18 Burst results for "Carson University"

"clarkson university" Discussed on All the Kings Men | LA Kings

All the Kings Men | LA Kings

05:58 min | 2 months ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on All the Kings Men | LA Kings

"A bit of a Offense pretty much only guy in my view. He's a passive defensively. But it's it's kind of a situation where for now you can forgive it because of just how many offensive talents he has. He's a great. He's a great playmaker. He's got a ton of skilled to obey pressure. And you know he he. He comes and goes but when i see players who are offensive leaning and they can disappear stretches and not really contribute a whole lot. I still value what they do when they show up. You know when when they're playing really really well. There's a few guys this year. Where i think if they if they play at the top twenty five percent of what they're capable of a lot more often they'll outperform their drafts lot. No question and i think that you kind of have to bet on that. Because you've you can you see you've seen it and were scattered. She's another one of those guys where sometimes he might not be all the air but then he sort of flips a switch in the right situation and then you just see something magical and something really high end. So he's the really fun one. I can see why a team might value him. Really highly. But i can see why teams might be a little bit skittish. She's very much an open ice guy. He likes to have some space to play with. You likes to challenge guys. One on one in the nhl that you can get away with that And i think that you can definitely hope that that that he develops into a player can do that in the nhl but at the same time you can also understand why in nhl team might be a little bit. Skeptical of high-skill lying guys. That might come and go a little bit like you. Said he was only. 'bout appoint per game in the h. l. Which is not bad but not typical sort of first round talent But i think there's a definitely very interesting player there. And if he goes he goes fifteenth overall. I get it if he goes fortieth overall. I also get. It just depend very much on a team. And what they see. 'em for sure. I had two names written down in terms of any show comparisons and i'm curious to know what you think of them. As the first one is mitch martyr in the second. One was johnny drought. Do you see you know reminiscent styles of play or is there another name that you have in your head. I mean in terms of pure skill level. There is a bit of an echo. There i mean with with guys. Like johnny joe and mitch monir. I mean that those guys were much more on all the time. And i think that's a lot of what fed into their point totals when they were but in terms of in terms of just the skill and the one on one willingness to challenge guys and get fans out of their seats. Like he's got a lot of that. And and sodas a guy like mitch martyr in in and johnny ghajar. I guess it's in terms of an all around game in an actual scoring output. There's a lot with sam moskovitz where there's potential but i think there's still some work to be done in terms of actually consistently being an offensively threatening claire every time he steps on the ice for me. We're gonna move to the next guy here in its Martino left wing five. Eleven one sixty so not the biggest guy somewhere projected in that mid second round out of omaha. He's on his way to clarkson university next year Had thirty eight games and fifty six points with the majority coming from assists..

nhl mitch martyr johnny joe mitch monir johnny ghajar sam moskovitz Martino clarkson university omaha
"clarkson university" Discussed on Spittin' Chiclets

Spittin' Chiclets

03:49 min | 10 months ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Spittin' Chiclets

"Like watching at their head. They got catching without touching the bottom and throw it back and they're doing this to three minutes at a time. It's it's amazing to watch. Some condition themselves really. Is i wanna ask about the referee. And i thought it was pretty decent. This year's playoffs. I thought they call the regular season style but struggled the last couple of years. You there any flaws in the process from bring guys up to the nhl. Maybe to too. Many idaho allowed nepotism. Pla politics any of that stuff. No you know one of the best things happen for me in the bubble. This year. I lived long morton's but that i said tim hortons tim. Hortons free. good knows get bows one of the things. But i lived with the officials for nine weeks and i got the train with your initials every day. Got to see on professional where i knew the law facially but i didn't know those was people 'cause you just you don't run with them year. Seeing you're out in the city joining game you leave the game. They stay one. I'll tell you stay another. But i got to spend time nine weeks for the line of these guys and i respect their professionalism. I respect they carry themselves. Some of them are former prison. Guard some of them are former undercover policeman. Some of just walk be kaya policemen. Just phenomenal guys. I respect them so much. And i think this year's playoff was phenomenal. I thought the ficials were just off the charts. Good in the playoffs this year. Just to clarify not picking on the refs. I know they have a tough and they do a great job. It's is invest young official. Chris moonies right up there. He didn't make the final but there there are a really good young officials come along really really good officials one other thing. I want to ask what about the hockey hall of fame process. You're that committee as well. Right arrow. forget three years ago. When lanny mcdonald call me. I thought it was a gag years. You put me on a candid camera thing. He goes no care slaney. I'm being serious you nominated and we'd like on offense electric media like i'm in where sign up and i sent them along just to make sure it wasn't a gag any sent went back to me and i'll never forget the first meeting. It's an amazing thing to be part health landing and john davidson such an amazing job running it. The people on the committee their process of being prepared is just amazing. The debates are phenomenal. They really are and you can learn so much. Those meetings it's great. I'm just so proud to be part of that committee other than that. What were you. What were you doing inside the bubble. I imagine that was a tough experience being away from the family that long now. That was one of the most difficult things i've ever done. Paul my career. I'll be honest with the best part about. It was hanging with the referees training. Every day spending a lot of time with the not officials from the league but general managers coaches are spending time practice working with kenny albert. Johnny forslund was phenomenal. Those guys were great so you know again. I was grateful for the friendships that i made in the people that i knew over time. It was a different experience. And i'm not sure it could ever be replicated. Is this as it was in toronto. And edmonton iraq. I realize with the players went through. And i respect him so much should ripped through it yet. Annoy the harda was difficult. Actually want to jump back to the hall of fame for a second. I'm one of these guys was probably critical about it. And i know it's not easy to whittle down that list then you've got guys on it for a long time but does not skew a little too canadian. At times i mean we've got europeans who get shadow guys than the stage. Don't get in for a long time and then you know eighteen. Twenty years a guy gets into wasn't good enough eighteen years and all of a sudden he gets it now. How no. i don't think it's us. American canadian european at all. I think it's used with the best presentations. And i'll give you an example on not this past spring the spring before jerry york legendary coach watertown massachusetts on started. His career clarkson university goes to bowling. Green ends.

Chris moonies lanny mcdonald slaney tim hortons Hortons Pla morton nhl idaho john davidson kenny albert Johnny forslund hockey Paul edmonton toronto iraq
"clarkson university" Discussed on Pantheon

Pantheon

08:19 min | 10 months ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Pantheon

"His appearance. At the woodstock festival of nineteen sixty nine at buffalo. New york playing with hendrix. He currently plays in the african performance. Group send cova the band sons of thunder and with the jaw. Juma sultan ban soltan was born in monrovia california in nineteen sixty nine. He performed at the woodstock festival in hendrix's band gypsy sun and rainbows and on the dick cabbage. Show and a special show harlan. Several weeks later. He was interviewed. Extensively for the documentary films to hendrix and jimi hendrix live at woodstock. He appears on approximately. Twelve of jimi hendrix's posthumous releases. Juma salons musical towns span jazz rock blues and spirituals throughout decades of performing producing and recording in two thousand six clarkson university in conjunction with sultan received a grant from the national endowment of the arts to preserve sultan's audio and video documentation of off guard jazz during the nineteen sixties nine hundred seventy s. The collection may be viewed at his archive dot org. Alright so now. I give you june. We got tired of his side of the change and gypsy sun rainbows bush bandages. We have really playing beds living gelo little. Welcome to deeper digs gyltan. How you doing today. I'm doing great actually. Minute is i'm not here. Upstate new york you know. Still winter's coming on. Es great to you well. I have to ask the first question so so much and so many people. I've talked to you this year especially musicians and you know what must be the strangest year of of any musicians life. You know how you deal with covid nineteen and all the other crazy stuff. We've had to deal with this year. Well beyond strangers the strenuous because you have to It's like on the spot. Reinvent yourself for survival. And and there's many people that are in a position to thrive and and then they really blessed but the average musician You know. I just know wonderful guys who have When back to their early early career of a day job if they get the yeah oh yeah. Yeah and that's that's terrible. 'cause you know we we. We all became musicians to avoid a real job. Oh yeah well yeah well. In in some respect. I agree with that whether it's about the music. Yeah yeah yeah. It's about the music. So so let's let's get a little bit about you know the juma sultan origin story the superhero origin story. How did you get into music and added that. Come into your life well. Music came into my life. Early started playing music Early in the third grade on baritone horn and just floated in and out in junior high school. I played sousaphone. And then i And then i played trumpet and then i played guitar. And then i got Turn onto the outright base and studied You know the To be a judge basis for a number of years and always had a a spirit for For like him and drums and so i I was exposed to that earlier in my life. And i always just sort of a drums on the side and years later I gravitated to new york Playing bright base. You know. I came here with a group call. Sonny simmons depth progress. And you know when the lower east side all over new york this was about nineteen sixty five so i'm an early early years on Ended up in Sorry e woodstock area you know. Oh yeah yeah yeah. that was. That was the heyday of that woodstock and musicians collectively. Obviously we all know that. Bob dylan the band. You know were hanging out up there at that time. What are the Grossness albert algal. I'll i'll grossman had had the bears. Will he had a great studio and he was making everybody. John joslyn so many different bands. You know we're coming through this and so many bounds already You know living here you know with other labels like like guys like jim harding and You know so me You know Later on voter show bad and different view him. Yeah problem the other way. So many van morrison I think you know called in wolcott new. There was some budget denver. So many musicians you know during that period of the sixties and Yeah seventy yeah you know. Yeah so how does a southern california boy like yourself by the way. I was born and raised in in southern california my as well. How do you migrate too big nyc and why well. I came to new york. Because i was living in the canyon and I was a. I was a visual artist. I was studying All the various old master techniques at ucla extension courses and Sunny finland's came through and i am in Bill evans and those guys they blew my mind would assam because it reminded me of Some some of the other areas and You know that time. I was just Playing you know three cores and singing the blues. Like don't around the fire. Manning you know folk music mortal folkloric and that's why we're living and these guys came through and i said man and i thought you know going through Music and i happen to be was a close to a lot of music. I was introduced to on that occasion. A guy named burt wilson with a saxophone player and he was a Great saxophone everybody was like quite jeep and he took me on like a mentor and just taught me so much about jazz and standard and and also they were playing a more of a guard anyway. In about three years. I went up to san francisco and and Joint sonny simmons. Any and that night i would go and play on the different clubs and practice and a lot of great music up to and haidar sperry days. Miata was that a mid sixties like sixty five sixty six that era. Yeah that are working here in san francisco at the during the summer of love. Oh yeah yeah. I was proud of the I you know. I remember one of the last big one was in golden gate park in the drummer's.

New york Juma sultan ban soltan jimi hendrix california Sonny simmons woodstock san francisco monrovia harlan burt wilson Bob dylan haidar sperry golden gate park clarkson university van morrison John joslyn junior high school jim harding grossman denver
"clarkson university" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

08:19 min | 10 months ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"His appearance. At the woodstock festival of nineteen sixty nine at buffalo. New york playing with hendrix. He currently plays in the african performance. Group send cova the band sons of thunder and with the jaw. Juma sultan ban soltan was born in monrovia california in nineteen sixty nine. He performed at the woodstock festival in hendrix's band gypsy sun and rainbows and on the dick cabbage. Show and a special show harlan. Several weeks later. He was interviewed. Extensively for the documentary films to hendrix and jimi hendrix live at woodstock. He appears on approximately. Twelve of jimi hendrix's posthumous releases. Juma salons musical towns span jazz rock blues and spirituals throughout decades of performing producing and recording in two thousand six clarkson university in conjunction with sultan received a grant from the national endowment of the arts to preserve sultan's audio and video documentation of off guard jazz during the nineteen sixties and nineteen seventies. The collection may be viewed at julia's archive. Dot org alright. So now i give you june. We got tired of his side of the change and gypsy sun rainbows bush. Gypsies have really playing beds. Living gelo little welcome to deeper digs gyltan. How you doing today. i'm doing great. Actually minute is. I'm not here. Upstate new york you know. Still winter's coming on. Es great good you well. I have to ask the first question so so much and so many people. I've talked to you this year especially musicians and you know what must be the strangest year of of any musicians life. You know how you deal with covid nineteen and all the other crazy stuff. We've had to deal with this year. Well beyond strangers strenuous because you have to It's like on the spot. Reinvent yourself for the bible and and there's many people that are in a position to thrive and and then they really blessed but The average musician You know. I just know wonderful guys who have When back to their early early career of a day job if they get the yeah oh yeah. Yeah and that's that's terrible 'cause you know we. We all became musicians to avoid a real job. Oh yeah well yeah well. In in some respect. I agree with that whether it's about the music. Yeah yeah yeah. It's about the music. So so let's let's get a little bit about You know the juma soltan origin story the superhero origin story. How did you get into music and added that. Come into your life well. Music came into my life. Early started playing music early in the third grade on baritone horn and it's floated in and out in junior high school. i played sousaphone. And then i And then i played trumpet and then i played guitar. And then i got Turn onto the outright base and studied You know the To be a judge basis for a number of years and always had a a spirit for For like him and drums and so i I was exposed to that earlier in my life. And i always just sort of play Drums on the side and Years later I gravitated to new york Playing bright base. You know. I came here with a group call. Sonny simmons depth progress. And you know when she the lower east side all over new york. This was about nineteen sixty five in early early years on ended up in Sorry e woodstock area. Oh yeah yeah yeah. that was. That was the heyday of that woodstock and musicians collectively. Obviously we all know that. Bob dylan the band. You know were hanging out up there at that time. What are the grossness albert alberta. I'll i'll grossman had had the bears. Will he had a great studio and he was making everybody. John joslyn so many different bands. You know we're coming to this and so many bounds already You know living here you know with other labels like like guys like jim harding and You know so me You know Later on voter show bad and different view him. Yeah problem there were so many van. Morrison i think you know called in wolcott new. There was some budget denver. So many musicians you know during that period of the sixties and Yeah seventy yeah you know. There's isel yeah. So how does a southern california boy like yourself by the way. I was born and raised in in southern california as well. How do you migrate too big nyc. And why. well. I came to new york because i was living in the canyon and I was a. I was a visual artist. I was studying All the various old master techniques at ucla extension courses and Sunny finland's came through and i am in Bill evans and those guys they blew my mind would assam because it reminded me of Some some of the other areas and know that time i was just Playing you know three cores and singing the blues. Like don't around the fire. Manning you know folk music mortal folkloric and that's why we're living and these guys came through and i said man and i thought you know going through A music and i happen to be was a major slows to a lot of music. I was introduced to on that occasion. A guy named burt wilson with a saxophone player and he was a Great saxophone player but he was like chrysler jeep and he took me on like a mentor and just taught me so much about jazz and standard and and also they were playing a more of a guard anyway. In about three years. I went up to san francisco and and Joint sonny simmons. Any and that night i would go and play on the different clubs and practice and a lot of great music up to and haidar spur days. Miata was that a mid sixties like sixty five sixty six that era. Yeah that are working here in san francisco at the during the summer of love. Oh yeah yeah. I was proud of the you know like i remember one of the last big one was in golden gate park in the drummer's.

New york jimi hendrix Juma sultan ban soltan california Sonny simmons woodstock juma soltan san francisco monrovia Juma harlan burt wilson Bob dylan golden gate park clarkson university julia Dot chrysler Manning haidar
"clarkson university" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

05:36 min | 11 months ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on WJR 760

"I'm Jack Fuller. This is anything is possible. And we're talking to hell, Rosser, who is recognised to have completed more transactions in the restaurant space than any other private equity firm. In existence. Help welcome a real honor to have you. I used to be here, Jack, Do you mind if I open with a word of prayer? We'd be honored, please. Thank you, sir. Well, Lord, as we begin this show, we just lift up our country. Lord, we lift up our great nation be with all the people who love you and will come to know you, Lord, we are honored to have you as friend The hope that you give us and we just thank you for The blessings that you've bestowed upon us and our lives and we're just thankful to be here today. In Jesus's name, we pray. Amen. Amen. Your childhood, You move six times growing up. And you title your story. Shame on me. Health. Why so well, Jack, that's Ah. Good question. A cz you mentioned I moved actually, seven or eight times before. I, uh Graduated are completed My high school years My dad was in a high pressure job in the insurance business. My mom. A nurse came down with cancer at an early age and I think I just didn't have any roots in my life. And so as we were moving around, for whatever reason, I always ended up leaning to the dark side. And I did a lot of things that I'm frankly that had been bothering me most of my life. Ah, lot of things that created a lot of shame. Ah, I got involved with drinking at an early age. Um, he didn't really apply myself. I skipped school a lot. And I just had a feeling of of general purpose. Purposeless, nous and guilt. Jack and ah! And that started early on. Probably in the eighth grade. Um you're a shining example of one set of footprints. Hell, you actually were arrested in Toronto? What caused that? Well on one of those nights myself in a couple other my colleagues were drinking as we did on most weekends. We ran out of liquor early. And we were stupid enough, Teo, go break into a house of Ah, friend of ours While the parents were out of town. We took most of the liquor out of their liquor cabinet. And we went to a party and we brought all this liquor and so where they're given it out and hand it out. They press charges. So three of us were arrested for breaking, entering and theft, and that happened in the when I was in the 11th grade. You have then graduated college Clarkson University Industrial management. You got into business. You want to work for City Bank City core. You're very successful. But you kept drinking, how we're able to live those two lives. Successfully. That's a good question. I just think that You know, I could never have one drink, Jack. So when I started, I I would drink many. But I was in a On a JJ where I think I could shield it. I could hide it from any event that was involved in business. You know, I jump right in and I don't know why, but it probably lasted from when I was up until I became 42 years old. I was able to hide that and 47 years old, actually. I did many stupid things. I'm sure that other people around me saw that It was hurting me, but I just didn't see it. Unfortunately, my career, you know, kept rising. I got were responsibility and I was able to somehow get it done. If there's a guy tonight, that's very successful that has this silent life and nobody's ever going to find out. Then I masterful at living both of them. What would you say to him? Hell, I would say it isn't a good life and I think he knows that And I know that And it's just not something that is sustainable. It's hurting to you, but not only us fighting all those around you and you know alcohol is we know is a is a Major problem many people can I always admire the people, Jack. Though I go out to dinner with today They can have one glass of wine, be perfectly happy and enjoy it. And I'm in no way condemning alcohol. But for some of us, I think the genes that I had my family. My father had a similar issue. It just wasn't good for us and ah No. I was able Teo, give it up. Ah, a later point in my life, And I think it's probably the.

Jack Fuller Teo Lord Rosser City Bank City Clarkson University Industrial theft Toronto
"clarkson university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Check on Wall Street. Now Andrew a day is that Bloomberg Wall Street tried to balance further economic uncertainty with the lure of bargain shares following recent selloffs. Toward the close of trading leaned into the ladder that now rose 140 NASDAQ Up 1 85 has to be 535 walking around a huge lot haggling with a sales person wondering if you're getting ripped off the old way of buying a car keeps riding into the sunset, much to the delight of car. Vanna, the online car seller says Thanks to our new way of buying just about everything It expects record sales and first break even earnings this quarter. Shares of Carbonneau accelerated as much as 29% today. Andrew O'Day Bloomberg Business on W B Z Boston's news radio covering Ulrika Foxboro, Milford Woburn Way Know where You Live? W B z Boston's NewsRadio This is tomorrow's technology today. Brought to you by Toyota. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently challenged researchers a Clarkson University to address the water quality issue that's been around for years. Thanks to persistent algae blooms. Professor Stephane Greenberg's as they may have found the answer chemical filtration, he says. They're electrochemical oxidation process includes a cathode and an anode. We built a water through a porous anode and a zoo ology or the side of bacteria are incoming contact. The note there will be oxidized or killed. That's tomorrow's technology today,.

Governor Andrew Cuomo Professor Stephane Greenberg Boston Bloomberg Andrew O'Day Ulrika Foxboro Bloomberg Business Vanna Clarkson University Toyota New York Carbonneau
"clarkson university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Charge is likely to be dropped in the prostitution case against Patriots owner Robert Kraft as the Florida solicitor general decides against another appeal. It was last month when the state appeals court sided with the lower court's decision to have video evidence in this case thrown out under the guise of the way cameras were installed during the investigation of the Orchards of Asia SpA in West Palm Beach, Florida Robert Kraft legal team, saying the way that was handled tied to a search Violated Fourth Amendment rights. A judge last year agreed with that argument, and the state's case has been an uphill battle ever since, and appeals courts craft was initially charged with solicitation in February of last year after more than 20 men were arrested for allegedly receiving sex acts for payment in that spot. Jim McKay, W B. C. Boston's news radio and a former Ipswich man pleaded guilty to possessing 20,000 images of girls. Between the ages of 10 and 15 will be allowed to move in with his fiancee and her 14 year old daughter. The Salem News says the decision to allow sex offender Robert Freeman to move into the home Comes from Salem Superior Court Judge Thomas Dressler. Both the ages office and the probation department in Middlesex County have objective 12 38 and joining us now live from Bloomberg. It's Andrew O'Day. Walking around a huge lot haggling with a sales person wondering if you're getting ripped off. The old way of buying a car keeps riding into the sunset, much to the delight of car. Vanna, the online car seller says, thanks to our new way of buying just about everything and expects record sales and its first break, even earnings this quarter. Tears of car Vonda are accelerating as much as 29% along with car is something else selling at a brisk pace houses today, the National Association of Realtors boards US existing home sales increased 2.4% in August. Exactly as predicted by Bloomberg surveyed economists that's uncommon. But even more uncommon is the annual pace of six million units sold last month. That's the highest in 14 years. Wall Street is clinging to a split persona today down losing 32. NASDAQ Up 70 has to be 500 Gaining 11. Andrew Rhodey Bloomberg Business on W. B z Boston's NewsRadio Andrew Thank you Coming up a 12 45. We have a special report from ABC News on the death toll in the United States from Cove in 19. Before you make up your mind. Listen to Boston's Thiss is tomorrow's technology today brought to you by Toyota. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently challenged researchers a Clarkson University to address the water quality issue that's been around for years. Thanks to persistent algae blooms. Professor Stephane Greenberg says they may have found the answer. Chemical filtration. Says they're electrochemical oxidation process includes a cathode and an anode filter water through a porous and notes and a zoo ology or the side about Syria are.

Boston Robert Kraft Bloomberg Andrew O'Day Governor Andrew Cuomo West Palm Beach Salem Superior Court solicitation Andrew Rhodey Professor Stephane Greenberg Florida prostitution Judge Thomas Dressler The Salem News Jim McKay Robert Freeman ABC News National Association of Realto Vanna
"clarkson university" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:26 min | 1 year ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"We are creatures that live in an environment. Our environment is our climate says Alexander Cohen. An assistant professor of Political Science at Clarkson University who studies climate and political behavior. Do analyze political behavior or really any social behavior without looking at this huge variable is to not tell the whole story. And these tumultuous times both politically, and climatically, there are several key factors of human behavior to consider research has shown that warm temperatures increase the odds of violent interpersonal interactions. Cities see spikes in violent crime and police are more likely to use force in extreme heat. Studies have also found that people dealing with extreme heat are more likely to distrust outsiders and research has shown that challenging whether shapes political decisions when people are uncomfortable weather explains some of that says Cohen it can explain how they respond to public opinion surveys. We know that it affects how they vote or if they voted all. The research on these linkages is fairly nascent and it's hard to lay out precisely. The subtle role climate is playing an hour occurrence turmoil. But in recent weeks, hundreds of thousands have been displaced in California and Oregon more than ten million acres of farmland have been damaged by a storm in Iowa and a pair of hurricanes have flooded parts of Louisiana and Texas. Temperatures across the country are on track to make this one of the hottest years on record. It's hard to imagine this upheaval isn't subtly feeding into the Zeitgeist. The. Future. What could come next if climate changes left unchecked? Climate changes role in shaping politics geopolitics today may be subtle but in the future, it's influences certain to be more pronounced and concerning. If changes left unchecked bigger storms, unsurvivable heat and disappearing coastlines will leave billions display stores struggling to survive. This would in turn create unprecedented strain on political and social institutions not to mention the global economy. No one really knows exactly how the fallout liquor, but there's a strong scientific basis to assume that without urgent action to stem emissions will be in for many more years and decades of disturbing newspaper headlines. And they won't be just about storms and heat waves..

Alexander Cohen assistant professor of Politic Clarkson University California Iowa Louisiana Oregon Texas
New York Olympic region earns LEED gold

Climate Connections

01:20 min | 1 year ago

New York Olympic region earns LEED gold

"I'm doctor. Anthony License and this is climate connections. It's known as the miracle on ice in nineteen eighty the US men's hockey team the Soviet team and went on to win gold at the Olympics in Lake Placid New York. Now the region itself has won gold in September. The New York Olympic region earned Leed gold certification from the US Green Building Council the rating has long been applied to buildings but now entire cities and communities can become certified for sustainability. Eric backers of Clarkson University helped the region with its application. He says participating communities measure their performance in key areas whether that be greenhouse gas emissions or waste diversion rates or things like vehicle. Miles traveled per year per capita. Then they sent goals for improvement back says the Olympic region will try to reduce how many miles people drive. That means finding ways to help. Visitors get to popular hiking spots without a car. For example by creating connecting trails are offering shuttle back. It says the region's economy depends on the climate and global warming will lead to more days without snow. Those are days. You're not having people skiing. Those days you're not generating revenue so Rodney's facilities so he says the region embraces environmental action.

Anthony License Lake Placid New York Us Green Building Council New York Olympic United States Rodney Clarkson University Skiing Leed Eric
"clarkson university" Discussed on Clarkson Ignite Podcast

Clarkson Ignite Podcast

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Clarkson Ignite Podcast

"Logan think make ignite we hope to connect individuals across clarkson's diverse community. And give you our listeners. Interesting and unique content. Who our hope is that you can walk away from our episodes learning something new and valuable something that will truly inspire you for this week's episode. We're talking with tom kossuth. He recently retired but prior to that he was the senior vice president of snap on incorporated since december. Two thousand seven in was the president of snap on tools group since april two thousand ten. Tom has earned his bachelor's degree. in science. and mechanical engineering from clarkson university in nineteen seventy four. He currently holds nine. Us patents in. He has previously been chairman president and managing director of various companies five different countries. Tom was also the donor of all the snap. On equipment the clarkson maker space is actually the second time we've recorded with tom..

tom kossuth clarkson Logan clarkson university Tom Us tom
"clarkson university" Discussed on Clarkson Ignite Podcast

Clarkson Ignite Podcast

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Clarkson Ignite Podcast

"Forget forgot to say that it's our mission is to shape this podcast to the ignites. Logan which is think make ignite we hope to connect individuals across clarkson's diverse community and give you our listeners interesting and unique content. Who are hope is that you can walk away from our episodes learning something new and valuable something that will truly inspire you for this week's episode. We talked with zeke. He's a co founder of changing paradigms 's a consumer packaged goods company of which he retired from but remains as a consultant. He also still remains with his own consulting. Firm z source. Llc he is a graduate of clarkson university in nineteen seventy eight He was a chemical engineer and he was actually coosa. President a. t. a. and failings on with many more that we honestly just couldn't less because it's gonna take to the intro so it was great conversation. Yes it was great to have ball on and we hope you enjoyed the conversation. As much as we question week this week coming to you from griffin curtis senior supply chain management also on the clarkston. Alpine ski team asked us. What fact amazes you every single time you think about it nemo manucher. I go ahead so the cubs just won the world series fears ago but the last time before that that they won the world series the oldest empire ever to exist the ottoman empire still existed back for world war one. That's how long it was before they won the world series that blows my mind. I'd have to say that if you were to a all the ten thousand chilean ants in the world. They'd way as much as humans didn't seem so about this ir- ten thousand trillion. Say about all of those answers decided that they wanted like instead of building their nests and stuff like that. They decided they wanted to take down the human race. Do you think they could do it. Yeah they probably could and you know. They're very efficient so whether they like. Climate one would climbing each person's ear and like dislodge. They're actually they're like very Community like how do you said minded exactly where together as a team. Humans don't do that will probably meet us that way and thank you so much for the question. This is nina this the emails again next week. All right thank you so much for joining us. Bub zeke welcome. Are you enjoying yourself on campus. So far a absolutely the ride wasn't too bad from cincinnati. Were great all the time. And the dry down from ottawa was very nice. Okay from ottawa. Is it the closest. It is wow to get from cincinnati okay. That's usually the story around here. The easiest way to get somewhere all right so you were involved. A lot obviously clarkson we listened earlier. Anna intro all the things that you're involved in and we just wanted to. How did you juggle doing all that and once wellbeing chemical engineer it was pretty easy actually since i had retired from full time work when i sold my last business. That's when i decided to get engaged or reengaged at clarkson so that freed up a lot of time so the juggling was a lot easier than it appears at clarkson..

changing paradigms griffin curtis clarkson clarkson university zeke Logan clarkston cubs cincinnati ottawa nina Anna intro
"clarkson university" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

Reality Life with Kate Casey

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Reality Life with Kate Casey

"With it on october. October twenty fourth two thousand eleven twelve year old garrett phillips was murdered in his home in potsdam a small town in upstate new york so police quickly zeroed in on a suspect aspect in this unthinkable crime orel nick hillary a black man in this mostly white community who was a soccer coach at clarkson university and the ex boyfriend of garrett's. It's mother tandy cyrus from two time academy award nominee an emmy winner liz garbage the absorbing two part documentary looks at the case from an initial initial investigation through the arrest and numerous legal twists and turns that culminated in hillary's trial for murder five years after the crime this two part documentary he raises troubling questions of racial bias and issues surrounding police scene and the criminal justice system. I have asked brian dunford. Who's been a boston in police officer for fourteen years to watch this series. He's been awarded the medal of honor twice. He's got a master's degree in criminal justice and most importantly his debut ape. You novel south of evil was written while he was a detective. Welcome to the show. Hey thanks for having me was this the first you had heard of <hes> this case it wasn't it was riveting television so tell me a little bit about what your first impression was. As you began to watch the series series <hes> my first impression was that it was heavily biased in favor of <hes> nick hillary <hes> in this and it was all it was very entertaining. There were times it was a bit may appeal to there's one thing we do when i was lectured by an older detective why started <hes> we were at a crime scene and someone's tame came off and i turned us at all. Do you think could be him. He's he yelled at me and said no. I don't do that. I don't do that. I i just look at the facts and go they lead me. He was actually right. We have to keep a clear their mind about that. <hes> which is why. I'll tell you right now. I have no idea with nick hillary or not but it's not just a cop thing. It's not something just detectives. Do something reporters do something. We we all do that. Once an idea haden's in your head and you think i've got my suspect now. It is very hard to get it out of your head. So what do you think happened in this case. Do you think that thir legitimately was racial. Bias <hes> i i don't know and i know it's a hot button. Topic is one a coup flight to avoid <hes>. I think there are a lot of things are probably happened off camera or that the he'll make it wasn't privy to <hes> first and foremost i think tandy probably initially agreed with the assessment asman bed. Nick hillary was the one who likely killed her son. She now says he was probably likely involved but it wasn't in the documentary that she didn't say anything documentary so i felt troubled in the beginning when i was watching her former boyfriend john jones in the police room with her shortly okay after she found out that garrett was murdered. Why was he allowed to escort her into those meetings with the police officers <hes> he should not had been there. He should not have been involved in any formal interview. He can bring her to the police station. That's perfectly normal. We can hold their hand during his actions but he product to primary investigators investigators who have a private sit down where they walked through <hes> tennis irises day invite everywhere she was the last time she saw her son and <hes> every other pertinent detail..

nick hillary garrett phillips brian dunford officer emmy clarkson university potsdam soccer new york boston murder tandy liz haden tennis john jones two thousand eleven twelve yea fourteen years five years
"clarkson university" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"The survey used a point system to add or subtract points based on categories such as race religion. And attractiveness, Catherine Snyder is the chair of the education department at Clarkson university. She tells news channel thirteen while initiating discussions on diversity. And inclusion is a good thing. It is important to have someone with the proper training involved when we open up topics related to diversity inclusion the conversations become very rich very quickly. They also become very sensitive very quickly. So you need trained facilitators to lead. Those discussions school district did release a statement addressing insensitive words listed on the survey and regarded disabilities. The statement read in part, quote, the district does not condone the use of the document with these insensitive word. With the investigation into an alleged domestic incident, and colony now closed cohoes mayor Sean Morris is speaking out the mayor telling news channel thirteen he never thought about giving in to calls for his resignation. I want other people to know that in these dark times can survive them. You just gotta be strong. And you just got to believe in yourself. And if you didn't do something don't let other people tell you what to do in your life. Never let somebody direct the course of your life because they're screaming at you from the top of the mountain when they don't even know what you did police say there were inconsistencies in his wife story regarding an incident at the Denny's on wolf road last November state police are still investigating abuse allegations though against the mayor following the death of a twenty four year old inmate at the green correctional facility on Monday. We're now learning of the second death that happened at the facility last November down the Stannard died from strangulation state police confirmed that they are investigating both deaths. Whether next on NewsRadio eight ten and one or three one..

Catherine Snyder Clarkson university cohoes Stannard Sean Morris twenty four year
"clarkson university" Discussed on Download

Download

03:36 min | 2 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Download

"But I feel like that's okay. I feel like that's what apple should do is say the home pod you buy a home pod. Not because apple music on it that because it's a premium speaker product with engineered this, and right, you tell the story and people look at the price, which is probably one hundred dollars too high and will make their decision and they can compete on features. And all that rather than having the the exclusivity or semi exclusivity of the service propping it up and at the same time, you know, apple music. I think this leads the way to the TV service that they're going to do next year which talking about our last conversation about being frustrated that content that you want is not available to you. I think it's much more likely now that apple will make its TV service available on other platforms and not just on Apple's platforms as well for the same reasons. They want to grow revenue. They want people to be like, oh, I really like that apple stuff. Maybe I'll buy apple TV next time. Maybe I'll buy an iphone next time, and you know, better to like to see apple competing on these terms. Instead of the other way, they could do which is just saying, well, we'll we'll do the minimal effort and put it inside our ecosystem. And then everybody's just going to be stuck with with it. If they want to be in our ecosystem because that's lazy, and I think a bad about look at that sign for Apple's future. If they did that. So I'm encouraged by the fact that they're actually willing to compete on both on the hardware side on the service aside. Yeah. And the only thing that happened will hopefully the thing the results is everybody gets better. Right competition is good for consumers because we want the best things the most innovative things. And this is how it happens because they need that incentive to continue iterating and making things better for everybody. Well, we're almost at the end I did say earlier that as we move through our grim Tope. We would need more puppies. So we have more puppy. So I I have a fussy puppy update from listener Peter who sent in this story about Britney Holly who uses a wheelchair and has chronic pain, but has managed to get through college and grad school with the help of her service dog Griffin. That's why the board of trustees from Clarkson university has decided to grant Griffin the dog an honorary degree for his extraordinary effort steadfast commitment and diligent dedication, to the wellbeing and student success of Brittany Brittany's. Master's degrees in occupational therapy. And she says Griffin is actually helpful in her therapy sessions and very popular with her patients, which is pretty cool. But here's your bonus. Because we went extra dark this week. Which is that panelist lean Hello? This story about a service called embark. You might be able to work it out. Just from the name. It's been launched in Australia. You go to the airport. You're a little nervous your little stress. You may not like flying. You don't like the going through security, and are you gonna make your flight and all that and embark provides puppies at the airport. So that you can pet a puppy and be delighted and calmed down a little bit and feel a little bit better. And if I do if I could release puppies in this podcast. I would do it. But I can't I can only tell stories about puppies. So this the best I can do. But thank you lean for sending that in. We did need the second helping fuzzy poppies to those actually my husband, Justin. He was like, hey, did, you know the story? And I was like, yes, let's let's let's do a fuzzy puppy. Thank you. Panelists husband, Justin. For that. And once again, just a reminder to everybody out there. Send in your thoughts about the stories of the year tiny URL dot com.

apple Griffin Justin Clarkson university Brittany Brittany Australia Britney Holly Peter one hundred dollars
"clarkson university" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Gilbert Gottfried's Amazing Colossal Podcast

"And but no one can say em at wall it scans alright you can read it like harry dean sent you know jake carole nash has a has a a poetic sound to it but you can't say 'em walls with it got it looks it looks okay on paper which you can't say it out loud so but that's the weird that's where it came from the and you know i'm my mother's favourite brother was emmet sullivan so that's where the middle took that it's spelled e m n bt the irish way you know robert emmet a nathan hale of ireland was hung by the english back in eighteen twenty some his it was a certain he was a protestant but robert emmet spelled as one team and the irish who were uneducated and so forth to pay homage to this great person spelled his name wrong for the next two years oh man we'll tell tell us what you were before we turn the mic on it you were telling us the story you from your from vermont you came to new york against you are you telling me the mike sarin on now they are now they weren't till gilbert read his intro but you were you were fascinating us you were telling us how your mother did not want you to come to new york and you took a channel i have a degree in marketing degree in business and my mother you know lovely irish lady my olivier alerts said his his mother had the wish the way he got into theater in the acting was his mother had the wish and never did anything with it my father had the wish you know picked it up from someone in the family my father never did you know he was machine going into the first world war and all this other stuff but i got the wish for my father and then when i was finishing up in college you know the students had been clarkson university clarkson college up in potsdam new york saint lawrence is right next to clarkson up there in north my college is only a hundred and fifty miles from where i grew up in vermont and the students have.

harry dean jake carole nash robert emmet ireland vermont new york mike sarin emmet sullivan gilbert potsdam new york saint lawrenc clarkson two years
"clarkson university" Discussed on BrainStuff

BrainStuff

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on BrainStuff

"Hi this is john rorick from the rock band the long winter but i'm ken jennings from the syndicated crucial jeopardy we have a podcast called omnibus it's a time capsule of our era and we put a new entry in the ground every tuesday and thursday listen on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts and subscribe to never miss a single episode two welcome to brain stepped from how step with bard mobile hey brain steph lauren vogel bomb here imagine your hours into a late night poker match holed up in the basement of a sketchy watering hole where tensions are rising you know you should quit while you're ahead be you just can't bring yourself to leave any possible winnings on the table the streak has gone on so long it's like you can't lose except you do one bad card deals you a killer blow dispel is broken and you're hot hand is gone unfortunately it never existed in the first place researchers have taken great pains to prove that the hot hand bias is exactly that a bias it's humans in meat predisposition that makes us believe we see patterns including winning or losing streaks where none exist especially when preservation or gain involved now we know that monkeys have the same superstitious bias to oh and they really love to gamble it seems we species have more in common than just the ninety three percent of our dna during a study by researchers at clarkson university and the university of rochester rhesus monkeys played a fastpaced computer game with builtin rewards correctly guess the next step in the pattern get a treat however even when.

john rorick rock band ken jennings time capsule clarkson university university of rochester ninety three percent
"clarkson university" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:30 min | 4 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Science Friday

"Uh i would you want to go early milford i would say the behavioral biometrics um it's more now about not necessarily a single pressing of your finger taking a photograph but really just that you're device knows you it knows you by how you hold it by how you work with the device um but by how you swipe and type and maybe other wearables you may have so you don't really have to do anything by device you pick up the device that it knows who you are pipe by so which should have like your friend i can't be so and so they don't do that i i would agree i think that increasing they were seeing companies taken of a constellation of things uh that they can read about you whether it's your gate or you know your fingerprints or your password and using all of these things together to know that indeed that is you the question then becomes how is this going to be applied now that they know you're the one in the room are they gonna taylor adds to you are they gonna dig up your criminal history these are the questions that remain unanswered scary questions trikha brave new world to deal with it and let me let me thank my guest shuckers director of the center for identification technology research and a professor at clarkson university in potsdam new york april glaser technology staff writer at sleigh thank you both for tickets have to be with us today.

director professor clarkson university taylor potsdam new york april glaser technology staff writer
"clarkson university" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:46 min | 4 years ago

"clarkson university" Discussed on Science Friday

"You're welcome and i guess if you want more information you could screen chinatown nail from vicky uh during the break we're going to take a break in at what if you could hold your smartphone up to year and unlock it with unique shape of your earprint that is possible biometrics away way behind the way beyond the finger fingerprint and talk about all different ways that we're thinking about using body parts to a keep your privacy intact stay with us we'll be right back after the break this is science friday i am i replayed oh your fingerprints are all over your phone right if you if you're like me that unique physical marker can be used to unlock your smartphone too but if it you know it's not foolproof technology because security researchers have already shown that you can unlock devices with a replica of someone's fingerprint they see that they can even swipe fingerprint data from a photo of someone flashing the peacein while so cocaine what when not use then an iris scan consider the case where a hacker used a poster of german chancellor angela merkel to extract iris information from her eye which the hacker said he could print on a contact lanes to spook an iris skinner you get the point here as more biometric tech comes on line like three d face scanning in near next iphone perhaps how can we make our machines savvy enough to know to know the real thing from a spoof stephanie shuckers director of the center for identification technology research and a professor at clarkson university in potsdam new york is here she joins us from will in illinois welcome to science friday.

cocaine angela merkel iphone director professor clarkson university chancellor stephanie shuckers potsdam new york illinois