17 Burst results for "Carson Mccullers"

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

Problematic Premium Feed

03:40 min | 9 months ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Problematic Premium Feed

"Discussing three related but for nama one called world political repression aimed at limiting pro russian sympathies among liberal radical. New deal you americans to the mccarthyite purges of the us government itself in a inter imperialist policy struggle and three the violent terroristic contra insurgency campaigns to cross revolutionary struggles throughout the expanded us. It is a particular trait of your american left revisionism to blurred these three phenomena together while self as the main of us imperialism. This is an outrageous lie when we actually analyzed the repression of the communist party. Usa it is striking how mild it was more like a warning from the great white father than repression. In contrast the euro american left pitches its role as one of steadfast and heroic sacrifice against the unleashed imperialist juggernaut then Len decal a former communist party. Usa activists who was who was publicity director of the national cio recalls. In in self-congratulation the the united states was now officially launched on a bipartisan. Cold war course with the appearance of it during nineteen thirty. Seven through nineteen forty was a communist party. Usa member tens of thousands of administrators schoolteachers scientists. Social workers writers and officials belong to the communist party. Usa that was a period in which writers as prominent as ernest hemingway in artists. Such as rockwell. Kent bench sean and been sean contributed to communist party. Usa publications prominent modern dancers gave benefit performances agreements village for the daily worker maxim lieber one of the most exclusive madison avenue literary agents with clients like john cheever carson mccullers. Johnny harra and links and hues was not only a communist party. Usa member but was using his business as a cover to send clandestine communications between new york and eastern europe. The communist party usa then was a common presence in your american life from textile mills to this seeming success story only concealed the growing alien ization from the communist party usa by the white workers who had one started in the early nineteen twenty s. The infant communist party was overwhelmingly european. Emigrant plo proletarian in this in. Its first year. Half of his members spoke no english for that to of two thirds of the total party. Were finnish immigrants. Who had left the social democracy and the w ww to embrace bolshevism. Virtually all the rest will russian polish jewish lab that and other european immigrants. The communist party. Usa was once a white proletarian party. Not just in words. But in material fact the rapid expansion of the party influence and size during the late thirties and the world war two years was an illusion. Your americans we're not fighting for a revolution but for several ristic reforms and those years the communist party usa was just the radical wing of president. Roosevelt's new deal as soon as you. American industrial workers had won.

Usa communist party Len decal nama Usa publications maxim lieber john cheever carson mccullers Johnny harra us government sean clandestine communications ernest hemingway white workers infant communist party rockwell Kent eastern europe white proletarian party new york Roosevelt
"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:45 min | 10 months ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Mm. Remember well when she used to be around Looking in her here. My heart pound Smoking cigarettes talking much too fast days that Seem so short. Night too good to last. Warm and feel and just like the feeling of jazz. Heads up in the clouds feeling brighter than the sun. Dude, I got no time for crowds when you with one Hands beneath the table, saying all the words hearts that touch the sky. Flying like birds happy feeling up just like the field of Jack. Hey, good things never last crazy bubbles. Not a first baby goes away, the best turns to the worst sitting by the phone. Smoking cigarettes more You're all alone. Lonely your it gets Lonely feeling just like the field, Jack. Bobby Troop gives us the feeling of jazz and something by Duke Ellington, Dinah Washington Destination Moon Suzanne Vega, Destination New York in the personage of Carson McCullers, and from her and evening of New York songs and stories recorded last year at the Cafe Carlyle. Oh, we'll get that world back Cafe Society will live again. But Between now and then. It's a little bit more life behind the mask. But the music sets us free and from the feeling of jazz to the feeling of a solid base riff in a great record by font. Tell a bass in the early sixties rescue me on w N Y. C and new standards startled. Mm hmm. Draft kill. May I want your tender Ugo rescue me? Rescue me calling me Theo catches. To me. Come on and take my heart. Take on offer everybody I need you. You may rescue me.

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"All you need to do a search for both shows on iTunes and hit subscribe. On this show. We're exploring stories about rules and regulations, especially is they applied to nuclear families. I grew up in a pretty average, one by and large two parents, six kids and a livin grandmother who spoke eight words of English. When I was a boy, I didn't dare talk back to my parents even rolling. My eyes was asking for it. Cut to my brother who's 10 years younger and would regularly tell our father to shut his stupid mouth while putting him in a headlock. What can I say The line forever shifts, times change. Rules around This next story is by the noted Southerner, Carson McCullers. Lt is best known for the heart is a lonely hunter and the Ballad of the Sad Cafe. So, yes, plenty of melancholy. I read the story is part of an evening with fashion guru Tim Gunn. And here he is talking about my collars on stage. It's symphony space. My love affair with Carson McCullers, who really is a hero of mine is a story of a long journey. I was an insatiable reader as a kid. I grew up with an absolutely debilitating stutter. My world was the world sitting in those books. And I could take a journey. I could go anywhere. I could go to the moon. I could go to South America. They were just so unshackling and freeing and I treasured them. I also was passionate about architecture. So I had one semester of architecture in college hated it absolutely hated it. I thought I'm gonna be doing wiring and plumbing specs for gas stations or the rest of my life. And I became a literature major. What was interesting was there were no Southern writers among any of the individuals we studied so well, fast forward the pages of the calendar. I'm now in art and design students. I'm going back for a second undergraduate degree, and I had a wonderful mentor in design schools. Bill Kristol Berry, who said Well known Southern artist photographer sculptor And it was Bill who introduced me to the Southern writers. I wanted to know more. I was intensely curious. So in addition to Carson McCullers, splintery O'Connor, Truman Capote James Aging, but it was McCullers work in particular that struck me in, but I did a whole singer thesis that was inspired by her writings. And for me, the narratives, the stories, the journeys that one could take. Suddenly it wasn't Just the power of the written word, but the beauty of it the poetry of us the cadence, the rhythm. The sequence of words that was so beautifully orchestrated that I could read a paragraph over and over and over again. It was magical. And in addition to having bill Christian Berry is a mentor, I had a senior thesis advisor whom I revered and was in all of her name was and true it from reading about my colors. I knew that she had attended the Hado art Colony and in Saratoga Springs, and I knew that and true. It had attended ya Go so My two heroes. I wanted to know whether they'd met. What was she like? What was she like and said she was like a spoiled, petulant child who would steal your lollypop at any moment. Carson McCullers did have a very Demanding difficult existence on DH. A domestic dilemma is a story I was not at all familiar with. It's such poignant Mirror on her own life..

Carson McCullers Bill Kristol Berry Tim Gunn Christian Berry James Aging Sad Cafe South America Saratoga Springs Hado art Colony Truman Capote advisor splintery O'Connor
"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Podcast. When you do, you'll get episodes of our spin off podcast selected shorts too hot for radio. All you need to do a search for both shows on iTunes and hit subscribe on this show. We're exploring stories about rules and regulations, especially is they applied to nuclear families. I grew up in a pretty average, one by and large Two parents, six kids and a living grandmother, who spoke eight wards of English. When I was a boy, I didn't dare talk back to my parents, even rolling. My eyes was asking for it cut to my brother who's 10 years younger and would regularly tell our father to shut his stupid mouth while putting him in a headlock. What can I say? The line forever shifts. Times change rules a road. This next stories by the noted Southerner, Carson McCullers. Lt is best known for the heart is a lonely hunter and the Ballad of the Sad Cafe. So, yes, Plenty of melancholy we read this story is part of an evening with fashion guru Tim Gunn. And here he is talking about my collars on stage at Symphony Space. My love affair with Carson McCullers, who really is a hero of mine is a story of a long journey. I was an insatiable reader is a kid. I grew up with an absolutely debilitating stutter. My world was the world sitting in those books. And I could take a journey. I could go anywhere. I could go to the moon. I could go to South America. They were just so unshackling and freeing and I treasured them. I also was passionate about architecture. So I had one semester of architecture in college hated it. Absolutely hated it. I thought I'm gonna be doing wiring and plumbing specs for gas stations or the rest of my life on I became a literature major. What was interesting was there were no Southern writers among any of the individuals.

Carson McCullers Tim Gunn Sad Cafe Symphony Space South America
"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Monks and levitating holy man. And fill the anti dog anti snake trough with water so that the farmers could if they chose go swimming. But not when there was a thunderstorm or the possibility of a thunderstorm and not without their life Jackets, which contains special built in shark alarms. And not before they had signed the swimming log, which had to be signed again when one was done swimming, even if one just got out briefly to eat something being cooked on the outdoor fire. Which far attended very carefully Clinching the fire dousing bucket at all times, even on that rare occasion when, quickly cautiously. He went for a swim himself. That was George Saunders. Story. Lars Far excessively fearful husband and father read by James Naughton. I'm David Sedaris. When we return secrets, booze and Carson McCullers, you're listening to selected shorts recorded live in performance and symphony space in New York City. In another venues nationwide..

Carson McCullers David Sedaris George Saunders James Naughton New York City Lars
"carson mccullers" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Artificial Intelligence (AI Podcast) with Lex Fridman

"The ones in blue online right and you know I've already said that I've found backers work and. Put The denial of death out there Is that his best sorry on a small tangent is there other books of his? Yes. If I could have this count as one, the the the birth and death of meaning the denial of death and escaped from evil are three books of Ernest backers. That I believe to all be profound in a in a little. Brief dance around. Topics. I've only read denial death like, well, how do those books connecting year yet? Nicer. The birth and death meaning is where Becker situates his thinking. In more of an evolutionary foundation so I like that for that reason. Escape from. evil. is where he applies the ideas in denial of death. More directly. To economic matters. And inequality. And also, to our inability to peacefully coexist with other folks who don't share our beliefs. So I would put Ernest Becker out there as one. I, also, like novel Salat. And Heroes I. got him at no matter. I Say I'm GonNa be like, yes. But but that's essentially issue like all those folks, Komo. Like thought that literary exercise I do but I mean, you know I I've read all those books of. I will tell you the last line of the plague. We learn in times of pestilence that there's more to admire in men than to despise, and I, love that Yuck. Oh, plagues such I don't know I find the blade is a brilliant may to before before the plague has come to us and twenty twenty, I it was just. So. Love about. But I'll toss a one that may be less known to folks. I'm nominated with a novel by woman named Carson mccullers written in nineteen, fifty, three com clock without hands. and. I find it a brilliant literary depiction of many of the ideas that we have spoken about fiction fiction. Yeah. What's What kind of ideas we talking? Oh, it all of the existential ideas that we have encountered today but in the context of a story. Of someone who finds out that he is terminally ill. It's sat in the south in the. Heyday of like segregation. So there's a lot of social issues, lot of existential issues, but it's basically a fictional account. Of someone who finds out that they're terminally ill and who reacts originally as. You might expect anyone becomes more hostile to people who are different petty and stupid than is that anything's happening but a as the book goes on and he comes more two terms. with his own mortality. it ends lovingly and I back to your idea A. About you know.

Ernest Becker Carson mccullers
"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:00 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Thing you got to do? Makes New York is my destination. New York We're from New York. Randers just swing by the club. Three live in it. New York grand just will Could this be? No. Littering on the Virgin snow. New York is Brando eggs just They will. No New York is waiting for me. Those bus way. Ah, lost all my money for Julia. In the Macy's. I slipped in a way, my dest New York is grander thing, just like me. Do you? New York is grander things just like May. Suzanne Vega lover beloved songs from an evening with Carson McCullers in New York is my destination. Suzanne Vega, who tells great stories. In her own voice inhabits the personage of a great American scribe and storyteller swinging the blues with Basie before that, and it don't mean a thing Surreal. A may fall. Cavalcanti and W N.

"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To the crash to the crowd does this man spark joy does this man spark joy the crowd use no heat is not the crowd you know he does not do this does this man spoke Joan the crowd used he does not and she nods silently silently sided throws him into the pit I don't know if it's possible to talk about the should not talk about it right now but we have been talking about the ocean in New York City without without Coney Island flickering through one's mind of my favorite thing about Coney Island happens to be a selling that gave que Han wrote about Tony island and seeing as he's here and all okay so this is a song from a musical called February house that I wrote back in two thousand twelve it's about a boarding house in Brooklyn where a bunch of literary and musical luminaries lived including WH Auden Benjamin Britten Peter Pierce the striptease artist gypsy rose Lee and the up and coming novelist Carson McCullers who is fresh off of the success of her debut novel the heart is a lonely hunter she's kind of the vampire weekend for time and anyway so she she sort of had an affinity for those who who were outsiders and this is sort of a song about that in their case they can face I was stealing glances with this is this is the lonely is looms always together soon not friends this is and it's I Santa death in Ireland this is I'm single I'm crazy this choose the matter well it's a good looking handsome hopefully I would thank you for that which brings us to our instrumental break in approximately three minutes we'll be hearing more from our friend Maria Popova who as you heard is originally from Bulgaria which strikes me as an excellent reason to playable Garion tune in the unlikely time signature of twenty five sixteen so are the the song is called CD docker they're not you know counting to twenty five as they play these things and I think even the existence of twenty five sixteen has something to do with that dance steps that that I do not understand I've seen it done it's gorgeous I think they counted mostly in twos and threes and I I feel that you should be counting along at home I think they want to put the a little later this afternoon on the Ted radio hour our greatest breakthroughs in trials have one thing in common creativity but how do you ignited and how do you reconcile it that's the Ted radio hour this afternoon at three o'clock and.

Joan New York City Coney Island Tony island Brooklyn Auden Benjamin Britten Peter P Lee Ireland Maria Popova Bulgaria que Han Carson McCullers
"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"No he does not and she nods silently silently sided and throws him into the pit I don't know if it's possible to talk about the should not talk about it right now but we have been talking about the ocean in New York City without without Coney Island flickering through one's mind of my favorite thing about Coney Island happens to be a selling that gave que Han wrote about Tony island and seeing as he's here and all okay so this is a song from a musical cult favorite house that I wrote back in two thousand twelve it's about a boarding house in Brooklyn where a bunch of literary and musical luminaries lived including WH Auden Benjamin Britten Peter Pierce the striptease artist gypsy rose Lee and the up and coming novelist Carson McCullers who is fresh off of the success of her debut novel the heart is a lonely hunter she's kind of the vampire weekend for time and anyway so she she sort of had an affinity for those who who were outsiders and this is sort of a song about that in that case they can face I steal a glance with.

New York City Coney Island Tony island Brooklyn Auden Benjamin Britten Peter P Lee que Han Carson McCullers
"carson mccullers" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"All of your bridesmaids Obree red and I will be happy to fill in I'm busy but I just don't strapless or spaghetti straps we also need a lot of it it's not gonna be your day I'm going to have sex with your father those are very read it what are you gonna do I am going to as long as you have short route as an option and I don't have to wear sleeveless I'm good I'm gonna make a massive beach I would just a monologue from member of the wedding by Carson McCullers and then minutes mash the big wedding cake so pretty much Gina date will be yours thank you so much please keep us posted thank you answer okay yeah no you're the mazing and and just just I just don't died you so we'd be haunted by your friends okay we love you five when you guys I heart podcast channel over two hundred fifty thousand podcasts all available to you for free right now by downloading the I heart radio make a new year's resolution to get better sleep I have this is Lisa bear again make mattress warehouse your first stop in keeping that resolution incredible new year sale going.

Carson McCullers Lisa
"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

14:53 min | 1 year ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Christmas of my fifth year when we still lived in the old downtown Georgia home I had just recovered from scarlet fever and that Christmas day I overcame a rivalry that likes the fever had muffled and blanched my second heart this rivalry that changed to love overshadowed my discovery that Santa Claus and Jesus were not the can I had supposed the scarlet fever came first in November my brother budge and I were quarantined in the back room and for six weeks time hovered over thermometers potties alcohol rubs and Rosa Henderson Roosevelt was the practical nurse who cared for us as mother had deserted me for my hated rival the new baby sister mother would have opened the door and pass the presence that came to the house to Rosa calling out some words before she shut the door she did not bring the baby and I was glad of that there were many presence and rose to put them in a big soap box between the beds of my brother and me there were games modeling clay paint sets cutting out scissors and engines judge was much Littler than I was he was too little to come straight to play par cheesy to wipe himself he could only model squashed bowls and cut out easy big round to things like magazine pictures of Santa Claus then his tongue would we go out of the corner of his mouth because of the difficulty I cut out the hard things and paper dolls when he played the harp it made a sickening shriek I played Dixie and Christmas carols toward dark rose a read aloud to us she read child life story books or a true confessions magazine her soft stumbling voice would rise and fall in the quiet room as fire lit shadows staggered golden gray upon the walls at that time there were only the changing tones of her colored voice and the changing walls in the fire light except sometimes the baby cried and I felt as if a worm crawled inside me and played the harp to drown out the sound it was late fall when the quarantine began and through the closed windows we could see the autumn leaves falling against the blue sky and sunlight we saying come little leave said the window one day come more the meadows with me and play then suddenly one morning Jack frost silver the grass and rooftops rose said mentioned at Christmas was not long away how long but as long as that said lord Shane I reckon to the end of the quarantine we had been making a celluloid chain out of many colors I puzzled about the answer and bunch thought and then put his tongue in the corner of his mouth Rosa added Christmas is on the twenty fifth of December directly I will count the days if you listen you can hear the reindeers come galloping from the North Pole it's not long will we be loose from this old room by then I trust the lord a sudden terrible thought came to me our people ever stick on Christmas yes baby who rose it was making supper toast by the fire turning it carefully with a long toast for her voice was like torn paper when she said again my little son died on Christmas day diet Sherman diet no it isn't Sherman she said sternly sermon comes to our window every day and you know it Sherman was a Big Boy and after school he would stand by our window and rose would open it from the bottom and talk to him a long time and sometimes given a dime to go to the store Sherman held his nose all the time he was at the window so that his voice twang to like a ukulele string it was Sherman's little brother a long time ago was he sick with scarlet fever no he burned to death on Christmas morning he was just a baby and Sherman put him down on the horse to play with him then child like Sherman forgot about him and left him alone on the hearth the fire popped into spark caught his little night gown and by the time I knew it my baby was that was how come I got this year wrinkled white scar on my neck was your baby like our new baby about the same age I thought about it a long time before I said we Sherman glad thoughts is in your head to sister I don't like babies I said you will like the baby later on just like you love your brother now Bonnie smells bad I said most every child don't like the new baby until they get used to it our every and ever the same I asked those were the days when we were peeling everyday bhajan I peeled strips and patches of skin and save them in a pill box I wonder what we're going to do with all this skin we've saved face that when the time comes sister enjoy it while you can I wonder what we're going to do with this long chain we've made I looked at the chain that was piled in the box between the beds of my brother and me it covered all the other toys to dolls engines and all the quarantine ended and the joy of our release battled with a sudden inexplicable grief all our toys for going to be burned every toy the chain even the peel skin which seem the most terrible loss of all its own account of the germs Rosa said everything burned and the beds and mattresses will go to the germ disinfect tree man and the room scoured with Lysol I stood on the threshold of the room after the German man had gone there were no echoes of toys no bad snow furniture the room was bitter cold and the damp floor was sharp smelling the windows wet my heart shut with the closing door mother had sold me a red dress for the Christmas season of bhajan I were free to walk in all the rooms and go out of the yard but I was not happy the baby was always in my mother's lap merry the cook would say do you and Daddy would throw the baby up in the air there was a terrible song that Christmas hang up the baby's stocking be sure you don't forget the dear little damn bowl darlings sheen their soccer is messy air I did the whining tune and the words so much that I put my fingers in my ears and hum Dixie until the talk changed to Santa's reindeer the North Pole and the magic of Christmas three days before Christmas the real and the magic collided so suddenly that my world of understanding was instantly scattered for some reason I don't remember now I opened the door of the scarlet fever room and stopped on the threshold spellbound and trembling the room what rioted before my unbelieving eyes nothing familiar was there and the space was filled with everything budge and I had written on the Santa Claus list and sent up the chimney all that and even more so that the room was like a Santa Claus room in a department store there were a tricycle a doll a train with tracks and a child's table and four chairs I doubted the reality of what I saw and looked at the familiar tree outside the window and that a crack on the ceiling I knew well then I moved around with the light secret way of a child who metals I touch the table the Tories with careful for finger they were touchable real I saw a wonderful on asked for thing a green monkey with an organ grinder the monkey wore a scarlet coat and looked very very ill with his monkey anxious face and worried eyes I loved the monkey of but did not dare touch him I looked around the Santa Claus room the last time there was a hush spaces in my heart that follows the shock of revelation I close the door and walked away slowly weighed by two much wisdom mother was knitting in the front room and the baby was there in her playpen I took a big breath and said in a demanding voice why are the Santa Claus things in the back room mother have a stumbling look of someone who was telling a story why sister as Santa Claus asked your father if he could store some things in the backroom I didn't believe it and said I think Santa Claus is only parents third Darling I wondered about chimneys which doesn't even have a chimney but Santa Claus always comes to him sometimes he he walks in the door for the first time I knew my mother was telling me stories and I was thinking is Jesus real Santa Claus in Jesus are close can I know mama put down her knitting Santa Claus is toys and stores and Jesus is hers the mention of church brought me thoughts of boredom colored windows organ music restless I hated church and Jesus if church was Jesus I loved only Santa Claus and he was not real mother tried again Jesus is as the holy infant like Bonnie the Christ child this was the worst of it on the floor and holding the baby's face Santa Claus is only parents she's the baby began to cry and mother picked her up and cuddled her in her lap thank you behave yourself young lady you're making Bonnie cry he got old ugly Bonnie I whales and went to the hall to cry Christmas day was like twice done happening I played with the monkey under the tree and help to budge lay the tracks for the train the baby had blocks and a rubber doll and she cried and didn't play bhajan I did a whole layer of our box of Treasure Island chocolates and by afternoon we were jaded by play and candy later I was sitting on the floor alone in the Christmas the room except for the baby in her playpen the bright tree glowed in the winter light suddenly I thought of Rosa Henderson and the baby who was burned on Christmas day I looked at Bonnie and glanced around the room mother and Daddy had gone to visit my uncle will and merry was in the kitchen I was alone carefully I lifted the baby and put her on the hearth in the unclear conscious of five years old I did not feel that I was doing wrong I wondered if the fire would pop and went to the back room with my brother sad and troubled it was our family custom to have fireworks on Christmas night Daddy would light a bonfire after dark and we would shoot Roman candles and skyrockets I remembered the box of fire works was on the mantle piece of the back room and I opened it and selected to Roman candles I asked fudge do you want to do something fun I knew clearly that this was wrong but angry and sad I wanted to do wrong I held the Roman candles to the fire and gave one to budge watch here I thought I remember the fireworks but I have never seen anything like this after his and spider the Roman candles violent and a live shot in streams of yellow and red we stood on opposite sides of the room in the blazing fire works ricocheted from wall to wall in an arc of splendor and terror it lasted a long time and we stood transfixed him the radiant fearful room when finally it was finished my hostile feelings had disappeared I was quiet in the very silent room I thought I heard the baby cry but when I ran into the living room I knew she was not crying nor had she been burned and gone up the chimney she had turned over and was crawling toward the Christmas tree her little fingered hands were on the floor her nightgown was hyped over her diapers I never seen Bonnie crawl before and I watched her with the first feelings of love and pride the old hostility gone forever I played with honey with a heart cleansed of jealousy and joyful for the first time in many months I was reconciled that Santa Claus was only family but with this new tranquility I felt maybe my family and Jesus were somehow can soon afterward when we moved to a new house in the suburbs I taught Bonnie how to walk and even let her hold the monkey well I played the organ grinder Amanda Quaid performed the discovery of Christmas by Carson McCullers I'm hope Davis when we return a complicated relationship you're listening to selected shorts recorded live.

fever Georgia
"carson mccullers" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

Charlotte Readers Podcast

08:36 min | 2 years ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Charlotte Readers Podcast

"An ancient cigarette advertisement on the Tobacco Barn door that made up her conference room table. Reach for a lucky instead of a sweet tweet said or maybe Cate said he wants to win the suit and take your newspaper way from you so he can be the new publisher she saw a flicker of fear in waves is he blinked and then it was gone all right when we come back. We're going to have a writing life. SEGMA- Sigma with the John Buchan. We're GONNA talk some more about the forest. He's GonNa Review more things. It might be a cliffhanger. The end that He's going to leave you with so so stay with us. Hey listeners I'm here at the Robinson Spangler Carolina Room Uptown Branch show maximum library great resource for Citizens of Charlotte in the region. I'm here with Tom. Patchett historian resume. And we're talking about the books that are available in this great space. Tell us about the first time this is a novel that that is set in part thank in Charlotte Carson mccullers wrote. The heart is a lonely hunter. which is now a classic? American literature was an Oprah Winfrey Book. Club selection take years ago She was just out of high school. She came to Charlotte with her Her new husband in the Great Depression lived in a rooming house up on central avenue. And then another one over in Dilworth and started to write about what it was like to be lonely young person sitting and another book that you've got here which was on our podcast. In the second season former journalist Pam Kelly is called money rock and and it's interesting to pair with Carson mccullers. Heart is a lonely hunter which is a book in some ways talks about the structures of poverty that made it hard for people to advance advance in Charlotte during the Great Depression. Money Rock is about a cocaine dealer. Now Minister Belton Platt back in the nineties. He was known as money. Rock the most flamboyant and successful cocaine dealer in Charlotte went to prison for But he came out of a situation Where that that seemed to be the only way upwards so when you talk about opportunity structures of poverty Money rock powerful and it was a a it really enjoyed interview with Cam. She really brought out a side of Charlotte with this. That you would know if you're just now moving and even lived through it. I was surprised to what was going on behind the same. Gerald is a city where it's real easy to assume that everybody's kind of like you. That's not okay so for more resources like this go to see him. Library Dot Org to stop any branch. Thanks Tom. Thank you Charlotte readers. PODCAST and in host land dissuade are grateful to you for listening to this show. If you liked the show. Please leave a short written review on Apple podcasts also known as Itunes or the podcast platform of your choice because your review helps author share their stories with more listeners. Thank you for your support. And we're back with John Buchan Code of the Forest Josh. So you got a lot of painting a very Nice picture of South Carolina Politics Ticks. Oh guess have you received any feedback about even though just fiction so people can't get over the fact that even those fiction senior feedback. Somebody saying that's just a little not much happened this one. Yeah I have a few people raise. That was me when I walked round. Places talking about the book speaking here and there and and And I always tell them I. This book is set in South Carolina. But it's not just about South Carolina and I it. It is true that I believe that public servants Are Out there so many I admire. I support I get behind when they're running because they're great right. People who want the best for their families and for South Carolina or North Carolina or the country but also remind those people in South Carolina who raise it that there was a time in the nineteen ninety s when ten percent of the South Carolina legislature was under indictment for taking bribes Video the smallest ninety percent. That's right It does have an endless. Don't forget in North Carolina. We won't have to go into that history but there's plenty of recent history mystery. In North Carolina of elected officials go into prison. Or you're also in the business of trying to tell an entertaining story and I mean I think Jan Gresham would say when somebody asked him. Why are you writing about lawyers and judges? They're complicit in all these shenanigans. He said well you know the most time they're all good. This is a you know. I gotTA sell books here. Yeah so so bad news play. We talked about all the planes and Lansley exactly where we're going to this little. Thank the writing life segment I I I. I'm doing. Some different pieces here is going to be some fill in the blanks and true false true as far as your concern not necessarily truth entirely but True false routine is an important part of your writing process. It was not from it was now is working fulltime. I did it When when I just had time and what I also was excited about doing publishing is a journey not a sprint true false as absolutely true? Yeah took you to. How many years did you if you want from the time? I wrote the first first paragraph without a book came out with ten years. Yeah they were. Doing things tend to take nine months. I was working on some case and not paying attention to this true false writing. The second book is harder than the first well. I says I had read the second round yet. League guilty to that And that's leads into my question about it because I know you've been asked this over and over and over. John when are we going to get the sequel here. We're GONNA find out what happens to debate and Wade and all this stuff. You thought about it right. I not only have thought about it. I do think about it in I. I still take lots of notes. I still think about the plot that would that would hold some of these characters together and bring in some new characters and I think ABS- still practicing law. I think as soon as I quit. There's the fear I have to say. I thought about this long time a little bit of fear that can do it as well as all that did this. All right Fill in the blank devices and activities. That would interfere with my writing include. Oh my grandchildren. I have three wonderful great grandchildren. One of them's only ten months. It would be an activity. Not Advice Right. Yeah Well you have to include tennis vice and and and I'm terrible Golfer but my friends still let me go with them and I liked her companionship. So there are things like data in terms of Vices I've met I love to read and that's if I could tell my younger writing self something very helpful it would be well almost took to address something you said earlier. I think you need to write at least initially what you really know because I know there's some old quotes I've seen that gave her where it came from but something about fiction. Speak to the facts in the true of the facts. The better the fiction Tom Wolfe off. was a nonfiction writer who then wrote several novels not perfect novels but good novels and he because he could create a scene saying that was so real. It made you believe even some of the parts of the story might be hard to believe. I think that's That's an important part is make sure you either know these things or you learn about them enough so that they're they're credible it makes the rest of your story credible. Sometimes there's more truth than fiction than there is in real life yeah. Black was helpful influence on me as a writer can be a person or thing. Well I've met a couple of real quickly Robert Penn Warren's all the king's men great American novel Great Influence Tom Wolfe Because of his ability to focus on facts and make them part of fiction For sure Those too so. What's the fact about you as a right of the people might be surprised to learn? Well I used to tell people when they would ask for that. The thing that surprised about that. I've actually run at practice law as long as I have for over four decades. So how did you bow. So how'd you bounce the writing life with the with the legal. Well I used to give friends of mine. Particular lawyer.

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

10:47 min | 2 years ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Give us a call at two one two, four three three nine six nine two two two four three three WNYC were talking about the book when Brooklyn was queer. So you write in your book, that the first time you heard about queer Brooklyn. You were you were twenty one years old. So when you first heard about it, what made you think this is something one day that I'm going to write a book about. Well, you know, when I first heard about actually nothing made me think that my first thought was, how do I get to Dumbo? I was not familiar with the city, and I didn't know anything about the queer history of Brooklyn. All I knew about New York City's history was Harlem Greenwich Village and Chelsea, but long after that, when I finally moved to Brooklyn in my early twenties. I started to realize that there was a vibrant gain neighborhoods all across the borough, and eventually that started making me think we'll wait where we here ten years ago where we here forty years ago. What about one hundred years ago? Well, what was it about the Brooklyn queer community that you found, particularly interesting, you mentioned these other places, and we know that each have their different sort of flavor? What was it about Brooklyn square community community that I trace was connected, deeply to the waterfront, which brought economic prosperity to Brooklyn, basically, from the early eighteen twenty s all the way up to World War, Two, and for the entire time that, that waterfront was active and powerful as an economic? Generator, it nurtured, all different kinds of queer communities, the entire sort of umbrella of queer identities that we know today had analogs back then they weren't exactly the same as who we are today. And how we think of ourselves our talk about ourselves. But we were there, I love the story because you found an organization called the pop up museum of queer history. So what prompted it, and then tell me about the response was actually an act of censorship. The removal of David Warner Rovic piece of fire in the belly from a show at the Smithsonian in twenty two thousand nine and I was so angry. And then I realized that I couldn't go see queer historical work anywhere in the city. And, and why was I so angry about this one piece being polled and not this? Silence. That was all around me. And in response to that, I decided, okay, let's, let's just see what would acquire museum made by queer people where we didn't have to worry about being to queer for the visitors look like or feel like, and I started as a one night party in my apartment. And when. Three hundred people showed up, and fourteen clothes cups shut us down at midnight. I realized that there was a hunger for this. That's so interesting. I love that idea that you just put something out there. And you didn't necessarily know if anybody respond, and there was such a response. That's just I mean that just tells you so much. Yeah, I think it shows how hungry, so many their history. Let's take a couple of calls. Then we'll get into some details. Robin is calling us from Brooklyn. Hi, robin. Thanks for calling all of it. How you doing doing great? Tell us your story. I'm moved to Brooklyn in nineteen eighty three not because I was a lesbian. But because it was inexpensive housing there. And I found out that they were a lot of day unless you an artist living there. They were group and communal household of gay people and lesbians. There was Brooklyn women's martial arts, which is a karate school, but it was hotbed of lesbian activism, self defense training, and other kinds of, of things. It was a sliding scale was care. There was something called the slope activities for lesbians where people would get together and do titties. And it was a cafe called the rising cafe, which was a bar and cafe. That had live music. My band used to play there a pool. Table, lots of folks doubted, their lesbians primarily, and I had heard I don't know if it's true, I heard that people actually moved there lesbians moved there because devising I've heard that as well. In fact, someone told me that she moved park slope in nineteen seventy or thereabouts and she was told she was the first lesbian in park slope. But that many came after her our numbers. Trailblazer. I guess, Robyn, thank you so much for calling in our numbers to unto four three three WNYC to onto four three three nine six nine two we're talking about the new book, when Brooklyn was queer, if you have a story about your experience in Brooklyn, we would love to hear it. So you give these tours the take you to important places in Brooklyn in, in queer history. What was the first gave are interesting question? So the first gay bar as we think about gay bars today was a place called Bonner's height supper club on Montague street in Brooklyn heights, opened in nineteen fifty Tony Bonner was returning photojournalist from World War Two and he brought global flavors. That was what made the place so exciting and by that, what that means, but it sounds thrilling Italian food, but also some Asian flavors, he brought a wide variety of things, and by the early sixties we know that it was a gay bar, because the New York state police raided it repeatedly. And shut it down in nineteen sixty two which prompted the first big. Big article in the New York Times about areas of New York City, where homosexual concentration is high. And despite the fact that was prompted by an arrest in a bar in Brooklyn. They only talked about Manhattan. What do you know let's go to Adrian in the east village? Hi adrian. Thanks for calling all of it. Adrian, are you there? Adrian's listening. I think Adrian's listening. We'll get back to Adrian in a moment. It's interesting. You should talk about what the what the how the press presented because you have this great back cover of a Broadway. Brevity talking about I'm going to read this headline third sex plagues spreads a new sissies permeate, sublime social strata, as film stars and Broadway, go gay Brooklyn navy yard center, a flagrant campaigning for gobs and society. Slumbers. My goodness. The navy yard tell me about the navy. The navy was an exciting place. It was not only the place where sailors and other people men in the armed forces could find each other. But as a place where women, particularly during the world wars found work, and freedom, and many lesbians, found each other there. But also it made the area around. There were so many sailors, who were on leave who were sexually open who might have met people in the bars on sand street that the whole neighborhood had this permissive vibe to it and people would actually come in the twenties and thirties. So does the same way they would go to Harlem Greenwich Village on slumming tours to see what was out trae in queer and exciting. They would come to Brooklyn heights to San street right along the navy yard to go to these bars, that had reputations around the world, Carson mccullers wrote about them, Wh, Auden wrote about them, Lincoln, Kirstein, and Sergei Eisenstein, these artists and influence from around the world came to find sailors and sex workers, and stevedores and men and women, and queer people, and trans people in Brooklyn. My guess is Hugh, Ryan the author of the book when Brooklyn was queer Adrian is back. Hi adrian. Thanks for calling all of it. Thank you. And I just wanted to say, thank you again. You I heard you speak at the center and you were wonderful your, your book is wonderful. We both read it, and we want to remind people say, George hotel in Brooklyn heights, that had a very gay atmosphere. People would come from that Hatton was a pool people. Mission to use the pool, of course, often assignations happened there. Just for second about the priest. In nineteen fifty nine and it was the beginning of a bubbling up, thousands and thousands of gay men came to New York to get away from these small town, and it was a lot of active as people could please two three years before would bang on Billy clubs on the telephone pole on cruisers street and, and they move on and people would yell things out. And then, you know, so it was a bubbling up of it, and I have to admit that my brother who was fifteen months overly. And I we never tolerated anyone calling names or trying to rough itself because we got equally violent back once picked up a garbage can lid cracked head with. Two board that I found, and we would chase them and so we so there were other people like particularly drag Queen Street would take any goes, you know what I'm saying is the culmination of above of, of gauges, speak. Thank you so much for sharing your story. Thank you. Thank you. I numbers to one two four three three nine six nine to two two four three WNYC, if you'd like to share your story about your experience with Brooklyn queens, Brooklyn. It's interesting. Adrian mentioned the hotel George because that is listed in your, your book, and on your walking tour, what was special about it was at one hundred hundred St. Jeff, who's actually for a, while, the largest hotel in the world in the late eighteen hundreds and it was elegant storied place. And in particular the pool as Adrian mentioned, two story grand art deco with mosaics all around it pool that attracted admirals, who were visiting the navy yard and poets and diplomats like the Irish diplomat, Roger Casement, who is famous queer author and the pool was known for a place where, you know, you could meet other men. It was pretty good, crews and ground for men. And then by the time the nineteen forties, fifties, sixties when the Saint George's kind of on it skids, it becomes a place where sex work. Workers. The lifeguards were known to be sex workers in the underground world and actually just last night, I met a man who told me that he going to the Saint George in the sixties sauce, sign outside of the pool. That said, no DC eighters allowed. And he said, I didn't know what that meant, but I knew it meant me and actually stands for disorderly conduct subsection eight, which is the first law in New York City history that criminalized sex between men specifically Coney Island. What was going on out in Coney Island? What wasn't Coney Island? You've got everything from all male beauty pageants in the nineteen twenties that were filled with gay men and people in full makeup and drag when they were not supposed to be the people hosting the beauty pageant freaked out over this, this was not what they expected to burlesque dancers in the nineteen forties. Women who were themselves queer hired other queer women's long history. Mabel, Hampton, black lesbian dancer, who gets her first. Job before she becomes big in the Harlem renaissance theatres. She gets her first job as a dancer down at Coney Island where she learns the word lesbian for the first time from another woman. Everything went on at Coney Island..

Brooklyn Adrian Brooklyn heights New York City Brooklyn square Brooklyn navy yard center museum of queer history Coney Island Harlem Greenwich Village New York New York Times Dumbo Saint George navy David Warner Rovic Harlem renaissance theatres Robin Manhattan Robyn
"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:02 min | 2 years ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"You would actually very good impression of the drama teacher. Yes. Oh, who hated me drama teacher? Loved martha. And hated me would invite Martha to come sleep in her bed. Not when she was there. To nap in the middle of the day because Martha would get tired easily, whereas I just couldn't stop laughing and acting class, and I would just get kicked out of acting class. And I couldn't couldn't stop laughing. But I love being there so much because I felt like I was sort of waking up to everything and Martha and I talked about it over the years. But it wasn't until my fifties. That I realized I wanted to write about it. And I thought I sent more the why didn't I think to write about this book earlier, and I realized it was because it would have just been kind of one of those nostalgic summer books that firefly summer. Hey, Jenny come to the bunk. A metro the lake. Anything I would be interested in writing. But what it became about? I mean, you always ask what is a novel about and what is it really about? So this novel was about a girl who goes to the summer camp meets a group of friends, and in some sense or other stays friends with them were in touch with them for over forty years. But what it was really about was what happens to tell it over time and about mortality, of course. But I was interested in about envy. Which is another thing. That's I think not been written about that much. Because there's this kind of quiet envy that you might feel even for people you love and once in a while it sort of a kind of inserts itself into the room like a moose head mounted on a wall. And I wanted to rent a about the passage of time and what happens to the brightest. The the ones you think we'll go far I was very affected by the Michael Apted film, seven up twenty eight up. Films because there was this moment in one of them when it's are really about class because he interviewed a group of British schoolchildren every seven years starting with when they were seven, and you see how people become who they are. And how they always in a sense were that person that they become, but there was one character named a real person named Susan or Susie. And when she was very young. She was very seemed snobby to me kind of posh like I don't care for that. And then I think maybe during twenty eight up her father died, and she's wounded by this, and I felt great sympathy for her, and she became a very full character to me. So to see people and see how their lives are not a straight road. This was a novel that was going to be about a full life. And I let myself go with it in a different way from the wife. It was another kind of I don't wanna say breakthrough that's to noxious. But it was another way of seeing that while the while the wife was this terse, Sean. Novel like a lozenge of a novel sucked down to the narrators deep rage. This one could flower in a lot of directions, and I had to let myself be shown identified breakthrough better certainly was an advanced and one of the ways I thought it was an advanced exactly in the way, you're discussing. It's because you're always have been fascinated by what might seem like why young adult themes because you're fascinated by that moment in life by by key dangers in adolescence. And you found a way to write about them in the funding fully nodding, a young adult. Well, I mean, I have a children's book in fact, coming out in two weeks call tonight from dogfish and you've written series of young adult books over the years. Actually. Yes. Yes. This is with this one is with my co a co writer Holly Goldberg Sloan a wonderful writer who is a natural. Who is a children's writer for me. Adolescence like sex. It's a part of life. Why not included in your books a novel about an adolescent, that's one of my favorite novels ever is the member of the wedding by Carson mccullers, and it's absolutely beautiful and important about racism and some about feeling like yearning uring and longing. That's summer at camp. Actually, I think Martha was in did a monologue. The we of me, my my career and all leads back to it all goes back to the other players. There's the layer of of trying to have a kind of similitude about being young. But then there is the advantage of having some long view of things. So I tried to take the long view on the short view in the interesting. Absolutely. I want to talk before we go about the female persuasion because fewer persuasion is a book that interests me in part because a lot of your themes and a lot of here. Emissions all come together. There's book very much explicitly about feminism and about the evolution of American feminism over the last forty years, it's very much about a mentor relation that's poor. That's the core idea about how mentor changes our life. And how it affects? I don't know if you remember that actually in my last book in. Strangers gave I've as a character named Meg waltzer, actually. Who is who who I write about the ways in which people get attached to mentor as you as you said before very much to Nora Ephron. And so what made you decide this was the moment to write a book about that relationship. I think we are back to the notion of the marinade. I think we are kind of sitting with things for very very long time in exploring them and only when they've been explored but not fully explored because you have to now. Explore the monopolistic way. Are they ready to go? And I wanted to write about that moment when? Someone reaches out and changes you and I've been as a feminist. This has been an again target people say to writers write what you know. I think it's right. What obsesses, you know? There is a very good way to know what obsesses us, but no one would want to do it. Look at everything you've Google for the past twenty. For me. Terrible horrifying thing for me. It would be like what's what stars of the eighties? Look like now. How how many for me, it's Virginia Woolf, and does this mole look suspicious? Which is not or maybe a novella. But feminism is something that has mattered to me for as long as I can remember seeing my mother really be helped by other women as a writer and sort of come of age in this period of time when novels by women were taken seriously at a new way, I was in a consciousness raising group when I was fourteen and we wrote away to the national organization for women to ask for a list of topics, and they sent us a pamphlet that had things in it like orgasm. And you when we wanted, you know, SAT's don't stress out or. But I felt a great kinship with other girls and later women, and I felt. I felt very stirred by this idea of women helping each other. And the notion of a mentor is interesting to me when I think about women who were. Pivotal in my life. Nora my mother, I had a teacher in first grade MRs Gerber who used to invite me up to her desk to dictate stories to her because she could write them down a lot faster than I could. And I was sort of like a. Business executive, and she was sort of my secretary. Mattered so much. Is it a coincidence that they were female, and I was I don't think so. But I think what a mentor has to do is not have expectations about the outcome. That's what a good mentor does just give the person what they have. And then get out of the way, not caring. If it ends up one way or another. They can care, but not showing that and I their complications with it and feminism which has just enriched my life, and it's maddening how much still needs to be done felt like a really good way to show as I said what you know, what obsesses me it was a good way to show relationships between men and women to write about sex to write about older, women younger women. It's in the interesting. Everyone was the same age my age because I hate math. And I can't I just this way. I didn't have to do the math. And how old they were. They were your new get it wrong. I would be so. So bad that I have people like, you know, be eighty three when I couldn't get it. Couldn't be a show runner. Tracked. But here it was intergenerational. It's intergenerational. Would you read make your prose is like no one else? Would you read just because it's very much about the subject matter of mental the first couple of pages, though, the female persuasion, Greer cadet ski met faith Frank in October of two thousand six at Ryland college. We're faith had come to deliver the Edmund and Wilhelmina Ryland memorial lecture, and though that night the chapel was full of students some of them boiling over with loud mouth commentary. It seemed astonishing but true that out of everyone there Greer was the one to interest faith Greer, a freshman, then at this undistinguished school in southern Connecticut was selectively and furiously shy. She could give answers easily but rarely opinions which makes no sense because I am stuffed with opinions. I am a pin. Yada of opinions. She'd said to Corey during one of their nightly Skype sessions since college had separated. Them. She'd always been a tireless student and a constant reader, but she found it impossible to speak in the wild and free ways that other people did for most of her life it hadn't mattered. But now it did. So what was it about her that faith Frank recognized and liked maybe Greer thought it was the possibility of boldness likely suggested in the streak of electric blue that zagged across one side of her otherwise ordinary furniture Brown hair, but plenty of college girls had hair partially dipped to the colors of frozen and spun treats founded county fairs, maybe it was just that faith at sixty three a person of influence and a certain level of fame who'd been travelling the country for decades, speaking ardently about women's lives felt sorry for eighteen year old Greer who is hot faced and inarticulate that night. Or maybe faith was automatically generous and attentive around young people who are uncomfortable in the world. Career didn't really know why faith took an interest. But what she knew for. Sure eventually was that meeting faith. Frank was the thrilling beginning of everything it would be a very long time before the unspeakable end..

martha writer faith Greer Nora Ephron Frank Michael Apted Jenny Carson mccullers Google Holly Goldberg Sloan Virginia Woolf Connecticut Sean Meg waltzer Wilhelmina Ryland memorial lec Corey Susan Ryland college executive
"carson mccullers" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

At The Movies with Arch and Ann

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on At The Movies with Arch and Ann

"Yes. It really is. Nice. That is awesome. So she will be missed very soon. Is this and say, you know, we talked about Eastwood's movie Sandra lock passed away. She was his live-in Powell for many years and his Geico store and a bunch of his movies. But you, and that's where I got to know from was all the Eastwood movies, right outlaw, Josey Wales. I think it was maybe the most notable one any which way you can you know, what the one that made me laugh the most and like enjoy the most Bronco Billy. And if you remember that one with Scott Cruthers, these like this aging cowboy and they're they're they're torn around the country. And she's some rich woman falls in with them for some reason. I forget, but I remember thinking, okay. But but Archie pointed out to me, but the movie before all that sort of curriculum in nineteen sixty eight was the heart is a lonely hunter, which is based on a Carson mccullers novel about young girl in the south whose mother has to take in. Borders, and she takes in a man who cannot hear or speak and he's played by Alan Arkin. And that was Arkansas that was his big breakout role. And and it's a very poignant lovely movie height would highly recommend it to you. And she Sandra lock was nominated for best supporting actress, and she carries the movie. Wow. I. I think you would like it like it's and she abyss just exquisite. I mean, she is just such an her break up with Eastwood, very that was not like part is friends that was sued for palimony didn't he exert kind of. Yes. I think that's all over her. That was not. Yeah. It distasteful cool not cool at all not cool dolls. I remember that. So well, I sad week hate that. But the penny Marshall thing just is just rolls all over you. It does. I I didn't see it's crummy didn't see coming ahead and heard any reports that she was ill, and that just sort of came out of left field from an it's always and her brother had just died a couple of. Yes. So sad too. So I don't like being set shut yourself with some music. Yes. Played ice. Now. This is a different kind of song replaying. Yeah. It's from the I'm taking this directly from the movie. I think you guys are going to get fair. No. I think you're gonna get this one..

Eastwood Sandra lock Bronco Billy Alan Arkin Josey Wales Carson mccullers penny Marshall Scott Cruthers Archie Arkansas palimony
"carson mccullers" Discussed on Little Atoms

Little Atoms

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Little Atoms

"Oh, to To read. read, one develop you would. This is an interesting question to ask when a setting of a book is somewhere again that we think we're so familiar way from the off. Owns, but what the one of the writing was an influence on this novel, particularly. That's a really interesting question. No one's actually asked me that directly. They always ask you, what are you reading? And then you can't think of a single book you've ever read like ever. Let's see. I'm John Fantasia asked the dust is it was a big influence on it. A lot of California books like Walter Mosely, not in terms of style, but in terms of the ability for those books to traverse, wide swath of California really interested me and eat some of the books that influence visitation street really also influenced this book. Structurally, Carson mccullers the heart is a lonely hunter, which has a multi perspective take on a small town and this book by Lee called the vagrants, which is about an execution about a bunch of different people, sort of reacting to that. And then of course, the book that always influences me, everything Don delillo underworld because it has this amazing prologue that can stand alone sort of sets the whole book and motion about a baseball game. And this is sort of my Don delillo Oma you know, the idea that there's this event that sort of captures the rapt attention of the city. Okay, Los Angeles, twenty ten. He is almost beautiful running with the San Gabriel's over one shoulder, the rise of the Hollywood freeway.

Don delillo Walter Mosely California John Fantasia San Gabriel Los Angeles Carson baseball Hollywood Lee
"carson mccullers" Discussed on Gilmore Guys

Gilmore Guys

02:23 min | 4 years ago

"carson mccullers" Discussed on Gilmore Guys

"I'll i'll sammy today i think about that when i read it me don't like it yeah whatever and yeah whatever you know game and um i'm now look that's or you can buy me i only him instagram twitter and now what some than i'm in two right now in into an reading does it have to be like anything in particular now just a reading the bible the bible and this this and named is somebody ignores accommodate had a few crazy idea it was harrison core he should again and airplanes thank you should but and i said a reading this very old but by carson mccullers called the ballot of the sad cathy and it is this unit it says see it's it's the series of short stories but the get kind dan campbell i'm sure you can never things like in the man you know it's not catcher in the ride and a lot of plays aren't on kendall is it because kendall as a phony book it's a phone iii buck nevermind yeah lenear is him through that yeah you know no yeah cameras all around and you know that really is clear oh my god it is of already valid of the sad calf a going to read that it's never carson mccullough mccullers mccullers threats carson they if the at latrell amendment and some turned thing of anything i've seen recently that isn't get out because i feel like it's everyone's going to everyone style i was like of course it's get out for me to bed once the browns going to do it yeah it's great even if you're the kind of person is i don't like or movies go see it it's not that scary it's more of a thriller it's just so tightly written and greatly directed and just really really well acted and don't watch the trailer if you can't erasing the.

carson mccullers cathy dan campbell kendall browns instagram carson mccullough