem of the mountains. And this was actually surrounding the naming of what is now Colorado. So this is a whole saga that kind of gets this this this name gets sort of kicked around a little bit. Yeah. Let's talk a little bit about the background of George MAURICE willing junior known as Dr his friends. He was born sometime around eighteen twenty nine to a very well off family in Philadelphia. He was educated as a. Physician but he got in trouble. He got disgraced because he was discovered performing performing abortions. Right. That is true visited I know. And so in the early eighteen fifties moves to California to escape potential legal complications and by the late eighteen fifties. He's resettled to Saint Louis, Missouri. He becomes part of the Pike's peak gold rush in eighteen fifty nine. He was described as a man of many interests good geologist, polished gentleman, he became a candidate for the Jefferson territory delegation in October eighteen fifty nine he lost the election. But he still despite losing the election. Check this out. He just goes to DC anyway and becomes a lobbyist. And then while he's working as a delegate lease. According to the story, he's the one associated most. Strongly with the name Idaho would have been in the earliest days of lobbying wouldn't have been. I it was nothing like it is today. Right. You know, it was nowhere near as closely. Regulated you know what I mean? So it's suggested by willing and some other people early in eighteen sixty as an alternative name for the territory that finally became known as Colorado. And as you said, no, it was represented as being a term meaning gem of the mountains, which some people love that's true. But it didn't fly at that particular time and a little time went by and Idaho was not forgotten because it just had a certain I don't know certain mouth feel to right, Ben. Yeah. Let's also consider willing. Again, we can't overemphasize. This isn't really supposed to be there. The the miners aren't even supposed to have a delegate, but people are becoming increasing fans of this Fraser, this buzzword or this. Term in the halls of DC. I'm Katie golden. I studied psychology and biology at Harvard, and I pretend to be a bird on Twitter and my new podcast creature feature. We've you nature in man from a new perspective each episode asking comedian to get inside the minds of animals, so we can explore the startling connections to human psychology, you'll find blood bands and treachery that make game of thrones seemed like a dumb show for babies. Join this every Wednesday and subscribe on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. There's a good in Williams who has interactions with both political groups in these different mining camps, and he's really digging the name, Idaho. And some something important is happening at this point to the sixty elections out of the way Lincoln is president. And there's this blockade that has existed against creating new territories, right? And this this blockade begins to clear, so while the southern states are ramping up towards secession. There's an Idaho Bill for the pikes. Peak minds that was printed by the house on December eighteenth eighteen sixty and at this week, it's complicated. This Williams guy pushes lobbies congress to alter it. Colorado territorial Bill that they've been sitting on for months and to change the name of that territory from Colorado to Idaho. And then when this happened when this came up and this new name was proposed in the Senate, a Senator from Oregon objected, and then another guy says James green Senator James green says Idaho's very good name in the Indian language. You know, it means gem of the mountains. And this guy from Oregon says, no, no, no, no, no, no quote. I did not believe it is an Indian word it is a corruption. No Indian tribe in this nation has that word in my opinion. It is a corruption certainly a counterfeit and not to be adopted, and let's remember to the states out. Hopefully, I'm not like overly simplify Mus something. I I have a tendency to do sometimes, but the states would begin their lives as territories. When enough miners would come in. And they realized there were enough natural resources there to justify a colony of minors. And then as more and more people came and more and more infrastructure was created the population would boom and. Enough to justify calling it a state or they would be a whole nother series of discussions would form around. Okay. Now, it's going to transfer from being a colony territory to actually being a proper state and having a name. Yeah. We know we knew that especially in this period of history released more so than in the modern day groups of people will get together pitch ideas for states like in our previous episode about US states that never actually happened. There are so many conversations throughout the US historical record about people trying to make the name of his state or create their own state when someone else's claiming the same land the thing that happens, though, is that the Senate at first the approved this change, they say, okay, we'll change it from Colorado to Idaho. 'cause Williams really wants at that way. But Williams get suspicious, you know, like this Senator lane is from Oregon, right? He's on the west coast. He is probably fairly well acquainted with the languages of indigenous people at the time, and he seems very certain this is not a real word. So he looks into the matter. And that's when he finds out that I'd Aho's not a word, or it's not a it's not an existing word in an existing language, but Williams was largely ignored in the first place to because he was like the vice presidential candidate of the pro slavery wing of the Democratic Party, which was not a good look. So he was kind of, you know, just get this guy out of here. You know? So they may have been just making fun of him right and the beginning. So this is when he learns that George m willing or one of his supporters had just invented the word along with the notion of its definition about a year before. And so Williams hunts up another Senator in eastern Senator guy named Henry Wilson, Massachusetts. And he says we please change the name back to Colorado and February fourth eighteen sixty one. The Senate says, okay, we'll change it to Colorado. And before the house did anything about its Idaho. Bill the Colorado Bill passed in the Senate, and then the representatives passed the Colorado Bill, and so the house Bill never was acted on and the name Idaho received. No further consideration for Colorado, which became a territory on February twenty eighth eighteen sixty one. But the thing was sort of in a Pandora's box kind of situation people like the word people in what will become Idaho, or in that territory are digging it it's already a popular phrase in the Rockies and in the Pacific northwest. And it's kind of like, I don't know if you've ever heard this. Are you familiar with the ice cream franchise Haagen-Dazs or so? Oh, Haagen-Dazs is a made up word. No, really. Yes. They just wanted something that sounded like vaguely Scandinavian. So it'd be a little more classing, Idaho. Kind of like this people are swearing to one another up and down that it is a word from a language of native people who have lived in this area of the world. So like, you said been to that point this word, Idaho was already out of the box. It was floating around. It was in the side guys and people thought it sounded nice because of the mouth feel and it's just Indian sounding Ness so in December of eighteen sixty one there was a territorial legislature of Washington, and it created Idaho county, and that as we mentioned the geography of Idaho borders, Washington state, so in originally was part of Washington state, but then it became its own state. And there's another player and kind of keeping this Idaho word alive guy by the name of Joaquin Miller who wrote the poet of the Sierras where he's. Spelled it Edo. And he claimed that it meant the light or diadem on the line of the mountain, which is a little bit more of a high falutin way of saying what was the original one been the gym of the mountain? They keep in mind. These are mining concerns this. That's true. So I think at this point the original CRA full with willing had been largely forgotten and but the word the name kind of lived on right yet. And at this point we do want to profile a little bit there. There's some background context the willing character that come into play here. Willing was involved in a number of frauds? One of the most Torius being something called the AirAsia Peralta land grant fraud in which he played a despicable part. He also was associated forgers. He was guys. Similar to so many other con artists that we have talked about in past episodes and you'll hear different alternate theories that he met a young girl named Ida and that inspired the name or that it actually is a corruption of a indigenous peoples language, the Kyowa Paci term, I die. He which meant enemy that doesn't really measure up in my opinion that last one I could see state being named after person that's happened before. But I can't see state being named enemy you want. Something a little more positive, right? You do. People say necessity is the mother of invention. But that's not always true. Sometimes the mother of invention is advertising. Yeah. Or pure accident. How about ego maniacal delusion? Absolutely. Or just a desperate longing. To be cool. I'm Robert lamb, and I'm Joe McCormick. We're the host of the science podcasts stuff to blow your mind. Now, we're branching off into the exploration of invention. Invention is the story of human history told one piece of technology at a time the things we made and how they made us invention publishes every Monday, listen and subscribe to invention on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you find your podcasts. We know this battle that happened. Ultimately was a battle fought in the public sphere in terms of public opinion and public use of the phrase, and that's why the term Idaho was first used to refer to Idaho is a state instead of Idaho springs or some other area in eighteen sixty three Williams went on to do some more shenanigans. Yeah. Sure did. And let's not forget to that. At this point a lot of lawmakers that may be had there breaches in bunches about this in the first place where a little more preoccupied with the the civil war than than coralling about state names and made up Indian words, right, right? And so that's kind of how is slid in under the radar because people were so worried about this burgeoning war between the states that they didn't really have time nor the clinician to worry about what they saw as a relatively. Benign concept, like the the name, I home. And so I'd Aho just like kind of a Haagen-Dazs stuck around sounded close enough to the thing that it was purporting to be that more and more people began using it and some of the same senators who remembered that last naming incident when they figured out that it was a made up name. We're the same senators who were like, hey, we have to figure out the civil war thing. So just just let it ride maybe we can fix it later. Maybe we can kick the can down the road and kick the can they did because it is twenty nineteen an Idaho is the states, they it's not going to change anytime. Sue now, it's true. And this is not even the most egregious example of a naming fraud you ever heard of Montpellier Illinois who'll I have heard the name. What's the what's the skinny on that? Yeah. Turns out that the name and as Casey off Mike just pointed out it would be more properly. Pronounced montpelier was something of a practical JR. Joke. Father jock Marquette in sixteen seventy three encountered some members of the Peoria Indian tribe, and that was near the mouth of what would today be called the demo- lines river, and he asked them to give him the name of a nother tribe of rivals that lived further down the river, and the Peoria leadership told him that they were called the Moines Guana, and that became the roots for Moines, but Michael McCafferty of Indiana University discovered that in the Miami Illinois language, which is now no longer. It's a deadline guage. This actually would have been translated to faces. And apparently, nobody in Illinois government in the city of Des Moines has acknowledged that this is the case, but the research stance interesting stuff, so I guess having a made up name is maybe a little less embarrassing than having a name that translates to something so derogatory, that's a great point. And as many of us are thinking as realistic this up right now most actually all words are made up at some point. We all agreed various factions of us throughout the human species. Agreed that this word means this thing, you know, what I mean, like hand means that thing at the end of your arm, shoe means thing that goes over your foot. An Idaho is one of the fifty states of the United States of America day go and that is our episode for today. How many states how many states have we done? Now. Are there any? Intrepid ridiculous stories that wanna do the tally and shoot us. An Email it ridiculous it how stuff works com. That'd be cool. We love to hear from you. Because otherwise now be completely honest with you here folks, otherwise we'll get halfway through an episode. And then realized that we have in fact already covered that state. It's okay, whatever it takes to get the show out as long as it's a good story too. So thank you in advance for sending us that note. We want to hear the interesting stories of place names in your neck of the global woods. We'd also of course, like the think of super producer Casey peg REM, and maybe you know, maybe we could go for a road trip to Idaho, windy, student also like to thank Alex Williams who composed our theme. Gabe, our research associate who kept us to this topic. You can check me out on Instagram at embryonic insider, you can find our show on Instagram as well on Twitter and Facebook of you can find your fellow listeners on our Facebook community page, that's ridiculous story ins and. If you what to hang out with me. See some pictures of weird adventures and. Lie. Oversized cats, you can find the at bed bullet on Instagram. We'll see you next time, folks. Hello. My name is Kevin Pollack. Yes. The award winning funny fellow from that film. And or TV thing that makes you smile every darn time. You see it, folks. Did you know, I've got a new comedy podcast that was created with you and mine 'cause I do it's called alchemy this, and it was designed with a single purpose, you laughing a lot I'm talking please. Let someone else drive when listening if you enjoy laughing. Uncontrollably while running errands exercising or building crispy cream doughnut machine in your basement from parts you stole while working there. As an assistant manager, oh, buddy. Boy, I've got the comedy podcast for you each episode. I'm the puppet master who sets the scene, and then five genius improvisers, and I will make you laugh and feel better alchemy. This the new funny podcast from me. Kevin pollick? Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or. Wherever you listen the podcast.

Idaho US Alex Williams apple iheartradio Colorado producer Oregon Casey peg Senate Colorado Casey Walt Disney DC Idaho springs York Senator tennis Nolan
California Schoolchildren and the Great Squirrel War

Ridiculous History

30:19 min | 1 year ago

California Schoolchildren and the Great Squirrel War

"This is the zodiac speaking. I am the motor of the taxi driver over by Washington street and maple street last night to prove this. Here's a bloodstained piece of his shirt, the thing that makes it interesting is this guy was the ethical you could be anybody. He could be your on Bill could be the guy living next door. Whatever I think we're fifty years. I do it's time to solve the case the entire season of monster. The zodiac killer is available now. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Friends. Neighbors farmer city dwellers rural and urban residents alike. Have you ever had an infestation of pest, Sarah, choose or rats or bats and so on. Hi, I'm Ben I'm Noel. No. But I did once have a pet. Squirrel named Mr. Muffin tops. Was this was an animal that lived nearby or an animal in a cage. Yes, both. Okay. I made that up. It's wanted to say, Mr. Muffin tops. But and I would honestly be terrified to have a squirrel for a pet. I'm very skittish around creatures that have unpredictable movements and beady eyes. Squirrels definitely do. I've had in my various stages of life. I've lived in places that were infested with bats possums. And of course, squirrels, which are wily creatures. I have a friend here in Atlanta, where this podcast is based who raised a squirrel in his apartment, and the squirrel was very friendly. Very nice. But eventually being wild animals when they reach adulthood. It's time to say goodbye, right? It was a rescue squirrel, by the way. He didn't steal it. A, but how could I mention infestations without talking about one of the number one infestations in my heart, and yours knoll super producer Casey peg. Just an infestation of joy kindness. I know and goodwill towards humanity. Yes. Yes. And even even squirrels, I would imagine Casey. Did you ever have an infestation in your house or your neighborhood growing up? Yeah. Actually, my parents house. We had bats in the attic and my room was upstairs. And so I was the only one kind of in close proximity to said bats like throughout the day. And I would just hear these like kind of faint chirping sound. And I you know, I reported this to my parents over and over tried to get them to believe me. And they were just like, no, it's just like a fan that squeaky up there, you know. And so one day, my mom goes into the attic. And what does she see but about like feet in front of her face and she screams and freaks out? And then they believe me about the bats after that point. But I had actually gone as far as to like take some my audio recording gear and put it up to the vent and like record them, and then boosted and post and. You know amplify the signal enhance and sounded like bats to me. But. Required. A little more proof. You really I think the ended up in the wrong field. You should have become you should have been like a like a ghostbuster for pets. Exactly. Tool meters. And all that. That's right. You're gonna monitor exactly Casey on the case. I the same bonding with you here Casey because I had the same situation. I was in. I I lived in a bonus room in our house, and we had we had this unfinished thing that was pretty much an attic, but had a creepy door to it. And I I remember vividly those weird chirping noises. But once you see them in your house it surprising. The point of this relatively circuitous introduction is to say that there is one thing that unifies a lot of homeowners across the world. And that is that we like our outside animals to stay outside, and we often in the course of human civilization come into conflict with animals, and this is the something historically happens. All the time, you know, their stories of locust in ancient text. There are stories. Of other things off the top of the dome here for Oxx. There we go plagues biblical ones. The locus would eat would decimate fields of grain and other crops. And that's the thing we like animals when they're cute and cuddly, and they keep a healthy distance from us, and they stay in their animal lanes. But as soon as they start eating our lunch. It will not stand. This animal aggression will not stand my friends, and we often band together as humans to cooperative -ly combat the threats posed by wild admirals today story takes us all the way back to length teen eighteen as American soldiers were battling German forces in France. There was an entirely new war going on in California. And it used child soldiers of all places. Yeah. This is this is how a fantastic article on Allah. Of scare us sets up this tale and little spoiler alert here in nineteen eighteen California drafted children into a war on squirrels is the title of this article by the task, Dave Gilson. I'd never heard of this ban. The squirrel war. We know about wars real wars. They were started by all kinds of arbitrary things. Like, there's the stray dog war. There was the one about the camel. There was the one about like a bucket. This is not a real war, but involves some anti German propaganda little down the line. That's why the setup works. So. Well, but here's the thing in California. They were in the midst of a ground squirrel epidemic. These little buggers were consuming about thirty million dollars worth of crops, which if you enter that into the old inflation calculator, it's approaching five hundred million dollars of of food stuffs yet. Absolutely. I personally think squirrels are. Cute. I know they're not for everybody. But I've also never been in a situation where they are less literally eating eating the food supply on which I would depend. So these girls were not loved they were not lovable. They were seeing as a source of pestilence. You know, and they were thought to be a vector for the plague so California addressed the problem, and we've got a great quote from state horticulture Commissioner, George H heck, which is a cool name. So old man heck says we have enemies here at home more destructive baps than some of the enemies all boys all fighting in the trenches. He said this is part of a impassioned call up for what he called school soldiers to self organize. You know, within your classroom, your friends or your overall school to a radical eight these ground squirrels in California as part of a seven day event. They called squirrel week, you know, a week seven days long is Alex shark week. Is a little more Agra than shark week. But but deep cut nice reference. Can you mention that on air back to the old the old parent company back several parent companies ago shark week was was a regular occurrence around the office people still love shark week. That's still a thing. Shirk week is great. It's it's good stuff to watch. I think what got us is way back in the day. When when we worked with discovery every podcast was told to come up with something related to shark week. And I don't know if I ever mentioned this to you. But this was when Scott Benjamin, and I were still doing car stuff, and we see guys car stuff and sharks. How do we make this work? But we did twice. You can check about they're not they're not the best episode. But they're out. I'm sure there are a lot of fun. I enjoy that entire catalogue. And I miss it dearly. Just just like everyone else. It's true. But you know, what forget move over shark week. It's time for squirrel week. And what squirrel week was was a promotion that the government pumped a pretty penny into to December print and. Eight pamphlets posters and all all kinds of literature because that's what you spend money on those days. I don't know maybe some broadcast pieces. What do you think? Yeah. Public speeches California's set aside, forty large from their emergency wartime funds to create this squirrel week campaign. And it was a PR blit says he said, no around thirty four thousand posters popped up around the state half a million leaflets and the pamphlet which you can see the it is not subtle. You can see victors of this in the article. And then in archival reports of from papers of the time. It says it's nice old timey propaganda cartoon kind of approach and it says in the top left kill the squirrels and shoes a mother or a teacher instructing children to scatter poison. Barley, and then. It shows squirrels in the bottom. Mr. MRs swirl dining on dining like kings. Right. Yeah. Literally. And they've all got little speech bubbles next to him. And it's like the the caption for this particular comic is our star borders as though they're at some sort of bed and breakfast. Like, we're giving them free, you know, free room and board and one of the missus worl-, Mr. squirrel is saying wait out today. I'll have my favorite dish whole wheat cakes. And then MRs squirrel replies. And you may have me some nice young body sprouts. And she's holding up class opera glass opera glasses and in the back behind the hapless waiter who has a tag describing him as a farmer. There is a sign that says hotel, California board Bill for squirrels in nineteen seventeen thirty million dollars. So that's the amount of damage this ground, squirrel infests? Nation was doing to the agriculture of California. Here's my favorite little detail. Actually, notice this until just now on the bottom outside of the circle that sort of the, you know, the cartoon panel. That's framing the squirrel seen are two. Squirrels wearing those Kaiser Wilhelm kind of spiked helmets. Yep. And that's the little touch of anti German propaganda. And we'll hear more about that. In some of these other pamphlets? Hi. I'm Laura vendor. I'm the author of several time management books, including the brand new Juliet school of possibilities off the clock and a hundred sixty eight hours and also the host of I hurt media's newest podcast before breakfast. Every weekday morning. I'll be sharing a quick productivity will help you. Take your day from great to awesome. These are strategies that worked for me for people I admire and that I've learned from all the feedback. I've received over the years from listeners like you. I care about time because life is lived in. And what we do. Our lives is going to be a function of how we spend our. I can't give you a twenty fifth hour in the day. But just like that I have of coffee each episode is going to help you feel like you can take on the world one productivity tip at a time. Start your workday with before breakfast available each morning Monday through Friday five apple Todd now the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcast together. We're gonna feel busy getting more done. So what they wanted to do in this world week campaign was to inspire patriotism in kids who knew that their relatives. Or maybe even one of their parents was active in the war effort. They wanted these kids to feel like they were doing their part by sprinkling rodenticide outside of these various squirrel Burrows, the pamphlet even included a recipe for strychnine laced grain as well. As suggestions. For other squirrel killing methods shooting drowning the use of poisonous gas. This is heavy heavy stuff for children, but they knew that money talks. Right. The heart may what what it wants. But the pocket book does too. So just in case. Doing one's patriotic duty was not inspiration enough. They also sweeten the pot with Br awards for the kids who killed the most. Squirrels. Yeah. It was a tiered reward system. Fifty bucks for the winter at each elementary school. What the organization behind this must have been pretty decent. Right. Yeah. So fifty bucks for the grand prize. And then you got your runners up making thirty and twenty and then you wanna you wanna handy dandy inflation calculator on those bad, boys. Sure. Fifty bucks is around eight hundred dollars today downs. I know especially you magic in elementary school, you eight hundred dollar even going to do with that by more munition for your red Ryder BB gun. I imagine I don't know man, they might get this feedback loop and just by more strychnine poison the week. How many full blown psychopaths do you think this program created Ben probably about three hundred seventeen team without the inflation? So if you got the runner up position, and you got thirty dollars that was still five hundred dollars back then. And then if you got twenty bucks that was still three hundred thirty something dollars. So this is this is good cash for psychopaths potential budding psychopaths, aspiring psychopaths, right totally. So the thing that's really interesting is this was all happening during World War One. And there was always a need for propaganda, and they were certainly able to sneak these messages into this material for for squirrel week and start making the squirrels like stand-ins for the greater enemy large and the language even really started to shift to some slogans like this he prays on our crops, and countless hordes he fills the ranks of the killed in true, military fashion. You know, why why hesitate? We can get them how poison gas drown shoot them trap them. Submarine them. Submarine, squirrel. It feels like just a different way of saying drown them. They also had neat. Little catchphrases. Right. One texted says millions of food must be saved slay the mother squirrel during breeding season much to me. Remember a swirl in time saves killing nine. That's right. But that's the there's a loophole with that. And I don't wanna be too cold. But if we are addressing the reward system in play then you would want to kill nine squirrels, you wouldn't want to kill them early. You know, what I mean, they're not they didn't think that all the way through, but they had a lot of money on the line. And with this creeping propaganda with these squirrels being painted, increasingly as German soldiers. If we're being honest, we see the cause move beyond the. Boundaries of California the US food administrator at the time guy named Herbert Hoover. Who would later go on to be president heartily approved of this effort because he said they were saving vast quantities of food which otherwise be used for support of our armies abroad. So we're we're not just fighting pest in California. We're helping the war effort in Europe. Yeah. For sure I mean, it's impounding. And again, this is kids. This is directed at kids. This is a school like box top programme, essentially instead of box tops. You're bringing in squirrel tales or literally entire dead, squirrel. Carcasses? There's an image from the internet archive posted on this album scare article where it is a barbed wire fence hung with dozens of dead. Squirrels. It is very macabre is even instructions published for how to hook up a tube to the exhaust pipe of a car. And Phil squirrel Burrows with carbon monoxide to literally gas them out and kids loved this. Exactly gleeful murder. Kids loved this and the Olsen they loved his so much that some kids were impatient. They wanna wait for all the Tallis. So they started sending squirrel carcasses directly to Commissioner. Heck, even before squirrel weeks started. So his office literally began to wreak and he made a special request that children no longer sentence anymore tales directly, and he told all the county. Commissioners working for like, okay? Count the tails keep the tally. But then please get rid of them bury them or something. Stop sending squirrel tails to buy office. My wife won't touch me. She says I reek of death and rodents. I added that last part is low bit of poetic license, but it was a smashing success because I think. Tallied somewhere official number the official number was upwards of one hundred thousand squirrels dead recorded. But they, you know, it's a -ssume that that would have exceeded that number by quite a lot. Just just with the the attitude of rampant squirrel murder that was pervasive and all California around this time and that had to continued into the future even once the program expired. That's right. We don't know how long it lasted after squirrel week. We do know. However, thanks to a report called California ground. Squirrels bulletin dealing with life history habits and control of the ground. Squirrels in California that this machine could not switch on and off this cultural impetus that they had created continued on and for a quote indefinite period of time afterwards these kids kept killing swirls. We do have one example just to give us a snapshot of the level of squirrel genocide. Occurring here in Lassen county later in the year. There was another anti-scale campaign one girl when female student brought in three thousand seven hundred eighty tales and one boy brought in three thousand seven hundred and seventy so now we have to ask ourselves. We're these kids very very talented, squirrel, assassins, or were there just that many squirrels where the hills, you know, alive with the chitter of squirrels. Yeah. The hills have is my friend tiny Beatty. Fidgety squirrel is entails. Do. We talk about the difference between bushy tailed tree squirrel and a little bit. More of a skinny tailed chipmunk looking ground, squirrel. We have not. That's a that's a good call. Let's get into that so ground. Squirrels technically are known as Oto sperm Phyllis beach. Lia Yau's having a hard time without second part two has got the double E. And then the why and the why the plot twist? Is a big clutch with. But I think maybe any intrepid ridiculous stories out there that are what do you call that squirrel? Squirrel files. You know? It's a good question. I don't know whether we have in this languages specific word for squirrels. But I do have good news. We can make one up the languages flexible enough. Let's see. We could say squirrel, Allah gised, which is which is tough. That's real. No. I mean, we well now English as a malleable language for sugar, squirrel, squirrel. That's hard as Harlech. How? Okay. So squirrels are part of the scurity family. So maybe they could call themselves scurry, Allah gist that sounds a little bit more legitimate. Although wait now that I think about it when I seen this question before somewhere. I think Roden Dala gist is actually a word squirrel allergist might not be but rodent Allah. I'll I'll bet some scratch on that. Surely that must be a thing. All right. So Roden Dala gist is probably the closest will get until ridiculous historians we hear from you. Because as as you said English his malleable, it is a living language, and you know, this might be interesting. He Casey, what's the what's the French word for squirrel and just curious to see whether that would be easier. It's not easy. In fact, it's it's a weird one. The French word for squirrel is a Killa rolls off the tongue, right? Casey on the case. Sequin might have to stick with squirrel guys or road in tala. Just. This is the sodium speaking, I am the motor taxi driver over by Washington street and maple street last night to prove this. Here's a bloodstained piece of his shirt thing that makes it interesting. This guy was the ethical. He could be anybody. He could be your goal could be guy living store whatever ethic where fifty years it's time to solve the case. The entire season of monster. Zodiac killer is available now. Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Squirrel weekend may fourth children continued hunting and killing squirrels to combat this campaign and the state considered this a great success. According to reports the crop yields bounced back in areas where squirrels had been eradicated. So there was a clear correlation. But here we are a little more than a century later and ground. Squirrels are still considered insidious pest. You know what I mean? Yes, certainly site that we're used to around here in Georgia. But for me, it's more the tree squirrels that I'm used to seeing whenever I go somewhere else, and I see a different type of pervasive rodent like say chipmunks or whatever that weirds me out because I only did not remark upon like squirrels are like pigeons in New York City or something like that around here. It's just a very common occurrence, and they don't really threaten me. But if he ever seen like a rogue, squirrel that alike. It looks a little. Slack jawed like shambled too close to you like it's got the rabies or something. That's no fun. Yeah. I mean, a lot of people here hate squirrels. And Casey, you're mentioning off air some of your friends from different parts of the world finds squirrels a little bit. What spooky? Yeah. I guess. I mean, it's hard to imagine as an American who's been seeing them their whole life. But yeah, if you're not used to it, apparently, they can be quite upsetting. I'll tell you, you know, as I was looking through the differences of ground squirrels and tree worlds. I feel like I ran into squirrels before ground squirrels before once long ago, and it creeped me out because I saw them crawling on the ground, you know, belly on the ground. And I thought they had had their thought they had their backs broken or something until I realized they were that's just their method of Luke emotion. This was near Zona. So those may not have been ground. Squirrels. No, no. Right in let let us know what those weird little rodents were we see the prejudice against ground. Squirrels continuing today. There was a university of California webpage about damage caused by ground. Squirrels and it featured an image of a squirrel wearing a helmet and aiming at the ground with a Zucca. So there is still a problem. And it is true as strange as it may sound California did indeed recruit child soldiers to wage war on ground. Squirrels. They weren't the first or the last to launch a tactical strike like this against these these pests in eighteen ninety seven according to the same author as the atlas obscure piece in an interview he did with the Washington Post, the Washington Post in fact published a report citing thirty US states have offered quote unquote, bounties for troublesome animals, including like. Panthers. The sinister ground squirrel, of course pocket. Gophers would woodchucks English sparrows and wolves. So this was definitely a thing that there was a precedent for and Pennsylvania paid out around ninety thousand dollars in bounties for chicken hawks. And this is really interesting because the post wrote, quote, it appears that Pennsylvania expended ninety thousand dollars in destroying birds worth three million eight hundred fifty seven thousand two hundred thirty dollars for the sake of saving one thousand eight hundred seventy five dollars to the poultry interest. What they mean by that is that these very same birds. We're actually killing thousands of mice each hawk one thousand mice in a year's time and these were very injuries to crops. So the math wasn't quite working out there. Right. Because I think at the time it was easy to forget how complex and interlinked every organism in an ecosystem is. Is sort of tough to figure out who the real culprit may be an it's even more difficult to figure out what the long term ramifications of radicalization campaign will be in the future. However today, if you are a school child listening to this and you're anxious to join in a murderous campaign against one type of animal or another. We have some tough news for you nowadays, these sorts of expeditions are left to professional exterminators. And as a matter of fact, in many states, a common pest may be protected under law so to bring it all back around to the example, we had from super producer Casey peg REM Casey, I imagine your family was not allowed to kill the bats that correct? That is correct. Although maybe I shouldn't tell this part of the story, but said bad in the attic caught my mom guard. And she. Swung at it and happened to kill the poor thing. So I believe the rest were safely loaded out of the attic we had pest control person come over. And I think they were able to shepherd them out without costing anymore bat lives Casey on the case. Casey on the case. And this concludes today's episode, but not our show. Tune in for our next episode. When we explore a surprising opinion about confederate memorials that giving away too much. No, no, no, okay. There we go. Thanks for tuning in. We would love to hear your infestation stories. We would like to hear about the common pest in your neck of the global woods that normal to you. But amazing to outsiders, for instance. This is true. You guys a lot of people in Australia hate kangaroos. Did you know that I think they're so cool. Well, they're probably just tired of them because they're just popping out of the woodwork there and Australia or maybe not right in let us know. Are they really as prevalent as we've been led to believe from crocodile Dundee films? Right, right. Shall we travel down to Australia to encounter kangaroos firsthand, and you can write to us directly? But wait dramatic sound Q. Please casey. We have a new Email address write to us at ridiculous at I heart podcast network dot com. You can also find us on social media right now yet, you sure can we've got a pretty pop Facebook group called the ridiculous historians where all kinds of fun things are happening every day. And that is at the ridiculous stories on Facebook. You can also find on Instagram. You know, if you like or you can find us personally where I am at embryonic insider, and I am a burst of creativity at then Bullen, thanks as always super producer, Casey peg room things out Williams who composed are track. And thanks to you. Then bolan for being the Benny bony pal. I could ever hope for. We'll see next. If you're going to build something from nothing, you've got to know what really works. I took a thousand dollar loan built a five billion dollar business. And now, I make smart investments new businesses on shark tank. I'm Barbara Corcoran. Now. I'm sharing my secrets might podcast cold business unusual. You might think that looking at someone's resume and asking them a lot of questions are the key to finding the right person for a position you dead wrong. Follow business unusual on iheartradio or subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts.

California Casey peg Phil squirrel Burrows Mr. squirrel apple iheartradio producer Commissioner Mr. Muffin US Bill Atlanta Facebook Europe Kaiser Wilhelm Dundee Barbara Corcoran Australia Lassen county murder
Dromomania: The Wanderlust Disease

Ridiculous History

41:04 min | 6 months ago

Dromomania: The Wanderlust Disease

"This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by DC Universe isn't your average streaming service. Not only can you watch your favorite superheroes and villains in action but you can read over twenty two thousand digital comics. What I had no idea. Oh well connecting with DC fans in their interactive community forum DC Universe's available on your favorite devices enjoy DC content anytime anywhere. It's no wonder they call. Dc Universe the ultimate DC membership. Get fifteen percent off your first three months with code history valid for monthly subscriptions only expires five. Thirty one twenty redeemer. Dc UNIVERSE DOT com slash. Join join for a free seven-day trial visit DC UNIVERSE DOT com slash join. Hi I'm Laura Vendor Cam and the host of the before breakfast podcast and the author of several time management books. I'm also the host of IHEART media's newest podcast the new corner office in this show we share strategies for thriving in the new World War One way or the location and ours are more flexible than in the past. Listen over that First Cup of coffee and I promise you'll learn something useful. Listen to the new corner office. Every weekday on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio Welcome back to the show ridiculous historians thank you so much for tuning in and here we are this. I it. It's getting weird. I don't know about you guys. I am Ben. I am no wherever you go there. You are here we are now and we will entertain you. I hope Yeah you know Today we're talking about okay so we we obviously are all in the same boat in that we are sequestered in our various homes and domiciles. What's this home in a domicile domicile? Just seems more formal. I Dunno well You know home is home. Has that emotional stake all right. Yeah there's implication you know that maybe a person you're in love with can be more of a home than house ever will be That's a nice sentiment then takes dates speaking of Nice speaking van. Tastic of course. We got our super producer. Casey peg rem I live and direct in full effect here You and I and Casey all three of US probably you listening at home folks wherever your home may be have been thinking a lot about travel about all the things we took for granted. Now it is a not so Not so secret secret our very own. Casey peg room may or may not have a another identity across the pond. Casey travels pretty like I would say on a on a fairly regular basis to France right. Like how often would you say you travel a year there? Casey I would say I average once a year sometimes just twice a year for several weeks at a time. So you know The question of Homeland Dome Missile. I would just say a house is not a home. You know that's true that's true you know but I was getting out with. All of that was though that we're all in the same boat because of this This this pandemic and Today we're GonNa talk about a away. Stupider pandemic may or may not have even been a real thing. Yeah I've been thinking a lot about travel. The different epic trips that we've taken as individuals and even as groups are impairs here for for the good old day job in the podcast minds. And I think a Lotta people are dreaming of their favorite road trips or their favorite sojourns and today as as you said. Nole today we are going to. We're going to look into what seems like A. I don't know an outbreak a social panic a seemingly contagious epidemic. Our story like this Casey. Our story takes us to France in Let's see really kicks in in the late nineteenth century and eighteen eighties. Yes and please forgive my My Lack of scientific shops. This would definitely be an epidemic not a pandemic because it's very regionalized In France in the eighteen ninety s The country of France was beset on all sides Seemingly by this contagion It was around eighteen. Eighty six to nine thousand nine hundred zero nine that the phenomenon of wanderlust became a thing where people would be seemingly for no reason wandering around Europe in like a few states. Like that. That time we're Walter White Never mind that's that's spoiler alert. Forget about forget I said anything. Watch breaking bad. It's a great show. Now's the time But yeah a few state being like sort of like a a a waking sleep type situation where you're just sort of Zomba fide walking around They were crossing borders With no papers going into other continents even with with nothing in mind for for endpoint. And what's going on? This seems like madness They would often be arrested. Some would be subjected to a mental health quarantine. You know put into an insane asylum that they caught him at the time and it was collectively referred to. I said Wanderlust we will get into that but The scientific term that was about the time was I love. This can say right Dromomania and that is based on reporting by a philosopher by the name of Ian Hacking who is also the author of mad travelers reflections on the reality of transient mental illnesses. Yep Physicians also refer to this as quote pathological tourism. Today we call it something else. We call it. Wanderlust and Wanderlust is a fascinating word for any fans of ETA Mahlouji in the podcast house. Today it doesn't really have a translation into English from German. It's one of those words where it feels like. When you say we all kind of get the gist right. It's it's this deep abiding desire. Dare we say a lust to hit the streets to travel right? It's like fifty two song roam roam if you want to roam around the world without wings without whatever else without but yeah that that. That song to me sums up the sentiment of wanderlust. It's this Voice calling from within that is That is urging you to go forth and explore the your surroundings and beyond right. Yeah I I also think of a bit of nostalgia for me. I also think of on the road again because I don't know about you guys but as soon as I could drive I pulled out my map and I made this series of concentric circles. That would let me know how far out drive and then how long it would take me to get back and I always played on the road again. I know it's a Corny Song. I get it but I embrace it and Wanderlust. This compulsion to travel nowadays. It's it's something that we view is. Relatively benign right. Someone's like wanderlust took me and I. I decided to just hit the open road. You know Happy trails to you and so on and the weird thing is back. In France in the late nineteenth century this was considered a disease. Like you said people were travelling in a kind of a trance. State the didn't really seem to know what they were doing where they were going and as this spread people are struggling to get a handle on what actually was happening. It seemed like it was maybe even less a guest. You would see a true psychiatric condition and more like a diagnosis of convenience anytime. Somebody was doing something violated norms or status quo. Doctors might say you're a dro maniac and it could. It was applied to any number of situations. Right Oh yeah. It sure was from that from that book. We talked about earlier mad travelers reflections on the reality of transient mental illnesses It describes the first man who diagnosed with this condition by the name of John Albert. Da Da. How Do Casey does? Yeah yes sounds good. Okay Good Casey. On the case he was diagnosed with what was then being referred to as Traveling sickness and the diagnosis read as such He was diagnosed with traveling obsessively often without identification or specific reason for why he was traveling. I mean to me this just sounds like good old fashioned just taking a walk you know like going out and smelling the roses I I. It seems very totalitarian to require someone to have a destination in mind. Wh who is this hurting Ben? Who is this hurting hurting? Who is this hurting just wandering without a destination in mind? I don't understand who is who is going to suffer as a result of this well. We have to see what I'm established with this idea of a convenient diagnosis Just like just like doctors were diagnosing. All all sorts of patients from all sorts of walks of life with quote unquote hysteria. People were being diagnosed with Dromomania to cover up or politely address. Things that ordinary society would not would not put in public spaces like people were diagnosed with Romania for leaving their families for instance for deserting the military and of course experiencing about of Amnesia so it kind of became a catchall or miscellaneous diagnosis in the case of DA. He may have had a genuine mental problem because when he was very young at the age of eight he fell out of a tree and he had a concussion. That caused fits vomiting and migraines. This may have been according to historians. This may have been a physiological cause for his his wanderlust one day when he was twelve he just disappeared and then he surfaced later in a nearby town now for a lot of US listening. Today we would just say. Hey that's that's twelve. Year olds do like kids. WanNa run away sometimes right. Yeah sure I was just GONNA says. Sounds like the Healthy curiosity of a young lad trying to find his way in the world but no he did apparently have some Some qualities that took it a little further than that So He disappeared and when he resurfaced that nearby town his brother found him and and gave them a good shake and he had apparently been Wandering around with a traveling umbrella salesman acting as his young apprentice. I guess And he had this sense about him according to his brother almost as if he had been awakened from some sort of deep sleep like he had been hypnotized in some way or under the spell of this This umbrella salesman or at least at the very least the idea of wandering. Yes this dastardly. Umbrella salesman right the silent threat of France yes. It's true. He blacked out and spontaneously traveled. Not Once but numerous times he would wake up or I guess come to full consciousness on benches and public spaces in police stations on trains headed to cities he had never dreamed of going to and sometimes he would have traveled so far away in his. Fuchs state that he would actually have to work odd jobs just to get enough money to make it back home. A we have a couple of different weird stories about him like that time he ended up in Algeria. Ya'll's obscure as always does a fabulous job of Of listing off some of these great stories In an article Colwin win. Wanderlust was a disease and it goes into great detail about the story when he woke up he had apparently taken a ship to. Algieria earned his keep on said ship by becoming like a galley hand. or he would do dishes and then hop the ship that Took him back to France and he was arrested in a French city. Gosh it seems so obvious. I'm going to try my best pronouncing this Casey Ex. I'M GONNA GO WITH X. We think yeah that that's pretty much right. It'd be like x like Excellent excellent prevent and that is the city in question here often just refer to in shorthand as X. and he is arrested there because he was an undocumented laborer and he had been kind of slipping in and out of these. Fuchs dates from job to job. It seems like a pretty high functioning psychological condition. And that you can you know you're kind of drifting around doing these things and waking up from these these weird dream like states but you manage to keep a job you know. That's that's that's not easy. That's the weirdest part in addition to his His various few state of freelance gigs. That's what I'll call them. He had a solid job at a gas company had been apprentice to a manufacturer since he was twelve. And Maud Casey an author who wrote a fictionalized version of Donna's life called the man who walked away says how he kept. This job was a mystery to me because it was always wandering off. I mean let's remember to not just wasn't just going into Fugu freelance states. He was also going to prisons. He was also going to asylums. People began to know his story word. Spread about this accidental tourist. Who's walking around bit? Zombie fide and even today as reported in Fana- dot Com when too much travel as a sickness. Even today. Some people question whether or not he was legit whether he was sincerely encountering some mental problems or whether he was just kind of swindling people he always managed to find some way to get home. He always managed to be safe. You know what I mean like. He didn't wake up in a in a zoo fighting tiger or anything and this caused some people to believe that maybe these episodes were deliberate attempts to erase his own presence. You know get off the grid start somewhere else or maybe just escaped his day to day life. Well you sure had me Goin' ban. He sure had me going Because I was thinking the same thing but also was like the poor guy so again we don't really know one way or the other but it does seem a little suspicious that he never found his way into any Perilous Situations. It seems like you know someone with this. Almost like an extreme form of narcolepsy or something and people who are narcolepsy. Don't get to decide where they fall out right and where they come come to Certainly wouldn't be in the comfort of a park bench. Necessarily it could be very well while driving at the wheel or like riding on horseback at this time. I guess now this is. This is passed horseback. Forget I said that So what how horses? Pb L. K. But it's not like the primary mode of transportation but he could very well have been on horseback. It's not beyond the realm of possibility. Today's episode is brought to you by IBM. Technology is becoming more open data more accessible and the world more innovative. Ibm's combining their industry expertise with open source leadership of Red Hat to bring you more freedom. More security more flexibility. Let's unlock the world's potential. Let's put smart. Twerk learn more at IBM dot com slash red hat. Hey DC fans are you craving action packed D. C. content if you're in luck. Dc Universe is here to save the day. Boy Are they ever. You can watch DC series and movies read over. Twenty two thousand digital comics remember reading and connect with other fans alike you and us in their highly engaging community forum. Dc Universe also has an astonishing lineup of hit original series. You can watch new episodes of the adult animated series Harley Quinn Season Two right now or enjoy fan favorites like doom patrol titans swamp thing and young justice outsiders. Whatever their newest series star girl premiering may eighteenth and take walk down Memory Lane you can watch classic series and movies as well kick back and relax enjoy. 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Think he's kind of taken the the P out of people as the Brits say He joins the French army near a mole And he has east and he He goes through Some cities in Europe Prague Po San Berlin and Moscow By foot and in Prussia he Gets A NASTY DOG BITE? And he lands in the hospital and he gets recognized because he's a bit of a local celebrity because of his Accidental Tourism But unfortunately this is very very very bad timing for Dob because this czar had been assassinated and Da Da Who had was a known nihilist. Philosophy was arrested again from the the hospital and thrown into jail. Yeah a known at Nihilist. Tell Lebowski is that so his his ferris Bueller Is Ferris Bueller? Adventure does not end well for him at least at that moment Three months after he's thrown in jail or thrown in prison rather there is a difference he and other prisoners are marched out to Constantinople and the French consul gives him enough money just enough money for fourth class train ticket so he goes back to his stomping grounds and he goes back to his job at the gas factory. What on Earth is going on with this guy. Fast forward eighteen eighty six. He is in a hospital in Bordeaux and his case catches the eye of a young neuro. Psychiatrist Philippe Ghost. Yeah that'd be Philippe. Tci Casey on the case a you're saving the day in this episode so this young euro psychiatrist gets obsessed with Dada. And and he's saying you. This guy is nuts. He has an uncontrollable urge to wander or travel. I'm going to call it D- Romania that's right Dromomania which becomes the The prevailing term for that uncontrollable wanderlust. And here's the kicker That the really cassettes. Dada part And really convinces teissier that. This was illegitimate Psychological condition apparently Dudot could only remember his travels when he was hypnotized interesting right now when he was put into a trance. Apparently he was an open book in a meadow on a sunny day and win. The neuro. Psychiatrist is hearing these stories relaid while the patient is a sensibly under hypnosis. He's writing them down and he compiles this this huge anthology for lack of a better word of the guys experiences and he sends it to a Medical Journal under the name the mad travelers so he's patient zero for this and this happens often. You know there's one person with maybe a an inexplicable condition and they're the they often end up being kind of an historical footnote like that one guy we talked about who is able to eat everything and may have been a mutant remember him. Lepanto Ma now that was the farting guy. That's the flatulence. Yeah who who is Tara fats him. Yeah Yeah Yeah he was. He was the guy. He and the pedal man should've teamed up the farting guy and the eating guy. And then this guy could have been part of their weird stupid superpower crew. There's the sleepy wandering guy and then it'd be another another edition. That could have another useless ability. Do they have to be French No I'll I'll allow any European of European descent. Now you know well. Let's broaden it. Let's broaden do we have any others in the annals of ridiculous history that I think you do we talk about the Habsburgs. No so maybe maybe a. Habsburg what I like about this idea. Is that the sleepy. Forgetful could have actually been part of this Weird Superhero Group and just forgot about it. Also is that the Habsburg because they can bleed all over you. What's the deal with the HABSBURGS? Oh the Habsburgs are just were just egregiously inbred right so they might have been some hemophiliacs in the bunch and they just bleed all you there. You Go Probably probably some color blindness Probably Oh and they were super rich right. So they're the they're the money bags of the Superhero group assembling. Also sure. So so. Here's the thing. Maybe maybe real power was not just as few state in Egypt traveling. Maybe his real power was to set in create trends because he may have been the first case of Dromomania but he was certainly not to be the last. Now he really wasn't There this this thing was being more and more looked at as as an epidemic. As as a truly contagious. That's the thing we're like. Is it mental illness contagious? But there was a weird crossover here. it was be after. Tissier's he kind of gave a data his diagnosis and crowned him as patient zero. More or less of this thing Were a ton of other diagnoses that followed and you gotta wonder if that's just confirmation bias. Ben You know when something has a name all side and you're going to see it everywhere and try to use that name as much as possible right right. Yeah no there was a there was kind of a demographic for the people who diagnosed with Dromomania. They weren't itinerant travelers. They weren't Vagrants you know or Hobos tramps etc. Whatever you WANNA call it. They didn't seem to have common addiction problems. They were not super wealthy. They were middle-class but they were working poor they had jobs but you know they didn't own castles or states and then one day they would just wander off. I think there's a really big point here that we kind of eluded to at the top of the show. Which is that if you tried to do this in Europe now. You would have a more difficult time than than these fellows. Even though there's a free travel zone in the EU there are some rules and regulations and paperwork but it was way easier to just sort of walk into a country back then and this was also. It wasn't just like see you know. I asked earlier who this was hurting. Well I'll tell you who is hurting then. It was hurting the very foundation of family life and the family unit because the notion of vagrancy was becoming a big deal And that was simply because there was this expectation that people belonged at home with the family with the wife with the kids with the puppy dog And the by wandering around Willy Nilly they were somehow endangering that the very foundation of society. Yeah and there's there's an interesting conspiracy here a very well intentioned conspiracy. Military doctors were very well aware of the incredibly harsh punishments that deserters could face incarceration or even actual execution. You could be killed for deserting so sometimes we believe they would diagnose a deserter with Dromomania which is kind of like saying. Hey I know. They didn't show up to their duties as a soldier. But it's not because they were trying to run away because they have this mental condition and therefore we can't really blame them. You know what I mean so it was like to spare them. It was. It was really to help them out. At least in some cases I could see that if they had someone who could maybe vouch for them or a high up and then there in their ranks. That would maybe you know. Talk to the doctor and say hey you know he's a good man maybe Throw them a bone and given the style to make the diagnosis go his way. I don't know I'm just guessing guessing here but certainly sees. Why would the doctor care you know if the person truly was a deserter? I I don't know I'm just wondering why they would bother Looking out for someone if they really had deserted. Which is you know even to the least patriotic of us. It's not particularly cool to desert. If you're like meant to be you know in the service of your country and your needed just to take off unless the cause is absolutely hopeless like in that paths of glory movie. I would have hoped those guys would have deserted but I'm getting ahead of myself. Well you know it makes me think of the hippocratic oath. I imagine at least a few cases the charge to do no harm was a huge motivator for the doctors. You know they. They probably didn't agree with the the idea of desertion but they didn't want to be directly involved in the loss of a human life. That's if we're being very optimistic you know. Maybe they were paid by deserters right. Maybe they were bribed. We don't know we do not know but we do know that it happened This was It caught on. And then you know I mean it certainly wasn't an epidemic that you could measure in terms of You know any kind of virus or disease already kind of evidence of a real transmittable sickness but We do see evidence of it and it's the ballooning of these diagnoses. Yeah this is a this is a time win. Medical Science is wild. Maybe this is like these are the days of You know people people exploring all kinds of things in a pseudoscientific way. So they call Romania an impulse control. Disorder Lake KLEPTOMANIAC PYROMANIAC or dips o mania dipped so mania being the need to drink alcohol. There's there's what they Gosh I got it. My my favorite book in the entirety of this research is a book by Guy Named Benjamin Que Han or Khan and the name of the book is the book of minor perverts. You see that one no I. I did. Read the book of major perverts though But I I need to get a little more Minutia in the world of PERV. So that that'll be some good quarantine reading for me problems. It's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things things make things better? That's why so many people work with. Ibm On everything from city. Traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety smart loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit. Ibm DOT com slash. Smart to learn more everyone. Ben Bullen here host of stuff that I want you to know in ridiculous history as a podcast does. I am constantly reading and researching for upcoming episodes but even I need an occasional break so when I feel like I need some kind of mental pallet cleanser. My GO-TO REFRESHER IS THE MOBILE PUZZLE. Game best fiends. That's fiends not friends. Best fiends is a puzzle game. You can play right on your phone. It's pretty cool because you go through all these levels solving challenging puzzles that actually engage your brain but it's a casual game that anyone can play and it's actually Super Fun. The great thing about it is that it doesn't take much time but it's great because it fills up those moments where you wish you had something to do. You don't need an Internet connection to play so it's cool for when you don't have a connection. This game is also visually stimulating with these bright vivid colors and cute characters and best fiends updates. The game monthly with new levels and events so it never gets old best. Beans is a five-star rated mobile puzzle game on the apple APP store and Google play and you can download it right now for free. That's friends without the our best fiends. This author professor of English and Women's and gender studies at Louisiana State University. And they say that the D- Romania was one of a quote numberless family of perverts. That were highly specific and interconnected dromomania chaos says established stability as a key kind of condition. For what is normal or for what is seeing you know as heterosexual at least in in this professors opinion and I think you know that that goes back to what you were saying earlier about. How vagrancy was seen as such a violation of France's moral code and culture. You were supposed to be a family man and this was a challenge to it. Yeah it's true. I mean that that is probably the most fascinating part of it. I wonder if that It was so culturally ingrained Because again the original descriptions of this in the descriptions in This book That you mentioned these conditions. The descriptions really are it. Sounds like you know they're they're describing it with such harsh negatively as though to demonize these people as mindless zombies. You know wandering with no care to anyone but themselves or you know that it doesn't make sense to me I don't know what do you think that I'm. I'm really on the fence as to whether this was a quote unquote condition or whether it was just like a societal thing that was then they needed to be given a name so they could make it illegal at. I don't know yeah yeah I I'm right with you. It seems like there's a lot of public panic tied up into this. We know that D- Romania functioned almost the way that a would function because it disappeared almost as soon as it appeared in nineteen zero. Nine psychiatrist completely redefined the concept of what we call a few state and so instead of looking at a few state as sort of its own distinct separate thing. Psychiatrist understood it to be a symptom of a deeper mental conditions. Such as for example schizophrenia. And then of course World War One occurs European countries are ceiling their borders left and right so people like Datta can no longer take those easy train rides within what less than twenty five years. Diagnoses of D- Romania. Peter out and eventually you just didn't diagnose people without any more. It was a disease that disappeared. We put it that way. It sounds like a good thing right. It does sound like a good thing. Ben And I think we can pretty much wrap this episode of here for Today. But a little teaser. We've got a great episode coming out soon. That's going to be a companion to this about something called hysteria that was very much a Kind of hand in hand condition to this and it specifically involved women and something called Wandering Womb Syndrome. Which I've always found to be both a horrifically sexist and yet hilariously cartoonish concept Yeah they'll wandering uterus diagnosis and the the massage to relieve people. We'RE GONNA learn a lot about the horrible behavior of the Patriarchy in the medical community. We share our but before we wrap in what happened to Datta himself DA himself. Yeah well it's weird because I think we bury the lead here are buried. One of the leads did we mention that. Dada managed to not only get married but stay married for his whole life. Isn't that nuts? The Guy The guy. If he was a charlatan he was a damn fine one. Anti what do you mean? Like how how? What like. He just disappeared for weeks at a time and just came back and he goes. Hey honey had another one of the few states does need to give my wander on and the poor long suffering spouse who had to have the patience of a saint I eventually. She passed away from tuberculosis and their daughter is adopted by a family of gardeners so inbetween. His Fuchs states data would visit her And one day. She was apparently according to him abducted and soon after that. Dada himself was found dead in a well so things ended poorly for him. I hate to hear that Bannon but Yeah and now I mean when you live that untethered life sometimes things. Don't go your way. I don't know what I'm talking about. I I really I. I don't know what to make of this Guy Ben. I don't know what to make of this guy like. Do you think he was just completely irresponsible. In a terrible husband and father or really had a Legitimate psychological condition. Yeah I don't know man I don't want to cast unfair aspersion but there are a lot of things about this story that don't quite jibe with it being entirely a medical condition. You know what I mean. We're not doctors so we can't officially give this guy a diagnosis. But if I'm being completely objective it doesn't seem to entirely check out. And that makes me feel like we're very lucky to live in the world we live in today where quarantines aside quarantines notwithstanding. We can travel and we won't be we won't be called The downfall of society for doing so. I thought you were saying in the world. We live in now where we aren't allowed to leave the house at all On fear of fine. That's going into effect here in Atlanta tonight. I think it's six o'clock. It's a official shelter in place for. I think you'll get a ticket if you're caught going somewhere. I had some friends say that they were stopped and asked where they were going. Zilly today. Yeah Police State here. We come baby right. Yeah the lockdown. Here's beginning at six PM. There are a lot of essential businesses that will remain open. It's okay to travel to those this. Being Atlanta liquor stores are considered essential business and consumption has gone through the roof for the city. Oh I bet it has Bubba about the same But I'm definitely going to have a little happy hour with some folks on my team and I don't know if you're doing anything five thirty van you want to join our virtual happy hour. You're more than welcome Sir Thanks so much man. Only if Casey can come. Oh you know Casey can come. I'll I'll I'll send you a white claw in spirit. Thanks so much man. I appreciate that I actually. These virtual hang out meetings are killing me. I don't know you guys. I think I've got another one at six. That's why did last week though is going to invite you guys. I think I sent you the message last week. Wait are you doing with your folks at six? Yeah just some random co workers of ours. That'd be nice because we did it last week. Well then maybe we should've combine ours. Folks we don't need to get in the weeds about the details but as you can tell we're we're happy. We're safe We miss each other. We love hearing from you. I guess yeah. Let's see if we can get the band back together. What you're saying. Sounds like a plan. Thanks to you as always for being there in this difficult time and continuing to crank out. Ridiculous history hits Huge thanks and Super Producer Casey peg rum for being Manche Alex Williams who composed our theme Christopher Haciendas big. Thanks of course to Eve's Jeffcoat big. Thanks as always to people on the frontlines of the current situation. The grocery store workers the truck drivers the doctors the educators. I mean being a teacher is already a very difficult task. I think a lot of people are are learning that firsthand nowadays. So thank you listening. Thanks for hanging out. Stay safe you know and send. Us Send US bad jokes. Please do. We'll see you next time folks for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows if you're like most people who wear glasses or contacts you're probably not jumping for joy about not being able to see running out of contact lenses at the worst time or constantly paying for context just so they can irritate your eyes. That's why it just makes sense to look at. I look at the center. Lazic makes sense for your lifestyle for your convenience and sometimes even for your health but it also makes good financial sense especially when you register for twenty percent savings on i. Lease at the eye center head to the eye center dot com now to secure your savings and us. 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Maud Casey France Romania Dromomania Wanderlust DC IBM apple Casey peg Europe Ben Bullen producer Fuchs sickness Dromomania Habsburgs Google US
Nosy Boraha: The Pirate's Paradise (And Cemetery)

Ridiculous History

27:48 min | 1 year ago

Nosy Boraha: The Pirate's Paradise (And Cemetery)

"Is hard. But I was so afraid I could lose everything love is wonderful and confusing magical, and infuriating everything about life that we had thought and planned and hoped for was just in that moment gone. I was so so so lucky that join the millions of listeners who've made committed possible and promise you it's cheaper than therapy. Listen to committed on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Ridiculous histories of production of I heart radio. Are the hard are avast in a holy Philo. Ridiculous story ins welcome to the show today. We're diving into piracy, I guess diving next dental pun there. Hi, my name's Ben. My name's no doer pirates known for their diving skills, whether were maritime, and you know, I would I would think they would go to great lengths to stay as dry as possible. They were known for their nonconsensual diving skills where they had to walk the plank. I'm sorry. Bad. I felt bad about that with. No, it's very I think we all feel bad about that. But we feel great about our super producer. Give it up for Casey peg rope. Now, none of us here in the studio. And hopefully, none of you have been involved in acts of I r l piracy, let's be honest. It is twenty nineteen in these our modern days. Many people are digitally pirating things as about as say, I think we've all probably downloaded at torrent or two in our day. We're not advocating that here. But you may remember that very pointed trailer where it tells you about how piracy does hurt people. You wouldn't download a car. You wouldn't download a car you wouldn't steal. That's right. So we're not talking about that kind of piracy. We're talking about a much much more brazen. Former piracy, and I wanna start the show off by talking about the fact that in this age of political correctness, and you know, people getting canceled. Why aren't people talking more about how pirates probably aren't the best role model for little kids? You know, you still can buy pirate hats and pirates swords eyepatches with the jolly Roger on his. Sports team the sports team. It's a LEGO sets. You know, it's a it's a series of LEGO sites a series. I read it's a kids cartoon the pirates of dark water members. Oh, deep cut I loved it. I loved to there was sort of like future pirates. They were steam some elliptic Sifi pirates. You know, it's it's funny. Casey, you're mentioning that off the air is well, you specifically said are pirates due to get cancelled which I thought was a great point, man. It just seems like they get up to a lot of stuff. That's not so great. You know, the lowest of hijinks. So nowadays, we romanticize pirates. However, this was not always the case. And we should point out. Now that there are active pirates existing around the world, right? Some based in small era, so based off different coast. And these folks are not romance. Intisar, but we have in our collective brains. We have this idealized romanticized concept of pirate a swashbuckler. You know what I mean? A lovable rogue this romanticize ation begins in eighteen eighty three. It's weird because we can pinpoint the exact moment where it began it began. Arguably with Treasure Island by Robert Louis, Stevenson, so Treasure Island comes out, and you guys remember Treasure Island. Right. Of course, swashbuckling adventures on the high seas believe Long, John, silver, you know, all of the kind of like tropes of pirate nece were sort of solidified in that one book, and then it was taken and run with and everything from the pirates of dark water to the Disney Treasure Island to everything care of court hoodoo that would work the film franchise based on a ride an element the rides pretty. But it, you know, when you're a kid, but it's it's problematic. It is definitely as you said romanticizing things. But yeah, Treasure Island has this tremendous influence on how we think of pirates today. It includes all those things that we consider cliches or mandatory parts of pirate story treasure maps, have an X on the spot one legged sailors who have a trustee parrot. You know, what I mean all the hits all the all that slow cool jazz. But if we look at real pirates, we see a lot of distance between what they actually were. And what Hollywood would have us believe when we engage with things like talk like pirate day or watching pirates of the Caribbean nineteen or whatever whichever one they're how far they into that. How many how many deep are they? Well, Johnny Depp got cancelled briefly. And I think he's okay now, I can't remember because I think it may be turned out that his estranged wife was actually being abuse. Towards him. I saw that pop up in the press, and then it kind of went away. So that's yet to be determined. I know he's not in the next one. But they're doing it without they're doing it without him. Are they just going to get key Stewart to do it? I'm not you mean, Keith Richards. That's the one what are the keys one of the keys. I'm not discriminatory when it comes to Keith this guy named Keith. And they're giving some dreadlocks put him in the film, just kind of prop up with a bottle of rum is Keith Stewart affair aspersers. That's just a I think that's a guy who went to high school. It's possible care Keith Richards vied Nonni famous Stewart's except for Jon Stewart Rod Stewart. Okay. Well, you got me there. He did not go to scoop. But but yeah, yeah. It's amazing. This kind of this kind of vision this pop culture phenomenon exists, but we can weaken set the stage for today's show by looking at pirate fact versus pirate fiction first things. First the life of a pirate was grim. They were ruthless. This was a time of homicide. This was a time of murder if you think a captain Jack Sparrow realize in real life. He could have never become the captain of a pirate ship. He would have been killed by his crew was for wearing shadow. I think it was less less the Kohl liner and more the profound commitment to running away or that's right 'cause pirates didn't run away if anything they ran towards things, right? That's what they that's what they had to do. You know, they had to they had to capture these ships. We know that the most famous pirates were probably not the most successful as well. We also see this whole buried treasure thing. It probably happened several times, but it was not common. It was not normal. These guys pirates didn't live super long, they weren't like long term thinking, you know, what I mean? It's like one of the guys selling drugs in the wire is not wondering about what he's going to do when he's eighty because he doesn't think he'll make it. They're only here's the thing. Then some pirates did kind of live the equivalent of a twilight years retiring to Florida kind of situation didn't they did. They did nail on the head. This is something that the three of us recently found out about because we're all right? We we understand Hollywood doesn't depict a lot of the truth about pirates, the whole walking the plank thing are an I made those are those are kind of Hollywood creations. But some pirates did make it some pirates did as you say, no have a retirement plan. There is a small island off the coast of Madagascar that we call nosy Barat today. Weird. It's weird. It's weird one in the past. It was known as the summary. Casey. Could could you help us out with that? Yeah. You'll sound Mari. That sounds about right, Casey. And Ben on the case. Will end. No, I think that that predate that. But you nailed it in the first place. We just got a little bit of confirmation from our resident what do you? Call him a francophone. Yeah. Casey palim Casey peg of the man the myth legend. Do you sell stuff online? Then you know, what a pain shipping can be. It's time consuming. It's expensive. It's a hassle until now. 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Again, just off the Coast Madagascar a real life pirate paradise. Yeah. Win about in the neighborhood of a thousand pirates weren't out pirating. They can't this is kind of their summer home, you know, their off-season paradise. There was a map from seventeen thirty three that was discovered of this area. And it was simply headed with the island of pirates, and it is near the East Indies trade routes, very very centrally located to where these folks would have been pillaging and pirating and looting and raping their way across the high seas. It was very convenient. And it was the perfect place to it was like a real life Treasure Island inferior anyway, right because it was perfect tucked away location where they could hide all of their ill gotten booty. I like saying duty. Right. Yet since a pirate named Adam Baldrige started making that his base in sixteen ninety one this became a home away from home, or in some cases, legit I home for a lot of pirates. And it went on until seventeen nineteen with a pirate named John pro. There were multiple reasons for this tiny island to be attractive to pirates the first off enjoyed proximity to multiple trading routes. You know, what I mean this chips appear returning from the East Indies with precious goods, fine, fine, clothing spices. And so on. And then it had a bunch of bays and inlets that were protected geographically from storms. It was situated in quiet. Easy water. It had tons of fruit. You could just live off the land if you had to and so two r make their own rum or make their own room. Oh, that's probably more important than the fruit. That was a big big. I think yeah. I think you're right. And they lived in these little huts right there. Little wooden huts. And each one was marked with an emblem or one of the pirate the business pirate flags which presumably would have been different designs for the different crews that were under serving under these different captains. And also, wouldn't you think that some of these factions wouldn't necessarily be like vying for the same stuff like there wasn't necessarily like an overall brotherhood of pirates to my understanding? It was sort of like every man every crew for themselves kind of situation, and yet they managed to coexist on this. I land. That's true. Quite a few of them managed, the coexist. Maybe they had kind of a truce situation. But we're talking legendary real pirates William kid, Robert colored Henry Avery Abraham Samuel Thomas to and so on the island had a main town called embody Tatro, which is a mouthful, and they also had family here, you know, they met they met women who were native to the area, and they had children, and they evolved this sort of of non-criminal lifestyle, but the took a bunch of stuff with them. So the island today remains allegedly home to massive amounts of missing loot, or has you prefer, no booty booty, booty hearty. So we're talking gold. We're talking coins works of art religious artifacts, precious stone. Jones and legend has it that the treasurer William kid is still buried somewhere in this pirate island in the bay. The main town and people have been hunting around this area for buried treasure for decades and decades and decades and decades. But one thing that really fascinated us was the culture that sprang up on this island, particularly that there is an actual pirate. Cima terry. That's nuts. There's action there, you know, like the whole nine their tombstones, they're weird messages and codes and skulls, there's actually their skulls inscribed on the tombstone totally and the whole jolly Roger imagery. Yes. So it's not a huge one. It's on a hill. Shaded by palm trees, and it overlooks the ocean and pretty small only about thirty real life. I IRL L pirates are buried there. And they were buried there because they were residents of this island. This was their home away from their home on the high seas. I guess and you can still go visit the site today yet. Yeah, you can go tour it the same way that you could see another local attraction, it's only about three or four dollars to go US. There's a small pathway behind this law way wall, which is south of the capital and signs from there will lead you to the cemetery. There's a small hut where you can pay your entrance fee, and you can learn more about the pirates that are buried in the in the area, and then you can walk over to saint-pierre. The problem is that over the years surprised the prize not a lot of people have put time into taking care of the gravestones and the grave site. So. So a lot of a lot of graves in crypts were damaged because because of very understandable crime. I have to say guys if I grew up in this area, or if I were interested in in being around pirates and finding their treasure. I would totally miss what their graves because I would figure they would be buried with their stuff. Because again, I have a goonies level understanding of real pirates. Yeah. And to be fair, that's probably one of the more accurate pirate films out there. Right, right. Mine was Pippi Longstocking Pippi Longstocking. I do. Well, she a pirate. She wasn't. She was on a pirate ship. There was a pirate believe she served under a some sort of pirate. And she had a monkey right? I think so, you know, I mainly remember her hair. But it's it's true though. This is one of the misconceptions that's leading to pretty serious damage to this real life, pirate similar. -tary pirates. Didn't again, they didn't really bury treasure it could happen. But it was not commonplace. Instead, just imagine. If you listening and Casey Nolan I or or all together, and we're we're pirates were sailing Icees, and we rob ship, and we get our booty with the hard t-, then we're going to keep it on the ship. And then later will divide it up amongst ourselves. Again. This idea buried treasure comes from Treasure Island, and the x marks the spot the whole nine largely fictive the only person we know for sure to bury anything was captain Kidd, and the entire reason he buried his treasure was to keep it away from the governor of New York, he buried it outside of New York. I don't know like Yonkers or something. I'm kidding. He didn't do it in young. Endless thread, the podcast from WBU are featuring stories from read it presents infectious a special series on the strange passed in surprising present of vaccines in MTV Xers, which is tennis split strange place in the only people speaking up, the parents this story and this fight. It isn't just about right now, it can be traced back over centuries and today's battles are just the latest cycle. My personal guess is that somebody died of smallpox out in the in the middle of the Gobi desert somebody came upon their body and the body was succeeded and they briefed in the dust from the body. It's a cycle of medical experimentation in vacation and reaction. It's so Nazi Germany, and I hate to use that word, but it's so the healthcare industries goosesteps to vaccinate X innate next next Nate infectious coming may third. Subscribe. On apple podcasts or wherever you listen. So one of the I don't know slightly more. Well, known certainly not as well known as Billy the kid pirates that was laid to rest in this graveyard and spent a lot of time on this island was a French corps sair by the name of Ollivier Lavazza or aka Labouchere level. Casey, cricket astound effect for that. Of course, that means the mouth, I I don't know if he has some sort of weird snag tooth kind of situation going on or if he just talked too much, but apparently dead men tell no tales. But here's the thing. La Bouche did tell tales after his his passing in the form of a cipher. I know you're a fan of a good cipher. We're not talking about a freestyle rap at are. We know. But fun fact, I am actually very scarily good. If restyling yet we're talking about ciphers and a code so his executed in seventeen thirty four's, many, many, many many crimes as a scally wag of buccaneer and so on but apparently moments before execution he yelled fire. My treasure the one who may understand and hurled a necklace into the crowd, and this necklace had sort of note, but it was actually a cipher is seventeen line. Coded message, and you can see you can see photographs of this cipher on great article by Magellan times, the the cipher itself remained. It's uncertain today. Right. No one's cracked believe. That's true. And not not that it wasn't attempted. Because maybe it's just maybe no one's figured it out yet. I mean on the same article there is like a key with some of the little symbols and wet letter their present. But obviously didn't do trick. And not for nothing. People have been trying to find this for such a long time. There's a guy named berry Clifford who is a real life treasure hunter and somewhat successful to that. That's nuts to meet you guys. Think about that. Like, we're here in our podcast studio. And we're we're having a lovely time making shows and exploring these stories, but this guy is actually out hunting treasure. I gotta say if I had to pick another job no offense to you guys. But I would totally be. Treasure hunter. Would you guys be in like if we had a chance of finding treasure Steve Z, sue style? Yes. He was more like a naturalist. Doc go figure, but yeah, I'd be down, especially if you knew a good area to look where am I that being almost as though we've been talking about what might have been a hotbed of pirate activity boggles, the boggles the mind boggled, Barry Clifford's mind to the point where he decided surely there are remnants of sunken pirate galleys and all of the company muti littered throughout Saint Marie? He told the Daily Mail in two thousand fifteen pirates have more money than they could spend in ten lifetime. So surely their stuff squirrelled away in these little lagoons or in caves, or what have you? Yeah. So surely, you must have had complete success. And he is now very wealthy, man. Right. He changed his name to Jeff Bezos. No. He goes on. And he says he's like, yeah. You know back in the day if you were pirate this islands where you would go. What's where all the pirates hung out this guy, so haggard sounding? He's lived a hard life. You know, what I mean doesn't wear sunscreen? So it's very barely is very bad for your throat, not wear sunscreen, but he is been exploring the island for almost well more than twenty years. And during the time he's found thirteen separate distinct shipwrecks, and you can see you can see photos. You can see some of the stuff that he's that he's extracted from these crash sites or these some of these ships were probably scuttled to if they're damage was too. Great. And I know you love that word scuttle, but scuttled be rumors they scuttled. But I I said scuttled some of these ships were scuttled, I know that's your favorite word, but it would have been funny. If. It said some of these ships were scuttled, but it would have been. Yeah. Drew the jokes. That would have been everybody who's seat hunger games. Go ahead kiss your fingers. Do the wh what was that motion? Oh, that's always thought of that is sort of like a bad ass sign-off amount. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I think both of us have done that in social situations before. But anyway, yes, he is not found treasure Clifford has not he has however found religious artifacts. He's found ships, of course, pieces of ships one of his big one of his big recovery's was an early statue of Jesus Christ from the thirteenth or fourteenth century. So who knows whether you have a dream job or something? That's just sort of a means to an end right now. Maybe a career in treasure hunting is for you. It takes some dedication and sounds like it takes a lot of overhead. But. I would personally love it love it. If someone listening now actually found buried treasure. You know what I mean? Because even we know it was super unusual newest largely a myth. But that doesn't mean it's totally myth the treasures out there. Right. Also, hashtag, no guyland remind me about Oakland. Again the oak island money pit. We did a show on this for stuff. They don't want you to know and the oak island money in Nova Scotia is thought to be a site of largely unrecovered buried treasure. Now, this has also become a reality show phenomenon. So the producers got involved now, you'll see all kinds of here you go scuttle butt about about what's actually in the ground there. Thanks for doing that. For me. Ben. Hey, man, I got your back. So some things have been carbon dated some people. Have claimed that they found something. But they haven't found any significant treasure. The thing is there are real buried treasures out there. And I would I would love to be a part of finding one. So you know, it is up hit us up on ridiculous historians, if you have if you have a pitch for a likely site of buried treasure, you can find us on Facebook, where we are ridiculous historians to group that we have you might hurt if timer to we tend to mention you can join just simply by saying Ben in my name in the same way, you might summon genie in some sort of secret cave. And of course, there you will also see our good friends super-duper Casey peg REM and Christopher haciendas among others. You know, I notice of our co workers are sort of stealth hanging out on that page using that totally lurking. You can also find us on Twitter and Instagram if you want to get a peek behind the curtain you can follow you can follow us on our person. Instagram's I am at Ben bullet. I am at embryonic insider and big thanks super producer, Casey Pegam as always thanks to Alex Williams who composed our theme. Thanks to our here in spirit cohort, Christopher hus- yoda's who one day in a see the light about how. And let us know about your favorite pirate throughout history and let me know was Pippi Longstocking pirate. I dunno. I forget it was longtime ago. We'll see next time. For more podcasts from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. You know, it can be a little frustrating, especially if you're in a hurry or running late to find yourself at a railway crossing waiting for a train. And if the signals are going, and the trains, not even there yet, you can feel a bit tempted to try and sneak across the tracks. Don't ever trains are often going a lot faster than you expect them to be and they can't stop even if the engineer hits the brakes right away. It can take a train over a mile to stop. Yeah. By that time, what used to be your car it just crushed hunk of metal. And what used to be you? Well, probably better not to think about that. Agreed. The point is you can't know how quickly the train will arrive and the train can't stop, even if it sees you. The result is disaster. If the signals are on the train is on its way, and you just need to remember one thing. Stop trains can't.

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The Straw Hat Riots of 1922

Ridiculous History

43:41 min | 9 months ago

The Straw Hat Riots of 1922

"At IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city. Traffic to ocean. Plastic smart loves problems IBM IBM let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart to learn more ridiculous histories of production of I. Heart Radio Welcome to the show ridiculous historians. Thank you so much for tuning in. We've got some hectic energy today day we've got some good vibes going on We're going to have a riotous a time. Yeah we probably it was probably ill advised for us to snarl at BC powder before we started today. Don't you think right. I agree with you then. Oh yes no. I agree with you. There Super Producer Casey Peg rim who supports US despite our frankly problematic BC powder habits behavior? In general really is Is Not on a A abort abort exactly we are Abominations if you will podcast abomination But you know what today. We're GONNA have a good old fashioned Straw draw Ryan. You don't have to do anything that would be a super producer. Casey Pegam was pointing out just before the show that whenever there's anything riot two words yeah immediately your brain goes to the famed Cherry poppin. daddies seminal what do you could. He called swing dance. Hit swingers provided that whole thing. Because it was post Brian Setzer Orchestra. He was like a harbinger. Revival is what it was right because there was the revival was I mean even love cats by the cure is kind of a swing song. Robert Smith got there before and then Brian Setzer And then Cherry Poppin daddies. There was another daddy's there was the big bad voodoo data. I had their Their up now how squirrel the Zipper No no I know. Don't let me finish they. They I would not rank as swing revival. What I was going to say the studios does and Especially outlets like MTV on a percent wanted to package them together they were weirder though. Yeah they were more I I don't so far be it from me to accuse any of the swing musicians of being somewhat insincere but squirrel nut zippers. They were in it. They were of it they were like why should I by CDs. More of it was hit by CDs when I already have gramophone exactly we record exclusively on wax cylinders sir or Madam Record executive and that's the thing about It's your note about revivals thing. I love about revivals. 'cause once you have one it's it's always still it's now it's just a continual version of revival. We're acting like they're distinct but there's just positive between it's like once you start clapping until until you die you're never not clapping there. Just pauses between when you're clapping once you pop you can't stop. I know pringles right it just so and you know what else can have revivals. Level's been with the fashion. Hey turn to the left. You don't have to turn to the right if you wish but it's true. Fashion has revivals and it can be you know might be considered a fad for a minute but then if it really takes off it takes hold to gets his claws into the Zeitgeist it really becomes a full blown revival and that's kind of what we see I don't know maybe I'm maybe Overseeing the case a little bit but with the Straw hat riots of nineteen twenty two which is a real thing. You'll just have to believe us but we will prove it to you yes. Fashion fashion is a complex multilayered means of aesthetic expression. But it's also a means of social identification right even back to if you think. The fashion rules about wind aware white shoes and such are are strange range complicated. Now we have to consider that throughout human civilization there have been real legal fashion crimes like wearing purple when you're not royalty having having the wrong haircut which which is the deal with Labor Day and white. You're not supposed to wear before is it. After I always I don't know why is it only shoes or is it any white I I just. I think it's shoes but I I don't know I I learned that rule is how unplugged. I am from fashion. I I learned that rule by watching a film called serial mom who about a mom who's also a serial killer. That's a John Waters movie. Yeah I thought it was cool and that's when I learned something about when you wear when you should wear Shoes what is it I typed in into Google instant. Doing its job as usual. It's listening I typed in white shoes off and we immediately get the instant to white shoes after Labor a day white shoes after Labor Day movie third one white shoes after Labor Day. Serial mom crates. Google gets. I think she murdered somebody for wearing. I choose after Labor Day. Because she's a she's a real stickler for these fashion Rules he's Kinda type and that's what today's show is about. It's about fashion rules rules. Yes yeah so. Hats used to be a way bigger deal than they are now right and we wanna read just an excerpt from New York Times Times article. Good it's pretty good. You have it okay. I'll I'll do this for you. The next one Gangs of young hoodlums ran riot in various parts of the city last night smashing smashed on seasonable Straw hats and trampling them in the street. And some cases Bob's of hundreds of boys and young men terrorized hold box. Stop the presses. WHO's that it's not Vicki Vale? It's unseasonable Straw hats coming in. Yeah that's the part that made me chuckle as like these. You just some pedantic young hooligans aren't that yeah you can tell right from the onset. This was an issue of them being appalled in some way by someone wearing the half out of season by just a couple of days right. That's important part see. We figured out what was happening. Thanks to thanks to some fantastic Articles one of which was on history naked dot com Straw hat riots of nineteen twenty two and it turns out that there was this rigorous tradition amongst the male members of the population of the end of the nineteenth century and into the beginning of the twentieth and it was all centered on dressing in what was deemed appropriate for the season. This makes sense because there wasn't central. AC or heating right sure. I'm picturing you know boat shoes news. light docker shorts. No this probably is in trouble. We do have are these very light and airy straw hats and maybe a nice learns suit a Nice Linden success. Right they wouldn't shorts would have been way too untoward. You couldn't have gotten away with shorts. You probably would have been stoned to death in the streets. which is one of my favorite pastimes as you know from? Ah Yes that's right But yes straw hats. It was a very much fashionable to wear during the summer months Both fashionable and comfortable because because it would shade you from the Sun and it wasn't the thick kind of felt hats that you'd wear During the more wintry times of the year that were also considered very fashionable But here's the thing. After the fifteenth of September It was essentially fashioned mandates unwritten fashioned fashioned mandate to switch to. Those heavier felt hats. Yes this is. This is strange right because no one was considered fully clothed essentially essentially without a hat and would wear felt hat until may fifteenth fifteenth. You could switch to the straw hat and that would be fine. Fine on September fifteenth. You have to put away your Straw hat. You have to break out the felt hat again and woe betide those who do not follow. Oh this rule. Yeah you're essentially opening yourself up to a a light mugging Or at the very least you know being accosted by young fashion fashion-conscious Ruffians. Who really started taking this very seriously? possibly a little too seriously they were described as a group of overeager boys Who began to Do the old swipe and smash or you knock. Somebody's head off a very disrespectful. Move to begin with not to mention stopping it into the the filthy street. Yeah I wouldn't abide by that kind of behavior my friend will. I think the three of us are pretty easy. Going when it comes to how other people want addressing acidic should feel good. Wear flip my hat. I'M GONNA WE'RE GONNA have a good old fashioned throwdown. Yeah the flip. The flippers will be flipped. That's what what happens. Exactly and script gets flipped always. Yeah no lift off you know what all those things. This is a real combination of factors that led to an out an out. Street brawl Because here's the thing Initially you know these hooligans were Find a couple of bucks. Five five bucks wouldn't have been you know a poultry some in those days because after all this is a form of assault and destruction of private property. Right right it's illegal to smash hats and it's weird because we get a lot of information about this event from the New York Times. We we have another quote from one magistrate Peter a having no pun intended. That's his real name. I'm going to take take the pine as just right and natural. You know it really sets the tone for the story. It is against the law to smash man's hat and he has a right to wear it in January snowstorm if he so wishes. I made this judge a bit of a little foghorn. Will you know it's it's the whole the Linden. The fine linen suits we were talking about her. Yeah and he goes on I write this is a to me could crystallize this quote down to like the ultimate commits in righteousness. And good like this is like this guy laying down the law of what it means to be just to hit. A man's hat is a simple kimball assault and in this called. It will be treated as such and I want you to spread this word amongst all. Who would smash hats? It's reminded reminded me of like a Mississippi. I love this voices remind me of like Mississippi Five specifically that tent preacher and true detective. He's he's y'all true proof Isis right to me. It's more like Mississippi breeze gently brushing the hair from their forehead. Yeah Mississippi Breeze. That's the I think that's one of the Casey peg rail lines of signature perfumes. I think you're probably right Mississippi breeze you know about that sleek yes that is the line so why was this such a big deal. Why was the New York Times the most prominent paper the nation reporting on this so heavily? Well it's because the sort of created the fire or they definitely stoked the flames that would lead to out Out Madness in the streets. They had said that when they were explaining September fifteenth which was known as felt hat day at the time they said that it was indeed a mandatory thing and that any person who wore straw hat after this date may even be Bolshevik communal enemy potential subverter murder of the social order. That we are populating. The New York was of great care. I love it. I love us so people were it was like it was like the way people treat pleated pants. Sometimes right it was just It was terrible to wear them. Yeah and I got a question for you do you. Is it pants deal. Could you refer to as a pant. UK Yeah this is stacy London who says a pant. She's a fast fashion designers sea of love. Good Pant Yeah Yeah A pair of pants. Those always struck me as odd. Because you can't really just have one. I mean a pair. It's not a pair of pants would be just a single leg if it's a pair of pants well we've got to have to pant a to make a pair well. Would you say a pair of scissors. I would call it a scissor. I don't like pair of scissors. If it's just it's a scissor it's Detach it and it's just it's a knife that's right right exactly so Ben. It's a pair of knives bolted together. That's what we're GONNA call scissors years from now on. They're just a pair of by the way not to get too derailed. I'm really excited when I get home. I've been traveling when I get home in the mailbox. Waiting on me my first ever. Damascus steel kitchen chef's knife. Hey congrats man. Thanks but looking forward to maybe chopping off the tip of my finger by accident. All the pros. Yeah you gotta earn it. It's like accusa rules in a moment chefs Hackley and also the other rulers. You got to cook with the tip. You don't get to put the tip back on us. It goes into your your spaghetti and your spaghetti. Whatever whatever you're making question for you sure? Have you heard of a tradition in the. US Senate called Seal Succoth Thursday. I have yeah. Is that the same as sucker. Free Sunday they're related. Okay probably they're both in English. Tell me about seersucker. Thursday seersucker Thursday is seeing in the US Senate where people wear wear seersucker suits. They're awesome. I highly recommend them of one myself. What makes it a seersucker? Is that a pattern or is it the fabric. You know what it's it's is cotton and it's a type of we've gotten also known as railroad stripe. Isn't that right. So it may be does have a bit of a textured appearance to being breathable and comfortable and that is an example of this kind of focus on Seasonal wear and tradition. That has a maintain into this day. seersucker Thursday as a popular thing in the US Senate Hats of course were a big part of this kind of thinking. Back in the day The hats aren't really so much part of the you know you don't really see senators wearing hats anymore. Not Not anymore but back then of course in the twenties yeah everybody wore hats And the weird thing is this September fifteenth is felt hat day. No one knows why that day was chosen. It just suddenly suddenly became a rule and really the logic really breaks down when you consider that summer doesn't end until September twenty twenty-first so for some arbitrary reason the The the Zeitgeist said September fifteenth. Was the day you could no longer wear a straw hat. You what it reminds me of there. There's a thing that's kind of conspiratorial in the fashion world. Where apparently thing? Once a a year once a season these different luminaries of fashion a modeling meet up and they decide which colors are going to be the cool all callers. Have you heard about that. I mean I I have no doubt that there are these private of fashion luminosity type meetings the going to this day I hope they're descended from the people who did these is bs with these hats. I bet it is. I mean. That's exactly what you're saying at the top of the show. Bend the idea of fashion curation. It really is a almost hierarchical kind of aesthetic nick thing whereas look at today like some of the clothes the Gucci and For Saatchi and some of these really luxury fashion lines put forward. They're kind of bizarre and ridiculous looking. Let's be honest. Oh not functional or comfortable in the least so this kind of goes into that. I mean heavy suits weren't really comfortable. Those kind of hats you know there was a certain Stuffiness to it all that maybe meant you know. I am My station dictates that I must constantly be a little bit uncomfortable and to lean into staying comfortable wearing that straw hats past the point of no return that was an affront this entire arrangement right. Yeah Yeah it reminds. Did you ever see thirty rock. Oh Yeah Yeah. Were you a thirty rock fan. Casey actually never saw it. I'll man you are in for treats. There's there's a character played by Alec. Baldwin who has a great line and Liz Lemon Tina fey walks up and she finds him dressed in a Tux and she was. Why are you wearing a Tuxedo? And he goes. It's after six. Lemon what am I th armor. So these kinds of people were very vulnerable to these sort these mandates In the world of fashion and of course the ideas pretty pretty obvious you stick out like a sore thumb. I if you are Still wearing your straw hat. When autumn starts people think you don't get it you're naive or your aerob- you're kind of dumb dumb and this was taken so seriously seriously in multiple? US cities that police had to intervene. Pittsburgh press said In nineteen ten that police were protecting Straw draw limited pedestrians right and it was it was acceptable for stockbrokers like your friends could knock off your hat. Yeah like you know just as a playful all kind of Josh Punch in the shoulder. Kind of move right. Yeah Yeah but strangers especially young hoodlums. I say I say no Sir that I will not stand and that Pittsburgh press article went on to say if the in formality should become general there will sure to be a number of obstinate. Stinnett gentlemen most likely with English blood in their veins. Who Will Cooley precede to treat the fun making as a physical assaults and defend themselves elves in a manner which will spoil the fun for all concerned the press added you gotTa love the The Casual Eurocentric. Oh centric racism here. The implication like well Irish people are going to be fine with this. You know watch out. Watch out for the English because because we all know how they are. They're humorless is what they are that's joyless and they they just can't take a joke. Apparently the rate a fly off the handle at any given remould hot tempered hot blooded. Oh I'm just kidding. English friends out there. We know that you're all coolest cucumbers or prone to anxiety and violence just just as much as any of us here. We go glass half full half empty Yeah UK listeners. Let us know where that stereotype comes from and You know we'll still be your friends if you have a straw hat. Regardless of what day of the year it is this episode of ridiculous history is brought to Hubei mood. Dot Com and online print design company specializing in custom premium print products. I love premium business. Guard deal with a letter. Press and the that that you know that paper feel the tactile sensation of raised text. Perhaps a bone paper stock there. We go there we go. Does that heavy stock. This is the kind of stuff you can find with mood. Dot Com their remarkable premium qualities. What sets them apart and it allows you as a customer to set yourself and your business apart and leave a lasting impact and they might not have American psycho bone but they do have special finishes like gold and silver foil oil letter press and raised spot gloss that allows customers to add extra dazzle perhaps razzle absolutely shine and texture to truly truly stand out from the crowd and yet move dot? COM makes business cards. But that's not all. They also make postcards greeting cards invitations stickers letterhead in notebooks so you can have an entire suite of things that are branded for you or your business. It's true there are more than just a printer. Moo.com partners with their customers like us to make our ideas into realities. Whatever it takes whatever print vision? You might have mu offers as much or as little support as you might need need to make it happen. Their award. Winning team of print experts is here for you and has been there for us to show that they care about quality as much as we do. But you don't have to take our word for it. Try It yourself today. For a limited time you can use the code to get fifteen percent off of everything at mood. Dot Com vets dot Com Promo Code history for fifteen percent off anything so that it was Pittsburgh but the straw hat stuff really reaches a breaking point in New York in the big apple because like this is one thousand nine hundred eighty two right so this twelve years after that Pittsburgh article the entire time people have been obeying this straw hat rule and it has become mm so accepted that it's just understood that you can't really walk down the street after felt hat day with a straw hat without some mm kid snatching it off stopping it in front of you and the Kennel get away clean. No one cares. Let's just point out too that this took a hot minute to reach critical mass right. It was a good twelve twelve years before the this kind of playful hat flipping you know. started that a full blown. zoot suit riot went into effect. I'm sorry excuse me Straw hat riot. It's tough tough one casey. You really really messed us up on this. One of brain poisoned everybody brain brain poisons. It's Great Casey. On the case so on September Thirteenth Nineteen twenty two just two days before the straw hat ban was supposed to go into effect. Young men jumped the gun. They started grabbing and stomping the straw hats factory workers offers in The specific section of Manhattan Mulberry Benz. And then the gang tried to do the same stunt on a bunch of dockworkers but dockworkers like the Wu Tang clan are nothing to F- with and the men didn't say well we got our house. What are what on earth to do? No they started laying hands started swinging. A fight broke out. Yeah a literal street brawl We know it was the street because we we heard we read that it stopped traffic You know no small task laterano like New York traffic moves at a snail's pace anyway but this definitely was was a disruption right It was on the Manhattan Bridge and police Actually had to make arrests break-up the what's a good. What's a good word for for the Fracas Brouhaha Brouhaha? Indeed they had to break it up. and sorry this. This is an from a mental floss article and I think this is there. Were the words of the the writer. Their mental floss Mark Manzini scores of rowdies east side and in other other parts of the city started smashing hats. Oh that's from the Times. That's of course that that sounded like a little bit of anachronistic language rowdies. I liked that scores of rowdies On the east side and and other parts of the city started smashing hats Palese reserves were called out Straw hat. Bonfire swertz started had In seven men were convicted of disorderly conduct in the men's night court. Okay full. Stop the men's night court. Love this I I don't I don't know what it is but I I just I like the concept of them is night court. I'm just very pro night court. Because of that Sitcom I never really watched the whole bunch of it at an age where I I can understand it but man. I love that theme song. I think I'm not alone in that. I think a lot of us say we like sitcoms but we actually just dig the theme song you know has theme song lyrics now it's It's got the it's it's this really cool instrumental that starts with the base on or something like that. Yeah right why am I thinking. I'm thinking of the law and order theme for obvious reasons. That one's pretty based heavy too right. Yeah and that one's got ah the divey Guitar. Yeah Yeah and the you know the law and order theme that we don't use anymore so stop coming after as Dick Wolf Straw Straw hats off. That's not featured in theme at all. It's its own thing. I I thought that missed opportunity. So yeah it's cute. The first sound is Dick in the second it can sound is Wolf. You know I I WanNa meet the guy I want to say that I know someone named I want to refer to them as the Dick Wolf Casey. I see you say something. There's a guy on that show. I think he's either a pretty lead or a writer. Yes feed we. His two classic names just you know murderer's row of great and it's in every credit credit like since the beginning of the show that's your Dick Wolf and he got your speed. Yeah also the guy who composed that themes a guy named Mike Post if you look at his credits. He's just like every every memorable theme you can think of from certain era. He's he's pretty much responsible for if he's still alive. It'd be fantastic to interview. He is yeah he's still around. I'd love to hear stories. Metal's wikipedia page right now. Do you think he did the perfect strangers team. I mean it didn't Amaz- it's an amazing thing. It's a huge roster of stuff it's like law and order arrests view the a team in Wapiti blue renegade ROCKFORD FILES ELLIOTT LAW QUANTUM LEAP MAGNUM P. I I love the quantum leap. Yeah yeah that's great. That's a good one uh-huh my gosh. That's a really good one. What happened in the Sitcom themes music lake those theme songs used to be so engaging bent? You know I've been. I've been pushing you and bugging you about how you got to watch the leftovers. This might do it for you. Maybe it has a perfect strangers tie in okay and one episode. In the in the last season they change out. The theme theme song for every episode. One episode is the perfect strangers. Theme Song Will Definitely Watch that episode. No I'll give it a go. I'll give it a go Okay but Apologies for that for that slight Derailment I'M GONNA give us one more. Twist and turn gentlemen. What do you think are odds of success would be if we wrote to Dick Wolf himself and said Hey? We're huge fans. We do we do this little podcast and we would love. Love your permission to use this awesome sound cue because we talk about you all the time. So when did hit us up on facebook right and they said that that little dungdung sound apparently apparently like a a preset on a on a sampler no way so it's you know arguably you could kind of like recreate it or something and probably be mostly in the clear. Wow I still need to find I I tried to Google it and I couldn't find too much on it but Whoever whoever told us that thanks for the note and we will try to figure it out? Yeah I gotTa say though Casey I kind of prefer your casey fide version. You know it's more personal as more of a personal touch and I think it just makes the audience the INS and US feel closer to you. It's got to be weird for people who have not heard the older episodes only know the new Q.. And you're done. Yeah I Yeah I know. Let's let's see if we can reach out If we can. I'm sure we can do figure out a way to do it legally but it'd be nice to have the blessing of the Dick Wolf. I actually we know a couple of folks who have been like guest spots on episodes of of law and order like back in the early nineties. But honestly that's like every actor in In the world yeah particularly special connection. We're of the age now where Some of our friends at least in my friends. My Peer Group are are appearing on the law and order stuff. That's still running like Svu right the weird one it enormously popular really is ice tea. Who has is John? Mullany points out is continually baffled. Every time he learned something that people in Svu should already know. Totally isn't Vincent in Ontario in that one or is he in another series. There's so how many of those I think he's injury series. NCIS navy unconnected. They're all kind of they'll bleed together now. He did it for me. As kingpin daredevil. Netflix series is quite a good job he he was awesome hats. Do a good job of getting back to straw longest diversion ever but honestly a personal favor in a career highlight. It was worthwhile. You Know Casey. I'm always learning a lot from you so this night of September thirteen traffic is stopped. There is as you said. Knowle's street brawl all the New York Times reports the next day on September fourteenth. That straw hat riots embroiled the e side and this is where we see see that quote from magistrate having again that is his real name and people are calling for civility calling for an end to the violence. They are unsuccessful. chestful in this because the riots continue the next day and then the day after that they moved from the east side to the upper west side. There are some people who say you know what we're gonNA wear these hats until the fifteenth. Because that's the rule we live in a society. Fight me and mobs of hundreds of boys when young men again for that quote terrorized entire blocks the kids. The teenagers started roaming the streets with sticks that literally had nails on the end. This is Mrs a some next level mischief is what this is this is Lord of the flies is. But what's what's at play here. Ben Is it a is. Is it a class divide situation. Are these youngsters potentially of a lower class and they resent the fashion east elites and perhaps that's why they're just looking at anthem as easy targets. Because I'm not I'm not sensing I'm not quite clear on like what the operating principle is here like. I think the kids just wanted to mess with some rich people and then it got out of hand. Yeah we don't have a lot about the Possible class motivations. That's what I think makes this way. Shining example example of ridiculous history feels like it just got out of control. They just slippery sloped into this box of bananas. Wait wait. But we haven't haven't even gotten to police mandated spankings yet. Bats the thing all right so we do want to say those Those nails on the ends of the sticks they weren't to puncture the People's heads. I know they were to help hook the straw hats off clearly. A of course you're going to do that. How do you judge someone not by what they say by what they do? We're a nation of doers. What's Mike Bloomberg about doing things? A middle class kid worked his way through college and Entrepreneur Noor Bloomberg built a global news information business from scratch mayor of a diverse progressive city. Mike Bloomberg rebuilt after nine eleven. Creating nearly five hundred thousand thousand jobs improving healthcare and public schools. Now he's running for President and Mike's the change. We need from chaos to steady leadership from allies to someone who believes in facts data from divisiveness to someone who builds teams nurtures good ideas and hold himself accountable for results. Mike Mike Bloomberg knows how to lead to build to deliver to do. He'll win night. This country Mike will get things done. I'm Mike Bloomberg candidate for president isn't and I approve this message because we need to deliver on. The premise of the American dream paid for by Mike Bloomberg Twenty Twenty so police did ultimately intervene. And as you said There were kind of gangs of these roving Thugs going from on the east side of the upper west side Amsterdam Avenue was Supposedly just like the whole block was full of Straw hat enthusiasts. So here's the thing A lot of these these boys these are they were kids. They were under the age of fifteen So they weren't arrested because they weren't of. I Dunno I guess Esi Coulda sent him to Juvie or whatever but The cops came up with the different attack for their disciplinary measures. Didn't they been yeah. Problematic highly problematic by today's standards. Yeah yeah so a lot of these. A lot of these anti Straw hat. People were our children are under age. Fifteen and they weren't arrested Instead they were spanked that they were given a thrashing ashes and so we know. At least a few instances that police New York in the at the height of the riots when they catch these these scam. AMC scalawags doing their hat related crime they would capture and probably you know yanked him by the collar their neck and ear possibly by the ear it was that era and then they would invite the fathers of the boys to come to the station and spank them instead right. Which how humiliating if you're fourteen or fifteen eighteen in public a public spanking yeah? It'd be hard to come back from them. I think is the most impressive to me about this. These these young hoods the. They seem pretty organized. You know it really was like a an act of domestic terrorism will all be pretty you know low grade domestic terrorism symbolize. Some of them would like hide in doorways before. Like leaping out like some sort of jumping spider boy shape spider and attack them in and knock heads up There there was a report from Ripley's DOT COM A man by the name of E. C. Jones made the claim that one thousand teenagers were participating in a quote roaming mob there on Amsterdam Avenue so they how are they communicating with each other. Was it just like organically it. Just kind of organically happened. It was just something in the air that we have to seat search and destroy these offending Straw hats again. It's difficult to explain really difficult. It's almost like one of those Salem witch each trial hysteria. Almost you know I mean. Obviously nobody was hanged or burned or anything. But it's still a little little strange. It makes I think the question I believe me of come from family guy but its origins are old question of Realistically if you're if you're listening an an adult realistically how many five year olds do you think you could successfully taken a fight. Think this through and I'm not none of us are condoning toning violence against children tireless. Thought experiment like what. If they're six year olds that changes it. They're a little more agile. He'll do find yourself a narrow hallway. Yeah they they come running at you they can only hit you wanna time and you just kinda punt them. That's what they say. Family got no way no way is it. Yeah are you sure. Pull that out of my Yeah that's exactly it's either there. Yeah I think it's exactly what they family got. Well that's parallel thinking right there. My friends I have not seen. I think it's family guy but that is that is in that. Show the correct answer and this was real life problems during the straw hat. Riots didn't have any five year olds necessarily but you know definitely had children yes One man who is twenty five was kicked and beaten by these kids so badly that he had to go to the hospital and police officers were also victimized. One one detective sergeant was his hat was stolen and he was trying to chase the kids like you dirty scams and then he tripped and fell into a gutter full of trash and every time the authorities were break up a gang. The kids who scattered would just go find another neighborhood and join up with bore people. This did work out very well for one group when very small group in New York the hat store owners. It's right because I guess everyone needed a new hats after they'd been stumped. I gotta get a felt hat. Oh okay so there is either that or maybe you double down. You're like you know what no one's GonNa stop my Straw hat. I'M GONNA go buy me a fresh easy right now But as things tend to do fashion moves in cycles. You know you've got like much like the Cherry Poppin daddies and the the zoot suit. Revolution Revival Not Not so much revolution. That's not corrected more of a revival Straw hats fell out of favour. Didn't they did. They replaced by things like Panama. Jack hats which are infinitely less dorky. Yeah because after the straw hat riots. Twenty two this hat hat snatching. Tradition phenomenon continued for a few more years. No one died in the nineteen twenty two riot but one man was According to reports one man was killed in nineteen twenty four while he was trying to fight back against some hat. stompers ANS- ads Calvin coolidge president. Calvin coolidge was spotted. One time wearing now. Try To restrain your your Your your scandal Randall. Here he was spotted wearing a straw hat on September eighteenth. This got covered on the front page of The Times. How dare you coolidge coolidge? SORTA like what Obama were. That was lost their minds so after he so he may have played a role history here because after he said you know after he said. I wear Straw hat when once people eventually started following his example and hat smashing died out now as he said. The Panama Hat became much more fashionable. And I do want to say that. It is tempting for us to look back and think. Oh how silly how L. Sushi and how like a young adult or roll doll novel. This is but the truth of the matter. Is these arbitrary opinions about fashion. Like I believe give you similar to know they continued today for instance. I was thinking of hats. Stereotypes in one of the big ones. Is that the trilby we were the FIDORA right has become associated with What are called Nice guys on the Internet right? What is this as a euphemism? The museum or just means kind of like Vanilla Dorky guys like a creepy edge Lord. Okay you know what I'm talking about Casey. It's yeah it didn't it. Start kind of with the whole pickup artist thing in that kind of blood over MRI thing and there's a stomach now it's sort of like shorthand for. I don't know certain kind of Guy I'll tell you where it really started with was with Justin Timberlake. He he really turned the fedora on its hat he can pull it off though. I think it's like I. I think the the problem was the the problem was for people who objected to those hats That they needed a quick shorthand way to authentified different demographics right To Casey's point you named three prime examples and then They also were irritated. That people would where these hats but then also be wearing a tee shirt and cargo shorts again. We fall very much on this side of letting people do and where what they want. As long as they're not hurting someone else to do. Otherwise is just it's just not on it's ridiculous to tell people what they can or cannot wear but thank God you know. I don't even own a straw hat do you. Do you have a straw hat. And I traffic exclusively in baseball hats and trucker hats Casey. You're not a straw hat guy no although There is like a good practical reason for having them if you have to do a lot of outdoor work or something so so even on like a film shoots in that kind of thing. Sometimes you'll see people with Straw hats. And it's a smart thing to do. Usually it's accompanied by giant smears of sunscreen indirectly under the eye. Exactly if you really want to complete the ensemble you get the piece of Straw teeth kind of you know lean into it really do and we. You want to hear your opinion on hats. Are there Hatzi love or their hats that you hate. Is the straw hat set for a revival just like swing music. What do you call that kind of half that? You're wearing this very moment then. This is a flat cap. A flat cap sort of like the type. You'd see a London Cabbie wearing perhaps yes. Yes approachable working. Class U K hats. I like this. This was a gift. So it's a it's a lucky hat fact. Yes and and it seems to be working for you because I've always considered to be a pretty lucky dude. it's also kind of similar to type of hats that Samuel L. Jackson Wears Usually of the KANGOL angle brand. Yeah there's also known as scally caps in the US we call it Driving cap my favorite name for it probably comes from New Zealand where it's called a cheese cutter cheese cutter so yeah we WANNA hear we want to hear about your taste in hats We WanNa hear whether you think the straw will return and we want to hear more about your ideas for the silliest riots that ever occurred you can tell us any number ways where all over the Internet you can find us on facebook. INSTAGRAM twitter We specifically like to recommend our facebook page ridiculous historians. Sure all you gotTa do is conjure the names of myself Ben or KC peg rooms who've producer. That he is or upon of some kind is let us know that you're you're not a Russian bought or bought of any other nationality. We don't discriminate against bots. We just don't want him on facebook. Page you can also find us as individuals on social media. I'm on instagram exclusively. At how now Noah Brown dialogue on Instagram at Ben Bullen. You can also find me on twitter where I'm talking all kinds of trash on at Ben. Bullen H. W. thanks. Thanks as always to Alex Williams who composed their track. Thinks you Casey peg group and we're going to follow up on that tickle stuff. Thanks to gate of or be without gave Luger our research associates thanks to Jonathan Strickland Aka the quitter constantly keeping us on our toes For being got US very friendly throats. Join them that's not true. I hate him on killings on act. He's a good friend of ours thanks to him for resetting our our count for the year right. That was nice. You have to do that do that now. He also owns a straw hat. I bet he does. He seem like the off. Was He inexpensive for more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows Jerry. Yang rocker is a podcast coming of age story about finding a home in rock music and learning to flourish in your own weird way. It's also a series of letters of advice to my younger self as she navigates the pressures of adolescence seals with social anxiety body issues and relationships and discovers the transformative power of music during rocker comes from double elvis productions is created and hosted by me Chelsea Ersan and executive produced by Jake. Brennan of Graceland listened to dear rocker on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts.

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How Robert "The Fastest Knife In The West End" Liston Conducted A Surgery With A 300% Mortality Rate

Ridiculous History

31:32 min | 1 year ago

How Robert "The Fastest Knife In The West End" Liston Conducted A Surgery With A 300% Mortality Rate

"Jerry Lewis v. Wave seditious Kurt Kobe, also Amy wine-house, Johnny cash and more disgrace them rock and roll true crime podcast stories about -sition getting away with murder behaving. Very badly is available now posted by me. Jake Brennan, you can listen to disgrace of the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Ridiculous histories of production of I heart radio. Hello. Thank you for tuning in. Today's question. Did you ever want to be a doctor when you grew up or you are you a doctor listening now if so what kind of specially love to hear from some surgeons? Hi, I'm hi, I'm no. And when I get blood drawn I have to look away in close my eyes in breathe slow earl's pass out because blood and the whole idea of the human body weirds me out the human body overall. Well, no, just the stuff inside. Okay. Should stay inside remaining inside. I would prefer that to be the case. I don't like cutting in movies never liked it. When people get cut this story today was a bit of a stretch for me in terms of my own personal constitution. I see. That's what you're talking about this. Yeah. We've also got our super producer Casey peg in the house. Casey, do you ever think of being a doctor when you were a we take? No that was that was never one of my kind of growing up wanna be things. The how do you feel about the sight of blood? I'm okay with the sight of blood in general, I don't like the side of my own blood. So I don't like getting blood taken, you know, all that kind of stuff. I'm not a fan of all he didn't ask menial. I think I have a feeling you seem like a bit of a fearless iron gutted figure to me. You always have. But no do tell it's that's very kind of you. I I I have a life of fraught with strange FU be is the terrify me like touching metal. Or have you detach cardboard who blood is kind of metallic does that fall into that category? For you only if a drink. So usually I having to do survival training kind of stuff gets you over that initial squid or squeak pretty quickly. But I don't go out of my way to get in situations where I'm looking inside people or something because if I were to do that, then I would probably be better suited to be a surgeon rather than a podcast and today's episode is about surgery there is some graphic stuff. Nola check in with you to make sure that we don't go too far out of a comfort zone. I will be the bellwether of whispery in this woman. You're the you're the Canaria the cave bite of carnage. Yes. The coal mine cave. But yeah, no slight trigger. Warning. If you didn't already catch the drift stories kinda gross. There's some gore, and we're not going to be superb descriptive about it. Because God knows I'll pass out on the floor right here in the shipping container. But. But just a heads up. If this isn't the kind of thing that you wanna listen to than don't. Fairly. This is also darkly comic. And to begin the story we're going to need to introduce you to a fellow named Robert liston born on the twenty eighth of October seventeen ninety four he is a Scottish surgeon, and he was known for being a bit of a Shobin is a bit cocky, kind of show boat kind of David Blaine stage magician vibe, I don't know if that's something you want in a surgeon if a surgeon was a peacock d this guy. Yes. Who's bantam? Indeed. As you know, I'm scared of birds to guests. So this is a bird sergent peacock surgeon is like my worst nightmare. Welcome for the nightmare that you're going to have this weekend. So so Robert liston, though was one of the best most widely known surgeons of his time. He got his education at the university of Edinburgh and became the first great northern anatomist of Blackwill's magazine. And by eighteen eighteen he was a surgeon at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh and his legacy contains stuff that is primarily found in the medical community. You know, like inside trade info, and then stuff that made it into popular culture. Listen was very very well known for his the speed at which he conducted surgery here in defend tastic nickname, which was the fastest knife in the West End, which is clever on a couple of levels. In fact, there's a little story. That's that's an mental floss article called on the table. If one of history's most infamous surgeons by guy named Matt Sonia that describes a particular surgery where listen actually asked one of his assistants to set a timer. So that he could show off how quickly he could amputate a gentleman's leg. And I'm going to review a, quote, it's very visual love it. He was the man grabs your leg and begins to cut just below the knee continues to hold onto your leg. As one of his lackeys gets attorney kit around it to freeze cutting handy. Clasps the knife covered in your blood in his teeth and picks up a saw he cuts back and forth through the bowl drops the severed part of the leg into a bucket filled with sawdust, and so's you up to the applause of the men sitting in the wings. They've timed the whole bloody procedure get it from first incision to clipping the loose threads on the sutures at just two and a half minutes and that. That quote comes from the journalist, Matt Sony AC who has this fantastic article about listen. So in two and a half minutes, he has performed an amputation his style may of seemed really cavalier, but we have to remember this is before so many of the medical discoveries in technical improvements that we have today. Yeah. I'm guessing they may have given ether back, then I would have been something they at least had their disposal, right imagine. But this is the age before widespread anesthesia true, so maybe hundred I don't wanna sound like an ignorant person you want to go to surgery like I said, it kind of freaks me out. So let me look into it too heavily. But one thing I know from this research is quite often, no one was given anything, and there was a whole lot of just absolute screaming in horror and terror fight down on down on this while assistance, literally had to hold the person down while the surgeon. So speed was kind of the name of the game yet, and no one was faster than listing. There is even a story. I read in the in a Gizmodo article or on nine article that talked about how sometimes people would flee the operating table like just like lunging away with a snail trail of blood left behind them yet because the other people lost their grip the assistance. So yes, speed is key here it not only minimizes the patient's pain, but it also improves their odds of surviving surgery. You know, it can be a little frustrating, especially if you you're in a hurry or running late to find yourself at a railway crossing waiting for a train. And if the signals are going, and the trains, not even there yet, you can feel a bit tempted to try and sneak across the tracks. Well, don't ever trains are often going a lot faster than you expect them to be and they can't stop even if the engineer hits the brakes right away. It can take a train over a mile to stop. Yeah. By that time, what used to be your car? It just a crushed hunk of metal. And what used to be you? Well, probably better not to think about that. Agreed. The point is you can't know how quickly the train will arrive and the train can't stop, even if it sees you. The result is disaster. If the signals are on the train is on its way, and you just need to remember one thing. Stop trains can't. Listen is not only very very fast. He's also very very good for the time. If you went into listens operating theater, you only had a one intentions of died, which I doubt sounds terrible. It does pretty terrible. But let's compare the competition. Their rate of death was hovering around one in four. Yeah. So you can see why you would wanna go to listen, right? Sometimes patients would camp out would literally sleep inside his waiting room for days waiting to see him. Hey, can you imagine the scene? Be can you imagine the smell, right? He tried to see every single one of his patients Louis was a little bit cocky, you know, he had a good heart when it came to helping people which is another reason the speed factored into it. So importantly, because you can't see people if you're, you know, taking your time with that old saw. Yeah, we have to remember. This era, hospitals were very scary. Intimidating places. People walked in having made peace with their creator thinking. Well, this might be might be it for me. I think it's just a cough. The we'll see and listened understood that he thought he had responsibility for his patients feelings so he wanted to have a thorough knowledge of anatomy, pathology, all that slew jazz all the good stuff and also be a good diagnosis of symptoms. But he also wanted to be compassionate. So it's very easy for us. Looking back to forget that softer aspect of his persona. He did care about people. It was crazy good. But he did care about people. And it's kinda like Tony stark in the moral comics or the C you because you know, he's kinda air again these a bit of a show off. But. These got a harder gold underneath that. Here's one example. That's very Tony stark of him listed loved treating cases that his fellow surgeons had dismissed the surgeon say, well, there's no way I'm going to do that because you'll die. It's an incurable condition. Good day, sir. I said to you good day. There would go to listen. And you say, oh, they say they can't it can't be done. This can't be done. It will prove them wrong. Start the Tiber. Exactly. Yeah. So I mean, it's it's interesting combination of compassion and cocksure bravado for sure and what ends up happening enters into the big part. The quite disturbing part of our story. Is that very thing. It's a combination of all those factors kind of playing into a perfect storm of horrible outcome. That's right, though. He was good. He was not perfect. And sometimes like it's his hubris was his downfall. Once for example, listen was in such a hurry to amputate a leg that he accidentally cut a patient's testicles off along with the leg. Yeah. Like he saw too close to the taint. Yes. His most famous story along these lines happens this way, there's an operation smells operation. Right. He's moving. So so very fast that he takes off the fingers of his surgical assistant. He's cutting through a leg and he cuts through his assistance hand while holding the patient down. That's right. And again after member this patient would have been struggling it was no small feat to restrain these folks. I'm sure there were some restraints involved too. Like having them strapped down. But you can't have somebody flopping around the ca- fish when you're trying to sort through their leg. So not only did he miscue as fingers I think part of this had to do with he at aimed too high. And he saw through up the. Upper hip or near the hip area. Which is probably where the assistant was gripping him to get purchase to keep him held down. Exactly. And this already does the stuff is happening quickly. This is not ideal. So he's not going to stop the surgery, though, the show must go on. So he switches instruments throws one thing into that to the floor to bucket Assan us or what have you and then while he's switching instruments. I you can't see here, folks. But I am doing a pretty fantastic arms-flailing impression here. He's which hits the Ritz still trying to figure out how this happens because he must have been just throwing his arms wide. There's a spectator. Standing nearby just watching the surgery because that's what people used to do. And he slashes the spectators coat with this bloody instrument. And this guy goes just the onlooker freaks out. First of all, I'm not trying to you know, three under the bus here. But that's. Spectator was probably a little too much of a hovering. Lookie louis. Probably should have been keeping his distance a little bit in the situation. So I'm gonna argue that he sort of had that coming a little bit. But yeah, he also like clearly was squeamish about the blood because by this point fingers are off on assistant squirting blood out of like blooding up stumps than the leg is off blood squirting out of their absolute pandemonium in the operating theatre and the spectator. You know, almost gets you know, when I I read this I saw sliced and coat, and I misread a sliced throat. Yeah. But no, he again, this is the stuff of legend almost hard to confirm what exactly happened to this guy. But we've seen it written in several places that he had an immediate massive, heart attack and died rights. Yeah. He died later that night of of fright and the patient died because they got gangrene in the hospital the assistant died because the gangrene the hosp. Title. I think the that it all kind of spread from that original saw to that may have been tainted. And it wasn't properly sterilized, which you'll you said, you're throwing stuff into buckets covered in blood. It's more like a butcher shop in proper operating room. And yeah that infection got into the assistance blood as well. And he also died from the effects, and this is what led the distinguished surgeon an anesthesiologist Richard Gordon to call this the only operation in history with a three hundred percent mortality rate. He is also the guy who coined the nickname, the fastest knife in the West End for listen. So let's not forget, legacy wise. Listen was remembered, you know, in his community in the medical community, which is a very niche kind of close knit community with a lot of esoteric knowledge that wouldn't mean much anybody. They remember him for a lot of important deeds. Works to sure further the medical profession. But of course, you know, most regular old folks are gonna remember much more the story where he accidentally killed three people by slicing through them with a, you know, infected blade. Well, he created the list and splint bulldog locking forceps those are still around today, and he also did play a role in the administration of ether. So he he made proper contributions. But you know, if it bleeds it leads, and so now, listen is known outside of the medical community as the surgeon with a three hundred percent mortality rates again that story is somewhat anecdotal, but is illustrative. I would I would argue of the problems with medical care and surgery at the time. I mean, this is still before people washed their hands. When conducting surgery, MS true. He also published a couple of important medical text the elements of surgery and practical surgery, and this is pretty interesting near the end of his career. He made history when he performed a surgery in Britain on a man named Frederick Churchill in eighteen forty six who had a right knee that had been giving him a lot of pain. So nothing had worked for him. And the only option was going to be amputation. But instead, listen didn't use a knife. He actually pulled out a jar of ether as you said, and then that became something that dentists and surgeons used as a surgical anesthetic from that point on rights. These are the days when people were still saying, maybe we should hypnotize patients found that ether ether words as well. Jerry Lewis is dead sitting Nancy dead Kirk Cobain. Also, Courtney love insane Johnny cash. Dick, did I turn abusive XXX ten Tassie own Amy wine house completely off the rails? Disgrace land is a rock and roll true crime podcast about musicians getting away with murder behaving very badly. This hosted by me Jake Brennan, I grew up in round rock and roll. In the one thing, I know to be absolutely true. Is that real Rockstars parties? Sane more like feral narcissistic animals than functioning members of society in this is precisely what makes them so damn entertaining to big Marvin Gaye James Brown. John Lennon GD Alan stones and the Hells Angels running security and a dead kid on the dance floor these stories and more are all waiting for you in disgrace. Listen disgrace and on the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your. God casts. I don't wanna let this go the importance of people washing their hands just in general. There was a guy the Hungarian doctor named Ignace similize. And he was the person who could have saved so many lives, especially during childbirth. And so on by the simple technique of washing one's hands. Leave he introduced that in eighteen forty seven at the amount of minds Konkan house in fair Deutschland, but doctors were upset and they didn't listen to they said this similize guys making us look bad because he's implying that we're giving these women and children fevers. He also wasn't very tactful. He was kind of a a Larry David or Bernie Sanders figure you know, what I mean bit of corruption anyway Semo vice eventually ends up in a mental health facility in an aside. Silom to wash your hands. The inclusion of this, and hey, sometimes speed is everything. Yeah. Come on. Guys, slowdown smell the roses figured it was vague summations. I can make going real fortune cookie caption here something interesting will happen this week. Oh, oh, okay. That one was made live and interesting. Great. It's gentlemen. Judge. Strickland AK Christer. This may speak come as a surprise people. But you're you're back again. You're back your old rule shenanigans tricks. I just can't keep me out you keep changing the locks key breaking in. Well, as we know that missed you guys. Oh, hey, how's vacation buddy is really good? Thank you for asking. Mrs knows fantastic highly recommend London Paris. It was wonderful. That's right, man. You went to the UK was there is I was there during some interesting protests would leave it there. But now, I wanna know is about Brexit about let me tell you something if you want to take the chunnel from London to Paris, don't do it. When dude as climbed up on top of the train station 'cause you ain't going nowhere awhile. Were you the dude? No, no. I was in line very long line to get on the train that was almost certainly not going to leave. Well, thank you for narrowly escaping disaster or the channel to come with his employees one of our most divisive games. Yes. The the most cringe or these segment and all the pod casting is which was which was again, if we have to straighten out the stork record here, which was your idea. Yes. It was. I one day. We suggested that I present you with different scenarios and you have to determine whether or not the scenario. I'm presenting to you is in fact, a real one or if I made it up cease, and so the way this works is I will present the scenario. And then the the the two gentlemen would have three minutes to deliberate on whether or not I'm telling the truth, or I'm lying, and they may ask questions of me, if they follow an arbitrary rule of choosing which I realize I did not think of before I came in here. So in honor of the topic for you to build us a question, you must preface it with the phrase, doctor, doctor, give me the news. I got a bad case of cutting. You just just the first purchase Nokia just to commit the followed by your question. And now I will read up a scenario when I am done. We will start the timer. So get the big grandfather clock ready. I'm limbering up. Dr hasty Lanyon was a bit of an eccentric surgeon. He was nearly equal parts performer and doctor and had a flair for the macabre. He had studied though, probably never directly the work of Luigi Galvani for whom the galvanic response is named Lanyon took to extremes and in northern England in the early eighteen hundreds demonstrated some rather ghoulish applications of the technology upon cadavers that I am sure were totally acquired legally while there were no truly reliable reports from those demonstrations some reporters of questionable honesty road of corpses. Pointing grimacing twitching and in one case even sitting up and gasping in response to the electrical impulses. Dr Lanyon applied modern historians. Doctors doubt the veracity of those claims, but it seems that Hastie Lanyon was at least well known for some pretty primitive corpse. Puppetry start the timer. Doctor doctor give me the news is Mr. Bill, and so this the sky hasty, this guy hasty was primarily known for this or it was how he became famous. Otherwise, he was a doctor studied at the university of Edinburgh school of medicine, but apart from these are really the only records of the doesn't have like a long storied career that exists in any record. But there are records of these supposed demonstrations hasty sounds made up to me sounds like hasty like he was little too hasty perhaps. Yeah. Honest with you. I don't know why I feel optimistic about this. But I'm going with true. Wait what? Yeah. Oh, that's not what I was getting at all. I was really only going on because the name is super sketchy. Right. She sounding. I feel like that. Maybe you could ask your doctor. Give me the news is what did he do again? So he stuck electrodes onto cadavers that the made them twitch around a lot he to give you a little more detail. Just because I said early eighteen hundreds the time period, we're looking at his eighteen eight. So that's about three decades after Galvani and also supposedly was one of the inspirations for Mary Shelley's, Frankenstein that that yes, surely published in eighteen eighteen I feel like there's too much detail here. Now, I'm starting to doubt it I'm gonna stick. I stick with true stick with what you're. Going to stick with. Yeah. Contradiction. A man of mind games, vile quiz daughter. I've out of practice with the question. That's true. He's been relaxing on the Sam. It's true. I did I took a cruise. Yeah. It was nice was a nice. It was not in niece. It was in Paris. Does eat any patisserie. I did in to Serie right across the street from the apartment guys guys guys. We have forty seconds. What did you say? You're gonna stick with true limited. Locked you wanna lock it in three to one true. You guys got to read more. Dr hasty Lanyon is a character, Dr Jekyll and Hyde I made it up sees. Well, interestingly interestingly, though, I should say first of all the inspiration supposedly for Mary Shelley's. Frankenstein was Dr Joseph Conrad dippled who was active in the seventeenth century and was born in bum castle Frankenstein, and then geo Giovanni L dippy who was the nephew to Luigi Galvani actually did do demonstrations similar to what I described where supposedly corpses had opened up. There is pointed punched the air kicked the air. But again, this just supposedly people would pass out looking at these demonstrations, I don't know exactly how reliable those either. But what I gave you was total fiction. Yeah. That's what I began to suspect. When you had too many ready made detail yet have you were dare I say hasty to provide. I wanted to give you a chance you've lost the last few. And I thought well if I just keep feeding them there. Surely, they're going, but no, Nope. Just had to go down that road of me. Now, it turns out we're hungry, boys. And to be fair. It is similar to things that have been reported. I was mostly eight us. I was mostly hoping that you had read Dr Jekyll mister Hyde. I was really I was business. A coin flip. It may be been turned to being. So you mean like the character Dr Jekyll mister whoop sees it's been a long time. But you know, what gives us new goal. Maybe one day. We can ask a question that just completely blew up. The scenario you presented if we did that would you ever be situation? Rec- would. No, no, I know you too. Well, my old friend, you would you would continue with with the Chiran. Here's the problem is that if you asked me a legitimate question about a legitimate, historical fact, and I don't know the answer. I would be honored bound to say, I don't know the answer to that question. And that means that I should probably do the same for the fake ones. Because otherwise. You asked me a question. And I don't know the answer to that question. I tell you that you're going to say, well, this is obviously where the true ones we win so close when you started giving out the details. Well, that one's on me. Can't win them all know but can't win to win. Why actually, you know, almost even with me for a while part of the fun of this though is eating crow from time to time, you know, very Thomas Jerry to me, you know, like, so despite winning today's round Jonathan Strickland AK the quiz ter-. Thank you so much for dropping by. We're glad that you made it out of the chunnel. Yeah. Sure. Durian rian. What's that mean? It's nothing. What you say? If someone says, thank you the common responses. It's nothing. No big deal. Not a problem though. Sweat zero perspiration. Thank you for coming on the show. Thanks as always to our super producer, Casey peg REM, thanks to Gabe Loussier fantabulous research, associate and thanks to Alex Williams who composed our theme. So what are some of the strange Sauber esque stories of medical quackery or medical mishaps that you have heard what are your favorite ones share them with us and your fellow listeners? Also shout out to the podcast saw bones. That's a great show on the maximum fund. Now are huge fans of Justin McElroy recalls. One of the host of that show. Do believe you recall correctly. You can write us at ridiculous. How stuff works dot com. We're gonna stick with that one. For the meantime, we may have another one inching in pretty soon. But for the time being he's our you can also hit us up on our Facebook groups ridiculous historians where you know, folks. Posting memes the Jonathan Strickland liquid or even creeps his way in there from time to time just true. That is still think we. Don't see. Don't think we don't see you. You can also you could also find us. Instagram twitter. We have our own personal. Instagram's if you wanna see various shenanigans, I'm Ben bullet at embryonic insider. I'm John Strickland. No, no, h see next time, folks. For more podcast for my heart radio. Visit the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by it could happen here is the second American civil war possible. How would it look and most importantly could use revive host Robert Evans of behind the bastards fame answers, these questions in tremendous terrifying detail in his brand new podcast. It could happen here. Each season. He'll take a premise more commonly than science fiction and explain how might be closer than you think to reality in. It could happen here, Robert mixes indepth research statistics and his own experience. Reporting from multiple civil wars around the world to paint, a vivid picture of a United States toward apart by conflict listeners are going to hear eerily plausible explanations for how war could start on the left or the right. 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French Waiters Once Had to Strike for Their Right to Wear Mustaches

Ridiculous History

40:26 min | 11 months ago

French Waiters Once Had to Strike for Their Right to Wear Mustaches

"This subset of ridiculous history is brought to you by the completely redesigned. Twenty twenty four to explore the greatest exploration vehicle of all time. Now it's not going to the moon or the bottom of the sea but those those places are explored already anyway so who cares the Ford Explorer. We'll take you on explorations that everyone can relate to but few have conquered like navigating complicated interstates in a new towns on vacation or successful grocery store trips with the cargo. Space to haul everything you need and handling winding gravel roads to get to the birthday party for a kid in your son's fifth grade class the all new twenty two thousand Ford explorer the greatest exploration vehicle of all time ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio Welcome to the show ridiculous historians. Thank you so much for tuning in I am very very excited about. Today's episode of my name is Ben. I I gotTa tell you notice I shaved Bonjour you see Noel and you can tell them France out how to branch just sort of a Disney beauty and the beast vibe not Gaston and the candlestick And there's are super producer. Casey Peg Agra Bozo Casey. You're going to absolutely love the cartoonish French accent. I'm going to be dropping. Throw this episode Sir. I'm here for it. Yeah understood and you're also here in in the same room as us because when a different studio and I really liked being look right at you and not be separated by glass and you know fiberglass the barriers that separate us they've come down Casey. I'm a partway through this. I'm going to reach out and hold your hand as I do my own terrible accents and I want you to be ready at that moment when it happens I'll prepare myself. Don't do fleas do so the three of us. I'm looking around the room. The three of us all have a facial O'hare of one sort or another. I typically as you guys know My my beard grew really quickly so I am always like three hours away away from a five o'clock shadow and I try to shave when I want to look clean cut and no two o'clock shadow usually is about twenty minutes after shave and no you you yourself have not shaved for years right. Not once not ever at trim met his let it grow like an old prospector. We Trim it. I you get it trimmed. Actually that's one of the luxuries. I afford myself when I get a haircut. I get them to to trim my beard as well and shape it up because I'm not qualified to do that. It's our and and it's tough when you're doing it for yourself in case you you've you've had kind of a I would say we call that a beard right. Yeah it then that Senate a little trying to because it's not it's not stumble and there's some interesting studies it's somewhere but I mean like I usually maintain contain the same kind of thing because there's a there's a fascinating study that says there's this spectrum of facial hair and people tend to when they're looking at pictures of strangers the tend to think that people with bigger a beards legs Z. Z.. Top wizard beards are more or wiser eiser but less trustworthy and the people who are clean shaven are more trustworthy but perhaps with less real world experience and then a In a in a concurrent study they found that now. This may be controversial They found that was considered the most attractive of facial hair. Pinterest is weird right. You know why that might be. Because it gives you the lake half-and-half it gives you the benefit of clean shaven. Look you can sort of see the skin still especially if you have like a nice jaw line and then you also get the ruggedness of a little beard. Sprinkling kind of you know I have a question for you guys about mustaches. Che's is a Moustache Moustache if it's connected to a beard you know that's interesting because wouldn't become at that point goatee of some just all one assembly assembly. Well what if the mustache grown out and waxed in. It's sort of its own thing. Is this something else at that point. I don't know according to my autocorrect. autocorrect which insist that? I don't mean to type Moustache but I gotTa tell you guys this story. Recently I was looking back. My worst auto correct mistakes aches at twenty nine thousand nine. I wrote to my mom and I told her we were in conversation. I said you know I'm thinking of growing a mustache and autocratic turned it into this. This is true. I'm thinking of growing moist ache Sorry mom moist a word. Aversion people are losing their minds in the audience right. Yeah I know yeah to imagine the humiliation I grew mustache once for For A bet. But I've have never committed to. You have to be a specific type of person. I think you have to have the right facial structure right. Dare I say the right vibe. I want shaved my beard except for the mustache and people kept telling me I looked like Ron Jeremy. So I never did that again. It also made my daughter cry. WHOA yeah because because she liked didn't recognize me because she's you know I've had this beard since I was about fourteen somewhere approaching this level of facial hair since I was at least fifteen or sixteen and She'd never seen me without it before and I shaved everything up at the mustache. She was like maybe three And she lost. She didn't know who I was three. That makes sense though it that makes sense and it's weird because when we first meet someone we assume that that's initial meeting the initial shot. We have of them in our heads is how they always look. That's why it feels weird if you meet someone while they're wearing a hat and then you see them the next time and they're not wearing a hat you're like whoa. What is this plot twist? It's kind of the same way with facial hair and shout out to everyone listening. WHO grows facial hair? Who does that thing I? Yeah I don't know if anybody else done this but when I have a full beard grown out and I like I like to shave into different auditions for facial hair. You know what I mean like. I'll do the what's that mustache. Stash it kind of goes down. It's like a Fu Manchu handlebar handlebar. Is that what it is. The one that like I think so okay. It it resembles set of handlebars there. We go but sometimes occasionally connects up to the chops though Yeah Yeah Yeah and it becomes another thing entirely. I did that one where you shave everything everything except right here on the Chin line and I feel like an old time prophet of some sort. I don't time profit or like saloon Proprietors perhaps soon. Yeah and so today today we are exploring facial hair. I I know that mustaches can be a divisive thing right because some people say they'll they'll never condone a mustache. Some people love them. They had a bit of a vogue moment in hipsterdom here in the United States years back because remember her when people were getting mustache. Tattoos and Like mustache tattoos on their fingers that they were under their nose. Do you remember that. Yeah I thought it was an odd commitment. Yeah why not. Just use the finger the mustaches sort of implied. It's a tattoo you know they're gonNa have that for a while but back in the the early nineteen hundreds Paris France Famously home to the Bush. Mustaches became a huge huge hot button. Issue and it started with waiters. And this is so strange like okay. So Casey Casey. If we could ask you can you bus couple of stereotypes. I feel like the. US Unfairly gives waiters in Paris a a bad rep. Yeah they had the classic rap. I mean it's it's it's a very Common stereotype right of like the rude French. Waiter the SNOOTY French waiter I. It really has not up in the case of my experience. I've had maybe one rude waiter experience where I think my bill came out to maybe eight euros. I had like ten years to pay for it and the guy wanted exact change and I had to explain to him that I only had a ten euro bill and he with his fingers is counting out like eight and he sang the English word. Eight eight and I'm telling him in French like no. I understand eight versus ten. I just need change and as soon as I kind of responded responded to him like in fluent French his whole demeanor changed and he was very apologetic and he actually seemed somewhat embarrassed that he had behaved that way. And it's it's almost as though you're a francophone nature Precludes you from rude waiter behavior. This is true this is true but even like earlier trips to Paris I it has has been remarked upon that it has gotten more polite over the years You know some of the some of the waiting kind of culture that we have you've in the United States in terms of the tip And this feeling that it's almost like a kind of emotional blackmail. You have to kind of like act like your best buds with the person you're waiting on. In France they are salaried employees. Waiters are so they're really not beholden to the customer the same way they are in the United States. It's it's more of like a trade or or something that they practice so they don't I mean you don't have to tip the tip is included. You could round up interest. Generally the price is like the price of the food includes tip for the staff so they make a good wage. Yeah really yeah interesting. And so Yeah it it's Kinda cool they I mean the waiters. I've had tend to be very professional very quick very efficient. They're not really much for small talk or for hanging out or anything like that but at at the same time I have not experienced like so much rudeness or abruptness from them. Just kind of like you know cool customers and Kinda just like there to get you your food and get out of the way. I hi despise the American culture of small talk by waiters either Tan. Anna's Schick a whole schtick where they have to do this whole song and dance first time here. Oh Oh God yeah okay. Okay well let me walk you through the menu and how this works okay. You're going to want to start with Shaw's all right we also have some. We also have half off APPS and we have bottomless to- feet. You know go. Yeah for sure. Love me some coffee but don't WanNa hear about it. WanNa make my own choice. Yeah please leave me alone Is I'm sorry any any waitstaff folks out there. I I know you're I get I get it. Some people are all about that and it will get you better tip I'm just a criminally old fart art and that is don't want anything to do with him. People in the service industry in the United States have One of the most challenging gigs in in careers in the country because of tips which will get to in a second because they have an advertisement. I think you'll like so how you're listening and you're thinking Guys how are you going to bring these dispirit things together. How are you going to bring French? Culture and tipping and mustaches together. Well Strap in because we are going somewhere with this. Let's start at the very beginning. Archaeologists think that mustaches were always kind a human thing even back when people were living in caves There is strong evidence that members of our species used shells and tweezers to who shape facial hair into you. Know One design or another was naturally occurring tweezers joys here so much about Yeah Yep Yep Yep the the common tweezers I believe is the Latin. I mean I guess the most basic you know improvis- tweezers could be too small sticks. Guess Sherwood together like Chopsticks Block or maybe split Split a branch there. You Go Vertically see that has some very industrious thinking with their my friend thinks men of but although we know facial hair was decorated. And can I say ban. Scape does manscaping apply just to the Australia or does its trademarks. Okay okay so you might not you might get sued but how endless roll the dice list Casey and the case sound cue. All over again really is hey. Hey it's Joe and Matt from the money podcast partnering with American Express to support small businesses everywhere. American Express encourages you to become a regular at small businesses more irregularly. Yeah and we encourage you to check out our podcast more regularly to specifically our latest episode where we record live from the American Express. Big Future of shopping small Event we talk about the distinguishing factors that set small businesses apart. How small businesses help communities thrive and a lot more so check out the podcast now and make sure you shopsmall every every day because small adds up? So when did the mustaches. As we know it today come into being no or winded ended it you know really explode on the scene well it really got. Its its footing If you can imagine mustache with with feet firmly planted in the the cultural zeitgeist in England during the Elizabethan era in those days as you can imagine the beard reigned supreme on in King James the first and his son Old King Charles. The first decided that they were going to make a splash and turn this this. Yes Beard thing on its end And make themselves really stand apart from the crowd By debuting their handlebar mustaches stashes. Yeah Yeah and the Holy Poloi. The masses followed suit in this something. We see a lot with fashion in general right right some of the The more elite whether political elites or financial elites are just Fashion elites the they do something they're kind of the the early adopters of a style and then it filters down and it becomes more popular mainstream. And that's what happened with the mustache. Win Britain moved away. From Fromm Puritan rule the mustache stayed and it was a status symbol. King Charles the second had a mustache and you can she portraits of him in his early teens. Where already has his mustache Peter? The great in Russia attempted to control facial hair through implementing ending a beard tax. This is a real thing. It was in sixteen ninety eight. He went through Western Europe and he thought you know he's like after my trip of abroad. I feel that Beards facial hair are more old fashioned than masculine. So we're going to charge sixty to one hundred rubles also for anyone wants to grow a beard and they have to have a little token they can carry around so the three of us would have to would have to pay the beard tax. For what like like Wendy you have to deliver this like as you pay like yearly or quarterly or just get shaken down by you know the beard cops the beard cops. The beard police sermons me the butter tax indulge in the butter boxes. Or whatever like for the privilege and decadence of having a beard. You gotta pay. Yeah it's a weird thing thing and he wanted to Incentivize people to be clean shaven. He felt like that would be more Western European of them so people. I DIDN'T WANNA pay the taxes. Of course mustaches became the way for men to in time for men to show that they were grown. You know they were manly men. I see and would you have to pay moustache. Tax Now. Did not qualify for the period tax. But mustaches were so popular The they have occasional resurgence here in the US. But mustaches were so popular back in this time that the British army required mustaches as part of their official uniform from eighteen. Sixty all the way to nineteen sixteen. It's true and we have gotten Some of this information from a wonderful article on fatherly Dot Com of the history of moustache by the way. Check out our partner ship with them Finding Fred about the delightful Mr Rogers who for some reason we have not done an episode assert about. He had some really interesting things where he spoke out about. You know Warren actually included some pretty heavy topics and some of his early black and white shows mister. Mr Rogers is a veteran as well. He is yeah and Really I don't know I really. I watched that. How would you be my neighbor documentary on a plane and I was sobbing by the end? Ed Nine texted my kid and I said you're special just the way you are. and She She she knew I was telling the truth. Rogers clean-shaven es clean-shaven Shaven and therefore much more trustworthy as Mandy Patinkin sometimes clean-shaven sometimes bearded. Never know you never know what you're going to get But yeah it's it's true and say that the British army actually required mustaches. As can you imagine as part of their uniform. That's I think a uniform is close by that. I guess it's Haircut Haircut Haircut Army here I got it makes sense okay. I'm back I'm back in. I'm so by the end of the nineteenth century according to this Lovely fatherly article. It became a kind of a health liability for cleanliness because You know there was more research being done into hygiene and You you know there were issues with tuberculosis. Spreading in such and other diseases in so beards were started starting to be looked down on a vector of of spreading germs and and rightly so this went across the Atlantic as well New York City actually banned Milkman from having beards nineteen o two hospitals hospitals in Britain forced staff and patients to shave and because of this new emphasis on cleanliness and shaving in nineteen eighteen. o four guy with a fantastic name. I love his name King. Camp Gillette got the patent for the first ever disposable razor and cleanliness. This became increasingly important. Beards were on a little bit of a downward trend and I have I have one one gear to grind I want you guys take gone away. Thank you Here it is so when I was living abroad and I was in a place where most things were a a much less expensive than they are here in the states with one exception is razors. It is razors razors. Were even more expensive than they were in the estates and this was the Central America. I don't know they add a monopoly so eventually I just Let my beard grow out and I came back looking like The era of the Beatles where they all had nice suits but crazy beards. I love that is true. I will say this this sort of unrelated but the fact that I haven't shaved in such a long time Gives me pretty sweet ability to just rocket disguise. If I need to like go on the Lam that's true that's true if I shaved and like did my hair differently. You wouldn't recognize me. Well I you might. You might be but But I can give you away Also Kudos to you for not participating paid in two thousand nine two thousand nineteen facial Comparison thing I didn't do it no I didn't do it either. I did not do it for ideological reasons. I I didn't get around to it. But yes our boy king to call. Yes get it. King King Camp King. He's the King of Camp I. There's so many ways you can go with that Gillette it's true Back to your your South America thing. I wonder if it was because they didn't have a factory. The made them to import them perhaps are imported. That is yeah they were actually the only reason I can find There were there were two kinds and they were both in my my opinion ludicrously expensive but back at this time people needed these razors. There was definitely a market. We also have to consider the role of gas gasmask because gas mask would not seal properly if someone had a beard and so people had to shave if they wanted to survive. I've been gassed yet. And that comes from a really great. BBC Article called the Mustache. A Harry history. I'm check that one how as well So so yeah that's interesting wouldn't seal because a little hairs would just poke through there and then you could get contaminated and so now with this rise and fall waxing and waning in popularity for the beard the mustache becomes a statement a statement of maturity and Masculinity Nitty according to Christopher old stone. Moore who wrote of beards in men the revealing history of facial. Hair men who stuck with mustaches. At at this time were either older men sticking to the older standard. You know kind of this military look or they were strong willed individualist who didn't need org care to follow the new rules of cooperative manliness. So there you have it folks. The mustache becomes a statement. That's our main takeaway here now. Let's fast forward a little bit to the rise of the first modern restaurants in Paris. These started out as establishments for we're the wealthy. And there's we're getting some of this great article on Atlas Obscure. The restaurants wanted to recreate the feeling of dining in a very very nice place and opulent mansion. A palace. What have you? And this means the restorative gestalt experience. It was not just about the food the waiters service staff also had to look like domestic valets and domestic valets at this time in traditionally were not allowed to wear mustaches as a sign of their rank. That's right much like that British officers uniform where it was I was required and in this article. historian named Gil MMA Haley was quoted as saying that diners were actually allowed able to essentially actually pay a fee to humiliate these people in a bizarre institutional kind of way which seems very cruel cruel? Yeah because they were paying they were paying for food shore but there were also paying for the experience of being the master. Yeah which is why first off. Never say Dr Song Because of course means boy right and that in itself is kind of a reference to this dynamic. Hi Nancy that was going on. According to Gill Maili this idea of regulating facial hair and France is rooted in colonialist expansion expansion and the industrial revolution. Because people who are less well-off had more access to what had been luxury goods and when that happened the elite the halves of society had to turn to stuff. Money couldn't buy for a new way of communicating their status Guilma. Haley by the always I I don't think we pronouncing that correctly. Because he is. He is French but he is Among other things in editor at a cost Sueur magazine in French fringe publication and has written extensively on the role of masculinity in French culture. And that's why that's why he comes into the picture. Gotcha With this facial hair band so now the elites want to communicate their status through their Their right or the privilege of possessing facial hair and according to kill it was intensely humiliating creating for people in France to return from a war and then be told that they have to shave their mustache just to get a job You says that to be denied. The mustache was to be demeaned. infantilized emasculated even deep hatred in front of their families. Neighbors and friends the man that is assigning a lot of meaning to the stash And I think that's the we're going with this. Yeah it really felt as as though you were being stripped of your freedom your liberty. Blessed rakishly Libertarian Liebau Labour Day Casey on the case done uh. Hey It's Joel Matt from the podcast when you shop small it affects your community in a big way which is why we partnered with American Express is to support small businesses everywhere. Check out this clip from our latest episode where we recorded live from the American Express. Big Future shopping small event they're nimble and it. It doesn't take moving a mountain to try something new. That's just an amazing benefit small businesses half. It's actually helping you streamline and be able to focus more on the customer focus more on the product focused more on your end goals as opposed to all those little nitty-gritty things that need to be done. Listen to the entire episode now. It's titled the Role of Technology as small small businesses innovate. And make sure shopsmall every day. And this all leads us to the Great French Asia Mustache strike of nineteen o seven Casey here's this. Here's this ad we're just GonNa read this. Add to your okay. This ties highs in all that stuff we were talking about the beginning hotel keepers refused to yield bitterly opposed the plan for operation with striking Paris waiters. Big American tips blamed bill before Parliament Halibut to make it impossible for employers to bond blaze. Mustaches Right And that's the thing Americans actually were a big part I if indirectly for this strike You can't really under state How important the the culture of American tipping is in this whole thing? We talked about it at the top of the show. I was blissfully unaware as I have not traveled outside of of the United States. In a hot the minute that you don't tip in Europe is a Europe as a whole or is it just France. I think it varies a little bit country to country got it but in general the idea of tipping twenty percent is an American content. I'm on I I don't care for it particularly I I mean I get ag- how the system works but I'm like just charge me with. The food is worth Charlie. I love it when when the when the tip is built into the check. I don't have to think about it because it creates all of this. Like one upsmanship right. You know the thing about a meal for me is I think a good meal should end with maybe coffee or a dessert. Not Having to do math. Yeah exactly But so you know the French not into this concept either. For and win American tourists would come. It raised the the specter of tipping in a culture that hadn't really had to contend with it because there was some tipping already in French culture at this time which was in in the early nineteen hundreds but it was nominal at best I think the kind of influx of American tourism. I'm really raised the bar on tipping because Americans were more used to tipping right and as we see this increase in the average tip for the average Parisians region Restaurant's employees we see that the owners of cafes and restaurants are also clocking that rise in income and they start levying charges on their staff to get you know their cut of the Pie. So the waiters go on strike at these high in restaurants and they demand better pay more time off and they say hey. Let us grow our mustaches out. Let us have the facial hair we want. It's at the time this The mustache have been almost ubiquitous amongst a male French residents for decades and priest East domestic servers and waiters. Were often not allowed to have it. They said it was forced shaving. They felt sentenced to four shaving and according to one estimate commit when they did finally strike they cost the city roughly twenty five thousand francs a day in revenue. Just wanted to jump in here. Real quick the word the French word for tipping his Porbandar which roughly means like for drinking. It's like drinking money so you can kind of see just implied in the in the word itself that that they're not necessarily talking about somebody's livelihood. It's just like a little bonus to kind of you know reward really good service but it's not going to pay your bills. Oh drinking money. Yeah yeah not like drinking money. That's just like you know. Beer Beer. Money Got Got Casey on the case always so according to one contemporaneous Iranian newspaper. There's there's a line here I thought you would enjoy women or quite determined to starve with their children rather than see the whiskers of their husbands still fall under the razor. So the families were supporting the guy's striking and they're like no. You're not a man you know what you know. What Francis assists the man I married? He had a moustache. Sure did but you know. It wasn't all support for the striking waiters. I mean there are some folks that were like. What are you guys doing like you know this is? That's how it always is with strikes. Me Not not always but like you either GonNa be folks that lead. Just look at it as like being greedy. We were trying to get more money or if there's no real hardship involved you know one thing when like coal miners living in horrified conditions and striking for better pay a better working conditions. But this is you know I could see how there could be some detractors for this sure and there's also sort of a know your place lowly. I believe that's true. That's true and on the wrong side of history here. No no no I mean I. It's it's strange because the people who stayed were consider like not everybody quit. Obviously in some people jumped in to fill the new To fill the new positions that had opened up but the people who stayed eight were considered kind of traders scabs. Is strikers were like come on man what's going don't you also want to be a man and grow your mustache. There's weird La Times report from April Twentieth. Nineteen seven that includes some favorite innocent bystanders. So the authorities are trying to clear out the strikers right and they expel every clean-shaven man including apparently a dozen innocent Americans pickens who had just arrived in town knew nothing about the strike and were astonished by how hostile the police were. They giving a walloping well. There were forcefully pushed out town. Yeah literally ran into town around any like. So what do we know about the The details of this this strike. A lot of our information does come from Gill Haley some of the details are still unclear right. What was the DREYFUSS Affair Dreyfuss Fisa Fair? That's that's tricky territory. Get into but basically. It's where this guy was falsely accused of. I don't even remember what But there was a lot of it was like a proxy for Anti Semitism basically. It's it's still referred to today in In kind of contemporary French culture the Dreyfuss affair and Roman Polanski. His new film called Shaqs and it is also about the Dreyfus affair and him kind of comparing himself to drive really. Yep Yup really little bit legris because the Dreyfuss affair. The Guy was falsely accused that is true plants on the record. Great I mean there's no there's no question that it happens knows what he did. Yeah Society knows what he and there's also some new charges for Lansky that have come out just within the last month or so. Is that right. Yeah what are those more. Just more allegations of him doing she. You know terrible stuff. What happened to like wait a minute? Good old fashioned like dirtbag. Crimes Wire people like bouncing checks and doing small time cons for breast watches to a simpler time. But the reason I bring up the DREYFUSS DREYFUSS affairs because that WH-WHAT I know it's Complex Casey and appreciate you shedding some light on the force but it was another one of these kind of high watermark moments of just like what are. What is French identity kind of you know and the book this is obviously a little more frivolous example but this mustache strike was us as well? Yeah Yeah we don't know exactly how many people went on strike or exactly when they started striking the the numbers that we've been able to gather have a pretty wide range. Some say hundreds were striking other safe thousands and other say that it came mm-hmm and went in waves. People argued different facts. Yo and some people were against the strike. Just for scientific reasons for hygenic concerns. They they said. Look if people wear mustaches. Are they going to clean them is there. Is this detritus and scruff from their mustache. Going to go into the food we eat. Someone else pointed out in Seattle on April twenty second. They said watching the mustache man. Eat certainly common site in the days restaurants. Regardless of the appearance of the wait staff is repugnant to viewer as that. That wounds me me too. Quick Ben But I will say that even today like I mean. You're not allowed to a lot of police. People that work in kitchens and they have to wear like beard nets. Yeah which is the most humiliating creating thing in the world. I don't know I always thought it was a hygienic thing hygienic. It looks ridiculous and I always wonder whether they actually work. You know what I mean it. It seems like a lot of humiliation for not much payoff. But I don't know I get it I. I've seen my beard hairs Make their way into the food that I'm eating occasionally It's I would be grossed out if I if I saw an unrecognised hair. I'm used to my own beard hairs but others. No thank you right right. So this 'cause catches fire for it's The people opposed to it and the people supporting the strikers eventually reaches parliament where a guy named untamed not boyer. The Socialist deputy from Marseille makes a bill proposes a bill in parliament. That says let's make it illegal to ban mustaches stashes. And let's say that if we catch you banning mustaches in your restaurant or place of business. You could be imprisoned for up to three months and weirdly enough off. He introduced this bill before. The nineteen zero seven strike began. We have a pretty good quote from him in the New York Times. That's right Boy In the New York Times described the bill as is the product of some misguided noblemen presumptuous middle-class folk cling to the belief they're honoring themselves by forbidding bidding their servants whom they treat a slaves to wear mustaches says a practice under a Democratic Republic is grotesque in humiliating He went on to say that. A resurrection of bygone tyranny. Contrary to the principles contained in the declaration of the rights of of man was another way of looking at this front so he's saying hypocrites hypocrites all this bill fails but luckily it turned Out Not to be necessary because by may waiters across the city of Paris had won back the right to wear mustaches. Che's oddly enough in negotiations. Some waiters chose to take the right to wear mustache in exchange for some of their other other demands so they make concessions things like pay or days off really to keep their mustache garnished my wages. Just don't take away my mustache from very intense. They really felt strongly about these moustaches. So this China became A symbolic victory for some and in material terms. They weren't winning that much. So according to the historians maybe the waiters got hoodwinked or maybe the strike was only kind of about about labor and workers rights maybe it was more about the ability to define oneself and the concept of belonging as an equal will in society. So the bill didn't pass but A lot of folks were able to get their rights to mustaches. Back and There was actually another slightly less spectacular. Tackler mustache strike in nineteen. Oh eight thereabouts That kind of ended without much fuss Because of the of the day you know if your employer requires you to dress a certain way or where a certain thing you can choose to work there. And she's not to work there. It's tough it depends on the market. What if there's only one kind of job you can get ads? You know. That's a good point so this concludes our episode. But not our show. We haven't even trimmed the edges of the complex role old mustaches play in various societies facial. Hair in general. Like what you did there them. Thank you man who I hit it in my stash of terrible jokes. I I No I mean this is terrible you should be set on fire is what I. Oh yeah yeah no no one hundred percent got it got it thankfully we work in podcasting where we can have. We can wear facial hair however we damn well please. Yeah look we are garbage fires sometimes in the studio we just try to. We try to sound like we. We are better dressed than we are rolling here with tattered sweatpants. Yeah I'm in my baby. Yoda onesie you know that you are right now. Oh Yeah yeah sure. I'm Rockin Komo. Yeah I'm wearing a panda bear. Roomy and it looks wonderful on it really. Just I strike a dashing figure in in a fluffy animal costumes so let us know your favorite facial hair stories also mustaches. Are you for them or against them and why you can let us know on facebook. Instagram twitter where we are ridiculous history ridiculous history show or some variation thereof. You can also find us as individual people and see our various of facial hairs on our own stuff if I am instagram at Ben Bolan twitter up in Berlin each s w you can find me exclusively on instagram. At how now Noel Browne big. Thanks super producer. Casey Peres always how Williams who composed impose our delightful theme that. You're hearing this very moment. Christopher Haciendas here in spirit eaves Jeff coat as always and of course Gabe lose Yay. And where would we EP. Without the Quiz later the Quiz Torino Aka Young Quizzes Aka Jonathan Strickland Aka the Twister Aka the quiz whistler makes mouths happy And likewise thinks you know while we're thinking everybody thanks to all the people who have been jerks folks about how they want to dress her agreed For more podcasts. From iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows at IBM problems inspire us to push the world forward. That's why so many people work with us on everything from city traffic to ocean. Plastic smart loves loves problems I._B._M.. Let's put smart to work visit I._B._M.. Dot Com slash smart to learn more.

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The Smooth-talking Takeover of Tabor Bridge

Ridiculous History

34:07 min | 2 years ago

The Smooth-talking Takeover of Tabor Bridge

"My father is Keith hunter, just Persson. He's known as the happy face, serial killer. On one side of the coin, he's a loving family, man. And then on the other side of the coin, he is everything that could hurt you. Heat goes from protected or predator. Happy face a new series from house to forks, new episodes out every Friday on apple podcasts or wherever you get podcast. On Jul ridiculous historians and welcome to the show. We'd like to begin by giving a profound and sincere. Thank you to Napoleon Bonaparte who has done so much for this program. Yeah, man, he, you know, he taught us how to love again. He taught us that rabbits can be a threat. He taught us that a little bit of HUD split goes a long way. Yeah, he taught us about the inherent beauty of a swan like neck and a luxurious ringlets filled main, yeah. We're going to talk about one of Napoleon's officials who pitched him is that, but first things first, I'm Ben. I'm no, and we are doing with our super producer, Casey peg room. Give it up for him folks. I don't know why sound so downtrodden when I said that I was just trying something new, trying a new cadence, you know, I don't know. And sometimes we need to try new unroadworthy docs things when the traditional methods aren't quite working, even when we need something new and your mastery of the segue never ceases to amaze balls me. That's very kind man. Thank you for saying. So our story today takes place during the Napoleonic wars. Oh boy, you know those Napoleonic wars. It was that conflict that lasted from around eighteen three till eighteen fifteen where Napoleon was like the Polian versus the world or at least Europe. But he had overthrown the during the revolution, the French revolutionary government, and installed himself as grant high, conquering emperor of France. And you know, he had designs on extending that title to as much of the world or the lands that he could get to as humanly possible. And whomever it was that gave us a shout out for calling it a mix tape of European powers, voltron and together as you do use it, you said that team now, dude, I'm glad to be part of your voltron, but you are clearly the head. Oh, no, no, no. We're a team and if we were, if we did have a hierarchy, I think we both agree. Casey is the head I am known an I on the left shoulder. Casey is like the torso or maybe the sword and use her are the head. The reason I like the comparison of Casey being the head, I appreciate this, but the reside like the idea of Casey being the head is because folks. The podcast you are hearing now has been spun from straw into gold by super-producer. Oh, I think it's a, it's a team effort there. Well, we're all kind of spinning straw to go, but Casey in particular works magic. He's a magic mouse Mun. Yes, there we go. I like that. And our story today is similar in terms of spinning straw into gold at takes place. Ace on the thirteenth of November in eighteen zero five. So just a couple years into this, this massive conflict. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Just a couple years into this conflict that will continue until eighteen fifteen for ten more years ripe. There are two marshals in the police forces and they are battling Austrians near a town called spits, which is located on the Danube river. Yeah, which is believed near Vienna. And you said this is an Australian they were fighting the Austrian forces who were were no slouches. They were pretty intensely good at at at war and defending their their territory, right. So as you said, the French were being led by these two marshals. One of them was named Joel Casey cools all know the long Casey. On the case. I like show alone. It's great. Who's the next? The next guy? I got this one. Now this came Mora Murrah Moran. Murrah Murrah and quasi Joakim is rookie walking. Yeah, Kim, I don't know. Casey, I think in the infringe. Rocky Joakim joie Akeem on Moore, Kim. Something like rocky. Okay. I think the JJ is a little more apparent logo out Schalke Murat. Okay. L. time double time case. Right? And this dude, actually, he was Keam Napoleon Murat. Yes, dash Napoleon moroseness funny that he got the guy's first name as a weird little sub name for marrying his sister Caroline. You'd think he would have gotten at Bonaparte hyphenate in there, but no, no, sir. He got an Opole Ian in there. Now let's talk a little bit about these guys before we get to their ventures. So I if I it looks like they're not going to have a great day. Tensions are running high. Joachim Murat or gel. Tin Murat was born in seventeen sixty seven, and he became one of Napoleon's most celebrated marshals. As a matter of fact, after this day that we discuss in stays episode, he later becomes the king of Naples. He was the son of an innkeeper. Unlike Drake, he actually did start from the bottom. He studied reflief for a career in the church, but he enlisted in cavalry regiment in seventeen eighty seven and war broke out in ninety two, he was rapidly promoted. And when Napoleon was trusted with suppressing, royalist, insurrection in seventeen ninety five Murat joined up and Napoleon liked him so much and specifically is contribution in bringing cannon bear one more places in aid to come to Bonaparte for the Italian campaign in seventeen ninety six ninety seven. So by the time eighteen oh five rolls around this guy. I seasoned and we don't want to judge people on appearances, but I think the three of us can agree. This guy has some amazing portrait of himself. We all do all of these French military dignitaries were super well dressed in these outfits. It just don't seem very functional for battle super garish. She was also a real smoke show his. He looks like a hair commercial. I know it looks like a commercial for product for their own Perm kit or something. Clear all herbal essences, neither of which sponsors of our show. We're just making a comparison, but we'll take it, but we will take if you are listening, clear all herbal essence, maybe some kind of relaxer. I don't know. Yeah. Yeah. Like you said, some kind of Perm kit, but he and his compatriots fellow Marshall zone loan. He was born in seventeen sixty nine and he would go on to become one of Napoleon's most prized generals Napoleon win speaking of John loan famously one. Said, I found him a pygmy left him a giant, which is a very self aggrandizing way to look at somebody's success. And that's also kind of interesting considering what people say about Napoleon's height. You know, as though he was able to lift men up from small stature to giant food who which we did establish was British propaganda all really, yeah. Choose to still like to believe he wasn't actually extraordinarily short. I told a friend of mine that I was doing an episode. We were doing episode Napoleon today, and she sent me a gif of a cartoon Napoleon writing very, very small horse looking very sad, the horse, non Napoleon. Yeah, it was one of the most -ffective propaganda campaigns in western history. So back to this day, November thirteenth, eighteen five, John and Joachim, our guiding their forces as you said, no on their way to Vienna, but there's a very important bridge that they have to cross. Yeah, the tabloid orbit, the cab, Roger tape. Bridge. I don't know. I'll go with that. I support that listeners don't don't bother writing in with your particular initiations of unless you really feel strongly about it, we might. I don't know. It'll still annoy. That's fine. We love you though. We love all of you each and everyone of you Casey's pronunciation corner row quick. Yes, you're just get it out there. The pronunciation would be Murrah more than Murat. Okay. But because yours run in these situations where everybody says it certain winning list that you kind of get used to saying it that way, holy and it's kind of noxious in a way if you say rural in in another wise English language. That's right. That's right. But we, we also work putting on some slightly accents is okay, so it's is it at the level of pretension that going into Taco Bell in order kiss a deal. Surely not true. Okay. While we still have you, Casey, what about the bridge is an France in front of Vienna? Yeah. Yeah. So who knows. I don't. Casey on the case adjourn. Yeah. Casey's jurisdiction is only in French French regions. Yeah, so, but still thank you for showing up and thank you for doing the right thing and recusing yourself. That's very honest as the resident little German boy of the podcast. I would like to throw my dice behind Taber Taber yoke. So these guys lung Murrah see this bridge and they know that the Austrians their forces being imminently experienced and very well aware of the importance of the bridge. They know that these enemy forces may destroy the bridge and tirelessly and less do something, and they can't do the usual Napoleonic tactic of running up their mass because the bridge will just get destroyed that much more quickly. So instead these two guys in this great, these two guys decide to run a con job. They don't run up with the forces, you know, banners and guns. Leasing somebody drumming behind them and all that jazz. Instead they walk up to the bridge casually, a little bit of a a little bit of a stroll and they're waving a white flag, right? And they've just got a small group of a small group of people with little on voi-. Right. And let's less we forget that the the, the Austrians had the bridge rigged to blow already right. There were like fuses, like at the ready. So they could like, you know, send this thing into the into the river upon first sight or on. I, I 'cause they knew and they were instructed by their their commander who is a guy named Carl Osberg to defend their territory at all costs and not let the French cross the bridge. So they were prepared for this scenario, but there was this nice little subterfuge going on here. They just kinda sauntered across the bridge, like you said, waving this white flag of retreat of truce writing. Yeah, of truce. And this is. Commonly understood to mean that there will be some sort of parley some sort of conversation rather than a conflict and they meet, you know, the Austrians this point are dumbfounded. They're thinking what's happening. They already have their adrenaline pumping. They're ready to fight. And then these two French marshals they say, oh, guys, funny story, quick update. An armistice is about to be signed mean will enter into a time of peace and due to the negotiations. This bridge actually belongs to a French forces and we're on the way to make it official with your boss. Carl, I just want to say to that's also possible that the Australia's are just taken aback by the sheer sex appeal. These two French generals of flowing lava flowing locks. There's honoring down these bridges and by the way, the Taber bridge, it was not just one bridge. It was a series of bridges. They were re bridges and the first two were set to burn. Learn because they were on they were, would I imagine? And then the third one was actually raid with munitions. Third, one being the one closest to to shore, which until land. Hey, everyone. We're ridiculous history, and we want to tell you about a brand new app. We discovered an app just for investing. It's called Robin Hood. Answer I Robin Hood and investing at that lets you buy and sell stocks. ETF s.'s options and crypto currencies. All commission free. They tried to make financial services work for everyone including investment neophytes like me and Ben, not just the wealthy yet it's none intimidating waiver stock market newcomers to invest for the first time with true confidence, you'll, let's go back to the some of the high points of this. I love that they're no commission fees. Other brokerages may charge up to ten dollars for every trade, but Robin Hood does not full stop year round who was actually kind enough to give us a little bit of scratch to invest. And we've been having a really good time doing it's very intuitive, very clean. Other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every robinhood does not charge us or you a dime, so you can trade stocks and keep all of your profits. The design, the ease of use, it's out of this world, easy to understand charts and market data place a trade in just four taps right on your smartphone. You can learn how to invest as you build your portfolio. You can discover new stocks and track favorite companies with your own personalized news feed, and you get custom notifications for price movements. So you never miss the right moment to invest. And today just for hanging out with ridiculous history, Robin Hood wants to give you a free stock like apple Ford, or sprint to help build your portfolio, sign up at history, Robin Hood dot com. That's right. Just go to history dot, Robin Hood dot com and sign up now. So, and I love this guy named Osberg by the way ours Berg at believes how you pronounce it. This is his. His title was field marshal Lieutenant, yes. All one world where love these long German compound words. They're great, and he was also not around when this happened. So the Austrians in charge. And as you said, no, it's a series of bridges. They were going for the main bridge that crosses the Daniel most directly. Carl is not around it all. And while the marshalls are sort of vamping and convincing these folks that, hey, we don't have to fight an armistice is pretty much official at this time. Let's let's chill a little bit while they're while they're doing all this smoke and mirrors their actual French troops are sneaking slowly toward the bridge as loan Murrah are walking across the. Bridge with the Austrians? Yeah, because these guys are kind of a little bit dumbfounded. They were taken aback by this. They're trying to confirm these reports like they have any kind of mobile communications technology. They're running couriers, sending a runner. Yeah, of course. So they had to hop to and find out if this was true, and that's why I was such a tactical feet of genius because they literally just kind of confused them to the point where they weren't paying attention and they were able to get their guys pretty casually across the bridge. It's got this kind of ocean's eleven vibe very much bridge heist in terms of the con- so things do get sticky. They don't completely go according to plan because as they're waiting as the marshalls are waiting for the French troops to get close enough to the bridge to make a difference in a fight or save it from being destroyed. One Austrian sergeant decides that he does not by this tale, smart man. Yeah, that this is all cockamamie that if it's too good to be true, that usually means it is real cock and bull story. And so this guy syrup tissue Asli begins to starts to light a fuse or tries to. He's got matches in his hand. He's about to just blow the bridge up. Yeah, and doesn't our boy Murat just just daintily snatch it from him. It was lawn, excuse me? Yeah, John John wall, so so low snatches the match from this guy's hand. And he says, you know what? How a truce has been signed and that means that your destroying public property because we're not an active war. And if you try that one more time, I will have you arrested off to prison with you. So we've talked about these munitions that were rigged to blow up the bridge diehard style, but they had some other stuff guarding their side of the bridge, these Austria and the didn't. They've been. They had some. Heavy weapons. Yeah. The ad nor Tillery force with cannon, and the canons were preparing to fire on the grenadiers who were standing behind the marshalls now, by the way, I just want to clarify this with you've been we're grenadiers wielders of grenades or is this just another name that was pre the invention of the grenade because that seems like a little bit more of a modern device to me, they were specialized soldiers that were first established a guests in the mid to late seventeenth century sixteen hundreds for throwing grenades. That's what they did. They were usually going to be the strongest and largest soldiers because they can throw the farthest. That's right. So the grenades more or less as we know them today were definitely used during the Napoleonic conflicts during his era, at least the basic principle basic principle. So maybe maybe more on the line, maybe a little bit less. I don't know. There's not a whole lot of moving parts in a grenade is sort of like a metal piece of dynamite with. Fuse more or less, right? Yeah, pull throw. Yeah, released the whatever the latch, the crack, crack and please. So these, there's, there's a really amazing account where who has Murat or long who distracts one of the canon operators by LOL straddling the canon. I'm picturing in a slightly come hither way. I don't know why if laid on his or a grand piano, you know, and like, I don't know, the grenadiers are on the other side of the bridge still, or they have a walked all the way across at least and Joel sees the artillery about the fire on the French forces. And so as he said, he hops on the candidate and just lights a pipe yet, again, picture just kind of like straddling the cannon crossing his legs, pulling out his pipe and just never like breaking the man's gaze lighting, his pipe and this being light. What during the Basic Instinct doing a bit of a base against? Yes, yes, I am picture. During that and I'm sticking to. That's that's what my magin says. And that's what I'm saying out loud. And so here's where Murrah cubs in the play. This really is a two person con. So there several sergeants there and the sergeants are gonna be battle-tested and they typically are going to be a little bit better at seeing through a ruse or discerning tactic. And one of the sergeants continue saying, look, this is a trick, do not trust these evil French forces. These guys are clearly doing a snow job on us. And then Murat says to the Austrian officers, you guys gonna let an enlisted man talk to you that way. I don't know how it works in the Austrian army, but we don't tolerate that as French officers. So I don't know what kind of what kind of circus you all running here. These dudes powers of persuasion and distraction. In our second to none. My friend second to none this fabulous stuff and the Austrian officers are like what goes on. We don't know exactly what he says, but he goes on for a little while and he's dressing down the officers because he's like horrified fended on their behalf. And so eventually the officers are. So I guess, shamed and humiliated like initatives e or. Yeah, because you officers see each other as equals, right? So they're essentially screwing up by allowing this insolence to occur. And so they order that sergeant arrested and imprisoned and kingdom magin being that poor Austrian sergeant, you know, you're correct. You know, it's a trick and now you're going to jail this whole thing plays out. Like one of those episodes of Bugs Bunny where he convinces someone like he's a girl rabbit or whatever, just to get his way, or he poses and some disguise and his able to. Gaslight some poor hapless sap, like Elmer Fudd until like doing just a thing he needs to do to have him win the day. This is not strike you as that like these, these Austrians and it's gonna come around to haunt them, acted in utter incompetent ways that just defy any kind of logic. So all I can do is I can only assume that these guys were not complete and utter idiots. You know, the Austrian army had a good reputation for for having their their stuff together, but they were no match for the wits. These two Frenchmen where, right? Exactly. And so at this point they're still trying to convince all the Austrians and armistice has been reached its it just happened. So recently that you guys haven't heard of it again, implying something might not be great with your army. And this point, a nother Austrian officer arrives, and they do the whole component show. Again, an armistice has been signed. This bridge belongs to France. It's public property. We're not at war. What's the big hubbub. Yeah. And if you blow this bridge up, then you're liable for destruction of public property. You dolts you're essentially terrorist. This gas lighting. One did not wanna wants his advanced level and this is this is high intermediate at the visits? Yeah, it's it's, it's a, it's a, it's a real. A real ship show here. Yeah, and gas lighting is just for anyone who is fortunate enough not to known that phrase beforehand. Gas lighting is when you deceive or manipulate someone by making them think that they are raising. Hey, everyone. We're ridiculous history, and we want to tell you about a brand new app. We discovered an app just for investing. It's called Robin Hood. Answer I Robin Hood and investing at that lets you buy and sell stocks e f, s.'s options, and crypto currencies. All commission free. They tried to make financial services work for everyone including investment neophytes like me and Ben, not just the wealthy yet it's none intimidating wave for stock market newcomers to invest for the first time with true confidence, you'll, let's go back to the some of the high points of this. I love that there no commission fees. Other brokerages may charge up to ten dollars for every trade, but Robin Hood does not full stop year Rowan, who was actually kind enough to give us a little bit of scratch to invest. And we've been having a really good time doing. It's very intuitive, very clean. Other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every robinhood does not charge us or you a dime, so you can trade stocks and keep. All of your profits, the design, the ease of use. It's out of this world, easy to understand charts and market data place a trade in just four taps right on your smartphone. You can learn how to invest as you build your portfolio. You can discover new stocks and track favorite companies with your own personalized news feed, and you get custom notifications for price movements. So you never miss the right moment to invest. And today just for hanging out with ridiculous history, Robin Hood wants to give you a free stock like apple Ford, or sprint to help build your portfolio, sign up at history, Robin Hood dot com. That's right. Just go to history dot, Robin Hood dot com and sign up now. So what does this officer do this new on the scene officer when he learns the news at this point, they really need an adult in the room right now. They really need to consult with the grownup. So he runs to get our spurred the field marshal Lieutenant who was in command, but seemingly a bit of an absentee commander. So they really needed to consult with this guy 'cause they were just running around like chickens with their heads cut off at this point and the French forces. Now they're still approaching Austrians have no idea what the do because it's a cost benefit thing. If it really if there really is an armistice than they are in deep deep. Fudge if they, if they shoot at the French forces like a who's on third kind of like, I mean, it really is. It's yeah. And the the French soldiers have been told by the marshals like right before they went off on this crazy cahnge. I've been told guys just walk forward like nothing's wrong. Just like walk forward like you're not in a War. I just think it's so incredible that like all the information they're getting is coming from the enemy, all of it, and they're acting on it as though it's like to be believed and the the one guy, the one guy who said, hey, maybe we should slow roll little bit like, you know, take a couple of steps back and think on this. He gets arrested and like put in the stocks or whatever his own people. Yeah, this is some Bugs Bunny malevolence right here. My friend and picturing this Benny hill soundtrack playing softly under a lot of this. I'm just picturing. These these Austria's just running around like juggling stuff and just like tripping over each other. And it's like Pratt, falling for days all on this bridge. Yes, we have to mention to this this stuff once it begins happening once these two guys walk up with their forces, it happens pretty quick succession. I think this could have been. This could be like a sitcom episode one one episode? Yeah, that's about how long it could it in real time to play out as a twenty five minute television sick. Why don't we just do a season of various hilarious things from the Napoleonic wars, get Larry David to write it and then put it on HBO it can't you picture the part where Polian and his dues against him by the bunnies and it's just don't don't don't runner. Exactly. I think that's perfect, especially Benny hill. Larry, David work on and Seinfeld works for this too, because as the forces from France, March onto the bridge, they actually get on the bridge. They're being super chill about it. Everybody's being cooled. They're just strolling up there sauntering maybe a sachet or so for anyone who was a suppressed actor and as they're walking up, the Austrians are panicking. They're realizing we're not war hip hip. Hooray. Kaluka lay would a wondrous day and so on. And they start physically throwing all the explosives that they had prepared for blowing up the bridge into the Danube. They just threw away, get them out of the way the French are coming. We're friends now. Yeah. Yeah, really, really ill advised. So Karl shows up. I love calling him by his first car all call. Car. All Carl get over here. We have an armistice. So Karl shows up and he sees the French marshaled and all their forces on the bridge. He sees his own men throwing away all the explosives and Carl looks around. He goes well, it must be true. They've got some far with this. You know, it's clearly this. I mean, this is good news for us. Right. Really you think he thought that you think he wasn't just immediately outraged heat? No, he thought it was true, and so he handed the bridge over to the marshals not a shot was fired in the entire thing out God, but then immediately after handing over the bridge, they became prisoners of war. The French took them prisoner, and they're like, wait, what. What what. Casey can queue up that that curbed music again. Yeah, like that. So what happened afterwards? I mean, because Napoleon's not on the scene at all. He's not on the scene began. Napoleon had nothing but praise to heap on his brother-in-law ole to Akeem Napoleon Murrah and he had a really cool nickname formed by the way, which was the first horseman of Europe and his compatriot John law. And he basically said that they had Chievo a feat of strategy and that he was very proud of them and they were good little boys and he gave them Pat on the head. And you know, probably some kind of military commendation who's to say the Austrian side did not fair quite so well, in terms of the praise that was heaped upon them because there was none. Right? Right. There was not. It's a great story, but yeah, you can only imagine the ignominy of that. And Carl himself is later court. Martialed convicted of negligence rightly so cashiered strip. Of all his honours later he is pardoned and actually reinstated. So this hilarious mistake did not follow him for all of his days and are now man. I feel like it probably did that's up Freddie embarrassing thing to have been in charge of. Yeah, hopefully he learned better. Critical thinking skills. Yeah. Well, he wasn't even there, right? Like all this hand later, he came later and he, you would have thought that he could have put it together, but it's I cannot believe that these French guys outsmarted their enemies at literally every possible turn in this story. Yeah, I can't get over the one guy that was like way, but, but it's like the kid in the horror movie that knows there's a monster, but no one believe him, you know? Yeah, yeah. Or the the one person gets called crazy in the first third of a horror movie. Yeah, it's it's insane. I can't get over just the the sheer amazing confidence. And as does comedy outside of. The studio here. I'm very impressed with their improvisational skills. They were just, yes, Andy, their way to victory. Yeah, we're putting we should have put that as the subtitle of the episode. Hey, that's not a bad idea. Yeah, let's do that. And this concludes our most recent installment of hilarious stories for the polio wars. A lot of them and excited to get into some more Shirley, Shirley, we have done exhausted them yet. Yeah, true. Let us know what other strange and funny war stories you have found, especially if they involve the pollyannish mannequins in the meantime, or we do hope you enjoyed this episode as always wanna. Give big thanks to Casey peg room for once again, saving the show and are immortal. So. And knows mortal soul. I, I'm sorry I shouldn't spoke. I shouldn't have lunch. Well, I had a, I got this ongoing go, she, that's fair. We also wanted think our recurring guest and research associate, Chris for haciendas, man. He pitched at us earlier about making that thing regular occurrence in. I wanna bring it up to you right now. I think it's a golden idea. Yeah. All ready wrote back to them. Ghouls said much the same. Yeah, good. Good agreement yet. So we are in agreement and we hope that you agree. It would be fun to check out our other stuff on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and I swear been on all of our shows. We need, you know, we need to follow the lead of our POWs LA who do a much better job of maintaining their social media accounts. They got the stories, they get the gifts, the boomerangs and stuff we need to do more of that. I, I'm a third down the gauntlet right now and pledge that we're gonna try to start doing if we don't follow through, don't hold it against us too harshly. But you know, I want. To change. I want to be better data. Be the change. Yeah, we have anything else we're supposed to mention a think. So thanks for italics to Alex Williams. Composer theme. Thanks to Eve's Jeffcoat who did not we're going to sort of, but is a font of knowledge. Thanks to you, Benjamin for that. Dapper checkered shirt. You're wearing today. Thanks to, you know, Jamin you have nice shirt as well. I do. You're right. Thank you. Casey, Casey, your shirt. Casey's killing it to you really is. And I think we're all going to go and have a drink in a bite of food at our local haunt after we wrap up here because we are in fact real Francis isn't just a show. Yeah, we do hang out in ordinate amount of time. We probably spend more time with each other that we do with our girlfriends. Yeah. Well, you know what I mean? I'm working on right. Well, that's it until next time. So they tuned the. The. Ever wonder why your office kitchen is so disgusting. What about how to deal with an overly critical boss or a colleague who smells or that co worker who for some reason takes all of his calls on speakerphone. I'm Alison green from the podcast, ask manager where I answer questions from listeners, but how to navigate life at work, especially the trickier more awkward aspects of having a job Abbass and co workers, the stuff you may have questions about have never known to ask. We've just added a second show each week. So now you can listen every Monday and Wednesday in upcoming shows, taking questions about how to handle a co worker who sucks at her job, what to do about a boss who's a jerk, but only to you what to do when people tell you that your tone sounds mean and lots more if you like advice columns, and you have a job or you ever want to have job checkout, the ask manager show you can listen on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Joel Casey Napoleon Bonaparte Robin Hood Akeem Napoleon Murrah Carl Osberg Joachim Murat apple Murrah officer France Vienna Europe Keam Napoleon Murat France Casey peg Danube river Austria Taber bridge John John wall commander
The Weird, Weird History of Shipping: Part II

Ridiculous History

23:32 min | 11 months ago

The Weird, Weird History of Shipping: Part II

"Hey ridiculous historians been here. The easiest place to find holiday gifts for everyone on my list is online and now getting all the packages as I orders. Easier to. That's thanks to Fedex. I don't have to worry about being home to receive a package because I can take more control of where they're delivered. I simply I send my fedex packages to the nearest pickup location in my neighborhood and picked them up from there. It's so convenient with over thirteen thousand locations across the country. You can pick up your fedex packages near you to visit FEDEX DOT com slash holiday guide to learn more ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio. You Welcome to do this show ridiculous. Historians don't call it a comeback. Well actually do because we are back with with part two on the weird weird weird history of shipping things in the US. If you have not listened to part one For for you know for your sake just looking out for you you go ahead and pause this go play part one. It's worth it. We'll wait I'm not by the way. Oh that's right and I am Ben Bullen. We are joined as always with our Super For producer Casey peg room and we are officially halfway through the very strange story of how things get from point. A. To Point B. and all the weird stops they make along the way to have joined that already in progress the way that at Liss obscure freezes it is pretty funny. The author says the owners of the Central Pacific Railroad created a company solely for the purpose of screwing with Wells Fargo which Which I always love it? When people interject a little bit of petty humanity into these stories Oh stories full of petty humanity for sure? Oh Yeah Yeah we've all been to the we've all had ship something somewhere. So you're right they do. They do decide to purchase this company and they continue Being this huge force in the package industry until world old war one because during World War One the US government forces all of these posters services all the express industry companies. He's to combine into a single monolithic thing and they nationalize it and they call this the railway express agency yeah and this is specifically typically so the government can have an easier time of shipping wartime necessities Such as rations human beings and all of the other Trappings things and accoutrements of war and as we know in history you know all good things must come to an end. and disruptive technology is just the order of the day and in nineteen seventy five. This monolith collapsed as well and it's because of motor vehicles. They just became much more efficient patient for shipping things. Because you weren't bound to literal routes laid out on tracks and you could just be a lot more nimble in shipping stuff and. That's when we start to see Wells Fargo oh completely abandoning shipping and receiving In favor of exclusively their banking operations which again they were happening in tandem. The banks were kind of part and parcel. If you'll excuse the pun you don't have to To the shipping business because they were already handling these assets it made sense for them to be able just invest them and hold them for people in all of these various wells fargo locations so they give that up and this is when we start to see A lot more individual companies companies pop up a start up companies at the time for lack of a better term like ups and Fedex. Yet we have to remember that while L.. All these swells and shipping tycoons were putting their stamp on history We after a member that the federal post stop this time was a lot more like a regulatory agency than something that actually shipped packages and letters so while all this is happening and let's let's jump back in time here in in the early days of the federal post office it wasn't a shipping company was more of a regulatory agency. They made rules about how packages and letters should be sent intil. That is several big changes occur which lead us to the current day. The first I was the rural free delivery act through the establishment of rural free delivery in one thousand nine hundred ninety six. This was huge for more than half of the country country because half the country lived in rural areas and now they could get mailed directly sent to them instead of having to go to the county seat to find the post office and in nineteen thirteen. There was another big change. was something called parcel post. Yeah parcel post to send I mean I. It's it's as simple as it became much more cost effective to ship things maxing out at fifty pounds at the time in fact it was so deficient that As referenced in this Atlas Obscure Article College students would ship their dirty laundry. Home in these specially made aide metal boxes so their parents could do their laundry for them and then ship it back and it was more cost effective to do that than to go to a laundromat. Better hire somebody to to wash their clothes for them. which is crazy right you you have to wonder was the male just that cheaper were laundromats themselves incredibly expensive live? There's so much weird stuff that's been mailed over over the years we can. We can laundry list of few toward the end but we should mention just an honorable mention of course to Charlotte may pure store F- who was literally mails from Greenville to Lewiston Idaho for about in fifty three cents. Her trip only took a few hours. This was legal at the time because she was under the weight limit. I hope they poked some holes in the box for her. She she did she did survive. Yes maybe she was practicing some sort of a deep meditation to restrict your breathing ever seen that Malcolm in the middle episode. Where The older brother whose name I'm forgetting what's his name doesn't matter. He wants to ship himself to China because he wants to beat up his pen pal for some reason and do we the very smart younger brother decides to help him and also screw with him by packing him up into a giant wooden crate and then simulating what it would feel like to make that journey by like you know rocking back and forth and having sound effects and even had like a fish out so it smelled like the sea and all this stuff and he's got like spock's Boxes of cereal and milk and stuff inside the the crate I just love the idea of of anyone shipping themselves somewhere as a substitute to other more more traditional forms of travel and shout out of course to Henry Box Brown. I knew a lot of our fellow. Listeners are waiting to at least have a mention of this brilliant Elliot Man who escaped slavery when he was thirty three by having himself mailed in eighteen. Forty nine to Philadelphia which is talk talk about out of the box thinking well out of the box thinking led him into a box and then he got out eventually. Did get out of the box. True Yeah that's a really cool story and there's an episode of stuff if you missed in history class on that very subject. Where can you pick up both ice cream and ice skates electric toothbrushes and electric guitar ramps at Walgreens? That's because now you can pick up your fedex packages right where you shop. This holiday fed ex is helping you take more control of your deliveries just senior packages to a Fedex pickup location at walgreens and. Don't worry about being home to receive them with over eight thousand locations across the country. You can find one convenient for you visit that Fedex dot com slash holiday guide to learn more so let's let's bring ourselves forward to the future you mentioned. UPS earlier. They started out in Seattle in nineteen o seven as the American Messenger Company or AMC with no affiliation to the to the theater company. Now this was kind of like a GIG economy. There are a bunch of kids who work full-time employees. They were just doing odd jobs for nod. A ton of money. Remember the episode did about the firefly catchers you know or it was that company that was the company it was like a chemical Michael Company that like literally crowd sourced little kids to go around catching fireflies This was like that on a smaller scale. Initially which is crazy. Considering you know the the corporate megaliths eventually became but yeah they they describe it here as as almost like a lemonade. Stand mentality and then of course it ballooned when when this young man at the age of Nineteen James Casey expanded and he started kind of combining the efforts of all of these little disparate GIG kind of courier services and Moved outside of Seattle and changed the company's United Parcel Service in nineteen nineteen and their big thing was using cars like we said it was much more nimble They were very good at planning these routes and making things as efficient as possible. Yeah and at this it's time. UPS experiences tremendous growth. A thanks. Of course to the boom of the automobile industry it also actually becomes a direct competitor to this parcel post system because ups gets something called common carrier. Rights writes common carrier rights mean that shipping companies like ups have some of the rights and responsibilities of a public company or State Service. Even though it's in private entity because it's explicitly working for the general public good it is subject to regulation by the government and this sounds like a bunch of red tape but ultimately what it allows you to do is to become at the time the biggest package shipper in the world also and They are of course still overland shipping. There's new airmail yet. Although some some folks tried right I think the. US government actually tried airmail email. A couple of times. The Post Office Department started delivering mail by aircraft in nineteen eighteen. But they couldn't you know they couldn't couldn't deliver packages just letters just very fancy letters and that list included we had the newly-established United States Postal Service which as we mentioned the top of the show went from being a more of a department to actual agency. They have the letter delivery situation on lock. No one else really needs to mess with that. It's not really an area of of concern for any of these other companies we have ups and then in Nineteen seventy-one we have federal express which which The seed of that idea began in a Yale dorm room in nineteen sixty five It was a dream the subject of a term paper by undergraduate Frederick W Smith who essentially essentially invented the idea of airmail In this paper. That didn't even get a particularly good grade He is professor asserted. Did Not see the value in this revolutionary idea. And he he didn't flunk but it's it sounded like he gave it more of a C so then in seventy anyone after a little bit of time spent in the Military Smith got out a his service and he bought a very large share controlling. Share air in an Arkansas Company. Arkansas aviation sales which was in little rock And he began to see how tough the logistical justifiable side of using airplanes to deliver freight in a timely manner so he decided that he was going to find a better way to do that. It using kind of the lessons he learned from that term paper. Right so fred. Smith is is pretty candid with himself and the employees of Arkansas automation sales about the difficulties facing their company. And I gotta say I appreciate that Fedex is. Official website is also very very honest about the bumps and obstacles in the way. That's where we're getting a lot of the history here. He is behaving exactly like all those people see at the beginning beginning of made for TV infomercials where something happens. They kind of bumble something and they go. There's gotta be a better way. And that is where it's the idea for federal express because going back to the paper which was still very prescient. He thinks they're too big challenges. Logistics six and then infrastructure right which are inextricably intertwined. So he also he chooses the name Federal Express for some pretty clever reasons said federal makes it sound more like a a a government entity like patriotic to you wanted to appeal to people's patriotism eighteen and the idea that I mean the federalist papers was a big part of the foundation of our country and there would be positive associations with that. Yeah he thinks it will help attract public attention it also helps them with one of his first potential clients the Federal Reserve Bank. He thought they're gonNA love this. They turned it down. But obviously Fedex Soldiered on they moved to Memphis Tennessee because it was kind of central in the US and the airport was in a great location was rarely closed. Due to bad weather they were also able they said. Look Hey guys. If you want to move Fedex here we will work with you. Yeah and again that goes into his Forward thinking thinking as far as like streamlining the process in the logistics so They began operations on April seventeenth in nineteen seventy three and according to their official website. They had three three hundred and eighty nine employees And Fourteen planes that were housed in hangers there At the Memphis airport and Dan on their first outing they delivered one hundred eighty six packages to twenty five states Rochester New York to Miami Florida and all points in between and much like the Pony Express. They were not profitable At first but unlike the pony express they did figure out how to soldier through and from nineteen seventy seventy three to nineteen seventy five no profits but then in July of nineteen seventy-five. It started becoming a very Prominent carrier area of luxury goods in the marketplace And it started to become this kind of bellwether of how to do business shipping things in this kind of new era of on demand Door to door Shipman. He ridiculous stories been here. The easiest place defined holiday gifts for everyone on my list is online and now getting all the packages I orders easier to. That's thanks to Fedex. I I don't have to worry about being home to receive a package because I can take more control of where they're delivered. I simply send my fedex packages to the nearest pickup location in my my neighborhood and pick them up from there. It's so convenient with over thirteen thousand locations across the country. You can pick up your fedex packages near you to to visit vettix dot com slash holiday guide to learn more this path ultimately leads Fedex ext to become the world's largest all cargo air fleet they have tons of planes thanks to deregulation and in nineteen eighty three three. They were the first American company to get one billion dollars worth of revenue within ten years of startup without being bought by anybody without merging. So they got there on their own in in that business sense and this still despite the company size is just a small apiece of the weird weird gigantic thing. We call the shipping industry. We didn't even get into cargo ships when everybody listening to know if you want. Want a weird vacation. You can actually book a ride on a cargo ship. Why don't you just have to be very flexible with your times? Is it like cost effective active. I mean this is a weird vacation. It's like it's a weird vacations. It's a slow boat across the ocean so I wouldn't like book myself. Patch on a cargo cargo ship to save money. Maybe you could depending you know it's It's just it's so different because it's GonNa take such a long time you might have to. You can say okay I want to arrive. You know x amount of months or days later in East Asia But they'll say okay. We'll give it a margin margin of error of a month or two. Oh yeah that makes makes a lot more sense. We mentioned briefly the top of the show but like where things are now. It's interesting how it's come full circle now shipping and receiving is becoming much more back to those old days of just kind of getting a courier like with like task rabbit person or using Uber in some places like in New York. Uber drivers will pick up. And bring you stuff you know like if they're not supposed to but they will And then you have other delivery on demand man services legs and what have you and that feel like we've kind of come back full circle Not to mention The elephant in the room the giants a giant elephant in the room which is Amazon in terms of how a potentially a stand to dominate shipping and receiving through their Amazon prime memberships. And Etcetera. You know like I mean they have all these fulfillment centers that are nearby so when you order goods you're not having to have it shipped from across the country. You're literally have a duplicate facility. That's much more close to you that you could get your whatever it is. You're Pichu keychain you know in the same day eh because it's literally just a local delivery person bringing it from that fulfillment center. That might only be an hour or even less Away from you if you live in a bigger city like New York so so it's interesting to see how that's going to develop as they start experimenting with terrifying things like using drones to deliver birthday cakes and whatnot and and now we've we've caught up to the current situation. We also WANNA give an honorable mentioned to several strange things that have been shipped in the past. Of course diseases seizes have been shipped accidents. I would assume Well there's a lady named Miss Daisy James in August seventh eighteen ninety five issue of the New York Times who said the dead birds and small animals are sent a taxidermist throughout the country. She also handled different strains of smallpox diphtheria and scarlet fever that were shipped by doctors to the Health Board. Remember when people were sending anthrax in the Mail on that was a thing or fake anthrax as well right there there were also been entire buildings shipped sometimes brick by brick Pets of course loose diamonds. which are the millionaires? Nearest go to escape plan and many many other strange things. One one thing that might be of interest to some of us is that you can ship things anonymously through the mail these are these can range from practical jokes to To just very weird stuff stuff contraband perhaps or contraband. Perhaps which we are not We're not condoning right on a family show but what happens to the recipient. I'm sure you can send something Anonymously but the person that receives it could then be on the hook for whatever you sent is. How does that work will? There's a need article on Cheat Sheet Dot Com Where it says it lists different entities? That will help you. Send Weird stuff you can send somebody a potato in the mail you can send them a glitter bomb. which is crazy really really horrible? Yeah I would not do that to someone in please. So that gets in every orifice It's it's been described. As of course the herpes of the craft world. That's very true. You can ship brick. You can send people fake money you can send them a gigantic teddy. hetty bear a Venus flytrap. Just some sand One of the weirdest things a Lotta. These are Jokes in strange pranks you can send print. Candles handles that smell. Good when they burned for the first few minutes and then they go from like vanilla to you know sulphur or fecal smell farts. And then you can send the Worst Cup of coffee. You can send an eggplant Some things like that like I. I think potatoes and coconuts. You don't even have to wrap. You can just put a stamp on them. I do love a good mail order coconut. That's the way I That's the way I often prefer them. I in this. This brings us us to you dear listeners. What are some of the weirdest things that you have ever encountered via parcel or posts weirdest thing you've ever delivered or had delivered to you? We want to know you can find us on facebook. You can find us on instagram. You can find us on twitter not just as ridiculous history but as individuals as well you you can find me exclusively on instagram where I go by the handle. At how now Noah Brown you can find me on twitter at Ben Bullen H. S. W. for the old school school. How stuff works fans out there? You can also find me on instagram in various adventures. Where I'm at Ben Bullen thinks is all waste least super producer? Casey Pagara Alex Williams who composed our theme research associate gave Luger. Christopher Haciendas here in spirit. Eve's Jeffcoat of course The quizmaster Aka Jonathan Strickland Aka Young Whistles Aka Sap Whizzy Aka the worst. Oh and Hey Do us a solid. And why don't you go over to Itunes or your podcast platform of choice and leave us a nice review or a really hilarious bad review. We might read it on the show one day. And if you don't want to do any of that stuff you can send us an email or we are ridiculous at iheartradio Dot com the checks in the mail folks. Thanks for tuning in. We'll see For more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows where can you pick up both ice cream and ice skates electric toothbrushes and Electric Guitar amps at Walgreens. That's because now you can pick up your fedex packages right where you shop. This holiday fed ex is helping you take more control of your deliveries just in your packages packages to a Fedex pickup location at walgreens and don't worry about being home to receive them with over eight thousand locations across the country. You can find one convenient for you visit Fedex dot com slash holiday guide to learn more.

Federal Express US government Wells Fargo Walgreens Ben Bullen producer United States Postal Service Official instagram Central Pacific Railroad Post Office Department Casey peg Henry Box Brown facebook twitter Seattle United Parcel Service Charlotte East Asia
The Great Diamond Hoax - Part 2

Ridiculous History

28:34 min | 8 months ago

The Great Diamond Hoax - Part 2

"This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by mood. Dot Com Mu Dot com is an online print and design company specializing in custom. Premium print. Products you know a special finishes like gold and silver foil letter presses and raise spot gloss the stuff that allows customers to add extra dazzle shine and texture to truly stand out while business. Cards are moves core product. They also offer other marketing materials like postcards greeting cards invitations. Stickers letterhead and notebooks to create a cohesive suite of products for Your Business Mood Dot. Com is more than just a printer. They partner with you to make your ideas a reality. But don't take our word for it for a limited time. Use Code History for fifteen percent off everything on mood dot com. That's Mu Dot Com Promo code history. Hey everyone I'm Brooke Burke. I'm making king admits and I'm sex and intimacy Kirch Leila Deville and we have a podcast called intimate knowledge. That's what this show is about sack sex. But it's so much more than that. It's about the ups and downs near relationship. Your sex life is about overcoming heartbreak and infidelity. It's about understanding intimacy. And what makes you happy? And it's about everything you want to know but you might be too embarrassed to ask. We're giving you intimate knowledge. Listen to intimate knowledge on iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Over ever you get your podcasts find us ridiculous histories of production of I heart radio Welcome back to the show ridiculous historians thank you so much for tuning in now Before we begin this episode you should make sure that you've listened to the preceding episode part one of the great diamond hoax of eighteen. Seventy two Hi I'm Ben I'm no and this is Super Producer Casey peg. That's that's him in thin and sound effect for him. There is this is is lilting laugh. That's right it's it warms my heart but hey let's not preamble this too much. Let's just jump right back into the great time in hoax. Arnold is still in the game. He gets another one hundred fifty grads because he was promised that if the mining engineer was impressed they would get that payment. It's like a bonus and so he sells another three hundred thousand dollars worth of stock to Harbin Dean. Meaning that Minuses EXPENSES. He has made over Five hundred thousand dollars. And how much is that in? Today's money why been in today's dollars that would be close to eight million dollars And he was do more like based on this arrangement he had more coming his way It was an absolute stroke of luck that he had not been found out and it just goes to show people kind of see what they want to see especially when greed is concerned. You know you might think you're doing your due diligence but you you want it so bad to be real that you're willing to kind of suspend your disbelief almost and that's exactly what these suckers did. That's exactly what happened. So he was smart right. He was also the brains of the operation If this is a movie than what happens next has the song. Take the money and run playing in the background. That's the soundtrack who did that song. Casey Miller band right. Yeah okay so picture. That Steve Miller Take the money and run He says look could probably sell more shares. But you can only get lucky for so long. He already moved his family. Back to Kentucky from San Francisco in eighteen seventy two and by the time people found this was a sham. He's left out. How did they figure out that this diamond field seemed too good to be true was in fact a hoax? It was yet another piece of happenstance In a story just chock full of seventy two on a train heading for Oakland from San Francisco Jane. The mining engineer encountered some folks from government. Survey team led by one. Clarence king who is Something of an Adventurer Ivy League man from Yale And a crackerjack geologists You'd actually become one of the most well known scientists in California at the time. See he began to suspect that The the the guy heading up Clarence guy heading up the The government survey team that Jane INS Jewels came from this mind. They had just surveyed two hundred thousand square kilometer area And he was concerned that a big discovery like that would call into question the The the thoroughness with which he and his colleagues surveyed the the land for the government yet. Oh they decided they were going to go back and check it out again. Yeah because again. They said it sounds too good to be true and if it is true. That means that we're bad at our jobs. That's the problem. They don't WANNA look bad. They're not trying to make money. They're trying to defend their credibility so they sniff around they find the whereabouts of the mind there on the Colorado Wyoming border they start digging and they find gems so the guys must've slackened. Arnold must've at least put the gems a little bit in the ground right somewhere. Totally shallow grave. Yes exactly and these are geologists that we have to remember so they find a ton of gems but the pattern in which they are found doesn't make sense. Every time king finds a diamond he sees twelve rubies. But when people dig deeper they don't find any gems at all. And because these guys are geologists they know that certain gems are not found in the same place. They don't naturally occur together and they found these things that would normally. If you're just digging them out of the ground you would you would never find in the same mine and then they said okay. We'll see more stuff that doesn't fit their ant hills that have rubies inside them but they're also holes in the side of these hills where stones have been shoved in with a stick also. It doesn't make sense that rubies and diamonds will be found so closely together. Hang on guys. Stop the presses says Clarence King. This is a scam. Yes A- moment for sure The whole thing's revealed to be a massive fraud king books for San Francisco to get with his investors his His fellow bilked investors to let them know they all been totally screwed so all of them in a tizzy they Find a group in town and they I. I didn't understand there's been they deputize them to back them up and and go into the fields was that ability were the days okay so back then. Certain people in society imagine this. Having a certain people in society usually sheriffs marshals can deputize citizens in the event of a crisis. Or You need you need a gang of men to fight back against another gang bad people then you just find some civilians to trust and you deputise them Temporarily the best way to say there's like imagine if An Atlanta city police officer or a Fulton County. Sheriff burst into our PODCAST Studio and said You Casey Peg road. I need you on the case with me. Something Bad's going down here. How are you with a gun? And he tosses you a badge and a gun. Casey and then he says he's deputising you would you what would you do? I guess that after except Amanda Shirk Your Civic Duty Right now. That's right and I'm not much of a marksman but know I've been to target practice like once or twice in my life so I guess I do it I could. I have only ever held twenty two when I was a little kid. I really WANNA shoot a handgun one of these days. But I don't know if I ever will get to it. I did not like the experience I have to say but I was like you know pretty young at the time and my dad was like insistent on. T. ME firearm. Sage WanNa make you a man. Yeah Yeah just you know not to not to do dumb stuff with guns basically yes smart. That's smart yeah. Yeah it makes sense also wanted to tell you if you ever want to hang out. There's some pretty cool indoor ranges not far from here at all We can go we. Can You can rent some firearms if you want. And then we can you know And then we can practice marksmanship And then we can go get lunch somewhere. No no takers. I'm into it. I'll go by myself. I'm just you guys could go to. So it's it's good practice for Zombie apocalypse right. Actually one of the indoor arranges does have some of the shooting target. Serbis. That's cool. That's fun have you seen this thing. That's all the rage now. The kids are doing. Its axe throwing. Yeah we've got three axe throwing bars in the bars though. That's the kicker drunk and throw accent's really bad idea still let you throw the axes drinking heavily or anything. I mean if some bar I think you can hang out at the bar if they serve alcohol. One of them probably doesn't but if they serve alcohol you can hang out at the bar and then the peop- The axe throwing is a separate thing. You know what I mean. I don't know how you could keep the two apart you know. Is it a separate space like? Are there axes like flying over towards the bar from people who have poor aim? Hey I know you know it'd be by the way. Keep all this in the episode. Let's check can you drink alcohol and throw axes where there's a will there's a way? It's oddly it's `rational There's a specific Law is like a cat cafe where there's like a delineation between the cafe part and the cat part. I would make never the Twain shall meet thing but again. I think you'd have a hard time having those twain's not meet right. Okay so there are a couple of different answers. At kick axe throwing thing about it The owner says patriots can drink beer. Wine Malt Beverages but they can only get a maximum of three okay arts. No hardly they're looking out for the they're looking for the People. I don't know man I don't want someone three drinks deep. Throw it access absolutely not no. I don't think anybody wants that gun. This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by Mu Dot Com and online print and design company specializing in custom premium print products. Ooh I love a premium business cardio with a letter press and the that you know that paper field of the tactile sensation of raised text. Perhaps a bone paper stock. There we go there. Goes that heavy stock? This is the kind of stuff you can find with mood. Dot Com their remarkable premium qualities. What sets them apart. It allows you as a customer to set yourself and your business apart and leave a lasting impact and they might not have American psycho bone but they do have special finishes like gold and silver foil letter press and raised spot gloss that allows customers to add extra dazzle perhaps razzle absolutely shine and texture to truly stand out from the crowd and yet move dot. Com makes business cards. But that's not all. They also make postcards greeting cards invitations stickers letterhead in notebooks so you can have an entire suite of things that are branded for you or your business. It's true there are more than just a printer. Moo.com partners with their customers like us to make our ideas into realities. Whatever it takes whatever print vision. You might have mu offers as much or as little support as you might need to make it happen. Their award winning team of print experts here for you and has been there for us to show that they care about quality as much as we do. But you have to take our word for it. Try It yourself today. For a limited time you can use the code history to get fifteen percent off of everything at Mood Dot Com. That's Mu Dot com promo code history for fifteen percent off anything. There's a city far away a fiction. Podcast the richest most powerful place on earth on an epic to convey to invade a vast empire threatened by rebellion. Powders everything powered gives everything we have to get away from this place or we will die to. The truth makes a strong. Tuman Bay his own destiny history fantasy collide Kirk I if you know many for creators Joan Scott Dryden and Mike Walker. The only thing I ask of. You is total and complete loyalty now on the ihop across network. Three McVeigh listen to all episodes of Tumor Bay Seasons One and two now for free on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts. So what does it have any to to our Our hoax tres. So they are persuaded to return to the fields with their deputized. Party and general. David Colton is the company's general manager in addition to being a actual general He's leading this party this posse. He finds some rubies on top of Iraq and he says it would have been as possible for nature to have deposited them as full a Persian standard in San Francisco to toss a marble in the air and have it fall on Bunker Hill monument which was a very specific for him and so when they get this evidence these investors say are i. This is terrible we fell for it. We are dissolving our company. Everybody in San Francisco Makes Fun of them because this has already been in the news it also like imagine doing something that makes you look so dumb every media outlet in the country spends a week making fun of you. Yeah it's true there was There was even an article in the New York Times Which apparently had already been reporting on this and thought it was fraud the whole time so there was a real self righteous kind of I told you so. Article published on December. Sixth or reporters wrote that. The most remarkable part of the scam was that the perpetrators had succeeded in deceiving businessmen and capitalists so proverbially shrewd as those of San Francisco and then several years after the hoax was uncovered Ralston. Unfortunately took his own life. I mean this was the kind of this. Wasn't just some Mean-spirited Josh. I mean this was basically like a ruined his reputation in eighteen seventy nine king who was already on his way to becoming a legendary adventurer and geologist he founded the US Geological Survey. So you know pretty interesting. Trajectory for some of these characters Some sadder than others. Yeah we know the question. Everybody's mind what happened to slacken and Arnold the original hoaxers themselves. We have a story for you. John Slack was assumed to have disappeared from the historical record who fled the country or some people believe. He died soon after leaving the mining fields. At least at the time but in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven a guy named bruce. A woodard is an accountant. That's obsessed with this hoax. Says that slack took a job building caskets in Saint Louis and eventually moved to White Oaks New Mexico where he became an undertaker Lived alone died in eighteen ninety six and left behind in a state of only one thousand six hundred dollars. That's Woodward's book diamonds in the salt again. The guy's not historian. He's an accountant but he dug into this pretty pretty tenaciously. He mind the primary sources And then another article In eighteen seventy two that would are dug up. Seems to say that Philip Arnold bought a two story brick house in Kentucky and he moved his family there. He got five hundred acres of property all in his wife's name and then became a horse breeder who also raised sheep and pigs even though Arnold and slack were indicted in San Francisco for fraud Nothing came of it and again would or the author of diamonds and in the salt thinks that maybe the investors squashed the legal proceedings. Because they didn't want to getting clowned in the new totally. I can see that like they're not getting that money back now. Yeah it's over for them. They just want to like move on with their lives. But here's the thing I'm this this entire debacle really had some serious. Like societal implications. It was just kind of a sign that this whole prospecting gold rush mentality. You know had a clock on it you know that. It was in fact a bubble right because California had experienced so many of these frauds think about it think about all of the frauds that would go with You know the gold rush itself and of faking reports of oil for example Defrauding investors of millions of dollars in the eighteen sixties This is from an article from Smithsonian magazine that goes into all of the implications of the great diamond hoax and in that article Patricia O'Toole the author of money and morals in America. A history has some great quotes sums. This idea up. I see the diamond. Hoax is one of a long line of scams made possible by the fact that the United States truly was a land of opportunity many legitimate fortune seemed to be made overnight so particularly easy for a con artist to convince a Gullible American that he too could wake up a millionaire. Yeah Yeah I WANNA point out too that Arnold was aware of this indictment and had a had a crazy quote. He told the paper in Louisville. When when they asked him to go on record about these indictments he said this he said I've employed council myself a Henry rifle so he basically that's such a Kentucky thing to say. Eventually he does settle out of court with William lent specifically for a hundred and fifty grand. That's the only time he ever did something like admitting he had anything to do with his diamond hoax. Eighteen seventy three. He becomes a banker and then he gets in a fight with another banker in eighteen. Seventy eight that leads to a shootout. Three people are injured. Arnold GETS SHOTGUN BLASTS TO THE SHOULDER. This is back when banking disagreements. Were much more heated. Oh yeah sell that stuff in the streets And then I'm sorry. And then oh he just gets pneumonia and dies. Okay that's low into climactic but It happens it comes for us all death. Yeah well There is a mystery because we still don't know what happened to some of those hundreds of thousands of dollars Treasure story buried in here somewhere. Bam well definitely were reporting on their taxes. You know the seventh daughter. I brought you here to prepare you to condition your mind and body so while the magic it is the family trade. I'm teaching you so that you will have the skills to survive. That is a gift from your family that I have been entrusted to deliver the seventh daughter. Listen on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcast. Hey It's Laura Wasser you may know me best as a divorce attorney and the person who created the online divorce service. It's over easy now. We're inviting you to listen to my new podcast. All's fair with Laura Wasser after Practicing Family Law for over twenty years. I have seen firsthand. How miscommunication and unrealistic expectations can destroy relationships? I'm here to present some new options which include educating enlightening empowering and entertaining you with proven methods to navigate even the toughest of relationships every Tuesday. We drop a fresh episode. I have a lot to say and you'll also get here from some of my friends. Top legal financial and mental health professionals celebrities and everyday people all of whom have something to share about how they navigate their own relationships. Listen to all's fair with Laura Wasser. That's me on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Over where you get your podcasts. That's the end of the diamond hoax. I think you're I think you're right that this was the the tipping point or watershed moment. That kinda took the rose tenant glasses off people's eyes. Oh Yeah Yours one scam too many and I think it was you know again like like we like we quoted from that Smithsonian article these types of scams were were wide. Rife as they say in a brass is a British comedy. Show that I love very much. But they weren't to this degree they weren't this magnitude of hoax. That just kept going and kept pulling more people in all of the perfect storm of circumstances that led to this being perpetrated for as long as it was and to just build so many people have so much money That really opened. Some people's eyes agreed. Yeah agreed and You know I think the big lesson that we can all take away from this while we listen here today in twenty twenty. Is that by God. If you're starting a posse deputy PAGARA is Is The guy just can't go wrong with you know Casey I have this vision of you. being in like a director's cut of tombstone guys remember tombstone. I'm your huckleberry. Yeah Yeah Casey Program is our the new huckleberry you okay with that no? I always wanted to be the VAL kilmer too. It's like the best one who's who is. What is he referring to what he says? I'm your huckleberry Pie. He's like I'm I'm thin. Yeah it's probably referenced the huckleberry Finn Sidekick Yeah. I'm the guy that makes sense. Okay Casey I love it. If you'd be a our collective huckleberry your kind of I'd be honored so saying which when my Wyatt or who would. Who WOULD VAL KILMER DOC Holliday? Yeah yeah he's so Oh wait then that would make Casey the DOT com case. I would only want to be dot. Com is the best character. In my opinion. I got to cut down on my drinking. If I'm holiday that's true you know. Don't you have the consumption? Yeah Yeah Yeah you also have a very complex romantic situation. Yeah Doc. Holliday. Had some handsome a- He's a very interesting character. Is the most fleshed out my opinion not to be confused with the Michael J. Fox vehicle doc Hollywood rights and not to be confused with What was it Kurt Russell in tombstone? He was yeah. Okay now be was wider not to be confused with his other Western. Bone Tomahawk. Which is a whole different vibe. That one gets a little Gets a little grizzly a bit? Yes but But check it out. It's definitely not for everyone. It's it's very it's like a it's like a green inferno level gladdened. Violence got it. But it's strange isn't it? Did Arnold learn anything? He got away clean pretty much. He didn't even have to give that one hundred and fifty thousand dollars back. We're not condoning his actions folks but we have to admit that these scams in these cons are historically fascinating. Thank you so much for tuning in let us know Some of your favorite lesser-known scams or cons throughout world history. We are all ears. The as usual the more ridiculous. The better If you want to join the conversation you can talk to us on facebook. We've got a group called ridiculous historians. It's going to ask you a question when you when you click on the link to joy after name either knoll or Casey or myself or all three of us or just say something that made us laugh. I think somebody recently named one of the hosts they say cookie monster. That's fine you know. We've all been a cookie monster at one point now. Yeah I hereby referred to me though. Thinks you're being unfair to yourself. I more cookies than you. Don't really have a sweet tooth no way. I ate a cookie a week and a half ago. Okay was it good? What kind of cookie was it was like oatmeal chocolate chip stock? This wasn't A. Hey if you want to check us out outside of the facebook you can do so instagram for me. I am at how. Now Noah Brown and I am at Ben Bowling on Instagram. I see some of my Recent misadventures and I am Ben. Bullen H. S. W. on twitter Where I recently recently learned I've been studying mandarin off and on. I recently learned on the Internet that the characters and Mandarin for penguin translate to something like business goose. So that's the level of discourse on twitter. I just want to keep everybody's expectations low huge. Thanks to super producer. Casey Peggy Malecki Williams who composed our theme Christopher Hus- Iota always hearing spirit and that devious who your family stays huge. Thanks to ease jeffcoat huge. Thanks Gabe newsradio. Our research associate who you know. Obviously be cool to have Gabe on the show. At some point. I would love that. Let's do that. We'll see then folks for more podcast from iheartradio. Visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows everyone. I'm Steven Hyden Non Jordan runtaugh. Join us as we unveil our new music podcast rivals. It's a look back at famous music robberies at the past every week Jordan I will explore new rivalry delving into all the details of our beloved musical icons who just can't seem to get along with their federal legends and that will debate each other about who deserves the upper hand in these classic conflicts. You will remember the biggest beast for music history and hopefully become aware of some. You didn't know. 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The Weird, Weird History of Shipping: Part I

Ridiculous History

33:02 min | 11 months ago

The Weird, Weird History of Shipping: Part I

"Hey ridiculous historians been here. The easiest place to find holiday gifts for everyone on my list is online and now getting all the packages as I orders. Easier to. That's thanks to Fedex. I don't have to worry about being home to receive a package because I can take more control of where they're delivered. I simply I send my fedex packages to the nearest pickup location in my neighborhood and picked them up from there. It's so convenient with over thirteen thousand locations across the country. You can pick up your fedex packages near you to visit FEDEX DOT com slash holiday guide to learn more ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio. You Welcome to the show ridiculous historians. Thank you for tuning in. If you are a resident of these United States. You may be familiar with something we call the. US Postal Service There there's still a big deal. It's a crazy operation when you think about it and just for a quick statistic every single day they process and deliver one hundred eighty seven point eight million pieces of just First Class Mail every twenty four hours. Hi I'm Ben Bullet. Hey I'm Noah Brown and I'll tell you I didn't realize until he dug into this subject The US Postal Service wasn't even established officially officially until the seventy S. That's correct insane to me. I figured it was just something that was around since time immemorial you hear about Benjamin Franklin being You know the first official postmaster Mr General But that they did not have a government body it was more of like a ad hoc kind of situation. Yeah it was a department the post office department not the Postal Service Service right. So we also would be remiss if we didn't send an audible shoutout in the ear mail to our Super Uber Producer. Casey peg room and speaking of you know I like that. You bring up the surprising recent origin of this this This modern postal service. Because I was thinking about this off air. Is it easier or more difficult to run a postal all service today because we know that there's this amazing technology right we have GPS tracking systems Galore but we also have many many any more people millions more addresses still. I think it's easier to run a postal service or package service now than it was back in the a day. That is our topic for this episode. The weird weird weird history of shipping. Just in general. You know who I was ship Casey JC Penney and Pika Chew. And that's A. That's a phantom reference. I it is. We're talking about today though. This is a different kind of shipping. Oh Shipping and receiving got Casey the Seems to approve of my my shipping choice. I do yes Casey on the case Casey on the case. So let's let's think about it like what's what's the weirdest thing you guys have ever mailed or received in the mail I once received a A single floor. Tom Drum like a got like from a Yamaha drum kit like just the Tom and then I ended up meeting the guy who I bought it from on Ebay completely randomly. I was in the market for a single drum found one to my liking and and then it ended up the guy from Athens where I am eventually moved and his name is tiger the drummer guy the guy okay. Would you name the Drum Yamaha. Sorry you got the factory name exactly because some people name their instruments. That's real thing. Yeah I wonder if you have a drum kit drummer. Do you name each individual drum or G. Give the whole kid a single name. Casey your agenda. What do you think I think it's more of a kit thing? Yeah then individual drums. Maybe if you have like a special symbol or something maybe give it a name but yeah yeah Like old zillow or something. Yes so the response questions did ask. I have a weird shipping story. It's very short it. It won't take too long so I used to live out in the hinterlands very small area in Central America and I had to get some medication ship. Medication itself is not unusual. It's sent through the post all the time but I was so far away from the US and so far away from regular shipping routes is that this had to come. Let's see picked up out of pharmacy put in international mail carried by a private carrier once got in country and then the last two stops It went on the back of a pickup truck. There was a guy in the back of a pickup truck. It went about ten miles that way and then it was handed off to a corier on a dirt bike and there wasn't really an address so I had to go stand in front of this building. which is the main drag of town and just wait till I see the right guy in the dirt bike? I'm the only one by the way in this scenario. Who is who looks? Looks like I do. I'm pretty recognized so flag him down or did he just has made a beeline right for you. He recognized he he saw from a distance is so weird because I can see Z.. Through the stamps and the markings how many different kinds of systems this had gone through. And that's that's what. I am still baffled by you. Know Win when you have something. Very delicate for instance like a drum shipped through the mail. or You have something even normal shipped through. Do you know to the ends of the Earth. How can we do that? It's impressive as a species. It's really funny. been the the the situation that you just described is not too far removed for for what became the order of the day for shipping. It would be this kind of going around your ass to get to your elbow situation where steamships would go. Oh down to Panama and then they would you know transfer the deliveries to horses. Who would then make a journey over the very very treacherous isthmus of Panama and then picked up again by new ships and taken up the Pacific coast And that that was how it was done until eighteen. Fifty eight win. When overland delivering became much more of a thing and a bidding war ensued? We're getting a little ahead of ourselves but I really like your story. It really sets the tone for this this topic now. Thanks I mean yours is well the more things change right the the more they stay the same history doesn't repeat but it tends to rhyme. It's true I liked that. You brought up the freeze ad hoc at the top of the show because before the eighteen hundreds what we would call a package courier. Delivery Service List pretty unorganized. There wasn't a huge central authority. You would say okay. I need to send Duke Duke Casey Peg Room a not a balustrade. That's too big a loot for some reason your senior loot l.. Ut Sorry. What is a balustrade? Ben I've always wondered wondered that it was in an Aimee Mann Song and I never knew what it was. Is it like a banister. It's a it's kind of it's a railing and it's kind of ornamental thing like if you ever drive by an apartment building and you see maybe a nice one with like a stone railing around one of the balconies that is a balustrade that railing and and things will stems. Those are balancers sat right. That is true. That'd be hard to ship though those would be hard to ship shipping. A balustrade at that time seems weird so we send them a loot instead l.. Ut I would ship a balustrade with Casey Pilgrim. I'm like in the package. No you guys are just having a relationship to go with an inanimate object that people do that Fine Casey case it is almost twenty twenty after all less people be judgmental but back to Before the mid eighteen hundreds I would need to find a corier of physical person. Listen or crew. Now say get this loot to the duke and then the courier would say okay. We're GONNA go to the closest village near you know the Dukes of the Duke's Palace fortress or whatever and then instead of taking it to a specific address the corier would probably just drop it off and whatever the common area of town was and mind you zero protection for you as the sender to the recipient or to the gain guaranteed safety of the goods being transported or the you know the message or whatever this is this is an advance of the idea of shipping larger things we will come to version As a thing called parcel post but that comes right. Yeah IT'S A. It's a huge trust fall right because the courier could literally early disappear you would never see your loot Again and your loot will become the quarriers loot l.. Oh how funny is that. We've kind of come full circle to that. Now where where we put all of our trust in this Ride share and just kind of like sharing economy where we don't really need guarantees so much as long as they had the passed the test to get on the APP then we trust them. We just aren't really that concerned. It's just kind of interesting. It's a little bit of a full circle. You got stuff like task rabbit where people pick up stuff and do it for you whereas fifty or you know whatever all of those Absurdly named Services but it's true. Ben That is very definition of ad hoc. You would hire these individuals schedules. You might get your stuff you might not and it became you know. There was a gap that needed to be filled and that specifically happened during the California gold rush in the eighteen sixties. Win A lot of folks. Were settling going West young young men and women And they really wanted to it was. It was a time of technological boom the idea of the telegraph and you know being able to get things much more quickly and much more quickly. We're talking about you know. Weeks as opposed post two months. But that's still looks great. In comparison it does and And you're right. There's this there's this what Malcolm glad well would call a tipping points in the eighteen sixties and it coincides with the California gold rush part of it goes back to the geographical fact that the United States is huge. It's massive. It's very very wide exactly and those ad hoc methods of shipping and receiving might have worked in a more regional setup. Where you you didn't have to travel as far but once you start going from CD shining see that becomes completely Just untenable And by the way we're we're getting a lot of this chronology From a wonderful article from Atlas Obscure called from Pony Express to Amazon drone the strange history of delivering packages just by Dan Nossa wits. That's right and in this shipping free in this gap this area of opportunity. We see two incredible players emerge one is called the pony express the other is called Wells Fargo and the Pony Express had a real missed opportunity by not adopting shopped the tagline. Let those ponies run. That's the Scott Benjamin Benjamin close to the lifetime. Let those plenty run a ride. I think he's run. I think it's run okay. Let him loose. Where can you pick up both ice cream? And Ice Skates Electric toothbrushes and Electric Guitar AMPs at Atwal Greens. That's because now you can pick up your fedex packages right where you shop this holiday. Fedex is helping you take more control of your deliveries just in your packages is to affects pickup location at walgreens and don't worry about being home to receive them with over eight thousand locations across the country you could find one convenient for you visit Fedex Dot Com mhm slash holiday guide to learn more suit. The Pony Express is what it sounds like they were a Letter Transporting Cavalry. They would jump on these horses and they would deliver mail and newspapers and important Gordon messages through a system like a relay race of different mounted riders. So of course you would say well. It's ridiculous that I would write. Write a letter in New York and then handed to some guy in a horse and he would ride across the country he wouldn't he would ride a certain distance he would link up with someone else and they would ride along. Yeah and what would have taken twenty five days by stage coach Or perhaps many many months on a on a sea voyage The Pony Express could get it done in about ten days from East Coast to west coast And they operated between The Upper East between Missouri and California Cornea. But they didn't operate that long. It might surprise some people because the pony express after it went the way of the Dodo. Due to the Telegraph the Pony Express was very very romanticized in the American Zeitgeist but it was only in operation from April third eighteen sixty to October eighteen. Sixty one just a little more than a a year but in those eighteen months of operation the pony express changed history changed shipping and it remains an impressive endeavor. Today when you say I absolutely would say one thing that I didn't know about in that time. It operated that very limited time it did not turn a profit and and in fact there was a war between the United States in the Pie. You Tae Indians called the Pyramid Lake War that caused a temporary shutdown of the company and cost them seventy five thousand dollars a princely sum at the time and after that they when they started all the damage had been done and they never received received a government contract which as we know can be very very important for something that requires so much overhead and infrastructure and it is estimated according to some sources including history dot com Article Entitled Ten things. You may not know about the Pony Express by Evan Andrews. was that over. The course of that. Very brief history of the company it may have lost Around two hundred thousand dollars Just a couple of little quick facts from from that article as well I thought it was interesting. The riders you think of Pony Express. Riders is being like grizzled kind of cowboy types. But they actually were very slight fellows weighing between one hundred nine hundred twenty five pounds much more like a jockey and that's because of weight restrictions they wanted to keep them as light as possible also they could increase productivity in terms of like the quick quicker turnaround times and this is my favorite one as they received a salary of between one hundred two hundred and fifty dollars a month. This is a big deal the time and they were asked to submit themselves to reading this loyalty oath which says I hereby swear before for the great and living God the during my engagement and while an employee of Russell Majors in doubt is the the the the partners in the endeavor. This was a private company. Exactly exactly I will under no circumstances use profane language that I will drink no intoxicating liquors. That will not quarrel or fight with any other employee of the firm arm and then in every respect I will conduct myself. Honestly be faithful to my duties and so direct all my acts as to win the confidence of my employers. So help me God ought I want to add to that excerpt with a fascinating classified advertisement. This is an alleged advertisement wanted young young skinny. wiry fellows not over eighteen must be expert riders willing to Risk Death Daily orphans preferred. No yes. Orphan's prefer yeah. That's I mean 'cause that's enticing when you think about the age Oh you're trying to get to like I'm gonNA live dangerously. No and it's like you know you better not not have anybody who's GonNa miss you because you might get an Arrow through the throat or something. I don't know if it isn't a number of ways you could have died on this treacherous journeys because the West you know the the areas between that frontier very treacherous in terms of terrain in terms of potential ways of just falling to your death as any number of ways you could die. That's right in Oregon trail taught me anything. It's that anytime you travel with a group of six or more people. In that time one of you is going to get dysentery. One of you is going to break a leg and You know you might lose some oxen but not break a leg and like doing well and you know high school musical. No no like like a compound fracture bone sticking out and stuff. You guys remember Oregon trail. Did you play it where you fans. Oh yeah totally remember Fording the river Dying of dysentery. Gary stuff yeah I actually have a card game version of it. That came out pretty recently. That's quite a lot of fun. I recommend that if you if you haven't seen that should the update the diseases. No you know it was literally just a card. Game version of Oregon trail has a neat mechanic. The way you play it I re- I really cool check. We should have a breed into the next office game night. Sounds like a plan. If you want to participate in the Pony Express. There's kind of a way can do it today. You can follow followed their footsteps or should I say hoof prints by visiting the Pony Express national historic trail. It goes through a ton of different Lan Dan jurisdictions it has several sites that are open to public visitation. There are a couple of places where they've got automobile access. It's it's a piece of living history that's worth it and it is indeed history. The Pony Express is no more because in while was only in operation for that eighteen month period period in eighteen. Sixty six The owner of the time sold the assets for Pony Express to Outfit named Wells Fargo and he sold it for one point five million dollars in eighteen sixty six. She's the ways I know that's a ton right and Wells Fargo. You might be saying or you probably said earlier in the episode you said Wells Fargo Holy Moly stars and Garters. Isn't that a bank. Well Yeah Yeah now. Yeah but you may have seen their conic logo which is a horse drawn. stagecoach With the what do you call it. A captain pilot rains men. What do you call a driver? Drivers the driver boom ago. Do little the horses one hundred percent that guy and that is because while the pony express largely was known for delivering letters Wells Fargo Kind of had the market cornered on delivering larger sure things would packages coachman. I bet you as a coach Coachman I think he can do driver as well but much more appropriate. I love that and before are they made their real money in banking wells. Fargo was absolutely the end. All be all of package delivery as you can tell by by this Very very absurdly catchy little ditty I warn you in advance from the nineteen sixty two film version of the nineteen fifty seven Broadway musical musical. The music man by Meredith Willson have a listen the West Fargo wagon down. The street will be hold. The Wells Fargo Wagon is calm down the street. I wish I wish I knew what let it could be books on. Great mad now. ZAC Montgomery works across a bath. Tub and across cut saw They were there was shipping all kinds of stuff. That's right and it was literally all kinds of stuff. Because the folks teamed up there on the East Coast The New York to create wells Fargo wanted to dominate shipping across the contiguous United States and beyond. They wanted a monopoly. There were a bunch of east coast shipping concerns at the time but wells Fargo is different. It was the creation or the The result of a supergroup team up between Three Different People Henry Wells William G Fargo. Those are the names we know and then another one you may not have heard of a guy named John Butterfield on their own. These dudes each had a shipping company but The when they join enforces nineteen fifty. They created something. This is a trick question. What do you think they created way to not wells? Fargo right that Iraqi I'm thinking some other legacy brands. Let's see they called. They called the package shipping industry. The time the express industry mystery wait a minute and these activities were taking place in America. Let's see I like where we're going with this United Express American Eagle Goal State Express Package Postal Eagle America on Canada. Mail in a hurry. Okay I like all of those and those did not make it out of the Pitch meeting that ultimately settled on You guessed it maybe American Express. Yes I hope. We hope we left enough bread crumbs there and this is probably probably obvious to everyone. But I think it's so interesting how the biggest banks and credit card companies always got their start like in the gold rush and like you know occupying hang some niche and then just kind of like ballooning from there and now we have our you know our wells Fargo's in our you know big banks of the world which which are giant right. Hey ridiculous historians Ben here. The easiest place to find holiday gifts for everyone on my list is his online and now getting all the packages I orders easier to. That's thanks to Fedex. I don't have to worry about being home to receive a package because because I can take more control of where they're delivered. I simply send my fedex packages to the nearest pickup location in my neighborhood and picked them up from there. It's so convenient convenient with over thirteen thousand locations across the country. You can pick up your fedex packages near you to visit FEDEX DOT com slash holiday guide to learn learn more so these guys join forces. They make American Express Festival or two years. American Express's breasts is primarily an east coast operation. But they want to. They want to get in on the growing west coast market released some members of American Express. Do you see Henry Wells. And William Fargo or gassed about it. They're super excited. But the Board of American Express's he's like well. Why don't we do this? California thing we we got a pretty nice operation here on the east coast and ain't broke. Don't fix it Fargo And they he said well you know they. They started their own company. They kind of they took what they learn from the American Express operation and he just moved it to the West Coast and they changed the name and again early on they. Their biggest service was Delivery of valuable goods You know jewels and gold and then eventually kind of more you know homegoods that That folks that actually so you had a little money to spend from like catalogue ship shipments and stuff like that could spell a straits. All of that stuff. Yeah And they were. We're very clever in their marketing and Did a good job of endearing themselves to the news media by including free newspapers along with any packages that you would ship through their Their service and this is great because everybody enjoys being plugged in getting the latest news news and we have to remember. This is before television. This is a time in an age where information is a little tougher to come by so getting a free newspapers super great value. Add things. Get a little weird. When the company starts directly delivering gold as well right that's where it becomes a little bit more than a postage service is true? And that you know we'll we'll find out in as as we know Based on what we know Wells Fargo has today that became much more of their bread and butter but because they were handling so much of this precious material that was coming out of the gold rush They it made perfect sense to them to set up a situation where they could. You know invest in hold onto people's assets for them and they did such a job and You know did it so quickly. That folks were very the Comfortable with them and then you know that was one of the early days of folks having money that had been formerly destitute and they needed to trust somebody and they trusted wells Fargo so Again a really good point in this atlas obscure article is every new settlement gold mining colony. That was set up. You have yourself saloon and you'd have yourself a wells Fargo. Yep absolutely maybe a church to who knows definitely a wells Fargo and earlier. We had walked through through the strange and inconvenient Rube Goldberg esque shipping system that companies like Wells Fargo would use they would send the steamships team ships down to Panama the horses over the Smith which was a dangerous An time deadly trip and then they would send ships Up the Pacific coast in eighteen. Fifty eight they create the first of what we described his overland delivery service named in a burst of creativity the overland mail company and this is where Wells Fargo really kind have took that shipping to the next level because they started getting a little bit of assistance from Congress in the bidding war began to establish established much more of a nationwide postal system and that company. That offshoot was in the running and won the contract And so the Overland Mail Company and its by now Very experienced owners. Take a step forward forward there. There's still a private company. But now they're very closely working with the government and they are carrying all official mail. We know a little little bit about the original contract. They cracked the deal with uncle. Sam and they said okay. Mail is never going to take longer than twenty five days but despite what it said on paper the reality was much different you know and there was still a lot of wilderness in the West. We're still a lot of intervening variables. So you could. You could trust that overland and Wells Fargo and these kinds of outfits would do their best to get the mail to you at some point which wouldn't really be able to safely predict it all the time eventually butterfield resigns and in Wells Fargo as the company takes over the board of Overland Mail in eighteen sixty and then they buy the company straight out in eighteen sixty six and then everything changed when in eighteen sixty nine the very first transcontinental railroad system came into existence which was a network of various rail lines that were connected Through some very forward thinking individuals that started the central Central Pacific Railroad Company. Yeah and so imagine all the machinations of Wells Fargo of Henry Henry Wells and William Fargo imagine it like a very beautifully constructed palace of cards in a windy room. mm-hmm because as soon as all these regional railroad systems are connected this house of Shipping Cards Wells Fargo is built. Just his through the windows The owners of central Pacific in almost a single stroke render everything wells Fargo has worked on all of its monopolistic. AH ballistic infrastructure outdated if not obsolete right but they were quick to hop on the train That's that's not even a pine that's just I thought it works. Just laziness and Wells Fargo They they knew what the score was and the Central Pacific Railroad Company was actually actually kind of jerking them around a bit like playing a little bit of like a cat batting around. Some sort of you know handknitted mouse toy and they created created an express company themselves and that is when Wells Fargo purchased that company from Central Pacific. So they could get in on unshipped their goods through the railroad system. And that's what got them in the door. Yes yeah. Do you know what I have to be honest here. This is way more fascinating than I thought. It would have been when you know before. I started researching this. What do you think we'll first of? I hope you always feel that you can be honest with me and the listeners listeners. And I think you do. I agree though I was surprised. At how the history of shipping and receiving and mail and packages all things that sound a little dry on the surface. Actually pretty fascinating and there's a lot of adventure in the Pony Express. Who Knew? We're not even halfway done with this. Well we're okay officially. We're halfway done with the story we're going to. We're going to conclude and we hope you tune in for our follow up on the weird weird weird weird history of shipping stuff. In the meantime you can continue the conversation. We want to hear your shipping war stories. Or you're you're strange anecdotes find find us on facebook. You can find us on instagram. You can find us on twitter not just as a show but as individuals in find me exclusively on Instagram at how now no Brown I'm where I get into various adventures and misadventures and you know you can see me hanging out and doing cute stuff with my kid and going to concerts and eating delicious foods and you can enjoy my five areas Global Shenanigans see me get kicked into and out of different places communities and countries on instagram. At Ben Bullen or on twitter at Ben Bullen w thanks as always to super producer. Casey thanks to Alex Williams who composed our theme Christopher Hussy Otas here in spirit has always thanks of course to Gabe lose Jay. Thanks to ease jeffcoat. Thanks to appreciate you appreciate you reluctantly. co-signing me on this part but thanks to Jonathan Strickland Aka the Quizmaster Aka Young Whistles Aka strict. APU would hate that one. Mr Kuester Mr there we go. I like the Ryan. Their sister sister twisted sister the twisted quizzed her. I liked that Yeah okay reluctant. Thanks to to to Jonathan Strickland and and absolute wholehearted From the bottom of my heart. Thanks to Super Producer Casey Program. Did you already say that even if you did a matting another because we just loved the crap out that got And thanks to you Ben. I like you're hat today. Saying thanks so much all I got it in the mail. Oddly enough like Phoenix. Time folks For more podcast from iheartradio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to your favorite shows where can you pick both ice cream and ice skates electric toothbrushes and Electric Guitar amps At walgreens that's because now you can pick up your fedex packages right where you shop. This holiday fed ex is helping you take more control of your deliveries just in your packages packages to a fedex. Pickup location at Walgreens. And don't worry about being home to receive them with over eight thousand locations across the country you can find one convenient for you visit Fedex dot com slash holiday guide to learn more.

Pony Express Wells Fargo Fedex United States Duke Duke Casey Peg Fargo Wells Fargo Henry Wells William G Fargo Ben William Fargo Henry Henry Wells Wells Fargo Wagon walgreens Shipping Cards Wells Fargo American Express California New York American Express Panama Casey JC Penney
The Strange Story of the GhostNet

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

56:58 min | 2 years ago

The Strange Story of the GhostNet

"In two thousand four in a tiny town. A young woman named Rebecca Gould was brutally murdered. Nearly fifteen years later. Her killer is still on the loose. It's just really surreal walking around. Ideal mention so much fear too, is out there ready, yell, deep rant. Dude, I'm Katherine Townsend, and this is Helen gone. Now available on apple podcasts, growing UFO's to psychic powers and government conspiracies. History is riddled with unexplained events. You can turn back now or learn the stuff. They don't want you to know. Welcome back to the show. My name is Matt. My name is null. They call me Ben. We are joined with our returning guest, super producer, Casey pag room. Most importantly, you are you. You are here that makes this stuff. They don't want you to know today's episode is about war, what is it good for a war that some people will tell you is just a few years in the distance where that's already kind of happening a war that other people will argue has already begun. Here the facts. So the state of war is changing in decades and centuries past. Most of us who are not hundreds of years have only seen this depicted in film, right and photographs and such in in the past ages. In past conflicts, there would be things like Napoleonic warfare. Napoleonic warfare is one of the reasons that the civil war here in the US was such a bloody conflict. It's that thing where people lined up in rows and they'll hold guns or some kind of weapon. And then somebody in charge stands in the back and makes them all March toward each other and just continually shoot and see who's left standing at the end. Yeah, I, it's, it's a combination of the technology available to wage war and the rules that are set in place or agreed upon just as what is the correct thing to do in more. Right, right. What is the ethical thing? The traditional. Thing, how much do we value the lives of the people we are sending to die? The answer Napoleonic wars. Value. So war has changed as you said and I, it is continually changing. There are a lot of wonderful things we've talked about on the show that come from war usually advances in medical technology, but they're earned through horrific experiences. And there are lots of other non medical technological breakthroughs. Usually weaponized things that later have a civilian use, and that's everything from well, not really zippers, but kind of zippers, shoe like clothing, really lots and lots of different types of an kinds of clothing to what's something else, ovo, Andro food? Yeah, food storage, just everywhere. Everything. Probably somebody comes from innovation from war because you have needs. So in this way, in just this relatively innocent innovative way. One could argue that war is an economic necessity. The more realistic and way less inspiring. Ted talk version of wars neck onomic necessity is the one that admits that despite all the ideological claptrap people are fed by their leaders wars, typically going to be about dominance and resource extraction, controlling the stage, the theater in which these both blood drenched plays occur. And now we have moved past long past employees on warfare to what we would have considered modern warfare, which would be smaller groups of people or larger groups divide into smaller groups, practicing things that were once seen as very dishonorable like guerrilla tactics, you know, hide, shoot, avoid rinse and repeat and use. Information available to better target things. That's why we have. Now we live in a world of unmanned aerial vehicles. That in theory are targeting specific threats and never getting it wrong, not once. Yeah. Yeah, it a lot of the technology is very much one-sided, which is why being at the top of the technology game is so important. Yeah. Yeah, is hard to overstate that and a lot of nations, even the various advanced nations or working with these strangely uneven levels of sophistication. Computers in one part or one department could be notch, bleeding edge, scifis stuff that the public won't see for another ten to fifteen years, but the same country, maybe even in the same building could have computers that are doing equally important tasks that are hopelessly outdated like their pre windows. They're on IBM you know, like all the hacker film screens in the nineties agrees. With the green, the Monaco lowered. Those do still exist and windows ninety five machines in highly important like water treatment plants. Simple as that, even if it's not war. Yeah, we, I don't remember which show this was on, but I think we did it episode before either here on car stuff about how distressingly easy it is to compromise infrastructure and they all the traffic. If you were in the US you're listening to this unless you're in a very, very large city. The odds are that most of your traffic lights are controlled by a central thing and you can you can hack into it. Don't you're not telling you to in the terminals are usually immediately there next to write a traffic light is you cannot just mess up one traffic light. You can mess up all of them. Did you ever see that episode of macgyver where he like uses like a credit card and sticks it inside, you know, he opens up the traffic box and he gets the lights to change on command by, like, you know, using some kind of plastic device to like break the circuit. I can't remember exactly what he did very macgyver, but yeah, he called he basically it was kind of messed up because he actually. Caused a pretty catastrophic looking pile up and has like macgyver. That's not cool. You don't kill. Yeah, that's and that is for the record, the original macgyver the good one hot take. Yeah, sure fine. No regrets, but it it's true. We're, we have uneven progress as a species, especially in this field and according to prominent think tanks, like the RAND Corporation. This new face of war were volving past of pass guerrilla tactics pass, just sending people out with good human Intel or cigarette signal intelligence, and it's less about who has the biggest gun. Right. Exactly. It's more about who has the best information. So all of the think tanks for more or less agreeing in the in this post nuclear society. We have everybody's thaws nukes. Right? But a lot of people you don't wanna use them. That's political suicide. So. Now we're trying to find better ways to steal beggar borrow information, and that leads us to something called strategic information warfare. This is the term the US eg heads preferred to use. It has another term and other places. It's one sub-genre of what we would call asymmetrical warfare if we are three different nations. So if we're four different nations and we're in a conflict, and one of us met, let's say you're America and you have the world's most powerful Davey most certainly do. There's no reason for us other countries to spend billions and billions and billions of dollars trying to catch up with you when we can just leapfrog you and build a battleship killer or an aircraft carrier killer something that is less expensive to build and almost impossible for you to defend against. I always flex them that superior navy and air. Force because I can print dollars in too big for them pants make, you'll never know my black budgets. It's true. It's all true and that, you know, those are great pants, Matt has their American flag pants, Matt stake in wearing his Uncle Sam outfit, just twenty four, seven, which just has the weird out your kid. You know, he's comes a love it, and he calls me, Sammy teases, Sammy what? What are we doing today? And I'm like, we're gonna find some natives, and we're going to take all their land. Oh. With the plague home. Sorry. I think I was real playing a little too hard. America's great. Well, America's a country in all countries have blood on their hands. I would challenge anybody's name one that does not. It's actually my favorite song of the moment is called country blood country blood by Toby. Key sounds great. So it sounds great. Toby, Keith probably would fit. Oddly enough. This is off track, but to be Keith would fit in more into Siab's, right propaganda or fair. If you want to freak out people in foreign country, play your own music really loud and very patriotic and then play for hours like the Barney song is often used when law enforcement is making a siege of some kind of compound or commun- anyway. So now we've got the basic logic, why bother to try to build a battleship when you can build something that kills a battleship or you can build something that teaches you how to kill a battleship and you can do it for a lot less money. This is why we get this is how we get information warfare. This is why hacking is so important stealing information from another country from another business. You know what forget about Uncle, Sam. Let's just say, go to Northrop Grumman figure out what they've got going on, right? And they're million ways to do it. I would say hacking that kind of tactic really is an underdog tactic because it requires it. There is someone that has something that is worth stealing, right? And I completely see that law. I understand. It's. God, I don't wanna get into too much, but the the psychology of a suicide bombing or a kamikaze right. When you get into that idea of, we do not have the technology to meet this group in in warfare, like you're saying battleships and build battleships, but we can do something that destroys a battleship. Right? Yeah, I see what you're saying. And that's essentially what this is. We cannot build this thing, but we can take the information and we can know what you're doing. And we can basically used some of the other guerrilla tactics and things because now we know what you're doing. Yeah, that's absolutely correct. And the US in particular is seen as very vulnerable to these sorts of hacking attempts because operational securities, such a tough thing for the world's largest military too. You know, it's. It's like, you could get ninety percent secure on something, but that other ten percent is devilishly difficult. And this is where we see the emergence of things that have been called off to buy various journalists pundits. I think I've ended it a few years back having called hacking armies state-sponsored. Well, kind of kind of a state-sponsored groups used to compromise the security, rival governments of tain intelligence, and in a lot of cases, target high value individuals such as officials in the military key industries or officials in political campaigns and so on. So for example, of that super producer, Casey peg room is a general, and he has some kind of his some kind of intimate knowledge of something. Then he would be he would be a target worth looking as an individual. Good news is most people are not most. Most people you just doesn't matter. The primary thing is where you work and what your position is there. And maybe maybe maybe if you're related to somebody really important. And the thing is most of these hacker armies operate in their home countries in a way that their sponsors, their patrons can claim plausible deniability if they're caught or suspected. So there was that Russian botnets army that influence western social media, but it got it. The story broke in the wake of the previous presidential election, but this button at army was active on things on a lot of things for much longer. You know, like the even on sub read, it's which is weird indefinitely on YouTube, which is weird and you have to wonder what their priorities are. But according to Russia, the the actual federated states of Russia, their official position is yet not with us know if they were doing some. Bro. Russia is only pro. Russia is personal feeling. Not not a light. We're not paying them to do it. It's just they just like us so much, you know? Yeah, they're doing their own fields and we we have paid, and this is a very familiar line from Russia. It's oddly enough. It's one. We don't see us too often on the US side because the US has a really bad time as a really tough time getting the top notch hackers often just because mainly because of the drug use policy for security clearance, which I think they walked back. So maybe it's I, I don't know, maybe the the really good US hackers have just all completely secret and never commented on. Maybe the US has a group of patriotic hackers, but Russia's clearly played pain. These people paying amp lane paying to play these people. Thank you. I have to ask about the other countries who has the most effective hacker army. Most people, most of us in the west would just like in a knee-jerk reaction say, well, it's the USA. Obviously it's the US a partner. You know, we have the, we've got the money. We've got the means of got the motives America, bald eagles rock flag in eagle, you know? Yeah, but America hasn't been in underdog for a long time, and I think you you raised in very important point regarding that perspective. So then maybe other people would say, it's Russia. Clearly, it's Russia. They would say, look at, it's we know about the button it it's Russia, and then other people would say, no, no, you guys being ridiculous. Pay attention. Look past the the allusion of the single nation state look at international surveillance. These cooperatives like five is which is terrifying. Yeah, because that's that's a bunch of countries working together combining forces. And then saying, hey, we got all this land and we've got all this see, ran the land. Let's just monitor everything, and let's do it in such a way that we're never actually technically breaking our own domestic laws. We just happened to share some information. It's brilliant. It is so immoral in brilliant. We've all got g mail drafts open accounts that we share. Right, right. Oh, for portrays. So with all this stuff, the problem is people tend to overlook the role of China's digital super spies, and we want to be really careful in this episode because there's so much when the nationalism stuff comes into play there. So so many people fall in the slippery slope of racism, you know in jingoism and it's important to note that even the smallest countries are full of people with different viewpoints. Very, very, very rarely does entire. Country move in lockstep in agree on something. You know, is there a ton of people here in the US that completely don't think China's a threat. Don't want some sort of war and that problem that that. Variety of us, even larger in China. But they're also probably. They're also probably the biggest culprits or biggest propagator of digital warfare today. And we've seen that already in when we were talking about infiltration and a corporate infiltration and the the use of getting into systems taking intellectual property from other countries and then kind of building your own version of it. China. Again, it's hard to even speak about it, but groups in China have a very long history of doing this. And that's almost like a on the Lebanon, like corporate espionage, it is corporate espionage, but then if you magin it, we're just kind of moving it over a couple of steps to to military espionage in this way. Especially since because like you said, at the top of the show, so much of the technology is created the military level before it, you know, ends up in the public sphere. So it's just a way of like getting. Proprietary technology early? Yeah. And one of the main factors here is that China is home to one point, four billion people. It's the most populous country and they've been doing this for a long long, long time they see it's, we're going into. Right? And it's hard to even speak about it. We'll China is the they in the stuff. They don't want you to know of this episode. It is China's government. We could call the PR see if you have, that's that is that is good. The People's Republic of China. Yeah. Yes. And they also made something they created a program, a group of networks in a network of people that is doing something, and it's called. Ghosts net who bear ghost that pretty good Dame. I love it. At least that's what it's called. Isn't that the the name of mission impossible movie or is that that goes, nation ghost? Oh, it's something rogue nation was. It call goes protocol goes protocol maybe. And there was also like a Tom Clancy video game called ghost recon really nice. So we we have to. We have to figure out what that is. Hey, God. Possible. Okay. It's goes protocol goes protocol, hey, go, I've a fan of, are you a fan of, oh, they're fun show so much running running and jumping. And you know, you can really tell that cruise takes doing his own stunts very seriously because a lot of one takes, you know, not a lot of cutting slicing and dicing glue. It's good stuff and it's still not as dangerous as again, return to our original tone ghosts net. But what is it? We'll tell you after a word from our sponsor. Hello, Philadelphia. Have you ever wanted to see stuff? They don't want you to know live direct and in person? We hope so because we are coming to your town very soon. Yes, Ben Nolan, Matt, that's me. We're going on tour in October specifically October twenty six. We will be at the world cafe in Philadelphia. So come check out our first ever. Philadelphia live show on October the twenty six at the world cafe. You can get tickets now going to stuff, they don't want you to know dot com and clicking on the live shows tab at the top of the homepage. We'll see then Philly. Here's where it gets crazy. So commercial, Fisher fishing people members of the commercial fishing industry who listened to the show. It's a shout out to a very specific part of the demographic here. Deadliest catch. Yes, yes. You all will be familiar with goes that from a different perspective. Ghosts net camin one of two things in the world of commercial fishing ghost, nets or ghost gear are lost or discarded fishing nets that float through the ocean in every year they trap and kill millions and millions and millions of marine animals. It's a tragedy. The ocean ecosystem is collapsing, your grandchildren made up be able to eat fish, but that's that's a story for another day. What are you going to do? Go out there and capture all the nets. Yeah, good luck. Good luck. Try to capture the net, but the net will capture you and how did it without making Soviet Russia joke, at least in the world of hacking. However, the ghost net no spaces is a sophisticated program operating in China designed to capture information from ministries of foreign affairs. Embassies, international organizations, high value, target type. Individuals, news, media, institutions, and NGOs, non government organizations basically high value everything. So how do we find out about this? So ghosts net was discovered when the office of get this, the Dalai Lama in Thomas Allah, India contacted experts to investigate if this facility was being bugged and a researcher at Cambridge guy named Ross Anderson and also sheer Nagaraj at the university of Illinois wrote this about this event, quote the office of the Dalai Lama started to suspect it was under surveillance while setting up meetings between his holiness. I wish people called me his holiness. That'd be awesome. What do you have to do to get that title? You have to be the Dalai low or maybe a pope. Their whole enough. Yeah. So, yeah, his holiness and foreign dignitaries. They were looking to survey all these meetings between his holiness, the Dalai Lama and foreign dignitaries. So they sent an Email invitation on behalf of the Dalai Lama to foreign diplomat. But before anyone was able to follow up with a phone call, the diplomats office was contacted by the Chinese government and warned not to go ahead with the meeting. So this is important because it means one of two things happened, either win the office of the Dalai Lama since that Email the government of China knew what was happening, right? Uh-huh. Yes. Somehow or win the embassy received the Email, the government of trying to found it knew what was happening. So they had they had one side of it at least one side, right? And so Mr. Nago Raja travels to Dharamsala. In September of two thousand and eight believe and discovers that the Tibetan computer system had been breached from inside China. These computers contained details about the locations of refugees to ban refugees and the location of schools that were possible targets for the Chinese. Assimilation is one way to say assimilation tactics, but also the repression of Tibetan culture. So they got hacked and then they launched into an investigation that took almost a year before they reach their conclusions. Yes, in two thousand nine. It was a ten month investigation by the monks center for international studies in Toronto, and they revealed that this thing ghost net not only taps into their emails, but it also turns them into giant listening devices like leg Amazon, Alexa, right? Yes. Oh my God or Google home or whatever else you've just got sitting in your living room like me, wait, wait till like like, but like a reverse that thing. Right? Because it's not. It's not assisting you. It's not personally assisting you. It's more personally helping itself to your information and passing it on to whoever has which which Alexis doing as well. Right? We just have the allusion that we control will get intimate around and here's a fun one one who has one of these devices in your house as you're listening to this podcast. I'll do the one for Alexis. Someone do the one for Google. Does he Alexa tell us Amazon's official privacy policy. It's not going to do it. No, there's no way to make it happen. Hey, Google wins, lady Gaga, birthday feel like that's way less important. That's you. Hey, Google, erase all of your records. There you go. I just do that. You know, I can't do that. All right. Whatever. Google. Hey, Alexa play d'esposito. No, you realize we've alienated literally. Everyone is listening to this on news vices, right? Yeah. I know. Absolutely. The that's part of the show, and I don't think it'll work if you're listening to it all one of those devices already. I don't. Yeah, I don't think right in and let us know and we hope that that harmless prank hasn't done anything. The only reason bring it up is because those listening devices themselves are notoriously imperfect at answering questions. There's a wealth of research going on now to make these devices better at answering questions, but I maintain that there's some questions there simply refusing to answer. Oh yes, such as privacy questions, what happens to those recordings if you do think you have a race them? Yeah, the build the built in answers to a lot of those questions have changed, especially as they get as we become memes online about, we just forgot to mention Siri, the one that's like sitting on the desk, I'm looking at Syria right there. There's one in my pocket. Oh, yeah. Casey's got one out there pretty sure. Oh, Lord. Yep. There's an everybody's pocket now. So it's true. We have become the is. Ears that we feared no parents did. But the thing about this program goes net is that it did not even have the, it's not even have the. The pretense of control or privacy concerns didn't even have the feature of that that we see in Amazon and Google because there were there was absolutely no need. People weren't supposed to know about this. The report stopped short of outright accusing the government of the PR see for creating this network. And instead they said everything, but they said the vast majority of these attacks were originate from inside China. What they meant was all of these attacks originate from inside China, but they could be independently operating. They just happened to be in China. Right? Right, right. Someone is very patriotic and they say, you know, what? Not only am I a supremely talented computer wiz, but I'm also not just patriotic but I'm plugged into the internal off. Unstated policy goals of the Chinese military and government just because I liked the country so much, so I'm just going to do this even though the government has come forward and said that it's a crime. So I'm going to go to jail due to break in the laws of the country. I love and the country love is gonna put me in. You know what I mean? Yeah, this is the. That's a lot of that's a lot of it's just a lot in general to try to digest, right. So again, we have to be fair. It's unclear whether they're independent or state-sponsored, but that goes back to the idea, plausible deniability. And another thing that's important here too, is that it's a little bit of a lower simmer because a lot of other countries like Russia, the US Israel, whatever will have. Cyber-attacks or digital attacks that are blatantly violent targeting things. And in many cases have a little bit of a little bit of a style on them a little bit of swag. So that despite official deniability comedian open secret about who did this like Stuxnet clearly Israel US right to cripple or at least mitigate the progress of the Iran nuclear program Russia taking out various power grids and insane. Oh, those very sad. That's weird. A lot of times what a what, at least I'm seeing in, please write Ihnen. Correct me if I'm incorrect about this. Because with these kinds of cyber attacks in security threats, the originating or the area where an attack originates physically is harder, it's becoming harder and harder to understand or to verify, I guess. So you really have to look at motive, like you're saying been like, who what power would want this to happen or want this area to be infected? Or you know this sector in this military or something, and then is this weird Star Trek four d. level chess. It's interesting because one researcher said this could be happening in China without the knowledge of any Chinese nationals. We can't forget that there are no clean nor ethical intelligence agencies. That's not how intelligence works now instead. Okay. So Ronald Bart, one of the researchers said, and I quote here. A bit careful about it, knowing the nuance of what happens in subterranean realms. Whoa, you could tell this guy's yet, but this could also well be the CIA or the Russians. It's a murky realm where lifting the lid on. Right, and it I, I was very skeptical about that, but it's a really good point because if you wanted to make the government of China look bad disreputable or terrible than just send some since your own dirty boys in there to to do it operation gotta get them dirty boys on the scene. I know I like that phrase. So the US has also repeatedly warned about China's increasing capabilities in the realm of like traffic warfare, but we're. I don't know, we're, we're setting the context. We should probably walk everyone through how this happens. Because right now the way it happens might surprise you. It feels relatively simplistic. Yeah. So you know what? Let's take a word from our sponsor, and then we'll go through the what an attack looks like. It's Barrington Thurston host of spit iheartradio's newest podcast. Twenty-three in me where we explore how understanding your DNA changes, how we think about ourselves and the world around us. We've got the NFL why cleft John we have so much more in common than you could even imagine you put two kids together. They're going to want to play. They're gonna want to have a good time. They gonna wanna fall in love have opinions. This is every kid listen to the full episode of spit with twenty three and me in the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Okay. So. The coast net has is attempting to infect you. Here's what's going to happen. I you get an Email. Casey, could we get a Email cube. But it's an Email from someone, you know, it's not like what's a made up name. Lauren Vogel bomb. That's a great example actually. Okay. Let's say it is lured Buba is someone you know. Okay. So you get this Email from someone, you know, maybe someone you work with maybe a family member. Okay. But it's someone you trust and most importantly, it's someone that you have had a previous ongoing conversation with via these Email addresses. Okay. And the Email itself is not going to be something blatantly like a scam. It's actually going to be pretty pretty nuanced and sophisticated, so wouldn't be an Email from Lauren by the way for longtime listeners. You all know you all know her from our previous episode on diamonds will probably ever on the show a little bit later as well. Longtime friend of our show personal friend of all of us host of saver, correct rain stuff. So maybe we receive an Email from her and it says, instead of like, hey, OMG lull. Click this crazy link. It says something that's pretty blatant. We've all seen those right kitty emoji. Right, right. It says something like simply, hey, been earlier last week we were talking about, you know, we were talking about the differences between types of camels or between Llamas now, pockets and a no think, oh yeah, it's like to it that I found this great interviewer. I on this article about this thought you would like to read it and like, oh man, yeah, okay. I wanna learn more about Llamas alpacas I'm in. Yeah, I'll pack is whatever I need to know these things. And then you click on a word document or PDF that's there. And when it opens up, it is actually about the difference between Llamas alpacas. Janet actually opens up with word or whatever adobe and it looks legit and you read it and you think like, oh, what a great friend following up on that is operate says expected nothing, amiss here, not at all, but if we could get a sound cue that indicates a pivotal shift to tone here as a button-down. That was good. What's actually happening as you're reading this is the viruses downloading very quickly into your computer. This virus, a Trojan often, a Trojan called ghost. Rats will allow the hacker's based in China access to your camera, your microphone, access to screen shots, access to your files, and it will also be able to log key strokes that last part is incredibly important. Yeah, ki ki logging Blix's think we glossed over a little bit. Been ghost rat g h zero s. t. r. a. t. forest Whittaker movie. Go strat in the way of the samurai. Oh yeah, Jim Jarmusch directed number. It was a little slow for me, but overall enjoyed it goes though. I think there is the to the soundtrack, though there is here on stuff. They don't. You know. That's right. And yeah, so this this thing happens. You're learning about Lomas vodkas and then you are unwittingly becoming a. In Alexa for the people. You're like a node a seri-. Yeah, you're node and go strat itself is interesting because it was very, very successful. We we also should mention Noel. I think you alluded to this a little bit earlier that this occurs in the civilian world as well. Numerous voyeurs hackers people to crush or something we'll we'll hack into a victim's webcam just to watch them. You know what I mean? Not that a camera. We're talking about this on air off air, but not not to steal nuclear secrets or something. What's different here with ghost rat and ghosts net is a their names or way cooler and be civilian webcams or not. Typically going to give away things like troop movement or the the new design for a jet engine or nuclear payloads and their locations. Yeah, we'll just call those ghost creeps. Those are just goes creeps. The Chinese government. Again, officially denies any involvement was cyber spine spokesman for the Chinese embassy in London in two thousand nine. When this was first breaking news said Beijing had also fallen victim to hackers and dismiss this report as part of the Dalai Lama's media and propaganda campaign. So is just a it was a frame job by the Dalai Lama himself while. What? Yeah, that's that's how he, it wasn't the numerous allegations, improving instances of human rights abuses by the PR see, Nope. He said that he thought the best way to go at them would be a hacking accusation. Interesting. So they said this is smoke and mirrors. This is nothing pay no mind, but the problem is that a long, long time before that the Chinese government decided to make control of information. One of the main parts of the country's policy in two thousand and three at the tenth National People's Congress, the Chinese army, which is controlled by the party very important difference here of the Chinese army announced the creation of information warfare units and general the time die. Ching Ming said internet attacks would always run in advance of any military operation to cripple. Enemies said that in two thousand three. And then in two thousand nine there. Saying we'd never do anything like that. The Dalai Lama's the trying to get in your head. Yeah, westerners. Well, it's really interesting in two thousand three that's announced. I'm trying to imagine how many full-scale military conflicts China has engaged in up into this time. And really all I can think of is the South China Sea stuff, but it's not really full military engagements know where they've, you know, performed in internet attack in front of an actual military advance. Well, they just said military operation. Got you. An a military operation can also be a domestic operation or an operation on the border. Largely intelligence could be as well. So, yeah, so it doesn't have to be out and out war, but it could. Easily be just like you're saying series of small conflicts in the South China Sea as the attempt to enlarge their maritime border irks me get everybody else to agree with what they feel like their maritime border is. It feels. So it's strange because we're hearing conflicting reports from government officials depending on the situation. The Pentagon has been obsessed with this and quite uncomfortable with it. They conducted a number of investigations and one of the reports that they issued said that Chinese progress in this fear is. Pretty impressive. They're scared, but they were impressed. It is. China has made steady progress in recent years in developing offensive nuclear space and cyber warfare capabilities. The only aspects of China's armed forces that today have the potential to be truly global. So what they're saying there is that right now, the Chinese government, the Chinese military, the capacities that they have in terms of military hardware are are making them a regional power, right? The economic in the economic sphere, the are truly global power. But if it comes down to, you know, guns bombs and explosions they can control the region, but they can't lock down a globe. Yeah, but they're focusing on nuclear space and cyber which are the three things that can reach pretty much anywhere in the world. They also are building out a blue. Water navy? Yeah, is I think we've talked about this in the past, so they're not to get too in the weeds with it, but there are three ways to rate the navy of a country. The first is Brown, water Brown, water navy is mainly at the coast. The second. And is green water. The green water navy can project force to other closer areas in the region. It can go across seas. I'm like that, right? A blue water navy, which they're very few is able to project force anywhere across the globe. The US is the biggest blue water navy, which is why you hear about the US being involved in all sorts of maritime conflicts around the world. It's kind of where Britain was during its naval days of naval glories, chances chances days of naval. Yeah, no agrees of naval glory in navel-gazing. Yeah, it's feels like just the idea that there could be numerous, let's call them naval units, deployed and anywhere in the world at any time. And there there probably are because their bases, their naval bases throughout the world. That's true. We've got our stuff just parked and we've got the the super carriers essay. Essentially that are out there that can just be a base wherever you want it to be. Yes, the US has eleven super carriers, which are exactly. Could you describe met there? They're moving naval bases and. Now, I think has twenty eighteen. Officially China only has one overseas logistics base. I think it's an Africa and it does have an aircraft carrier or it's building one, it's either building or as just built it. The point is. That stuff takes a much longer time. Yeah, to become a to reach fruition. But this hacking stuff, we're all you need. Are. All you need her a few vulnerabilities in one in one place, and if you very, very smart people with an internet connection in another. So everybody else's research. All other governments research indicates. This is the goal of China. If so, this is the stuff that the Chinese government doesn't want you to know because they're, they maintain that this is not happening depending on who they talked to. Yeah, because as we know if you're a politician, make a speech to a domestic audience. It's very different from what you'll say to the United Nations most times. Oh, totally. I mean, like a good example is with Donald Trump who recently did a speech for the United Nations and caught some flak in the form of a little bit of laughing at at at a statement that he made that is not the kind of reception he would be even as a, you know, kind of controversial president. Any president would be used to speaking in front of a more friendly domestic audience, let alone an audience of their base. Yeah. And that's usually why one thing unusual, but that's beach. Was alluding to as that he was. He was speaking with the same talking points who would use for his domestic base doesn't fly. Yeah. Which other which other presidents usually wouldn't do of regardless of what country they are representing. But this means that right now. Technically officially on the record issue. Lee, we cannot say the government of China is currently sponsoring a ton of ongoing attacks to compromise various businesses and countries. We can't even say that they did into thousand nine, but here's the thing right, multiple attacks. Most of these attacks especially goes net but also with these other programs have been traced to an island in China called Hainan. And this island is home to a signals intelligence facility run by the government is also home to the third technical department of the People's Liberation Army, which is there cypher one cyber warfare places, so it may not be sponsored by then may may may, maybe. Yeah. I mean, you could tell that I don't believe it. That's my opinion, but it certainly in the same neighborhood. So maybe it's someone. Who works there and is so patriotic that they're doing this on their free time somehow in keep in mind that ghosts net. Happened. Ten years ago is discovered ten years ago. So whatever's out there now is whatever the successes are are far beyond that, and they're probably far beyond most of the technology available to citizens here in the west. One of the servers was verified to be Chinese government server. So for people who believe this PR see that's a smoking gun mile. Okay. Let's just for a little bit of perspective. This is two thousand eight, two thousand nine when this is occurring when computers across across the the globe sensitive areas were turned into Amazon. Alexis that occurred five years before the Amazon. Alexa premiered. So so whoever is doing this was way ahead of the game way, way ahead of the game, and they figured out you think maybe some of the technology that goes into like these lists these Alexes in these personal assistants may have had its origin in military technology. I didn't say that I don't think a like a bugging device was the reason companies wanted you to have a bugging device in your home. I don't think military applications of bugging devices had anything to do with voluntary bugging devices just so we're on the same thing. I mean, it is just an extension of like stuff like Facebook or we just, you know, no one needs to surveil us anymore because what is dumping all our information out into the interwebs. Right. So why would it not be a logical next step that we would just actively and voluntarily install bugging devices in our own homes, you know, using our ingenious powers of free will. Right, right. And the spookiest thing of it all is you know, to the point we just paid, we don't know whatever's happening now technologically speaking in terms of surveillance, we might not know about it for another ten, five, ten years. Yeah, and ghost as far as we know has been responsible for a minimum of one thousand two hundred ninety five computer system attacks on embassies for ministries government offices pretty much every exile center for the Dalai Lama in London, India, New York City. It's only one of multiple similar or operations running out of China. There are tons and they all have really cool names just on the side. Take away from today's episode. Ghosts net, it's kind of spooky. Unlike other nations, which tend to practice over attacks, crippling power grids, China's programs seem much more focused on just collecting sensitive information so that other parts of the military can act on that. That's so far at least, yeah and odd. Mixed signals are coming in twenty fifteen. Then President Obama that with president Xi Jinping, who will be president of China for long long time now to address a range of issues. And they talked about economic espionage. And when they talked about that, they said they reach an agreement. They said, neither government the PR see nor the US will conduct or support cyber enabled theft of business secrets that would provide competitive advantage to their commercial sectors. Importantly, disturbingly. They did not agree to restrict government espionage because most countries are cool with that. Yeah, we're most countries won't come out against it. Because they all do it. Yeah, exactly. You can't be against something that everybody knows. You're doing sure you can. Install kinds of stuff. Of I would. I would. Propose to you all in everyone listening that all countries also support theft of business secrets. Yeah, I think so. It's just you can't. You're not gonna put the rubber stamp of your country on it. You can. You've got a million different ways to obvious gate who's actually doing that. That's true. And I don't know. This is more of a. Socio philosophical perspective here. But the reason I think all countries will also support or attempt to commit industrial espionage is because I think it's increasingly misleading and a myth to pretend the business and government are separate. In many cases, I, it just doesn't make sense. I mean, look Russian oligarchs for the most part and the function brushing governance, look at the largest companies in the largest countries and many times. There's just so much bleed over from who controls what that while it's comforting to say that businesses and governments maybe separate while it's technically supposed to be the case in practice. It really isn't. Yeah. I mean, you can donate is like unlimited funds to a campaign when you can get government contracts. For just. A number of military applications and other applications. When there's a revolving door between business and government, I totally feel you seeing it's thank you, but I'm not even. I'm not even specifically talking about the US I know global phenomenon. And I guess what I'm just saying when you can use the United States as an example like the the one for in a lot of ways is the leader or at least the main bully when we're doing it, then it seems like probably do it or it's happening everywhere else doesn't. And then the question is what what to do next to an fight against it? Do you want to to to fight against it? Do you want to join the empire right? Or. Which is thinking about changing your password run in a couple of virus checks, you'll probably be able to catch anything from two thousand and nine, you know, even sure even something like Norton antivirus could find that. But what about the twenty eighteen stuff. You just gotta kinda hope cover up your cover up your cameras as much as you can take out the Mike's. 'cause there's really no way to stop that Mike from getting turned on. Yeah. Yeah, you just have a white noise generator that's like hitting on your monitor where the mic is we want to. We want to hear what you think folks now. Obviously, we are not our selves professional black nor white hat hackers, but we want to know if you believe there's propaganda involved here is the government of China really sponsoring these things. Are they just patriotic hackers? Is the west, making it look worse than it is to justify future military action? What kind of programs is the west doing right now to places like China, you have any info on that. Tell us you can tell us anonymously. Yeah, you can. You can you cannot tell us not lead Instagram, Facebook or Twitter? Yeah, we'd love to. We'd love to hear from you. You can find us on, here's where he gets crazy, but you can contact us anonymously at least anonymously to us. Our our long-serving. Hapless intern at the NSA will probably know everything about you. Shout out to you, Matt. Hopefully you've made it that far. And then if you want to send us a voicemail, you could disguise your voice call us from a payphone. That would be a lot of fun. Our number is one, eight, three, three TD w I t k stuff they don't want you to get in. Yes, good job. And if you don't want to do any of that stuff. Oh, I thing. How are you listening to this show? Are you listening on apple podcasts, maybe through the old itunes desktop app? How are you listening to us? Something that would be massively helpful is if you could log in, if you're an apple user and you have an account log in to itunes slash apple podcasts and give us a review, doesn't matter what it is. It can be terrible like these guys are just worse than the dirt that my boots are standing on or it could be these guys are okay. Those pretty much the range right? Is that the range? I think so. I don't have the range. Okay, but you're reviews will help us tremendously just to give us feedback as well as hopefully move us up a little bit in those ranks. Get some visibility. So thank you in advance. We appreciate it. And I guess if you don't want to do any of that stuff, you can always go the old fashioned route. You can, right. It's an Email at conspiracy at house of works dot com. Hello. It's me the Kadhamy would winning film actor Christopher Walken I've stopped by today to tell you about a friend of mine who is a new comedy podcast coming to this network. His name is Kevin Pollick. You know, you may even claim to your you policies your favorite. Never mind favored. What the point is you like them. He makes you laugh. Well, his new comedy podcast is called alchemy this each episode. He's like a puppet master. He sets the scene and then five of his favorite funny friends, and he improvise all of it. Wow. The sound of music. Do yourself a solid sample Kevin Pollack's new comedy podcasts, alchemy this starting October eighteenth exclusively from how stuff works. Celebrity voices impersonated by Kevin Pollick. That guy who's talking right now.

China US Russia Matt Chinese government Casey peg apple official America producer Alexa IBM Alexis Google Lauren Vogel Rebecca Gould
Gilles Garnier Convicted of Lycanthropy - Jan. 18, 1573

This Day in History Class

06:03 min | 1 year ago

Gilles Garnier Convicted of Lycanthropy - Jan. 18, 1573

"He here's my Blake to tell you about another podcast. You may enjoy it is the end of the world with Josh Clark. It is a ten episode series. All ten episodes are out there in the world now for you to binge. Josh Clark is co host of stuff, you should know. And for the end of the world, he dives into exit stencil risks. There's ways that we humans might accidentally wipe ourselves out with the same technology. We're developing to try to make a brighter future the end of the world with Josh Clark, waiting all ten episodes. Find it on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome to this day in history class from how stuff works dot com. And from the desk of stuff you missed in history class. It's the show where we explore the past one day at a time with a quick look at what happened today in history. Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm Tracy b Wilson. And it's January eighteenth Geel gonyea knowing the where will have dole was found guilty of like hanthropy and witchcraft on the stay in fifteen ninety three after a series of just gruesome attack on children and possible cannibalism GIO Garnier lived in the forest north of dole in France. And he was kind of a recluse he had been nicknamed the hermit of dole a lot of other hermits this time were reclusive for religious reasons. And this was the case for him. He was just kind of a loner and an oddball living out by himself in the woods. He also got married to a woman named Appalachia. And we know almost nothing about her including how he met her or why she married him given his very solitary kind of odd existence. The also didn't have any way of really supporting the two of them. They didn't have any. Animals. They had no garden they were mostly scavenging food and trying to glean it from other places on September twenty ninth of fifteen seventy two a girl of about ten or twelve was attacked and mauled and killed while out. An vineyard allegedly Garnier was the culprit and allegedly took parts of her body home to use his food another similar attack happened in a meadow, not long afterward. But this time the culprit was chased away before taking any parts of the girl's body, and the witnesses said that it was some kind of a wolf attacks continued they focused on children who were outdoors either walking or working in gardens vineyards. And then finally in one of these attacks witnesses said that it wasn't a wolf that. They saw it was Garnier. He was linked back to all of these earlier attacks and then arrested and put on trial about fifty witnesses gave testimony at the trial. Some of them said things like that. They had seen a wolf in the woods. And then they had seen Garnier in the woods. So they concluded that they were one and the same and then at the trial Garnier also confessed to these crimes, but he had made that confession after being tortured. He said that one day he had been out looking for food, and he met a spectre and the specter said that he could help Gournay they said that the specter gave him a Sav that would let him turn into an animal. He had a few animals to choose from. And he decided to be a wolf because that made the most sense out in the French countryside and this really fit right in with an existing belief in like hanthropy in sixteenth century France after the trial. He was sentenced to be drawn on a hurdle to the place of execution and then executed and his body burned into Ashish. This didn't really get rid of local fears of where wolves though and a law was passed later in fifteen seventy three that made it legal to hunt where wolves today, it's not really clear whether gonyea had anything. Do with any of these deaths? A survey of the forest in the early two thousands did identify the remains of a structure that dated to about the same time. It might have been his home. There was no sign of any human remains there. It's often suggested that he may have been experiencing some kind of delusions, especially if he believed that confession that he had given under torture, and it's also possible that some of these attacks really were animal attacks wolf attacks have been very rare and other times in history and and other parts of the world. But in early modern Europe, they were a big problem. There is more to all this in the October twenty eight th twenty fifteen episode of stuff you missed in history class. I also have a note for the folks who maybe don't listen to this show over the weekend on Monday, this show will have a brand new host Eve's Jeffcoat who will be taking over for me. She's going to be introduced onto the show on Sunday. So stay tuned for that. Thanks to Casey peg. Chandler maze. For their audio work on the show, and you can subscribe to this day in history class on apple podcast, Google podcast iheartradio app, and wherever else you get podcasts. Tune in tomorrow for a telegram that changed the course of a war. Hi, I'm Ariel Casten of I'm Jonathan Strickland and together, we're going to tell you the stories behind some of the biggest triumphs and failures and business. That's right. We're going to explore situations that tested the metal entrepreneurs pivotal moments required making decisions. We'll be talking about some companies that everybody knows like Disney LEGO and Harley Davidson and together we try to answer the question. What do you do when you find yourself at the brink? Listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to your podcasts.

GIO Garnier Josh Clark dole apple Garnier France specter Blake iheartradio Tracy b Wilson Disney Europe Ariel Casten Chandler maze gonyea Ashish Casey peg Harley Davidson Gournay Eve
The Tragic Origin Story of Morse Code

Ridiculous History

36:40 min | 1 year ago

The Tragic Origin Story of Morse Code

"The most serial killers don't make any effort to involve media or best Gators. They're very secretive. They don't want attention. They almost want their crimes to go unnoticed, but the idea of committing a crime, and then calling up the police and bragging about it. That's a whole 'nother level of terror. A man who wore a mediaeval style executioner's hood who has baffled the police and baffled the media. He seems to crave publicity. He sent letters and Ramsden newspapers. And the beliefs subject stated, I want to report a murder. No, a double murder. I did it. Here. We are fifty years to the first sodium killing in today's world of forensics old cases are being solved who doesn't wanna know. How it turns out? From the creators of Atlanta monster come season two. This is monster vizo yet killer. Listen as subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app. Knoll did you ever have to learn more scout? No. Guy was not a very spot. Let me make something. Yeah. Totally when I was in cub scouts. We went on a camping trip into the wilderness. We have to win how to communicate by tapping arteries, right? Bark Zach totalling, well, when I was back in boy scouts, one of the things that our troop leaders continually needles me about they're always like been you're good at Notts. You you can find a way around in the woods. But you you gotta learn more Skoda, buddy. It's just it's been too long. You know what? I mean, you're eleven now it's getting real gotta learn more scored. And so eventually learn more sewed passed the test with it, and then promptly forgot it. Yeah. When you turn eleven you get your first big boy bike, and you learn more s- code, right? Right. And that's for late bloomers not for early adopters like our super producer Casey peg REM give him a hand, folks. These episode is about Morse code. But more importantly, it's about the man himself. It's right. The Morrison the more cement not to be confused with some sort of Norseman. No, that's a hard end. Yes. Yeah. Yeah. The man the myth the Morrison the Morse Mun Samuel more spin Morse. So Samuel Morse born April twenty-seventh seventeen ninety one today. He is remembered primarily for the code system that bears his name Morse code. And everyone knows what that is. Casey. Can we get just a little clip of how that would sound? Perfect. So like a series of short beeps and then long ones. Yeah. If you're really good at it. You can do is. I would do it more like dot dot dash dot dot dash, if you really good, and you work one of those little flipper paddle button things that you see in the old movies you'd be BBB. That's Morse code a telegraph. Yeah. Telegraph, which he's also credited with he didn't really invented exactly. But he improved upon previous design and made it much more useful in relaying information. More or less instantaneously. Yeah. That's the thing. So most inventions that we think of as the the huge game changing innovations. Most of those are not going to be made up by one person organized elation. You know, what I mean, multiple people exhibit parallel thinking, it's a phrase you enjoy or, you know, all idea standing on the shoulders of giants and all that and improving piggybacking on this come before and making a better making it suit the times. Yes. That's correct. He he eventually improved as he said on this existing telegraph technology famously sending the first telegraph message on may twenty fourth eighteen forty four but between his first day on the planet and that moment where he sends the first. Telegraph message a lot of stuff happened and not all of it was particularly pleasant. In fact, we could say that without great personal tragedy. Morse code may not have ever come to be in that first. Telegraph message. The more sent slow heavy what hath God wrought. Sinister to me. I like it. It's better than a Hoy as true, which was what famously Mr. burns sent on the first ever telephone call. Right. Right. So before Samuel Morse was known for his inventions way back when Morse was just a regular surname. This guy had a completely different job. Didn't he did? He went to Yale. And when he graduated was degree in Ben. Did you catch that? We'll he studied several different things. He's studied religious flossy mathematics and a question science, which is so interesting because he went into none of those fields upon graduating from Yale. He became a quite well regarded portrait painter and a piece that he did I was on aware of this at all his work is pretty breathtaking. He has one piece called dining Hercules that has kind of care of Osceola asked look like some of the. Talion masters, like real char screw lighting. This dude is heavily ripped massive pectoral 's and eight-pack kind of back in the throes of agony leaning up against some rocks. Hercules, holding up this kind of like sheet as though or like a wing, and it's really breathtaking epic stuff. And he received some note from that work and got some really pretty big name commissions as a painter. It's interesting because this was a masterpiece early in his life. It's typically called his early masterpiece. And just a side note, he did a sculpture of this. I n any base the painting on that sculpture. I didn't know that. That's pretty weird, right? I wasn't aware of that technique. But I assume it's a common thing because this guy was a big deal painter. He ended up attracting the attention of noodle artists of the time such as Washington Allston who wanted him to meet another artist named Benjamin west and along with Boris's father Allston. Arranged for Moore stew stay in England for three years to study painting and eventually by the end of eighteen eleven he was admitted to the Royal Academy. And this is where he began producing things like dying, Hercules, yes. And portrait's there in the national poetry gallery now, including a self portrait. Yeah. Believe he did one of James Madison as well. Yeah. And he was commissioned to paint a portrait of the Marquis de LA yet in Washington in February of eighteen twenty five we also did John Adams and James Monroe, and that was when unfortunately, tragically his wife Lucretia fell deathly ill. Yes. She fell ill just a month after giving birth to their third child, and she was located in New Haven, Connecticut. And he was in Washington in February of eighteen twenty five painting that portrait. So he dropped everything Ren ran back to New Haven as quickly as he could. Unfortunately, he was too late and is wife passed at the young age of twenty five on February seventh eighteen twenty five. And at this point the only way that he could receive notice of this would be through a written correspondence a letter through the post or word of mouth or maybe somebody sending corier you know, what I mean and his orbit of some kind of korva Quarrier. So his father sent him a letter about his wife's illness and more stood not receive this letter for several days, he wrote to his wife two days after she had died unaware that she had passed from the surf and he was talking. To her about the election of John Quincy Adams as president is meeting with Lafayette, and then by the time he returned to New Haven several days passed since her burial. What would it event from Washington DC to New Haven Connecticut in those days, which would have been by train how traveled I wonder. It's interesting question. So the distance if you're talking just a straight flight the distance would be about corporate flies, yet two hundred seventy three miles or four hundred and forty kilometers for the rest of the world. Right. So just for perspective. If someone we're traveling on a train today on Amtrak, for instance, how how long would that journey? I think only about five and a half hour or so which kind of threw me 'cause it I I when I read this. I misread thought that he was much further away because he it's been a lot of time overseas. But he was in fact, not that far but still just the same. He needed the information instantly rats is what led him to. To decide he needed to devise a way of doing this other people wouldn't have to experience what he experienced because he wrote a letter to his daughter after the passing of his wife that was just really heartbreaking to read. Right. He said, you cannot know the depth of the wound was inflicted when I was deprived of your dear mother, nor in how many ways that wound has been kept open and when he learned death. He vowed to find some way to deliver important messages in a timely manner. And he would spend the next two decades perfecting this system, he didn't give the art right away. But he continued kind of tinkering away at the side hustle at the same time. And it was in eighteen thirty two when he was on another voyage siege to Europe for from Europe rather back to United States that he met. A very important gentlemen of for the evolution of what would be his kind of crowning achievement. Yes. Charles thomas. Jackson, a Boston physician and scientists and Jackson says the Morse. Hey, check out this electromagnet, I made his header rudimentary electromagnet and Morse was inspired more slot. You know, what I what if I could send a message along a wire by opening and closing an electrical circuit, and then an electromagnet could record these blips on a piece of paper FIA, some sort of dare I say a code, and and I like your thinking. Yeah. Right. And this is one of those. I don't know if I it's like, a cocktail napkin idea, you know, he's he's still what if to himself, but when he goes. Back to the US when he disembarked from the trip. He moves forward with the idea, and he meets eight another guy who works with electromagnet Selo named Joseph Henry and Joseph Henry was also working with the idea of electromagnetism, which just quick and dirty. I'm no magnet scientists. But it is the idea of passing electric current into a magnet that turns on and off. It's magnetic abilities. Right. Yeah. I mean, I'm not a magnet Dr either. But I like that phrase. But yeah, that's that's the basic gist. This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by navy Federal Credit. Union navy federal has a mission to put members I by making their financial goals the priority. It's true. You can receive a lifetime membership benefits to help you and your family accomplish those important life missions a credit card APR average. It's four percent lower than the industry's member. Only. S- -clusive rates discounts in perks access to over three hundred branches and thousands of fee free ATM's. This is open to active duty military, the DOD veterans and their family. Members navy federal is proud to serve over eight million members, including over a million veterans and their families. Visit navyfederal dot org. For more information again, that's navyfederal dot org. Insured by NCUA. At this time more still doesn't absolutely understand the nuts and bolts of how electromagnetism works, and it is Henry who explains the phenomenon of electromagnetism to Morse. And he also shows him the experimental electromagnet s- that he is built. And if you look at the electromagnet Morse later goes on to us in the experimental ones. Joseph Henry created their obviously the same design. He's well, you don't wanna call plagiarism. But he's riffing. Well, but he did sue. Yeah. Leave. Yeah, later, he did sue and said, hey, that's my idea. You can you can read some of this, by the way in a fantastic SUNY article called how Samuel Morse got his big idea by Joseph Stromberg, and the Smithsonian's written a couple of things about the story. Of Morse because I don't remember if we've mentioned this on area. Joseph Henry would later go on to become the first secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. So they have a little bit of stake in the game here, story wise. So before he gets sued Morse in Henry are pretty good buds. There have interesting conversations more goes back to his home, which is now a New York and in eighteen thirty seven he creates his first telegraph receiver. It's like I said is kind of that. That thing you see in some of these old the old pictures where it's like a button do do exactly on a spring, and that clip ins and closes the circuit to indicate. Yeah. When you do the taps. That's right. And that is pretty much what it looked like. And it got sort of streamlined over time. And you can actually see this first ever versions prototype today at the American history museum, and according to herald Wallace, the curator of the American history museum the most. Interesting aspect of this is that he took an artist canvas stretcher and made it into telegraph receiver canvas stretchers what used to to stretch the canvas Ryan ver- frame affixed. So he was kind of given props to his old arts roots and to Wallace this is symbolic of shift from painter too. Telegraph all in one piece one artifact somewhat poetic, right? So now, he fear radically has a way to record these signals Eddie s to figure out how to transmit them. Right. Yeah. He builds the receiver I, but he doesn't build away to transmit to as the infrastructure already in place for this. Because I mean, this is obviously pre telephone right? He had to work with some other people. And this is where his colleagues Leonard Gail and Alfred Vail come into play over the next few years after building this receiver Morse Stillman on emission works to improve this system any uses. Veils transmitter key and a code of dots and dashes this would be what becomes known as Morse code. And initially people said, okay, it could be potentially useful. But they had a hard time getting investors because of the infrastructure problem that you alluded to earlier, there's not a pre existing network of miles and miles and miles of wire you would have to build it to send that signal. And that's something that we see with lots of technology. One of the things people are talking about today with Thomas vehicles is how do you build a system in which they can exist? That's right. And so in the same way that we're doing small scale tests of times vehicles in private in these private companies and then gradually doing road tests of which have spectacularly failed. They did that very thing to demonstrate to potential investors that this technology did work using short runs of wires instead of the. That would have been strung miles and miles apart to make the technology actually useful across long distances. Yeah. That's a part of the story that I found in Deering they turned to Sam and they asked the US government for some scratch, some cheddar some sweet sweet telegraph money just to construct this network to lay these lines to make this wire stuff happened and the way that they convinced the government to fund it was through the sort of science fair approach. They did a live demonstration within the capital. They strove wires up just between different rooms, you know, what it makes me think of there's a part in the new red dead redemption game where the character you play the cowboy cameras name for some reason. Now, Arthur Morgan Arthur Morgan ring game if you haven't played he happens upon a an inventor who has these remote control boats that are like little battleship kind of things that can shoot missiles, and the whole idea is he. He wants to get investors, and he rounds up rich people that are like walking around the city that you're in to come and check out him using this wireless technology, and that was a time. It was the same time around the late eighteen hundreds or mid eighteen hundreds. And it was a time of that kind of ingenuity when people were so far ahead of what investors were willing to put their money toward you had to really wow them with some kind of display that they it was unequivocal a thing that was going to work and that was worth their money. And so they put some cash behind it. They gave Morse and co thirty thousand dollars to build a thirty eight mile wireline from Baltimore Maryland to Washington DC, and then on may first oh inflation calculate that off. Of course, whenever we can. We should I'm going to guess one million dollars. So let's say just for the sake of argh military, eighteen forties dollar. Dollars. And we said what was that thirty thousand? Okay. So thirty thousand dollars in the eighteen forties would be equal to what did you guess one million dollars? Do you really close? It's nine hundred and eighty thousand nine hundred eighty thousand four hundred eighty dollars awesome. What do I win a peace of mind? I'll take it. Okay. I need it. Yeah. IBM sure we have a t shirt somewhere a ridiculous history t shirt, I'm not going to be one of those guys in the band wearing their own. I would wear Casey. Oh, absolutely. That's different though, that that represents the good, Mr. Mr. Peckham, not our own Durant. Do we talk about this air pitched Casey on giddy a t shirt with Justice face on it? You were against that. Right. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm going to say no to that. One man. Casey on the sad. Sad case. Well, you know what? Hey, how about this listeners you guys speak up? Let us know demand. It demand Casey's phase on a T shirt. Then we'll see if he changes tune. Oh, we're going to be in deep trouble on that one. So. Yeah. So they strung up the line. Yeah. Probably along a similar route. Is there would have been train travel? Imagine that would make sense, right? That's a good point. It really gets national attention. When the device is used by the whig party to telegraph their presidential nomination from Baltimore Maryland to Washington DC much much faster than an ordinary corier could have traveled and people say, holy smokes building. This wires is real painting. Once you have the wire up. This is very useful. And makes me think of those barbed wire telephone networks because all you need is a conductive material is only special about it just has to travel from point eight point B, and it can transmit those messages, and it's so cool because I mean, it makes sense. But I just wasn't thinking about it in these terms in my head the invention of the telegraph was so far removed from the telephone. But. That's how technology works when you're building on the work of others Antonio MU Chee who was an Italian immigrant started developing what was referred to as the talking telegraph as early as eighteen forty nine. We see the concurrence or the confluence rather of these similar technologies. And then speaking of your parallel thinking, the Italian gentlemen, I just mentioned came up with his design completely independently of Alexander Graham Bell who is credited with the invention. So it just goes to show like it's totally thing that happens it's first to the pan office. Sometimes that's the way it works. Right. So more says finally achieved his mission and almost twenty years later nineteen twenty years later, he has not put his tragedy to rest, but he's made something positive in the world from this terrible personal catastrophe. And that brings us to the question that we have. To ask would Morse code or with the telegraph have existed without this minimum personal mission. The answer's yes, it just wouldn't be more to go. Oh. This is Ron burgundy telling you to listen to my podcast. Here's a little something to what your appetite right now. I'm a little terrified because I don't know what a podcast he's let's take some calls. Caller, number one. You're on with Ron burgundy what's on your mind? No callers. No. Because people aren't listening in real time. Check got it. If you are listening to this and have downloaded by mistake. Please turn it off. Now, turn it off. We have the crews here. Okay. All right. Okay. Taurus, your horoscope is come on pull you together. Defecate? It was reduced to my basic. Rumba gas available. Whatever putt guests found. We've been throwing around the freeze Morse code there. Dots dashes what exactly is more school? It changed a little over time. Right. It did change a bit of time. Because like you said, you know, he had this invention that he had worked with these other inventors to achieve including Alfred Vail who invented his contribution to the device, which was the telegraph key, which is literally that little button that we've been talking about the allows you to like enter in the code, but more some self was credited with coming up with a system of dots. As in a short beep. And then I'm along beep beep versus and with those it's sort of like a braille alphabet, but for years is that if your fingers, right, right? And he created this code with some inspiration from earlier attempts to communicate even just line of sight over distance through visual cues semaphore kind of stuff yet a controversy. Exists. If you look at international Morse code now, we still call it Morse code. You'll see that that fairly easy to gronk system. Dots and dashes sore Ditz in does as it's referred to in the parlance of Morris coterie. Yes. And I like the phrase coterie, however, many scholars will tell you that Morse code is misnamed in should actually be called Vail code to do to the contributions of Alfred Vail who collaborated with Samuel Morse so many scholars will say that veil as a collaborator was the generative force behind what we call Morse code. However, people who say that Morse invented it himself will point out the veil in public and private never claimed invented the goat, and he credited Samuel Morse with the creation of the code in different private correspondence. So if you wanna be a revolutionary. The academic. You can you can argue the veil side of it. It's just many people attribute Morse code two Samuel Morse including Alfred Vail. Yeah. And I actually had the misconception that Morse code was sort of the way you would enter in letters alpha numeric -ly like in a telephone where each however, many, you know, a is one dot B is to see three. But if you think about it in a whole sentence, if you keep things in one letter at a time like that, it would take ages to communicate any meaningful information. Right. So there's a whole nother system that makes a Moore's code officiant. And able to have high words per minute counts. Which is how Morse code transmissions are measured but have to say that even after eating into the stuff. Maybe I'm being a little dense here. I still don't fully get like how the code works because if an S as an SOS is three debts an open three does an S three Ditz. How how does that relate to other letters? Or is it a phrase based like maybe you can think of it in terms of units. So a debt or dot think of as one unit almost like music. Okay. And a dash is three units so dot and then a dashes d got it for lack of a better of vocal queue this space between parts of the same letter would be one unit. So there's one Ditz space between these Ditz in these and the space between separate letters is three units. So there's a three unit space between every letter that you send out. So when an SOS you would have that debt, and then a space for the span of three other Ditz? So people say, okay that stopped. That's an s and then was that why on telegrams? They say stop. Now, I'm sorry. What's the the space between words would be seven units? So they're they're counting. Not just the Ditz or the does. But they're counting the absence of those. And they they can figure out from the spaces between letters or words what a freeze is supposed to be ic-. And also looking this chart of the alphabet and the number system one through ten or one through nine zero. It's a little easier than you might think a is dit da be is dot that C is. Daudet debt? I like saying Don did it's Di da did is just one dit f is did dodge it and going back to your question. Why is it not a bit for one for two for three? I feel like beats about to drop. But one is actually did dot da da seems long for one does. And what we're talking about right now, this this code Rian back to you is what became known as international Morris code, and it was adopted by the international community because incorporated, the Latin alphabet with some extra Latin letters and also air bec- numerals and punctuation in some other symbols that were not accounted for in Morse's original coat. So over time more says basis for more code got phased out, and it actually ended up not even being the original Moore's code that Morris created that kind of took hold and got a doctor by the international community. It was this internet. Morse code that was developed by Frederick Clemens Gerke, who is a German writer journalist and also someone that was very interested in telegraphy, and he revised that Morse code to make it make more sense include more necessary characters that could be adopted more widely. Yes. So ten years after that first. Telegraph line opens in eighteen forty four. There were over twenty three thousand miles of line or wire crossing the continent and hit a watershed moment as various businesses that required. Quick long distance communication began us telegraph systems, railroad companies were one of the first to the plate there. They would use it to communicate between their stations. And these telegraph companies began to pop up everywhere that you could imagine while this was happening countries in Europe or developing their own system of Morse code and the code used in America was called American Morse. Road or railroad Morse and the code used in Europe was called continental Morse. And so that's when that's when they realize they need to standardize the stuff as you pointed out with something that everyone can agree on and one of the things that brought this need for an international code to public. Attention was the use of radio communication, invented in the eighteen nineties, right and radio frequencies got longer and longer and longer it became possible to communicate internationally, and that's when they realize, okay. If we're talking about a global level of communication, we all have to more or less, be speaking the same language, and it's right. And as technology tends to do it was subsumed by the next best thing, which became the telephone or the talking telegraph, and then radio communication or wireless. Right. Because you didn't have to have the infrastructure. It was all done on radio waves. Yeah. That was. Adopted by the military for communicating between, you know planes, and such and even though like for example, amateur radio enthusiasts still use Moore's code. It's a little bit more of kind of quirky holdover from the past. I believe Ben you were telling me that the that pilots in military personnel. Had to learn more showed up until I think the nineties, right? Yeah. Up until the nineteen nineties pilots were required to know, how to communicate using Morse code and up until two thousand seven if you wanted to get an amateur radio license you had to pass Morse code proficiency test. But you're right. The average person today is probably not going to communicate Morse code. And they're probably not going to know it most of us wouldn't know Morse code. I mean, I admitted the beginning this show that I promptly forgot it after getting whatever merit badge. I was I was gunning for and believe. Or not man American Morse code. The railroad Morse code is still around. It's nearly extinct, but it's still around and one group of people who are keeping it alive might surprise. You short amateur radio operators. I feel like that's that's an easy one civil war re-enactors to civil war reenactor, keep American Morse code alive. Interesting and one that I hadn't thought about is something we haven't even discussed at all is that you can also transmit Morris code visually through flashes of light. And it c- to communicate between ships or for ship communicate with shore. They have these lamps that have shutters on them. They can flash codes to you know, to the shorts. You can actually get messages back to shore by line of sight and military personnel. POW's have used Morse code through blinking to communicate the true nature their situation. Video it's got all kinds of USA. Still not to mention young lads. Banging on tree stumps in the forest. Yes. Yes. Yes. It's a huge industry nowadays. And that's our story. A there. There is a point though that we should make. And that is that the telegraph system or something like it would have developed without Samuel Morse because so many people were working on something similar, however, his personal mission. I is passion to to save other people from the situation that he himself encountered played a huge role in the timing of Morse code for it to become a thing when it did. It may have taken a little bit longer had one man not been so emotionally personally driven to pursue this innovation. And you know, what I say, thanks because we couldn't have had a podcast if things like Morse code and telegraphs and later radio ever existed. Certainly like one of the earliest forms of longest communication that served as the basis for it's just the spark of an idea say, hey, what if I could communicate and idea or thought or a message from point eight point B, that's literally what podcasting in broadcasting. A media of any kind is. It's all a jumping off from that simple idea. One day. We should tell the story of Farnsworth the inventor of television. You know, he got that idea when he was a fourteen year old farmhand well story for a day. And we've got to say, maybe we should go back rerecord this entire episode in Morse code. What do you think Gannon about that? Thinking let us know your thoughts on Morse code feel free to write to us in Morse code. If you wish you can find us on Facebook. You can find us on almost said Amazon. I don't know if you can find Amazon, but we're definitely on Twitter, and you can find us collectively and individually on Instagram. I am at Ben bullet. I am at embryonic insider, you can check out our community page on Facebook ridiculous historians where you can drop your history memes and hang out with your fellow podcast fans enthusiasts. Check us out. Next time. We explore the weird story of how a stray dog caused a war through. In the meantime, thanks to our super producer, Casey peg REM Casey, I want to make eye contact with you and apologize for bringing up the Casey face t-shirt again. But now, the more I say the phrase the more and feeling so I don't know if this puts us on opposite sides of history. But I hope we remain friends. We'll see you ends up on the right side of history. Thanks to Williams who composed our theme. And it's always on the right side of history and the right side of our hearts along with Gabe, our research, associate Ben and you as well, and you know, what to use Samuel Morse cheerio. This episode of ridiculous history is brought to you by dressed their over seven billion people in this world. And we all have one thing in common every day. We all get dressed, join fashion stories, April Callaghan. Cassidy's accurate twice a week as they explore. The who what? When of why we wear guests include museum curator's experts from around the world and each episode is accompanied by images on their fabulous. 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The Beast of Gvaudan, Part Two: The Birth of a Grisly Legend

Ridiculous History

29:29 min | Last week

The Beast of Gvaudan, Part Two: The Birth of a Grisly Legend

"This episode is brought to you by IBM. Today answers matter more than ever before. That's why IBM is helping businesses manage customer questions. With Watson Assistant It's conversational a I designed to work for any industry. Let's put smart to work visit IBM Dot Com Slash Watson Assistant. Ladies and gentlemen today US opponents on man versus trained at the crossing. We have rick a one, hundred, seventy, five, com frustrated man who's running late forward and on the tracks we have bowl a million pound freight train that takes a mile to stop. Let's see who comes out on top. You can't beat a train. So don't try stop trains can't paid for by Nitsa ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio. Welcome back to the show ridiculous historians. Thank you as always for tuning into our our. Our Halloween phase. CAST critics will call it. It's like a blue phase kind of Duke Year. By the way. I am today I'm Ben Heck. That's our Super Producer Casey peg rowe on the ones and twos. Two of our episode on the beast of several Dole and. and. We were talking off my before we started part to. Gabe I don't know how much of it made it on the air in part one. But Gabe, Louisiana, who is our? Our north. Star in the world of research. Really surprised us with this with some of the research here like in a way that I don't know makes me feel like maybe. Maybe we're nerds not sure well, I mean I think everyone who's listening to part one will know that about sixty percent of the content of that episode is US gushing about the movie Brotherhood of the Wolf hopefully everyone's washed it by now or maybe save it I don't know we can't control what you do but. There's a section in the research that Gabe provided us about pop culture references to this story, the beast of Chevaux. Don. And he mentions a Robert Louis Stevenson story references this event to some degree and the movie Teen Wolf starring. Starring Michael J. Fox. I kinda think he was joking because that's certainly is a pop culture reference to where wolves but in my mind and both of our minds, clearly, the number one reference to this story in pop culture is the Brotherhood of the wolf. It is known as they say, game of thrones, which is adapted from the song of ice. And Fire George R R Martin please put out once winter he's not going to do it. You can't tell him what to do. When you know one day anyhow yeah. You're right. You're at Gabe we were we were surprised. We thought maybe you were pulling a fast one on us because. The, three of us are such big fans of you do. The were like obviously gave his wife gave not talking about Brotherhood of the Wolf Right. This is very important to us been I. Love that we have such a shared appreciation for this movie Anna shared appreciation for this story. So let's get back into this story kept developing and in either being these really interesting characters that would present themselves. We've got the you know the disgraced soldier we've got the scrappy young lad. You know this is really I mean it's perfect for making a movie about And a new character enters the fight eight. Nine hundred twenty year old young woman named Marie, Zhong, Valet and she went after the beast with Pica their own. This was a bayonet attached to a pole. I was still pretty pike like it's a improvised pike. And on August eleventh seventeen, sixty five, she was crossing the river desk GATT dig. Casey. DAS GPS probably more like dej Dez the river Dez Casey on the case. With her sister armed with said improvised Pike, and manage to give that beast sticking You know give it a good old poke in the chest and impaled it. You know drew blood but still you know in keeping with what we know about this creature, it got away again but valet became this like heroin. You know they dubbed her the Amazon and the made of Goethe I'm sorry now forgotten Judd have all shadow On. The MEDA GENEVAN is all stays in. And I believe if I'm not mistaken, that's the bad ass woman in the Brotherhood of the wolf probably inspired by this real life character much more ninja-like in the movie though if I'm not mistaken but such a fun story and grisly has all the things that we love about Spooky Historical Tales Yeah So we have these human interest stories of brave individuals, surviving these attacks and in some cases wounding the beast or appearing to, but the official hunters didn't have much luck at all. You know we know that. They. went out and they killed wolves. More than thousand likely. In the also kind of everybody assumed this was like A. An Uber version of Wolf. This was a really big like dire wolf kind of thing bringing home was sure it just made sense I I will add a quick trigger warning if anyone's considering watching brotherhood of the wolf, if you are bothered by animal violence, not the movie for you because a lot of the stuff that we're talking about here, there are piles and piles of dead wolves that you see in this this whole period here people. Were presenting these beasts to the court Ese a lot of Grizzly just actual facts wolves I mean I'm sure they didn't actually slaughter a bunch of walls, but it's very realistic and very gory, and if the that bothers you I would, I would maybe give this movie a pass but you're right ben the hunters were really flummoxed Jean-charles an and his son hunting team from Normandy. made a big show coming to Jill Dan to to put an end to this once and for all and they're the ones that were boasting. They'd already killed twelve hundred wolves in the they you know we're up to the task but in fact, the no one really knew if it was a Wolfer, not all of these disparate descriptions of the thing really made it super clear and we'll get into some of the possibilities in a little bit. Yeah. For now, we're going to follow the career of the beast. So. Eventually. After repeated failures, folks like the dental roles give up and the king is getting irritated. This is making the king look bad. You know what I mean. So he eventually sends his own personal bodyguard, one Francois and tone he is seventy one years old. So he's no spring spring chicken he and his nephew on September twentieth seventeen, sixty, five, shoot a very large wolf near an abbey at chose it, which is assumed to be. The beast they were like this wolf is so big. This wolf could easily eat children. It's gotTa be this is this is the wolf we're looking for and Francois is awarded he it's. He gets actual titles of nobility the core of the admiral, and this is what they're alluding to Brotherhood of the wolf. The corpse of the animal is stuffed by a taxidermist and sent to the royal court at Versailles to be displayed but if you've seen the movie You know that the taxidermy job looked really really bad. They actually think they. All Casey correct me if I'm wrong on this but I think they were in the film instructed to sort of Jewish it up right and make it scarier daytime. They like broke his jaw. Even I believe to make it have a wider kind of scarier looking Maw and yeah, you're right. They almost did like a what do they call those things a Cockatoo tree sad situation. Yeah. We're like you know do a Frankenstein's monster mishmash of parts in it. You know I, it was a real hack job. was literally literally yeah, and that's again another thing that might trigger you about the movie this this is in the movie as well This episode is brought to you by IBM today every answer matters more than ever before because whether it's about health deliveries or finance some things just can't wait. That's IBM's helping businesses, manage millions of calls, texts, and chats with Watson Assistant. It's conversational a I designed to help your customers, find the answers they need faster no matter the industry. Let's put smart work IBM Dot Com Slash Watson Assistant to learn more catch Hbo Max's New Limited series the murders, White House farm streaming September twenty fourth and infamous true crime story over thirty years ago. Three generations of one family were murdered at their. Farm in England, initial evidence pointed the finger at the daughter of the family who had a history of mental illness. However, one detective refuse to accept this as he dove deeper into the investigation, he uncovered new evidence that shed suspicion on a different family member. This six part limited series uncovers the mystery behind what happened that fateful night. The murders of White House, Farm Streaming September twenty fourth only on Hbo Max. So. All's well that ends well. Not, psych you thought as we say in the world of memes the attacks began again they resumed in December and this comes to us via an eighteen ninety, eight volume of the Parisian illustrated review. But this time just like with any other good sequel, the beast seemed different at least was behaving differently a used to be afraid of livestock of cattle right. Get it Kausar big spooky. If you get mad you know but this time it wasn't scared of it. Was it the same beasts though is just like a gritty reboot of. Or was there a new second beast? Did matter to the court. They decided to ignore these new attacks and again they had very strong control over the press. So they just said, look our official line is it's over Francois and taunt killed the creature. But what I'm saying is. Great, but that's the that's the P R, line it's done Then there's another outbreak in June of seventeen, sixty, seven and then another nobleman gets involved trying to make you know just make a name for himself and be part of the whole practice here Marquee Dab share I'm GonNa go with that and he organized his own hunt, and then there's this guy farmer named Josh Astle who'd been involved in a previous but was actually thrown in prison by Antawn who is in charge because he liked it a bad job navigating and led his men into a a mucky. Swampy bog type place. But then all is forgiven when show cell was able to bring down the beast or you know eight a beast with with a shot from his from his musket and that was on Mount Moshe on June nineteenth of seventeen, sixty, seven. Amazing and they have the body and they do an autopsy and they find human remains inside this may not have been the beast all the time. But this was definitely something eating people in the woods and then they find some interesting stuff. Don't they dig in they say you know this animal has some real non lupine on wolf stuff about it. The attack ends at this point and it was assumed at the time that the beast the beast this man that killed was Lee beast but people were still kind of. Like a conspiracy theory about whether or not it was in actuality a wolf chastel by the way like the Amazon has a statue in his honor. Of course what the hell was this thing There are some possibilities that gets bandied around a Eurasian Wolf which I'm guessing is just a much larger dire wolf type wolf like you're talking about A love this one and this is very much what they kind of with in Brotherhood of the Wolf, an armored war dog. They took it a step further. Yeah. Indeed. a striped hyena that's in keeping with that black stripe that they see and I'm sure there's some red headed hyenas out there in the world or an escaped lion. Perhaps some nobleman had it as a exotic pet in their menagerie in it and it jumped the fence and wreaked havoc on the countryside. Yeah or some kind of prehistoric Predator which. Is Super Exciting, and also probably not true or my favorite. Okay. So I should have mentioned this Chastel when he fires that famous shot and when he kills what is largely acknowledged to be the beast, he uses a silver bullet a silver bullet kills this creature tot add. So you can't blame people for say this is clearly aware wolf. This is where Wolf country that's where Wolf loop. Here we are. This is just a silly question, but like win wear wolf mythology I kinda winced come around I I wouldn't have even thought would've thought would've been later than that but I guess maybe it's one of tales all the time about humans transforming into creatures. In centuries before there have been cases where people were accused of being where wolves usually through some satanic pact and This was very, you know this was very lime with supernatural beliefs of the time. People would have been aware of the fifteen ninety eight case of Peter Stumped who was a accused of being aware wolf he he actually was probably a German serial killer, but we have to remember where wolves were very much in play. These were real things. People were genuinely afraid of. So one thing that really stood out to me I think all three of us when we were looking at early descriptions of the beast, is that that detail you mentioned earlier and all which is consistent and eyewitness accounts the the stripe, the stuff going on along the spine, right? That's what led people to think. It was a striped Hyena just as we mentioned earlier, maybe some eccentric aristocrat had this and their private menagerie and escaped it wasn't native to France so you would have. Reasonably thought what does this look like? It looks like a wolf, but it's not a wolf definitely. So that's like based on data evidence. That's a pretty good argument that might be hiding it but are known to attack humans not really Oh, and by the way I realized literally in doing the research for this episode that a dire wolf is a real thing It's a prehistoric Predator that we talked about being one of the possibilities not just a made up game of. Thrones thing. So that's that's interesting. Also potentially on that list with something called a bare dog or a high don which I guess is a prehistoric Hyena and don't forget our farmer friends shell. There's a fascinating theory that that that is jumped on pretty heavily in our favorite movie with that he himself actually trained the beasts to to murder humans in an effort to deflect attention from some crimes of or another that we don't really know what that might have been. In another option that we touched on earlier, but the definitely is a thing is the idea that might I think? It's our favorite to we talked about it offline Ben the idea that it was a juvenile. And this get some sand in some of the reporting that we read. Yeah. Yeah. Think about it. The ideas just like the Hyena thing like we mentioned earlier, it escapes from some private. Menagerie, and it begins to do what lines do it hunts with an ambush strategy. It seizes prey by the neck impossibly if he do the physics on pressure per square inch for the jaw, he could possibly decapitate a human being and that's why people like Carl Hans Talk Argue that a that that Lyon was the ultimate culprit, it's also true that lions have been known. In. Some cases to prey on humans for food like the Lions of. Salvo. The ghost and the darkness. That's. That's so funny I was literally I've I've got that up on wicky right now with Val kilmer and who else is Michael Douglas a very similar story actually there are these lions of salvo in. Africa that are just wrecking the the villages and murdering the hell out of people and these two hunters are out to get them and and they I believe those lions are in a museum maybe the Field Museum in Chicago if I'm not mistaken I, believe I believe they are in. A museum lions typically if they're if they're hunting humans, it's going to be a because they may have aged out of being able to hunt more efficient and more delicious pray like their teeth may have worn down. That's one of the big theories. So this could have happened. This could have happened in France and again, just like with Hyena the eye witnesses of the time we're probably not familiar with living lions they may have heard of one you may have seen a drawing or a woodcut of one. But. This problem is compounded because the drawings that they would have seen of a lion would almost certainly have been drawings with the big maintain. An adult lion has. A juvenile male lion doesn't have a main money does have is kind of a stripe running down its back now and the lines of salvo didn't have Maine's either and they you know rampage I believe it was had to do with the British railway bridge construction in salvo in Kenya and that's and the reason that the two white characters were brought in wasn't necessarily because it had anything to do with them caring about the indigenous people it was more about you know the continuing the construction project. But these lions if they were Juvenile. Lines wouldn't have had Maine's either you're absolutely right. Hey this episode of ridiculous history is brought everyone by audible I love audible Ben I truly and everyone else should too. If you don't already although I know many of you do because you've heard sing its praises low these many years but you know as communities around the world kind of unite to confront new challenges like social distancing in school closures. Everyone's really. Trying to find a way to relax but also stay informed and entertained, and you know we ridiculous history consider ourselves story tellers. We know that stories are a great way to do that thing stories entertain they teach but they also help keep our minds active alert and engaged. Yeah. Audible is the leading provider of spoken word entertainment and audio book. So we're not. Just, talking about novels bestsellers also Talk News Business Self Development, and also things like all sleep. If you're hoping for some easier naps in these trying times and being trying times with stories, dot audible dot com, which is a special site that audible created for families with children who are away from the stimulation of a classroom right now with more urgent need than. Ever to find stimulating entertainment, maybe get off those screens. So folks can actually stream hundreds of audible titles completely free with no strings attached for as long as this pandemic in quarantine situation lasts Ben you're a fan of audible and I think you've got a new title that you've been checking out. That's right now I've been going back to some of my favorite's. Halloween and autumnal reads just started bump in something wicked. This way comes by the one and only ray. Bradbury. Classic and I have been listening to Charlie Kaufman, the screenwriter and Weirdo filmmaker. He's got a new novel out called aunt kind which if you're fan of Kaufmann I think you'll definitely be a fan of this book and the The guy that reads it does a great job you don't. Have to take our word for folks don't delay. You can visit audible dot com slash ridiculous today to learn more or just text ridiculous to five hundred, five, hundred find out yourself why audible is the best at audible dot com slash ridiculous or just text ridiculous to five hundred, five, hundred this episode is brought to you by IBM today every answer matters more than ever before because whether it's about. or finance something's just can't wait. That's why IBM's helping businesses manage millions of calls, texts and chats with Watson Assistant. It's conversational a I designed to help your customers, find the answers they need faster no matter the industry. Let's put smart to work with IBM DOT COM Slash Watson Assistant to learn more. So. Now, we have to go to what is largely considered. The most credible theory. WOMP. WOMP. Will. be a man really ed wool for groups of Wolves at Super Wolves or I don't I don't see. So the idea is, is this one is that the? It that the region Gerald did have a serious wolf infestation, but they were just wolves out woven. You know doing what they could to eat and they had a lot of competition from a bunch of other wolves and the question about why it became the beast became such a terror at least two Smith is is really a question of the clergy's agenda. There's the idea that the clergy took who is very opportunistic and leverage these deaths to try to reinstall the fear of God in the population. So the clergy folk were saying that this is the these attacks are happening because God is punishing the French because you got your keystone kicked in the seven years' war. Checks out seems legit. Now it's a divine instrument. So of course, it has powers. Still. It's weird and we see that recurrent theme that I'm so glad you mentioned about recovering one's masculinity because the hunter who had been thrown in jail was doing the same thing as Duhamel and that's that's the story. But one one thing for every fan of cryptic in the audience today, there are some flaws in the theory. the beast attacks lasted for a pretty long time longer than they would have. If it was just like one single wolf with rabies, it would have died. Yes. It's a really good point Ben and it is a bit of a kink in the armor of this version of the events added to by the fact that none of the survivors got rabies Mitch. Have happened you know if Bitten or winged by a a rabid wolf, but do you think? What what what led the clergy stuff. I get and all the journalism in them you know making a big to do about this and all the different of the telephone effect of all of these different descriptions but. Why didn't anybody just thinking that they weren't people that were attacked they said Yeah Yeah it was a wolf I got wolf. Right. Because the true story might. Not Be as watering. May I? Think? Maybe that's the case I don't know it's interesting though the way these things happen take on a life of their own and you know sad for all the folks that died horrifically in this story but damn is not a good story like really. A story to make a an intentional two parter that we we tend to. Do those after the fact. But really, really cool. So many interesting twists and turns and interesting characters and I've said it. Once I've said a thousand times checkout Brotherhood of the wolf you won't be land unless you're squeezed out by animals stuff. Well, then you won't be disappointed. You'll be horrifying. Doesn't isn't that what? Halloween. Unsold. So one last known I think would be great to end on MVP of interest to you Casey in your alternate identity across the pond. If you want to get some some firsthand experience with this story, why not visit the Museum of the Beast Avalon Doll, which is a thing it's open now the case of the beast remains largely unsolved to this day who knows maybe strolling around. Through. One of the twenty two Dioramas you may become the person who finally solves the mystery this museums big to make it plan the whole afternoon for answer I. Love a good Diorama and I know this is only a side story but the Lions of salvo another fascinating story about wild animals. We know we know what these were though they were in fact, lions, they are taxidermied. At the Field Museum in Chicago. So if that if that's you know close by to where you are definitely worth checking that out as well, and there's a great episode of stuff you missed in history class on the lines of salvos. Well, Oh man I miss go engine museums. That's why I missed the most. So that is our story for today that concludes our two part series. On the mystery of the beast of Gerald, thanks as always and in today's episode, especially to our Super Producer Casey peg rim patron saint of being patient on a podcast Yep and patron saint of French pronunciation assistance as well. Agreed thanks also to Alex Williams who composed track thanks sue the Brotherhood of the wolf, which again, like I have the DVD and I was telling myself Oh role ward. Myself by re watching it after we did this episode trying to see if the director Christof Johns. Did anything else interesting because it is such a weird movie and obviously we were both very taken by Let's see. He did a movie called Crying Freeman which looks very highlander. Ask Scott Mark to Costco's and and. got. Ninja swords or Samurai sword situation on the cover. The also did I'll he directed the silent hill movie. With economic on his while vern. Anthology. Series on economic. Policy for film and what's better? And thanks of course to our own beast of ridiculous history Jonathan Strickland. The. Is Eli. Is he a striped Aida is human beings? Question remains unsolved to this day. See next time folks. For more podcasts from my heart radio, visit the iheartradio APP, apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Feeling loss. And we've got the PODCAST for you labyrinth. I'm Christopher Robinson and I'm Amanda Knox. Stuck to wind up in a life I never expected but you're maze might be a cruise ship or your minute tar a terrorist husband. So get lost with US starting October sixteenth as we step into the personal labyrinth of people like Andrew Yang, Lavar, Burton and Malcolm. Glad well. Listen to labyrinths. Radio, APP ON APPLE PODCASTS or wherever you get your podcasts. It's no secret that in Washington DC corruption is everywhere and I should know my mom's the speaker of the House. My friends are on the same boat daughters of the DC elite. 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Lions IBM Ben Heck Slash Watson Assistant Salvo Casey peg rowe Gabe Watson US Francois Amazon official Wolf Producer Field Museum France Wolf loop Chicago Dez Casey
Who are the Hartlepudlian Monkey Hangers?

Ridiculous History

33:49 min | 2 years ago

Who are the Hartlepudlian Monkey Hangers?

"Hey, everybody, this is no one. You know that I typically keep a pretty healthy and thick beard on my face. But when I need to touch up Majali's and you know the occasional next shave or what have you. I used Gillette and that's because Gillette offers options for everyone from your fresh-faced clean-shaven Hollywood boys to a little bit more of the mountain. Man Williamsburg look like. I typically sport Gillette you see offers a variety of shaving products for every single guy, regardless of personal style skin needs, or budget or the you want three blades or five blades, the new Gillette three Angeletti five razors. Have you covered all under ten bucks? I myself rely on the formidable yet delicate Gillette mach three for guys looking to get Gillette performance delivered to their door. You could find Gillette five at Gillette on demand dot com subscribed today. Welcome to the show. Fellow ridiculous historians. My name is Ben usually do something usually a bit. At the beginning of this show threw me for a loop there. Do you wanna bit? We. Okay, guys journey with us back to the beginning. Wait, we keep this all of my. Yeah, of course do that. You need to fill time. All right. So there's are super producer, Casey peg, REM everybody. Give him a hand. You guys, we are flying blind today we are. We are, here's instead of a bit. Let's do a bit of background. How about that Ben, that smart smart use of the word bit. So everyone knows where we're coming from, right. Well, that that's very important setting up. The scene is very important. So today's seen starts in well in France and Europe in general, I guess in the late seventeen hundreds because you see in seventeen ninety nine Napoleon Bonaparte remember the guy that gusts warmed by cute little bunnies. He overthrew the French revolutionary government, right? Yes. And this triggered what is known as the Napoleonic war because he had designs on conquering everything. Yeah, he had. He was like more successful, William Walker who you'll recall from previous episodes. The Napoleonic wars occurred between eighteen three and eighteen fifteen. And this was the French empire led by Napoleon against just a mix tape of various European powers. Voltron together usually led by the United Kingdom that was the ringleader and just just for a little bit of a quick bookkeeping. It was in eighteen to that. There was a thing called the piece of our means that ended a decade of war between Great Britain and France rights, right? So things were not particularly stabled to begin with when the wars began in eighteen zero three. And before we go on, this is this is going to be a punchy episode folks. I think that's the word us, no, because when I said a bit of background, also talking on a meta level about our situation today, we are knowl- Casey and I are in the studio for this episode. And then we're going to be here into the night, making an appearance on a favorite show of ours beh-. Hind the bastards should go ahead and plug that in assume that we survived this recording session. Yeah, we'll see. We're, we're going to be some punchy characters, but the time that's all said and done. But yeah, our buddy Robert Evans to be on the show and we thought he was joking when he said, yeah, you know, just be about three or four hours. Okay, we're, you know, we're, we're, we're game, but I'll tell you who else was game was Napoleon? I some conquering 's. Yes, no, why don't you walk us through a few of these conflicts? Because this context is very important today story. Well, the the US is actually involved a little bit as well. Napoleon got back Louisiana from Spain in eighteen hundred. And then he made a brash attempt to overthrow a revolution in Haiti, but it did not succeed. And so having Louisiana was not a valuable thing without these strategic stronghold of Haiti. So he decided to give it back to the US in the Louisiana purchase of eighteen three before Great Britain. Could invade it. Yes. And in addition to this, the British forces were increasingly creeped out irritated angered upset and eventually frightened by Napoleon's actions in Europe, right? Switzerland, Germany, Italy in the Netherlands. And they were also concerned as you said that Napoleon might not stop at Haiti, he might become a threat to Britain's overseas colonies. That's right because the British had the Royal Navy and they were doing quite a good job of defending their shores, and French invasion attempts had not gone so well. But the tide kind of turned when there were some big successes by the French military and the power of the British navy started to wane a little bit, and they really get into kind of bolster that up. So there was a lot of paranoia there would be a direct invasion by sea. See of British territories. And that is where our story truly begins with this paranoia and this concept of are the French are coming. Yes, the French are coming. There was a nationwide fear that some historians describe as irrational about Napoleon's motives and intentions. They were especially spooked when Napoleon or Surti control over Switzerland. They thought the French, the British, the French could be coming at any given moment and one day according to the story or a legend, or at the very least allege story. A French ship actually did land in England, but it wrecks erect by an old fishing village named Hartlepool. Yeah, it was like right there on the beach and supposedly the Hartley poodle liens Hartlepool Putin's came running. And there were supposedly no survivors to this rack. Note almonds. Well, I'll come on to come now. No human survivors to this wreck, but there was a little hairy guy who who was in fact, or in fiction, a monkey, yes. The only survivor of the wreck there on the northeastern coast of England was a very panicked and traumatized little monkey who washed ashore, miraculously survived. Keep in mind. Everybody else on the ship drown, right. And the put liens had never seen a primate like this before that is what they say. And according to a source from historic UK dot com, the monkey was possibly dressed in a tiny military uniform. See, that's that's interesting. I appreciate these possibly because again, there are things about this. Story. I think you can tell by the way we're carefully hedging, some of these statements are things about this story that can't really be proven, but we do know internally the logic jibes because the monkeys supposed to be a mascot of the ship, right? Yeah, but this thing, though Ben, I mean, do all ships have mascots I, that's not something I'd ever heard of surely not carry around a like a signature animal. A familiar though. Some military groups have done that, but I guess so I can actual living. Well, I guess, like a football team, like having the g. a. bulldog or you know, I guess when I think of a mascot, I think of somebody wearing a, you know, a big author. EBay? Yeah, exactly. So, yes. So this supposed primate supposedly dressed in a tiny military uniform was panicked as one could imagine, and gibbering mindlessly as monkeys do and. According to the tale, the hardly Putin's interpreted this gibbering as as a foreign language, possibly French. Those pause there for a second. Casey, could you do a massive favor and play the sound of a monkey chattering because we all know a little bit about French enough to know what it sounds like roughly. So clearly not French. If you don't know French, who's who's to say, who's to say, and that is the crux of the story knoll, because the people of this town, the Hartlepool liens had an awareness of the nation of France and the threat that it posed geopolitically, but not a person in the village had ever seen a French person and to make matters worse. Apparently a lot of political satire cartoons of the day depicted Frenchmen as Harry monkey like creatures with stuff hails and subhumans exactly because they were the enemy. I mean, it was sort of like the, the red scare type stuff. I mean, this guy is like gunning for their their lands, right? So yes. So what are the, what do they do? They do like any God, fearing French, fearing person would do. They panic, they panicked, he absolutely they bug out and according to the story, the seas again, this poor traumatized monkey who is skirted death. Once already. So the panic, it's exactly what they do, and they say we have to do something about this Frenchman. Yeah, but thankfully, you know, they had their their wits were about them. They didn't let Justice go on served Ben. They decided to put this monkey on trial. Unfortunately, due to the language barrier, yes. The monkey was not able to defend itself or provide. A satisfactory answers to the towns people's question. That's right because the thing has been, they didn't just think the monkey was was a Frenchman. They thought the monkey was a French spy, and I've yet to find the detail that that justifies what exactly that was, but those are the questions they were asking him a lot of are you a spy? Right? I said, are you a spy. He just keeps speaking French at me. I know. I know. So, yeah. So they, they sentenced the monkey to death according to the tale. Yeah, you can redefine accounts of this but sources that cleave to the story or the anecdote say that the townsfolk literally dragged the spunky into the town square, and then they hanged him and he died. But this is where we get a couple of different. I dunno interpretations and questions about credibility because there's a darker side to the tale that we founded historic UK dot com. I know that when you're talking about go on, then the hanging of the Hartlepool monkey by Ben Johnson, the dark turn is this. Maybe the villagers didn't actually hang a monkey, but instead a small boy pretty a child who was employed on the worship because at this time there were boys who were hired on works on the ships to prime. The canons with gunpowder. Yeah, with the very convenient name of powder monkeys. Right. So is this a game of telephone throughout history with a misinterpretation occurring? People tell the story over and over again. Yeah, it's, it's, it's true. These. These are all very important questions that we probably won't have an actual satisfactory answer to spoiler but it's because no one was there and it was, you know, a lot of ships went down around that time because like I said, the the naval exploits of the polling. Weren't all always that's acceptable rights. And according to historic England's records of thirty eight thousand shipwrecks, round the coast of Britain. Fourteen ships sank in the Hartlepool bay area around that time. So there it was not incredibly uncommon for shipwrecks to occur. Hello, Philadelphia. Have you ever wanted to see stuff? They don't want you to know live direct and impersonal? We hope so because we are coming to your town very soon. Yes, Ben Nolan, Matt, that's me. We're going on tour in October specifically October twenty six. We will be at the world cafe in Philadelphia. So come check out our first ever. Philadelphia live show on October the twenty six at the world cafe. You can get tickets now going to stuff, they don't want you to know dot com and clicking on the live shows tab at the top of the homepage. We'll see then Philly. So this I think we can agree that's more or less the gist of the legend, correct? Correct. But that's not the gist of the episode. I mean, we wouldn't just stop short there. There's got to be more Ben. There's got to be more, please give us more. There has to be more you're right because you see, this is where the credibility of the tail comes into question. So you could say maybe something like this happened and it got embellished over time, right? But the problem is this tale is attributed to more than one place. There's a remarkably similar tale from seventeen seventy two that centers on Botum near Peterhead in Aberdeenshire. I love British down. Does it even better one then a believe that's a Welsh town or a Cornish town, right? Yes. Yeah. Give us when ago my never gets. Okay. That's good. Come on folks reticent shot. I would have done the same. I'm with you on them. So in both of these cases of villagers, supposedly find a monkey. Yeah, and one of them I believe they it was the last survivor of the shipwreck they killed it so that they could have claim on the cargo. Isn't that the deal? Some technicality law? Yeah. Shire brutal. The monkey was human enough, I guess. What would it have done? Would it have become the new captain of direction? Would it have made a claim? And then the other one, I believe the monkey was an organ grinder. Monkey wasn't a saying it was a slightly different. Did a kit. Uh-huh. Yeah, monkey come in. That's still happens when animals attack people, everything that show when animals attack people. I've I've seen when animals attack. Yes, my favorite one is the the one where it's specifically people. I, you know, I, I'm fond of animals attacking cars. That's the thing you have you ever seen those videos of like first off, if you've. Ever been around a monkey, some of those monkeys or brutal they not playing? No, and it will break into chart. Don't they eat their young to? Did I make that up? I don't know. Never mind. Let us know if that's just a primate stereotype that we've seen spread or we could just check it now. Right? So those are two points against the veracity of the story. That one thing very similar is attributed to a completely different town, and there are other points that stick with it. A lot of people who say that it definitely happened there in Hartlepool are supportive of it as being a part of local culture. No, it's totally like part of their heritage because it's weird. It's like on the one hand, it seems like a term of abuse. But on the other hand, some people look at it as a term of pride Hartlepool liens are often described as monkey hangers. Yeah. In for centuries after the legend spread references to monkey hanging, we're used to mock the residents the Hartlepool liens and apparently at football matches today between local rivals, they have this chant. Who hung the monkey, which I would have loved to hear out of context. There's also a quote in this BBC article called was a monkey really hanged in Hartley pool from historian by the name of Keith Gregson who mentions the fact that there was sort of a divide between the town because of newly industrialized area, I believe so there was a sense that the folks that lived in this new industrialized part of the town called west Hartley pool. We're more intelligent than those who lived in the old more antiquated, you know, old and clinging onto the old ways. Part of the town who may have been the ones who hanged this monkey. So it was kind of a there is a divide there. And that's the older part of the town was also where the fishing industry continued. Right? So they would have been most likely to be hanging out by the waters? Yup. And as the years passed, the people have hardly pool begin to embrace this story as you. Mentioned all, as you alluded to earlier, it becomes a point of cultural pride or something that differentiates their town from other nearby towns and people begin to fall in love with it. It becomes the subject of books. There's even a graphic novel. I think there's a play and. There's even a song with a little bit of story bind. Yeah, let's hear that. Well, along. Eventually. Harry mandate never seen all sitting in the sun. Clutch in a non lethal hairy also not proven, no. Now. Now this this, this is sensually does the entire story. It really does. And it takes good four and a half minutes to do it. So we'll go ahead and give it a nice little fade out right now. The song is actually a big part of how this legend kind of came to be what it is today, right Ben, right? That's how I got popularized or at least the evolution of a song. Not quite sure if it's this song actually find any attribution for what this song is, and there's a set of lyrics that's a little different. That is a reference to a song that was first performed in eighteen fifty five by a performer from the area by the name of Mr. e core van or Edward, Ned corden who is a Victorian performer, who toured around the area known as the Tyneside heard of this been? Yeah, he was a, he was a Tyneside concert hall player route songs and stuff. Tyneside is the banks of the river Tyne, northeast England. So it's region includes a couple of places. A couple of different places have great names Newcastle upon. Tyne Gateshead time mouth Walson south shields and jarrow probably mispronounced a couple of those. But if you're listening to your from that part of the world shout out to you, shout out you. You're going to tell him to shut up no more. I want more Tyneside you know what's interesting about Ned. We can call them Ned because we're fans of his, was that he was known for writing like a satirical song a little bit of a lighthearted roast for every town that he visited. So he would go visit a town and he would write a song about them while he was there and he would perform it in the town. So when Ned goes to Hartlepool, he writes a song about airtime the monkey hanging and this song becomes popular in the region. People love it. Eventually from what I understand, Hartley poorly themselves begin to be fans of the salty. Well, here's the thing in this BBC article. They talk about how he was making reference. Two previous on that existed called the babboons which is written in eighteen twenty five or which was I heard around eighteen twenty five and it was a different story entirely about about boom that visited the region with some Cossack soldiers. Yes. So I don't quite see the connection there, but they both happened in Tyneside. Yeah, too. But how did he know about the he's made up the Napoleonic is, is that what's being employed here? Ben that he just made this thing wholesale would it seems there imply is that this was a remix or a reworked version of the song and that he took elements from the babboons and used them in his song about the Hartlepool monkey hangers. But at that point was this already a legend that's my question is, is the legend coming from the song like where where's the? Where's the seed of truth here? Because there are people that still we're gonna talk about the second is still hang onto the fact that the idea that this could well have happened is such a bizarre story, but that logic always alludes me when you say it's so. It must be true. Well, also those folks as we'll find have a skin in the game, right? The main people who believe it are themselves heartlessly ins it. It feels like Corvin heard the story the the French monkey story, right? And then mixed with it aspects of the story about the babboons also from Tyneside and then added a dash of his own stuff out here we go and then set the whole thing in Hartlepool. Okay, that makes sense. And here, we also have some other something from the BBC article that says, the original song had some phrases in it that he reused like Harry French spy and the Polian uncle, and I wish I could find the lyrics to the babboons, but there's another set of lyrics called the monkey song. It's not the same as only played. There's a lot of these song foot around, but it goes in former times when Warren strife the French invasion threatened life and always armed to the knife. The fishermen hung the monkey, o the fishermen with courage. Hi, seized on the monkey for a French spy, hang him says one. He's today. They did and they hung the monkey o. But it's like it's got that same sing song evoke a equality that the song we played has in the original this when we played because they think he's a spy. So we'll hang him in the square. And this one's just a little bit different. If the fishermen were courage, high seized on the monkey for French by hanging him says, one, he's to die. They did and they hung the monkey o. So I don't know, man, like is it song? Let's like making this legend thing or is it oral history is a history first, and then the song which is borrowing from other side. Got it. Okay. So it's still and because it's a song, it's still oral history is true. Good point been. Hi, I'm Jeff Krosno and welcome to communist where every week we explore the ideas, values and practices that bring us together and help us live healthy and purpose filled lives. We talked to research scientists, congressman spiritual leaders, world class athletes and founders of international institutes about everything from personal wellness practices to ideas that inspire us to take action. Welcome to come. You subscribe now for weekly episodes. Here's where we find disagreements as as we mentioned earlier, lot of the people who whole heartedly believe in this story your claim to or themselves Hartlepool's liens these successful mayoral candidate in the two thousand two local elections scanning, Stuart Drummond. He campaigned dressed in the costume of he wasn't just dressed in advance. He was the official mascot of the Hartlepool in football club, right? And he campaigned for mayor dressed in that character. But that was a, it was a sort of goof. It was sort of goof, but he maintains that it really did happen. But of course, you would maintain that really did happen. He's running for mayor, wants the town to be Neak. It's great PR. And as we said, he was the mascot for time the, but he also won. He did win and laid mayor for for like, I think, eleven years. He was mayor three election victories. He ES. Seeded. And yeah, and it just goes to and he, you know, he maintains that nobody can say whether or not this happened or not, because nobody was there and that's okay. That's when we were looking at. I saw I saw cool where he said that it definitely something happens. The problem is most people disagree with them or professional historians. And even if they don't go so far as to say, this never happened. They end up saying, we looked everywhere for proof of this and we could find absolutely no proof. There was some excitement in two thousand five. When an animal bone was found buried on the beach. Despite the fact that in the story, the monkey's hanged in the town square people thought, well, this might be physical proof was small, primate washing ashore. Unfortunately, it was not a primate bone. It was the bone of a prehistoric dear. That's right. A deer from somewhere in the neighborhood of six thousand years ago, when herds of deer would have migrated. Across that part of the country, and they were followed by tribes of hunters who wanted them for sustenance. And for you know the by products like their skin in their in their Antlers and stuff. And this is from article headline a very pithy headline. Very good ancient bone, not from monkey spy. Hoops unraveling the mystery of the legendary Hartlepool monkey said to have been hanged as Napoleonic. Spy have been scuppered by science, scuppered scuppered, great word. We need to bring that back to like scupper nog what's scupper non. It's like a type of grape, I think. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Sort of like a moose Scott. Okay, the Scott, I know, but scupper say it again. Scupper nog scuppered. That sounds so token s. k. you can make wine out of it. And in fact, it is compared to a musket on a large variety of Muscat dine o species of grape native to the southern United States. So right here in our backyard. And at this point it becomes somewhat of a matter of opinion. What do you feel better about believing? The main argument for proponents of the story is that it's not hurting anyone and there's no proof that it didn't happen, which is not a particularly strong position to take, especially because on the other side of the coin, there's no proof that it did happen. Right. So what what do you believe what you choose to believe folks our putting into the people well to you as well. Okay. Well, I don't know, man, I don't wanna poop on anybody's monkey parade or anything, but it feels to me like with the the nature of the multiple monkey stories, some of the kind of you know. Mutating facts in the story and the different accounts in song. I feel like this is rife for having been a kind of a good gag, poking fun at the intellect of the people of of Hartlepool. Yeah, personally, I choose to believe it didn't happen because I don't like the idea of town of people hanging monkey man come on. That's brutal for me to be able to laugh at it and derive enjoyment for I have to think of as tall tale data. So this is this is the story of man. I can't wait for the flood of Email from people who have strong opinions. We're going to get a lot of Tyneside. People have strong opinions and they send emails. It's a new thing. You can be part of it. We'll give you the information at the end, but speaking of emails enough about us, what a, what about you? Did you see any good listener males today? No. The matter of fact, I do Ben. I did and I do still do this one. Yeah. This one comes from Mr. venomous and it says Benon. All agents of discord is what he's referring, which I like in all of history. My favorite will figure is emperor Norton historian makes perfect candidate for ridiculous history in eighteen forty eight. He was be quizzed forty thousand dollars from his father's estate. He tried making it as a businessman in San Francisco, but made a bad investment in buying a hundred tons of pure Peruvian rice, a prolonged core battle over the loss of his investment, led him to go bankrupt in eighteen Fifty-eight penniless and discontent with the legal system and politics. He declared himself emperor of the United States and protector of Mexico in eighteen fifty nine. Let's just leave it there then because I like this one and it almost sounds like something stuff you missed in history class are pure podcast may have done. Yeah, if not, we're gonna snatch it up and agents of discord is a reference, I believe, to would've our other shows mister. Thomas has written into his before on stuff in what you know at doesn't ring a bell. Yeah. Well, it's great to hear from you again. I agree with my trusty co-host here. That is a fantastic idea for an episode. If we're the first ones to get to the plate on it, we have one more Email that's that's a little bit long from Adam s e he titled it lots of topics. Sorry of just going to read some of the greatest hits the excerpts here. So Adam, you say, hey, guys recently picked up the pike cast catching up nearly there. I love the show so far, but I do listen to the new episodes then go back to make my way through that golden backlog. I've never heard backlog described as golden. He has some suggestions for food fails. Adam says, you talked about food fails. Can I point a drink one your way here in the UK Coca Cola released a water, which I think you may still get in the US dishonor. The use, the marketing is something like can't live without spunk here in the UK. That's a slang word for something you really wouldn't want in your drink how you said every year plenty. I think that's that would made it across the pond in Adam says it got better when it was found out that it was treated tap water from a suburban London and was no better than said, tap water when the press got a hold of it, it was a PR nightmare and pulled. I think it may be one of the funniest and worst PR disasters here for a while. Now this got new think you'd at least we could do an episode on some of the biggest historic food fails. There used to be a museum in the states. It's a long time ago. There was a hall of shame for foods that appeared and disappeared from supermarkets. Things like a Ps that were pressed into a shape of French fries to try to treat kids into eating their vegetables. Yeah, as a as a father of a nine year old, I can tell you that's not gonna fly. It did not fly, but try making my colleague flower because you can make cauliflower into like a rice time. Yeah, she doesn't buy it. She knows it's non-rice. I'll make a cauliflower pizza, but she'd dig it. Well, that's different. I feel like that's, that's that's a good example Ben because that's like you baking it, and it has that crunch with rice. It's just they're not. They're not rice sized grains. You're not gonna mistake for ROY rice, cauliflower, cauliflower, rice. So thank you Mr.. Venomous thank you. Adam for writing in a. We want to hear some more food fails. So send us your favorite ones from your neck of the global woods? Yeah, you can write to us ridiculous. It has to calm. You can hit us up on social media, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and all that you can join our. Our Facebook group ridiculous stories, or we still kick around some fun ideas in have ever. Really nice community that sprung up there. So come come, hang out with us. They're on ridiculous historians. Of course we want to thank you for listening. We want to thank our super producer, Casey peg room. Thanks to Christopher hussy yoda's and eaves, Jeff coda research associates, and thanks to Alex. Williams composed are TRE. We'll see next time folks and we go out on the monkey song that's catch. Oh, man. Let's do it. Fronts. When a British. The comes open. On the show singing. Coinc- the French. On the beach. The grit. The rumors are true friends and neighbors. We are getting out of the podcast studio and hitting the road to visit a town near you on Tuesday, October twenty. Third, we're going to be at the armory in Boston on Thursday, October twenty. Fifth, we're gonna be at the Arlington cinema draft house in Arlington, Virginia, that's near DC than Friday on October twenty six. We're going to be the world cafe live in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Saturday, October twenty. Seventh, we will get the bell house in Brooklyn New York and will be returning to Atlantis Sunday, October twenty eighth for very special show at terminal west. No spoilers. But this is going to be a little bit different is going to be very much weird and we'd love for you to be part of the show, get out there and get a ticket while you can go to stuff, they don't want you to know dot com. Click on the live shows tab, and you'll see where you can get tickets right down there, get them. Now you better get quick.

Hartlepool Ben Napoleon Bonaparte England Casey peg Harry French Tyneside United States United Kingdom Britain Gillette BBC Hartlepool Putin Philadelphia Adam Europe Hartlepool Monkey France world cafe
Babies in Incubators were Once a Sideshow Attraction

Ridiculous History

47:36 min | Last month

Babies in Incubators were Once a Sideshow Attraction

"Someday. I might win millions playing the DC lottery today I want three hundred dollars which turned out to be a good thing for my co workers since we're all working from home, we meet on video once a week to catch up actually see each other. Thanks to that three hundred dollars I had lunch delivered to everyone from our favorite Deli which made the meeting more satisfying. See No matter how big a prize you in from the DC lottery or how small everyone is a win This episode is brought to you by IBM. Today answers matter more than ever before. That's why IBM is helping businesses manage customer questions with Watson Assistant It's conversational a I designed to work for any industry. Let's put smart to work as it I B Dot Com, Slash Watson assistant ridiculous histories of production of iheartradio. Welcome to the show ridiculous historians as always. Thank you so much for tuning in this is you know I said this before, but but this, this is a a really really weird one. It's a story that may be unfamiliar to a lot of people of, unless, of course, your Phantom sideshows I don't do people still go to sideshows. I, mean certainly, not particularly politically correct anymore. You're Ben's still not a proprietor of a show. Yeah, and you're no I. Am I mean I think the closest thing we've got today would be like a Ripley's believe it or not situation where maybe Maybe. There's some things in there that could be classified as that but they're nice human beings. They're dioramas or re-creations are yeah. Just a historical kind of exhibit. But yeah, man sideshows problematic. Then fascinating things. Yes. Yes. To say the least I I was also captivated by Ripley's believe it or not. I think for people in our generation that was probably to your point the closest that a lot of us came decide shows. We have to as always ask our Super Producer Casey peg room. Before we begin to show Casey I know you're coming blind with this one What's your take on sideshows? I'm I'm just thinking about sideshow Bob from the simpsons that was one association that popped up immediately. But yeah, I, I'm pretty much where you guys are like Ripley's believe it or not. The Wax Museum things you do at destined beach on vacation. Those are kind of I'm getting. So never saw like a genuine sideshow probably for the best. Usually somewhere near the airbrush t shirts Dan Regan get like a dolphin jumping over sunset Hackley. That's right. Shell. That is painted in some bizarre color I I like the beach life. The Walk Snacks today we are talking about something the happen on boardwalks early Boardwalk sideshows. No today in two, thousand twenty no sideshows often have this terrible historical reputation because there would be people who had some sort of disability right or some sort of visually striking difference about themselves. That's right. I mean it's complicated because oftentimes while those folks were reviled and ridiculed as part of those, it was a society that would have shunned them to such a degree. They probably wouldn't have been able to find gainful employment any other way. So it's a bit of a mixed bag while it was definitely you know. It makes me think of why people had a real problem with that movie the greatest showman because it really romanticized that whole world. But then there's a very empowered musical number. We're all sides show oddity individuals, kind of band together and talk about how they're beautiful on the inside and stuff. But movie kind of divided people I quite enjoy the. Music though, but you know what I'm saying though like this is definitely they were getting paid probably a pittance you know but they were fed and they were allowed to kind of live within a society or a mini society that would at least kind of accept them pierce and often there were you know kind of famous ones in terms of intrigue Joel's like. The lobster boy and all of that stuff But you have sort of categories of sideshow oddity things pinheads which would have been. You know a pretty crass way of referring to somebody with a developmental condition that caused problems with the shape of their skull etc and they kind of had like a point Microsoft Com. That's exactly right. That's exactly right Ben. And bearded ladies and things like that. The tattooed man, you know people that had any any number of outward conditions that could have been looked at as you know, there some kind of mutation or some sort of superpower weird way. But not in a positive way, I don't know I'm kind Kinda feel like I'm having a hard time talking about it and trying to stay relatively pc because it is such A. Difficult thing to discuss. Yeah. For a lot of people. The idea of aside show instantly conjures images. I. Know You were probably think this to Casey of the nineteen thirty, two film freaks. FREAKS did feature people who had worked as sideshow performers in real life blake the Microcephaly Nick Schlitz who was billed as the last of the techs and interior point older would be things like conjoined twins there would be things like as you said, someone with. Differently shaped hands someone who had three legs but then there would also be people who are capable of extraordinary feats like how many how many people were roaming through the midwest claiming to be the world's strongest man he of the largest largest person. When we think of this, I think he did a tremendous job explaining some of the the problematic aspects of this. But when we think of sideshows today, we're you know we we have the benefit of retrospect and we also think in terms of those categories like tattooed lady, the illustrate demand and so on. But today we'd like to introduce you to a new type of sideshow exhibit. That might surprise you. It turned out for a time in the beginning of the twentieth century babies became stars of sideshows for a very weird reason but not just any baby these were specifically babies that were born. Early, before the full term pregnancy had come to a conclusion and they're referred to collectively as premature babies and folks out there in podcast may have siblings that are premature that were born prematurely There are many reasons this can happen some absolute leaked completely a fluke never you can't really predict when it's going to happen There are obviously more kind of negative nasty reasons. This can happen things like drug. Addiction in the mother but a lot of times oftentimes when babies are born prematurely has nothing to do with any negative actions of the mother, and it's also more than possible for that baby other born quite small to have a completely normal life and become completely healthy and that is because of some medical technology specifically something called an incubator. Yes. One of the main characters of our story today's Dr Martin a Kuni. He knew about incubators. He knew that incubators could play a powerful role in ensuring the health of premature babies. But he also knew that the quote unquote system, you know the medical establishment and stuff. Didn't have much interest. In pushing this new technology forward, because the incubator was a very new idea at the time, there wasn't a lot of money being put into research for this literally life-saving technology. So. He decided that he would hit the streets himself and he built a traveling exhibit. That showed audience members, premature babies living in incubators for a lot of us. This sounds like a maternity ward, right? Hey, pre cove it. I could go to a hospital and if I'm not too creepy, they'll let me walk by that area. They sure will not not so much these days but Kunis. Fascination with incubators came didn't just come like an overnight thing wasn't like the hot new medical device on the street he studied in Paris under a very well respected researcher and. And physician named Pierre Boudin who was confused as to why? You know these devices hadn't been adopted more widely. So he actually displayed some incubators in the Berlin world's fair in eighteen, ninety six, and this was really kind of at the the onset of the idea of fair. It wasn't really what we think of today as you know, it's sort of devolved into just more of a place where you can read sheep rollercoaster sorta travels from town to town There might be some games that you'RE GONNA lose your money. Off Of, but at the time, they were really league considered these kind of almost like we have today with the stuff like CAS which is you know the the massive electronics convention where new technology is unveiled in all of the different organizations and companies that make technology show up and show their wares all the same time in in Vegas you've been to one of those haven't you Casey we've been to several been I. Yeah. to cover automotive stuff. Some. Just general technology it's Multiple. Convention centers massive footprint tens of thousands of booths I think it's quite something who we My favorite memory of see us probably is, is the the weird night that group of us the crew got together and one of US friend of the show still in Fagan had never gambled before and I think Ramsey was the same. So. We set off to try to try to have a vegas experience. It was ridiculous story for another day but you're right these things world fairs see. Stuff like the the expos like the Panamerican Exposition the these were prominent high level of fairs. You know what I mean like people would go to these things to see the latest innovations. I. Think your comparison about CBS is spot on Nolan's it was much. These were much more like a big. Upcoming Technology kind of convention, and they were What you would consider aside, show today and that's where. These child hatcheries came in and said, they were called. You would as an audience member, you would pay a dime and you can see pictures of this especially There's some great ones on an article from Atlas Obscure. You would pay a dime and you would walk around and observe these babies livy happy and hopefully healthy in these incubators they're much larger by the way than the incubators we're familiar with today and. We have to establish the beginning of this story. The children were not harmed by being in the incubators they were they were on display. So there's A wound to their dignity perhaps, but they were able to receive medical care that they otherwise probably would not have received and this this is idea that went through several iterations. Before our friend Cooney had brought the act to the United States. So let's Let's say with the incubators just a little bit and what's described them so His baby child hatchery or inventory them as it was called. Each incubator in there was about one and a half meters high head steel walls, they had a framework glass fronts so you could observe the children and they used water boilers to feed warm water into pipes running underneath the babies. And thermostats to maintain regulate temperatures. What we're saying is that the baby's overall were safe in these things. That's that's key to the story. Well, I mean they were more than safe right they they really desperately needed this and that's because premature babies. Have a they they're they're incapable of regulating their own body temperatures, and before incubators were thing I've I've read you know in researching this in watching I watched a really interesting pbs I remember what it was called but it was actually a woman who antique roadshow style was presented with this like Silver Cup from an event at the at the Chicago world's. Fair and it was connected to one of these baby display kinda situations and one of the doctors they interviewed us talking about how before there were incubators doctors didn't know what to do and they didn't have much control. So they would do things like put the babies and shoe boxes and stick them next to a radiator which sounds really unsafe. These things were revolutionary. Yeah. Yet, and sadly before the rise of incubators there would be people who would say things like well, the child has to do its best to survive you know, and that's a terrible thing for you to hear his a parrot. and. That's where our story leads us to Coney Island around the turn of the century if you headed to coney island. You would see you know all the usual coney island diversions although I do believe this was before Nathan's famous hot dog eating contest, which is one of my favorite things. You could go to a newly opened amusement park called Luna Park but you might also run into a permanent inventory them a permanent exhibit of premature babies in these incubators in. Cooney was doing this because. He needed the funds from these audience members. The technology of incubators for humans was laughed at her roundly dismissed by physicians even though as you said, no it, it had passed before like people knew the thing would work. It's just it's sad when you think that for the first five decades of the existence of this incubator, it was functioning mostly as a novelty item. That's right. I mean you know we think you baiters in terms of like hatching eggs you know from Chicken Embryos. Let's say and that's really cool. But not always necessary. It's sort of a little more like a parlor trick a scientific parlor trick It's not something when you think of farmed eggs. or even mass produced chicken eggs it's not something that would be employed in that respect. So that's that's interesting. Way of putting bed although I can't help but think of the scene from Jurassic Park with the incubator and the baby velociraptor that he pulls out it's all covered in like bloody slime. and. Then Kinda makes that little. Kind of and that's how you know those buggers are evil because. Evil grown are definitely going to be able. Yeah you're right. But what what isn't cute when it's in the juvenile stage, I am clearly biased I'm a drastic park fan. There's even a holiday, all July sixth park by one of my favorite scheduled Chris Jackson do celebrate it. When you get a chance your your point about incubators is absolutely true. It wasn't until the eighteen eighties when Stefanie of French obstetrician solve these things being used at a zoo and hey, if it works on baby chickens maybe works on baby humans and part of the reason the medical establishment did not immediately jump on the baby train here is that they had a long. Kiss -Tory of prejudice toward premature babies. It was expensive to care for them, and honestly as horrible as this sounds a lot of people thought it was pointless because babies born below a certain threshold of birthweight. Had High mortality and then physicians also thought this invention that came from watching chickens in zoo was unsigned. And they didn't believe that it could actually save people's lives and that's where the guy mentioned earlier Pierre comes in and he says, why aren't more hospitals investing in this? We can save people. So he started researching the technology eighteen, eighty eight he kept running into roadblocks for funding, and that's why 1896 like you said, it wanted to display these incubators at the world's fair. That's absolutely correct the world's fair You recall when you're making that CS comparison sort of the whole like modern day con-, you know whether it's unveiling the newest Smart Home Technology or what have you back in these days the technology that was being unveiled was like life changing really well, I mean not to say, the technology today isn't important if there aren't occasionally things that are unveiled these kind of A. Conferences that do change people's lives, but not the same as like the dishwasher. The color television things that haven't really been replaced they've been improved upon. They've maybe been given internet connectivity or you'll have like a camera inside your fridge that you can look up on your smartphone kissing see how much cottage cheese left when you're at the grocery store but. Is, game, changing technology in the way that we would see in these industrial just post industrial revolution fares isn't quite the same today and you guys completely full of crap. If if you think I'm missing the mark on that but the ones that we that really led the charge were European. The world shaped by the voices we choose to listen to. The leaders we pay attention to. The ideas we choose to embrace. What if we made the choice right now to create a new world? With better outcomes for more of us. By listening. To. More, voices. What if we made the choice? Right now to design a future. Inspired by diverse voices of one hundred amazing women. Women are speaking. Listen to them. Learn from them. Join US at PNG and choose equal right now for an equal future. And now here, equal. Introducing Senecas one hundred women to hear a new podcast by Seneca Women's supported by and. Listen, on the iheartradio APP wherever you get your podcasts. It's your apartment speaking and I need some favors when you're singing in the shower, just try going up a key. You're trying to be an alto when really you're a soprano Oh and if you could bundle your renters and car insurance with GEICO, it's easy to do online and we could save money and then when you read your murder mysteries at night, could you read out loud but? Skip the murder parts because I get scared. For bundling made easy go to. GEICO DOT. com today. So, Kuni realizes these exhibits, conceive babies, lives, and they any realizes the public will pay to see this futuristic technology. Eventually, he and brooding realized that these exhibits are successful enough to make a potential lifesaver for these children. Coney was interested personally in this because he himself was the father of a child born prematurely as daughter and he reasoned if hospitals don't care for these prematurely born children, then we can crowdsource it. He didn't use the word crowdsource, but that's essentially what he did in Buffalo New York nineteen a one he built this huge building just for the baby incubator exhibit. He got tons of press which turned out to be even more important than getting a lot of people in the crowd and that's how started in nineteen. Oh, three you could see the permanent coney island baby incubator. Exhibition was at Luna Park and another one was also in Coney Island at Dreamland so nurses would tend to the babies. The public would look on in amazement and the weird thing is this is still kind of like a sideshow. So there is still a carnival Barker here I wonder what they're saying like America technology the baby is born premature through the wonders of our age will be able to live. So yeah. They had a pitch I'm sure they absolutely no it I've been. The thing about it is premature babies are cute because they're so bloody small and their eyes are closed. They look like little rabbits or little puppies. You know that are born when their eyes aren't even open yet and they're real skinny and so on the one hand, they're adorable babies are cute and everything but they're also you know they're not the most healthy looking they're a little like you're worried about them. There's a sense of of of Oh. No is this baby going to be okay and I wonder. It seems like there is a capitalization on all of those things because I don't know like the pitch likely did not center specifically on the amazing life saving technology. That is that is just my my the sense that I get what do you what do you think them? Yeah, he definitely. So there were definitely theatrical elements to this right that people are going to see it. We know that according to a book by Dawn Raffle. The strange case of Dr Kuni mysterious European Showman, save thousands of American babies. Kuni knew. The score you know what I mean like he dressed infants on purpose in two large clothing. He would he would have nurses slip a finger ring around the entire wrist of premature child because this was visually appealing right and it's it's like people were watching it for the fascination and the little a little bit of danger. Little bit of anxiety. Will these children make it you? One thing I forgot to mention at the beginning of this? He used the phrase premiums in nineteen thirty nine when he was looking back and talking about this experience, he said all my life. I've been making propaganda for the proper care of premiums who and other times were allowed to die, and that's why said everything that he did was strictly ethical kind of a ends justify the means reasoning if you think about it and here's the thing this coney island inventory stuff huge success huge success. He would charge a couple of cents to get in and then again from that PBS. Little short that saw he was apparently raking in about fifteen hundred dollars a day. But here's the thing. I think a big part of the success of in terms of like the viewers wasn't necessarily. It was a pleasant thing. It wasn't like a freak show wasn't like look at that weird looking baby it was because in their incubators they looked safe and they they looked cuddly in kind of like you know nothing could harm them and that's sort of comforting. Especially when you see something vulnerable that's being cared for. That that's just a theory but I think that that likely has something to do with success because he was making that kind of money every day, and this was a permanent installation at coney island's Luna Park. And he while he charged people to see it, he didn't charge the parents of the babies to put them in there. So what does that mean? This is a very complicated individual like on the one hand, he's doing this thing that on the surface could seem kind of exploitive of of these. You know unfortunate infants th that are having difficulty, but he's also literally the reason that they're like GonNa be okay and he's not charging the parents anything because medical the medical community hasn't fully embraced the technology yet. So without him and the side show, he likely he's a lot of these babies likely wouldn't survived. Yeah it's true. They made a lot of money and. It went to the children we know that in nineteen. Oh three, it costs fifteen dollars a day to care for each individual baby that's around four hundred and five dollars a day in these are modern times. And he cooney was able to cover all the costs through the entrance fees alone. But because he was operating aside, show setting rather than the maternity ward of a hospital. People viewed him with suspicion and some folks outright hated this guy folks like the New York Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to children they accused him multiple times of exploiting the baby's endangering their lives, putting them on display. But none of these complaints really hurt he endeavor and by the Nineteen Thirties people were coming around and they were saying, you know this guy is a medical pioneer. That's right. He's onto something. As I I don't have the direct quote in front of me but one of those prevention of cruelty to children organization said something like how dare you sir take a vulnerable small child and put them in the tawdry chaos of the mid way. You know like something along those lines like it was like he was he was being a bad influence. These babies were gonNA accidentally get drunk or or catch a whiff of cigarette smoke right exactly and so if you happen to see the world's fair in Chicago in nineteen, thirty, three and thirty four lasted more than years like eighteen months it'd be tough dimissed kunis display. You would see this huge sign that says like living babies incubators. Apparently. It was quite a massive sign. Yeah. That's the them categorizes being at the Smithsonian article that we looked at as the letters being so large, they could be read from across the entire. Fairground, which was massive. This was the Chicago world's fair. This is like the America's big like this is us we are at the pinnacle of technological discovery of pushing the narrative forward and this was no exception. So you'd think something like the incubator with all the amazing we said about it all the amazing research would be like in the main hall next to the automobile you know right or the. DIP DOTS or whatever. But that wasn't the case because it really continued the same tradition as his previous iteration of this as kind of like on the mid way right which they had definitely had at the world's fair. In fact, this booth was right next to one featuring the famous scandalous sally rand who is known was a burlesque dancer known for her ostrich feather fan dance and also balloon bubble Danson. Really got arrested. Multiple. Times charged with like oh kinds of low levels of indecency and they had her right next to the premature baby exhibit at the Chicago World's fair. Exactly. Yeah. And these incubators of course if talking Turkey here they were not inexpensive as you might imagine. The exhibit itself was. I think the entire cost of it was seventy five thousand dollars back then which is around one point four, million dollars today. And in the price went up to over time as as it became more respected in the public in the Zeitgeist. Believe by the time it was in Chicago, the audience members pay twenty five cents to see the exhibit and they flocked there by the hundreds of thousands of eventually this leads Kuni having a homecoming celebration on July, twenty, fifth nineteen, thirty, four and. I rarely say this word, but this is kind of cute. It was for the babies who had graduated from the incubators at the Chicago world's fair that past summer and this was broadcast live. On, local radio across the fairgrounds. So people were able to see the results of this incubation technology at work and you gotta think how amazing it is. It's got to be a warm fuzzy feeling. If you saw these exhibits earlier and then you hear this story and you think you know I in some way whether through a dime or quarter helped these kids lip it certainly the surprise twist payoff you know. Again it really seems that the. At the very least I mean what is it real live incubated babies? It's doesn't necessarily. Scream charity but he almost was like secretly getting these folks to contribute to the well-being of these children even if that wasn't front and center in the in the whole concept of the of the exhibit. He also had all Schmaltz Stop Red White and blue. You know he had nurses running around wearing like starched white kind of uniforms and the whole thing was very There was a lot of pageantry to it. It's very interesting but I think he knew exactly what he was doing. Hey. It's your homie. Sorry. It's your home i. know you don't like it when I call myself your homemade. So I have some favors to ask you could you get rid of a few chairs in the living room? My floorboards are tired another easy thing. Save money if you bundled your home and car insurance with Geico on more thing I know you love lavender scent candles but could try to he should vanilla I think it would fit my five better. For bundling easy go to GEICO. Dot Com today. 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Code ridiculous restrictions may apply see bollandbranch dot com for details. You might be asking yourself Casey no been. Why can't I go see a inventories today you know I. Don't want to see it in a hospital I the sideshow experience I wanNA eat some fun. Okay. I want a little razzle dazzle with my babies. Exactly. This was an era and it did come to an end. After decades of carrying for these children, Cooney was credited in the development of neo natal care and hospitals. But the public familiarized with it right and lost that razzle dazzle we described lost that sense of novelty and by the early nineteen forties, people just weren't as interested in the novelty of baby incubators and hospitals were also starting to open their own units dedicated to the care of premature children. And so in one, thousand, nine, hundred, forty, three, Kuni, closes the show in Coney Island. He lives seven more years he passes away at the age of eighty. The sad story is that he achieved fame maybe not financial success this how this? What makes me think you wasn't crooked embezzling the was apparently broke when he passed away did you see that now I didn't see that but it does make sense I mean you know we're talking a lot of money to buy all these machines and to have the upkeep and the higher the staff. And you know it really does feel like perhaps the price of admission was just going back into the maintenance of all the stuff you know he really did just figure out a clever kinda sneaky way of building like the world's first top of the Line Neo Natal Care Center because it wasn't until folks took notice of the of the good that he was doing that this technology did really catch on a much more meaningful way. I wanted to backtrack ever since latest to point out something interesting is something that was mentioned in. The PBS. which I'm to give you the name of because it's quite good and short and very interesting We talked about this in the past that the world's fair had kind of a history of doing odd human displays if you get my drift. Ben. You remember the indigenous people display vary messed up very messed up like this human zoo almost of folks from. African countries dressed in their you know indigenous garb and holding spears and one particular individual was. Eventually put in like a zoo and then he was forced to like wrestle with chimpanzee every day until a organization that work towards. A black rights shut down and then he ended up in a in a home kind of like a halfway house situation and took his own life not to say that this is anything like that. But if my brain move towards like the exploitation of this, that's something that definitely popped in especially since we had discussed that story before. Yeah. There's another twist here. Cooney had his heart in the right place, but we were very careful folks in the way we described him throughout this episode. Let's see. We called him a an entrepreneur maybe we implied that businessman we called them a medical pioneer, but there's one thing he wasn't. He was not a doctor most likely almost almost certainly. Yeah. I did feel like I almost like I missed that part like because he. He had said that he studied medicine in Berlin and Leipzig. But there was no evidence that he actually and he a couple of different names we know him as Kuni he went by Colin Kate h also Cohen Luanne. There's no evidence that he actually studied medicine at a university in either of those cities and you know in Germany to be a physician, you have write a thesis and you know the US National Library of medicine has copies of all of the German records and of US far beneath unable to locate a thesis written by Kuni Yeah. He was also super super sketchy about the specifics of his personal life. which you know I respect he was evasive about his date of birth and where he was born later research showed that he immigrated to the US in eighteen eighty eight at the age of nineteen. But the problem with that is someone of that age would not have been old enough to university in Berlin and leaps egg before going on to Grad work in Paris he claimed to be the inventor of an incubator, but there's no evidence that you registered a patent in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ten, he listed his career as get this surgical instruments and then by. My nineteen thirty, he described himself in the census as a physician. So. If he had been caught doing any of that falsely. Pretending to be a doctor. That's the that's breaking the law. He could've gone to prison in the weird complex. Is. This means almost certainly many of those children would've died. Yeah. That's right. We kinda saying that all along and not to Belabor the point. But because the whole thing just kind of a head Scratcher, right? Like on the one hand, he did something that was real real. Cool. At a real positive impact by the way off Mike. Well, well, Ben was making an amazing point. I looked up at this PBS clip was and it's from a show or a series called history detectives from season seven episode for. Sixteen minute fifty second clip about sideshow babies, and basically this all starts with a woman who wants to know if the Silver Baby Cup, she got from the nineteen thirty-three Chicago's world's fair with her name engraved on it. Patricia If there was her mother claimed that she was whisked away from her home as a premature baby who is literally being kept in a shoebox by the radiator like we talked about and taken to an incubator at the nineteen, thirty three Chicago. World's fair and this episode starts off with is this even true? She has no evidence of this being true. The woman does recognize the Silver Cup is, in fact, a genuine artifact from the ninety three Chicago world's fair had the right logo and everything it turns out that these cups were given to those quote unquote graduates that we talked about and she was in fact, one of the babies that were you know and again there's a lot of it's GONNA be a lot of babies. You say it lasted a year the Chicago world's fair yet eighteen months, eighteen months. So I don't want to spoil the whole thing for even though I kinda just a part of it, but there's a lot more information as a highly recommend you check it out just like a lot of good imagery from the time archival stuff and you get to see you get to go a little deeper into it visually then obviously, you can do on a podcast, but she ends up very pleased that she was that this happened it starts off a little questionable and then she ends up being very thankful that that she didn't think she would've survived if not. For this gentleman and it's been a journey like that for I think both of us too bad is from ups and downs in terms of world wd after. It's heartwarming. Fact. Somewhere in the middle when we find out that he wasn't really a doctor but at some point he retired and just said my work here is done I have saved enough babies. Yeah. He claimed an eighty five percent success rate there's no way to verify that but it's still far far better than zero percents right or then these poor children having to be left to the whims of fate. And with that in mind we say hats off to you Kuni Yura Eurobit sketchy that's true. It is a bit of a rollercoaster worthy of cody island, but you made the world a better place. So I we I would say Thanks to him. Thanks for making sideshows a little more wholesome. and. I would also argue that in those days sometimes a little healthy sketch goes a long way. That's right. Yes. Sometimes you had to get it in where you could, and he definitely had a plan and you know as evidenced by the fact that he did retired with very little money certainly wasn't a moneymaking scheme. It was much more of like a his life's work and I don't know if there's quite enough for like a big full bio-pic but I definitely think he deserves a place in the history of of medicine even if he wasn't an actual doctor and so that's our show today. Thank you as always for tuning in big big. Thanks to super-producer Casey, peg romanet forgot to ask you guys. Did either you happen to be born prematurely not I. Though, my daughter's sister was, but only just a little bit but she did have a little bit of she had to be put in an incubator for a bit and then she was fine but she had a she had a little bit problems breathing. That's the thing that happens to if they're underdeveloped they have to. Get a little extra help So yeah, it was definitely scary but less. So knowing this tech was out there. Yeah. What about you Casey? I had a friend growing up I was born on his date and he was born on mine but it was only a difference four days. So that's not really premature. So I can't I can't really lay claim to that. Now that's pretty cool. I was the opposite I was born two weeks late and I'm still catching up. Normal But we want to hear from. You can find us all over the Internet. The instagram's the twitter bols the. FACEBOOK cary's just go check out ridiculous historians on. facebook. Love to recommend that one. You can see some sick memes you can see. Fellow listeners booth mocking both my crippling phobia of metal and my towel knowles fear of birds. In in a very good hardy, also usually. Usually you? Know. We love every single one of the folks over there because historians and you can be one of them to and be the recipient of our love. All you gotTa do is go to Facebook hurting the stories and enter one of our names, all three and a joke. 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When Dentist Sold Dentures Made with Corpse Teeth

Ridiculous History

36:16 min | 2 years ago

When Dentist Sold Dentures Made with Corpse Teeth

"Hello. I'm Kevin Pollak. Yes that Kevin Pollock. What's that? I did save room for pie. Thank you. And may I offer you a slice of my new comedy podcast. It's called alchemy. This. I've gathered five hilarious improvisers. And each episode. I set the scene and the comedy gold fills your life with undeniable joy, be the first a yellow your friends about Kevin politics. New comedy podcasts. Alchemy this listen and subscribe at apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. It's no secret that one of the average Americans least favorite things to do is to go to the dentist. Not not super popular. With a lot of people Ben I'm fond of going to the dentist that make me weird. No, no. It's just another reason that I find you extrordinary. No, so ordinary just another word for weird though. Isn't it Ben? Yeah. I feel like it has a better connotation nowadays. Although extrordinary could be anything unusual or anomalous nowadays. We usually say extrordinary when we mean something as good, you know, what Ben I'll take it as a compliment husband. Speaking of extraordinary. Let's introduce everyone to our super producer Casey peg Peckham. But I don't want to get lost on this conversation. You genuinely do like going to the dentist. No. I was just going to go with you on. I couldn't I couldn't lie to the people, man. No. I was just trying to be extrordinary. It's you know, it's it's weird because dentistry is it's a necessary thing, right. It's come a long way. And it is come such a long way, you'll hear some critics of modern dentistry say that they're purposely, not pursuing the newest technological breakthroughs or techniques. But you, and I grew up in the days in case you as well grew up in the days where those mercury fillings were quite common. Remember those? I don't you know. What's funny? I never had a cavity until like last year because I benefited from a development in modern dentistry called sealant, which is thing. They did to like every kid in my town. I guess because I know lots of other kids that got it. But I've also talked people that I have no idea what I'm talking about. And it's some kind of extra coding, they put on your teeth than kind of cases them in and keeps them safe from all the horrible stuff that you shove into your mouth. So I had this like false sense of security, and this false sense of superiority that I'd never had. A cavity. And then all of a sudden at thirty four years old can cavities. So, you know, well, can't you get them resealed or something? Yes. Good question. Ben which had no answer. I think it's something only children are permitted to do. Oh, wow. I don't know that like the shining and Stephen king's unanimous. Well, that's not quite that's not quite true. Because Hollarin' also the shining did have the shinning. Yeah. But he oh, yeah. I don't wanna get a seed, but we're talking about dentistry, and how far it's come. We're very very lucky today in comparison to dental patients of the past you, and I quite recently learned that a little bit about the history of dentistry and just how gruesome it was in way back in eighteen fifteen I guess the foundations what would become modern dentistry existed, but it was still in its infancy and people had terrible terrible teeth. You know, you would just your teeth. We get ground down over time, depending on your diet. You would lose teeth to infection or lack of hygiene maintenance. And it didn't matter whether you were. Popper or prince your teeth would probably at some point your life, become problematic. Yes, specially in the upper class in like the mid to late seventeen hundreds when you know ingestion of sugar by the upper class was on the rise that really precipitated that rot, and that irreversible decay that would happen in the mouths of these aristocrats, which led to things like horrible horrible, stinking breath, and like a funky kind of rotting taste in your mouth, and nobody wants that. So what would they do? They would just like get rid of all their their real teeth and get them replaced with some handy dandy dentures. And we should also point out these problems. I think that was the primary problem. But there was also a compounding factor, which was people would try to whiten their teeth as well by using acidic solutions gross. So if the sugar didn't get you the acid, would that's the thing you always think about when you're you're talking about, you know, past. Forms of technology that we now know in love and benefit from. There's a lot of just kind of trial and error and say, oh, this does sort of like mercury as laxatives. This definitely does one thing. But it also does other thing that I'm not fully aware of. And that is is ultimately worse than the thing that it's fixing right, right? But let's make sure my bil- is correct. So they're they're on a search for dentures, they know enough about human anatomy to know that it is virtually impossible. Well, let's extrordinary for people to grow multiple sets of teeth. It does happen but not often. And that's when you start to find advertisements. You said this was late eighteenth century, right? We found an advertisement reprinted in excellent BBC article that we won't won't give you the headline of yet. But we can just go ahead and read it for you. It says wonted several human front teeth to prevent unnecessary. Area. Placations those own the all wanted that's all sent from the continent. Apply to Dr Wolfendale dentist number twenty one Duva St. Picadilly that guy's a dentist, but he's not saying that he'll fix teeth. He wants to buy teeth that seems a little weird doesn't it? Yeah. But not really because here's the thing that I was intrigued by the most popular way of making or the most popular and cost effective way. Let's say of making dentures was out of like elephant ivory or any other type of bone material. Yeah. But I didn't think about this at all that stuff does not have enamel. Which is nature's sealant Ryan that is what keeps your teeth from or at least, you know, slows down the inevitable process of your teeth rotting out of your head. So if you have these these these bone dentures in your mouth, they will eventually also begin to rot yet doesn't matter if they're walrus tusk elephant tusks hippopotamus teeth. They will eventually fall the same way. Especially if you don't change your diet. And I believe was. It was George Washington. Right. Who had dentures made of carved hippopotamus ivory? That's right. And now as wasn't that like one of those kind of misnomer stories where everyone's like he had wooden teeth. Yeah. Truth was a little bit more still weird. But but not wouldn't as gross wouldn't get disgusting. Very quick, wouldn't it? Because how often wouldn't how often would you have to replace those wooden dentures? Think about this think about a wooden spoon, and how it holds up in the dishwasher, for example, or, you know, a upon repeated use it starts to get kind of soft and weird and squishy and rough around the edges anyway point being the solution the more expensive solution because a pair of I've ary dentures. So when the mood back a little bit. Yeah, they would be full ivory dentures. Whether it'd be carved out of a single piece of ivory, then the higher quality ones would have a base of ivory, and they would have human teeth to your point been human teeth. For sale or seeking him and teeth right in the one ads stitched in or actually kind of like wired in there. Like pins were different ways of doing it ends of wires were the two primary Mun. That's right. So this those cost a hundred pounds rights with the human teeth, and that meant that they were relegated to the upper crust of the aristocracy. The I don't know I'm not even gonna basket inflation calculator that, but that would have been a dear dear price writes, actually, my friend. I have some some good news here because the United Kingdom has been around so long we can take a stab at some inflation calculations. And I'm so excited about that. I'm going to give you a pass for actual ING me feel like actually both of us didn't so one hundred pounds in seventeen ninety two is approximately equivalent to fourteen thousand three hundred pounds in twenty eighteen and let's take it a little bit further. Let's convert pounds two dollars. Because if we're being honest, I'm not sure about that conversion rate, I don't know off hand how much that is. I'm gonna guess thirty K Casey on the case. Was he right? Let's see let me isn't a pound roughly two dollars. I know it changes fluctuates. So what I said roughly guys roughly was accounting for fluctuation. So would that be okay? So it's fourteen thousand three hundred pounds that acquaints to drum roll, please. Eighteen thousand three hundred forty one dollars forty seven lease the pound is cratered. Well, you know that that is in the news right now. Is that right? Yeah. Brexit is doing all sorts of shenanigans. Man. I gotta buy stuff from the UK. That's a good idea. You know, not to derail. But I still can't hear Brexit and not think of breakfast, really, not as tasty. No drugs is going to be a future episode of ridiculous history for still doing this show twenty years later. I hope we are we are too. I hope he's on the energy for. Hey, everyone, we're ridiculous history. And we want to tell you about a brand new app we discovered an app just for investing. It's cold. Robinhood answer, I Robin Hood investing at that lets you buy and sell stocks E T F S's options and crypto currencies all commission free. They tried to make financial services work for everyone, including investment neophytes like me and Ben not just the wealthy yet. It's none intimidating wave for stock market newcomers to invest for the first time with true confidence. You know, let's go back to the some of the high points of this. I love that there. No commission fees. Other brokerages may charge up to ten dollars for every trade. But Robin Hood does not full stop yet. Who was actually kind enough to give us a little bit of scratch to invest and we've been having a really good time doing it. It's very intuitive very clean other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every robinhood does not charge us or you a dime. So you can trade stocks and keep all of your. 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People would pay enormous amounts of money for these dentures that were as you said, no, the Primo ones have an ivory base individually sewn in or pinned in or wired in human teeth, and the reason that people would pay more for this is because the slightly lower tier ivory dentures were as you said a block of ivory where someone would just carve teeth looking notches into these things, and they looked terrible because they were way too white. Yeah. And they also were clearly one chomper. Yeah. Exactly. But back to human teeth, actually human, obviously, like you said, Ben because of the, you know, the finite nature of our ability to grow teeth and got the baby ones. And then we got the the big boy and girl ones, then we're done. I'd said they are in short supply because nobody wants to part with them if they can help it because what happens. You lose your teeth. Ben, you can't talk you sound like all mumble mouth. You get these sunken cheeks, look and things you know, you ever seen somebody with dentures take them out. It's a thing. Yeah. It's it's a definite weird moment. No shade on anyone. That is missing there any elderly folks audience. It's a natural part of life. But these were like, you know, twenty somethings thirty somethings. And a lot of them were like in high positions in government. They did not want to take their turn at the podium and have to you know, mumble their way through a speech that was not gonna fly and one of the big questions here, then becomes what is the providence of these teeth because we as we said tooth decay was rampant. So you you have to find the right donor in order to provide the teeth. Otherwise, you have to find someone who is either. Impoverished and wants to make some money to sell their teeth to sell their own teeth that expression, I'd sell my eyeteeth there. I'd give my eyeteeth for a bite of that candy. What's an eye to the I don't know. Ben, casey. Is it a canine? I do not not is it like a wisdom tooth. I feel like it's sort of like an imaginary to is just one of your front teeth. Let's just go with that. Okay. Hey, nine perhaps. Yeah. I was guessing Kim, but right in and let us know, although we could just search the internet will we like to hear your take. So I guess we're getting at is you have to pretty sticky situation to want to sell your teeth. So while that may have happened here. And there that certainly was not a sustainable source of teeth. Ben, this is where your favorite types from this period, come into play the resurrection men. Oh, yes. It is true. It is true. Because there was you see one very particular demographic that didn't willingly donate their teeth of. But we're left in a position where they could not object to their teeth being taken and those were soldiers and criminals because after their spirit had departed the mortal plane, especially in the case of criminals their bodies would be used by grave robbers by resurrection men supplied on the medical black market for people studying anatomy, but they found this other secondary market which was to take their teeth and sell them to high flute and dentists, and what are you looking for Ben if you're one of these resurrection men, you want the freshest of the fresh you don't wanna go actually digging in graves if you can help it. I mean, sure you will if you need to. But what would be a pretty amazing source for these teeth precious little bone nuggets would be a recent bloodbath of a battle right such as the battle of Waterloo. That's where we go only were there. Yeah. We're there at the battle of Waterloo. It's gross here. There's bodies everywhere. What was it like fifty thousand dead? Yes. After Napoleon's forces were defeated by the the English. Yep. This human tragedy. This scene is if you imagine hazy the smell of Carey is in the air here. Ben where we traveled here. Yeah. We're here we are. And if you look in the distance there as if you're here with us, you can see some groups of people walking from corpse, the corpse squatting down with early version of pliers and wrestling Wrigley. Wrenching teeth out of the mouths of these corpses. You see this is a brand new business, and we say they're taking teeth. They're taking a lot of teeth. Well, here's my question. Do you think this was like parallel thinking was this whole? Cowed. This is a a gold mine of teeth because this new profession or this. You know, new trade had wasn't that new? It'd been around for a while the use of human teeth. I think dates as far back as the the BCS's, right? Seven hundred BC trust gins in northern Italy may dentures out of human teeth. So, you know, while this wasn't like exactly new idea. It seems like it was hot. It was a hot commodity and that was a relatively new ish development like from the mid seventeen hundreds. I guess. Yeah. And people here's one of the big controversies that we're still trying to suss out today. Nowadays, we refer to this particular genre of denture as Waterloo teeth based again on that tremendous battle, right? But according to some researchers like Rachel bare stone, nobody really called them that at the time. And this leads her to speculate the. People may not have had any idea where these teeth were coming from do you think this would have affected the market since all of a sudden, I wouldn't call it a glut. I guess demand was so high, but this certainly fifty thousand human specimens, you know, that would probably have maybe caused a fluctuation in the price. Maybe I could see definitely causing a fluctuation in the price maybe would have gone down. We don't know how much, you know, make this level of dental work available to say someone who was just in the landowning class, but not wealthy that answer. We don't know. However, we do have a list from the British dental association's museum in London almost a menu. It's a tooth menu. It's it's a mouth menu. It's listing American pivot teeth and natural teeth, and you can order them in an upper set of six lower set. Of six can order odd central's laterals and canine what are American pivot teeth? What is that referring to? We know that the definition of a pivot tooth is an artificial crown attached to the root of a tooth. Okay. So we're talking about would be more than natural teeth. Right, right. We're talking about the natural teeth, and we have a chart for that too. From a William Hornets dental depot a lot of coming from a fantastic article with amazing visuals on the BBC, call the dentures made from the teeth of dead soldiers at Waterloo by Paul curly. And this dental depot has a priceless from eighteen fifty one that shows the breakdown of how much does pay wholesale for these different amounts of teeth. I wanna be transparent here. I have not become an expert in British currency from the nineteenth century. No there that I don't understand. Yeah. Like, for example, it says you can get them in natural teeth, by the way, you can get them in sets of six. Uppers and it says from and then it says to slash six to twenty five slash and nothing. So hey, right in any Stoorikhel dental. The story is out there redundant. But you know, what I'm saying let us know my favorite thing, though, it has has a whole list sets of six uppers from. And then that and then it says Ditto six lowers. And then we've got by cuss words, upper and says nine d each I'm not sure what the D stands for Ditto, lower sixty. Then you got the the animal which I love because it offers seahorse teeth. Yeah. Wouldn't those be tiny than it all offers straight seahorse teeth, which for some reason reminds me of mix tapes where something straight fire? Well, if it's the straight seahorse teeth uncut. Direct the deranged mouth with seahorse teeth get seek how tusk I presume that means that the dentist would be doing the carving of the tusk themselves imagine so in less than people just really wanted gnarly tusk, which you know, is out of the realm of possibility especially nowadays with all these grill pieces and stuff you ever seen any of those. Oh, yeah. The vampire teeth things wild. I haven't version to touchy metal as you know. So I the thought of having that in my mouth fills me with dread. Well, here's the thing for me. It's like you pay fifty thousand dollars to look like a meth head like, I don't understand that logic. You know, it's. Looks like your teeth or jacked up. That's true. But you know, if it makes people happy, and they're not hurting anyone. I'm sure that their dentists are jewelry isn't complaining who do you think puts those do you think it's jewelry? Do you think it's a dentist jeweler the reason? I bring it up is because I I discovered this. There's a famous jeweler to in Dallas who does chains and stuff like he does it for little Yati. And like all the Lille's, you know, and also does grill pieces, and he I think they're false like they fit on top of your regular teeth. So it's not like, they're actually ripping your teeth out and replacing them with diamond chunks. But it still gives me the creeps. Do ben. I'm with you on them. Folks, we have a favor to ask. And we think you're going to like it enough about us. We want to find out more about you. Yeah. Why? Because we like you we want to know more about you. We went to make sure that we're matching the right kinds of advertisers to you are amazing listeners. You can find the link to our listener survey on ridiculous history, show dot com. Go to the show page. Just click on the listener survey tab, help us out and help out your fellow listeners. And don't worry. We will not share your information with anybody exclusively for internal use that we can figure out how to give you the best listener experience possible, and it won't take more than five minutes. So thanks in advance for your time. So I wanna go back to your earlier question about whether the market became glutted. It's strange because two things occur in the mid eighteen hundreds. There's the eighteen thirty two anatomy act which clamps down on the trade and dead human beings dead human being because it was a wild west up to this point. It was pretty weird. They would just go on the battlefield and rip out the teeth of the new the dearly departed the recently dearly. And at the same time. There were some new things emerging that could take the place of real teeth. And that's where we start to see all these straight seahorse teeth. I can't not say it that way. That sounds like a really great complimented talk about someone's mixed say man that was Tracy teeth. That's agreed. You we should make it a catchphrase. I think we should. We just didn't think we did. Let's who. Power mad. But you know, let's be street seahorse teeth about it. Yeah. I like it. It feels good. Some other things happen to like what there were some developments in dental technology and required licensing of dentists. Remember, we're talking about like, I think that research that you mentioned earlier Ben was her name, Rachel bear sto. She is quoted in saying that during this time everyone dabbled in dentistry, meaning that it was not necessarily a codified profession yet at that point. Right. So that's something that happened right around the time of that anatomy act. There were also some other developments technologically speaking that may have rendered this question of, you know, human teeth for the middle class a little bit moot. Although we probably had a good fifteen years when the products of those fifty thousand dead souls who probably made the rounds allow long enough time for those to get some use wouldn't you say, yeah would say because at the look someone invented the first porcelain dentures in way, back and seven. Eighteen seventy four, but they were terrible. They would ship just like ivory they sometimes to white to be convincing. So these Waterloo teeth or human teeth in general were just considered easier to eat with way, more comfortable, and that continued after eighteen fifteen until as we're about to explore now, these new technological inventions hit the market that's right by the eighteen thirties. There were some significant improvements made to those crappier porcelain teeth, and there was something called tube teeth that was developed by a jeweler named Claudius ash on. And then again from this BBC article that I recommend highly. Checking eggs are some amazing pictures of all the stuff that we're talking about the American innovators of industry Charles Nelson Goodyear of the Goodyear blimp fame developed something called compound using something called India rubber that is. Very much in line. I think with what is used today that your grandpa might have the pink kind of soft rubbery bass that looks very much like gums that make up the part of the denture that the teeth are actually embedded in and it was easy to mass produce and it fit the Bill in terms of the color called vulcanized. Sometimes it was the discovery of the Vulcan is Asian of rubber. That's the process that allows rubber to withstand heat and cold and this stuff eventually went on to be used in so many other things tires, obviously, good your pencil racers, life, jackets, balls, gloves and more and more stuff. But yeah, it played a huge role in the dentist's industry mentioned two teeth with Claudius ash, he mounted his on something similar to grill. It was eighteen carat gold plate and gold springs and swivels in this is where we get to a part that really bothers me man because as even though they're making these amazing breakthroughs in the appearance of. The teeth the appearance of the gums, the placing of it. And so on the still have the steam punk esque metal springs that Bragg connect the top. Yeah. Gusting it looks like something off of hell raiser wouldn't like rub. You raw on the inside of your mouth. I was thinking about that too cutting the inside of your cheeks, but the thing is these would get fitted for people and then refitted after they had spent some time with them. You would go to jeweler jeweler, and they would fix up your it would fix your springs because that's the thing been that researcher, you mentioned earlier, Rachel barest barrier. Still they're still. Yeah. She had a great quote saying that in around this time everyone dabbled in dentistry because there were no laws on the books or regulations governing the profession or any kind of certification. That would not come for many many more years, which is crazy to me until like almost nineteen hundred. I think around eighteen seventy nine that was when I register was Chris, right, right? But they they didn't even have a dental legislation passed until eighteen seventy eight. So that's why you would go to a jeweller rather than spell. Dentist's unless we had a dentist who happen to just be somehow. Good and not just some Johnny toothpick of the street who wants to mess with strangers teeth for money. I has JT. Yeah. Johnny toothpick. And as we know this field continues to evolve in the twentieth. Century acrylic starts placing Volk night Floride makes its way into toothpaste. But the big question, which we still still do not know the answer to is how many of these people knew where they were getting these teeth. I mean, what would you have done weight? Like, if you if you had some really you've been eating you've been living sugary sweet life, you acid sticks and and skittles and marzipan or something of marzipan great love to that's the stuff of the almond paste. It's amazing so good it. Make little trinkets. Gets out of it to you can mold it into little director roots in little Lakers, mushrooms. We get some more zip pan after this. We should should be like, you know, what the there's like a a French bakery downstairs. It has marzipan Gracie loves that. It's a good place. What would I do if you if you were on if you were on the dental fence, and you had lost several teeth this time, would you be comfortable putting the teeth of another person in your mouth taking to donor? I would much prefer the teeth of freshly deceased, you know, strapping young lad than that of some sort of hardened criminal hanging from the news rotting in the sun. Yeah. Yeah. I see what you said. So I feel about that. Yeah. I'm on the same page as the resurrection. Men. I want mine to be fresh. There's another thing that happens in. Let's see before the legislation stuff passes in the UK supplies of these human teeth are not just limited to Waterloo incr-. Criminals, the increased during the Korean war of the eighteen fifties. And in eighteen sixty five outfit named the Pall Mall gazette reported that some London dentists still refused to switch the porcelain. They said no natural teeth. That's my business human teeth. Get me more teeth, and I know Waterloo is over, but we have a whole new source on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean. You see the civil war occurred heard of that. Yeah. And now there's an entirely new source of teeth for what we're called the tooth robbers. So like evil to fairies mercenary to fairy love that image. Ben love that image. Now. Here's a question for you. Sure. Can you imagine if like organ transplants were possible in those days, what absolute ship show, those battlefield would have been with people just pulling out guts left? And right thrown them into coolers. You know, I shudder to think a lot of people would have died simply because the hygiene wasn't. There. Oh, yeah. I know. Right. And we didn't really understand what makes because this stuff in this alternate reality of mine. Organ transplants are possible. But people are still quite disgusting. Ray? Well, they would also I the if we've learned anything the first thing they would try to do is transplant organs from animals, which. Oh, that's my. That's my reaction to that. We're we're verging onto a different show that we do but checkout our episode and stuff they don't want you to know about the red market read market. It's a real thing in. In the meantime, though, I've got to say all that we give dentist a tough time. I if you're listening, and you're in the dental industry, you're a hygienist or you're someone who just carbs teeth from a animal which job or your DDS yourself. Thank you, so much hugged dentists hug, you dentists thank them for not putting the teeth of a corpse in your mouth that sounds like an ancient curse or something. Bad may the teeth cops ever being young enough? Right. That's that's some pox on your house kind of stuff really is. And on that note that note I like Indian hug hug identified and then and then a curse a pox on your mouth. Yes. So let us know. What your experiences have been with dentist? You think? Dentistry gets a hard rap. Do you think people should be more appreciative dentist, would you sport the teeth of a corpse in your mouth on a day-to-day basis while you eat your hot pockets? Let us know you can write to us ridiculous. It has for dot com. You can hit us up on our Facebook group, which is ridiculous stories on Facebook, courtesy of our pal. Mark zuckerberg. We got some thanks to throw out there. We do have some things to through out there, of course, Casey super producer, Casey pay as always thank you Noel, I want to thank you. This has been a prequel conversation. We found some knee catchphrases, that's straight seahorse teeth. Doug, right, right. And we also want to think Alex Williams who composed our track, which is straight CRC, which is straight seahorse teeth, folks. I hope you enjoy this catchphrase because I think we're gonna we're gonna ride this one out. Not the last you heard of St. seahorse. Definitely we wanna think our research associates gave Chris Rossouw visit us Jeff go. And most importantly, we wanna thank you folks out there podcast land listening and be should attend in next time. When we talk about feral children and imperialism it's going to be a good old time, Richard. Real pill. Hey, everyone, we're ridiculous history. And we want to tell you about a brand new app. We discover an app just for investing. It's cold. Robinhood answer, I Robin Hood and investing at that lets you buy and sell stocks E T F S's options and cryptocurrencies all commission free. They tried to make financial services work for everyone, including investment neophytes like me and Ben not just the wealthy yet. It's none intimidating wave for stock market newcomers to invest for the first time with true confidence know, let's go back to the some of the high points of this. I love that. They're no commission fees. Other brokerages may charge up to ten dollars for every trade. But Robin Hood does not full stop. Yeah. Round. Who was actually kind enough to give us a little bit of scratch to invest and we've been having a really good time doing it. It's very intuitive very clean other brokerages charge up to ten dollars for every robinhood does not charge us or you a dime. 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Ben Waterloo Casey peg Peckham Tracy teeth Robin Hood apple BBC United Kingdom Robinhood Kevin Pollak Kevin Pollock Brexit producer Chris Rossouw iheartradio extrordinary Rachel bear researcher
How a  Broken Toilet Foiled a German Sub

Ridiculous History

26:35 min | 1 year ago

How a Broken Toilet Foiled a German Sub

"Hey, guys, get another cool podcast wreck for it's called creature feature. And it's a new comedy educational podcast from how stuff works hosted by Katie golden, former writer at crack dot com, evolutionary biology at Harvard, and apparently writes from the perspective of a bird on Twitter. That's right folks in each episode of creature feature Katie takes a different guests comedian through some downright freaky. Evolutionary oddities that will make you wonder what mother nature has been smoking this whole time when you listen to this you're taking on an expedition through the bizarre world of human and animal behaviors in though, it may be hard to admit. We will discover how eerily similar we are to our untamed animal cousins. Here's the pitch comedians are asked to shrink down, you know, imaginary and get inside the minds of animals. What would it be like to be the brainwashed victim of a parasitic wasp or a penguin who turns to a life of crime? Yeah. What will be the fate of a mouse who fell in love with the cat and the human fell in love with his car. Both true stories as they answer these scandals queries a larger question looms. Are humans truly as unique as we thought so tune in every Wednesdays, Katie introduces you to a cast of freaky creatures telling tales of terror love, trickery, predation and death defying stunts get in touch with your wild side. Listen and subscribe to creature feature on apple podcast the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts. Welcome to the show ridiculous historians as well. As fans of the hunt for Red October, the the thriller starring Sean Connery. What about despot dos? Boot is more of a classic. I would say and and set a precedent for sure. Yeah. You don't directed us. Boot Wolfgang Peterson Pearson. That's the case that's super producer, Casey peg room. He's already on the case, we have how do we do that? Can we combine the Casey fairy sound effect with the Dunton? I like the way that it just rolled in with the with the sound effect after you know, what? Yeah. Who cares? We double it up. Sure. I don't know. It's happened. I'm Ben I'm knoll, and yeah, Wolfgang Petersen. Also, directed a nightmare fuel movie from Mayan probably many other people's childhoods the never ending story. Nightmare fuel really amazing is. But as a kid is a very dark depressing film, like when the horse get sucked into the swamp, and like those creepy Spinks that shoot lasers and have breasts. Those were cool though. I still think of what I'm trying to describe a various rites of passage the people use the metaphor of those three gates that trae who has to go through. No, it's true. I think it just it traumatized me a little bit as a child, and that sort of a bit of internet trope where it's a screen shot of that scene where the horses like sinking into the swamps of sadness, and sort of like, this is where it all started going south for me, mental, health wise. Speaking of fantastic segues. Today's episode is not about the never ending story. But it is related to maritime adventures boot dust boot the hunt for Red October, which to me from restall GIC reasons is probably closer to my heart in a previous episode. We split life on submarines because of that potato war. Yes. Yes. Very short lived potato war, very a potato skirmish ago. Yeah. And today's episode brings us to a nother tale of maritime mishaps. There we go. That's the way to say it we are traveling back to April fourteenth nineteen forty five. And we are aboard one of the most advanced submarines at the time. A little thing called a u twelve o six now is not that not to harp on dust boot. Because I like to say, but isn't that what that movie was about wasn't it about the crew of of of of you boat? Yes. Yeah. Cool. That's right. Ben. He's is in fact about a sort of two point over Sion of one of these boats because this was kind of the scourge of the Nazi party. Well, they're scourge on the allies that was one of their most covert and successful ways of wreaking havoc. Isn't that? Right. That is correct. You boats were quite dangerous. And what are the reasons they were dangerous is because they were very difficult to detect right? And they were very nimble asked yet fast agile creatures. I believe the submarine in dos boot is based on a United six all the U-boats submarines were called boots at the time to all the u boats had that designation of you dash something three. And in the case of today's story. We're looking that you twelve six you twelve o six was premier vessel. I mean, this thing was. A big deal. It went into service and March of nineteen forty four its emblem was a white stork on a black shield with a green beak and legs. So let's get an idea of the size of this thing. It was a two hundred and twenty feet seven inches long or for the rest of the world outside of the US that sixty seven point two three meters. It was about thirty one feet or nine point six years high, and it was able to despite it size disappear under the water pretty quickly. It could operate at depths of up to seven hundred and fifty feet or two hundred thirty meters. It also in addition to its heightened functional capacities. Right. It's a superior armament. And so on it had a couple of amenities which were pretty rare for submarines at the time in particular it had. A very high tech toilet a complicated toilet, very complicated. Let's backtrack just slightly in previous models. They they did have toilets, but they hadn't quite cracked the code yet on how to get these toilets to flush and expel the waste while the boat was submerged while this was emerged, right? There was problem operating the previous models of the toilet at depth this one. However, they figured it out those crafty, German engineers figured it out. But as you said, Ben it wasn't easy. In fact, it was so complicated. They had to designate a toilet specialist to be on board who could assist with the flushing of this. The can you imagine that Ben having to call in the toilet specialist to flush down your your business had multiple specialists right yet there multiple specialists because someone who was trained in the operation of this contraption had to be present to flush it. Had a complicated system of valves in sensually would've boils down to you. Couldn't just hit a handle. And then call it a day. This thing was complicated. But it was also poorly placed in terms of the interior of the submarine. Yeah. It was directly over the batteries that powered the sub the power of the sub when it was submerged because the engines had to be shut off at the right, right? And I actually wasn't aware that battery technology was quite as advanced as it clearly was in this time, they were banks of batteries that would supply an ordinance amount of electronic because can you imagine like how much you would need to keep a about like that moving. That's right. These batteries provided five hundred sixty kilowatts of power for propulsion. When there was when the sub was submerged and you're right about killing the engines as well because diesel electric submarines had a had a larger. Signature when they were running under water. It was allowed. It was easier to detect so ideally, you want a quieter source of power, and Ben I just want to point out. We're getting a little bit of this information from a website with a delightful URL. It is toilet dash guru dot com. I'm also a fan of war is boring dot com. Mary very good. And I've got a little spoiler alert a surprise the saving for the end. I think you will appreciate. But for now onward onward to this. The the very Pitta me of sub technology at the time on April six nineteen forty five this fantastic submarine with it's very complicated toilet the U twelve o. Six leaves the port city of Chris Johnson in Nazi occupied Norway, and it goes on its first combat patrol its mission. Like that of many U boats is to seek out and destroy. British and u s ships seeking destroy like the like the stooges for search and destroy same f you know, you're looking for something and then destroy. Yeah. I'm Erin minke by now, you've probably heard about my newest podcast on obscured. It's a seasonal show that dives deep into a single major historical event. And this season has been all about the Salem witch trials with the release of episode twelve on December nineteenth the entire season is out. It's the perfect opportunity to get caught up and finished the journey. You started or dive in and binge the entire show, but we're not done. Just yet starting on January second we'll be releasing all six of our incredible historian interviews for you to hear in full these great conversations with the leading scholars in the world of the Salem witch trials, and you won't want to miss them. Learn more about the show over at history on obscured dot com and listen along on apple podcasts, I heart radio or wherever you listen to podcasts and stay subscribed. We'll have news about season to to share a few weeks, and you won't want to miss out. So it's on patrol for about eight days. And I mentioned this to underline the fact that the U twelve o six was in the service of the Nazi war effort that only had three more weeks to go at best before it was the end of the game for them. I think of as point Hitler was already holed up in what I had not heard the term for until just a little while ago is fewer bunker. That's true yet. And I think on April thirtieth. He commits suicide in that same feeler bunker seventies after that Germany completely surrenders and the war is over. But no one knew that on the you twelve o six at the time. They knew they were just out to find and obliterate any allied ship. They could they could get in their sights or within range of their torpedoes. And so they're out. On the open sea. And it's fairly uneventful help big was there crew again it was around forty. So these thirty to forty crew members trapped in this ten Ken beneath the waves while they have their eyes peeled. They're not running into. They're not running into any action any war, but they are doing the normal things that you do they're eating. They're sleeping in shifts. They're using that very very fancy toilet. Again. This is this is like the version of this is to sub toilets as the Japanese TOTO days are to normal Camotes. I think we've talked about this re our our sponsorship by tissue. But man, those things are high tech and incredible life changing. I know listen to us America. You've gotta stop pooping barbarian seriously. So so, but that's that's actually a fairly accurate. Comparison because a lot of people were confused by this. And this is when we introduced captain Carl Adolph Schlitt to the story was twenty seven years old young charge of the sub at the time. Yeah, it's true. And it was it was it wasn't fact his first rodeo when it comes to going out on a sub he was very new to the game a little bit green. And if I'm not mistaken, Ben where story really starts to get interesting is about eight miles off of the coast of Scotland at about two hundred feet below the surface of the ocean. That's win. Our man Schlitt had to take Schlitt captain Schlitt. He take the chain of command there. Yes. So he decided that he wasn't going to request the assistance of the toilet technician. Right. Surely, I'm a captain of a submarine. The chief Camotes I can operate a toilet. I can do this the toilet tinker was I? They're not desired or not around and so- Schlitt said, you know, what I'm in charge of this. This tire sub. I'm captain. I know how everything works and the instruction manual is right here by the toilet. Did we mention that? It had a comprehensive instruction manual, m picturing a massive Thome spiral bound hanging from a chain on the wall. That's I don't know. That's just how I'm looking at it, which is helpful from a design perspective when you think about it because a lot of people like to read when they're using the restroom. That's right. So this is this is actually could engineer, but whatever maybe he was in a hurry because being capped in the at other things to do. Maybe just miss read it maybe was smart on the quick on the uptake as he thought he was because something went wrong. And then he goes, you know, owes lit and so he says, okay. I know when I need to delegate, where's the toilet specialist? Right. Where's the the commodes Mun? Yeah. So. Schlitt ask that crew member to come help them out. And then that crew member takes a stab. And maybe because something was already messed up with the valves. They make the problem worse. We we're not trying to throw this specialist under the bus here. You know, I'm sure he knew his craft. But I have a feeling that are boy slit kind of pre botched the whole works. Right. Right. And there's the toilet. There's the commode probably still full of Schlitt. And now the specialist has figure out not just how to operate the toilet correctly. But how to make up for a schlitz mishap? And so the specialist opens the outside valve of the commode the one that goes directly to the sea. While the inside valve is still open, and this causes a delus- of seawater into the sub and also probably the rest of schlitz leaving schlitz flits. Right. It's fun to say. And we talked about the Bank of batteries. We talk about the design where they were located or just the fact. At the sub operated on the. We did mention it dimension that the batteries are directly under the toilet. Right. It is problematic. It's tough to design. This kind of stuff, you know, stuff to to put all the needed gadgetry into space with such a sharp strong form constraint. Totally it's sort of like they keep making the iphone thinner and finish. They gotta remove the headphone, Jack. Sure, just like that. I don't buy. I don't buy. They actually brought it back, but they made it a little thicker, right, or it's it's like looking under the hood of a high end sports cars, right? Because so much stuff is put in this weird tetris like arranging, and that's kind of what was happening in this up. I mean, clearly it's not a good idea to have the power source directly under something like the toilet. But then it's a question of wells going to put it, right? You don't want it necessarily near the torpedoes? Yeah. No. It seemed like it probably seemed like a good idea at the time probably seemed very clever to those crafty German engineers. So Ben is this the part we want to get into a little chemistry. Yeah. Yet is it is so salt the symbol for that in a C L, ripe waters, H two O. And if you dissolve salt in water, you get a solution of various I ons and h throw on it self is not conductive doesn't conducting thing, but an Ionic solution certainly is conductive instrument does conduct stuff. So when this water floods in through the valve system of this complicated. Toilet, the water and the salt in the seawater hit the sub battery and the sub battery as a result of this chemical interaction produces lie plus hydrogen gas, plus most importantly, chlorine gas because the battery's full of acid. So the problem chlorine gas is that it is a. Deadly deadly poison. Yeah. And they're in a tube. I'm handled tube under the water. With their pants down. Well, you presumably let's Pancer up at this. I like the idea of him still having his trousers around his ankles in a blind panic that would be. Yeah. Just kind of you know, scooting around the little penguin. That's the one. Yeah. So so we still have pictures of the scene mental pictures, we have imaginings have dreams of this of this moment. What we do know what happens next the submarine. Philly recording guests, this could be a death sentence. If they don't do something, do you think they clocked instantly? What was happening on a chemical level? Or do you think they just started gagging? Choking. Uncontrollably in new os lit something's gone wrong. Ab-absolutely sure they knew because it were very well aware of how the batteries worked. That's if the toilet was complicated. That's because it was new but diesel electric battery power would have been familiar to them. Most serial killers. Don't make any effort to involve the media or best caters. They're very secretive. They don't want attention. They almost want their crimes to go on notice. But the idea of committing a crime, and then calling the police and bragging about it. That's a whole 'nother level of terror. Dear editor this is expecting. If you do not criticise by the afternoon of Friday. First of August. I will go on a kill rampage Friday night L cruise around all weekend killing people in the night and move on to kill again. The best part of it is that when I die be reborn in paradise. And all that I have killed will become my slates creators of Atlanta monster come season to get the first two thirds of monster zodiac killer starting January third. Listen as scribe at apple podcasts or on the I heart radio app. So this is win. Our boy slid has to kind of jump into action, and despite having sort of botched the whole thing to begin with had to sort of exercise his thinking on his feet muscles. Right. And the captain quickly realized that he had no choice, but to order the submarine to surface because they had the vent this gas as quickly as possible. And then replace it with breathe -able air mind, you they're doing this in enemy territory off the coast of Scotland about eight miles. Yeah. And so they surfaced within sight of the Scottish slide in one story you'll hear that they surfaced almost directly beneath analogy ship, but we do know for sure they surfaced so close to shore that they were quickly spotted by allied aircraft. They were attacked and the captain to order the crew to abandon ship three three members of the crew. Overboard and drowned and believe one died in the malay- fighting that so we're right at forty crewmembers than because thirty six five. Yep. That is Greg. So what happens what happened during this attack? The u twelve o six was badly damaged and couldn't dive. And this is win Schlitt starts ordering the crew into lifeboats. And then he makes the game time decision that only a captain can make abandon ship. Right. Get on get you a hint to a lifeboat. He's done that. But now he does the very last thing he scuttles the ship. What does that mean? I know that term it means to purposely sink, a ship of any sort. So in the rough definition it means to cut a hole through the bottom deck or side of ship. But you you know, you destroy it. That's what he did. He destroyed the submarine his own ship and it went down as the ship sank. He got away by the way. As the ship sank. We can only imagine what he thought maybe thought I should've just contacted the toilets Mun when I was supposed to the headman. Sure. That's that's something different that someone that's like an executioner the Kanner, but he also entered into history the annals of history as the captain of the only warship in the entirety of naval history to be doomed by its own malfunctioning toilets cool gets on his tombstone. I think they probably he probably wanted to go with something a little more prestigious like loving, father or husband or something. So presumably they were captured by the allies, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Thirty six members of the crew were rescued by small boats in the area, some people made it to shore in their lifeboats, and then we're captured, but nobody really got away. So they would have ended up in POW. Camps or something right? Yeah. They would have ended up in pure w camps. And they probably would have been well, they were certainly well aware of the severity of the situation on the axis side. They news source getting toward the end. That's right. Yeah. And speaking of the end, we are reaching the end of our story today. But we're reaching the beginning of something else. We just went off Mike for a second and realize that this episode is coming out a New Year's day. So happy New Year's they'll happy New Year's to you. Ben happy new year to you. Casey. Thank you. Happy New Year's to everyone and to all a good. I know it's been it's been a hell of a good run. And we didn't I don't think we've talked about this. But not too long ago. Remember the exact day, we reached a solid year of doing this show. That's true. Yeah. I don't think either of us realized that until we were well off air. Yeah. And we were well past the time, and then it was just lay. So if we're talking about. New Year's business. We could recognize that fact, and and just say how much we appreciate all the folks that tune in and seemed to dig the show and allow us to keep doing it. I sure enjoyed doing. And hope we can keep doing it for many years to come. Agreed. You know, if I could turn back time, the only thing I would change is a little bit more energy the opening of this episode because we totally forgot it's our first episode of twenty nineteen. That's true. It's okay. We saved it for the back. End we go. There we go backward for everyone who stuck around. Right. So thank you so much. We would like to hear. Oh, no. I forgot the surprise. I found a lovely list of wacky submarine terms. Because you'll remember in our potato episode. We use some terms that I think were a little bit off because neither of us. You know, have a history of the navy. So there are so many terms that people have there's burn Affleck just watch a movie there's bull George by navy tradition. The most junior and has called George and the most seniors called the bull in the submarine force. It takes so long for junior officers to get to the boat to six months schools ten weeks school at least two moves and a oh and a bunch of red tape that most arrive as lieutenants junior grade when you only have one incident as many of them do by tradition. He is both the bull in the George or the bull, George and things that don't work are called broke. Dick, anything that doesn't work that pump has been broke dick for a week. Broke dick broke, dick. I like it. There are a lot of vulgar terms of the. So we learned even more strange sling phrases, many of which are not fit for air on this show. But we would like to hear some of your favorite military slang, or naval slang, phrases, anything that made you laugh anything that made no sense or anything with a really compelling story behind it. Let us know you can find us on Instagram Facebook and Twitter, we'd especially like to recommend you. Check out our Facebook community page ridiculous stories where you can interact with fellow listeners. Many of whom have some fascinating stories to tell. If you've been checking out some that tooth fairy stuff love to ferry stuff that seem to hit a nerve to his nerves nerve ending. I don't know. Now. I I really enjoyed that a lot. I wanna say I really had a good time doing it in when we listen back to these. Sometimes it feels like a chore, and I. Actually, find myself kinda enjoying that one. Good to hear man skit the way a we want to take our super producer Casey peg room. We do wanna thank Alex Williams who composed our track to Gabe Luger are wonderful research associate who kept us to this topic. And I'd like to thank you. It's been a great year ban. I think you as well it has been great year. I look forward to many more on ridiculous history. Cenex year, folks. Hey, guys, get another cool podcast wreck for you. It's called creature feature and it's a new comedy educational podcast from how stuff work hosted by Katie golden, former writer at crack dot com study evolutionary biology at Harvard, and apparently writes from the perspective of a bird on Twitter. That's right folks in each episode of creature feature Katie takes different guests comedian through some downright freaky. Evolutionary oddities that will make you wonder what mother nature has been smoking this whole time when you listen to this. You're taking on an expedition through the bizarre world of human and animal behaviors may be hard to admit. We will discover how irritably similar we are to our untamed animal cousins. So here's the pitch comedians are asked to shrink down imaginary and get inside the minds of animals. What would it be like to be the brainwashed victim of a parasitic wasp or a penguin who turns to a life of crime? Yeah. What will be the fate of a mouse who fell in love with the cat and the human who fell in love with his car. Both true. As they answer these scandalous queries, a larger question looms are humans truly as unique as we thought. So tune in every Wednesdays, Katie introduces you to a cast a freaky creatures telling tales of terror love, trickery, predation and death defying stunts get in touch with your wild side. Listen and subscribe to creature feature on apple podcast the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts.

Ben apple Katie golden Casey peg Twitter Schlitt Harvard producer writer Wolfgang Petersen Sean Connery Schlitt Scotland Salem George captain Carl Adolph Schlitt Dick schlitz
How the Monopoly Board Game Became a World War II Escape Kit

Ridiculous History

32:32 min | 1 year ago

How the Monopoly Board Game Became a World War II Escape Kit

"If you haven't checked out my new series the end of the world with Josh Clark. The now's a great time to start the holidays are over the doldrums of winter had begun. And there's no better time to explore existentialist dread than right now. But wait, there's more to the end of the world than that. Yes. The series is about existential risks. But it's also about hope the threats that are coming our way that could wipe humans right out of existence. Could also be just the thing that makes us band together. In a way that humanity never has before in the end of the world. I take you on a journey across time and space from the moment and asteroid collided with earth and set off a chain of events that wiped out the dinosaurs to the post biological future where we live in a digital format. If we don't already we'll explore big questions like whether we're alone in the universe and exactly how artificial intelligence could take control of our world from us. It also has a beautiful score. For and cinematic sound design. So it's an adventure for your mind. Which is just the thing to snap. You out of the winter blondes all ten episodes of the end of the world with Josh Clark are available for you to binge now on apple podcasts the iheartradio app or wherever you get podcasts. If you're like millions of other people throughout history and around the world, then you have probably at least once played some sort of game with your friends, whether it's a game of dice a- game of cards or important for purposes today a board game and today's episode is about board games. But not in the way, you think welcome to ridiculous history. My name is Ben my name is Nolan. I'm fan of the old five finger fillet, you know, where you take a blade and pop it real quick between the gaps between your fingers have you ever done that only in video game form. It's it's an invaluable game in a believe red dead, redemption. Cool haven't found it yet in the new one. But hopefully it exists. But yeah, it's pretty scary game. I've played that game in real life before. And I I never went fast enough to to actually cut myself series. Asli is that back when you spent time in that prison camp? POW camp. Well, they call the church camp. But you know, what I think six one hand half a dozen in the other not to derail the before we even get there. But I just watched both documentaries about the ill-fated fire festival though. Yeah. Talked about this that was sort of like being in a POW camp f y r e the ill-fated the ill-fated festival that was most closely associated with John rule wrote in the news, and the the main guy who was the the perpetrator of the whole hoax is a guy named Billy McFarland. I believe it was nice name. And yet he he he was a real piece of work. But here's one thing. They didn't have at fire fest. They had these geodesic dome kind of FEMA tents that were left over they use that they'd advertised as luxury, I believe villas. They had some really sad looking cheese sandwiches. They had a lot of kind of gross porta-pottys. They didn't have was the game of monopoly. What they also didn't have was our sue. Super producer, Casey peg room. So there they were without monopoly and without Casey peg room, which I think is a is a grave injustice possibly could have solve the whole debacle quite possibly a. We are by way of tastic segues exploring the world of monopoly. But again, perhaps not in the way that you have heard it explored before for just a quick look at the strange history of monopoly. It was originally invented as something called the landlord's game in nineteen. Oh, four by Elizabeth Maggie. And it was a real estate and taxation game that was really meant to inform people about the dangers of unbridled capitalism and win this game was. More or less stolen from her. The game play was modified. So that it rewarded unbridled capitalism. And nowadays monopoly is a love it or hate it game. For a lot of people. I've never experienced a huge falling out with friends loved ones relatives. And so on play monopoly. But that's because I don't play with cheaters, and that seems to be one of the big accusations against winners of monopoly. I just think monopoly sort of the board game equivalent of solitary confinement in that it's really boring and find it boring and takes a long time to finish yet. Pre. I mean, I could I could see that being a criticism. It's not for everyone. But it's a tremendously popular game. You know, what I mean, like even even people who aren't a big fans of have played it before. Absolutely. It's very true. Do you think people still play it now? Like, oh, yeah. Fun. Really? Absolutely. They've made a huge business similar to trivial pursuit. They have made a huge business in selling things monopoly boards. True. But at least with the trivial pursuit branded versions there like questions related to that topic with monopoly, it's just like different looking bored. And instead of a shoe you've got like the stranger things baseball bat or something. Yeah. Yeah. Or demagogue? And right. The thing that I always found interesting about monopoly is that it is a pale shadow of the board game in life. Which is I think much more intriguing butts either way you look at it monopoly is is here to stay. It's a very popular game. And during World War Two it was widely played. It was just as popular in the United Kingdom as it was in the US. In fact, there was a manufacturer of monopoly in the United Kingdom called. Waddington John Waddington LTd, and they had purchased a license to create this just across the pond, which will be important later. But no where are we going with this? Oh, man. We're going so many places. Yeah. Sure Whitington was the licensee of the product almost like a franchise deal. Right where they were allowed to manufacturing distribute this game in the UK after it had seen a lot of success in the US. But Waddington this company was also very well known for their ability to print things on silk. And that doesn't seem like a big deal for our story today. But it turns out it might be the biggest deal and the thing that gave Uncle Sam and his minions of espionage idea to pull off this amazing caper. I guess we can say I think Capers great word or schema keeper is a little more fun. Yes. The story really kicks into gear with a guy. Named christopher. William Clayton Hutton known as cloudy to his friends, which I think is just terrible nickname. Not great not not superior. So Christopher Clayton Hutton or clumsy is an intelligence officer at m I nine and he got this job to Riveria strange series of events or offhand comment when he applied to work as an intelligence officer in nineteen thirty nine for the UK war office. He says an quote later, my passport to the whole curious busness has been a casual reference to my voltage efforts to get the better of Harry Houdini, the world's greatest s cappella gist this right because he his whole deal, and the reason that he was attractive to my six was that he was kind of clever guy who was very fascinated by things like up-close magic. And and little tricks that might be involved in doing so. Some allusions, and he was able to apply that to those kind of JAMES BOND type gadgets that you that we all know in love like, you know, a pen. It's also an explosive device or something right? Tiny telescope looks like a cigarette holder or compasses on the backs of buttons boots with hollow heels that held knives maps, compasses and files. But the thing was you're right, only as brilliant brilliant, man. But as ingenious as his inventions were it seemed that zoo Jomon 's as they called them always eventually figured them out all of them that is except for one. You see he came to Waddington LTd and said, hey, you all manufacturer lot of things check I understand that you print on silk double check. And I am of the understanding that you also print board game called monopoly. I triple check probably pronounce it. Correct. Are some important boxes and these three boxes up together? You get away to execute this plot that was just stating in this guy's mind. Because there's a thing the reason that was a big deal to print on silk is because they could be used to have maps printed on them maps that wouldn't deteriorate in. In the rain or get torn to stretch if you stepped on them or make a noise when you try to clandestinely unfold them maybe in a POW camp or surrounded by enemy troops. Absolutely. Absolutely. See this is something that fascinated me. Worse studying up for this episode silk maps were already round because of those advantages that we just named silk maps, it already been proven superior to the paper stuff that could disintegrate tear make noise giveaway your position, and because Waddington's made silk maps and monopoly cloudy knew he was onto something. There was one other important ingredient of wartime reality that that solidified his decision. He knew the board games were allowed into POW camps largely because of the Geneva conventions and the Red Cross and also because Germany at this point. In the war had such a bad rep for adhering to Geneva conventions in the way, they treated prisoners of war that they were willing to allow these humanitarian airdrops into their camps which included things like snacks. And you know, things to pass the time. I think books, but a board games. We're also, okay. And they would also think of it as a win for them because they figured if they're prisoners were busy occupying themselves playing inter mineable board game that took ages and ages ages to finish really I'm not a fan the game. But I mean, it would do it its purpose. Right. And they would probably be thrilled to have the opportunity to do something like that to pass the time. But there's thing aboard game is in a big box with layers with stacks of stuff. Ed is a pretty amazing opportunity for our Mr. Klay. Yeah. Absolutely. I can't believe it that Gerald presenting the quarterly budget report with finger puppets. Look here comes one point seven percent decrease in fixed overhead I know everybody. No, I can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on car insurance. Geico. Though projected increase in organic three revenue. Believe it. Geico could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. So what the eventually decided to do Waddington's? We should note was initially not a hundred percent on board with this so cloudy and the UK government pitched it to them hard. And they said, look we are going to we're going to have this covered stem to stern. We are not just going to smuggle maps in these monopoly games. We are also going to include real money hidden with the monopoly money. We're going to include French Italian and German notes just under the actual monopoly cash. What else do they include? They included hidden in little indentations that were cut in the board itself. Because back in those days the boards were good bit thicker than they are now. So they were able to pre label because the label with all the pieces park place and all that just a big old sticker that goes on a piece of foldable card. Board. They were able to cut these very shallow indentations that could hold things like files or those those little compasses you mentioned earlier, the very small ones, the smaller the better because they wouldn't want it to be a red flagged any officers, and he German guards handling who might think. This is way too heavy for a board game, right? You also read other accounts that say playing pieces were actually the escape items like a compass of file were disguised as playing pieces. That's interesting. Because when I when I picture the whole cutting out of indentations into the board thing kind of reminds me of stuff like how you might hide something in prison by cutting the pages out of the middle of a book or a by more Ciment than having like, a a file or shiver something hidden inside. And it's interesting too because this actually was classified until I wanna say the nineteen eighty s and the soldiers were in instructed to destroy these boards. And the thing is to they had to use their own. Jewish to figure these things or even in there. Which is the thing that blew me away. Because apparently there was a little red dot on the board that made that serve a clue I guess this is a special board. But it wouldn't have been seen as anything out of the ordinary other than like printing error, maybe for the folks that were distributing the boards K that the German soldiers. But is it takes a lot for you to think? Oh my gosh. This board game surely hides these secret items. No. May you spend a lot of time looking at the same board. So maybe the staff of the POW camp just checks it, and they shake it a little bit. But they don't really care because it's a monopoly game. But then there couple points one hit before they get lost. So this this board. If you're familiar with monopoly does look very similar most importantly, though, the map you may hear different things about the pieces versus things being stuffed in the board. But the map itself was always. Hidden within the board and Imai nine covered their tracks. Very well here they invented fake cover organizations to quote, unquote, donate these parcels to the camps. So this remove culpability from the Red Cross because they can't knowingly distribute escape kits right? So instead, they're not getting stuff from the UK government. They're getting stuff from organizations with names like the licensed vitually sports association. The ladies knitting circle, the jigsaw puzzle club and the prisoners leisure our fund, so as far as the people actually supplying the kids know, these are legit monopoly boards, as far as the Germans know, these are legitimate monopoly boards, and it they just had to wait. It was a leap of faith to wait for one of those POW's to say, hey, this piece doesn't look quite normal. Let me turn. Earn it over. Oh, there's a compass. You know what? I mean. Yeah. That's true. Not to mention like that the stacks of money. I believe were fake money on top fake money on bottom real money in between. So that might have been the first thing that gave it away. Right. Think about it. You're going to play nice. Give him monopoly you pull out the fake money. Say what ho- what this? And then there's you know, real money, and that may be would make them investigate further. You think? Yeah. Yeah. I think that's I think that's quite likely, and it's strange because if I you know, I question is why is this not a film, right? Because it seems like one heck of a story. But the second question is how much of this is exaggerated because monopoly is a cultural icon the answer is. Really not much not much and just to throw in one last point Parker brothers themselves. The creators of the game. Didn't know this was going on this all had to be done very secretly. And it's not like, they would let them know. Hey, by the way, is it. Okay. If we use your beloved board Kanta rescue our troops. But you know, again, it was not known for decades because it was classified, and we don't have any examples of what these might have looked like because they were all destroyed because what if German guard had discovered one the whole jig would be up for all of the camps. Here's the thing to Ben they knew which camps. They were air-dropping these on and they had customized packages for each particular spot. Right, right. This may have been declassified relatively recently. But it was kind of an open secret way before two thousand seven you can find a nineteen eighty five p press article about this butts, again, we don't know what. The kids look like because people could describe them right POW's who used these to escape people can recount their appearance. But as he said they had to be destroyed. There's a fantastic article on this in the Atlantic. How monopoly games held ally POW's escape during World War Two by Meghan Garber? And you know for someone who is severely anti monopoly. Like, it seems no fence you might be. No this. Maybe as redemptive. Does this make you feel a little bit better about the game? We'll sure I think the game has its as positive qualities in the certainly as one of them. I just personally don't enjoy playing. It's one of those games. Right. Like the idea of more than the actual practice of playing the game. I'm really into a game called pandemic, which is a game that you play cooperatively with people. And I think that's a lot of fun. Sometimes the adversary nature of a game is for me. You know, they're also game such as. A great each p lovecraft game called something like call through and you cooperate with other players to prevent the coming of the Eldredge guy. Yeah. Yeah. Had pandemics very similar that you're preventing some sort of global outbreak that could annihilate civilization. So it's all you know, it's all for a good cause also thing about monopoly kinda rose me the wrong way. Because like you said at the top of the show it used to be much more about, you know, highlighting the eagles and potential negative things that can result from capitalism run amok. And now it's just much more about like, hey, let's run amok with some capitalism. Now that we live in a world of late stage capitalism. Oh, excuse me, gig economy. She well. Well, we would be remiss if we did not ask super producer, Casey peck room. Are you a monopolist Casey? I like it because the experience of playing it is terrible. I just kind of feel like it's good propaganda for you know, a different way of life. So sort of like in the way, you might watch a mystery science theater three thousand movie you enjoy the. The awfulness of just for its own sake. Yeah. Because I mean, it's it's true. Life is too. It's terribly true to life Casey on the case, folks. Yeah. I think that's such a great point one thing that I was thinking about during the course of research into today's episode was the fact that going to jail in monopoly is just part of business and does not impede your financial or social success in any shape, fashion or form sort of like how pay multimillion dollar fines is just the cost of business for a lot of banks don't to get to oriented toward the corporate talk, recy- or politics. But that's just the case monopoly predicted it, but they predicted a terribly misleading way. So I'm glad it did something good and helped some portion of over thirty five thousand allied POW's escaped from German prison camps. And they don't have exact numbers of how many people many many POW's escape using these monopoly kits. But everyone involved is pretty confident that they were. Effective on some level. And here's the thing. I just found been to in this great article from ABC news where they say that airmen before being deployed on missions that might have been going out on maneuvers at this stage in the war were told if they were captured to look for escape kits in monopoly games. Ho cool. So I was thinking more of the folks that have been there. Maybe a little longer term, right? Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Which lets us know that this had been in production for some time. You know what I mean? And it worked a also quoted in the ABC article is Victor Watson who is a former chairman of Waddington's until nineteen ninety three and in his estimating again. This might be bit biased because he did work for the company. He says that Waddington's reckoned around ten thousand POW's successfully used the monopoly map, which is it Spiring. No. And I love that. You raise the point that we're never gonna know the actual number of people who were who were for sure saved or able to escape with this. I can't believe that Gerald is presenting the quarterly budget report with finger puppets. Look here comes one point seven percent decrease in overhead everybody. No, I can't believe how easy it was to save hundreds of dollars on car insurance guy. Are you projected increase in organic Khukri revenue? Believe it. Geico could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. We should also mentioned that this was not the first involvement uncle penny bags as the name of that cartoon character the capitalist the guy. Yeah. We'll just call the monopoly guy. Yeah. Well, his real names, rich uncle penny. Uncle penny bag is when a penny before flation buried a lot more immense. Something back when a penny meant something after World War Two monopoly found itself in the middle of another international conflict, this one more ideology related because you see Cuba, the USSR and other communist countries outlawed the game because it advocated capitalism. You know, what I mean, there's not a communist version of monopoly yet. Someone check on that. If if there is please let me know whether there's some sort of anti monopoly or a communist monopoly and Casey, by the way, I see that you just sent us. Something called monopoly for millennia. Yes. This this is a true thing. I remember hearing about this a awhile back when when it broke a fairly recently. It was monopolies crass attempt to advertise the millennial generation vay might have airdrop some vs on fire fest. There we go nice way to call back. So what is this Casey? It is a updated version of monopoly former lineal and just looking at the box cover our love, the slogan. Forget real estate you can't afford it. Anyway. So that's just that lovely lovely late capitalist stove. Yeah. We've all enjoyed. Casey on a tragic case there. But I love it because it's got pictures of like bike lanes. And it's like a vegan only restaurant green kind of ecological messages, and Mr. pennybags has kind of like some reflective sunglasses on looks like he has an ipod earbud in his ear. So they're they're really hitting the the millennial cliches pretty heavily. They're more of a douchebag than a penny. Back community chest cards safe things. Like your free web, streaming trial expires pay the Bank, forty dollars tokens emoji at a hashtag. This is great. This is terrible. Is it's funny because it seems like they're trolling. But I mean, it is a real thing. You can buy stores of Airlie what rough board game slouches towards Bethlehem to be bored. Yeah. Especially again, I'm fresh off watching both of these fire fest documentaries. So I have a pretty bad taste in my mouth and a bit of a self loathing for millennia. I'm technically xenical. I think I'm on the cusp. I think. With you. And I care little bit on the cusp. Yeah. We're customers customers it's rated in two different ways. The one way would be to read it on a generational chronological divide. But another way some sociologists for you. This would be to rate it on a digital divide or access to information. You know, so people who were born before the days of dial up modem, right or clearly not millennial. I think we're I think we're all actually customers what we what we should be wondering about if we were Hasbro is what sort of board game the generation after millennials would like to play hint. It's not on a part. That's true. Also, there's this app versions of most old board games. Yeah. And they're very similar to a little quicker to play. Like, you mentioned the game of life at the top of the show, and I used to have an app version of that because the mechanics of the game of life or a little cumbersome and with the advocate. It does all that for you. So it's it's a the lazy game of life. I don't know. It's weird. I've tried doing. You know, you guys know me huge fan across words, and I've tried doing them online. But there's something about the physical pen and paper. Also. Yeah, I do them in Penn. But whatever I chose battle. Oh, we should mention as we wrapping up here that Uncle Sam and the the Yanks that's us. So we can see keys and not be pejorative. We totally copied this idea a little later after the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December seventh nineteen forty one Hutton was tasked with training his American like his the American version of him guy named captain rob -ly. Winfrey in the art of concealing escape tools in this Nike was looking stuff, and he came up with ideas that took off kind of dovetailed on Hutton's and eventually his part of the intelligence services military intelligence services, escape, an invasion section or miss. X started sending out monopoly boards. We're also loaded with a scape tools. The one thing different. They did is that Winfrey would send his employees's into toys stores and department stores to buy civilian monopoly games. And then they would take the games back to their secret lair. And that's when they would kit them up. So they didn't have nobody trusted Parker brothers that time. You know, what I mean 'cause they ever asked Parker brothers to manufacture bespoke custom ones, they just reverse engineered them. That's nuts that there'd be that much logistical planning. That would go. That you talk about the glue, for example. Oh, laid on us. Yeah. They had to reverse engineer. The exact glue that Parker brothers used in order to make the you know, the the decal lay correctly. So there was a whole lot of little things. They had to kind of troubleshoot and figure out how to make that wouldn't throw up any red flags. Okay. Gotta catch up because just for the second. When you said the decal lay correctly. I for some reason I had a brain fart. And I thought you said d-calais like it was some sort of very specific Parker brothers Calais correctly. Yeah. You're you're right, though. And by golly by gosh by government worked because when the war ended in September nineteen forty five there was only one escape kit that the German forces had not discovered, and it was monopoly as you said. No, everything was destroyed. We know this really happened. It was officially revealed. Nineteen eighty five. Right. But the American use of the game wasn't revealed until nineteen ninety and Cording to various sources, at least at least seven hundred and forty something airman escaped with aids created by cloudy, and Ropley Winfrey. Which you know, it sounds like a great a great gig. If you can get it if there's a wartime thing, and and you get drafted to imagine fellas if someone said, okay, your job is to make top secret board game escape kits. I would be in. I would be one million percent. I would do. And I think it's a real testament to British engineering and engineering agreed. And with that ends our tale, but not our show. Tune in for our next episode, which will be a surprising through the origin story of one of the world's most fame. Rhino's very much for that. In the meantime, we'd love to think are sued producer, Casey peg rim. Alex Williams who composed. Our theme our research associate game. Of course, you fellow ridiculous stories for listening and knoll. Thank you for. Thank you for exploring the story with me. Ben, thank you for being a friend. I wish we do. We don't have the rights to play the golden girls you'll have to use your magic go watch it on Hulu right now. I play it on ukulele. Can you really? Yes. That's very cool. Well, early by priorities daughter, right? You got to and you guys have your priorities in order to listen to the next episode. We'll see. Hey, guys, get another cool podcast wreck for you. It's called creature feature and it's a new comedy educational podcast from how stuff works hosted by Katie golden, former writer at crack dot com study evolutionary biology at Harvard, and apparently writes from the perspective of a bird on Twitter. That's right folks in each of creature feature Katie takes different guests comedian through some downright freaky. Evolutionary oddities that will make you wonder what mother nature has been smoking this whole time when you listen to this. You're taking on an expedition through the bizarre world of human and animal behaviors may be hard to admit. We will discover how irritably similar we are to our untamed animal cousins. So here's the pitch comedians are asked to shrink down, you know, imaginary and get inside the minds of animals. What would it be like to be the brainwashed victim of parasitic wasp or a penguin who turns to a life of crime? Yeah. What will be the fate of a mouse who fell in love with the cat and the human fell in love with his car. Both true stories. As they answer these scandalous queries, a larger question looms are humans truly as unique as we thought so tune in every Wednesdays, Katie introduces you to a cast of freaky creatures telling tales of terror love, trickery, predation and death defying stunts get in touch with your wild side. Listen and subscribe to creature feature on apple podcast the iheartradio app or wherever you happen to find your podcasts.

Casey Waddington United Kingdom Parker brothers Ben producer Geico Christopher Clayton Hutton Red Cross US Josh Clark Ropley Winfrey apple Gerald John Waddington LTd Katie golden Casey peg