25 Burst results for "Casado"

"casado" Discussed on O Mediato

O Mediato

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"casado" Discussed on O Mediato

"Would produce a suicide won't be glad. I will the whole bubble said. Beg the seamless major bubble. The but it is increase socialismo macadamia though lou by soldiers local ula chiasso budgie japaneser ella. Simply below as measure impact. Wessel hideous quarter moderna miss arizona on says thanks dacca's solely saudi dome who a funnel emma. Yeah you'll spend energy source alicea. That's only thirty. Oh it will eliminate tomasi Casado discounts denied moon. Cod eighty sued Seattle and i wish through suic- john quasi lena visa y'all equal biddable. You'll land with the butts on auto spanish into your mind. You scoff egg. Also my current father. And i don't watch it will call would ask them. You'll end got him with cloud. H he suwat theft. Hope is was me. Folks won't do. What does that ballgame. We'll here when malky. Y'all game not kalaheo men's luke haul off bash or move. Y'all game you sacrifice live. I got out of cassava faced. His okada car speak those month month. Bash the the Move over the yellow star. Robbie thanks own own. Don't get to see my stomach. Anal senior shops recoils. If you've us accent society. Ms about is well i shopped get. You won't go on. Fash defeat i could see. Body will gain the gain. Salem customized national gaseous yalies body. We staying then in that yup upside vice my shove a shell which would kudos. Don't they really helped me shia in several songs. I'll spoke by some as the mood seeing that thing..

dacca alicea tomasi Casado john quasi lena visa Wessel suwat malky lou arizona Seattle okada Robbie Fash Salem
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Point. What about more broadly. Applications of crypto to enterprise software and. Just just bear with me. Because this sounds kind of ridiculous today. I think it i mean so you think about like consumerization of the enterprise. That's happened right. And who would have thought when facebook was coming out that these kinds of principles would be applied to enterprise software very successfully if you think about crypto crypto is the atomization of incentives and both organizations are all about incentives. Are there applications of tokens or crypto protocols. That could have applications to enterprise software. Yeah i just wanted to say something. That's obvious here. Because i just feel like this conversation has become almost a cliche. Not investment advice is that i just feel like everybody says the same thing. What about supply chains. It's like the not talking about supply chains definitely. Here's the thing i think. The right way to evaluate crypto on the trust assumptions. And there's been very few truly federated systems that have penetrated the enterprise story right. So have you think about what generates turns. Bgp's is federated right. There's almost for game theoretic like you know. Bjp which is you know. Everybody runs their pgp. Router they appear and they trust each other etcetera such and so there is some precedents. But it's pretty pretty historical. I think the reason why you haven't seen federated systems actually emerge a lot in the bbc contexts because you actually have a structured relationship around payment already right like for example. If you're going to buy something from me. I'm going to have like your driver's license and like know we're gonna exchange money like we've met each other. That's kind of a much more structured relationship there. So i i think strictly in the b. two b. context where businesses buying from businesses. I think there's a lot of laws and regulations and a slow sale cycle etcetera. Where eddie crypto is is less relevant in the near term where i think it's more relevant to your point is btc where businesses are trying to establish a relationship with anybody out there and they're it makes a lot of sense because not only can companies whether they're brands or whatever you know. Establish their own tokens and their own networks. Like you see a lot of companies jumping into the whole thing right. That makes a lot of sense. I think in the bbc context. That definitely makes sense in. The context may be use cases. But i think they're far less prevalent and i think because you have existing relationships in place it just makes it less immediate need so i focus pretty much on the court corey infrastructure. So i don't deal ton with this. But if i were i would focus more on the bbc use cases. I believe all right. Well closer to your specialization. You have done a lot of data infrastructure deals and it almost seems like the data infrastructure space was kind of an emergent emergent opportunity and you guys captured a lot of the the big deals and almost to two point where you have a a real portfolio synergy in a gravity in the portfolio where you can presumably have some interesting information sharing and i to how does in this increasingly competitive venture world. How does portfolio synergy allow you to win deals that you wouldn't otherwise win so to win deal. There's two big advantages to portfolio energy on the winning deal. Front like the way that we think about investments as we look at spaces and we do a lot of work in the space right and spaces. Large data has got a ton of sub spaces even like if you split data into like basically analytics and aml like those. Are you can have venture firms. That just focused on either of them and so one advantage is simply that you really get to learn the spaces and i think that's value to the entrepreneur because if you invest you can bring that knowledge both the background but also the understanding of how the spaces evolved. So i think that provides value another thing in this is a little bit unique to injuries horowitz. But i think it's becoming more common. The industry is we have entrances. People know as a platform and we provide services to our portfolio companies. One of those services is called is basically market network so we we can introduce them to a number of customers and this has been hugely successful right like. Let me talk to my company. In this era. I mean you know i think the i ten significant customer came from entry it's market development network and so for those the more that we can kind of group like for like companies. I think the more that they can work together in a customer account if that makes sense so there's almost secondary effect of like for example. We say we'll do a data week where we'll have all of our data companies meet with companies. That are interested in this. It actually gives them kind of a better qualified conversation because this is an active conversation in the certain space. That's happening right rather than just. Here's some random intro. I mean. I think it actually matures the market kind of in a bit of a different way so i think those are the two primary advantages. We actually understand the space and then we can when it comes to actually providing services for them we can take advantage of the momentum going deeper on the data infrastructure space the spark versus snowflake ecosystem are these disparate ecosystems are the mutual exclusive or are they overlapping. That is the big clan is a great question but that is the big question right so we roughly break data into two sectors. There's the analytic sector. Which is more of a traditional sector right that includes like b. I and data warehouse and reporting and the primary use case. There is kind of human decision making you kind of assume. There's a human being in the loop. The biggest cases are like dashboard and reporting and then the other one is this more. Aiml world where often more compute intensive jobs. Maybe you're model goes models and production. You're dealing with unstructured data. It's kind of this. New is becoming a primitive in applications. And so you know it's pretty clear that these markets are separate and even complimentary right. We did this. This study where we talked to a bunch of practitioners and we found that a ton us both like spark and stuff like they all have a data warehouse and they'll have like a like a data lake. I believe today. These are two markets. Snowflake is is much more on the analytics spark data. Bricks is much more kind of unstructured data operationally. I'm out that said it's pretty clear we're starting to see virgins happening. Meaning let's let's talk about like the lake house construct. Right which is if i can have you know a sequel air. That can talk to a bunch of different data stores..

facebook today two markets One one advantage both organizations two point two sectors both two primary advantages two big advantages ten eddie bbc Snowflake secondary effect each btc federated horowitz
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Of cloud cost optimization companies. Why hasn't there been so. At first glance to me cloud cost optimization looks like one of those areas. That's sorta like logging where you have eventually you have some kind of data dog winner or quote unquote winner. That takes a maybe a plurality of market share but you haven't really seen a breakout winner in cost optimization. Why is that. This is such great. This is such a good question. I actually think gets to kind of the heart of all of this stuff which is okay so i think that an analysis like this is really looking ahead five years or so right. I mean we're honestly still an early innings for the cloud so the cloud not only is growing asymptotically right. If you actually look at the growth curves. I mean like the second. Derivative is definitely positive. I mean it's super linear but the clouds are getting very good at optimizing themselves as well costs for the cloud have dropped a whole bunch and so that benefits to customers and so if you look at it right now i mean from a customer standpoint costs dropping. You know growth is going. There's a lot of services there and so listen. Data dog is fantastic number of optimization companies. I mean there really are competing with kind of a growing market where the platforms themselves are doing a fantastic job of lowering price right. The question happens is what happens when things mature a bit more now what. The clouds have been very good at maintaining thirty percent margins. So how'd you get those while you get them by whatever charging for new services and maybe having higher prices for small customers. I mean there's just a lot of room or you are more sophisticated than the rest of the industry because you do do your own servers because you do have like. There's a lot of ways to get to that thirty percent margin but again if you look at the ends and what happened with the cloud service providers it's instructive. It's some point at some point. Things mature a bit and at some point. There are viable alternatives right. So let's look at the actually. I was talking. With george frazier. Who is the founder and here. The scud of great. Which i think is right. Which is if you haven't oligopoly where you can maintain margins at thirty percent as long as you've got a differentiated product and you're doing great and you're growing. That's totally fine. But at some point you know the industry catches up and that always happens and at that point if somebody stands up and infrastructure that similar but has lower margins. And that's the goal which actually happens in the pharmacy industry. When you've got you can actually create generics. Then all of a sudden that provides a viable alternative for people to move to but that only happens once you actually start to see kind of the differentiation innovation slowdown down and so this is kind of a long rambling response but it answers to specific questions and then it kind of a follow on question so to your specific question i think the reason is that no optimization company has become significant is because i think the clouds are going to great job of lowering cost themselves through a bunch of internal optimization and kudos to them. They've done a great job of that. However they have maintained thirty percent margins which suggests to me that as soon as that gap slows down like they can't drop those prices that alternatives happen which in a competitive market. They should happen. That's the big question. So let's go four years in the future and let's say that the big three are clinging to thirty percent margins. They can't drop prices much more. They're competitive solutions out. At fifteen percent margins will the big three reduce their own margins or will they allow the workloads to move off. I don't know the answer to that. I do know that. In the case of the oem's in the clouds. The clouds just decided to move off of traditional hardware. Maybe that will happen. Maybe the spinners are like screw this. I'm not paying your thirty percent margins. Big cloud company. I'm going to go to this other thing and pay them fifty percent margins because we're sophisticated enough more fed up enough or maybe the big three will be like listen. We're happy with less margins. And they'll stay on but nobody knows the answer to that. But i i do think that the finances are becoming sufficiently compelling. That will happen like this question will happen. We're we're going into this. This paradox. this question. The cloud cost optimization domain. Do you see it. Invested bill is it and how much like a consulting business is. Is there a standardized way to attack. Cloud cost optimization. Yeah no that's a great. That's a great question. Comes down to it. If it really being grandiose which i can't i can't help but we're talking about a trillion dollars in value. I mean in the paper like we're very conservative with every number that we put out. I mean it's not hard to say like there's actually a trillion dollars in market cap. That's being captured by the big five. Right it's a massive massive market and by the way if you look at what is the combined market cap of like microsoft google and aws it's about five trillion dollars five trillion dollars into so to say that five hundred billion to a trillion is going from you know the rest of the industry into them isn't isn't a stretch. I mean that's you know that's ten to twenty five percent right so then a question is like okay. Is there an opportunity for startups. Five hundred billion to trillion. I think the answer is absolutely whether this is surfacing cloud metrics whether this is doing actual cloud optimization itself whether it's providing pass for repatriation. I mean i think there's a number of things you can do there's kind of marketplace's etcetera etcetera etcetera. And so i definitely think this is investable. But like i told you i believe it's early days i mean i think this comes to a head in a few years i just you know i just think that now. We're starting to see the real impact. And i want to reiterate of the fifty companies. Really look at seventy six percent. Ipo d- in the last five years this is a very new phenomenon. Right of these seventy six percent that ipo in the last five years talking about billions of dollars of market cap being depressed because of the use of cloud So listen if you play out in the future something has to give.

thirty percent fifteen percent five hundred billion george frazier fifty companies ten Five hundred billion microsoft five trillion dollars google seventy six percent five years aws four years twenty five percent first ipo billions of dollars thirty percent margin a trillion dollars
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"However the cost of using the cloud up once companies reach large scale dropbox for example shifted away from the cloud in two thousand sixteen to opt for a custom built infrastructure in colocation facilities. This was called dropbox magic pocket. We covered in a few previous episodes in that exercise. They saved seventy five million dollars over two years and increase their gross margins from thirty three percent to sixty seven percent. And it's not just dropbox who is attempting to make this off cloud migration. It turns out that some major companies are spending seventy five to eighty percent of cost of revenue on their cloud. Bills consider how much of a company seventy five to eighty percent of revenue leads to so should large companies shift away from the cloud. Like dropbox did. Is it too late for some companies to untangle themselves from it and this episode. We talked with martine. Casado of andreessen horowitz. We discussed the cost of cloud for small and large companies and the financial implications of cloud infrastructure scale. Our first book is coming soon. Move fast is a book about how facebook build software. It comes out july six. And it's something we're pretty proud of. We've spent about two and a half years on this book. And it's been a great exploration of how one of the most successful companies in the world build software in the process of move fast. I was reinforced with regard to the idea that i want to build a software company and i have a new idea that i'm starting to build the difference between this company and the previous software companies. That have started. Is i need to let go of some of the responsibilities of software engineering daily. We're going to be starting to transition to having more voices on software engineering daily and in the long run. I think this will be much better for the business because we'll have a deeper more diverse voice about what the world of software entails. If you are interested in becoming a host please email me. Jeff at software engineering daily dot com. This is a opportunity and it's also a great opportunity for learning and access and growing your personal brand speaking of personal brand. We are starting youtube channel as well will start to air choice interviews that we've done in person at a studio and these are high quality videos that we're gonna be uploading to youtube and you can subscribe to those videos at youtube and find the software daily youtube channel. Thank you for listening. Thank you for reading. Hope you check out. Move fast and very soon. Thanks for watching software daily martine. Welcome back to the show. Happy to be here. There's a phrase that i have heard in the software business and that phrase is it's easier to figure out a way to make more money than it is to figure out how to save money. Do you agree with that phrase. Actually do yeah. I do agree with that. That's a good phrase and to what extent do you think that applies to the world of cloud. Well it's interesting so our companies go through three. You and i've talked about this before. But i'll companies. I think go through three stages right. They go through the product stage they go through the sale stage and then they go to the operations stage is roughly and these are the first stage is finding product market fit and that i think is just the hardest. It is the art. You're trying to build something that people want and frankly most companies don't get out of that. Don't get out of that stage but once you do and you've gone through that saga you've built this dna around a company of innovation and growth and building something new and so then you move to the sales phase where you actually sell that and so i just think many companies when they cut teeth they cut their teeth in this way of. How do i add new value. In how do i grow and the best medium for that. Absolutely the cloud. How can i set of infrastructure very quickly. How can i get access to services already running. How can i focus on my core competency which is finding product market fit. I think the cloud is very very good about that but to your previous question. So you've got these companies that spend often you know. It could be a decade learning all the muscles growth. The question is what happens when things saturate and they're no longer growing. What do you do a quote from your recent article. If you're operating at scale the cost of cloud can at least double your infrastructure bill. So i can understand that. Operating clouded scale can double my infrastructure. Bill relative to running on prem infrastructure. But i thought that this saved operational expense in exchange. So isn't that just fine like donate compensate for my increased capital expenditure with savings in operational expenditures. So actually the numbers are all in. So that's not the case. Forget the on prem on prem because that actually wasn't the folks at the analysis. I think we should talk about that. Probably in just a minute. The analysis says it turns out that if you reduce your cloud spend by fifty percent. You get this massive uplift in share price for the companies. We focused on which are public software. Companies were cloud as a part of cogs. Which is very important to this conversation. This can be on the order of billions of dollars. And so what can you do that. Billions of dollars and this is all in. This includes operations are strictly got higher share price and that flows through to cash. We've got more cash flow. You've got more access to capital either by selling shares equity taking debt against the new price. And of course you could mess growth if you wanted to..

Jeff facebook fifty percent july six thirty three percent Billions of dollars youtube seventy five million dollars billions of dollars first book eighty percent sixty seven percent martine seventy five Casado about two and a half years one Move fast first stage daily dot com
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

06:20 min | 1 year ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"However the cost of using the cloud up once companies reach large scale dropbox for example shifted away from the cloud in two thousand sixteen to opt for a custom built infrastructure in colocation facilities. This was called dropbox magic pocket. We covered in a few previous episodes in that exercise. They saved seventy five million dollars over two years and increase their gross margins from thirty three percent to sixty seven percent. And it's not just dropbox who is attempting to make this off cloud migration. It turns out that some major companies are spending seventy five to eighty percent of cost of revenue on their cloud. Bills consider how much of a company seventy five to eighty percent of revenue leads to so should large companies shift away from the cloud. Like dropbox did. Is it too late for some companies to untangle themselves from it and this episode. We talked with martine. Casado of andreessen horowitz. We discussed the cost of cloud for small and large companies and the financial implications of cloud infrastructure scale. Our first book is coming soon. Move fast is a book about how facebook build software. It comes out july six. And it's something we're pretty proud of. We've spent about two and a half years on this book. And it's been a great exploration of how one of the most successful companies in the world build software in the process of move fast. I was reinforced with regard to the idea that i want to build a software company and i have a new idea that i'm starting to build the difference between this company and the previous software companies. That have started. Is i need to let go of some of the responsibilities of software engineering daily. We're going to be starting to transition to having more voices on software engineering daily and in the long run. I think this will be much better for the business because we'll have a deeper more diverse voice about what the world of software entails. If you are interested in becoming a host please email me. Jeff at software engineering daily dot com. This is a opportunity and it's also a great opportunity for learning and access and growing your personal brand speaking of personal brand. We are starting youtube channel as well will start to air choice interviews that we've done in person at a studio and these are high quality videos that we're gonna be uploading to youtube and you can subscribe to those videos at youtube and find the software daily youtube channel. Thank you for listening. Thank you for reading. Hope you check out. Move fast and very soon. Thanks for watching software daily martine. Welcome back to the show. Happy to be here. There's a phrase that i have heard in the software business and that phrase is it's easier to figure out a way to make more money than it is to figure out how to save money. Do you agree with that phrase. Actually do yeah. I do agree with that. That's a good phrase and to what extent do you think that applies to the world of cloud. Well it's interesting so our companies go through three. And i've talked about this before but i'll companies. I think go through three stages right. They go through the product stage they go through the sale stage and then they go to the operations stage is roughly and these are the first stage is finding product market fit and that i think is just the hardest. It is the art. You're trying to build something that people want and frankly most companies don't get out of that. Don't get out of that stage but once you do and you've gone through that saga you've built this dna around a company of innovation and growth and building something new and so then you move to the sales phase where you actually sell that and so i just think many companies when they cut teeth they cut their teeth in this way of. How do i add new value. In how do i grow and the best medium for that. Absolutely the cloud. How can i set of infrastructure very quickly. How can i get access to services already running. How can i focus on my core competency which is finding product market fit. I think the cloud is very very good about that but to your previous question. So you've got these companies that spend often you know. It could be a decade learning all the muscles growth. The question is what happens when things saturate and they're no longer growing. What do you do a quote from your recent article. If you're operating at scale the cost of cloud can at least double your infrastructure bill. So i can understand that. Operating clouded scale can double my infrastructure. Bill relative to running on prem infrastructure. But i thought that this saved operational expense in exchange. So isn't that just fine like donate compensate for my increased capital expenditure with savings in operational expenditures. So actually the numbers are all in. So that's not the case. Forget the on prem or not on prem because that actually wasn't the folks at the analysis. I think we should talk about that. Probably in just a minute. The analysis says it turns out that if you reduce your cloud spend by fifty percent. You get this massive uplift in share price for the companies. We focused on which are public software. Companies were cloud as a part of cogs. Which is very important to this conversation. This can be on the order of billions of dollars. And so what can you do that. Billions of dollars and this is all in. This includes operations are strictly got higher share price and that flows through to cash. We've got more cash flow. You've got more access to capital either by selling shares equity taking debt against the new price. And of course you could mess growth if you wanted to..

Jeff facebook fifty percent july six thirty three percent Billions of dollars youtube billions of dollars seventy five million dollars first book eighty percent sixty seven percent martine seventy five first stage Casado about two and a half years one Move fast daily dot com
Cloud Cost With Martin Casado

Software Engineering Daily

01:46 min | 1 year ago

Cloud Cost With Martin Casado

"Martine. Welcome back to the show. Happy to be here. There's a phrase that i have heard in the software business and that phrase is it's easier to figure out a way to make more money than it is to figure out how to save money. Do you agree with that phrase. Actually do yeah. I do agree with that. That's a good phrase and to what extent do you think that applies to the world of cloud. Well it's interesting so our companies go through three. And i've talked about this before but i'll companies. I think go through three stages right. They go through the product stage they go through the sale stage and then they go to the operations stage is roughly and these are the first stage is finding product market fit and that i think is just the hardest. It is the art. You're trying to build something that people want and frankly most companies don't get out of that. Don't get out of that stage but once you do and you've gone through that saga you've built this dna around a company of innovation and growth and building something new and so then you move to the sales phase where you actually sell that and so i just think many companies when they cut teeth they cut their teeth in this way of. How do i add new value. In how do i grow and the best medium for that. Absolutely the cloud. How can i set of infrastructure very quickly. How can i get access to services already running. How can i focus on my core competency which is finding product market fit. I think the cloud is very very good about that but to your previous question. So you've got these companies that spend often you know. It could be a decade learning all the muscles growth. The question is what happens when things saturate and they're no longer growing. What do you do

Martine
"casado" Discussed on Rare with Flair

Rare with Flair

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"casado" Discussed on Rare with Flair

"All right my last one which. I really liked this one. What is your best and worst personality characteristic. Ooh we'll do worse so we can end on a high note. I feel pain call this. They're like toxic trait. I feel like my mytalk. Slick trait is. I also feel like it's very tied to my like any a grim number for those who don't know what was my so for those who don't know i'm i'm a type eight in the any graham. Which is the challenger like vary like kinda dominant decisive strong personality We think mine is that like. I don't wanna say controlling because that has an extremely negative connotation but i think it's more like if i get closer to people i find ways that i think that i can help them and like i kind of forcibly. Really want them to do it. Because i think it's a really good idea But then like you know. People don't like that. And i understand. Why like the one of the worst things i do or the in general. Just like if i'm in a mood i'm kinda snippy but i think that those are the worst things about my personnel. But i think the best thing about my personalities. That i i did sort of thing so i guess you know i even though i don't have a lot of samina i'm usually a very open person. I love to try new things. I love to explore So i am like usually almost always like down for an adventure. Also like i like i will stand by you for like a long time so You know. I think that. I will also like really really work hard at our friendship and so i think that those are. Those are some good things about me. What about you. yes. I think my worst and my best is the same thing actually i. I think i am very very emotional and sensitive. And i think that is my best and my worst quality and when i say sensitive i don't i don't mean like get my feelings hurt easily. I just mean like i. I feel the feels very strongly in my life so when i feel good feels like i am one of the most excitable happy people. I get very excited very easily and very emotional about happy things very easily but i also can get like really sad and really deepened in my thoughts and i can get just about things know just really and i. I'm an impasse. So i just really really pick up on other people's emotions and feelings and so i think like it's it's really like my one of my worst traits and one of my best is just i'm constantly feeling. Emotions are strongly. So i think that's me. Yeah cool your. Your question was so good. But i my. My question is like probably more not as deepest thought one. If you i feel like i knew the answer but like if you could be anyone in a tv show who would you be. Oh goodness oh casado. You're throwing me for a loop with these You know what okay so. I'm actually. I'm just going to go with what i'm currently watching right now. So i'm currently watching. I don't know if you've ever seen the show. But i'm currently watching once upon a time. Yes i have thought to like season for and then i got bored but it was right. Yeah was yeah..

graham casado
Data Alone Is Not Enough: The Evolution of Data Architectures

a16z

05:28 min | 1 year ago

Data Alone Is Not Enough: The Evolution of Data Architectures

"Hi and welcome to the a sixteen e podcast. I'm DOS, data, data data. It's long been a buzzword in the industry whether big data, streaming data, data, analytics, data science even ai and machine learning but data alone is not enough. It takes an entire system of tools and technology to extract value from data. A multibillion dollar industry has emerged around these data tools and technologies and was so much excitement and innovation in the space. It raises the question how exactly do all these tools together This podcast featuring Ali Goatee, the CEO and founder of data bricks explores the evolution of data architectures including some quick history where they're going and surprising use case for streaming data as well as always take on how he'd architect the picks and shovels that handle data and ten today. Joining Ali this hallway style jam is a sixteen see General Partner Martinez. Casado who with other a sixteen the enterprise partners just published a series of blueprints for the modern data stack. You can find that as well as other pieces on building a businesses the empty promise of data moats and more at a sixteen dot com backslash mfl economics. In this conversation, we start with holly answering the question. How did we arrive at the set of data tools we have today Starting eighties, business leaders were kind of flying blind, not knowing how the business were doing waiting for finance to close the books and data warehousing paradigm came about they said, look we have all this data in these operational data systems. Why don't we just all that data would take it out of all of these systems transform into some place. Let's call data house and. Then, we can get business intelligence on that data and it was just a major transformation because now you have dashboard, you could know how your product is selling by region by skew by geography and that itself has created at least twenty billion dollar market that has been around for quite a few decades. Now, what about ten years ago? This technology started seeing some challenges? One more and more data types like video and audio started coming out, and there's no way you can store any of that in did our houses second they were on prem big boxes that you have to buy and the couple of storage and compute. Kim really expensive to scale them up and down, and the third thing was people wanted to do more and more machine learning ai on his data sets. They saw that we can ask future looking questions, which are my customers charn which my. Products are going to sell which campaigns should it be offering to who? So then the data leak came about ten years ago and idea was here's really cheap storage, dump all your data here and you can get all those insights and it turns out just dumping all your data in a central location. It's hard to make sense out of that data that sitting there and as a result, what people are doing now is they're taking subsets of that data moving into classic data warehouses in the cloud. So we ended up with an architectural maths stats inferior to what we had ladies go. We have data in two places and they don't make ended that or house or the stale mass, and the recent sees not great in the last two three years. There's some really interesting technological breakthroughs. That actually now are enabling a new kind of design pattern. We referred to it as the Lake House and idea is what if you could actually be able to do bi that rightly on your knowledge and what if you could do your reporting directly on your radio and your data science and your machine learning straight up on the data link I would love to tease apart a few things that have led us here. You know this is very clearly a large existing data warehouse market behind. And you know it's typified by people using sequel on structured data. Like the Emily, a use case is a little bit different than the analytics use case right the case it's normally human beings that are looking pash boards in making decisions where the. Use Case, you're creating these models and those models are actually put into production and they're part of the product they're doing pricing. They're doing fraud detection to underwriting, etc.. The analytics market is an existing buying behavior and existing customer MLA is an emerging market and so. The core question is, are we actually seeing the emergence of multiple markets order this one market? Well, there are big similarities and there are big differences. and. Let's start with similarities roughly the same data. is needed for both there's no doubt when it comes to a and machine learning a lot of the secret sauce, you'll get those. Results predictions comes with augmenting your data with additional Meta data that you have. In some sense we have the same data and you're asking questions don't differences. One is backwards looking future looking but other than that a lot of it is the same and you want to do the same kind of things with the data you want to sort of repair it WanNa have it so that you can make sense of it. If you have structural problems with your data that actually causes also problems for machine learning, actually the difference today is that. It's line of business as typically doing a and they'll science or hardcore rnd whereas housing and be I oftentimes sits in it users of the data warehouse into Beatles, our data analysts, business analysts, and machine learning. We have the all scientists machine learning engineers. We have machine learning scientists. So the personas different and it sits in a different place in the organization and those people have different backgrounds and they have different requirements on the product using today.

Ali Goatee Lake House KIM Fraud Martinez General Partner Emily CEO Founder
"casado" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

02:39 min | 2 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

"For For Sadler don't I'm not sure about that distance. But he posted a workout this morning. He'll be one of the favorites in the Hollywood Gold Cup and the nominations will be released this afternoon. There's some time today by the Santa Racing Office so the Hollywood go back. Renamed restored its original name. That never should have been changed absolute card next Saturday. Not only that but the sanity of the Derby the Sanity Okay. The CINEMA STAKES FOR FOR GRAPHS. Three year olds Sprint for three year olds on turf and then a couple of calibrate racing so seven stakes races Next Saturday Danita including the the Hollywood Gold Cup. Well and I'm going to ask you for an opinion on a tough nightcap tomorrow Brad and where you'll landed in the maiden special weight mile and an eighth turf race ninth It does feature an interesting pace play and a Nick Casado home-bred I gotTa love it. Nick the SLAM DUNK team and world. Candy is going to stretch out from a five and a half furlong turf sprint. Try and should be on an isolated lead. Well should be this. I wish I had something intelligent to say about this. I looked at this race for a half hour and really i. I don't I don't know what's going to happen Other than the fact that you're right about world candy He's going to be loose on the lead. It's his first time around two turns he. He's dueled on the lead last time going five and a half and faded and he is an interesting pace play. And you have to love these twirling candies that he's still a relatively young sire and his horses they love the grass and they can't carry their speed. The one my one concern. There's a couple of concerns not only the distance mild one eight on turf. I mentioned earlier. Generally closers hold the advantage at sanity at nine furlongs on grass so world. Can't he's GonNa have to try to carry his speed at a distance? It's not always conducive to that style. And Secondly you Richard Barn. We are accustomed to seeing this guy win at a you know twenty three to twenty five percent rates weakened weak out in and month out but over the last couple well last couple of weeks anyway. the Baltics stable has has has been gone a little chilly. And you know I don't like to get too heavy into these stats Because.

Nick Casado Hollywood Gold Cup Sadler Hollywood Santa Racing Office Candy Richard Barn Brad
The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

Bookworm

09:57 min | 2 years ago

The Promise and Forgotten Journey by Silvina Ocampo

"Of the joys on the path of a reader is seeing a name that you see for years and years. Who is this person as we know today? This person who we hear of and don't know is likely to be a woman who's been neglected. This woman Safina. Oh compo was considered to be one of the great unknowns of South American Literature. She worked with or who we spore his when he was putting together his collection of fantastic literature working on that anthology as well was her husband. Cassavetes who wrote a book that Voorhis praised very highly the invention of Morrell. I read born face and Casado race as a young man but until recently I had never read much to my discredit savina Ocampo. Now I can say in my defense. The two of her books a novel and a book of Stories have just been translated and published by city. Lights press many people know city. Lights Bookstore do you also know that froing getty has oppress attached to that bookstore? Yes there is a press and they have published Safina Compost Forgotten Journey which is a book of short stories. But if I am not giving away too much the forgotten journey is the journey out of the womb into the world. This is a journey. None of US succeed in remembering completely. He did not remember it or face. He saw that. Silvino aqap ball had the gift he said of clairvoyance and so now. We have to thrilling books. Forgotten Journey a book of her short stories and I mean the longest is six pages and then a novel called the promise and we say an awful because it is probably the longest thing she wrote. But it's fairly a hundred pages. I have three translators here who have been working on Silvino compo and they are just some of the translators who are working on Silvino Compo. Because she's about to be the discovery that we have all been waiting for. It's very exciting. And one of these translators is the marvelous Suzanne Joe Levin who goes by the name June. Wien many of you will know as soon as I tell you that. She has translated. Cabrera Infanta. Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Man will tweak Severo Saad we hand Buick Assad Race. And she's translated a great deal of poetry more than forty book on translations she is the dean of Spanish South American literature and translation with her are to people who've been her students and who worked with her on each of these two books. Jill how did you come to know? Savina OCAMPO's work well I came to know Selena. Compost work Because I had the good taste and look to make amazing Literary critic when I was very young New York name a mirror years ago and he with him I was down in Argentina and Together we went to the House of Combo They were married. They were married and so I met them for the first time but of course I had already heard of them because I studied Latin American literature in college and And I was at graduate school that time so but getting to meet. These people was like so exciting. You know it's sort of like meeting Gods When you're a student you're studying. These people like absolutely amazing. Did you also meet for his? At that time. I actually met him the year before because he was brought to yell to give a lecture and evolve bone. Was there also Savino Campbell about whom we're speaking being cassavetes and all who were triumvirate of sorts? Once they married for fifty years he continued to be their dinner guest and You know he as I said. He said of her that she was clairvoyant. She didn't take many photographs. She did not like to be photographed when you see a picture of Safina or Campo. It's not unusual for hands to be crossed in front of her face and if fast if she were going to this or that party she would sing with this ugly face. Jessica Powell use started to read Cedar Fina under the direction of Jill Levine. Yes I was first introduced to Selena's work many years ago in a translation seminar that I took with Jill when I was a graduate student at UC Santa Barbara and after that class ended Jilin. I decided to collaborate on a novella which was actually the only work that Silvino Compo and her husband Blake Assad wrote together and so it was lower haight which is fantastic and we co translated it. And after that Jill and I started talking about you know Oh wouldn't it be wonderful to translate more of Selena's works and so then in Katie a? New Young came on the scene and she's completing her doctorate and her dissertation is in part on Compo Katie's Latif John worked on the translation of forgotton journey. A book of short pieces. There has been also. I don't want to confuse anyone a book of poetry from the New York review books as well as another book covering the entire spectrum of So Vena or Campos pros. I've found my own beginning point. Were these two thrilling little books. Let's here who would like to read a section of Savino Compo? Who'd like to go start with the first black? I can read a section of the Olive Green Dress. The first paragraph from journey forgotten journey. The very first book of Savino Gone Full. Let's hear the first paragraph of the Olive Green dress the olive green dress. The display windows stepped forward to greet her. The only reason she had left the House that morning was to go shopping. Miss Hilton blushed easily her skin translucent as a waxed paper like those packages who's wrappings reveal. All that's inside but beneath such transparencies where the thinnest layers of mystery behind the branching veins growing a little tree over the surface. She was ageless unjust when one noticed the deepest wrinkles on her face or her long white braids. It was possible to catch an unexpected glimpse of her youth in some childlike gesture. Other times she seemed to have the smooth skin of a young girl and light blonde hair precisely at the moment when she looked as if old age had caught up with her. The first paragraph of a very short story called the Olive Green Dress as I read. The stories seem to escape from me as I moved forward in them. There's a strange quality of presence and absence coal joint as she writes. It's quite extraordinary and this first paragraph. Because it's so zigzag you know I I saw it begins with a very odd sentence received like awkward. How could display windows stepped forward to greet you of course? That's that's very surrealist element of you. Know which was the time she was writing in but you know she she young as she old. It's like going from a woman's You know perception of herself but you were talking about how she felt about. She looked I mean. I thought this is kind of interesting example now. Above of that of of those issues and so as very twisty this is Jill Levine. Who is perhaps the Guardian Angel of these three translators bringing savina Ocampo's writing into our present

Jill Levine Silvino Compo Olive Green Dress Savina Ocampo Selena Savino Compo Cassavetes South American Literature Casado Lights Bookstore Savino Campbell United States Voorhis Cabrera Infanta Savino Morrell Julio Cortazar Carlos Fuentes Suzanne Joe Levin
Tpac Amaru executed - September 24, 1572

This Day in History Class

04:13 min | 3 years ago

Tpac Amaru executed - September 24, 1572

"The day was September twenty four th fifteen seventy two to pop a motto. The last indigenous indigenous ruler of the INCA was executed inco by the Spanish in fifteen thirty three Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro and his forces was captured and killed Incan emperor to Halwa. He was the last stop by Inca or sovereign emperor believes to be a direct descendant of guides. Though later rulers of the NEO INCA state considered themselves stop Inca after his death the inca empire effectively collapsed Casado and his forces proceeded to march on Cousteau the capital of the INCA empire and occupied the city from there the Spanish continued in their quest to conquer and colonize Peru the Spaniards had cavalry guns swords and steel armor and many Lincoln's sided with them but the anchor who were loyal to the Empire did attempt to resist Spanish colonization originally a puppet ruler installed by Pisarro Manco Inca you panchi rebelled against the Spanish informed his own army. He and his followers were not able to retake cousteau but they did establish a a neo interstate imbue Kabamba a remote region east cousteau. The Neo Inca state functioned as a seat of Resistance Manco and his supporters quarters were not a serious threat to the Spanish but vehicle Bomba was a concern to colonial officials after Marco's rule ended in the NEO INCA state state. He was succeeded by his son siree two bucks then t to cousy you punky then to pot Amaru to park became the Inca ruler after Tito cousy died in fifteen seventy one while t to cousy fortified Bill Kabamba and did not go to cousteau he did eventually relent lent and was baptized into the Roman Catholic Church to Puck Ahmadu though opposed Christianity and Spanish rule churches and Bill Kabamba were destroyed. Spaniards there were killed and the borders were closed but the Spaniards Inco were not aware of the changes in Vilcabamba after a Spanish diplomat returning to Vilcabamba from Kuske was killed the Spaniards justified attacking ink by concluding that they had quote broken broken the inviolate law observed by all nations of the World Regarding Ambassadors Viceroy Francisco Toledo Declared War on Bill Kabamba in fifteen eighteen seventy two when Spanish got to build Kabamba in June. The city was destroyed into pot a motto was gone but Spanish soldiers pursued the the Inca who had fled and captured Tutti sign and wife to pot a modern relativists generals as well as other prisoners and valuable items with the help of a group of indigenous people to a motto and his wife were captured. The captured were sent to cousteau late September. The Spaniards attempted attempted to convert the captives to Christianity to puck maters generals were sentenced to death by hanging after a hurried trial to a motto was was convicted of murder and sentenced to be beheaded. Though many people were short that he was innocent. According to one account to pot a matter was riding a mule mule with his hands tied behind his back on the day of his execution other said that he was surrounded by hundreds of guards with Lances there are several roll reported versions of the speech to Parramatta gave as he prepared to die on the scaffold on September twenty third after he was executed his head was reportedly. He put on a pike along with the heads of his generals. After locals began honoring to Pock Ahmadu at the site of his severed head the Viceroy ordered that his head be burried with his body. The Spanish had colonized Peru in culture and the landward drastically affected by the arrival of the Spanish Europeans. This carried diseases that decimated in populations and culture and religion was imposed upon the remaining Lincoln's.

Cousteau Neo Inca Pisarro Manco Inca Bill Kabamba Peru Kabamba Francisco Pizarro Lincoln Marco Tito Cousy Resistance Manco Viceroy Francisco Toledo Pock Ahmadu Halwa Puck Ahmadu Vilcabamba Casado Murder Bomba Parramatta
Nationalist spectre hovers over Spanish poll debate

FT News

05:09 min | 3 years ago

Nationalist spectre hovers over Spanish poll debate

"Face one of the most divisive national elections in living memory with two electoral blocs, competing to portray each other as an existential threat Spain's feature Ben whole discusses the last days of the campaign within mount our reporter in Madrid. Dusko, you know, second books, but she didn't didn't look. So what I'm not saying this tastes better punch it when I'm gonna kiss just gimme without been Been been. Benito publicly. We've just heard a clip from the opening of one of the televised debates between party leaders, supposedly one of the highlights of this election campaign in how did the party leaders do? Well, they desperately fought to track to the twenty five percent or more of Spanish voters who are still undecided. They were very aggressive polarized dates with the right and left wing candidates bathing themselves in completely opposite colors patriot sons as the socialist prime minister remarked wryly that what TV view as well. Witnessing was a primary of the right wing parties in which they were competing to say the most monstrous things was he being a bit unfair. No, I think he's not justified in saying that he was called the enemy of Spain close friend of those who inch to tear the country apart person who preferred hands bathed in blood too. Into an agreement with moderate forces in reference to the terrorists who tact Spanish cities during the eighties and nineties. It's probably fair to say as well that much of the action in this campaign has been between the three right wing policies. So we're talking about fielded on those the liberal Fazli. Antique Catalan independence party the People's Party, which is the mainstream center-right and vox this insurgent ultra nationalist party. Yes. The arrival of ox is really pulled the other two parties to the right? Is there fearful of losing voters to a party that without any embarrassment? As called for a return to Spanish tradition that recentralization of the state a clamp down on immigration and other populist, nationalist issues that have attracted a lot of people angered by the attempt to session in Catalonia, and who are looking for a home. After the premiership of money her Hoi who is seen as sort of gray and unwilling to attack the secession of the separatist problem in Catalunia head on. And this has been a bit of a gift to Mr. Sanchez, ROY. He's been able to sort of sit back and watches these opponents sort of fight it out. Ironic that as he's moved left to peel off voters from the anti-establishment most, partly he still manages to appear to be the most centrist and moderate of all the politicians because of the parties of the right have moved so far to the right to try to capture that nationalist populist vote. And keep us a sense of how what the polls are telling us about the state of play off to voting on Sunday. Well, the polls point to a very difficult government formation. Scientists is socialist parties palling around thirty percent the traditional center, right? People's Party around twenty sea levels around fifteen, but it must around thirteen or fourteen and vox around eleven and if you put together either left or right block, neither of them adds up to a parliamentary majority which suggests that either Mr. Sanchez will have to make some sort of deal with catalog nationals parties again, which is. In a sense. What led to the collapse of last government? When those parties abandoned him because he would not negotiate a referendum on independence for Catalonia or some sort of cross party agreement between Mr. Sanchez's socialist the party, which has said repeatedly that it will not for a collision with him. But which in the past has supported him and could at some level say we're surrendering our veto of Mr. Sanchez new order to save Spain from an agreement with the separatist that could break apart the country. Whatever happens, it's most likely to be very difficult negotiations into appears that neither the three parties in the right or the two parties in the left will add up to majority and if Mr. Sanchez emerges from this election as the relative at least winner Pablo Casado, the leader of the PP the center right t the big loser. It really depends how the election turns out pollsters don't really know how much effect vox will have they're saying. They're polling around. Eleven percent. But they said that they were pulling around three or four percent in recent regional elections and undo and they came out with ten eleven percent there. The question is whether there's a lot of undeclared, vox supporters who say they will vote for the People's Party, if vox shoots up in the polls and Paseo comes close to

Mr. Sanchez People's Party Benito Dusko Spain Madrid Catalonia Prime Minister Reporter Ben Whole Fazli Catalunia Paseo Pablo Casado Twenty Five Percent Ten Eleven Percent Eleven Percent
"casado" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

04:18 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Gary Casado has spent three decades working with and researching both big companies and fast growing ones. He says bigger established companies can move to the next level. But they have to go about it in a different way than a startup Bassano is professor business administration and senior associate dean at Harvard Business School. His new book is creative construction the DNA of sustained innovation and a pleasure to have him. Joining us from Boston right now. Gary thank you very much for your time today. Dan. Thank you pleasure to be with you. Thank you. You know, I it's funny because the word innovation seems like it's it's kind of been in our financial for probably the last couple of decades. But you mentioned in the book that realistically it's been around for a long line. Time. And the fact that many of the biggest companies in the twentieth century were innovators at one point or another. Yes. Absolutely. I mean, it ovation has been kind of a fundamental part of economic growth in the last couple of centuries. But you know, I like to remind people that as humans we've been in hitting four millennia I made it something we do as a species that we do better than any other species presumably, so I sometimes hear people saying they're tired of hearing about innovation. But I mean, it's kind of fundamental to our existence and fundamental to solving the problems that we face. We don't innovate would else. Do we do do you think there are more companies now more larger companies that understand the concept of needing to be an innovator even as their growth has has expanded over over their time. Oh, yes. Absolutely. I think large companies today across the board in variety of industries are thinking about ways that they can invigorate their growth, and they turn to. Innovation of. But the reason I wrote the book is what I found in both from my research and my teaching, and my consulting activities that a lot of larger companies in substance struggled to to get started. They didn't know really how to attack the problem where they would attack it by trying to be just like a startup which doesn't work for a larger company. You talk about a variety of different companies, both positively and negatively in terms of their success or failures and one of the companies you do bring up is blockbuster. And that is obviously I think one of the the true examples of a company that was doing exceptionally, well, but didn't adjust or innovate to meet the needs of the consumers, and obviously went by the boards absolately, and there's many others like it. But mean blockbuster people forget that at one point in time. They absolutely dominated dominated the video rental business. They put basically all the mom and pop shops out of business. Themselves were were a great disruptor of that industry, creating a basically a chain and could leverage their scale. They were great at leveraging data. They they they were they were quite successful. But what they didn't innovate. Was there the business model change Netflix introduced a new business model so much about the technology? It was a new business model, and they couldn't adapt to that. And that's a common story. That's played out time and again. Yeah, how do you? How do you? Compare those two companies specifically with that level of innovation and being able to continue that to build that success because of a c- Netflix right now is is one of the premier entities in the video and streaming world right now. Yeah. Absolutely. Netflix is a great a kind of counter example, and actually goes against Netflix experienced what they did they transitioned from the kind of traditional DVD in the red envelope to video on demand. They did this when they were the leader in the traditional business, and they were quite large. They were multibillion dollar company they were seven to ten. Billion in revenue at the time. They they they started make that transition. And you know, every theory of innovation was basically say, well, that's not gonna happen themselves will get disrupted they'll be to wed to their own business model too large the two to entrenched at cetera. And that's the kind of pattern that folks have come to expect but net flicks is a great example of no, it doesn't have to be that way through the right kind of strategy and the right innovation processes and the right culture. A large company can make a transition and and be a dominant player. It's not just about startups being able to do that. But are there?.

Netflix Gary Casado Harvard Business School Boston Bassano Dan senior associate dean professor three decades
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So I do think we're in an era that you can build an application and a lot of the hard parts are available the API's and heard a statistic, and like so I want to be very clear. I don't I don't recall exactly the number. But I believe something like on average if you download app from the mobile app sorters. It'll us sixteen extra labia is right. But that's send grid whether that's Google for identity. Whether that's totally right. And so that's a lot. And I think that numbers just going to increase, no less. Should double check that number. But like it's on the order of chair your philosophy around company building emphasizes survival ISM you like markets where survivalist founder can wait for the market to evolve into their vision. Why survival ISM a useful trait for founder is a good one of the two I actually shamelessly stole this from Chris Dickson? But like when he said it rang, so true. I think the thing is either like Dikwi survived but like, but actually focus on survival. I think is probably a better way of saying it, but having gone through what I went through like I really empathized with those on the survival site. So Chris Dickson's said this very well. He's like, listen, if you look at a lot of really hard spaces, the ones that made it out of the other end or the ones that just simply survived and waited for the market to take off. Right. I mean, for example in crypto currencies alone. There were long periods of things not really working out and people got frustrated, and they left or they ended up spending too much money, and how many shut down, but the ones are able to survive when you had the upswing to the upswing with it. You know, you could argue this is going on in the drone market right now. Right. So Mark is a very hard. They take a long time to take a long time to figure out. And so it's much more important that you're ready there for the inflection of the market than to somehow think that you can create the market because creating Marcus incredibly hard. And so in my case, and I started the company in two thousand seven were literally like, a viable business model was like, you're a smart Stanford PHD like that was my that was my pitch to investors, you know. And then a year later like the world ended man was two thousand eight my is the worst economic times instigate depression, and you couldn't raise any money man, we stayed twelve people for years, and I looked around and like we had a lot of potential competitors. At time every one of them died. I would say a large portion of our success is we just survived that like really meager crazy downtime, and then we were able to draft on the upswing where people become more optimistic, and they try new technologies and budgets do come up. And I just think and so I just do think that you know for hard markets. It's the right approach. But then you don't want to become a victim to your own strategy. When it's time to take off you have to take off to and that's hard of you spent years of belt-tightening, and like, you know, an ascetic lifestyle of Kia tables and four dollar lunches and pink yourself minimum wage like I did for years like tend to turn that on and like to actually like invest in the company and burn a lot of cash, it's hard. So I knew it was I just I just didn't want to be very categorical. And I wanted to put context on that. But I do think it's something for founders are frustrated and things are hard. I think like it's good to really built titan until the market takes off. It's very hard to create a market yourself. Martine casado. Thanks for coming on the show. I really appreciate thanks so much. Guber Netease can be difficult container networking storage, disaster recovery. These are issues that you would rather not have to figure out a loan.

Chris Dickson founder Guber Netease Google Martine casado Dikwi Mark four dollar
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:41 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Using something like spot in store. Or any of these companies that actually do good predictive models on pricing question about the API economy. Mice sense is that companies get started and they're doing something and whatever they're doing the look for a p is to solve problems within that company. So you start Uber. And then you say, okay, I need to solve the background. Check problem. You find checker. I need solve SMS. If I'm twilly. Oh, there seems to be less analysis of the API economy when companies are in the idea Asian phase. But it seems like you could just go onto rapid API or some other API service and look through API and find ideas to start businesses API mashups. Why hasn't that been a big trend is there something deficient in the API economy today? Have we not hit a world where you can just stick together API's and build a business? I think we're there now. So I think the reason we weren't there ten years ago as I just believe the market wasn't large enough. So I listen the people listening this may krone when? I say this because it's such a hackneyed thing. But I just have to. I just I actually just believe it to be true. So here's the hackneyed expression. Which is as markets get larger the granularity for what you can create a business gets higher. Right. And so like again, the most hackneyed like story ever. But it's worth saying is Ford early on when the market for cars was a few hundred cars they had to do every aspect of production. Right. They had to like I mean, they have they literally have like the Rouge river complex for Ford. You know, they take in water, and rubber and coal and like iron ore and outwit come cars. They have to every aspect of that. And if you compare that to now, they multi trillion dollar car market today. You know, you've got, you know, third fourth tier suppliers that loose supplier, nuts and bolts and screws and aftermarket cameras and each one of those independent components are independent companies potentially. Right. So compute we've seen a number of these also expansions originally, the only way you can tell the computer system, like let's say, you know, you're thinking machines or your way back when or you're a deck is like you literally had to like, you know, you're responsible for the chips. The board the sheet metal around. All this offer on it and all the applications on it you come a little further to the PC era. Then like, okay software was decoupled from hardware. But you still like, you know, the OS and the OS provider did most of things you come up a little, you know, forward than independent applications became independent companies, right? Like europE got decomposed into like CRM databases. And so now, I think we're at the stage where an independent applications being dilapidated the marks have become so large that you can take an independent application, and you can independent functions and those functions can be entire companies. Right. If that function sufficiently complex, and and you know, and has come analogy between applications, there's no reason somebody can't do that. I've been in the bay area for twenty years of driving up one. Oh, one and back, you know for those twenty years. What's on the billboards is often with on the mine of people, right? And it is right. And I remember, you know, in the early two thousands is like dot com and Yahoo dot com stopped, and then I remember a little bit later on. It was like a lot of SMP stuff kind of barracuda and this and that and the litter on all the social networking stuff. I remember that it was like in France through this nat- little later on like all the mobile stuff. Now, if you go like you've got a I Iot? t. But you often have these developer companies on the billboards. Right. It's pump nub it's Braintree. It's twilly. You know, I remember the till you wanna ask your developer right for API company. So I just think the market has expanded to the point. It's large enough now that you can build a company that's just services API. And if you look at like, rapid API said on the boredom and invest rapid P. I mean, like they have like nearly ten thousand API's that do everything from sending SMS messages to hardcore AI to like making your next. Look like Yoda said it, right? Like there's so much out there now..

Ford developer europE Yoda Rouge river France AI Braintree Yahoo twenty years trillion dollar ten years
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:45 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Some questions about other markets. There are a number of second layer cloud providers. So I've talked to some companies recently like spot in st- or Zeitz or horr- Oku. How do the margin profiles of second layer clouds compare to those of base-level clouds like AWS, I do think that you're asking the right medication? And the right meta question is is this a winner take all market like his era enough scale level moat is enough of a scale level moat because you have his ability because you've got the economies of scale that you end up becoming the next generation telcos. So what pretty much any economist will tell you is that if you have an economic system or the incremental cost of adding another user converges on zero this is absolutely the case with telcos, right? Then you'll end up in a monopoly situation. That's just basic economics has nothing to technology right at the incremental cost of. Adding that additional user convergence on zero you tend to have monopoly situations. And then the question is is that the case for for these large clouds now, it seems to be that clouds can actually differentiate by the way that services a commodity service. Right. And that's something that anybody can offer that service. It seems like the the clouds can differentiate an ad value. I mean, the workloads at run on Azure, acts you tend to be quite different than those that run on Amazon or digitalization if so we're we're investors in digital ocean. Also tends to be much more developer focus different types of workloads. And so I think actually you may end up in a situation where you can maintain margins through differentiation and through fragmentation of the not the customer base, but the use case base. It was interesting. We used to sell them the multi cloud environments all the time, but multi cloud didn't mean the same workload went between clouds, which I think is one of the biggest misunderstandings on the planet. Right. And like just because someone is multi cloud doesn't mean that they can actually arbitrate clouds. It just means that they use multiple clouds for use case that's best suited. And if if you maintain that, I mean, this is this trillion dollar markets all of IT. Going after. Yeah. Then you can think that actually there will be a fragmentation they'll be differentiation. If that's the case you will be able to maintain margin. But it's early to say that for fact, you could also go back to the taco gays and sitting actually everybody's gonna offer the same thing. The incremental cost betting users going to converge on zero there for the largest one will win. And right now that looks like that would be as on. Why hasn't there been a company that does this arbitrage between different cloud providers? Will so many have tried. Yeah. I've been very close to a number that have tried. And here's my view, my view is because it's not really solving customer pain point. And if that's your primary value. I don't think you can build a successful company. Now is the secondary value. It's great. But I don't think you can sell on that alone. So how do you save money on Amazon the best.

Amazon AWS Zeitz horr- Oku developer trillion dollar
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Sets of tools, how do the strategies for go to market differ between these types of companies? Yeah. No, that's a great question. More and more. If you have a product that you can sell bottoms up, it's a great way to get started. And the reason is is because it's actually very subversive to the incumbent stranglehold on an account. Right. I mean, if you're a pip squeak startup, a forty people, it doesn't matter how cool your product is. If you have your salesperson. They're having you know conversation with the the procurement office, you know, next to an incumbent who has hundreds of millions of dollars of leverage on the account. You're probably not gonna wind. But if you can build a product that so much better than their product that developers and bottoms up adopted, there's nothing they can do to respond to it. Like, the sales person can say anything against a cold product that developers using right and their product teams almost certainly can't make something like, you know, as flexible in its cool. I mean, that's what most technical founders are really good at it just making the coolest new popular product. I mean, they're almost like Shaolin monks had been studying it for ten years. That's kind of the only thing. They're really good at right come out of school. You really Pash about a product and technology. So it's very subversive from that standpoint. So I would recommend you know, if you have a product that you can do bottoms up you do that to start off with however at some point in time enterprise sales tends to follow this traditional paredo distribution. We're twenty percent of the customers have eighty percent of the dollars or generate about eighty percent of the dollars and to get access those dollars. You normally have to actually have direct sales. Go through a procurement officer and so forth and we've seen this with the number of his uncle's you see companies like get Hubbard whatever they start bottom ups phenomenon. And then they take sales various variously seriously. I say slack is another example of that. And so then you do want to shift to a more professional sales motion where you are going head head with these other companies, but hopefully by then you're already name brand you already have account control in account penetration. You're already unknown quantity. So you're doing it from base. That's also again when this very subversive to the incumbents because they just can't be as cool as you. Branding standpoint. And it's still if I did do it. And so they're very two very different motions. And sometimes you can only do them in isolation. But my recommendation is rather than doing that is to do both at the same time, you know, one of the bottoms up and then the top down. Now, if you're stuck your original question is how do these two different? They actually different than one is very much marketing lead and inside sales on the other ones actually direct sales like hiring account rep going forward. I just wanted to take that opportunity to make the point anyone being the bigger solution. So if you're doing bottoms up like you're mentioning like the early days of, you know, get hub or slack or Kahn or lot of open source projects. I mean, you know, the the growth engine the adoption engine is much more marketing than sales that right? The product markets itself. You know, you do meet ups, you do hack Athans you build open source community or SAS community. Use the products to create network has facts in virology. You.

account rep Kahn officer Hubbard eighty percent twenty percent ten years
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:48 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"I'm gonna do something in the cloud or I'm gonna do something cloud native. Whether it's from doesn't matter. But the mistake was and that model I'm going to find some thin layer of software some workstation system to apply to everything I have. So now, all of my crafty old steaming piles of seventies technology is going to be easy to provisions, etc. They all think not I mean, actually laters they don't think that much but early on everybody wants to do that. They wanna have like that one band-aid layer. So my wreck. Manasian as you know is do adopt. The most recent technology and cloud is to me independent. Whether it's on premise off Prem cloud is whether you consume it has a service the technologies that you use the expectations around those technologies make that independent decision. But keep that decision in a silo and things that are born into that go ahead and deploy into that. But those that are not. That's okay. It's okay to have two or three operating models. It's much much easier than having a lowest common denominator operating model that basically makes the cloud operate like you're nineteen seventies infrastructure, and if you're laying out rules for the developers in your Bank to procure software. You don't want them to have carte blanche to by way too much software. But you don't want them to feel restrained. What procurement policies do you put in place for your engineers? I think I would worry more about like tool explosion in loss of development process, the natural procurements. I think criminal rules are pretty good, which is more and more developer. Get discretionary spend sometimes as individual developers. Sometimes it's their VP of engineering directors, and they can use that budget up to a certain point. And then after that you have to go through procurement. There's a number of reasons why a procurement office makes sense number one like the professional negotiators. But more importantly, they understand everything that's being bought from a certain vendor. And so they can get maximum leverage on that. So for example, if I'm going to get app dynamics from Cisco all spending ten million dollars on a VoIP system. Maybe I can get a discount on that, you know, in a package on that or so forth. So procurement makes sense from that standpoint. Also, they know everything that's being used site-wide. So you can get again like these discounts. Right. I mean, I think from a sales efficiency procurement. So I think discretionary spending to some degree down to developers. Perfect. I actually loved this bottoms up organic consumption, having procurement still makes a lot of sense. But what I do worry about is like finding us whatever editor us. I literally like if you ever see me do a tweet or anything. I'm still using them. Like, literally. I still like he's like impulsiveness for Email browse using like the key bindings. I'm just like them person. That's fine. But you know for everybody to use their own were flown there. L to chain thing is just disruptive to the engineering process. Okay. And let's say the CIO of your Bank comes into your office and says, okay, I'm going to an expo conference next week..

Prem cloud developer VP of engineering CIO Cisco editor ten million dollars
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And in that case out say, listen, there's tons of infrastructure to be built I sit on the boards of many companies building great infrastructure to keep building. Great things. Horizontal plays enabling the similar. They're not. And there's a lot of value to be had. I mean, there's a lot of successful examples of companies building core infrastructure just recently think elastic search in conflict thing data bricks think Kong, I mean, these companies have real value. These are core infrastructure components in the cloud era, and they even host on the cloud, and they treat the clouds, basically as core infrastructure. So that's one view, and I believe mostly that byu the other view is. Yes, they are like the old infrastructure players yet. They have this advantage that the old infrastructure players don't which is they are such large point of aggregation. They can see everything that's going on and therefore they can see into the future. And if you have an incumbent competitor that can see into the future. They're much more dangerous than the old ones which. Couldn't really see in the future. And by that. I mean, they can look at everything like AWS Amazon can look at anything running on AWS. And if something looks like it's doing, well, there's no reason they can't replicate it and replicating that especially in the world of open source is simply just copping bits as opposed to having to rewrite it or in the traditional model than built out of Salesforce and do all the go to market front, which is easily as hard as engineering often in new areas in this case, they just need a replicated a startup is already doing all the market maturation stuff. And then they offer for free which is a much more dangerous situation. And so I think there's truth to both stories the first one that their distance for structure, and they're focused on the, you know, the eighty percent use case and not the new areas. But also, I think they can respond to startups in ways that the incumbents could not, and I think starts need to be very aware of that. And have that part of their strategy to make sure that they stay protected or cannot move when these things happen if you were operating a large established Bank today. What would your cloud native? Strategy. The interesting thing about the I've got a pretty specific answer to this. So the interesting thing about the banks is if you walk into any data center, their museums of computer science past I mean, I remember one that we worked with. I mean, they had old SGI boxes old sun boxes, and like, and I think here's what I think is the wrong thing to do. I think the wrong thing to do is to assume there is an operating model that covers all of those things. Right. And I think this is the biggest misstep I've seen you know, when I was running, for example, our business unit we dealt with these digital transformations all the time. This oh, the cloud is amazing..

AWS Amazon Salesforce byu Kong SGI Bank eighty percent
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"What advice would you give to twenty twelve Martine Casado going through the acquisition here? The best piece of advice. I got during that, and I'm just glad it happened. And I think that was the advice I needed to hear it came from Diane green. So for those of those that don't know Diane green was the founder of VM ware in the CEO of the wear and she sold it to EMC her mental Rosenbaum's wanted to EMC. And then, you know, she exited the company and so she was an early investor in. The sierra. And when I was talking we were talking about should we sell who? Should we sell to? She gave me a call. And it's very short conversation sit. Okay, Martina if you decide to sell them. I don't know if it's the right thing to do one piece of advice, and that one piece of advice is don't give up your sales team. And the reason is VM ware is very good at selling to people that run servers, and they're very good at selling to compute. But those don't know how to sell to networking security, which you're focused on. So no matter what happens as far as the deal goes like, you know, make sure that you retain that. And so not knowing anything and like being thrust in this situation. I actually held onto that really tightly. And in retrospect, I think is one of the best decisions we made in certainly VM were made going back to the previous conversation that we just had. It's very hard for somebody in a new area in a category creating area to sell what you've done, especially if they have no idea when the case of the emerald have been the core sales team could they sell it or not. So we maintain our sales team for years, and because of that we're able to build this. Ignificant business, and now any sales rep within VM whereas able to sell these types of thing, but I think that was the single most important piece of advice in this one out pass onto anybody in that situation when you were acquired around that time AWS was very early. And since that time AWS's become quite a dominant force cloud computing's been just growing and growing. It's been become really important. Did you predict that market shift that was going to happen or did it surprise you the speed on which it happened was what was so surprising to all of us like everybody. Understood the model and everybody understood the disruption. What I could never have predicted as in listen when I started selling networking software. So it's basically network is offering said of selling you a box. All you saw for you run in your hyper visor, not do networking. That's basically what our product was when I first started selling that pretty much. Everybody wanted to buy it using a perpetual license as a piece of downloadable installed software. You know, and this is even this is required by the two thousand twelve. But three years in almost everybody wanted this as a service or as a license. And so for me, the biggest impact of things like cloud have been these follow on facts. Like, how people assume they're going to consume Soffer how they they're going to pay for it not necessarily that. It's on Prem vers on from that was, you know, even today that still not nearly as big as shift as these other shifts. And so it's a prize me how fast it happened. But that that change is not that everything went up into AWS is running in AWS. It's the perception of how you consume software and pay for it was was the shocking thing. And I think honestly the entire industry today is dealing with with that shift and still has a figured out from investors to founders to customers in the regard, founders the clouds are taking a ton of the opportunity. What are the opportunities there left for infrastructure startups? So I have to views on this. So in one views, the clouds, the new HP's CISCO's IBM's and Dell and it's just infrastructure. It's. Cute. They'll do the most commoditised thing. And that's always been the case. But instead of shipping you a box with the software on it. You know, it's up in the cloud..

cloud Rosenbaum Diane green EMC Martine Casado founder Martina CEO Dell HP IBM CISCO three years
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"More programmable. How does network program ability today differ from when you started nice era? The story actually goes back a little bit before nicer. So like, I'm quick thumbnail sketch, I actually work for the intelligence community, and this is two thousand one to two thousand and three. And if you remember back at that time, my, you know, Syros getting pretty heavy we're doing some pretty significant engagements. This is like post nine eleven type things, and we were pushing compute into environments that they kinda weren't created for right? We're pushing compute into like nation state type attacks I was in the intelligence community. And at the time. What was really surprising was you know, with compute. Of course, you could program to do what you want actually SC Lennox for those that remember came out of the NSA. Right. And so you could go into the issue could change the us in ways that actually ma-. Depending on the threat environment, but networking and networking gear. Just wasn't built that way. I mean networks were built in an era where we just wanted to Ganic growth of the internet to cover the globe. And there was no way to really change the way you wanted it to work for things like let's say large data centers or mobility or security, so when I peeled out of the intelligence community. And I went to Stanford that was kind of the focus of the research, which is I can we change the internet architecture or networking architecture away that it's more programmable if you of zoom till now, which was your original question. I actually think the most interesting thing, and but we kind of got wrong and then later got right was the network. These days really is just plumbing. It just connects compute elements, really. And there's no need to really program that the functionality that you wanna program actually has been consumed into the end points. If you think about for example at data center right instead of actually trying to do fancy stuff in the network like say load, balancing or security policies or whatever is now consumed into either the, hyper visor or something like a service mesh. With on voi-. And so I think that the ultimate answer was not let's make routers, and switches programmable, I think the ultimate answer is like why don't we just pull this function -ality into an infrastructure layer that's in software and running on x eighty six and use that instead, and I think that has become the standard way of actually doing networking now is actually in software at the edge. When you were at nicer there were several different business models that you iterating through. What did you learn from that experience of business model iteration? Yeah. So so Aetna necessarily we were at the cusp of going from basically on Prem deployment or people would pay for Petula licensed to more service like cloud like where people would pay for recurring. I made all of the mistakes and naive technical person makes in enterprise early on assumed. Oh, wouldn't it be great? If we just built a product and have somebody else carry it so early on, for example, we had tricks OEM one of our products, which you know, never really worked out we tried to partner of every one we had early partners with Google any see in a lot of the early clouds. We actually thought there's a partnership when we can get value from that. And then later on we realized that listen, you know, this stuff is complicated. The best thing for us to do is to just sell it directly ourselves. I you know, I couldn't sell it. Nobody could sell it. And so we ended up basically in a direct sale model of a product, and that was the business model that stuck and it probably took us two years to figure that out. And so the landscape was shifting and I think. Is worth talking about that going forward? But as far as a business model, I think mostly they were just early mistakes. Honestly, if I would've listened to Ben Horowitz who was on my board. I wouldn't have made them, and we should have just started that way, how do those lessons apply to twenty eighteen enterprise software sales. They partially apply. So I hear is what I think is the most difficult question to answer as a founder..

Ben Horowitz Aetna Ganic ma Stanford founder Google Petula partner two years
"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"casado" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"The sales conversation is much easier in the top down model, you engage the CIO or the CEO or the CTO directly. And you try to convince them that your product is worth paying for when the senior leadership of a Bank buys into your product idea you can count on that senior leadership to convince their developers to use your product within the enterprise such as a Bank. It is a rare occurrence that your infrastructure software company will be able to fit cleanly into either of these models bottoms up or top down more often. There will be some bottoms up usage and some top down buying for your product. But you will have to evangelize the product on all fronts. You will have to convince both the engineers and the senior leadership your infrastructure software product, probably won't speak for itself. You will have to develop expertise in sales marketing and consultancy, and in many cases, you might end up in an unending chasm the unending chasm describes a mode in which an infrastructure software company must function as both a product company and a consultancy your consult. Consi is necessary to integrate your product into the enterprise and ensure that your software actually gets used, but it reduces the appealing economics of a pure software company with zero marginal costs, the unending chasm does not prevent you from being successful companies who have had very successful IPO's remain in the unin chasm today. But it's useful to know whether you are heading for an unending chasm, or if you're already in one Martine Casado joins the show today for a discussion.

unin chasm Martine Casado CIO CTO CEO
Prime Minister, Facebook and Israel discussed on BBC World Service

BBC World Service

04:34 min | 4 years ago

Prime Minister, Facebook and Israel discussed on BBC World Service

"And AM New York. Hello I'm Caroline Wyatt and welcome to. The world this week the program that tells you how the world has changed in. The past seven days this was the week when Donald Trump's turbulent tour of Europe closed with a controversial meeting on the president corrected his statement about Russian. Interference in the election the brought him to power energy. Sentence in my remarks I said the word would instead of wouldn't The sentence should have been I don't see any reason why wouldn't why wouldn't be Russian collusion okay awesome we ask? Are, we seeing the decline of the west the week when. Europe and Japan signed the world's biggest trade deal even though others are being torn. Up and when lynchings in India provoked action from an unexpected quarter does he has a sort of role where it can advise governments on certain policies or. Even set policies in a way that you wouldn't think. A court would do all that after this Hello Jerry Smith with the BBC news Israeli military officials say they've, been no further airstrikes or other operations. On targets in the Gaza Strip since last night the Palestinian group HAMAs says a ceasefire has been brokered by the. United Nations and Egypt but on Friday Israeli forces hit dozens. Of targets in Gaza there's Tom Bateman reports the strikes came after an Israeli soldier was shot dead the. First such talented for Israel since the? Start of regular protests which? Have. Seen. More than, one hundred and forty Palestinians killed buys ready forces since March early this morning HAMAs announced a ceasefire agreement but, there was no comment from Israel the latest exchange of fire raised fears of a significant escalation between? The. Two sides with Israel's defense minister earlier warning it was being pushed towards a broad and painful military operation the UN's envoy to the region warned that Gaza was on the brink of Of war and urged restraint members of the conservative People's Party in Spain choosing a new leader to replace Marianna ROY is retiring after being ousted as prime minister in a, confidence vote last month thousands of delegates gathered at a hotel in Madrid to hear, the two candidates make final appeals support. The former deputy prime minister psoriasis on day Santamaria is vying for the top job along with the thirty seven year. Old congressman Pablo Casado he's about to take the party further. To the right the winner will lead the opposition to Spain's minority socialist government Facebook has suspended another data collection firm from using it, site well let's investigate claims the Boston-based crimson hexagon. Maybe using people's information to build surveillance tools here's Dave Lee crimson hexagon says it collects the vast amounts of public data in order to provide consumer insights something, that is not against Facebook's policies however the. Wall Street Journal newspaper has reported that. Data firm worked with a group linked to the Kremlin as well as various US, government agencies using Facebook data for surveillance is against the sites policies and so the network has launched. An investigation Cuba's lawmakers are expected to approve a new constitution later today which will then be put to a public vote, this weeping reforms. Would see private property recognized for the first time since. One thousand nine hundred seventy six more grant is in Havana The new president Megan the canal is seeking to preserve the socialist character of the Cuban revolution or boosting the long stagnant economy on the island nevertheless state and military run. Entities will remain dominant in Cuba are the. Key changes include the introduction of a prime minister to the, Cuban political system dividing the roles of head of. State and head of government and the imposition of term limits on the presidency of two consecutive five-year terms world news from the BBC Pakistan's malady minority community say they're boycotting the forthcoming elections because of what they say are discriminatory laws they've, complained that Ahmad is being placed on a separate voter registration, list categorizing them as non Muslim community leaders say this violates their right to religious self identity as Muslim Investigators examining how seventeen people died when the terrorist boat sank on a lake.

Prime Minister Facebook Israel Gaza Europe Hamas President Trump Spain BBC Cuba Caroline Wyatt Donald Trump Congressman Pablo Casado Gaza Strip New York United States Wall Street Journal Havana United Nations
Israel pummels Hamas targets in Gaza after gunman kills Israeli soldier

BBC World Service

04:57 min | 4 years ago

Israel pummels Hamas targets in Gaza after gunman kills Israeli soldier

"Problems with democracy be next very good example I think of how things can perhaps change, as rutta something as simple as a film with me in the studio my two guests writer and editor Justin quirk and Sally leaves. Lee who trains companies and governments on protecting. People business from extreme incidents that's. All here on this edition of weekend Now the world news Hello Jerry Smith. With the BBC news the Palestinian group HAMAs says it's agreed a ceasefire with Israel off an upsurge of violence. In the Gaza Strip the cease-fire is reported to be holding on Friday the Israeli, military said his trunk dozens of targets in Gaza Middle East. Correspondent Tom vaping reports the s strikes came after an Israeli soldier was shot dead the first such fatality for Israel since the start of regular protests which have seen more than, one hundred and forty Palestinians killed buys. Rarely forces since March he was targeted by militants from the perimeter fence in southern, Gaza early this morning HAMAs, announced a ceasefire agreement but there was. No comment from Israel the latest exchange of fire raised fears of a significant escalation between the two sides with Israel's. Defense minister earlier warning it was being pushed towards a broad. And painful military operation the UN's envoy to the region warned that Gaza. Was on the bridge Think of war and urged restraint president Manuel Santos of Columbia has welcomed former rebels to. Congress at the opening of the new parliament the Faulk has five senators and five, members of the house of representatives as part of the peace. Deal reached in two thousand sixteen the to former commanders did not attend nNcholas Russia has the details president Santos said he was happy to see former rebels who fought the state, for five decades now respecting the constitution. And the country's laws the precedent twin sister in office next month it's the new, legislators and his successor to, defend peace in Colombia mister Duke wants. To prevent former rebels from sitting in congress until they're investigative for crimes committed during the civil war Facebook has suspended. Another data collection firm from using it site while it investigates. Claims the Boston-based crimson hexagon may be using people's information to build surveillance Tools Facebook suspended British. And, Canadian based analytic firms for similar reasons, earlier this year Dave Lee reports crimson hexagon. Says it collects the vast amounts of public data in order to, provide consumer insights something that is not against Facebook's policies however the Wall Street Journal newspaper has reported that data firm. Worked with a group linked to the Kremlin as well as various US government agencies. Using Facebook data for surveillance is against the sites policies Dave Lee The Spanish conservative People's Party is due to select a, new leader to replace Mariana Rockaway retiring. Of, to me ousted as prime minister in a confidence vote last month the former deputy prime minister Sarah science day Santamaria is running against the Thirty-seven-year-old congressman Pablo Casado would take the party further to. The right You're listening to world news from the BBC Disney has sacked the US film, director James Gunn after the discovery of. Tweets which included jokes about rape and paedophilia the guardians of the. Galaxy director, has since apologized for the messages Disney said the. Comments were indefensible and inconsistence with its values Cuba's lawmakers. Are expected. To approve a new constitution later today which will. Then be put. To public vote the sweeping reforms would say private property recognized for the first time since nineteen seventy six and the state's control. Of, the economy will be drastically reduced same sex marriage could. Be legalized from Havana will grant reports the new president Miguel Diaz canal is seeking to preserve the socialist character of the Cuban revolution or boosting the long stagnant economy on the island nevertheless state and military run. Entities will remain dominant in Cuba that much has been made, repeatedly cleared by both row Castro and president DS canal in the lead up. To this point are the key changes include the introduction of a prime minister to. The Cuban political system dividing the roles of head of state and, head of government and the imposition of, term limits on the presidency of two. Consecutive five-year terms round Castro who is eighty seven remained as the. Leader of, the Cuban communist party when he stepped down as President this year and headed the commission which drew up. These changes investigators examining how seventeen people died when the terrorist, boat sank colleague in the US state of Missouri of appeal for witnesses to..

Facebook Gaza Israel President Trump Dave Lee United States Prime Minister Manuel Santos Hamas Congress Cuba BBC Writer And Editor Cuban Communist Party Disney Gaza Middle East Director Jerry Smith UN
Prayer answered again: Loyola tops Tennessee on late jumper

After Hours With Amy Lawrence M

02:23 min | 4 years ago

Prayer answered again: Loyola tops Tennessee on late jumper

"Sports play i'm greg caserta it wouldn't be march madness without a game winner two towns will inbound admit court just to the left of us both the basketball kitchen a customer in the backboard here he comes across eight seconds dr troubling rights customer stops by for fifty bounces three point six seconds left snowfield the inbound in the bone on the wrong end of the top of the key three at the buzzer oh all of the sweet sixteen ryan radke on the westwood one nc double a radio network the ramblers of loyola chicago moving on after they're sixty three sixty two win over number three tennessee michigan freshman jordan pulled described his game winning three that crushed houston at the buzzer sixty four to sixty three you work in play thousands of times it practicing we actually perfectly is supposedly from the inbound pass again itar our senior guard muhammad and could've put this busy but he had the confidence to find me online does not casado pool finished with eight points in just eleven minutes wolverines await the winner of sunday's showdown between unc and texas am so those are two of your sixteen here on the other winners from saturday down the a couple of number one seeds in villanova and kansas number two duke number three texas tech number four gonzaga and fifthseeded kentucky busy night in the nba as well well and undermanned warriors team had draymond green rise to the occasion twenty five points eleven rebounds and eight assists and their one twenty four one zero nine win in phoenix there was the blazers one hundred and the pistons eightyseven lebron with a triple doubles seventy of his career as the cavs win in chicago one fourteen to one zero nine the knicks snapped a non game losing streak one twenty four one zero one over the hornets tim hardaway ended up with twenty five points the net survived the mavericks one fourteen to one oh six spurs cruised by the t wolves one seventeen to one zero one box grounded the hawks one twenty two to one seventeen and the grizzlies took down the nuggets one on one ninety four wizards over the pacers one on one or two rockets survive in new orleans one seven one zero one on a night where james harden and anthony davis had double doubles and finally the jazz one zero.

Knicks Anthony Davis James Harden Tim Hardaway Kentucky Kansas Michigan Tennessee Basketball New Orleans Pacers Nuggets Grizzlies Hawks Mavericks Hornets Greg Caserta Chicago Cavs Lebron