17 Burst results for "Casey Peg Rem"

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:09 min | 2 months ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show. Ridiculous historians. Thanks So much for tuning in peek behind the curtain. It is officially summer in Atlanta. The humidity and the heat combined to drape the city in soup. It feels like walking through soup. So I am very, very glad to be here inside our air conditioned studio. My name is Ben. My name is Noah Shipping container is icy cool today. On outside. It is sort of. There's this me asthma, this sort of funk this patina of awful hot, sweaty grossness. That does kind of envelope the city and happen over and I didn't it. It just happened overnight. Yeah, permeated, permeated this fair metropolis of ours. I always forget about how dire the situation becomes. When we hit summer in Atlanta, and you know this may mean that we're in here Recording Mohr episodes We do want to start the show with a big shout out to our guest. Superproducer Ramsey Ram jams Young. So everybody give him a fine. Hello. Do we get it? Does he get a sound a sound effect? That's good, very good, like And of course, this does not mean that we will ever forget our wonderful. Ah, our third, amigo, Right Superproducer. Casey Pegram gone but not forgotten. Gone, I say, but gone where? Ben, like they were talking about this, So I have a theory. Every year or so, Casey disappears. And in France, someone else reappears. A very different person who happens to look a little bit like our dear friend Casey Pegram. This guy we imagine is a member of the criminal underbelly of Paris. Known only by the name LeBeau. Bush. Yeah. And he dons a completely different get up in the form of a very slick looking leather jacket, a single dangly cross hearing on his left on his left ear. And sometimes he wears fingerless gloves and rides around in one of those cool little mod motorbikes in the pictures yet, and we strongly suspect that he may have one or more secret families. It's true. None of this squeaking neither confirm nor deny any of this were wildly speculate. It's all true, they'll put the pieces together, people. We're gonna have to let Casey have his day in court here and defend himself. But you know, Casey's not here. We're joined with Ramsay helping us pick up the slack here what he's doing his double life. But that's not the only person that we have on the show today, is it? That's absolutely true. This is a special episode that I know we were both very excited about we have in our network. A brand new podcast the We're We're all huge fans off. Sincerely huge fans of And it happens to be created by one of our close friends who you may have heard mentioned on our shore. Others shows before, folks, let's give it up for Alex Williams, the brains behind the podcast. We call ephemeral because that's name of the podcast. Hi. Alex makes us call it that just by virtue of having titled it being a very good tile in a very fine podcast. Thank you for being here. What a flattering introduction. I'm very happy to be. Here is the thing we've been working with you for quite some time. Now we've kind of seen you grow and develop and become more and more of a badass in with the pros referred to as the podcast space. Making wild jest. Ical ating, quote fingers when I say that you really have to. But here's the thing. You really took it another level in terms of making only a history podcast, but something that I referred to when I describe it to friends as something akin to like poetry meets sound collage meets music, Concrete meets history, and I think it's just a really beautiful piece of work. And I'm just beyond stoked this Honor network and that you're the guy behind it. So we'd like to ask you A good pinch. I don't know if I could pull that up. That was great. It's good. Well, now it is your turn. So we'd like to ask you some questions about ephemeral about your your inspiration behind it the first yet with with that excellent description that Knoll just just recited. What? How would you describe? How do you describe it? When when someone's like. Hey, what's this thing you're working on? I start stammering and sweating, and I tried to make it as concise as possible is thinking of a quick pitch in bed the other night. It's something like Show about fleeting moments and the things they leave behind. That's what ephemera is right. Ephemera is sort of a remnant of a thing that no longer is around, I guess kind of, or the idea of things being ephemeral means that they're fleeting or that they're here today. Gone tomorrow, but they do leave behind some kind of residue if you know where to look right. Yes. Or the word itself is kind of tricky in the textbook. A family might just mean paper, right? Broadsides, tickets, pamphlets for museums, Basically, anything printed hand printed, you know? Printing press computer printed That wasn't meant to be saved. But then it gets in the issue of like, how do you determine whether something was meant to be saved? Or not? Right? Like, for instance, a train schedule from the early 19 hundreds. Now the ones that are around are considered Thing to be things of historical value, right? But when they were printed, they were thought to have a definitive and very short lifespan or span of utility. One of the really classic examples is a stamp that episode of Working on that Come on Mondays about this Monday that might not be the Monday will come out on a Monday would come out on a Monday knowing this would come out A stamp is really classic example. Right? So you've written a letter to your friend Noel and you stand and you've put in me on in the mailbox and he gets it. Rips it open to read the letter, and he's you know, overwrought with emotion, Whatever he throws out, or hopefully recycles the and that's it. But but no happens to have a great stamp collection and I've sent him, you know. Ah, inverted Jenny stand from the 19 thirties and so he is overwrought with emotion, not because of my great pros, but because This's a great addition to his stamp collection because he is a philatelist or Philip. How did his house how it's pronounced in P h i l A T I s t one who collects Dale was the rude word a philatelist. It could also be one who fillets. That's what I would think a filet because that's how the British pronounced fillet they pronounce it fill it feel a geo hard T sound at the end of it. I always found that very interesting because sometimes the Brits seemed like they really own the word and sometimes they just feel like they're mispronouncing and just to be cute, Cute, sort of like aluminium like that's not the word Brits. Come on. It's aluminum. You're adding syllables there that don't belong letters added in that place with American English to be fair, we can't really criticize. The people who are doing it first. That's also fair bin and they want to add an extra P on shop, then that's kind of their call. Yet to answer that question about Entomology. It's interesting because It comes from French and Greek. So ah Italia means exemption from payment. The French Philo means loving, so it's loving exemption from payment. Which is what I heard right now, But it's it makes sense. But don't ask me to explain it. Well, we can. We're more about this wedding. What did you What are you exploring? On this episode concerning stamps? Well, it's not. It's all over so much. Fourth and You know, One of the things that we're doing is actually taking the word apart in this In this episode, eso ephemera. Comes from The root. We're happy meeting honor of like Epicurious epidermis on DH camera meeting day. It's like a Latin Greek combination.

Casey Pegram Ben Atlanta asthma Alex Williams Paris France Epicurious LeBeau Ramsay Bush Knoll Noel Dale Jenny Philip
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

03:27 min | 2 months ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show. Ridiculous historians. Thanks So much for tuning in peek behind the curtain. It is officially summer in Atlanta. The humidity and the heat combined to drape the city in soup. It feels like walking through soup. So I am very, very glad to be here inside our air conditioned studio. My name is Ben. My name is Noah Shipping container is icy cool today. On outside. It is sort of. There's this me asthma, this sort of funk this patina of awful hot, sweaty grossness. That does kind of envelope the city and have it over and I didn't It just happened overnight. Yeah, permeated permeated this fair metropolis of ours. I always forget about how dire the situation becomes. When we hit summer in Atlanta, and you know this may mean that we're in here Recording Mohr episodes We do want to start the show with a big shout out to our guest. Superproducer Ramsey Ram jams Young So everybody give him a fine. Hello. Do we get to get us out of a sound effect? You know? That's good. Yeah, I was very good. And of course, this does not mean that we will ever forget our wonderful. Ah, our third, amigo, Right, Superproducer. Casey Pegram gone but not forgotten. Gone, I say, but gone where? Ben, like they were talking about this, So I have a theory. Every year or so, Casey disappears. And in France, someone else reappears. A very different person who happens to look a little bit like our dear friend Casey Pegram. This guy we imagine is a member of the criminal underbelly of Paris. Known only by the name live Bush. Yeah. And he dons a completely different gap in the form of a very slick looking leather jacket, a single dangly cross hearing on his left on his left ear, and sometimes he wears fingerless gloves and rides around in one of those cool little mod motorbikes in the pictures. Yeah, and we strongly suspect that he may have one or more secret families. It's true. None of this squeaking neither confirm nor deny any of this were wildly speculate. It's all true, they'll put the pieces together, people. We're gonna have to let Casey have his day in court here and defend himself. But you know, Casey's not here. We're joined with Ramsay helping us pick up the slack here. What's least he's doing his double life. But that's not the only person that we have on the show today, is it? That's absolutely true. This is a special episode that I know we were both very excited about we have in our network. A brand new podcast the We're We're all huge fans off. Sincerely huge fans of And it happens to be created by one of our close friends who you may have heard mentioned on our shore. Others shows before, folks, let's give it up for Alex Williams, the brains behind the podcast. We call ephemeral because that's name of the podcast. Hi. Alex makes us call it that just by virtue of having titled it being a very good tile in a very fine podcast. Thank you for being here. What a flattering introduction. I'm very happy to be. Here is the thing we've been working with you for quite some time. Now we've kind of seen you grow and develop and become more and more of a badass in with the pros referred to as the podcast space..

Casey Pegram Ben Atlanta Alex Williams Paris Superproducer asthma France Ramsay Bush
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:24 min | 3 months ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show. Ridiculous historians. Thanks So much for tuning in peek behind the curtain. It is officially summer in Atlanta. The humidity and the heat combined to drape the city in soup. It feels like walking through soup. So I am very, very glad to be here inside our air conditioned studio. My name is Ben. My name is Noah Shipping container is icy cool today. On outside. It is sort of. There's this me asthma, this sort of funk this patina of awful hot, sweaty grossness. That does kind of envelope the city happen over and I didn't It just happened overnight. Yeah, permeated permeated this fair metropolis of ours. I always forget about how dire the situation becomes. When we hit summer in Atlanta, and you know this may mean that we're in here Recording Mohr episodes We do want to start the show with a big shout out to our guest. Superproducer Ramsey Ram jams Young. So everybody give him a fine. Hello. Do we get it? Does he get a sound a sound effect? You. That's not a good guy was very good. And of course, this does not mean that we will ever forget our wonderful. Ah, our third, amigo, right Superproducer. Casey Pegram gone but not forgotten. Gone, I say, but gone where? Ben, like they were talking about this, So I have a theory. Every year or so, Casey disappears. And in France, someone else reappears. A very different person who happens to look a little bit like our dear friend Casey Pegram. This guy we imagine is a member of the criminal underbelly of Paris. Known only by the name live Bush. Yeah. And he dons a completely different gap in the form of a very slick looking leather jacket, a single dangly cross hearing on his left on his left ear. And sometimes he wears fingerless gloves and rides around in one of those cool little mod motorbikes in the pictures yet, and we strongly suspect that he may have one or more secret families. It's true. None of this squeaking neither confirm nor deny any of this were wildly speculate. It's all true, they'll put the pieces together, people. We're gonna have to let Casey have his day in court here and defend himself. But you know, Casey's not here. We're joined with Ramsay helping us pick up the slack here what he's doing his double life. But that's not the only person that we have on the show today, is it? That's absolutely true. This is a special episode that I know we were both very excited about we have in our network. A brand new podcast the We're We're all huge fans off. Sincerely huge fans of And it happens to be created by one of our close friends who you may have heard mentioned on our shore. Others shows before, folks, let's give it up for Alex Williams, the brains behind the podcast. We call ephemeral because that's name of the podcast. Hi. Alex makes us call it that just by virtue of having titled it being a very good tile in a very fine podcast. Thank you for being here. What a flattering introduction. I'm very happy to be. Here is the thing we've been working with you for quite some time. Now we've kind of seen you grow and develop and become more and more of a badass in with the pros referred to as the podcast space. Making wild jest icky, elated, quote fingers when I say that you really have to, But here's the thing. You really took it another level in terms of making only a history podcast, but something that I referred to when I describe it to friends as something akin to like poetry meets sound collage meets music, Concrete meets history, and I think it's just a really beautiful piece of work, and I'm just beyond stoked that it's on our network and that you're the guy behind him. So we'd like to ask you A good pinch. I don't know if I could pull that up. That was great. It's good. Well, now it is your turn. So we'd like to ask you some questions about ephemeral about your your inspiration behind it the first yet With with that excellent description that no, just just recited. What? How would you describe? How do you describe it? When when someone's like. Hey, what's this thing you're working on? I start stammering and sweating, and I tried to make it as concise as possible is thinking of a quick pitch in bed the other night. It's something like A show about fleeting moments and the things they leave behind. That's what ephemera is right. Ephemera is sort of a remnant of a thing that no longer is around, I guess kind of, or the idea of things being ephemeral means that they're fleeting or that they're here today. Gone tomorrow, but they do leave behind some kind of residue if you know where to look right. Yes, to the word itself is kind of tricky in the textbook. A family a A might just mean paper, Right? Broadsides, tickets, pamphlets for museums, Basically, anything printed hand printed, you know? Printing press computer printed That wasn't meant to be saved. But then it gets in the issue of like, how do you determine whether something was meant to be saved? Or not? Right? Like, for instance, a train schedule from the early 19 hundreds. Now the ones that are around are considered Thing to be. Things have historical value, right? But when they were printed, they were thought to have a definitive and very short lifespan or span of utility. One of the really classic examples is stamped that episode of Working on the Toe. Come on Mondays about this Monday that might not be the Monday will come out on a Monday coming on a Monday and this will come out of a stamp is really classic example. Right. So you've written a letter to your friend Noel and you've stamped and you've put in me on in the mailbox and he gets it. Rips it open to read the letter, and he's you know, overwrought with emotion. Whatever he throws out or public recycles the and that's it, But but no happens to have a great stamp collection and I've sent him, you know. Ah, inverted Jenny stand from the 19 thirties and so he is overwrought with emotion, not because of my great pros, but because This's a great addition to his stamp collection because he is a philatelist or Philip test is How did it How? How it's pronounced Ph I l A T I s t one who collects data was the rude word a philatelist? The one who fillets. That's what I would think a filet because that's how the British pronounced fillet they pronounce it fill it feel a geo hard T sent at the end of it. I always found that very interesting because sometimes the Brits seemed like they really own the word and sometimes they just feel like they're mispronouncing and just to be cute, Cute, sort of like aluminium like that's not the word Brits. Come on. It's aluminum. You're adding syllables that don't belong letters added in a field field out of that place with American English To be fair, we can't really criticized The people who are doing it first. That's also fair, Ben and they want to add an extra P on shop, then that's kind of their call. Yet to answer that question about Entomology. It's interesting because it comes from French and Greek. So ah. Telia.

Casey Pegram Ben Atlanta Alex Williams Paris asthma Superproducer France Ramsay Bush Toe Noel Jenny Philip
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

07:13 min | 3 months ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"To the show. Ridiculous historians. Thanks So much for tuning in peek behind the curtain. It is officially summer in Atlanta. The humidity and the heat combined to drape the city in soup. It feels like walking through soup. So I am very, very glad to be here inside our air conditioned studio. My name is Ben. My name is Noah Shipping container is icy cool today. On outside. It is sort of. There's this me asthma, this sort of funk this patina of awful hot, sweaty grossness. That does kind of envelope the city and have it over and I did it. It just happened overnight. Yeah, permeated, permeated this fair metropolis of ours. I always forget about how dire the situation becomes. When we hit summer in Atlanta, and you know this may mean that we're in here Recording Mohr episodes We do want to start the show with a big shout out to our guest. Superproducer Ramsey Ram jams Young So everybody give him a fine. Hello. Do we get to get us out of a sound effect? That's good. Yeah, I was very good. I like it. And of course, this does not mean that we will ever forget our wonderful. Ah, our third, amigo, Right, Superproducer. Casey Pegram gone but not forgotten. Gone, I say, but gone Where? Ben, We're talking about this, So I have a theory. Every year or so, Casey disappears. And in France, someone else reappears. A very different person who happens to look a little bit like our dear friend Casey Pegram. This guy we imagine is a member of the criminal underbelly of Paris. Known only by the name of Bush. Yeah. And he dons a completely different get up in the form of a very slick looking letter jacket, a single dangly cross hearing on his left on his left ear. And sometimes he wears fingerless gloves and rides around in one of those cool little mod motorbikes in the pictures yet, and we strongly suspect that he may have one or more secret families. It's true. None of this squeaking neither confirm nor deny any of this were wildly speculate. It's all true, they'll put the pieces together, people. We're gonna have to let Casey have his day in court here and defend himself. But you know, Casey's not here. We're joined with Ramsay helping us pick up the slack here what he's doing his double life. But that's not the only person that we have on the show today, is it? That's absolutely true. This is a special episode that I know we were both very excited about we have in our network. A brand new podcast the We're we're all huge fans off sincerely huge fans of and it happens to be created by one of our close friends who you may have heard mentioned on our shore. Others shows before, folks, let's give it up for Alex Williams, the brains behind the podcast. We call ephemeral because that's the name of The podcast. Hi. Alex makes us call it that just by virtue of having titled it being a very good tile in a very fine podcast. Thank you for being here. What a flattering introduction. I'm very happy to be. Here is the thing we've been working with you for quite some time. Now we've kind of seen you grow and develop and become more and more of a badass in with the pros referred to as the podcast space. Making wild jest icky, elated, quote fingers when I say that you really have to, But here's the thing. You really took it another level in terms of making only a history podcast, but something that I referred to when I describe it to friends as something akin to like. Poetry meets Sound collage meets music Concrete meets History, and I think it's just a really beautiful piece of work. And I'm just beyond stoked for this honor Network and that you're the guy behind it. So we'd like to ask you. That was such a good pinch. I don't know if I could pull that up. That was great. Well, now it is your turn. So we'd like to ask you some questions about ephemeral about your your inspiration behind it the first yet With with that excellent description that Knoll just just recited. What? How would you describe? How do you describe it? When when someone's like. Hey, what's this thing you're working on? I start stammering and sweating and I try to make it as concise as possible is thinking of a quick pitch in bed the other night. It's something like A show about fleeting moments and the things they leave behind like that, because that's what ephemera is right. Ephemera is sort of a remnant of a thing that no longer is around, I guess kind of, or the idea of things being ephemeral means that they're fleeting or that they're here today. Gone tomorrow, but they do leave behind some kind of residue if you know where to look right. Yes. So the word itself is kind of tricky in the textbook. A family might just mean paper, Right? Broadsides, tickets, pamphlets for museums, Basically, anything printed hand printed, you know? Printing press computer printed That wasn't meant to be saved. But then it gets in the issue of like, how do you determine whether something was meant to be saved? Or not? Right? Like, for instance, a train schedule from the early 19 hundreds. Now the ones that are around are considered Thing to be. Things have historical value, right? But when they were printed, they were thought to have a definitive and very short lifespan or span of utility. One of the really classic examples is a stamp that episode of Working on that Come on Mondays about this Monday that might not be the Monday will come out on a Monday come out on a Monday and this will come out of that stamp is of the classic example. Right. So you've written a letter to your friend Noel and you've stamped and you've put in me on in the mailbox and he gets it. Rips it open to read the letter, and he's you know, overwrought with emotion, Whatever he throws out, or hopefully recycles the and that's it. But but no happens to have a great stamp collection and I've sent him, you know. Ah, inverted Jenny stand from the 19 thirties and so he is overwrought with emotion, not because of my great pros, but because This's a great addition to his stamp collection because he is a philatelist or Philip test is How did it how? How it's pronounced e p h i l A T I s t one who collects stamps with the root word a philatelist. It could also be one who fillets. That's what I would think a filet because that's how the British pronounced fillet they pronounce it fill it feel a geo hard T scent at the end of it. I always found that very interesting because sometimes the bread seemed like they really own the word and sometimes I just feel like they're mispronouncing and just to be cute, Cute, sort of like aluminium like that's not the word Brits come on Aluminum. You're adding syllables and dump along his letters added in that feels feels out of that place with American English. To be fair. We can't really criticized The people who are doing it first. That's also fair, Ben. They would add an extra P on shop, then that's kind of their call. Yet.

Casey Pegram Ben Atlanta Alex Williams Paris asthma Superproducer France Ramsay Bush Jenny Knoll Philip Noel
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

08:08 min | 4 months ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Welcome to the show. Ridiculous historians. Thanks So much for tuning in peek behind the curtain. It is officially summer in Atlanta. The humidity and the heat combined to drape the city in soup. It feels like walking through soup. So I am very, very glad to be here inside our air conditioned studio. My name is Ben. My name is no shipping container is icy. Cool today on outside, it is sort of. There's this me asthma, this sort of funk this patina of Awful hot, sweaty grossness. That does kind of envelope the city and have it over and I did it. It just happened overnight. Yeah, permeated it permeated this fair metropolis of ours. I always forget about how dire the situation becomes. When we hit summer in Atlanta, And you know, this may mean that we're in here recording. Maur episodes. We do want to start the show with a big shout out to our guest. Superproducer Ramsey Ram jams Young So everybody give him a fine. Hello. Do we get it done Get a sound a sound effect. You. That's how good I was very good. I like it. And of course, this does not mean that we will ever forget our wonderful. Ah, our third, amigo, right Superproducer. Casey Pegram gone but not forgotten. Gone, I say, but gone Where? Ben, We're talking about this, So I have a theory. Every year or so, Casey disappears. And in France, someone else reappears. A very different person who happens to look a little bit like our dear friend Casey Pegram. This guy we imagine is a member of the criminal underbelly of Paris. Known only by the name live Bush. Yeah. And he dons a completely different get up in the form of a very slick looking letter jacket, a single dangly cross hearing on his left on his left ear, and sometimes he wears fingerless gloves and rides around in one of those cool little mod motorbikes in the pictures. Yeah, and we strongly suspect that he may have one or more secret families. It's true. None of this Greek neither confirm nor deny any of this were wildly speculate. It's all true, they'll put the pieces together, people. We're gonna have to let Casey have his day in court here and defend himself. But you know, Casey's not here. We're joined with Ramsay helping us become the slack here. What's least he's doing his double life. But that's not the only person that we have on the show today, is it? That's absolutely true. This is a special episode that I know we were both very excited about. We have in our network, a brand new podcast the we're we're all huge fans of sincerely huge fans of and it happens to be created by one of our close friends who you may have heard mentioned on our shore. Others shows before, folks, let's give it up for Alex Williams, the brains behind the podcast. We call ephemeral because that's name of The podcast. Hi. Alex makes us call it that just by virtue of having titled it being a very good tile in a very fine podcast. Thank you for being here. What a flattering introduction. I'm very happy to be. Here is the thing we've been working with you for quite some time. Now we've kind of seen you grow and develop and become more and more of a badass in with the pros referred to as the podcast space. Making wild jest. Ical ating, quote fingers when I say that you really have to. But here's the thing. You really took it another level in terms of making only a history podcast, but something that I referred to when I describe it to friends as something akin to like poetry meets sound collage meets music, Concrete meets history, and I think it's just a really beautiful piece of work. And I'm just beyond stoked this on our network and that you're the guy behind him. So we'd like to ask you A good pinch. I don't know if I could pull that up. That was great. It's good. Well, now it is your turn. So we'd like to ask you some questions about ephemeral about your your inspiration behind it the first yet with with that excellent description that Knoll just just was I What? How would you describe? How do you describe it? When when someone's like. Hey, what's this thing you're working on? I start stammering and sweating, and I tried to make it as concise as possible is thinking of a quick pitch in bed the other night. It's something like A show about fleeting moments and the things they leave behind, because that's what ephemera is right. Ephemera is sort of a remnant of a thing that no longer is around, I guess kind of, or the idea of things being ephemeral means that they're fleeting or that they're here today. Gone tomorrow, but they do leave behind some kind of residue if you know where to look right. Yes. So the word itself is kind of tricky in the textbook. A family might just mean paper, Right? Broadsides, tickets, pamphlets for museums, Basically, anything printed hand printed, you know? Printing press computer printed That wasn't meant to be saved. But then it gets in the issue of like, how do you determine whether something was meant to be saved? Or not? Right? Like, for instance, a train schedule from the early 19 hundreds. Now the ones that are around are considered Thing to be. Things have historical value, right? But when they were printed, they were thought to have a definitive and very short lifespan or span of utility. One of the really classic examples is a stamp that episode of Working on that. Come on Mondays about this Monday that might not be the Monday will come out on a Monday. Come on a Monday. I don't know when this will come out. The stamp is really classic example. Right. So you've written a letter to your friend Noel and you stand and you've put in me on in the mailbox and he gets it rips it opened, reads the letter and he's you know, overwrought with emotion, Whatever he throws out I hope the recycles the and that's it, but but no happens to have a great stamp collection and I've sent him, you know. Ah, inverted Jenny stand from the 19 thirties, and so he is overwrought with emotion, not because of my great pros, but because This's a great addition to his stamp collection because he is a philatelist or Philip test is How did it How is that how it's pronounced? Ph I l A T I s t one who collects stand was the rude word a philatelist? It could also be one who fillets. That's what I would think a filet because that's how the British pronounced fillet they pronounce it fill it feel a geo hard T scent at the end of it. I always found that very interesting because sometimes the Brits seemed like they really own the word and sometimes they just feel like they're mispronouncing and just to be cute, Cute, sort of like aluminium like that's not the word Brits. Come on. It's aluminum. You're adding syllables there that don't belong, letters added. It feels feels so. That's place with American English. To be fair. We can't really criticized The people who are doing it first. That's also fair, Ben. They would add an extra P on shop, then that's kind of their call. Yet to answer that question about Entomology. It's interesting because it comes from French and Greek. So ah. Italia means exemption from payment. The French Philo means loving, so it's loving exemption from payment. Which is what I heard right now, but it's it makes sense. But don't ask me to explain it. Well, we can. We're more about this. What? What did you What are you exploring? On this episode concerning stamps? Well, it's not. It's all over. It's so much forth. And you know, one of the things that we're doing is actually taking the word apart in this In this episode, Eso Ephemera. Comes from Through words epi meaning honor of like epicurious epidermis on DH camera meaning day. It's like a Latin Greek.

Casey Pegram Ben Atlanta asthma Alex Williams Eso Ephemera Paris Superproducer France Ramsay Bush Knoll Noel Jenny Philip
"casey pegram" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Of those things you can use to break the glass from the inside if you ever go off a cliff into the ocean or a lake somebody of water they and make sure you get the kind that will let you cut the seat belt right well I guess that extra attachment little razor almost right behind the the hammer but why are we talking about being prepared why are we talking about Cold War stuff Hey your goal right I am still me who is that handsome devil just outside the booth on the ones and twos a good boy out there avoid Casey Pegram yes super producer Casey Pegram remember that song by Dada called I'm going to Disneyland yeah actually yeah he is like this is the part where it says it's to rat on a monkey's back headed west into the black I'm going to Disneyland today is not going to Disneyland Nikita Khrushchev yep we were going to use it out a little bit with the history of Disneyland but let's let's just get right to the heart of the matter Disneyland is an iconic American thing right it's one of the world's most famous amusement parks and people from across the planet associate it with the American dream the iconic image of what Americans do for fun right if you've probably met some people from abroad who just assume you've been to Disneyland what do you do it Disneyland van well let's see you can watch the fireworks for free that you've seen that I've been to Anaheim and they did not go to Disneyland but those fireworks probably get real dole to the people that live there that is like look now you will call I you guys all into because I was in the same car driving his back you're right Ben my am I have a short memory when it comes to beach related things so with with this in mind we also have to look at the context of the Cold War when we talk about the Cold War we must mention explore the life and times of the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev or is he called one of those press releases of the time years ago his newsreel wellness is here it.

Casey Pegram Dada Disneyland Disneyland van Anaheim dole Ben Nikita Khrushchev producer
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Go bag and also one of those things you can use to break the glass from the inside ever go off a cliff into the ocean or a lake somebody of water they and make sure you get the kind that will let you cut the seat belt right well I guess that extra attachment little razor almost right behind the the hammer but why are we talking about being prepared why are we talking about Cold War stuff Hey your goal right I am still me who is that handsome devil just outside the booth on the ones and twos a good boy out there avoid Casey Pegram yes super producer Casey Pegram remember that song by Dada called I'm going to Disneyland yeah actually yeah Nancy is like this is the part where it says it's to rat on a monkey's back headed west into the black I'm going to Disneyland because there's not going to Disneyland Nikita Khrushchev yep we were going to you I tease it out a little bit with the history of Disneyland but let's let's just get right to the heart of the matter Disneyland is an iconic American thing right it's one of the world's most famous amusement parks and people from across the planet associate it with the American dream the iconic image of what Americans do for fun right if you've probably met some people from abroad who just assume you've been to Disneyland what do you do it Disneyland man well let's see you can watch the fireworks for free that you've seen that I've been to Anaheim and they did not go to Disneyland but those fireworks probably get real dole to the people that live there there's like a look now you'll recall I called you guys all into because I was in the same car driving his back you're right Ben my am I have a short memory when it comes to beach related things so with with this in mind we also have to look at the context of the Cold War when we talk about the Cold War we must mention and explore the life and times of the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev or is he called one of those press releases of the time it is a good is newsreel well let's hear it.

Casey Pegram Dada Nancy Anaheim dole Ben Nikita Khrushchev producer Disneyland
"casey pegram" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

14:32 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"And I'm gonna say rented for the show I'm a little horse today as opposed to a giant luxury steed worth it well you know I think it gives a bit of gravitas to your state and hopefully our super producer Casey Pegram can fix it in post the man is a wizard I am telling you he is also in addition to being are quite talented Casey Pegram is also a very I would say a principled man that's sure if he was ever to slip you a Mickey he would have a damn good reason let me tell you what it would be a justified Mickey yeah we've talked about this off the air if either of us ever walked by and saw super producer Casey Pedro dragging a body sized garbage bag down the street we would just pick up the other end in helping move it because even if the world body he would have good reason for his actions and you know that that that day antiquated term slipped him a make your her a Mickey I just use a typically referred more to lacing a drink with a psychoactive drugs or something that would incapacitate someone not necessarily kill them like the Mickey is that we're talking about today would yes ladies and gentlemen today we are talking about the dark art of poison and not just any poison however we're talking about one of the most storied notorious and for a time popular poisons human civilization we'd like to introduce you to arsenic that's right actually earned the title the king of poison by the fifteenth century but it had a quite rich history even well before that right we know that agent objections of mind arsenic compounds we know that in one of the very very early pharmacological taxed the D. materia medica arsenic is also mentioned this is a naturally occurring element that is just across the planet and you can find a map of naturally occurring arsenic here in the United States it's spooky scary stuff and the fact it was naturally occurring is one of the many reasons that made it such a popular tool for getting the job done because it was easy to get because of its use in everything from medication to pesticides to industrial processing materials and things like that and it is odorless colorless and tasteless and dissolves in water in any other liquids easily in its oxide form the word arsenic itself comes from the Greek are Senna con which meant bold or potent medicine after moniker for this little killer and we do know that even in ancient times people were aware of arsenic potential as a poison on the first law against policing was passed in eighty two B. C. E. it was a Roman law that specifically mentioned outlawing arsenic because it was used so often by assassins in a in the light I love the point out the medicinal or the perceived medicinal benefits of arsenic because that's the thread that we see continuing concurrently with his popularity as a police in and earlier just a moment ago we mentioned that the fifteenth century is crucial to arsenic role as a poison used by everyone from jilted lovers to assassins to wealthy Italian aristocrats this is the moment where if arsenic was some sort of pop star it suddenly recorded its breakout single yeah I think the reason that that's a good way to put it is because it actually had a substance had a huge impact on politics especially in Italy Italians as it turns out had quite the reputation of wielding this substance and poison in general for political gain so in the Italian Renaissance you may have heard of the Borja family there is I think there was a Netflix series called the boards as maybe it was ma'am Sears like them you can get a cab Jeremy irons in it but it chronicles this pretty shady Italian Renaissance family that were quite powerful in fact we're Drigo Borja who actually went on to become pope Alexander the sixteen forty ninety two so no slouch and big big social climbers these Porsches and he had two children one was that sorry lose I think over the K. those and then the other one was Lucretius and Lucrece yeah actually is the one who got sort of a bad rap as being a poisoner because there is an opera by done it said he called Lucretius and there's a scene in it where she apparently poisons several people find drive people and as history doesn't really support that in fact she was apparently quite a pious woman and died without probably ever having poison anyone had just credit where credit is due up front we're getting a lot of this information from a fantastic book called the king of poisons history of arsenic by John scandal out so Lucretius seems to have her hands mostly clean but her brother chase are heirs to sorry is the one who really took this to the next level as we'll get to it's interesting because poison got a bit of a rap as a quote unquote woman's weapon get to that later so chase or a Porsche apparently was guilty of just poisoning hundreds of people dozens at the very least I'm in his pursuit of a political career it was like his imho his modus operandi what's fascinating here is that poisoning via arsenic became so prevalent in well known in Italy there was considered a formal masted assassination and earlier in the beginning of the show you may have heard the phrase Italian ation tally nation I do love that Italian nation was the slang term for Boise via arsenic outside of Italy think the Brits came up with that one then very pretty and we'll get to the how this ultimately spread from Italy elsewhere before we do that as we talk about this there were a handful of poison assassins that that had been really made names for themselves one of whom was Julia to fana local flower lots of fun I which I love all of these assassins have these amazing shorthand names and she is her story goes a couple different ways there's there's there's several versions of it but one version is that she invented this mixture a harmless looking liquid that apparently is as few as four to six drops would be enough to quote destroy a man and the principal ingredients material which was called aqua to fana is thought to have been arsenic and you got to think about the time we're talking about where men ruled families and governments and iron fist and women were nothing but channel so to empower women with this material was lots of fun and was able to do because it it you know there are many historians who say every woman in Naples probably had a bottle of the stuff in there you know medicine cabinets among their perfumes that only they would know which one it was this is this is a crucial point because I don't know if we're jumping ahead too much with this but is it seems like a good time to mention the method of delivery that was that was employed often Italy it wasn't an immediate death and this is a a instead a slow poisoning so you would have the there's this old myth I founder this old legend that said women in particular parts of Italy to keep their husbands faithful would supply them with a small amount of poison and then a small antidote so they had to keep coming back home but regardless of the rap veracity or a falsity of that we do know is true that people were being poisoned slowly rather than immediately often you know it's true actually found another fantastic article called aqua to fana slow poisoning and husband killing in seventeenth century Italy for website called a blast from the past and it's it's it's really kind of just a blog but it was written by wow it's not even really credited as having an author but I I checked everything and had a really great qualifying links and just a fantastic article specifically talking about the role that women played in this whole poisoning epidemic and lots of fun especially and being kind of the one that jumpstarted that and how a lot of her story is sort of the stuff of legends but to your point then the idea of the slow poisoning was really important in very devout Catholic Italy right because it gave the dying husband time to do a couple of things one of which was get his affairs in order if you're talking about this the inheritance powder making sure that the wife would be well provided for in the family would have all the needed after he passed for the church would have a donation the church would have a nation or that he was able to repent for his sins so this is a really sting thing because that's low meeting out of poison through food or drink was really a crucial part of this whole thing is a fantastic quoting this article from chambers journal which is a magazine started in eighteen thirty two by William chambers and it's a little long I was gonna read part of it just going to give the sense of at the time how this was looked upon administered in wine or tea or some other liquid by the flattering treacherous it produced but it's scarcely noticeable affect the husband became a little out of sorts felt weak and language so little indisposed that he would scarcely call in a medical man after the second dose of the poison this week yes and Langer became more pronounced the beautiful media sees a lot of language in here that characterizes this woman as some sort of horrible murderous Harbi type character like referencing media but obviously you know the political landscape of the time it's kind of a gray area there we'll get to that later this beautiful Medea who expressed so much anxiety for her husband's indisposition was scarcely be an object of suspicion and perhaps would prepare her husband's food or prescribed by the doctor with her own fair hands in this way the third drop would be administered would prostrate even the most vigorous man okay in the last bid to save her fair fame the wife would demand a post mortem examination resulting nothing except that the woman was able to pose as a slandered innocent and then it would be remembered that her husband died without either pain inflammation fever or spasms this is important because of for a long time arsenic was a difficult poison to identify not only was it odorless and colorless and so on but arsenic poisoning exhibited symptoms that could easily be confused with symptoms of diseases that were common at the time such as cholera which you will remember from several other strange episodes we've done on ridiculous history end because again it was naturally occurring and considered medicinal people were able to easily obtained arsenic I'd this year when our earlier episode on guy Fawkes we talked about the relative ease or difficulty of acquiring gun powder it was much easier to acquire arsenic end additionally arsenic was used in so many other things will get to that in just a second I have a great list for you know but before we do I think we need to bust some stereo types here the idea of poison being so closely associated with Italy this concept thrived because it sort of justified the stereo types that the French or the British already had about Italians they thought they were devious you'll Monte burns ask hand robbers sure and they often described it you know as a d'italia nation or as a an Italian nested of murder with the U. connotations being there was somehow cowardly but the French and the British both were often using arsenic they were just claiming it was an Italian it's true it was actually Catherine de Medici who married Henry the second who would go on to become the king of France in fifteen thirty three who is given lots of credit for bringing the Italian method of of assassination to France and specifically in using it for political gain yes and by the sixteenth century court records revealed that the cases involving poisoning were occurring regularly in Britain if not frequently there were about a dozen recorded poisonings between fifteen seventy one and fifteen ninety eight and of course one of the most popular choices of poison was in a stunning plot twist arsenic yeah in France Louis the fourteenth cats so weird out by this whole thing and feared for his life to the point that he established a special commission with the express purpose of investigating this phenomenon it took them until sixteen eighty two to finish during which time a hundred and four people were tried thirty four were executed and the rest were either banished or got prison terms and then this is the first time you start to see maybe not super well codified regulations regarding the sale of poisons but it was a little bit more draconian where if you were caught supplying someone poison for the purposes of committing a murder whether or not they succeeded you would be subject to death yourself right so not a fine not imprisonment but a horde death penalty if you.

producer Casey Pegram
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

13:49 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Boring and often let's join bend bowline and old brown as they dive into some of the stories from across the span of humanity this is the ridiculous history podcast we're here we're live well we're recording this live welcome to the show ridiculous historians my name is Ben we are of course joined with our super producer Casey Pegram my trusty coastal is off on some lovely ventures on the other side of the country but will return very soon speaking of returning we are incredibly fortunate today to have our returning guest host joining us Christopher Haase Yoda's thanks for coming thanks for having a band thing tried me Casey Knowles wherever you are whenever you are however you are thank you yes I all man I can't wait until I I hope we can reveal some of the the cool stuff that no was working on but I what I really wish were happening right now is that we would talk about knoll not being here and then anyone listen to this podcast would just slowly turn around and he's standing right behind them that's great no my it's my dream it was also it was Halloween recently so maybe I'm still in that mindset I'm definitely still in the mindset of man it's the most wonderful time of the year I love Halloween what did he what did you do for Halloween dressed up as a woodland creature I was kinda will feed took the family around the neighborhood and did not accept any candy because we've got a little baby who's not old enough for candy yet and I would feel like a real bomb taking candy from a wealthy snow taking candy for a baby I couldn't eat it under the pretense is that it's a really for me and I a grown man I can afford my own camps there you go that's that speaks highly it's because your character in a in a very complimentary way we'll see your your candy ethics are on point I think that's something to be proud of thank you I would have done the opposite I would have just to you know maybe around yes I I do think like maybe you would be fun to push a stroller around the neighborhood but with no baby in there and just be a person with a an empty stroller that's weird that's weird Christopher but it's not Halloween anymore right we should divested these spooky thought Hey I am always a reluctant to give up the ghost following what your rights things move on progress that's the name of the game for the human species hopefully theory M. today's episode is something that I thought would be fascinating for anybody who is a fan of words and one is a fan of writing today's episode is about the strange origin of the Oxford English Dictionary no this is something that you and I in particular have ever use pretty frequently over the years I have yet to dictionaries of of many kinds of income and super handy whether your professional writer whether you're an amateur writer whether you don't really care about writing at all but you want to know what a word means you can look it up in the dictionary the great thing yeah and it's funny you mention this because nola night will often have conversations where we one of us is on a rant about something and then we decide to use a word because it sounds particularly enticing yeah only to later usually when it's just the two of us hanging out on for us to later go okay one of us needs to look that up and make sure it means what we think it means we're using the right meaning were you were saying it properly I mean that's what the dictionary is for but also that's what Facebook is for social media I think anyone who is anyone in the podcast worlds very familiar with mispronounced words out there's a lot of words on there he went accidentally say something a little incorrectly but we rely on people like ridiculous historians the Facebook group associated with this fine podcast to point out in a constructive and critical manner any for able any misstep any misuse of a wired a lot well man you really put us on the tight rope here man alright well let's let's give it a go the Oxford English Dictionary has been around for a long time but perhaps not as long as many of us would assume the work on the dictionary began I guess the larger historical context is fairly recent it began in eighteen fifty seven yeah well that's when there was a call put out for a collection of words that a definition of words spanning the twelfth century to the present day at the time work actually didn't get under way though in till the late eighteen seventies eighteen seventy nine I believe and it took five years for the first volume of the O. E. D. as the kids on the street call it's to be published rate rate and here we introduce our first character for this story a fellow named professor James Murray it was a challenging assignment for Murray who was the editor of this of this dictionary the way the process worked was relatively simple people would send in entries for words and the Oxford English Dictionary functions as what's called an historical dictionary meaning it will talk about the development of a word rather than just its present day usage will see a little bit of entomology in the dictionary see a lot of etymology I mean the thing the thing about the Oxford English Dictionary is it's it doesn't just give you the definition of the word right it goes into the history of the word we said the first volume of the the dictionary wasn't published until eighteen eighty four this is a life long pursuit for Murray and his team the final volume of the dictionary wasn't published until nineteen twenty eight that's crazy yes that's that's insane and and it took a lot of blood sweat and cheers because we have to remember it was much more difficult to aggregate information back that you know what I mean these people had to literally write this stuff out usually by hand and send it via post yeah a majority of us in the modern world and I would assume most of us listening to this podcast we live in a wealth of information we have so many things available to us we have so much knowledge available to us but I think it's really really really easy to take that for granted right but you just look something up but for you to look something up another human being had to have put that thing in a place for it to be searchable in the first place so I mean imagine the task of speaking a language and thinking you know what all these words we just said in the past twenty seconds I just used forty of them let's let's catalogue ma'am let's itemize them let's label them I mean this is is it's a it's a crazy undertaking it's wild you have to define what a language is what is inside the language what's outside on which you have to talk to linguistics you've talked anthropologist you have to talk to authors and books and what's gobbledygook right which is that in the dictionary I don't know I believe I do actually it is in the business so that I think that's a very good way to paint the picture here professor James Murray I knew this was going to be a huge laborious herculean effort however she underestimated the Normandy off the task when the first agreed to edit this new English dictionary they thought this is going to take a decade and this will probably be gosh I don't know guys around seven thousand pages long in four volumes this call for volumes with the ended up was something much much larger by the time the final results were published in nineteen twenty eight it's twelve volumes long it is comprised of four hundred and fourteen thousand eight hundred twenty five words defined and has almost two million citations employed to illustrate what they mean as Murray is working on this he builds a corrugated iron shed that he decides to called the scriptorium and to the scriptorium houses him and his small team of assistance as well as this delusion of slips of paper that have been mailed to them that each you know an entry in the dictionary yeah and and this is all taking place in the U. K. so this is just one country you know right this is this isn't even trying to get that the breadth of global knowledge I do really like the name scriptorium I imagine Murray having a rough day at home maybe the kids are being kind of a pain and he storms out of his house plans that are as I'm going to the scriptorium I can't handle this to this program to the scriptorium I love it I am just gonna start saying that I am gonna find something our office and get a label at the scriptorium it won't be this studio that's too on the nose but I'm looking for scriptoria it next time you shout I'm off to the sprint four M. I. A. I'm really excited to see all of our co workers look around but musically and confuse Italy and befuddled Lee and but you and I will share something there we go no you don't and you for listening in case you're you in on this I'm totally in case on the case ladies and gentleman so as as people responding to this call this this crowd sourcing of dictionary entries Mr Murray begins to notice that there's one shining star out of all of his correspondence the most prolific the most consistent correspondent the man was sent in more than ten thousand entries to this developing dictionary a guy named doctor Williams G. minor all that marine knows about minor is that he is a doctor who's a surgeon he lives in Crowe form in the English countryside in Berkshire and marine reasonably assumes that minor must be quote a practicing medical men of literary taste with a good deal of the national your I like yeah sound sounds like the kind of guy who would send in send in entries to the dictionary the dictionary project it did they called the dictionary project at the time I think they did I'm a dictionaries existed before the we do so I think the word probably was out there here's where we introduce our second character doctor William Chester minor unamerican I'm yeah yeah so you've got this American guy whose contributing to one of the pillars of the English language what we know about doctor minor well we know that as you said he does reside in the UK he was an American not only an American but a surgeon not only a surgeon but a veteran a veteran heat but he he also had sort of a global backgrounds right so he existed in a world where many languages were available to him his parents were from New England they were missionaries and minor was actually born in say lawn which today is known to Sri Lanka so she grew up in the son of the son of a Americans in a former British colony a lot of languages are kind of swirling around and he's in that milieu it comes back to the US and he ends up fighting in the civil war he's fighting but he's working as a surgeon right so he's a he's a medical doctor he's in the civil war he experiences some horrific things as many people did but it seems to have really taken a toll on Dr minor on his mental health on his well being really rough stuff I mean he he was in situations where he saw sort of incendiary attacks he witnessed other soldiers burning to death yeah this is terrible then I don't know if you know about this but what doctor minor was ordered to do to a certain disorder right yeah it's it's a terrible story so he he served as you said it very is incredibly bloody conflicts including the battle of the wilderness nineteen sixty four which was a blood bath the particular story we're talking about now it concerns an Irish soldier in the Union Army minor was told to punish the soldier carry out his punishment by branding him on the face with a hot iron a with a capital D. for deserter yeah so this was a was a an Irish citizen who is fighting for the cause of the union but decided he was done with the battle wanted to leave wanted to leave the army was I assume captured in the brig and and minor was ordered to brand this guy against his wishes against the wishes of both of them I think in this hall it's him this affects him for the rest of his life.

Ben Casey Pegram producer twenty seconds five years four M
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

12:59 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Boring and often let's join bend bowline and old brown as they dive into some of the stories from across the span of humanity this is the ridiculous history podcast we're here we're live while we're recording this live welcome to the show ridiculous historians my name is Ben we are of course going with our super producer Casey Pegram my trusty coastal is off on some lovely ventures on the other side of the country but will return very soon speaking of returning we are incredibly fortunate today to have our returning guest host joining us Christopher Hussey Otis thanks for coming thanks for having a band thing tried me Casey Knowles wherever you are whenever you are however you are thank you yes man I can't wait until I I hope we can reveal some of the the cool stuff that no was working on but I what I really wish for happening right now is that we would talk about knoll not being here and then anyone listen to this podcast would just slowly turn around and he's standing right behind them that's great you know my it's my dream it was also it was Halloween recently so maybe I'm still in that mindset I'm definitely still in that mindset of man it's the most wonderful time of the year I love Halloween what he what did you do for Halloween dressed up as a woodland creature I was kinda will feed took the family around the neighborhood and did not accept any candy because we've got a little baby who's not old enough for candy yet and I would feel like a real bomb taking candy from a wealthy snow taking candy for a baby could meet is under the pretense is that it's a really for me and I'm not grown man I can afford my own kids there you go that's that speaks highly it's because your character in a in a very complimentary way we'll see your your candy ethics are on point I think that's something to be proud of thank you I would have done the opposite I would have just to you know maybe around yes yeah I I did think like maybe you would be fun to push a stroll around the neighborhood but with no baby in there and just be a person with a an empty stroller that's weird that's weird Christopher but it it's not Halloween anymore right we should divested these spooky thoughts on our souls may I am always too reluctant to give up the ghost Helene but your right things move on progress that's the name of the game for the human species hopefully theory M. today's episode is something that I thought would be fascinating for anybody who is a fan of words one is a fan of writing today's episode is about the strange origin of the Oxford English Dictionary no this is something that you and I in particular have ever use pretty frequently over the years I have yet to dictionaries of of many kinds I think come and super handy whether your professional writer whether you're an amateur writer whether you don't really care about writing at all but you want to know what a word means you can look it up in the dictionary the great thing yeah and it's funny you mention this because nola night will often have conversations where we one of us is on a rant about something and then we decide to use a word because it sounds particularly enticing yeah only to later usually when it's just the two of us hanging out on for us to later go okay one of us needs to look that up and make sure it means what we think it means we're using the right meaning were you were saying it properly I mean that's what the dictionary is for but also that's what Facebook is for social media I think anyone who is anyone in the podcast worlds very familiar with mispronounced words out there's a lot of words out there he went accidentally say something a little incorrectly but we rely on people like ridiculous historians the Facebook group associated with this fine podcast to point out in a constructive and critical manner any for able any misstep any misuse of a wired a lot well man you really put us on the tight rope here man alright well let's let's give it a go the Oxford English Dictionary has been around for a long time but perhaps not as long as many of us would assume the work on the dictionary began I guess a larger historical context is fairly recent it began in eighteen fifty seven yeah well that's when there was a call put out for a collection of words that a definition of words spanning the twelfth century to the present day at the time work actually didn't get under way though in till the late eighteen seventies eighteen seventy nine I believe and it took five years for the first volume of the O. E. D. as the kids on the street call it's to be published rate rate in here we introduce our first character for this story a fellow named professor James Murray it was a challenging assignment for marine who was the editor of this of this dictionary the way the process worked was relatively simple people would send in entries for words and the Oxford English Dictionary functions as what's called an historical dictionary meaning it will talk about the development of a word rather than just its present day usage we'll see a little bit of entomology in the dictionary see a lot of etymology I mean the thing the thing about the Oxford English Dictionary is it's it doesn't just give you the definition of the word right it goes into the history of the word we said the first volume of the the dictionary wasn't published until eighteen eighty four and this is a life long pursuit for Murray and his team the final volume of the dictionary wasn't published until nineteen twenty eight that's crazy yes that's that's insane and and it took a lot of blood sweat and tears because we have to remember it was much more difficult to aggregate information back that you know what I mean these people had to literally write this stuff out usually by hand and send it via post yeah a majority of us in the modern world and I would assume most of us listening to this podcast we live in a wealth of information we have so many things available to us we have so much knowledge available to us but I think it's really really really easy to take that for granted right but you just look something up but for you to look something up another human being had to have put that thing in a place for it to be searchable in the first place so I mean imagine the task of speaking a language and thinking you know what all these words we just said in the past twenty seconds I just used forty of them catalogue them let's itemize them let's label them I mean this is is it's a it's a crazy undertaking it's wild you have to define what a language is what is inside the language what's outside on which you have to talk to linguistics you've talked anthropologist you have to talk to authors and books and what's gobbledygook right which is that in the dictionary I don't know I believe I do actually it is innocent so that I think that's a very good way to pull the picture here professor James Murray knew this was going to be a few laborious herculean effort however she underestimated the enormity of the task when they first agreed to edit this new English dictionary they thought this is going to take a decade and this will probably be gosh I don't know guys around seven thousand pages long in four volumes this call for volumes with the ended up was something much much larger by the time the final results were published in nineteen twenty eight it's twelve volumes long it is comprised of four hundred and fourteen thousand eight hundred and twenty five words defined and has almost two million citations employed to illustrate what they mean as Murray is working on this he builds a corrugated iron shed that he decides to called the scriptorium and to the scriptorium houses him and his small team of assistance as well as this delusion of slips of paper that have been mailed to them that are each you know an entry in the dictionary yeah and and this is all taking place in the U. K. so this is just one country you know right this is this isn't even trying to get that the breadth of global knowledge I do really like the name scriptorium I imagine Murray having a rough day at home maybe the kids are being kind of a pain and he storms out of his house slams the door is I'm going to the scriptorium I can't handle this to this program to the scriptorium I love it I am just gonna start saying that I am gonna find something our office I'm going to label it the scriptorium it won't be this studio that's too on the nose but I'm looking for scriptoria next time you shout I'm off to the sprint four M. I. A. I'm really excited to see all of our coworkers look around but musically and confuse Italy and befuddled Lee and but you and I will share something there we go and you for listening in case you're you in on this I'm totally in case on the case ladies and gentleman so as as people responding to this call this this crowd sourcing of dictionary entries Mr Murray begins to notice that there's one shining star out of all of his correspondence the most prolific the most consistent correspondent the man was sent in more than ten thousand entries to this developing dictionary a guy named Dr William C. minor all that marine knows about minor is that he is a doctor who is a surgeon he lives in Crowthorne in the English countryside in Berkshire and Marie reasonably assumes that minor must be quote a practicing medical men of literary taste with a good deal of late show if your I like yeah sound sounds like the kind of guy who would send in send in entries to the dictionary the dictionary project the did they called the dictionary project at the time I think they did I'm a dictionaries existed before the we do so I think the word probably was out there and here's here's where we introduce our second character doctor William Chester minor unamerican I'm yeah yeah so you've got this American guy whose contributing to one of the pillars of the English language what we know about doctor minor well we know that as you said he does reside in the U. K. he was an American not only an American but a surgeon not only a surgeon but a veteran of veteran heat but he he also had sort of a global backgrounds right so he existed in a world where many languages were available to him his parents were from New England they were missionaries and minor was actually born in say lawn which today is known as Sri Lanka so he grew up in the son of the son of a Americans in a former British colony a lot of languages are kind of swirling around and he's in that milieu it comes back to the US and he ends up fighting in the civil war he's fighting but he's working as a surgeon right so he's a he's a medical doctor he's in the civil war he experiences some horrific things as many people did but it seems to have really taken a toll on Dr minor on his mental health on his well being really rough stuff I mean he he was in situations where he saw sort of incendiary attacks he witnessed other soldiers burning to death yeah this is terrible then I don't know if you know about this but what doctor minor was ordered to do to a certain disorder right yeah it's it's a terrible story so easy he served as you said various incredibly bloody.

Ben Casey Pegram producer twenty seconds five years four M
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

14:15 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Hello everyone ridiculous historians thank you for tuning in this is the show where we look at some of the strangest weirdest most bizarre yes ridiculous people places things and events throughout the span of human civilization animals vegetables minerals from today I'm not sure which category this topic falls under but it's it's a thing room is historically driven and it's a fun thing it is a fun thing no just happen one appointed by the way Ben what's that little are super producer Casey Pegram said okay start talking go right go he literally crack the whip at us I I is you you would you is thrown both case you know I under the bus before the before the show started I had a yeah by by stating that you are more grateful than anyone for particularly surprising amazing thing we have happening in this episode that's just me over compensating you know the note you want how about this let's let's drop the drop the goods what we have today that's the right that's correct yes so we have today an amazing story about an iconic food product that everyone in the U. S. is aware of it has to many people throughout the world are aware of this it is called spam but you and I are not exploring this story alone today hi we called in an expert folks would like to introduce you to our friend and today's co host any Reese hi everybody thanks so much for having me guys you know you were spam expert any you know I am a size gusting but does sound really great yeah it didn't work out they would have any open the can a little bit of the jazz for their eyes yeah while I did not need that mental images now she did okay the the expert maybe not I don't know we're all kind of like armchair experts on a lot of things we have a good time researching I don't know how you would get the qualification of spam express I'm gonna refer to you as our spam spirit guides to how bout that spam consultant I'm gonna go ahead and email I'm not getting a lot of Spanish yeah like make all the filters on your email that's either like a I'm shopping at a grocery store and going wait there's so many different things and then you appear yeah then you explain it this step by step basis I just want you to know that I am preemptively very appreciative of that I I feel like I'd be good at that I'm not sure but are very efficient thank you and you are you are a co host of our food podcast Seaver food lifestyle travel could you tell us a little bit about Seaver yeah favor is a show where we explore the science history culture of food and drinks and why we like what we like and how you can get more of that it used to be confused every recently rebranded but we did all episode on ma'am back when it was old school food staff and I have a confession to make that known I are talking about a briefly before that anyone who knows anything about apple podcast reviews you don't read them unless you're a **** right which I am you're a result in me but one time a friend of mine left a review and was like you've got to go find it you've got to read it and I said you know you're asking me to do but eventually I got over it and delved into the the nightmare will run into the shark that is hi guest reviews I like the reviews that might say something about you might say something about me as well but one of a number one recurring negative reviews was that I've never tried any of the foods are talking about and when we recorded spam I had not tried it yeah you're very open about it on the show though it seems like a very misplaced complaint you know you're yeah you're owning up to it you honestly maybe it's better that you haven't tasted the stuff it makes you more objective about still try to I tried it afterwards I went and got band to be in and that was a lovely man what was to be yeah it's a very popular if you can find in convenience stores and why that's how popular it is a kind of to me looks like McGeary like sushi it bam oh yes okay yeah I'm familiar with that and what we know now a days is that it in most grocery stores that carry spam you won't just be the iconic regular garden variety spaniel see stuff like Turkey spam spam with bacon spam lights and because this is so recognizable we have to ask ourselves how how did this thing which people love or hate how did it become so big with this in the world today how how come everybody vegetarians vegans included know what you're talking about misstates him well first of all it's good branding right Hey this bus sound is one of my favorites an ad that ma'am and it's just a delight to say out loud and it's it's it's it meant to be an acronym but the origin of with attacking them actually might be is a little bit lost to history or it's kind of a little murky right yeah there are a couple of stories about where the name came from from the people who should know where it came from I want is that it's like spiced ham or maybe it stands for scientifically processed animal matter animal matter that around not so delicious not white meat animal matter and there's there's others to there's shoulder of pork and ham and then you said spiced ham and if you want to really get into the weeds that's utterly not food related there stop **** in abusive marketing act also the state police association of Massachusetts I didn't realize I was in the running the goals of the Pacific atmospheric monitoring society for the publication of American music systems personnel activity meeting that's from Yale and my personal favorite society for palm top advancement through meetings only through me that's like a fascinating use of time but okay so spam it it dates back to nineteen thirty seven in a town called Austin Minnesota A. K. A. spam town USA room and it was made by Hormel foods the actually pitched as a way to help Z. homemakers serve quick and easy pork dishes without having to slave away for hours in front of it up but in like an Edward Bernays style stroke of genius that also did a thing where it's Hormel the guy he had a slaughter house and he had these by product parts that we worked very sellable make a the pork shoulder we now kind of dig pork shoulder that's like a thing that's like a delicacy rarely people eat at the thanksgiving table or whatever rainbow or enter it now yeah the barbecue I think grain yeah yeah yeah exactly so but he had this surplus of pork shoulder was not a popular cut and so he wanted to figure out a way to make this as you say been convenient a product that could be marketed to homemakers who are all about canned food at the time it was all the rage and they haven't really the first with the ingredients too much you know it's it's strange because when you think of shelf stable that shows they will be in the term for stuff that can stay at room temperature without going bad I guess getting worse than it originally was I think of that usually think of a ton of chemicals with so many syllables and the name that it sounds like a spell from Harry potter right rate but in the case of spam they have what six ingredients is just port slash ham salt water potato starch sugar and of course sodium nitrate of course for color yes that captain issue it is private so spam didn't immediately become this worldwide sensation there were other things happening across the planet that eventually would lead to a spam becoming like the king of canned meat and it goes into an angle that a lot of people might not be aware of because the tensions between the US and Japan during the nineteen thirty there's a guy Donald in show get the university of Hawaii who published a paper on this and he says that the US military began to view Hawaii's fishing fleet as a serious threat to national security so you know this time who why he's still not a U. S. state right so when the Japanese government arranged for many of wise Japanese fishermen to attend fishing schools in Japan there were concerns that these fishermen were actually being interrogated by Japanese navy officials yeah but to what end band to what end so this eventually okay walk through this real quick so in nineteen forty three years after the invention of spam suspicions about the loyalty of Japanese immigrants resulted in the implementation of a federal statute that stopped banned fishing vessels of five tons or more from obtaining licenses in less the person who owned the vessel was a US citizen the next year nineteen forty one they passed a law prohibiting quote aliens from fishing with Gil cursor these different kinds of nets within one mile of sure if they wanted to preserve the fishery resources for native Hawaiians and US citizens this ended careers of a lot of people the fishing industry in Hawaii and then that meant that with out spam these other canned meats and sardines the economy would have collapsed they had to find something to replace this massive fishing industry and let's not forget about executive order ninety sixty six where Franklin Roosevelt basically banned Japanese Americans citizens who were occupying military zones had them put in interment camps in this whole anti Japanese sentiment was why drive in the country and weirdly enough a trickle down to this canned meat products and of course these tensions these discriminatory laws and economic practices were only ripples of a much larger events on the horizon which is World War two and when the war begins spam also has a part to play yeah it does because if you remember spam is pretty near around the time that America was getting involved in four two but it was a popular option for soldiers because I'm getting fresh meat or fresh anything to Hawaii was difficult for American soldiers stationed there so the US government was sending spam or it might not have been exactly spam wasn't is kind of like leftover meat parts that they had that they shipped to Hormel and then they made the my spam like yeah yeah yeah though her Mel's canning ma'am but it probably wasn't exactly with spam is today what we think of it today and it was cheap non perishable could withstand all sorts of weather conditions soldiers weren't exactly happy with spam they were sometimes eating it three times a day so I am sure they were tired of it some of them even wrote hate mail to Hormel which the company must have in a quote girlish file into my favorite diss our quote meatloaf without basic training Hey I'm that didn't pass the physical and the real reason war was held at the tree is with intestines pretty harsh as are some sick burns do you think that this would have been like branded as spam would have come in the tens like with the logo on it and everything because you have made a point on your episode of food stuff back when this call that that almost like the the proper spam kind of got a bad rap because this was like almost like bootleg spam but it was being manufactured in Hormel's canning facilities wondering if they like branded differently or call the like MRE spammers I don't know if I anything about that in your research I didn't find much about that at all in fact the the fact that it wasn't spam was sort of a deep cut was kinda lost on people clearly yeah they were writing those letters those angry letters and it's also you and mines in the kind of people that right mean things about podcasting well it's also in the case of spam there's an interesting linguistic thing that occurs because they're using it as one word to describe this umbrella of a Brillo processed meat so we just got weird for me yeah but you know it's it's similar to the way the instead of people saying search for something on the internet they see Google it or make a Xerox this yeah right and it it seems pretty certain in the history that only a few soldiers received genuine spam well because there's already been this can be product around since the late thirties that's just what people called it maybe spam get an unfair mark the scurrilous mark on history mark Leff his reputation I wonder if it's possible to do that because spam was new and at the time there is such a push to be like right behind the boy is in you know all of American soldiers in number America's doing great alarm any is any great propaganda yeah these tiny American flags yeah Lee twisting between her thumb and forefinger shot off a firecracker I always come with route but I wonder if maybe they made a miscalculation and five spam is supporting the soldiers and this will really get our name out.

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Argue that Zeus is kind of a graphic novelist in some ways I would agree I would agree what do you would you dig in these days these days I'm digging some okay I've been really into some horror comics because you know it's always kinda Halloween in my heart and there's a comic called. regression which is terrifying not for children's about reincarnation and then there's another comic series that's complete called the clean room which is about aliens or maybe something different to say anymore would be to do a disservice cool have you have you had a chance to check out nameless nameless yes yeah yeah ed nameless was the one shot for issues right yes by grant Morrison who I'm always in love with everything he does I'm really trippy out there existentialism dread almost he give you kind of beers and a Lovecraftian territory this one is no exception is ones about like space madness and just like demonic possession and all this is not an exorcism and all kinds of crazy stuff doorways to other dimensions but it's a tight little story and the art is in the same insanely not for the faint of heart yet not only is not for children I would say it's not for you if you're already feeling a little bit you know less than good. I agree that it's a bit of a bummer I'm so glad you read that women I that's one of those that I keep buying copies of any keep giving them away yeah I have a hard cover of it and it is the art is just alone is is fantastic so we have met our mandate for this episode we talked about a crazy weird children's book guy recommended some comics had a good time learn the origins of the word krunk in nerd invented a new phrase to yell out exclamation. it's also kind of like noise. more stories and we hope that you enjoy this episode even half as much as we enjoyed exploring this story with you that's all for two days a stay tuned for our next episode when we examine. a lot of. hold. dangerous amounts of beef yeah in the meantime thanks of course to our super producer Casey Pegram thanks to our research associate Gabe thank you Alex Williams our pal composed our theme and thanks to you and being a dapper and intelligent co host is all thanks man I I recently did my laundry that's probably no fresh and clean thank you. channel simple over twenty five thousand podcast. free right now by downloading the. welcome to bring stuff the production of I heart. Hey bring stuff going on here. Viking warrior is buried in Sweden in the tenth century CE the grave excavated in the eighteen seventies DNA results are published in twenty seventeen sounds like a typical archaeological process of discovery that we take for granted this find however has been anything but typical because this Viking warrior was a woman. underground chamber in eighteen seventy eight this war your had been buried in a seated position with two horses as well as a sword axe knives spears shields and armor piercing arrows in addition a set of gaming pieces representing military strategy was found in the lap of see the body. where to buy such weapons of war and without typical feminine coated items such as jewelry or weaving equipment this high ranking warrior was it seems to be a man for more than a hundred and twenty five years. there had been an osteological analysis in the nineteen seventies suggesting a slender bone structure indicative of a female conclusive evidence was not presented Intel twenty seventeen. Charlie sheen's journal Jansson archaeologist at screens Uppsala university and her colleagues publish their genomic analysis in the American Journal of physical anthropology explaining that ancient DNA taken from a to the arm bone of the buried warrior showed only X. X. chromosomes with no Y. chromosome confirming this Viking warrior was a woman and she was likely more than thirty years old when she died. why did the results take so long we spoke with him standing Jansson by email and she explained good science takes time the project is working with several iron in Viking age skeletons and processing ancient DNA isn't as easy as modern DNA. their findings were initially met with questions and criticisms including suspicions that the wrong bones have been tested a.

Jansson American Journal of physical a Intel Casey Pegram Morrison Sweden Charlie sheen Uppsala university producer research associate Gabe Alex Williams twenty five years thirty years two days
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"We spent a little bit of time before we went on air in search of the perfect song to open today's episode with and by golly by gum I think we got it well let's let's let's roll it just a click but there was some scientists trying to figure out the Sasquatch rate all it was a mess is that the D. it is to the D. man I love the DM is the D. there back though who does what could be more appropriate than the tenacious D. song about big foot about the Sasquatch hello I'm Ben I am knoll enroll you found that perfect song as we were as we were looking through the internet to find a cool fun song what had to be the one band because there is really no finer song of the mystery of the big foot this a squash then in search of Sasquatch by a system that was also the TV show version I don't think it was actually on the record but the the may the only way that song could be topped is if she should do when they return they put out a reprise version or they have the discovery of the Sasquatch we want to of course be a distant hello to our super producer Casey Pegram and they are very close hello to our guests to super producer Paul decade yeah he seated right outside the shipping container we're looking at him right now.

Casey Pegram producer Paul
"casey pegram" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

WBAP 820AM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on WBAP 820AM

"Of those things you can use to break the glass from the inside if you ever go off a cliff into the ocean or a lake somebody of water they and make sure you get the kind that will let you cut the seat belt right well I guess that extra attachment will razor almost right behind the the hammer but why are we talking about being prepared why are we talking about Cold War stuff Hey your goal right I am still me who is that handsome devil just outside the booth on the ones and twos a good boy out there avoid Casey Pegram yes super producer Casey program remember that song by dot on called I'm going to Disneyland yeah actually yeah is like this is the part where it says it's to rat on a monkey's back headed west into the black I'm going to Disneyland today is not going to Disneyland Nikita Khrushchev yep we were going to you he's it out a little bit with the history of Disneyland but let's let's just get right to the heart of the matter Disneyland is an iconic American thing right it's one of the world's most famous amusement parks and people from across the planet associate it with the American dream the iconic image of what Americans do for fun right if you've probably met some people from abroad who just assume you've been to Disneyland what are you doing Disneyland man well let's see you can watch the fireworks for free that you've seen that I've been to Anaheim and did not go to Disneyland but those fireworks probably get real dole to the people that live there and it is late I'll look now you will call I you guys all into because I was in the same car driving his back you're right ban my am I have a short memory when it comes to beach related things so with with this in mind we also have to look at the context of the Cold War when we talk about the Cold War we must mention and explore the life and times of the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev or is he called one of those press releases of the time it is a gives newsreel wellness is here it.

Casey Pegram Disneyland Anaheim dole Nikita Khrushchev producer
"casey pegram" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"I highly recommend putting one in your go bag and also one of those things you can use to break the glass from the inside ever go off a cliff into the ocean or a lake somebody of water they and make sure you get the kind that will let you cut the seat belt right well as I guess that extra attachment little razor almost right behind the the hammer but why are we talking about being prepared why are we talking about Cold War stuff Hey your goal right I am still me who is that handsome devil just outside the booth on the ones and twos with a good boy out there avoid Casey Pegram yes super producer Casey program remember that song by Dada called I'm going to Disneyland yeah actually yeah Nancy is like this is the part where it says it's to rat on a monkey's back headed west into the black I'm going to Disneyland today there's not going to Disneyland Nikita Khrushchev yep we were going to you he's around a little bit with the history of Disneyland but let's let's just get right to the heart of the matter Disneyland is an iconic American thing right it's one of the world's most famous amusement parks and people from across the planet associate it with the American dream the iconic image of what Americans do for fun right if you've probably met some people from abroad who just assume you've been to Disneyland what do you do it Disneyland man well let's see you can watch the fireworks for free that you've seen that I'm in Anaheim and did not go to Disneyland but those fireworks probably get real dole to the people that live there there's like a look now you will call I you guys all into because I was in the same car driving his back you're right ban my am I have a short memory when it comes to beach related things so with with this in mind we also have to look at the context of the Cold War when we talk about the Cold War we must mention explore the life and times of the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev or is he called one of those press releases of the time it is a gives newsreel well let's hear it.

Casey Pegram Dada Nancy Disneyland Anaheim dole Nikita Khrushchev producer
"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of those things you can use to break the glass from the inside if you ever go off a cliff into the ocean or a lake somebody of water they and make sure you get the kind that will let you cut the seat belt right well as I guess an extra attachment little razor almost right behind the the hammer but why are we talking about being prepared why are we talking about Cold War stuff Hey your goal right I am still me who is that handsome devil just outside the booth on the ones and twos a good boy out there avoid Casey Pegram yes super producer Casey Pegram remember that song by Dada called I'm going to Disneyland yeah actually yeah he is like this is the part where it says it's to rat on a monkey is back headed west into the black I'm going to Disneyland today is not going to Disneyland Nikita Khrushchev yep we were going to you tease it out a little bit with the history of Disneyland but let's let's just get right to the heart of the matter Disneyland is an iconic American thing right it's one of the world's most famous amusement parks and people from across the planet associate it with the American dream the iconic image of what Americans do for fun right if you've probably met some people from abroad who just assume you've been to Disneyland what do you do it Disneyland man well let's see you can watch the fireworks for free that you've seen that I'm in Anaheim and they did not go to Disneyland but those fireworks probably get real dole to the people that live there and there's like a look now you will call I you guys all into because I was in the same car driving his back you're right Ben my am I have a short memory when it comes to beach related things so with with this in mind we also have to look at the context of the Cold War when we talk about the Cold War we must mention and explore the life and times of the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev or is he called one of those press releases of the time yeah there's a gives newsreel wellness is here it.

Casey Pegram Dada Disneyland Anaheim dole Ben Nikita Khrushchev producer
"casey pegram" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"casey pegram" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Distances I highly recommend putting one in your go bag and also one of those things you can use to break the glass from the inside if you ever go off a cliff into the ocean or a lake somebody of water they and make sure you get the kind that will let you cut the seat belt right well as I guess an extra attachment little razor almost right behind the the hammer but why are we talking about being prepared why are we talking about Cold War stuff Hey your goal right I am still me who is that handsome devil just outside the booth on the ones and twos a good boy out there avoid Casey Pegram yes super producer Casey Pegram remember that song by Dada called I'm going to Disneyland yeah actually yeah he is like this is a part where it says it's to ride on a monkey's back headed west into the black I'm going to Disneyland they could not going to Disneyland Nikita Khrushchev yep we were going to use it out a little bit with the history of Disneyland but let's let's just get right to the heart of the matter Disneyland is an iconic American thing right it's one of the world's most famous amusement parks and people from across the planet associate it with the American dream the iconic image of what Americans do for fun right if you've probably met some people from abroad who just assume you've been to Disneyland what do you do it Disneyland ban well let's see you can watch the fireworks for free that you've seen that I've been to Anaheim and they did not go to Disneyland but those fireworks probably get real dole to the people that live there there's like a look now you will call I you guys all into because I was in the same car driving his back you're right Ben my am I have a short memory when it comes to beach related things so which with this in mind we also have to look at the context of the Cold War when we talk about the Cold War we must mention explore the life and times of the Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev or is he called one of those press releases of the time yeah there's a gives newsreel well let's hear it.

Casey Pegram Dada Anaheim dole Ben Nikita Khrushchev producer Disneyland