20 Episode results for "Carruthers"

Paul Carothers, Navy Football

The Sporting Life with Jeremy Schaap

11:34 min | 1 year ago

Paul Carothers, Navy Football

"Great News there's a quick way you can save money switch to Geico Geico could help you get great coverage at a great price and it only takes fifteen minutes to see if you could save fifteen percent or more more on car insurance go to GEICO DOT com today and see how much you could save. This is the sporting life on. ESPN radio and the ESPN ESPN APP. Here's Jeremy SCHAAP. Last weekend it was the latest installment of a rivalry that goes back to eighteen ninety it is perhaps the most storied the most fierce and we're the most closely contested rivalries in the annals of college football. I'm speaking of course of of army versus navy. And we're joined now by one of the captains of the victorious midshipmen team linebacker. Paul carruthers Paul. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me Paul. You'd lost three in a row to army. You're a senior. This was your last shot. How did it feel to pull this one to pull this one off awesome man it feels? It feels fantastic We're just I. It's still a it's it's a overcast today in Annapolis. It's it's rainy rainy and I can tell you what it's A. It's a sunny day for us here at the Naval Academy and and Just for the Navy in general and That's Kinda Kinda the way we feel just been on a a wonderful high and Just because of all of our hard work and dedication to our program just so proud of our our fans are proud of our guys Just everyone coming out in support and showing love to our team and Yeah it's just it's just super exciting. So it's I don't know if it's completely hit yet but it is. It is a fantastic feeling to have the trophy You know both trophies back to where You know to where they belong. So it's it's very exciting. We're speaking talk rutgers. Linebacker for the Navy Midshipmen in the twenty third ranked Navy midshipmen which is unusual to see one of the service academies ranked so highly navy finishing the season ten and into with a thirty one to seven victory against army in Philadelphia. You guys were down seven nothing at the end of the first quarter and then scored thirty one consecutive points. What was that like when you were down seven? Nothing what were you thinking thinking. This is This is going to be a rough day. No No I. I think if you're a competitor you you just want another opportunity to get back out there yeah I think the middle game is very important so we knew they were gonNA come out fast. One of our goals stop there. I drive which we did and we did a very quickly. It was a three and out In Service Academy Games. You never quite know you know it. May it may seem like we would know what each each other going to do but there are slight variations slight changes that occur in for us. I mean if you if you saw we ran our offense it did look different front. It was still kind of the same concept but it looked different. which you know I worked the entire day so There's just you know after after the first quarter. We made some adjustments. Obviously we we were on the field for a long time Just speaking for the defense and You know they took out the whole quarter which is something that you know our teams like to do you know. Control the ball. Take the clock off. Don't let explosive plays happen. Things like that so yeah it. Just it just took eric some some warming up to and and You know we we expect to win mentality to not change. What can you say about your quarterback Malcolm comparee who had an unusual line? He rushed for three hundred four yards on twenty nine carries with two touchdowns two rushing touchdowns and and did not throw a pass. Yeah I think he's been playing incredible. Not just this game but the entire year and the confidence and leadership that he he's been able to have this year for our team is is just you know breath Dick. You know he he. He didn't really okay. No physician While here you know always going back and forth between an APEC or running back In regular terms and then and then in Qb and so finally he owned his position this year and he's done a phenomenal job. And I the expect to win. Mentality is expecting defense to do their thing and the offense to do their thing. And Malcolm is is a huge proponent to the office doing anything making people you know making plays just because he's he's Malcolm and then also you know though line and and the wide receivers like He. He could carry all those those he made. All those carries and open-field field moves because he got past the the front seven of army. You know and I think that there. There's a lot of people to give credit to just the scheme that our coaches which is made and and also the Lineman but no discredit Malcolm and I mean all this all of his ability god-given ability and and his has his confidence in mentality in preparation for this game. I I think yeah. He's he's athletic but the the most commendable thing is is His work ethic taken his preparation To all games but especially this game remarkable performance. We're speaking with one of Navy's captains Paul carruthers. He is a senior linebacker occur. He will soon be commissioned as an officer in the United States Marine Corps An. Excuse me Paul I I misspoke. I said that This was the end of Navy V. Season of course it's not you guys are playing Kansas State in the Liberty Bowl on New Year's Eve Going to a bowl game Ranked twenty third in the country What does that signify for you at the end of your career? It's a fantastic You know reached our goal so our goals and so we Our goals this year for our team. what we wanted to accomplish was to win the ACC AC championship. We were close but losing the Memphis put like Kept us from having control of our future so so And and Y'all know how that show if it was gonna be in our favorite in Cincinnati would've won and we would have chance to win the you see But then and we. We didn't get that opportunity so our focus was on army and so we accomplish that goal and it wasn't just army it was the CIC right so that was our main goal was to get the the commander in chief trophy was to to get that back in Annapolis And then finally to win a bowl game so you know we are words Very very specifically intentionally. Because you know getting to a bowl game is fun but the the fun part about football is winning the game you know and so when we get when we get to when we get to Memphis and you know we'll have a lot of events a lot of a lot of cool cool opportunities that we get to get to have their in Memphis that thanks to liberal And they're those sponsors and and those The leadership there It's still the game and we have an opportunity to go eleven to which hasn't been done but once a hundred twenty years of Naval Academy history so naval navy football history. So that's exciting. You know and can't stay there a great team. I I mean I was just talking to my coach today and how they are. We're we're playing the only team that that be One of the teams and and I in the championships and the play offs basically. So that's exciting to me I there I've I've I've already watched film. I've already been looking at them and they're very good team. So we're excited for the next challenge at this game Paul. Shortly in your senior as I said graduating educating soon shortly after you arrived at the Naval Academy three years ago your father who was United States Marshal for twenty six years was killed in line of duty shot to death. How how how did navy football? How did that Brotherhood play a role in the process of dealing with the grief reef and the disappointment and the anger and and all of those complicated motions? You must've been feeling when when you're father was killed so so much so much I mean right after I heard it was not on right after I received the news I it was not that maybe maybe thirty minutes For my teammates and my support staff and military staff to to come and and and You know be there for me be shoulder for me to lean on Because I I it's just it's just something that I had never her experience. The and and it was beautiful So I just had to do there within like I said within thirty minutes I had people calling on me. texting me Just doing their best to be supportive. and it was amazing. And just people you know who aren't aren't even on my on my team. Immediate team they were there were people from the Brotherhood You know a few years before me twenty years before me And then Just coaches and things like that. Who'd reached out and showing showing me love so just that right there was was just incredible and showed me not only the love that the Naval Academy can give Navy? Football can give but the love that God gives on a on a daily basis to everyone one so Me being a believer in having faith just I. I saw that and I was like. Wow this is this is how it is you know and good times or bad you have people showing unconditional love which is it was incredible? Paul carruthers is a senior linebacker graduating from the naval academy this coming being spring. His team has just beaten as we were discussing army. Thirty one to seven scoring thirty one consecutive points and is taking on Kansas State state in the Liberty Bowl on New Year's Eve. Paul thanks so much for joining us and good luck in Memphis. Thank you very much. Thank you for your interview and and and Thinking my my stories wanted to be told that I appreciate that go navy. I'm Jeremy Shop and you can listen to new editions of the sporting life every Saturday and Sunday they morning on. ESPN radio and the ESPN APP. Beginning at six. Am Eastern time as we watch. The suburban Garden gnome Catholic Catholic without disturbing it notice moves like not at all it's inanimate and utterly without brain function but despite that when a garden gnome his about how Geico not only saves people money but also who gives them access to licensed agents twenty seven online and over the phone. It's clear to them. You should switch because yes. Switching to GEICO is a no brainer on second thought. Maybe don't watch garden. gnomes to carefully people might talk.

army Paul carruthers Paul Navy Naval Academy Geico ESPN football Memphis Malcolm comparee Navy Midshipmen Paul carruthers Annapolis Kansas Jeremy SCHAAP midshipmen Garden gnome Catholic Catholic Jeremy Shop United States Marine Corps APEC
SYSK Choice: How to Age Better & Successful Leadership for You and Others

Something You Should Know

43:17 min | 1 year ago

SYSK Choice: How to Age Better & Successful Leadership for You and Others

"Today on something you should know you waste a lot of time on email more than you think. So I've got some ways to cut down on all that wasted time also want to look younger. Scientists who study aging have a message if people only knew how little they have have to do to affect major change in the way they're going to age years and decades from now also we all have the ability to be a leader. It's not just just about being the boss or having power. What makes a great leader? I'm talking about your ability as a person to do two things really well. How well you as an individual individual influence outcome and inspire others right? That's what I'm talking about and whether you can barely boil water or you're a gourmet cook. I've got some kitchen secrets that will transform your cooking all this today on something you should know. Have you ever thought about being an AIRBNB host and turning your extra room into some extra income there are actually millions of airbnb hosts in over one hundred thousand cities around the world. In fact I have a very good friend. Who's been an AIRBNB hosts for awhile now so Melissa? What's it like I love being an AIRBNB host? I just got through my third summer. Which is the most fun time because people come from all over the US and from Europe Argentina? I guess the big question people would have is what about the financial payoff here. Scrape money for me. I actually have my mortgage paid every month and when it's it's really busy. It's my mortgage all my utilities. So I'm living rent-free I imagine. There are some people who would be hesitant because of the idea of having strangers in their whole hole. I can't say that I've ever had the feeling of any kind of un-safety no matter. What kind of space you have you too can be a host AIRBNB? You can decide when and how often you want to host. So it's perfect for every schedule and lifestyle visit AIRBNB DOT com slash host post to learn more how to turn your extra space into extra cash AIRBNB DOT com slash host. Something you should know fascinating Intel the world's top experts and practical advice. You can use in your life today. Something he should now. Mike carruthers others N.. Welcome to our weekend episode of something you should know and I want to start today by talking about email because you probably league spend a lotta time on email probably wasted time with email. So here's some advice expert advice that will help you cut down on the amount of time you spend on email and it's from a guy named James Hamlyn from the Atlantic Dot Com and he claims these things helped him cut down on the time he spent on email in half and I eliminate the sign off. There's no need to write. You know sincerely best cheers or any. Oh the other farewells. There's no need for it and you can even skip your name in some cases because the email address makes it pretty clear who the email is from so it's somewhat redundant to sign the email it's really kind of a holdover from the handwritten note or the handwritten letter same anything with greeting. You don't really need to say deere Bob because you sent the email to Bob. and Bob's the only got the email and so you could eliminate that is well. Three sentences or fewer is his advice. The crux of any email usually doesn't need more than three sentences. If you're sending is more than three sentences you should probably consider calling the person instead. Check your email only two or three times a day. I don't know if I could do that but he says it's not that hard. And in fact the average American worker wastes thirty seconds every free time. They check their inbox. So if you think about all the Times you check your inbox in a day. Multiply that by thirty seconds and you'll see how many minutes a day you're really wasting. Think he says even if you think your job doesn't allow you to check your inbox that infrequently give it a try or cut down at least some but if you you give it a try. He says you'll be surprised how easy it is to get used to in time. And that is something you should know since aging is inevitable. You'd probably like to at least do it. Well but how much control do you have over how you age. Maybe you think it's the genetic or maybe you think you have to live by some strict set of rules to slow down the aging process. Well Margaret Pressler is a reporter for the Washington Post and she decided to really dive into this subject. The results of her research are in her book called cheap the clock and I think you'll be surprised. And and maybe encouraged by what she discovered about. How much control we have over? How we individually age so Margaret? It's kind of interesting interesting. Explain why you decided to investigate this in the first place Very quickly this actually came from personal experience. I am married to a man who is seventeen years older than me and he looks the same age as me it is. He is one of these people who just doesn't age and I am a reporter for the Washington Post so I took that as do as an opportunity to go ask top experts. Why does my husband looked like this? And what explains that. I fully explained expected that they would come back and say it was genetics and and every one of them came back and said it's not an that's what he does and I've always been interested in health and nutrition and this started a couple of years of of looking at all of the science on aging and and I just found incredible information that people really could benefit from. Well it's it's always kind of fascinated me with first time at fascinated me was going to high school reunions and seeing time is so kind to some people seemingly and so cruel to other the people but your point is perhaps. It's not just time. It's it's what goes on in that time. Oh there's no question and one of the best ways to look at that as studies that have been don in Scandinavia. They do a great job of tracking twins. They keep a twin registry. And there've been lots of research studies done tracking those twins especially identical article twins identical twins born the same the same genetic imprint of the same household but if they were then grew up to live very different lifestyles Food Food Exercise Sleep stress us. He dramatically different outcomes in identical twins. Even so it's not just luck of the draw. It's it's it's what you do and isn't it. Isn't it basically true though that it's it's kind of what everyone's heard that. If you lead a healthy life eat right. Exercise is that that's basically the prescription or is it more than that. You know there's no question you know the old mom's advice good advice. I think what's different about what I've got in the book. Is that what what science has really discovered. Because there's so much more technology going into the studying of aging now in the processes that go into into into their participating in the process of ageing scientists. Really understand how it's happening at the cellular level. They're on they really know now. Okay these are the things inside your body that are causing causing aging that that we think of outwardly as the the things that we see aging wrinkles or dementia later in life or whatever it may be and and what is really now clear is how these processes start when we're very young in an invisible way inside ourselves and that even those processes he's those infinitesimal. Prophecies are affected by even very small decisions. We make day in and day out throughout our lives. So the hopeful message here is is that yeah you yes eating well. All of that stuff is good. But you don't have to do as much as people think. Oh that's good news. Yes it is good news and that is this comes that is straight from science. And I don't think I spoke to a single aging researcher who didn't say with some sense of frustration if if people only knew how little they have to do to affect major change in the way they're going to age years and decades from now so specifically weekly what okay so for example if you WANNA look at nutritionist is obviously the low hanging. Fruit nutrition is great. But it doesn't mean you need to overhaul your diet. There certain things that you can do just on a daily basis that are easy and and I'm talking about starting by eating one more serving of fruit a day. The the government says eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day. A lot of people don't even get close to that. Does that mean that you shouldn't even try like if you know you're not gonna eat five servings of fruits and vegetables should you not not even try no in fact just eating one or two apples. A day can have a huge impact on your blood pressure. There are chemicals phytochemicals michaels in fruits and vegetables. That have a very positive effect on ourselves. They help reduce oxidative stress. which we've all heard of free radicals But but if you're getting these particular chemicals in your from plants phytochemicals. I'M GONNA use that word because they are really healthy chemicals that as a species. She's we developed over the Millennia eating these kinds of foods and our body adapted to To use those chemicals in a beneficial way an apples for example have apples. Watermelon is another one that have a very beneficial phytochemicals in them that affect the The supplements of your cardiovascular system so in addition to diet what else is there okay. So there's obviously exercise but again you don't need to go join the gym and you don't need to look hot. In a bikini you can affect a big change in the way you age with just a little bit of exercise is and the the magic number is ten minutes a day and just about anybody can do a ten minute walk a day. Don't you think yeah. That's ten minutes is not not that long and the difference in when they look at at epidemiological studies long term studies following populations the difference between people who have just walked doc ten minutes a day versus people who haven't is dramatic in terms of of the strength and dementia and Overall illness death from all causes it's dramatic so it goes up from there so you benefit from that point on but but really that is ah ten minutes and there are lots of scientists who were looking at different aspects of why that is immune cells. Start flowing into your system from your from your marrow after just ten minutes of walking your brain cells start read you start generating new brain cells if you walk a mile a day. So they're huge benefits to just small amounts of getting moving and and and of course then it builds on itself. This is what my husband has done. He started very small and has shown dramatic dramatic effects. In how healthy he feels and looks over the starting very small almost nothing five minutes a day. Historically the advice has been thirty minutes a day three at least three times a week not ten ten minutes a day which you know thirty minutes is a reason to say no and Mike that would be ideal. Of course. It would be great if everybody would do that. But you have to think of it a little bit like your body. He's a little bit like a bank account. Like if you you know if you could discipline yourself to put ten dollars a day in your bank account then after ten days you've got one hundred dollars but if you can only put a dollar a day after ten days you've still got ten dollars you may not have a hundred but you've got ten and is better than nothing right right so if you figure you use that money at the end of that ten days to buy gas for your car so see how far you can go. You've got one hundred dollars you can drive. What five hundred miles? Maybe depending on your car. If you've got ten dollars you can drive. You know thirty forty fifty miles. That's still farther than you could go otherwise and your your health is the same way you you nurture it bit by bit and it is cumulative and that is what what the side with. The current science has been able to do is pinpoint why that is. And that's really what my book explains explains it sort of an empowering Very empowering message by understanding how it works inside yourself in ways you can't see and that's what's tough you know if you can't see it then. Is it really working with these studies. They have discovered through magnetic resonance imaging and Epidemiological Studies. So from looking inside the cell to looking at whole populations they have been able to determine how even small things make a big difference. Stresses another big one people especially people who you know. Don't don't get involved in this kind of stuff will always point to the you know the hundred ten year old lady who smoked a pack a day and drank a quart of whiskey and And so see. It's all genetic because look at her. She never lifted her finger and smoked and drank and she lived to be one hundred ten. Yeah I'm really glad you brought that up. Because there there is absolutely a genetic component aging. What scientists now say is that based on all of the current research? The best estimate now. Is that genetics is twenty five to thirty percent of aging. And there are some people and those people you're referring to are called super agers and those people do have some lucky genetic cocktail that protects them from the figured out what that is very going to be very complicated thing to figure out if they ever can but there are certain people people who can live to a hundred well into their nineties smoking or living in just a not very healthy lifestyle and be fine. That's a very very small percentage. Did you people the thing is. It's so cool that you hear about them right. You know you hear about the great uncle so and so but it does tend to run in families so they know that that there is a genetic component to that the real issue for the vast majority of us. It's not gonNA help so it's really. It's like a deck of cards and it's how you play it. So in what else is there. Is there any mental aspect to this. Absolutely I I mentioned Stress is another major component of aging. There have been some incredibly incredibly fascinating studies about how stress ages you were cells in ways that have only just been able to be discovered their little caps at at. The end of your chromosomes called telomeres. which protect the genetic material every time? Your cell divides but every time. Your cell divides the get a little bit shorter and and people who are chronically stressed. The telomeres get shorter much faster. So what does that mean. It means that once the telomeres are so short that it would compromise. Your genetic material yourself. Is that sell all that. Has that chromosome. And it does the more cells. We have cells that billions of cells die in our bodies every day but that increases with age cell death and cell deaf south and and sort of self going into arresting phase increases with age and contributes to the conditions of aging. And it's a that is a natural process but stress hastens that their stress hormones that get into ourselves and they mess with the way they work. Cortisol you can feel it flowing through through your body when you're stressed out. That is very harmful on a cellular level to the way your aging so being exposed to chronic long-term stress. Absolutely you see You know you see it in presidents. After four years. They've clearly aged more than four years right. But here's the good news. The good news is This is also something that you can do something about even if you can't remove the source of your stress and and often you can't you know if you're dealing with an ageing parent or a chronically sick tiled or a very stressful job or financial woes. The stress is. It feels insurmountable. It's there all the time however what what researchers have discovered is that it really what really matters is how you you deal with that stress. Different people with the same levels of stress the same exposure to to stress can handle it very differently and actually the way you handle handle the stress helps alleviate the impact on the aging of yourself inside your body and I'll give you a couple of examples and and this you know weed. Seems sort of new agey but meditation has been conclusively shown to have make concrete changes inside the brain that help it helped the brain recover from and handle and not produces many stress hormones and recover from it faster. So that's That's one thing any kind of break. You can give viewer brain from stressful thinking through mindfulness paying trying to teach yourself to pay close attention to what you're doing at the moment rather than worrying in constantly about what's going on in the background. It is something you can train your brain to do just like a muscle and that that actually really does help. Intimacy helps Alleviate stress physical contact with other people social engagement and exercise all help you deal with stress of course when you're stressed sometimes it's hard to make you do those things but if you could just pick one small thing say okay. I'm going to sit at my desk and I'm going to visualize myself out in nature I'm GonNa do some deep breathing. It feels may feel kind of pointless pointless in fact it's not and this is what the science has shown what about the issue of but it's too late. I'm too old never too late. It never too late and there are There's some wonderful studies in my book Human Studies that that look at people in You know in the upper age brackets sixties eighties That show some remarkable changes. There's a An exercise Physiologist a researcher at McMaster university. mcdonagh Polski who's done some wonderful Studies one of the things. For example was he took a group of individuals and older group group and a younger group and Exercise them forty five minutes a day three times a week. for five months and The the difference in the the mighty Andrea production in their muscles had reverted back. Almost in older group had reverted back to youthful levels. It it was it was it was almost a complete reversal of the aging process Another example is and another example is a group of if elderly subjects who were put on a Mediterranean Diet for four weeks and after four weeks the level of senescence cells and those arresting cells cells else that have have ceased their normal active dividing lifestyle last cycle Had dramatically decreased in their vascular system and the percentage themselves that had shortening. Telomeres has also decreased dramatically. Just after four weeks on the Mediterranean Diet and these people in their seventies and eighties so it absolutely one hundred present it is never too late and the great thing is it doesn't take that much and it also if you if you engage in some of these activities with friends you get the social benefit. Also which also has been shown to have pretty dramatic anti-aging properties one of the things. I think that concerns people in the reason that they often don't get too who invested in. This is because the advice seems to change a lot. You know what's good. This week isn't good next week and now it's true you're absolutely right and and they're also there's so so much see you know there's so many conflicting quote unquote programs out there. You know there's so many books and here I am adding another book to the Max But there there's so many books there's so many programs there's so many celebrities and celebrity doctors all saying do it this way do it that way but I think what's what's really great. What's different about my book? I I I believe is that there is. There's a certain fundamental approach to health that everybody sort of always knows. It's what your mother told you. It's what the government says and they're you know five servings of fruits and vegetables a day that you just Kinda know. Yeah Yeah Yeah I know I know that that's GonNa make me healthy it is almost so obvious. CBS and so out there that people don't really pay much attention to it. And I think people need they need concrete examples of why something works why it's is going to work and if I don't see the difference from eating an apple for a week is it really making a difference in fact it is and so you need to know why you need to be armed with some information about you know what's going on inside your body so that you feel empowered quite frankly you know if you do something good for yourself. It makes you feel better about yourself right. It makes you feel like you can do it. Well I think everybody wants to look as good as they can and want to stay looking young as long as they can. It's nice to know that maybe maybe is not as hard as people thought. Margaret Pressler has been my guest. She is the author of the book. Cheat the clock she is also a reporter for the Washington Post and and you will find a link to her book Amazon in the show notes with the capital one venture card you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase everyday Eh and you can use those miles toward travel expenses like flights hotels rental cars and more just book and pay for your travel using your venture venture card and redeem your miles toward the cost capital one. What's in your wallet? CREDIT APPROVAL REQUIRED CAPITAL ONE BANK USA. Na Hey this year the home depot can help bring the holidays home for free with free delivery online holiday decor like artificial. Oh Christmas trees big small white lights or multicolored hundred and forty varieties. Pick one out will deliver it over the river through the woods right to your door for free free delivery on online holiday decor only at the home depot more saving more doing. US only see store for details. There's no shortage of leadership gurus in the world and so much of their advice tends to be business oriented. It's for managers. Bosses corporate bigwigs in the like. But we all have to be leaders at times in our lives. We lead our children. We lead others at work even if we're not the CEO. So I WANNA talk about leadership on a more individual scale less corporately although this certainly applies to leadership in the workplace as well my guest is Courtney Lynch she is a self proclaimed leadership junkie and she is co author of a new bestselling bestselling book out called spark how to lead yourself and others to greater success. Welcome Courtney thank you. It's a pleasure to be here. I'm excited to talk about leadership. So I'm I I don't usually like to ask start by asking people you know so tell me about yourself but I think you have an interesting story here with your co-authors coming out of the military and also I am. I'm going to ask you to tell me about yourself so tell me about yourself. Sure happy to do so. I think the most important thing to know about me is. I'm a leadership geek correct but I also was an accidental leader. I am someone that learned leadership. I guess in a pretty non traditional way at twenty one years of age I I made this interesting career choice to join the United States Marine Corps and to give you perspective. I think maybe gender makes it a little bit more Interesting out of one hundred eighty thousand Marines Only about a thousand one thousand are female Marine Corps officers so I had this very unique experience that not many people get learning to lead as a Marine Corps officer so I grew up in the marines. I'm an attorney. I worked in software yet. All of these different things I've done in my career. The one one common thread has been the leadership lessons that I learned firsthand in the military yet over the past thirteen. Fourteen years I've been consulting with our our nation and our world's leading organizations companies like facebook and Google and Walmart and Fedex helping them really understand how to leverage leadership skills and capabilities of their employees for greater success for the organization so I'm a leader. That's the best way to describe me with probably a unique background yet. It's all added up to being able to help others builder leadership skills were. You're quite a leadership. Smarty pants aren't it's what I love love. So the idea of the book and what your message is is what in big broad strokes here. The idea that all of us have this ability to lead others. Well it's just not a skill set that a lot of suspend a Lotta time developing right. I've met so many great professionals right amazing technical skills those advanced degrees Very capable very qualified high intellect right other smarty pants is out there yet. what we often don't do especially here in our American cultures build leadership skills. Well I think there's a sense that leaders are born not made and that they are there certain leadership type the people that that are better leaders than others. But but my guess is. You don't agree with that part and part of the fact I do right I think about you know there's been some really amazing studies. One of the best ones is out of the University of Minnesota Longitudinal Study of identical twins. Were they really looked at that. Born versus made question and that research looking at other a research kind of comes down about seventy thirty thirty percent of our ability. Delete is is inherited at birth things like R. I Q.. Things like maybe we leaned towards extroversion. people tend to think extroverts or better leaders CHARISMA OUR Ability to to influence and inspire though comes from truly are behaviors every day. And that's the extra seventy percent. What type of mindset do we have? What type of behaviors are we demonstrating? So yes some things fixed but at birth but the born with it peace I think falls away when you realize the majority of our ability to lead or based on the choices we make every day about how we're showing up and what behaviors were demonstrating restraining little. A lot of introverts for example might have real trouble with some of those behaviors. It's hard to you know be charming and and extroverted when you're not naturally see. I don't think charming extrovert didn't actually have much to do with leadership right. I think they're just a small piece. I think we're actually in the era of the introvert. great book quiet. That commanded a lot of attention. Not Too long ago and a lot of the research is moving towards with the nature of technology today again. The era of the introvert is upon us and I think the type of behaviors. I'm talking about things around your ability to be accountable. Your ability to have a sense of service towards others others your ability to credibly meet and exceed standards they transcend personality types versus extroversion introversion. I think they're more behaviors that anyone you want. Whether you're a social and outgoing or more quieted quiet and prefer to be on your own can can truly leverage to be effective will explain those behaviors in like real people terms arms because they can sound a bit platitude -i When you say exceed standards and all that sounds kind of like report card stuff but what does it mean in day to day? How how do people do this? Well how do people do credibility right. You're talking about exceed standards. The interesting thing about credibility is it's not us that evaluates our credibility pretty credibility is in the eye of the beholder meaning other people are always racking and stacking. You're right people are always evaluating you trying to decide. Can I trust this person. And do they know what they're talking about. Are they going to be able to get the job done. That's real world happening to us all the time anytime we're interacting with another human being so being credible means and really understanding what does success look like in this organization. What are the standards people that are doing well? Here are people that are contributing at Highest levels what what are they doing. How are they understanding success? And and how are they actually taken steps to meet and exceed those standards and the interesting thing. Is You know. We can have standards in our job right. We have a boss. That's who tells us what needs to be done. That's one opportunity to be credible right meeting and exceeding what we're asked to do but a lot of our credibility comes from our ability to read the circumstances and take some initiative in the areas. Sometimes we don't necessarily agree with or we're not excited about taking action there but those could be the things that actually help us be as credible as possible organization. I think a lot of people believe though and live the idea that if you show up and you do your job and you do it well everything else takes care of itself. I think that that's where credibility comes from yet. I think there's a bit more to it right so I think there's this dynamic of are you someone that naturally through how you engage with other people has the ability to influence and I think again we were talking earlier. You're about accountability when problems happen So you show up. You're doing your job. Something inevitably goes wrong. What do you do about it? Are you the person that jumps on the bandwagon right. It's become so socially acceptable to kind of blame. Someone else to blame the system or blame a process. Are you the person that can own it. Right seeking to to take responsibility not placing blame and then gets to what matters most how are we gonNA solve it and resolve it right so I think yeah if our worlds were super simple and and we can show up every day and everything was easy it would be just showing up and doing your job yet. The challenges of today's world. We're probably going to find a problem before you know before. Four we're an hour or two indoor morning and how do we take initiative at those points and take ownership and worked to solve those challenges. I think that's the above and beyond that's that's valuable and adds to credibility ability because this subject is is big. It's really big kind of hard to get your head around if someone's listening and saying well gee this this all sounds that's good but where do you begin. How do you start? How do you start showing up the way you're talking very specifically in everyday terms Maybe some examples would help of. What would I be doing differently that if I did what you're talking about that maybe I'm not doing now? I think the the biggest accelerate to how we develop as a leader and again. I think it's important. I'm thinking about leadership. Not about being the boss or notoriety or power prestige age now. Those things are important to someone. I think that's great. Nothing wrong with being the boss or having power and maybe having notoriety or prestige in your life yet. I'm talking about how your ability as a person to do two things really well. How well do you as an individual influence outcomes and inspire others right? That's what I'm talking talking about it. And and every day in our lives whether we're a parent and employees Involved in a volunteer organization we have to influence and inspire to get along well with others and to get things done and so I would say to someone that. Hey how do I elevate how do I get better. How do I you find more success? self-awareness what are your blind spots. And when I talk about blind spots okay it seems okay. They're blind. I'm blind to them. How we're GONNA know what they are but can you really really critically look at yourself and look at yourself with an eye for? What does everybody else know about me that? I'm not quite seeing around my own behavior. Like a practical article example. I think sometimes you know. We have tempers. People get angry right and in a professional situation. Let's bring it to the working world. What's your go-to behavior? When you're angry three some people scream and yell? Raise your voice some people it's withdraw right. We all have these behaviors that maybe are less than best when we're under stress or when we're angry and so it's really taking a step back and saying you know. Is that behavior of the most productive. What could I be doing better in those circumstances and I think that's the key if someone wants to develop their leadership skills they have to really be open to certainly recognizing what are my positive blind spots? What are the things that maybe little things I do? Each day that are valued at people but then they also have to look at those blind spots that are self-defeating and maybe holding them back a bit too so you have to be really out for a cold hard. Look at what's working here and what's not working here but when you say inspire others. Is that just doing you better or is that a deliberate act of. Hey you Chimera. I'm going to inspire you not in those words words but but you know deliberately go out and attempt to inspire. I don't think it is unsigned kind of charismatic. You know give a great speech. I'm going no you know raw inspiration. I think it's more subtle way. Do I because of who I am. I have an impact on you. That's positive and sometimes at at work that's about people getting work done I and sometimes in life. That's about hey look at that person. Look at their track record of success. Look at their character. Look at their Actions in this moment There's always an opportunity to inspire and there's always an opportunity to influence. My guest is Courtney Lynch she is co author of the bestselling pulling book spark how to lead yourself and others to greater success and we're talking about leadership skills developing your leadership skills shop over one hundred specials early at macy's black Friday preview and beat the rush. Get Fifty to sixty percents off coats jackets for the whole family and sixty to sixty five. I percents often Napkin hotel collection bedding to update the guest room and give the perfect surprise with sixty five percent off at the diamond rings pendants necklaces and more for more perks. Let's check out macy's star rewards. You'll get benefits no matter how you pay. That's the savings lineup. At macy's thirty day saving valid clarence prices exclusions apply. So Courtney these other behaviors that you talk about like act with intent and be of service confidence and I think confidence is probably one and that people struggle with because if you're not naturally self-confident it's hard to fake it. You can't fake it right. I think that's a really popular adage out there right. Fake get till you make it and I wholeheartedly disagree with confidence comes from within. You can't fake it but you can build it and I think that you'll all my work with leaders through the years is very focused on well. The ones that were confident. What was it And digging into the research and then working with folks to develop confidence and it's internal so much of what you project outwardly is because of where you are internally and so in the book and spark we talk about Really several categories. Right taking time to recognize your success. Even if it's making it through a difficult Tuesday right we all have those pretty terrible days and so being. I'm proud again internally. Not telling everybody how great you are for making it through your Difficult Tuesday confidence can be borderline arrogance but really the sincere so your understanding of your own beliefs capabilities. Positive Self Talk Right. I mean that was one that I found it a little trivia when I first heard about it right but really really understanding what we're telling ourselves internally has a big difference on how we show up to others in the world and then simple things I mean. Confidence is an emotion. Right confidence isn't isn't a skill. I still can practice bringing that emotion to the forefront when you need it the most and some of that is understanding things that yeah and Superman terms Kryptonite Kryptonite tear confidence. Things like fear. Worry insecurity very commonly felt human emotions yet. How often are you allowing them to get into your thinking and dispersed? You get rid of your confidence right when the moment you start to feel afraid the moment you're paralyzed by worry or the moment that you start to evaluate yourself against others and you don't quite feel like you're stacking up. Those are the moments that kill your confidence and so really just by understanding the internal dynamics of confidence it can translate to that stronger. Confidence projected outward. That sense of. I think it's been called the imposter syndrome Rome of of you know I really feel like I don't deserve this. I'm I don't know how I got here but sooner or later everybody's GonNa find me out for the fraud that I am. I think everybody feels that. And and that's pretty tough to deal with. I think everybody feels that and I love it. Mike that you're calling that out right that's the that's kind of a secret behind curtain and that's the unique thing about my work is the the privilege of it. Is I get to spend time with such amazing talented leaders right. I've had clients literally that were on the cover of Time magazine when I'm traveling to their client sites yet I know them as people and I see that they're dealing with these very same issues. People are people so yes. It's not Dismissing those feelings that are so common. It's working through them. And that's what I think we're a little bit of my marine training comes into play because they didn't teach us. I mean think about courage right I mean can courage really be todd. They didn't teach us to dismiss our fears. What they taught us to do was to face? Our our fear is and to move forward in spite of them right. Knowledge ing our own fallible nature. Is Humans Right. Were we all get scared. We all make mistakes. Abuse are common experiences for all of us as people yet. What do you do to rise? Above when you're in those circumstances and lives depend on it now in the private sector. Maybe maybe it's not always life or death but I think for professional today we take our career so seriously and we're proud of them and so understanding How we can work through challenges ages within ourselves or work to lead and serve and and Add value to other people more effectively. That's the essence of leadership development. So how'd you do in some nuts and bolts. Do that because I think when people hear things like work through your feelings and all this is glaze over. I don't know what that means. It's it's recognize them right and sometimes it's name your fears if we're talking about confidence if we're talking about accountability it's recognizing I am stuck in the story line. I'm blaming I mean everybody else right I mean again. WE BLAME CREDIT CARD COMPANIES FOR GETTING US into debt. We blame fast food restaurants for making fat. We blame our child's teacher for what our kids it's not doing right. I think practical nuts and bolts terms as we have to take ownership of what's going well in our lives and celebrate that and that contributes to confidence or what's not going well take ownership of that and figure out what are some steps to Betterman. Yeah well and that's that hard. Look in the mirror you talked about. It's some people aren't willing to take. Yeah I think everyone has the potential to be a better leader yet will and commitment have to be present present to that process. How how might not? How easy is this but I mean is this like a life a long journey or is this something you can work on for six months and and really see the difference? I think he can work on it for six days or six minutes and see the difference. As long as you're open to developing yet none of us will ever be the perfect leader. We can always be better again as much as as we commit to being better so it can be and I think for most folks who are achieving the success that matters to them. They've made it a commitment to continuously develop they're in a very much a growth mindset perspective and then I think some people and that doesn't mean they're bad or wrong but are in more of a fixed mindset and that's where they're staying gene and if that works for them. I think that's great. I think people are drawn to leadership development though at times when they get feedback from someone else that they need to develop their leadership skills sales right and like you've suggested sometimes that can be a bit vague yet if something's not going according to plan or something doesn't feel like it's working well turning to developing hoping yourself and developing your leadership skills can often be very Efficient and effective path to to betterment. Well that's a really interesting. Take GEICO leadership. And as I said as we started this discussion that that's different than the usual corporate business boss manager leadership skills. Dell's this is more about how you know. People look inward to become better leaders. So thanks Courtney Lynch has been my guest. She's author of the book spark how to lead yourself and others others to greater success in. You'll find a link to the book on Amazon on the show notes. Page for this episode of the podcast and all of our episodes are located aided at our website somethingyoushouldknow dot net. Thanks Courtney. Hey thank you I appreciate your time and thanks for having us be a part of the show the whether or not you're a great cook or maybe you just boil water and make some pasta every once in a while no matter what. I've got some expert tips for you. That will make your cooking much better. They come from the website pop. SUGAR DOT COM first of all protein including eggs. Protein hates heat. So if you've always ended up with overcooked and rubbery scrambled eggs. It's because you probably cook them too quickly at too high a heat low. Oh and slow is the only way to get soft custody scrambled eggs next almost every time you do make pasta. You should save about half a cup of the Pasta water. Before pouring the rest out of the drain that salty starchy liquid that the pasta cooked in becomes a crucial part to achieving. A Silky cohesive sauce in most pasta dishes sizzling bacon on the stove top typically results in splatters often painful bill burns and the tip is to roast baking in the oven on a cookie sheet lined with foil. So that the Bacon cooks evenly and the cleanup is effortless You'll never buy ground beef again. Once you start making burgers from Sirloin tips. Rather than ground chuck the flavor and the texture are far superior to plain old store bought ground beef and finally and I love this one ended. So it's so true any chocolate chip. Cookie is better with salt on it when you take the cookies out of the oven sprinkle them with just a little good quality flake salt preferably you know big flakes Salt Lake Kosher salt and it completely transforms the flavor of the chocolate chip cookies. And that is something you should know. And that is our podcast. Today you can subscribe to this podcast for free. and that way the episodes Get delivered right to whatever device you listen on. Just click the the subscribe button on whatever platform. You're listening on. I'm Mike carruthers. Thanks for listening today to something you should know.

Times Mike carruthers Courtney Lynch AIRBNB US Washington Post Margaret Pressler reporter Intel researcher AIRBNB DOT apple Amazon deere Bob Melissa Epidemiological Studies GEICO Atlantic Dot Com Dell
449 - Wallace Hume Carothers

The Dollop with Dave Anthony and Gareth Reynolds

1:26:01 hr | 4 months ago

449 - Wallace Hume Carothers

"Her. Yeah girl. Stop. I want people to know what our conversations are like before we start the podcast. Better than that that's not how they've been. Listening to the dollop on the all things comedy network is. Bilingual American history podcast or each week. Dave Anthony read a story from American history. To a guy. Gareth Reynolds who has no idea what the topic is going to be about. Your friend. To say that let's Let's not get ahead of ourselves. You must be happy to be recording a dollar people in they had to right through. It's been a rough week. SAY THAT WHY? Is Joe. Hurts when I laugh I hurt my ribs. What hurt by ribs. From, the show the other night. From the show Gulf. Got Ghaffar Rib I got guffawed. Yes. So let's just say about that. We did a live show what very good people seem very happy. There's a lot of videos in it and a lot of photographs in it. We were not told beforehand that that would be a copyright problem. So when it went up after the twenty four hours that stuff was blackout so I think from now on. And we'll talk about this, but we'll just do the live one in. It's it's kind of IF PEOPLE WANNA buy but we should make it explicit like probably blacked out. You know. Okay. All right. Well, yeah. Well, yeah. So I mean we plan on doing another one fairly soon. So yeah, we'll do another one. I would like to do before the election just to squeeze in something happy under the wire. Dave that don't you realize that something happy a pacifier is going to. Get it. To work out that's right. Just vote and everything will be fine GonNa work out nothing else is a Cana. Get you listen. You say he you say. We are brought to you in part by a Mack Weldon. Look. We got a we got a new normal going on a lot of us are looking in our closets. For men's essentials, then they're they're they're not in there. Because, we weren't ready for this and instead of the usual casual button ups and jeans. 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It's one of those things you like, why didn't I always have a day? Yeah Because hello touchy. You don't have to wipe it all even the best to ply just can't cut it when it comes to a hands-free poop experience gave it a paper products and uncomfortable chafing. We switched to the soothing cleansing stream water of a Hello Toshiba attachment and every Hello Toshiba attachment comes with a sixty day risk free guarantee in a twelve month. Warranty join millions of happy hello tissue customers right now and clean but with every flush gotTa Hella Toshi Dot. COM slash stopping at ten percent off. This is a special offer for our listeners go to hello Toshi dot com slash. Hello to she dot com slash Dow up. And we are also brought to you in part by QUIP. we always Gareth and I are obviously huge fans of quip. You've heard US talk about quip four. It's world's greatest electric toothbrush. Yeah. They have a new smart electric toothbrush now. Yeah. Mine's black. What color is black also black. When I first got it I like I was like, how's this GonNa work? Isn't toothpaste GONNA. Cover it and it'll be black. It's not. It's just stays black. Pretty fantastic. Look so you can. You can now of this March brush, it hooks up to your phone. You can see how often do you brushed look it's hilarious. It's like Oh. Yeah. I I was antics now. Yeah I. I was like, why would I need this now looking at it all the time. So what are you doing honey just checking my teeth Object bar graphs on my mouth. You probably heard US talk about a million times but this is something brand new that rewards you and your mouth we're talking about the smart toothbrush adults and kids it attracts one and how well you brush you get tips and coaching to improve your habits earn points for daily brushing and bonus points for completing challenges. That's very good for kids redeem your rewards. Like, free products, gift cards, discounts from clip and partners. If you already got equipped, you can upgrade and keep all the features you like which they already had the two minute timer, thirty second pulses, light weight sleek no bulky charger that travel cover can stick it on the mayor. All that stuff is still there. So it's all still great. It's just added features. So join five million Maoz who use quip and save hundreds compared to other Bluetooth toothbrushes when you get equip smart brush for just forty five dollars start getting rewards for brushing your teeth today and go to quip dot com slash all right now to get your first refill free. REFILL FREE GET QUIP DOT COM, slash? DOLLOP. GT Q. U. IP DOT com slash dot quip for better oral health made simple and rewarding. And of course, we are brought to you in part by Barak Lennon. Look you guys have heard US talk about Brooklyn. We absolutely love it. They're the Internet's favorite sheets. And towels, they have those. Let's. Just. Talk about tells. They give your daily routines something special with varying levels of plush nece. The towel of your dreams is just waiting for you listeners. And with all those extra time at home, it might be nice to invest in a little extra softness and absorb Consi. I have now have Brooklyn and towels. Go along with my awesome Brooklyn and sheets. They're really plush awesome and big got a big one. Did you get a Big One? I did yeah. meowing at my door I. Love just. Classic. Jose. I love a giant Tau and this just makes me feel like some kind of. It is very amazing. Yeah. It makes him in some crazy spot. It's really great their plush. It's like getting a nice hug from a really good friend. It's perfect. It's perfectly fine to stay in your towel all day after you showers sometimes I'll just towel until may shower gone and get twenty, four seven with it. s just efficiency Brooklyn's towels not only made it possible, but they make it comfortable. So Brooklyn is the perfect place to find all the comforts for home including ultra soft towels. They're so confident in their product that everything comes with a lifetime warranty use Promo code the DOLLOP for ten percent off your first order Brooklyn Dot Com that's B. R. O. K. L. I. N. Dot Com Promo Code the, dollop Brooklyn, and everything. You need to live your most comfortable life at third. Again, I'll be posting the specificities but I'll be doing a fundraiser at the believe seven pm to elect America's first trance corner. As, well, as October twenty fourth I will be doing a standup show virtual stand up show with a little after party, which you're not invited to Dave, and you can do that through rush takes dot com go to my website. You find out information about all that and join me Thursday evenings on my instagram live for Gareth's you send suggestions and I will rip upon them and go to my youtube Gareth Reynolds TV. April twenty-seventh Eighteen, ninety, six year of our Lord Jesus Christ. Who died for you. Stop Gareth Stop It. That's too specific for this. Very specifically I don't like that he's specific. No, that's too much weight. I do not want that weight. Suck it up. That's one of the Jesus famous. Sang's suck it up. Uses remember everyone suck it up. Quick being pussies. Jesus. Get over here. He he came out pretty hard. Yeah. When he came out from the rock three days later and he was like stumbling surly y'all don't even know anymore. Wallace Hume carruthers was born in Burlington Iowa. As young boy, he was very into tools mechanical devices. That's a dangerous to start at the recipe for a dollar. That's fine. That's little lines like that Dave when I did this I go okay. He's crafty works with hey, it's work should now I'm like Oh, man, this dude is going to cause some trouble. He began experimenting he and his friends formed a sort of engineering club with the headquarters in an old barn behind the others house. Share what? A what a great age kill. They wired things like they take something that didn't have a battery powdered and add wires they. The work with coils. School, he was super into chemistry. This dark his father knowing walls interest. In invention, an expiration pushed him to go to a local college to learn shorthand and bookkeeping. Right says father as I put real crafty, pretty good with electronics. You should write things down on cards. That should be what you do boy soon, I've tried to church your your gift. No. No I believe in your son. Now, what's your favorite thing to do? I like to. Tinker with electronics and just sort of chemistry stuff going to be a library in. No doubt I said I'd like to be librarian. You'll work with books all the time that I've spent in the barn, and that'll be your life. I made a robot we'll bring you little robot. Maybe can help you stack the shelves of the return books and Organiz. The pile of ones that are supposed to go out and keep an eye on the late fee San. Why you've got a skill set, that's perfectly applicable for. Librarian ship. Perfect is there something you wanted to say no I'm fine. Good. Don't because in a library you're not going to be able to follow that impulse. So Sh sh. Think it. Would always say think things. His father happen to be the vice president of the college that he was going to learn shorthand and bookkeeping. Okay. The capital city Commercial College. So that's where he goes. He goes there for I think a year he finished in July. Nineteen. Fifteen And His dad then made a deal with the Presbyterian minister send walls to Tarquinio, college in Missouri which was a Presbyterian College. Wow. Great. Perfect they. The revel. Technology and things like that. That goes great there. So the deal the dad made is that. Go to the college he would work part time and that would cover. Tuition and then studied English that would be as Major. Okay. Okay, a professor there said, Wallace's father quote didn't really sensed the possibilities of the field which is sawn wanted to vote to devote himself That seems that's coming across coming across. Isn't it? Yeah Yeah. Well, he likes coils and wires and batteries ministry. Chemistry at his father's like come, you could write things down and then you'll go go go go to a church that'll be good for you. Maybe. You could come up with an electric partition window boy. Or Way to put out all the candles faster. We maybe you could make a robot candle put her outer. Author Matthew. Harms said quote he was upon dominated by his father's efforts to curry favor with the Presbyterian Churchman. The epitome of pond? So He's obviously very smart right away the other students started calling him proof. Of his roommate. His roommate is described as pessimistic and Wallace was described as quote even more bleak. Wow. So the pessimists was like Jesus, Christ me and up to lighten up a little bit your bumming me out. I'm like against everything and you kind of depressing me. So soon, done still the two of them would go out and They go out to the football field. At night where Wallace would sing songs while his roommate played the Ukulele for hours. Wow. These two were the negatives. We're doing this anymore. This song's called probably not. Probably. Not mostly unlikely. We're not gonNA make it are damaged psyche. Do you know how hard it is to play a sad song on a Ukulele? Asking a lot of your EUCHRE. Admits still sounds kinda tropical I. Don't know what you want me to do. It's a little guitar that sounds like that. I don't even need you there. I'll just talk it out. So most of the students at the school, we're going to become ministers or missionaries they go to chapel every day. When Wallace his dad came to visit, he discovered Wallace was smoking cigarettes and he threatened to lower the partial payment. He was giving for tuition unless he stopped. Okay. Wow, that's A. At this I guess I had no clue that cigarettes were all frowned upon that time because it was just sort of like. I everybody smoked and nobody knew it was bad. I think it's a religious thing. I can't think of any other reason it's gotta be right. Yeah that's the body. Yes. Something like that. Yeah. I don't know if that they yell that's the body but. It it's something in that area. That's the sacrament boy. Good Lord that's leper grass. A fellow student said of Wallace's father quote. He appeared to me to be character right out of a dickens novel. He could as I think he could have studied scrooge Oh. That's. Perfect that's a perfect because that's a great dad. Dad reminds me of the biggest prick who needs ghosts to be cool that guy that's the guy that's the guy. Well, it depends which screws you talking about if you're talking about pre Priego Marley scrooge and that's right. But if you're talking about Christmas morning, get a get a hand. That's right. Yeah. That's fair. He just was walking around who's got a head green for pheasant. Then I'm so changed. Wallace couldn't stand to be in a room with his father. This is the friends still quoting Wallace couldn't stand to be in a room with his father. I can understand as Mr see appeared mean spirited thin nose close together cold grey is so he's just like well look he's a fucking monster but I liked that we give him the happy days finds e treatment. Hey, Mr seat. Big douchebag with like one one gray cyclops I in the middle of his ED, which is still Mr c can't you tell you son does a love you? Do you think anybody in their twenties seen happy days or like we'll be like, US watching old black and white shows. Probably? Not. Probably, not even of curiosity but I only know I own. I only know happy days from. Most shows that I know. Like that are older from from nickelodeon. So right maybe like that's just yeah. That's my parents argued I watched every episode of Taxi. His graduates, rumors tears had graduated, and then the two of them snuck out to celebrate, and that is when Wallis had his very first drink. We go now your American. That'd be something he enjoyed very much. Okay. Okay. A former student Arthur party now ran the chemistry department and Wallace found love with tiny basement lab at the school. He finished his chemistry curriculum in his junior year and party left for another job. So the college. Had Wallace become the chemistry instructor when he was still a senior Okay that's quite an interesting move. His. going. To be great I'm going to be grading and teaching myself to. Well, can you imagine you're in? You're in a class the guy next year you're like, Hey, man you on his study. Study for the test teacher and mentor. Then you go to the next class and he's and he's like teaching. That's literally what would be like yeah. That's like I told you. I told you one time when I was eleven. My mother hired a twelve year old to babysit me. and. I was like this is absolutely insane. He taught Cam for two years and actually had to delay graduation a year because he was so busy teaching. Okay So he graduates in Nineteen Twenty, eight, twenty, four. Now at this time, American chemists are not really thought much of in America. German. Chemist dominates before Pfizer okay. That's right. Right, right? Yeah. Right. I remember reading about that. German communists chemist dominant everything everything for a while and American American chemists just a huge drop down American chemists are ranked. By which German professor they got their post. DOC Under in Europe. Okay. So it's not even it's not even how good you are. It's like which German did you study at her right right? And so Americans depend on just German chemicals aspirin die like everything is a German based right but then World War Two comes and that's it breaks on Germany. Suddenly American chemistry is rising up. But at this point when Wallace graduates, which is when it's rising up. He's a guy with no money and he's got a degree from. College, Right. So. Yeah. So he goes to the University of Illinois to try to get a doctorate degree in chemistry. And the professor in charge of the program he's like a hot shit guy that God's that's a really good program Doug Hot. Shit. His name Oh. Did I say it? Does it. Yeah, I said it. Okay. So the university is trying to come up with this stuff to replace all the German stop this no longer on the market to the university's literally trying to make cash and they believe have their they have all of their. Students getting their master's postgraduate. They're all like just trying to come up with stuff from the school is so making cash this pill, this is a weird pill, but this pill will make you understand what your sister's like. This is a drug this pill. Pill. The goal of this pill to make you understand your sister a little bit better just your sister. well, once we get to clinical trials will be very interested to see if it does anything to the brother but again, that would be purely a side effect or just a plus this pill is intended to Understand your sister better. It's just the just the. No other women in just one. But if you have to sisters you dave would help you with both of but our worry is that it's going to split your understanding. So but again, that's why we're interested in getting to clinical trials because then we can really understand do you split your understanding, betwixt your sisters or do you maybe just one hundred understand one sister a lot better. Than the other. So here here's what I'm thinking I'm thinking you should get to that after right now we think you should just work on getting. The right sort of die. For Coats is what we're hoping for the sisters. Great. Let's just work on it later. I don't see I just I guess I don't see a huge connection between the the color die and how this pill would. Maybe this helps this would be a purple pill is that actually doesn't that doesn't help at all This purple and it's going to give you A. level. Of Understanding your sister that you've not had before you took the pill maybe I'm not explaining, right? No No, I got it I just. I don't think anybody needs that or want. You would take five in the morning five lunch and then five at night, and then you'd have to wake up in the night and take ten. Okay, yeah I think we should stick to like dyes for the. Clothing sure. Yeah. Of course why don't we just stick to die colors because? WHO WANTS UNDERSTAND THEIR SISTER? Right? Just let them these complicated beasts that will never really understand or empathize with. Distance make it so that by the by the time you're sisters, eighteen years old you have nothing to talk about is that the goal is institution is that the goal of this country 'cause the last time I checked this was a nation founded sisters who are easier to understand. and. That is that is fundamental in the constitution as it is your right to to free freedom. I think. I think everyone said what they need to say and we should probably just end the meeting I. Agree I will go get to work on dies and I'll come back to you. Thank you. So. Wallace. Is the student in the group? He's very talkative. He's Witty's bright quick. Quote but he would appear at Marvel's laboratory at night and sit off to the side looking straight ahead quiet and mute. Did Not mention that the guy who? Runs this. His lab is named Marvel. Marvel. Okay. So you're in Marvel's lab. Is that where the X. men came from that's right. That's what this story is oh. Thank God finally. Some marvel stuff for once Yeah Oh God we've been so starved finally. Party was now the chairman of Kim Department at University of Dakota and so he offered Wallace a faculty position. Okay. He took it after he got his masters in Cam from Illinois. But he goes south gotta he's not a great teacher Wallace's not this is not what he should be doing. Party called him quote not brilliant and neither was he interested in people? Okay. Well, good. Those are great. That makes for a really good higher. and. By this time, Wallace is a heavy drinker. So he does do for that to come back. He does research and he has an article published in the Journal of American Chemical Society. But after your he leaves South Dakota he goes back Illinois doctorate. While he's on campus day an old friend from his home hometown ran into him on campus quote. I ran into this man with his felt hat all pushed up into a chocolate drop soiled and dusty close in what looked like a week's growth of whiskers on his face. What is this guy? It's a woman she she she runs into Wallace. This is this. And her description is that he had A. He had a chocolate drop soiled his hat. That's what that's was like a shape of a hat I think is what she's saying. Drop. Yeah, I. Mean Sh actually technical that a chalk drop so to make it less. A call the helps, but it's still very confusing a chock trop hat. Yeah. So he's walking around like a little chocolate man and dusty close and what looked like a week's growth of whiskers on his face I never saw employed cookie. I never saw. A. Vagrant look more pathetic. And then I finally recognized Wallace. I spoke to him and Wallace started gasping opening and closing his mouth I thought he was having a heart attack. He kept he kept gasping and the companion with him supported him. I- Jabber. It on his if I didn't notice so. A couple of things he could be having some sort of mental snap, but he's he's drunk shit faced. Okay. That's was just he's liquor up and he's like. You you've been. And she's just like and then the other day I also found a new umbrella but that's not like my other one my son was different and in her head she's like I'm very concerned about this manners gasping like a tadpole. Yeah. He's probably on like a week bender like this is like a yeah right whiskey stubble. So she they connected and then he he got invited to her house for dinner a week later showed up all cleaned up. Okay and he's all normal never says a word about it maybe because he didn't remember it but yet, right Yeah he's probably like, why is she inviting me over? Good that's out of the blue isn't. So in the lab, he was assigned to study salt co? Catalysts. and. He received the car fellowship which was a huge award at the university. But he was pretty over all the schooling. Now, he'd been doing it for a while and he called it a form of slavery. Jesus Christ. Let's relates A. Dramatic, also, it's your choice to be in school so. Let's. Let's let's just put it. Let's put a Chi-. Sean sick comparing things to slavery is a white. And that is the history of time yeah. Yeah. Oh. God could anything be worse than this? He said the academic requirements were like quote, all the elements of adventure and enterprise which a nut Skar afford factory must feel and setting out for work each morning. Good Lord Certainly. Okay. He wrote home that the school would give him his doctorate if he made it through the three years and quote show intelligence slightly above that of the pathologically subnormal wild. Okay. So he is I, mean, there is pessimistic roommate was right. Man is negative. He's also really broke. He's poor. He's got no money. He gets into billiards. Try to make little scratch he just starts drinking hang on drinking coffee in the afternoon Okay but even with all this, he still coming to conclusions in the lab and he's doing work that showed his mind was seeing what other more experienced chemistry men we're not seeing. Okay All right. So. He was made an assistant in the department and he got his PhD and then he stayed another two years working as assistant. He and four other men. From the department, we get together once a week and drink beer and discuss and debate the issues of the day. And one of them said at this point when Wallace started carrying cyanide pills in his pocket. Turn that's. That's that's quite a quirk. That's a that's. That's some character development. It's definitely something you ask about if your friend you check in Hey, others are you kill pills? There don't worry about it. Okay stone your pocket. There's still there keeping real close. Just, in case Just got around no, you don't know. Do you know I don't know You don't know. No No. nope. Keep them. All right. Well good to catch up. Yeah is that what this was? Joe Got Four of them. I got four yeah. Okay. All right. Well, just try to always keep tabs on those just because again, they are murder pills. All right. Buddy take care. Thank you. Your eyes. Open. So his friends and co-workers. Now. Everyday would start checking on his mood in the morning. Hoping he was up happy instead of down and SAT. Right. And then they started they started try to make things better for him trying to fix him taking him on trips and trying to make him happy one to fishing in Wisconsin and he caught his first northern, Pike. Pike Buddy if I did it. Huge Fish. That's enormous. Happy. Why don't you take a? Take all all up all that up next year at some. Traditions. Give her a kiss. And what source kick could happen you feel something. Come on. Guy Kiss your fish. Take the pills out of your pocket. Fuck. But he found it harder to go about the same routine each day. He had depression. Depression made it difficult to right to research into experience yet through all of this, his reputation is growing. And and he's got this mind for chemistry and everyone's trying to recognize him. So. Harvard tries to prime away in one, thousand, nine, hundred, six. And he finally took an instructor position making two thousand and two hundred. Fifty dollars a year. For the summer he went and hung out in. Paris with other chemists and then he went back to Harvard while he was at Harvard. Started reaching out to. Okay good. Good good. He's now thirty one years old. Since one thousand eighteen had been spending the prophets it made from being a World War One profiteer. To try to rehabilitate itself as a more diverse people friendly chemicals company. Sure. There you go and and Dave Dare we say the second American dream was born. Yes. I mean Dupont win for being this. Awesome. War Profiteer to this wonderful company this killing and do damage. So many people well I also think that. It's amazing like right now because the time we live where it's like, you know it's just. So many lives are being. Completely fucked with and these companies keep either saying like it's walls, it's basically a wells fargo being. We also hand out food every other Friday. Go Fuck us like thank you for the food drive you fucking prick. Put the amount of damage you've done you know. When the huge companies are like. Help. Help out. People. Help donate some money. Yeah you you. You do it. You do it. Yeah. Round up the gun the up thing at the stores. Which? Yeah gotten around by the way it says a lot that when you say have you gotten the roundup think at the stores I'm thinking chemicals. round-ups not Dupont is it You know that's Other. Months. Oh, that's Monsanto can Monsanto has. Great. Great Great. Company to. In. So in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighteen. Start trying to rehabilitate the company and Dupont starts making Rayon Cellophane and cellular like South that people enjoy that they It can help their lives but in nineteen twenty, six Dupont to build its own team a research scientists. At. T. Jenner elected electric had already done this with their own research labs and they came up a long distance voice transmissions and the wire lightbulb. So. We want that kind of thing right a little in house lab place. Sure. Dupont. Say they were looking for quote fundamental research not not just to create new products but to understand the science behind them. Okay sure which makes sense because if you understand the science behind it, you can make other stuff, right? It's. Organic chemistry was huge part of it, and after searching for nine months, they thought Wallace was the guy to lead the. Department. Okay. So I turned to pot down. So the company offering twenty percent more in salary that'll do it, and he's now worried that he can't that he wouldn't be able to just to accompany after work in academia for so long. He told them quote I suffer from neurotic spells of diminished capacity, which might constitute a much more serious handicap. There than here. I think I speak for all of us when I say welcome aboard. You hired okay. I go through periods of madness. Let me ask you this. Do you WanNa do that in a corner office overlooking the river? All, windows. It's the kind of stuff we're looking for here. Okay. Well that's right. Dupont doesn't care and. They keep pursuing them in. February nineteen twenty eight, he takes the job. He gets there right away just super into it. He rides his bike through at Apple Orchard to work every day. You see like that Appalachia. We're planning on ruining that soon. That's exciting. Is it GONNA guess it. Quote nobody asks any questions as to how I'm spending my time or what my plans are. Apparently, it is all up to me. Well. So he's a Google, right? Yeah. He's a bass with the first time. He was like this is amazing. You understand that I'm allowed to tell people to do things on my behalf. He starts working on Palmer's Financial Times quote polymers are long chains of large molecules and one of the key building blocks of life. What is a polymer Soka polymer proteins a polymer DNA Za. Palmer. So. Wallace. Worked on proving polymers were made of large macromolecules had together held together by normal molecular bonds and he doesn't for two years. He was laying the basis for what would become modern polymer science. And then in April nineteen, thirty, one of his assistants Arnold Collins he made something in a tube and then he just left it on a bench for a week and then he came back down he's like what's up thing that? I left there. And he'd made synthetic rubber. How many there are so many of those there are so many things where someone just was like fuck it and then weekly like wait a minute I did it I in order to discover things, you have to quit just leave it for a while and then you come back. It is eating raw. So obviously, this is huge. Ten days letter, but ten days later while he was working on making bigger Mount Molecules Wallace created a molecular still to draw water off of the synthetic rubber. And this led to him creating what he called a quote festoon fibers with high molecular weights basically, very light stronger material. Okay rubber. Wow. Now you're gonNA pass rubber right because. On rubber. stringy. Okay. So Now he's at this point where European chemists are coming to tours lab to see what he's doing. and. Wallace. Has An affair with a married woman. Killing single itself, right? Yeah. Yeah, he's making robberies wearing rubbers. Let's do this. He got into squaws squash. Sorry. Say That again he got into squash the short. Yeah. Squash which he played quote violently. Sure Okay So. Know kind picture of picture it. I could picture it. It's I don't. We don't even know what squashes what is. Basically racquetball ball with just a different kind of like A. Less bouncing ball I mean. Is this the story of how he invented rocket Paul, that's what it could be. But. You know it's like when you think about it like I mean whenever I mean if you play like racquetball squash like it is very. Limited court. So in order to be violent and crazy like you need to be like rex. Bax. Knee high socks just like elbow pads on you know mouthguard just running back and forth like this should have been in. So he went to parties, he would bring wooden blocks so he could explain molecules to people. Hey You're blocks again Hey. There's a lot of girls here tonight into one and just maybe. Don't touch my no fuck blocks. Touch fucked lucks. The name, the name I won't touch them the name, their molecules, I understand their molecules, but you understand this this is more of a party. You know we'll have some drinks like you like a couple of drinks. I have a lot. I've had a lot of drinks I have more I'm going to have more. Of. Just great attitude. But so maybe just leave. Why don't we do this? Why don't we put the blocks in the car and then if anyone asks about them, we'll go get him or I think you I think you invented the world I clock Cock block my man. Hey, that's what I think you did. I don't want to be. There no fuck blocks fucks me. If I have the blocks all right bring the blocks in just don't call them that deal. Okay the molecules. Better closer. Let me introduce you to the girls. Hey Ladies. ME. My Buddy Wall. Meet some my buddy and his would don't touch my blocks. All right. Hey Someone flip this record. It's going real good. Last. Always his mental issues were there. He wrote a friend that he was feeling quote feeble smelly and cockroach like. Oh my God just why I don't know at any rate, I go through at least a dozen violent storms of despair every day. That he may have just fully described depression in a way that has not been done before we. Read that again dirty. I feel feeble. Roach like. Meli cocktail. Through at least a dozen violent storms of despair day. Yeah. There you go. Yeah. He moved to house. That's right the Moon House with three other Dupont chemists. And it became a nicknamed whiskey acres Oh. My Lord. Okay. We're experimenting with some chemicals in the House as well. His roommates were active, but he didn't take part quote. I'm living out in the country now with three other bachelors and they being socially inclined have all gone out in tall hats and white ties while I after my ancient custom sit sullenly at home. Can't put on a top hat and a white T to. He could do that and just sit at home. I've done that. Yeah I know then you sit in a chair and just go. Now what? At this point, he showed one of his roommates that he had a capsule of cyanide on his watch chain. Oh. My God Jesus Christ. Got The time. Sort of. With the Great Depression happening Dupont started pushing him to work on stuff that would make money. And The depression caused his his college his father worked out too close. So his parents came to live with them. Okay sure. Wallace was not thrilled quote I. Not only don't have any affection for my father, but I find it exasperatingly and sometimes sickening merely to be in his presence. Well, this ought to help everything. I get I get that you completely. got a sickening to be in your presence. He ended the affair with the married woman mostly under pressure from workers and his parents and friends, and this is spot. So everybody. Everybody, but she was getting a divorce the whole time so. It's like, so that could be a girlfriend. Yeah. But it's a different time where she's still technically married. So you're not supposed to but. It had been the best relationship of his life and he really started hitting the bottle his parents moved out. Beside him hating his father tension had built because of the affair. So they left and went back to des Moines in early nineteen, thirty four. K.. Now. Around this time Dupont pushed him to look at fibers again. And so he he went for it and he got his assistance all the job but this is exactly when his mental health issues over him. A coworker quote it was rather strange. You would. You would be a normal conversation back and forth, and then suddenly he would become silent and have a blank look on his face looking at me and not moving not saying a word no facial expression. The first time it happened at upset me I, thought he'd had a heart attack. Okay. So this guy also doesn't like it's a heart attack. Yeah, usually, if someone just goes of. Comatose staring at me I think heart attack Ariz pump his chest quick get oxygen into it. Can't pause around this guy. My. Heart attack? Also. You. Know he also he he he has been. He definitely was seeing a psychiatrist. At the University of Illinois. He's also for a while he was getting help help I. Don't know if he is now but he's clearly has like a legitimate really. Bad mental health issues. So over the next three years Wallace went through a series of mental collapses and recoveries. In the lab, he the work continued in soon they came up with nylon. In. February nineteen thirty five. So that stuff that they that stringer stuff and leads leads to it leads to nylon wow. It was obviously superstrong by weight. The Nylon project was then taken over by a number cabinet, another chemist. and. They set Wallace to a Faraday society meeting in Cambridge. Okay So everyone knows what's going on with them. Now they're just sending in places and. He comes back after that and he he starts having an affair with his secretary Dupont Helen when you when you say That they sent him, they were basically sending him away to. To try to make him feel happy. Is that what you're saying a little bit of that but also to get them out of the lab situation I think it's great to have that there. But then also he did feel better when he went. Out Door hikes outdoor walk so I think they're just. Shocking. Yeah. Yeah. His friends thought his new New Lady was too young and not worldly enough. So they're like she's beneath you. Guy. Ritchie is. That's exactly right. Yeah but he's he's right. Yeah. She's young understand what the points. So he's super into her or not maybe not that but not as much as previous girlfriend. So they got married in February nineteen, thirty six and a couple of months later he had the his worst attack. He was hospitalized in Philadelphia for two months. And during this time, he sent a letter to a friend and it was a big loopy letters that were Chai. He. Said is he said his trip was quote conversation rambling inconsequential pointless, and sometimes so repetitious and pure pure sil- as to be the source of laughter amazement or anger. So it's you know it's gone well yeah. No that's what I meant going. Really Great. Hold on I'm gonNA write bigger letters. To to letters. Christ, they're back of the truck he wrote a letter. Clear that they were giving him drugs right I would imagine that's just him hopped up on shit or you or I mean yeah maybe or you are just like I don't care. Like you're at that point, you know. So. When he got out, he took a trip to the Alps to hike. Like I said outdoor helped him and he returned to Depan after that. But now he was sort of petrified in worried he would never come up with another good idea. and. He was moving back and forth between his house with Jalan. A room in his old house in the hospital so he just kept sort of. An inch then in January. Nineteen thirty, seven, his sister Isabel died of a heart condition and he was devastated. Three months later, Helen tells him she's pregnant. And so April Twenty Eighth Nineteen, th thirty seven while Joe. Philadelphia checked into a hotel and took the side. And he was forty one. His daughter was born seven months later. But. What he had created was just beginning. Dupont began building a plant to make nylon. He died. He's dead. Okay. Dupont is now making a plan to build nylon rumors are swirling in. America the new amazing magical fiber coming. You can put it on your legs. Dupont stayed quiet until the nylon patent was issued in September nineteen, thirty, eight smart. GonNa find a lot of big companies shouting from rooftops until they got the pet. In October. Nineteen thirty eight three thousand women were at a seminar called we enter the world of tomorrow. I run, which which was basically an annual meeting they had where they all discussed the problems of the world. You know. My God. And that's where I dupont representative showed up and made the announcement about nylon. Women listen I understand you're trying to figure out your place in the world. However. WanNa interrupt that with a very important discovery. Do you find that your legs get cold. And that? Just your bare legs. Let a blank faces. No, we want equality. That's what we're saying but. These, for your legs had but. That's pretty cool. Look at that runs right up there. Looks a little darker. So. That's good. Then you underwears in there too I think pretty sure. So Any questions. Let's I'm not taking them. Now I don't know why I'd left a pause. Any questions? Swallow was what I was. GonNa say. Okay. Guys I feel like I really interrupted something. I didn't mean to kill the momentum, but we just have this stuff here. Look at that. We're talking about the rise of Hitler. Well. I, think that's applicable to what I'm talking about to. Fifth. I'll tell you one thing that. Hitler probably wouldn't have risen to the level that he did. If. Ada. had. Worn set of these. Very. Simple. Very simple style. And just again, I, don't know much. I'm not a big I'm not a big guy, but I would imagine that. Adolf Hitler I believe it was. Completely changed a lot of his theories and thoughts and stuff if he had just noticed. These sweet. Sweet. NYLONS. Can anyone have these cookies or these for you? They're not for men. His are not meant. Okay. Well I'M GONNA, leave a big stack of these here. Maybe one of you guys could organize them a little better. They seem a little cluttered to me and. I'll be outside. Anyone is any questions. Okay Don't, clap. Because you weren't. That's what love you to you. All right. Thank you so much girls women played. Non Men or sorry. That's others that's better others. Thank you. Excuse me. So. This is what he said. Quote. A brand new textile fabric was coming on the market. It can be fashioned into filaments as strong as steel as fine as a spider's Web. and. He broke down that they were going to be replaced stockings and the three thousand women there burst into wild applause. and. I don't mean to sound like an idiot but. This is really the reason why is because stockings are just so much more annoying like they're just. Heavier fabric there may silk they are much more of a pain in the ASS shrink. If you wash Shem, they like it's just all they tear easily it's a whole thing. Now what you were describing before pantyhose. These aren't pantyhose these just come up to the top of the thigh. All right. That was my first thought too. But yeah, that's all they are. So. Now, stockings are one of the biggest exhibits. Fair in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, nine along with kids along with television and Electro Mechanical Man. Dave. All I to talk about his electra, the electric man. Okay I can give you a little bit electro. Yes. Electrodes maybe westinghouse seven tall. HUMAN SHAPE, right? It's got a body and arms and legs. I'm your neighbor. I of your neighbor could move his arms and legs. I'm your neighbor I can move like your neighbor he was able to walk by voice? Command. Tell me where do walk I liked your neighbor he could speak seven hundred words. He used a record player to do that. So you had a record player inside of him. I'm your neighbor. Let me say more. Hello. It's me your neighbor from earlier before. I am your neighbor. The one from next door electro also smokes cigarettes blew up balloons is that flashed red and? I'm quitting the show. Smoke cigarette yeah what else. Clergy you. Can't smoke cigarettes but electro the electronic. Robot. Cigarettes. All right. So he smokes cigarettes is got weird is that he has a record site is belly. On. A little bit like a smoking teletubby. He's. Yeah I mean. He. Let me. Let me put up a picture you'll. Here we go. This says a the smoking robot. Areas. I mean that's pretty good. Yeah. It's pretty crazy right I mean Y- that's huge for that time period. Here, what's going to be great as when the robots eventually take off like takeover and they're going to reanimate him and he'll be. What? This. From. Smoking. I can smoke how great feature is that. I mean I should say I should probably put this as a picture on the. Episode. So it just very confusing. What's as like I inhale I'm not a pussy robot. He really is a he really is it. They ever make a robot doctor who is like you must quit electro. Next year at the world's fair electrodes. Doctor has lung capacity isn't what it used to be shut up Dr I need one after a hard day of work. Of the robot what should we do? What? About Smoke Bob Perfect that's the best answer wherever GONNA get. Let's move ahead with that plan. So, in March sample, nylon stockings were sold to Dupont employees and then a small amount to the public in Wilmington. We're the plant was so nice wet hot to people. Plays. The ladies moment mets. It's okay. They sold out in three hours in Wilmington and on December Fifth Nineteen, thirty, nine, mass production began nylons were put on sale on May Fifteenth Nineteen Forty which was called N Day. Sure. Sure. Sure. Sure. That important? When people are talking about it that they stopped calling a nylon day just started calling an end day. Right right. There are a buck fifteen, a pair, which is about twenty twenty one bucks today. In Decatur Illinois nylons put on sale without warning at stewarts dry goods quote the news flew to beauty parlours, business offices and housewives in rapid succession and buyers arrived with curlers in their hair and cream on their faces to be among the first to get a pair. Wise. It's strange. It's just so strange is it? Yeah. It's nuts I mean you understand why but it's also it's just another one of those pockets of things that I've never five me and I just never really thought about right. We've never had external. We've never experienced. We've taken them off. That's about it. Yeah The wing as weird. Yeah. Most stores in the US sold out by noon in Pueblo Colorado please shut down a department store after. The they determine the crowd of seven hundred women was unmanageable. So. Basically. It was like leg masks. Lake Yeah I mean finding masks now they have done ninety five. Yeah it's pretty much. The women had crushed counters and turned over other counters as they tried to get the nylons. Yeah. They ran through here like a bunch of counter locusts. They hurt clerks as they rushed to buy nylons in Houston's McRae's store had to be shut down after fifteen hundred women rushed in causing total mayhem. Yeah they they came through here pretty quick they. They killed to stock boys'll killed my cashier. They took all the nylons obviously most the other things pretty much the store. Now's just me my dog in this Husk. Husk of. US. Yeah This used to have shells. All four million pairs of nylons in the US sold out in two days. God. but. It's crazy that wallace it's upsetting because you do wonder if this would have given it that guy maybe more meaning or purpose or something. I don't know I just think that his. Beyond that I think he had A. It sounds like a chemical genetic. Predisposition to to. Depressed pressure. So but as fast as NYLAND's had come to, America they vanished because the US enter World War entered World War Two? And the material which was very, very strong. Light material was now only permitted to be used in manufacturing of parachutes. Tire cords ropes aircraft fuel tanks shoelaces. Mosquito. Netting, and Hammocks. Okay Wow. Okay. So nylons, Nylon stockings are gone. Man Nylon ended up being essential to the war effort and it has been called the fiber that won the war. Also at the same time most. Dave personally I like to believe that fiber was American Grit? Okay that's fair. I'm going to say that it wasn't the soldiers and it was just this. Actual. Not On stockings I think was the yeah. Not even the rope or the. nope. Not cordage or anything or the HAMMOCK that's. Right. So, also, silk is not happening because still comes from. Asia. Mostly. Japan is where we got it. So that's out because they don't like us it. Women still wanted the look and the Margaret responded with liquid stockings. What liquid stock? So, you buy it in a bottle and then you would paint on your legs foundations. So it's created a worse problem at this. This is like when my grandmother quit-smoking and started chewing nicotine gum and then get addicted to gum and started smoking again. Yeah. We've done nothing. There's no good. That's coming out of this. Women's just forced to paint their legs. Will they are they're all paying their legs some even started using eyeliner to create a seam down the back look like they were wearing nylons. What a pain and someone made a device out of. Foot clips a screwdriver as a handle, and then they'd put the eyebrow pencil. Rigged. In the middle to apply seem straight down your legs. Dave it sounds like we had a lady macgyver. There was definitely a lady her. Leg Makeup pop throughout bars. Yeah. Certain appear. All right. Just just pedal now pedal. Leg makeup bars popped up and department stores. You could go to a department store and there's an area where you can get your legs painted. I just I can't I can't. nylons also became huge on the black market. Women were paying up to twenty dollars a pair which would be about three, hundred, seventy today. God. We Dave. What nothing changes criminals started breaking into houses to Steal Ni- Launceston. Crazy. What? Criminals they were like we need something to put on her head. So we're going to break in then get something to put on her head. To rob places with. In one hall. Louisiana. Eighteen pairs were stolen from a home. Well that person was just showing them off. You deserve to get if you have thirty six nylons later that was a red. That was a so I'm fine with that. After. The war ended it was announced on August twenty I nine, hundred, forty, five that nylons would soon be available for purchase again. Oh my God. They wanted them to be on sale for Christmas. It was announced in movie theaters during the news broadcast upfront and women broke into applause everywhere. What do you have in your stocking stuck aches? The public opinion quote to the third newspaper quote men do not realize how serious womankind takes nylons. A recent questionnaire show that women are more eager to get them than electric refrigerators, radio sets, and household gadgets. Okay. That's a nice slice of the time. Men started to realize exactly how serious womankind. Took nylons when twelve thousand pairs were put on sale on August Seventeenth Nineteen forty-five in San Leandro California. The supply was from before the war. So this whoever owned this was a mill, it was called the mill whoever owned it? Had just a bunch of they couldn't sell because the war started but they held onto them. So. Now, they put on sale and women fucking storm the place. And police had to be called to restore order. In February nineteen forty-six, the Wisconsin State Journal wrote an article employing women women to stop being mean to clerks stores. who were saying there were no nylons. Quote frustrated nylon hunters drive some tearful salesgirls to quit the scientists who developed nylon for melodies. Legs have inadvertently created more ill will between merchant and customer than any single merchandising development since the invention of the bill collector. The bill collector. So, all of. These. Women's intense. Well, all of these women have heard that nylons going back on sale what? A long time before they're still not on sale. Six months later or whatever, and so their demand they're going into stores demanding in quick I. Don't have it and then they're yelling at the clerks until they, right? Right right. The manager of Matt, Madison's Department Store to my clerks came up to me the other day and said, they were quitting. They couldn't even take more of that kind of talk from customers. I tell you I knew the average American I never knew the average American could be so selfish. and Dave. What's cool is think about it we're now a hundred times more selfish. I know totally. And that's no. Awesome. Yeah. Women were caught going behind counters to try to find the nylons thought stores were hiding look all I want is what I came for I. Know It's back here. quit lying to me. I can see the salesgirls lying look into her fibbing little allies. And and just look just give you the nylon and I'll get the fuck outta here. I don't know what the big deal is. You have some I need some let's not bullshit anymore I will literally bite through your throat if I don't get my mind lines. Store operated store telephone operators were constantly being screamed at by people call them telling them. They didn't have any nylons don't call me to see where it goodbye hello. Madison's. That's right. We do not have any. No I will not my family those who very much goodbye Hello Madison's please stop screaming Ma'am. We don't have any NYLONS. I'm being completely honest with you if you throw a brick through the window that will be a police problem. Thank you goodbye. When stores put them on sale some set up what looked like horse race starting gates to manage the crowd. Women. Equine. Understand now get this stable each carrots and when we opened the gate, you may Russian like the beasts jar. God it's so crazy while in some places, there were enough nylons to go round other cities didn't have enough. In Pittsburgh Islands went on sale on June Twelfth Nineteen forty-six. East Liberty Hosiery shop was the only store selling them. And their ad said that ten thousand Pairs for sale for quote working girls only. The Pittsburgh press described what happened as a nylon mob. The wearer's were survivors of one of the most fantastic lines history a swirling shrieking mass of women that last night stretched five abroad for more than A. Mile. The line stretch sixteen blocks, and they came from all over. Pittsburgh. How to get. The police estimated there were forty thousand women at the peak. and. Doing ten thousand. What Well they've they've they've said, they'd thousand year in a forty thousand person line. There's not enough you gotta like that back in the line and you're like. Whatever we got here late. This was only fifteen by thirty feet. Okay. So, there are a food truck. I mean really like how this story is extremely tightening. Forty for a forty thousand persons line. There, they only had six clerks. Over Ten Thousand Pairs. Over a dozen women fainted and had to be helped. That's for someone in front of you fancy like perfect. Yeah. Beautiful. This mall store opened up at four PM and it was was selling until midnight. It was originally supposed to not open until six, but police got worried and asked them to open early. Yeah Hey we're real. Sorry. Can. Can you guys open it for today? That crazy open a little early for your work day at four. PM. Staff. I love. It's a nighttime hosiery shop. Oh. Yeah. No, the hours are. The amazed will be like a warlock shoppe. What time do you open six PM? When do you close whenever it's sunny? That's a little weird. Like who? Well we gotta go in early to. Work. Really Open at four pm what Four PM. Good Lord that's very early. Quote a good old fashioned hair pulling face scratching broke out in the line shortly before midnight, the police had to swarm in and restore order. I love that it's a good old fashioned. Good old fashioned hair pulling scratch it woman, `bout. Might have been because someone who were trying to slip in closer to the front of the line where they'd get. Attacked the yelling between win and could be heard from blocks away. Pittsburgh press quote some of the language used would have shocked a Boston fish peddler. Well A couple things one to be fair. I don't think you're GONNA shock anyone in Boston too when you are talking like it's The Pittsburgh crowd potentially a little bit rar than some of your other. With the language you know. But I'm sure like the boss the. Men a gathered across the street and taunted the women and Women GonNa, you're not gonNA get any. Way. Too far back in the line. Yeah you're to need to keep painting your legs, ladies, yes you are yes, you are. The women's swore back at the man. One man decided to mess with the women and walked up on announced there were no more nylons, just three gauge Rayon and the women went. Women were furious raging and the police had to move in and convince them the man had nothing to do with the store ladies ladies ladies called down clogged out. All right says officer dougherty called down. Okay. That man. was just a man. Who was a Dick? They, still have pantyhose. The fact that you're waiting in this forty thousand person line still has logic to it. Yeah, he's just a regular deck is not a store deck. He's just a regular guy I. Don't know if you guys heard but those and even the police they worked for department and they're just try to pretend to keep you in line convincing you. There's more pantyhose. He's right. That's my boy. He's right. He speaks for DEPAN. As the women waited. Rain started pouring down but they still waiting in line. Sure. One woman told the reporter quote if a man tries to get in this line will kill him. Sure I don't think he's GonNa want to. What person who gets at the end of the line like I just got to get a scarf? Gosh I really pick the wrong pick the wrong day. A, seventy five year old woman made it to the front of the line and said quote, the girls in line will tell you my elbows are as sharp as ever. So they were just talking. I mean, literally, if you look at the pictures and you can find the pictures online, it's it's a mass of of just it's a massive crowd covering the entire sidewalk of just. Women it's crazy. I, mean there's some men in there, but it's it's insane. Pray. The store closed at midnight and the line was still full of thousands of women. Stretching blocks hey, maybe you should open at like. Ten The women left in tears there. May there might have been some violence if it hadn't started pouring right when the store closed. After the crowd dispersed a cop told a reporter quote I. Hope. I. Never See another woman. What this this? I mean, this man is not fit for duty. Tell you what I won't handle again as a woman I'm out what you the Pittsburgh press I am a gay gentleman. And I don't WanNa see anymore women I only want to see men I'm not a reporter. I should point that out. And I would like to kiss you. Okay Here we go. Right. That was good. Oh I have a pair of nylons which just take a leg. We put them over our heads. We pretend like it's a robbery and we do that at my house. Yeah Yeah Yeah Great Yeah absolutely right I just don't want the nylons to go to waste. No no I understand I understand, and you say, and you say this is a robbery and then we just take it from there. This is a robbery. Now. We'll do it the house when we get there. Okay Gotcha. Great. Great. I can't believe my one fetish came together so quickly. A big day I know I had one. So these sort of situations played out in other cities, windows broken in DC New York women were fighting Georgia for whatever reason was that Dave was. Did. They call the National Guard. They did. But for whatever reason, these recalled the mobs and riots and Oh right because men saw women not behaving exactly they wanted and. I. Say Right Right. I mean. All the Shit dudes have done, and then they see adventure women lining up trying to get an islands they're like. I told you we can't give them stuff look at them. Now, let's go to war over something inconsequential forever. But soon, supply caught up with demand and nylon stockings were the standard in women's hosiery up until nineteen fifty-nine when pantyhose arrived. Those all the way up all the way underwear Combo. Garter belts are gone by the nineteen eighties. Pantyhose were going out of style and by the nineties Sorta of going with the natural look in in two thousand six, The New York Times said the hosiery industry was quote an industry that lost its footing. So. Can we just second? Or can I JUST FATHOM How long it took I mean okay. Because initially women were not allowed to wear pants. You had to wear these like insane dress. So the lengths that. At to go through. Furrer women to be like I'll just have my legs and for us to be like, oh I. Guess. Yeah Pretty. Much. It was not saying it was not until the nineties. Maybe a little seventies but I think really the nineties that. Burma like all right. You cannot wear stuff covering your legs I guess yeah. Right. I suppose it's time to see your actual buddy. A Lot. What we know about Wallace carruthers work is around only because two women in the do par Dupont. A lot of what we know about walls cruthers work is around only because two women in the Dupont archives ignored instructions to destroy his documents in the nineteen sixties. I assume they wanted to do because of his mental health issues there have been you know everyone's got tons of ideas of why. Everytime someone's depressed or whatever they always want to. Come up the re. The blame it on the the the affair he had or. Too hard at Dupont or But he was obviously depressed. He was a kid and sometimes it's a chemical thing that you're born with. Passed down from generation generation. and. You know it's it's just a thing and when you when you. Assign it to something and you don't know the situation. You're just a fucking asshole like we don't know. It sounds like it was a condition and this guy would have been greatly helped by the drugs that we have now. I always that someone who is experiencing depression wants to hear your way to solve it. That's right. Always. Always have you have you have you thought about going outside and just looking at birds? You get married. So his daughter Jane. WHO was born after he died and. His mother has done the months right? His Mother did not tell her anything really about him. She found that the friends and but she had depression the growing up and for a long time and she's better now to to medication. But you know. The thing I would like to say about this is you know. If you're depressed, there's help and. Even though things seem dark it's always better to try to get that help and I know a lot of people don't want to take the drugs that are available but. My Wife. Psychiatrist away says. Well if you had a broken arm, would you just let the bone keep sticking out? Yes. You would want to put on a cast and so maybe just look at the medicine as a cast. To help you heal. With any with any thing mental. There's a resistance to taking drugs and understand. I get why people don't want to do it but yeah. But also I mean this time. Like I can't imagine I mean it just as a very, very tough time. It's very hard and I think everybody is experiencing some. For the most part anyone with like empathy or anything experiencing this but. Yeah I think like. Yeah I mean I can't imagine the struggle that some people go through very right. You should absolutely try to do something make a move in any direction to try to like shake something loose. Therapists right now seeing people online Yeah. So if you don't want to leave your house, that's something you can do. Crazy. It's just such a crazy story about nine one isn't it? Yeah just nuts that like. That's How? We've come to this point like when you think about when they first discovered plastic, they were like Oh my God a revolutionary. Material. and. Now it's like. Is there I mean? Scabby top five worse discoveries. In Our world I mean yeah. Over sure. which a lot of people have been asking. About the election and whatever look a lot of people don't want to vote for Biden in. Trump is a fascist so. Biden's not a great pick I prefer when people just be honest my preferred thing would be. Elect Biden and the first day of his the days and. The biggest protests in the history of America? Whatever you think. It comes on it it should come down to this cove Vida's here. Trump is trying to. Have heard immunity and he's GonNa kill. -ality he's GonNa kill a Shitload of fucking people and those paper of vulnerable people. Those people are largely. Minorities in America and they're old people and they're sick people. That's a Nazis, dream. So. So I would say you know both for Biden and. And then. and. Then fucking protested leading living shit out of the guy and make sure every person in this country who thinks he's an awesome awesome president. Knows that we don't have is back and we're going to make him or at least try to make him do the right thing it'd be doesn't we'll make life a living fucking hell because we don't have time anymore and we don't have time for climate change. We don't have time for anything and then well, the truth is we don't have time for Biden but we really don't have time for sure. We'd have time for trump and look. I. Don't like the fact that the Democrats have no plan for what trump does if he loses and that's that could be the greatest accelerate that ever happened in America but you know you gotta you. GotTa. I get people have a lot of problems with by and they're right. Not a lot of it but cova. WELL IS KILLING The weakest among us in the most vulnerable amongst us, and that's what you need to think about. And that's Biden does have a plan for it and I'm sorry but any. Any monster would have a plan for it. We just happen to have the fucking one monster that doesn't like it's What trump is doing is extraordinary. So. I even Biden even if you don't like him at his worst, he'll do a better job. Than I look. I. Mean I truly there. There's also there's nothing worse than when you're falling in line with the stupidity that has been the Democratic Party and the selection process and you're getting voters shamed still. The idea of I think everything you said is is right I mean I it's unfortunate that every election in my lifetime has been a choice between the lesser of two evils and that you are told that you cannot huge just half to fall line and do it, and then you do and you keep getting shittier choices every four years and and then the process it's become normal now voter shame people become normalized to say what are you stupid you like it's like this it's so ass backwards the way that it works now that you. You now have to have voters sell you on why not vote for the other politician that's just not a system that it's just not supposed to be that there's supposed to be somebody who makes you want to vote and we've completely lost sight of that and I think to your point like. Yeah it it's time for that to change and really there's only one. person you can actually probably changed that under because it's not total fascism. So all right. All Right Take Care Asshole you fuck off. Son of a bitch. Oh sorry. I didn't realize I was recording an ad. Hi, everybody this Gareth from the dollop I just wanted to let you know that tickets are now up for sale for my virtual standup show that will be doing Saturday October twenty, four, th at seven PM Pacific Time. That's right. I'll be doing stand up and I'll be hosting an after party where a certain cat named Jose may or may not be present depends on the alcohol anyway it'll be fun so you can go to rush ticks dot com that's rush ticks tick spelled X. Dot Com and get your tickets to see me Saturday October twenty, four, th, seven PM Pacific Time let's do this.

Wallace Hume carruthers Dave US America Joe Illinois Gareth Reynolds Dupont University of Illinois Dave Anthony Dupont professor Mack Weldon Depression Dupont macworld instructor Brooklyn
The Best Way to Learn Anything New & How to Deal With People You Cant Stand

Something You Should Know

44:36 min | 1 year ago

The Best Way to Learn Anything New & How to Deal With People You Cant Stand

"Today on something you should know that you know the wave you smell can make you appear thinner. I'll explain that then if if you wanna learn anything you have to understand the good and bad ways to learn a lot of people when they are learning something will tend to cram it. They will try to learn it in a short short period of time and we just know from countless studies that this is actually the worst thing you can do. If you want to remember things long-term. If you want actually remember things long term you want to space space out also today why the next time you get a cramp you should reach for a jar of pickles and how effectively deal with people you can't stand dan you know those whining negative people and the problem is that when people are being y near negative. They tend to go into generalizations. Everything's wrong. Nothing's right. It's always always that way but you can't problem solve a generalization so they're kind of stuck in their own quicksand all this today on something. You should know so listen to this. The average person spends eleven hours a year resetting passwords. Don't you hate that you know you know the password it and it doesn't work and so you have to reset it and then wait for the confirmation email. That sometimes doesn't come and well now. I'm going to let you know how it feels to never have to do that again and you can try it for free with dash lane. Dash line isn't just a password management app. It is the ferrari of password managers. That's what fast company says because dash lanes saves and auto fills in your log in information everywhere across your phone your computer your tablet on on any operating system. Dash lane is secure. It's easy. It is in fact password magic. I just bought some airline tickets online and went to go through the process process and poof dash lane filled in everything over eleven million people use dash lane including me. No more guessing passwords dash lane in has an exclusive offer for my listeners a free thirty day trial of dash lean premium to redeem go to dash lane dot com slash s. y. Wii s. k. If you have more than one password dash lane is a no brainer goto dash lane dot com and start your free thirty day trial right now fix your password problem once and for all and support this podcast at dash lane dot com slash s. y. S. k. fascinating intel the world's top experts and practical advice. You can use in your life today something giving you should now it. Mike carruthers hi welcome to something you should know and we dive right in today talking about your sense since of smell of your five senses. The sense of smell is unique. It's not talked about a lot for example. You may not know that everyone has as their own unique odor except for children of multiple births twins and triplets all smell alike women have a better sense of smell than men smell falls off dramatically for men after their mid fifties and for women it doesn't happen until their mid sixties in a recent study eddie men thought women wearing a citrus floral scent were twelve pounds lighter green apple and cucumber sense create create the impression of a larger space while the scent of roasted meat creates the impression of closer quarters recall can be enhanced danced if learning is done in the presence of an odor and then that same odor is present at the time of recollection. This is why some teachers burn chocolate. It's scented candles in their classroom and then again on mandatory national tests like the s._a._t.'s and your sense of taste is about seventy eighty five percent smell and that is something you should know everything. You know you had to learn some things you learn quickly other things. Take time some things you learn to remember sometimes. Not we all do our best. Is we go through life to learn things. But how often have you ever thought about how you learn things. What does it mean to learn something. What's the best route to get there. How how can you be a better learner scott young as a successful writer who decided to take a hard and careful look at how human beings learn and he's he's author of a book called ultra learning master hard skills outsmart the competition and accelerate your career a scott welcome to something you should know. Oh no it's great to be here. So there is different kinds of learning right you can learn to ride a bike or play the trumpet which is different than learning about history and mathematics will. We're talking about <hes> scientific definitions. I think learning if we were to look up a textbook would probably say something about changes in the brain that adapt our behaviour based on experience so that's pretty broad and includes a lot of things that maybe we don't even think of as learning for instance you know our habits are incense. It's a kind of learning it's a change behavior in response to things and so learning is really quite broad and that's what i'm talking about that. It's it's really goes well beyond that certain certain narrow definition of studying for school and so we think we know how to learn right. I mean most people don't stop and think well. What's the best way to learn this. We just just try to learn stuff so there's actually a lot of really good. Research shows that people are absolutely terrible learning obviously if we were terrible learning we we wouldn't be very successful as a species but that there are lots of little traps that we can fall into so one of my favorite ones has to do with what is known as retrieval and basically there's a lot of studies on this but one of my favorites is they took <hes> students and put them into different groups and ask them to use different methods to study one of them they asked to do repeated review meaning that you just look over the text over and over again and the others they asked to do free recall which means that you close the book and you try to write down on a piece of paper paper everything that you can remember and immediately after they did this. They asked them how well did. They think they learned the information and the reviewers were the people who thought they had learned at best. They said yup. I've got this whereas the free recall people. They thought oh man this is really hard. I'm not actually getting this but when they tested them it was actually the opposite that those who did free recall perform better so the idea of learning is full of these little traps where you can think you're learning something really well. You're thinking you're doing what works best for your memory and it's actually something different is to learn to remember is that what learning is if you when people say you need to learn this. What what does that mean did that you not. You must memorize it. You must understand it. What what does it mean tone. Learn it will memory is certainly a component of learning obviously if you don't remember remember literally anything than there. It's hard to say that much learning took place but i think it's also important to separate what we talk about with memory because again going with the studying analogy algae a lot of people think memory is just okay. If i say you know what is the capital of france and you think paris you're able to just sort of spit out that answer that that is essentially what memory is a memory is also a lot of other things. It seems like when you're riding a bicycle for instance. You're doing that because you have memory stored in your head about how to move your muscles muscles in order to control the bicycle as there's lots of different types of member and there's lots of different ways that we <hes> remember things and so this is again that the the essence of of learning is not just being able to spit out facts but being able to perform in situations based on having experiences with them while the concept of learning to ride a bike is interesting because everyone knows the saying. Oh it's just like riding a bike meaning once you know it you always know it but when i learn stuff to study for a history test just because i know it now doesn't mean i'll know it a year from now. Why is that so so there seems to be a couple of reasons behind this but one of them that has been hypothesized that there is actually a difference between what psychologists call declared of memory which is the kind that you you can actually put into words and procedural memory which is the kind of informally known as muscle memory or this sort of motor skills that you learn throughout your lifetime and it seems is to be that procedural memory is more durable than declarative memory and this can actually have interesting interactions so in one example often we will remember our pin code road by how are hand moves. Even if you had to write down. Let's say well. Maybe not the numbers but if it was a longer password i certainly remember it by how it feels on the keyboard unless by what the exact letters are and that can be because you've got this muscle memory procedural memory of moving your fingers to type in your password that is more durable bowl than the ability to recall it explicitly and it may be that they are based on slightly different memory systems in one of them just lasts longer than the other. What about people's ability ready to learn. Is it different or is it more in the skill and the approach that everybody can learn more or less the same if they do it correctly will so it's both there's definitely a lot of evidence that some people can learn better than others and some people can learn certain skills better than others and i don't think there's much use denying that but at the same in time there's also effective ways to learn things and ineffective ways to learn things and so a lot of what i try to talk about is what are the effective ways to learn things so i mentioned one of those principles already which is retrieval that if you get students and you just ask them what would they like to do when they study so this is another experiment that was done they will often if they don't feel feel very confident use that strategy of repeated review so they'll continually review the same information and if you force them on the other hand to say okay you're not allowed to do that. You have have to do free recall than they actually will. Score better on the test so free recall is better for all people than repeated review. Some people will do better later with both then with <hes> with the other so there are people who will learn faster than other people but definitely this difference in how they learn is also based on what kind of methods they're using and what what are those two methods you just mentioned will so that this is just one idea but this is the contrast between what is called review you and recall so review is when you know what you're talking about when you have your notebook and you flip through it and you just sorta read it again and again and again and this makes you more and more familiar failure with the information but it doesn't necessarily help you remember it for test whereas recall is when you close the book and you try to actually recall for memory what was in the notebook without looking at it right and that's a there's a big difference between the two and and yet you would think well maybe that works at that one works just as well as the other but not so definitely and again. It's it's one of these deceptive things because after you do the review students will say oh i learned the material quite well and this this is because we actually don't really know how much we've remembered and so we use these proxy signals are these sort of little approximations to what we expect to to have remembered and in this case it's how familiar does it feel how when i read it again and again and again it's feeling more and more familiar to me but this is actually slightly different and the ability to recall it without looking at it on the page so in other words you're practicing being able to recognize the right answer but not necessarily to produce the right answer and i mean this is just one of many many different examples of little ways we get misled in are studying and and learning habits what about when you're trying to learn something being like playing an instrument or riding a bike or it isn't what you're trying to think about learn and remember. It's more about doing again. There's a lot of interesting little tidbits on that. So one of them that i find really interesting is that it has been known for a long time by psychologists colleges that people have difficulty transferring so if you learn something in one context <hes> say in the classroom and then you try to apply it in another context say real life we often fail at that we often are not able to transfer those contexts so one of the best things that you can do when you're learning is to try to practice the thing that you actually want to get good at and a lot of people when they are learning a new skill like let's say speaking a language for instance they will be working on a little app and they will be playing around with the app and they never actually actually practice having conversations or they decide. They're going to wait until they get to the point where they're ready and just like the people who were doing the review versus the recall they will often take a lot longer longer to actually learn the information in a way that they can use it because they have difficulty transferring those skills so so take me through. I wanna learn to play the violent so hutton. I don't really but let's say i want to learn violin. So what's the best way to do that will so the starting point i would say is to practice playing the violin so this is i know sounds kind of obvious but for a lot of people they would maybe start with a book they would start with you know while i'm going to have to go through all of these theoretical exercises so the first place would be to practice the violin. The next step is what i call drilling and this is something that we're all familiar with but it's often something that we don't understand astound why we're doing it and so in this case you want to break down. What is the activity of playing the violin into components that you can practice and get good at separately so the expert violin players do something which is called deliberate practice and this is something where you are trying to work on the points that you find hardest not just playing the same tunes sounds that you feel most comfortable with over and over again and so this often means that if you're working on an entire piece you don't play the entire piece from start to finish but you focus on the few little tricky the elements that you were starting to mess up when you were actually playing it through. There's a concept. I've heard over and over again. This particularly applies to sports that if you want to be a better tennis player play with people better than you will absolutely because if we don't get that feedback that you you know our skills are not as good as they could be than they tend to just stay where they are so and indeed a lot of the research done by anders eriksson on <hes> deliver for practice shows these plateaus so that we get to a level where we feel comfortable playing games tennis and then we don't improve because our habits are little kind of micro decisions that we make while we're playing the game are good enough but there may not the best thing for sue and this can lead to this situation where we don't get better because in order to get better. We actually have to to get a little worse. I we have to practice on working on something as if you play with someone who's better than you than your old habits are not going to be good enough and you're gonna get pushed to go further other whereas if you just play with people where you're winning all the time you're not gonna have that same pressure to improve so when you play someone who is better and you don't necessarily know how how to play someone better because they're doing things you're not used to. They're they're running circles around you. How is it that people somehow raise their game without necessarily knowing how to raise their game just by playing someone better well. There's two things obviously having a coach helps because they can tell oh you what you're doing wrong and what you're making mistakes with but even just the idea of you learning on your own and getting feedback can be enormously valuable because very often what we're doing is we're making subtle little adjustments and so if we get some kind of negative feedback oh i missed that shot then you start trying different things you start okay well. Maybe i will try to do this next next time. I'll try to do that next time and i will try to adjust to it and you can learn through this sort of approach. Get better and find ways to compensate for those weaknesses but again like we were saying thank. If you're playing against someone where you always get their shots and you're always able to return it. You're not going to get better at the same pace we're talking about and learning about learning and we're learning about learning with scott young. He's author of the book ultra learning master hard skills outsmart the competition and accelerate your career. Something you should know is sponsored by a._d._t. When you need real protection for your home and family you want the experts eh a._d._t. When you hear those three letters a._d._t. You think rock-solid home security and with a._d._t. You get all the latest innovation in smart home security combined with twenty four seven monitoring from the most trusted name in home security in fact a._d._t.'s the number one run smart home security provider. They have a team of professionals that will design and install a secure smart home just for you with a._d._t. So you get everything from video. Doorbells indoor and outdoor cameras smart locks in lights all controlled from the a._d._t. App or the sound of your voice and everything is custom designed to fit your home and lifestyle. They even have safety on the go in the car or when the kids are at school with the a._d._t. A._d._t. Go app with an s._o._s. button when it comes to real protection you need a._d._t. So scott. Let's talk about the idea of a coach or a tutor in school anyway. Usually you get a tutor when you're like falling behind. Its you know if you're the top of the class. You often don't have a tutor but but but when you're the top athlete you often do have a coach so wh what's the role there well. I think coaches can often see your performance separately from you. So you have your own sense of how you're performing but you're always inside your own head and in particular they can offer another perspective active on what you're doing so i think a lot of that sort of what you talked about that. We tend to think of tutors and people who are helping you as something that's more remedial because you're not able able to learn it on your own but i think really people of all stripes would benefit from tutors and benefit from coaches because they can see what you're doing and say hey what if you tried it this way hey what if you did it that way and that's true even if you are better than the coach that you're working with because even if you are better overall there may still be little things that you're doing which are tripping up your performance that you can work on and they might be able to spot those so you don't have to be the best to be the coach. You just have to be abled. Coaching is itself a whole all other skill actually isn't it isn't just playing the game well. It's learning how to coach will definitely just just like being a teacher is not the same as being being a performer as well like you have to learn how to see someone else's performance and figure out okay what are some ways that it can be improved and that's again slightly different from actually doing those things yourself. What a what we know from the research about things that may be people believe help them learn that don't or aren't very effective well so we just talked about one right now. Which is the idea of of this review versus retrieval so that's a really common one that people will tend to focus on review review instead of doing retrieval another one has to do with spacing so this is another <hes> really useful result from the psychological literature that a lot of people people when they are learning something will tend to cram it. They will try to learn it in a short period of time and we just know from countless studies that this is actually the worst thing you can do. If you want to remember things long-term that if you want actually remember things long term you want to space it out see want to expose yourself to the information either by doing some kind of recall what were by doing some kind of practice on multiple different occasions and this is gonna make it a lot more durable so continuing our discussion of memory if you are able to practice something just once it's very easy to forget it but if you practice it multiple times spread out over a few days or weeks it will store in your brain much much longer so oh cramming cramming at the last minute doesn't work in the long term but does it work for the test tomorrow. It can work for the very short term. So if you do do this kind of what's called mass practice. You can get over a very short term learning goal but again this is sort of a constant problem for students because they cram for this exam then they forget everything and then when they start the next class builds on it. They're already behind so really what i recommend. Is that if you can develop some kind of spacing schedule so if u._k. You're studying unit one and you're going to practice it again another three times in the semester and you had that in your calendar sure you'll do a lot better than if you just try to review just the week before the exam because you will have built it into your long term memory and that's just a much more stable thing for going forward. What else what. What else do you find it. Either people don't know about how to learn better or people think helps the dozen. One of the ones that i thought was really interesting has to do with feedback because feedback is obviously very important for learning and in some skills it would be nearly impossible to learn without any kind of a feedback if we're talking about learning bicycle if you had no sense of whether you are setting operate on the bicycle it would be almost impossible to learn but interestingly a lot of the studies that were done on feedback show that feedback often has a negative effect so in a meta analysis. I believe that was done by abraham closure and angelo denise we see they found that something like thirty seven percent of the studies they looked at feedback was actually negative and this can sometimes be because feedback as a distraction. It's not actually helping pink but it can also be because the information and the feedback doesn't help you improve so we can all think about that time that a teacher told us that we were no good at something and i mean that was feedback to who didn't exactly motivate us and so one thing that students often will focus on teachers will focus on and coaches will focus on is praise and so if you praise someone and say oh you did a really good job that's great. <hes> dot often actually can have a negative impact as well that if the information being given isn't relevant to the task of his just saying you know you're so smart smart. You're so great then i can also have a demotivating effect and it can allow the person to not work as hard at improving so what does work what kind of feedback if any is better so the best kind of feedback that you can get is what i call corrective feedback which is where you not only are told what you're doing wrong but how you can fix it so this is. The kind often comes from coaching where they'll say oh. You're doing your tennis backhand like this. You should do it like that and thus you can correct it now. The challenge is that for a lot of domains. We don't actually have corrective the feedback. We just have feedback that says you know you're doing better or you're doing worse but you don't actually know what you need to do to fix it so the important thing to realize with feedback back i think is not so much okay well. We need to have corrective feedback because that's helpful but to recognize also when you can't have corrective feedback so if you are running a business for instance and and you release a product in your product absolutely flops. It's easy to say okay. I'm gonna talk to my customers and ask them what i should have done. Instead and i mean your customers can tell you whether or not they wanted to buy your product so that is kind of feedback but they probably can't tell you what you need to do to fix your product to make it better unless it's something really obvious because because they are not the product developers are just the customers and so it's important to also distinguish what kind of feedback you can get see you don't overreact to the feedback insert just implementing suggestions questions from people who don't actually know enough to give you the proper advice what about a learning with people not from people but you know i think the the beatles you know and and i don't think they had a whole lot if any formal musical education but boy when they came together and worked together something being very magical happened that probably might not have happened if the situation was different yeah so working in groups and i think think especially if picking environments where you can be exposed to people who can give you that kind of feedbacks really important so we all know that learning a language through immersion is much easier easier than learning it through a classroom for instance. If you're going to learn french and you live in france and you speak french every day that learning with other people is going to be a lot easier and more effective than and if you're just studying it from a textbook but this is also true of a lot of skills that we don't normally think of as learning through immersion so if you wanted to learn and academic skill for instance in grad school very often functions as this kind of environment where you're surrounded by people who are also smart and also researching this topic and you're having conversations about it constantly and you quickly pick up this sort of indirectly. What do people think is important. What do they think matters. What are the different effects. What are the different scientists going on. That would be actually quite difficult to just piece together. If you were only reading journal articles similarly if you want to be at the cutting edge in some kind of professional skill picking the right company or the right office to work for can also matter under because if you're again surrounded by those people who are doing cutting edge work like the beatles <hes> you're also going to naturally <hes> learn through watching other people and learn by kind of tacitly picking up the skills that they think matter great well. I think i've just learned more about how i learn than i've ever learned before my guest has been scott young and his book is called ultra learning master hard skills outsmart the competition and accelerate your career here. You will find a link to his book in the show notes. Thanks got really interesting. Well thank you so much. Mike curb appeal. You know what you see and with the homedepot today is the day for doing boost your curb appeal with the best brands at the best prices from new garage doors colorful flowers exterior lights to a new coat of paint inspiration to installation. You can do it or let the home depot do it for you. Visit homedepot dot com slash services for more information information on installing your next project more saving more doing u._s. Only see store for details. Capital one is building a better bank doc one that feels nothing like a typical bank. It's why they've reimagined banking and built something completely different capital one cafes they offer for checking accounts with no fees or minimums and savings accounts with one of the best savings rates in america. This is banking reimagined with your needs needs in mind open an account today at any capital one location or online and five minutes and experienced banking reimagined for yourself alf capital one. What's in your wallet capital one n._a. Member f._d._i._c. here is a universal experience that most of us have on a fairly frequent basis and that is having to deal with people who by all outward appearances. This is our idiots morons difficult. There are people you cannot stand. Wouldn't it be great to arm yourself with a little intel that would make it a a lot easier to interact with these people since they do show up sooner or later in your life well good news here to help as rick brinkman rick speaker and writer or who has developed some really keen insights into human behavior and he is the author of bestselling book called dealing with people. You can't stand how to bring out the best in people at their worst a rick. Let's pleasure to be here. Mike thanks for having me so generally. Why do you think people are difficult and and i suspect that we can all be difficult at times. Some people seem to make a career of it but but why do people become difficult well people get stressed out we all do and <hes> different things may stress it out differently and we found that there's ten behaviors that are stress responses. You know in the simplest thing. Some are more out there attacking when people attack you run over you or be a know it all others are more passive like <hes> somebody who's warnings kinda flopping around helpless but even more passive than that is people who say fine no nothing's wrong but you don't really know where they stand and you know it's it's not fine so everybody is potentially one of these people and we all have probably been that way absolutely and <hes> <hes> it depends on two factors our relationship at context who were you with and what's going on. I was interviewing a c._e._o. To do a program for her people will and she admitted to me that when she's a at work she's more likely in the control area the lens get it done. Make things happen. Things have to be under control if she gets a little you too stressed out. Control can easily manifest as what we call a tank where people all right let people here's what we need to do but then she says when she goes home she becomes a wigner to her husband about the problems at work. Her husband can't understand how does she possibly run a company. She's such a whiner but he doesn't get to see her in her other context and all or other relationships in her blazing tank laurie so you've mentioned a couple of them the wigner in the tank. Let's talk about these specific types. Can you walk us through them and and <hes> and perhaps the best way to deal with yes in what we call the lens of understanding their four quadrants and again. You're not strictly one thing and it's not personality typing. It's behavior savior because personality every behavior you have in every relationship in context so in the get it done area. The lens where people are being more controlling. You got your tank. You also have your sniper who has kind of covert control <hes> so they tried to cut you down in front appears very often with sniping or some kind of some suppressed anger girl resentment. Maybe you got the promotion they think they should have gotten or other people in general just angry and suppressed and so they snipe and then the third controlling behaviors no it all behavior. I know ninety nine percents. I'm happy to tell you how much over hours on end and you know maybe they do know ninety seven percent of a subject but let's remove only three parts on three percent of the parts in an airplane ready go for flight and this is the problem though it all behavior then you have an attention area of the lens where people need appreciation intention and that's where you're more likely legal. Tantrum tantrum is more rational than a tank attack attack attack. You know what's going on. You may disagree with what they're doing but you know what it's about and it makes accents to a degree whereas with a tantrum you know suddenly it's the proverbial straw that breaks camel's back here all this stuff that has nothing to do with circumstances which also get out of that ariza's a friendly sniper people who like you so. It's friendly teasing. It's friendly put down humor gossip not really intending to hurt people though it can have unwanted side effects and then the third behavior get <hes> and that area of the lens is your think they know it all where somebody has such a need for attention that they act like they know even when they don't moving over to another lens where we want to get it right and people get a little more perfectionist. That's where you get your whining winning negatively. Basically they see what could be as high standard perfection a look at what is what is does not measure what could be and then they feel helpless do anything about it and the problem is that when people are being y near negative. They tend to go into generalizations. Everything's wrong. Nothing's right. It's always that way but you can't problem solve the generalization so they're kind of stuck in their own their own quicksand what you'll also get added that get it right. Perfection is a nothing person fine. Do it your way. Don't come crying to me when it doesn't work out and that point on they say nothing but you also get nothing out of a different area lens where people want approval and they want to get along and they're concerned about relationship so that's kind of nothing is well. If you don't have something nice to say don't say it at all or or you get yes behavior where people really agreeable on the surface but you really don't know where they stand in relation to decisions you get maybe behavior. I'm sure we've all all told salesperson. I'll think about it. We really weren't planning on thinking about it but you didn't want to hurt the person's feelings and of course out of that area the lens. It's very easy for people people to become passive aggressive and so. How do we handle these people well. It depends what you on your dealing with. I mean let's say with somebody whining winning or negative. You have to break down there generalizations so you listen to them. They're going to go in an endless loop tape once they start to repeat something. They said you say excuse me for interrupting. Nothing i just wanna make sure i understand and you backtrack summarize everything they said and then you start asking questions to dig a little deeper now they won't answer. Your questions is right away. You'll say what's wrong. They'll say everything you say okay but what specifically all of it. When does it occur. It happens all the time but don't let that stop you. You wanna just if you stay with it. Even if your recycling questions you'll get them to be specific and once you're looking at specifics of say. What do you think we should do here and some people will immediately go well. I guess we should and they'll come up with something. Other people <hes> might say i don't know and what i found works great with. I don't know and take note. This is also your nothing person's first response on a talkative day. You say guests make something up. If you did know what would it be and then you give me an expectant looking expectant pause and it's amazing how nine out of ten people will go well. I guess and they bring in the makes total sense so clearly there are different ways to deal with different different types of difficult people but generally what's the goal here. I mean is it just it to deal with them to get it over with. Are you trying to get get them to change the way they see the world. I mean what what are we trying to do here. You're trying to get them out of that. What we call it the red zone <hes> the danger zone where they're in this difficult ogle behavior. You know somebody could be controlling. Let's say but they're still rational the bosses. I think we need to do this right away you yes that's true bus however we i have to handle analysts because it added on the bus goes okay. We'll handle it so that's that's. A person is still <hes> rational about it. We're trying to pull them back. In so with the somebody's buddies whining or negative we want him to pull them back in so they can start to think problem solve if somebody's being a know it all we're wanting to open their closed mind and consider other people's opinions and other other factors <hes> if somebody is you know being a tank extreme tank. We want to get them out of tank mode enough to have rational conversation. I mean i'll never forget this. One time. Amid a loss luggage claim in an airport in the guy in front of me is tagging the person counter as if she purposely mislabeled his bags incent them to el salvador of sun. She puts her down. She looks in the is she says sir sir sir. I get very inconvenient view and you think we're idiots. That's called backtracking when you say back with somebody says to you however they're only two people stand as counter who care about what happens your luggage and of those two people one one of them is quickly losing interest and he said what do you need to know now when she says to people stand at the counter what she is clarifying is the the intent. What's the intent of this interaction. His purpose is to get as bad bags back her purpose to get the bags back. We're on the same side your behaviors defeating our common purpose and he got it and see. There's a <hes> an advantage. You're dealing with people in tank mode. You can be really direct. You can be very blunt with them and and they don't really take that as rude because tank attack is not really ego motivated behavior. Now that doesn't mean the person doesn't have an ego. Everybody's got an ego like to have a liver but in this is context in this relationship egos not the big issue. The guy at the bank claim doesn't have a care in the world that i could be stand behind and thinking what a jerk he doesn't care what she she thinks so each of these behaviors you do have to approach in a a a different way but the overall is to think of it like it's a workout at the the gym in it's it's to your benefit to try to get a result these people and then continue to know what you want pay attention and be flexible but when is it better to maybe walk away and deal with these people at another time when they're not being this way oh absolutely that is definitely an option <hes> and sometimes. Let's say if we're at a meeting being an somebody's snipes me. I wouldn't want to ignore it because people can only pay attention to seven give or take two things at one time so wagner the sniping everybody. Everybody in the room is like two bits of attention on me. What's he gonna do next to bits of attention on the sniper. What will she say next. The rest of their attention is internal. What would i do and everybody's going hi. I'm not here right now but i'll get back to you. If you keep pretending we're meeting so i may want to handle it. Excuse me i heard you say <hes> that. I must be the twin. No one person could be that stupid. What's going on you innocently. Ask that'll get the sniper to back off but then after the meeting you may want to circle back around and in dig a little deeper and go what's going on between us. Is there some issue. If you can clear the air you clear the sniping so you don't always handle it totally in the moment it's happening. Sometimes there's a secondary step at a more appropriate time and place so you really you really have to choose your battles and also also you want to think more long term like <hes> usually with a tank. If you have one good interaction where you stand up to them. This is the proverbial high school bully stand up to and then becomes does your best friend. You tend to get a long term result with them. The no one knows the opposite though the know it all takes time they need to know first of all that you know how much they know oh and then they need to know that you understand relevant factors the important criteria and so if in the meeting let's say we get the know it all to feel like we understand that would happen by backtracking what they say so that no we heard them we would ideally right the relevant factors the criteria on a whiteboard or flip chart so they can and see the factors that we know to which then makes it easy and addition. Maybe we should consider this. We could add another factor to that chart and what happens if you do this over time the know it all starts to know first of all that you respect them and second of all you also understand the relevant factors that need to be attended to and so they elevate u._t. Equal you know it all status. It seems though that these are very deliberate strategies that are probably great to use but in the moment when you're confronted with jerkin really you just want to haul off and smack him. It's really hard to stop and think okay now. What type is he and what do i want to do. And how do i wanna get there. Which brings us to a very important internal strategy is that you want to prepay how you'd like to be with that person so let's say you know i. I've read the book understand. Dan what strategy has to happen with the the nodal then i want in my mind to imagine go back to that last meeting where they shut me down instead. I said this and i went walked over to the whiteboard. I wrote those things and then now. I imagine the beans can happen this friday imagined when they do that. Does what i'm gonna do again. This is called positive replay. Positive pre play play now. Take note that whenever we have an uncomfortable interaction with somebody. This is what we do but we do the negative oh. They said that they felt bad. They said that i felt i said i felt bad. Well well. You're creating association trigger. You know have you hear a song and it takes you back or you smell something and transported through time so an associations made by repetition shen and or intensity like if you get sick on a certain food is while before you wanna eat that food so really unless you take conscious control role of this process you are going to keep yourself stuck in the past every time you imagine it the way it was. It's more likely will repeat it. Every time you prepare yourself up in the future by thinking oh no what if it happens again you're going to repeat it but if you break that cycle which is first of all know what the strategy is and then imagine doing it every time you think of them. This is what i would have said. This is how i would have said is what i would have done next. This is what i'm going to do on friday before you know it like magic. You're keeping these people out of the danger zone. Well not only getting them out but even preventing it in the first place yeah and i would imagine that once you you deal with people in a certain way it's kind of a line line in the sand in the sense that they probably are less likely to jerky around the next time oh yeah because you're never really truly embarrassing in front of their appears appears you are. You are really helping them. The wigner feels helpless but if you can empower them to problem solve they're no longer miserable and helpless. Negativity negativity is the same thing. It's just a little further gone. It's kinda got all the arrogance of would also just by the dark side of the force or going to that nice area the lens you know oh you're approaching somebody into get along area would be like hey. How's it going. How's your weekend. How's the family you know. You're chatting friendly manner and then go listen. I want you to know that you know at that meeting. If there was something going on it's highly educated. Tell me i mean nothing says going to change how i feel about you. I feel like we have a good relationship and we're gonna feel closer to. It's okay to talk about it so with somebody there. You have to make it okay with them to share themselves and you may have to do it a few times once they do. The first thing you say when they stopped talking is thank you. You thank you so much. I reproach it. You tell me that thank you because what they're afraid of is losing approval and so you have an opportunity to prove to them that they could tell oh you anything and it's not going to have a consequence and that's what creates a long-term effect because they feel safe in your presence and perhaps you as if you do this fairly fairly consistently you you'd probably get the reputation of somebody not to mess around with because it doesn't work. That's true yeah i mean. Are you really going to get along with most people. The person who is most flexible <hes> will really survive and thrive in the world because the people can't get to them they and like anything you learn. I remember when i first learned to drive my mother sent me to store all the store but it was nighttime and it was raining and the world series was on and i sat and driver for out with the windshield wipers going and the game playing and i realized nope got to turn off the radio that was too much input now drive. I have one hundred miles. I don't even remember how i got there. You know there no dense on the car. It must have been okay like anything you learn. I you put a bunch of attention on it. It seems a little overwhelming but then it becomes automatic thing and the same is true with all these behaviors once you've got that strategy wired then you're going to be able to handle all kinds of people well as as i said earlier these people show up in your life sooner or later often sooner than later and it's good to have strategies to deal with them. Rick brinkmann's been my guest. His book is called dealing with people. You can't stand how to bring out the best in people at their worst. There's a link to his book in the show notes. Thanks all right. Thanks mike ever get a cramp really bad cramp. I've heard people say well. You should eat a banana or drink some gatorade and maybe that works but here's another idea reach for the pickle juice. It's been used in sports for decades in the study. At brigham young university put pickle juice to the test subjects exercise to the point of mild dehydration and then had cramps induced houston them those who drank pickle juice felt relief with an eighty five seconds almost twice as fast as water or other sports drinks researchers have yet to figure out exactly why pickle juice is so effective one theory is that pickle juice is a natural source of sodium and other electrolytes sodium is a component of sweat and the pickle juice helps replace what was lost and helps retain water in the body. Whatever the reason it seems to work. That's the podcast today. I'm mike carruthers. Thanks for listening to something you should know.

scott young Mike carruthers writer beatles eddie tennis france brigham young university france paris intel america a._d._t. Rick brinkmann gatorade ariza anders eriksson
My secret to staying focused under pressure | Russell Wilson

TED Talks Daily

12:26 min | 7 months ago

My secret to staying focused under pressure | Russell Wilson

"I'm Elise Hugh and you're listening to Ted Talks daily Today on the show. Russell Wilson I'm a big Fan. He's a super bowl winning quarterback of the Seattle seahawks and Wilson has more than just physical trainers. He has a mental conditioning coach from that coach and his own experiences. He has learned a turnaround negatively, and the difficult circumstances of his life to cultivate a calm mind uses what he calls neutral thinking, and he explains it in his Ted Twenty, twenty talk. It's a useful approach to overcome the pressures of painful times. There's another podcast. He might enjoy something. You should know with Mike Carruthers, sometimes all it takes is one little factor piece of wisdom to change your life forever in each episode Mike carruthers interviews experts in their field, bringing you fascinating information and advice that will help you get more out of life Mike also uncovers and share short engaging pieces of Intel to make your life better today, so look for the bright yellow light bulb to listen and subscribe to something. You should know wherever you get your podcasts. Hi! This is Adam grant hosted the Ted podcast work life. This year we worked with our sponsor better up to tell amazing stories from their workplace. Stay tuned for a story from Rachel about the surprising value of working with a coach. June eighth, two, thousand ten. Russell Wilson Fourth Round. Pick to the Colorado rockies baseball I'm fired up when the highest moments of my life every kid's dream to be drafted by Major League Baseball team June eighth, two thousand ten. June nine, two, thousand ten. The line goes flat. Dad passes away. Highest, the high the lowest of the low. Just, like that, my dad lane is deathbed, and just tears running down my face and you know what do i. do next you know in my mind. Racing Memories, flashbacks moments early mornings, getting up taking grounders in throwing speed outs and depot's routes to my brother and my dad. Too early morning car writes a baseball to my dad being the third base coach. Fast forward to the championship high of winning a super bowl, holding at the Lombardi trophy, and then motions and excitement of at all blue and green confetti all over the place, knowing that just won the super, Bowl. Two year later, the pressure of the game and the ball on the one yard line, and this is the chance to win the game and it doesn't work. In however many millions millions of people all over the world watching. And having to walk to the median, what do I say next? What do I do? What do I think? Being married a young age, and just out of college and everything else to shortly after marriage, not working out and realizing what life happens, life happens. Life happens to all of us lost family members, divorce, fear, pain, depression concerns worries. We think about being super positive. Yes, positive by nature positively. It doesn't always work because when you're down. Sixteen nothing NFC championship game. People are like Russ. We're not going to win this game and like you know it's. It's not a great situation right now. When you you're facing cancer when you have things, you have to deal with their finances and this and that like how do we deal with it? And it's hard to be positive in the midst of it all and what I definitely knew. This negativity works one hundred percent of the time negative he. He was going to get me nowhere. I started saying to myself new or his mercies every morning, new beginnings, new starts, and despite hardship and pain and worries, and wanted to get through wooden. How how do I do this I start thinking about a car? You drive a car and get stick shift, and you want to shift to neutral well you go from first year to second year way to fifth gotTa Know How to shift to neutral and needed to shift in neutral immediately before it crashed. Sitting there after the super. Bowl I had a decision to make. Why let this define my career wallet? Define my life, l., no, what have found out. Was this the mindset of the skill? It can't be taught and learned. I started ten years ago. Training my mind. This guy named Trevor Mohan mental conditioning coach and he's been with me for ten years, and we've been best friends and partners ever since and as athletes train the body, we train ourselves to be able to run faster and throw farther and jump higher. Do Different things. But why don't we train our mind what he wants your life to look like? You, talk about it, saying what's our language? What is our language? Look like watch. These highlights Russell when your best moments. What does that? What does that look like in be that? Live that sound like that. The best free throw is they. Don't worry about the shot. They just missed the. They think about this shot this this. Throw this first down. Then I met this kid Milton. Right nineteen years old. He had cancer three different times this day when I went to go. See Milton almost frustrated. Russ I'm done I don't WanNa. Do this anymore. It's my time to go. I said Milton I started telling the story about my dad and my. Son Why not you? Why not you graduate early. Why don't you play pro football pro baseball? Why not you? Why not you? Why not? You sit, Milton, why not you? If you try cell therapy? And you try this and it doesn't work. You won't remember so. Milton got a smile on his face and he said you know what you're exactly right. Yes, I do have cancer rough. But I can either let this kill me. Not just physically can also let it kill me emotionally and mentally, and I have a choice right now in the midst of the problem in the midst of the storm to decide to overcome. One of the questions I always get asked about neutral thinking is this. Does that mean I don't have any emotion. I always say absolutely not yeah. We have emotions. We have real life situations. We have things to deal with, but what you have to do is is to stay focused on the moment an to to not be super emotionally. It's okay to have emotions, but don't be emotional. When people look at me, they see that on the highest paid player in the NFL. They see that I have the girl in Sierra I had the family and this and that but I still have real life situations. We all do we all. Have you know sadness and loss in depression in worries in fear and then just get here. What's the truth and come through this better? And that's really kind of a my mind started. Shifting was not just on the on the success of at all or the failure of it. It was it was on the process like. What is the next step? How do I do this right here right now? We have a choice to make in life and for me when I was young, and I didn't have much I made a choice I made a choice that I was gonna believe that great things are GonNa. Happen that I was GONNA. Have my mindset right now is going to have the right language and the right things to think about which helped prepare me for today because I'm assuming I, just have ability to throw. Throw the ball a long way to run around and make some cool fun throws and and make some people smile, but the reality is that I still have pressure I still have worries I still have fears I still have things that happen. He's still have loss. positivity can be dangerous, but what always works as negatively and Never WanNa live in negativity so I stayed in neutral I kept my my shift in neutral and so that's where I lived. You know that's where I've been living ever since. When you consider completely different fields, it's really daunting to be a senior leader who can't told Lingo. That's Rachel Barton last year she landed a new job as director of technology at a bank. But! There was one problem. Didn't have much experience in technology. Her coworkers might as well have been speaking another language. Imposter Syndrome imposter syndrome. Belief you don't deserve your success survey. Suggest that more than half of people have Felton some days in in the depths of a hundred acronyms per mason. It was pretty tough. CNBC DI DI DI HPSM, idea, L. O. B. M. Q.. Whip T rex. Two months in Rachel was still having trouble while she had the leadership skills. Not Understanding the intricacies of the banks tech infrastructure was a real obstacle, but Rachel hesitated to ask for help because she didn't want her new colleagues to think she couldn't do her job. I was just completely beating myself up in my mind. I was worried that if I kinda showed my cars to say, here's what I think. I need to learn that I would have been on on the path our after a major data breach, Rachel had to meet with a senior technology executive to help triage the crisis. Oh, it's just nothing and scribbling away and then he kind of paused and. He said. You're not technology story on US NOT ACKNOWLEDGING I came here for business chain background, and he says well. He says you need to learn to be. Down Fast Rachel. Knew she had to make a change. She needed to boost her confidence and figure out how she was going to learn all this new material so quickly. Her company gave her access to better up a leading mobile coaching platform where professionals can tackle challenges at work with the help of expert coaches. She figured she'd give it a shot. Of course, be honest, was a little skeptical of coaching by virtual mean, but when Rachel met her better up coach Victoria on video chat, she was surprised at the outcome I remember my first session. 'cause I had an epiphany Victoria. Victoria sesame clearly if you've learned of three career. How going about lending now? I think it was those words and I went. Oh, I was just completely bouncing from thing to thing without actually having a plan, and that no even sat down and gone right Rachel. What do you actually need to learn hits? It's become comfortable with the Royal Victoria Ratio Plan actionable steps to build up her technology at work. She started reading books on cloud technology. She reached out to some co workers to get up to speed. She even signed up for coding class run by a colleague, so I went along to one of these one of the guys who was leading it says all Rachel. If you come to observe our session now I've learned how to Code, and he looked at me like a gun off his life, but your thyroid through Surely you can coat of light now. People are often afraid to admit gaps in their expertise. But there's evidence that seeking knowledge help and advice can actually signal confidence and a desire to learn. Those who use better up coaching reports, significant increases in confidence and resilience by working with Victoria to shift your mindset and build proactive habits. Rachel has overcome impostor syndrome. Coaching gave me the confidence to know that it's fine to not. Have to accept that. Some of these people have twenty years experience in doing this i. have absolutely no the now saying to the guys. Can you just summarize that for me and some needs to now? Bow ritualised successfully leading her team with a clear and compelling vision. And when it comes to tech, she starting to sound like a pro in the context of how we deliver work in our AV as we've now looked at this asp. Very shortly we will need to do a t rex. Out of never formula that sentence for you six months ago. I joined the Science Advisory Board at better up because coaches have been fundamental in helping me at every point in my career. I believe everyone should have a coach in their corner. If! You'd like to work with greater clarity, purpose and passion. You can get a free trial with better up at better up dot com slash work life. I'm Chris Anderson. Host of the Ted Interview podcast every week. We're conducting live interviews with people focused on how we dig ourselves out of this pendant crisis. Start rebuilding a better welt. You'll hear from people right at the frontlines of the pandemic people trying to figure out better ways that we can test and contact trace people working in finance and the economy to figure out the smart way where we can get back to work people who are involved in the sense, full vaccine and many many more. This is really important content for where we are right here right now, so do check out. The Ted Interview on Apple Costs spotify aware of unison.

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Special Presentation of Allure's Science of Beauty: Wrinkles

She Makes Money Moves

39:17 min | 2 months ago

Special Presentation of Allure's Science of Beauty: Wrinkles

"In this episode of lawers the scientific beauty podcast is brought to you by ole. What's brighter and more resilient you after a cup of coffee and your skin after using a laze luxuriance new. Brightening plus vitamin c hydrating moisturizer. The one that beautiful white jar fragrant tree formula visibly reduces dullness. Leaving refreshed glowing available at target Everyone welcome to the science of beauty. A new podcast from allure. I'm michelle lee. The editor in chief of allure and jenny by the executive director on this podcast. We're going to be exploring the science behind beauty and the products that we're always talking about and using allure and to start off the show today we're going to be doing a deep dive into the origin story of one particular product. One you've definitely heard of experience. That's why i had to talk to. my doctor. Talks cosmetic only one botox cosmetic escort by name so we are all familiar with botox and michelle. Let's just go there right away. Have you ever done botox move. Go in there. I have done botox I think the first time i did it was probably about five years ago and knocking ally. I was nervous. I remember saying to the dermatologist. Go light please. i don't look crazy. And so the doctor who i went to went very light and within a couple of days i just looked kind of fresher more awake And totally not frozen Okay jenny your turn. Have you done botox. i have i have. I did the cliche thing. I did botox for the first time a few weeks before my fortieth birthday and i did have a similar experience. You know i did it just in my forehead. Kind of softening Those horizontal lines. And yeah my four had just got very placid. Although now do look. I look back at those fortieth birthday pictures and my forehead was a little shiny. Maybe a little too much that first time but nobody noticed i was like as my husband can notice and notice well both taxes become such a part of our culture. It was injected over seven million times just last year. So it's easy to forget that he was originally derived from potentially deadly neuro toxin. That's right but had such an incredible story. How did this substance that was once tested as an agent of bacterial warfare become the genesis of innovation. That is now such a commonplace treatment for just making us look. More refreshed for ironing out are etched browse and our crinkly is. The answer is fascinating. And we're going to get it right from the source from the woman who i discovered. That botulinum neurotoxin type could be used to make wrinkles disappear. I'm gene carruthers. I'm an Plastic surgeon in vancouver canada. Which and i worked on this project with my husband. Dr allison end the project. She's talking about how she and her husband dermatologist. Alastair carruthers realize that botulinum might just be an incredible beauty tool and they set out to prove it. We figured who better than dr carothers to talk us through it. Blackhawks is approaching. Its made by an anaerobic bacteria. I'm co clustered in botulinum and what it does is that it goes into a nerve that supplies a muscle and stops the nerve being able to stimulate muscle so it weakens muscles. It was fished observed in vine spark in germany when they had a poisoning epidemic. And what was happening. People were dying of this mysterious paralytic disease from sausages that these people were eating and that's hard got the name botulism. Who's but tillis is lesson for sausage. And he in fact wanted to try it on himself and his friend said. Don't please don't do but that's how it got. Its reputation as a terrible poison because what it did historically over one hundred years ago in germany so it started out his paralyzing sausages. Yes should these people never knew that. Yeah they were eating. The sausage is they they were impoverished. After a war had gone through their area. High gene was more difficult than In peaceful times and this is what was happening and it was it was something that just sounds kerner. This fantastic medical examiner thought. Well maybe we could use it to treat things like saint vitus dance and other overactive muscle conditions. So there's the first connection really between things. Something is a poison and as a drive. And when were you first introduced to it while it was nineteen eighty two. I had the opportunity to go and work with allen. Scott in san francisco at the smith kettle. Wealth instituted on. Sean and talks and that summer was his idea to use to treat. People with misaligned is is turn in her out without surgery and so that was a revolutionary idea because people felt that surging. The safe and this was a poison. And so all i did was to use a. He didn't initial study on macarthur monkeys and he compared injections in the orbit mass the muscles of botulinum toxin and also cobra venom avon euro toxin and df p which is a nerve gas and those monkeys didn't make the botulinum treated monkeys a change in their position and belived of thinking. This is something we could do as a trial on. Humans who have serious problems with the is being misaligned and also a secondary problem with people who can't open their eyes and two days after you've been treated with botulinum toxin to relax those muscles you were able to open your eyes drive a car. Be a bus driver. Earn living abby independent again. It's a huge life change. So how and. When did you discover that. You could actually use the toxin to treat lines and wrinkles. Eighty seven is when we i used this product cosmetically and so What happened was one of my patients. My breakfast spasm. Patients got angry at me. Because i hadn't treated her between her brows and i apologize to buy. I would've cheated you there. Had i thought he was fascinating there and she said no every. I know i'm not standing there but every time you treat me there i get this beautiful untroubled expression. So this is the benefit of being married to a To a cosmetic dermatologist. Has he had expressed his frustration. About how difficult it was to get a nice smooth brow and get rid of lines with the currently available treatments which were collagen cybele and fat and so i went home and said you know i think my my botulinum toxin could be very helpful to your wrinkle patients and that's how we started undid our first study together so i've heard that your first patient was actually your receptionist. Is that right. She was hope. I what was her reaction like after you had injected her for the first time to try to smooth those lines. I think she really did it because she was trying to help us. I don't think she was bothered by her friend lines so she was very pleased because it did. It really did help how she looked during the day. But i think inside. It didn't really bother her so she was pleased but not ecstatic but we were ecstatic. 'cause we could see what this one shot. Let's just zoom out for a minute okay. Let's do it before we get back to dr carver's story about discovering and what it could do cosmetically. Let's explain what the toxin is and how it works so maybe one thing that not. Everyone knows about botox is that it is a brand name for. Its one brand name for a purified form of a drug. Called botulinum neurotoxin type. A it was the first in his class of drugs that was approved for cosmetic use and today. The word botox has really become like kleenex. Whatever tissue you're picking up you call it kleenex. And in this case people say botox demean any neuro toxin. That is used to smooth lines and wrinkles so in this episode. You will hear us say botox but we are actually talking about this. Whole class of neuro modulators. Right and in the case of the toxin botox the neuro modulator is blocking signals from nerves to the muscles that are responsible for wrinkles and there are now lots of brands out there. Like ziamon discord and the newest kid on the block is juve. Oh i love these names. I know sound so. It's a french and lovely useful. Okay back to dr carruthers. What does blocks to do to the skin. First of all it relaxes the muscles underneath the skin. So it stops the skin folding into those lines and wrinkles and secondly it has an effect on the sweat glands in the skin and it also has an effect on the oil glands in the skin you'll often notice that people who have been treated with near modulator. have beautiful texture smoother texture and more receptivity to their skin loses that dull. Look right now when you discovered what the toxin could do for lines and wrinkles. Did you guys just immediately run to the larger dermatologist community. With this great news and i would love to know how exactly you are received with the news that you had this toxin that you thought the public should inject in their foreheads. To look better. It took us quite a long time to get eighteen patients. In our first steady. I would be explaining to people how it would be helpful for their phone lines if they would have this treatment and they would say inevitably will. Isn't that a terrible poison So realized that the only way i would ever get any patients to do this is to do it to me. So i got alastair to inject me. And i had my pictures from before when people would say yes. But isn't that terrible question. I would say what do you think and show the mike and the pictures that i had the before pictures and they do it. You said you did the treatment on yourself back in the late. Eighty s kind of convincing other people to join the study. Have you continued. If you don't mind. My asking continued using talks over all these years. Of course yes. I haven't showing since nineteen eighty seven and you asked me to found out i can see. I kept from look very peaceful. And do you do the injections on yourself. Does your husband do them. What elster retired five years ago But he was doing my injections before and since he's retired. I've been doing my own. And how long does it usually take you on average for someone to see those lines really disappear. After they've gotten the injections it starts within twenty four hours and usually by forty eight hours and then the full effect is usually fact seven days after the injection and then gradually by about sixteen weeks. It says starting to wear off in the face but the The resting face is really active for a lot longer. Like a hundred and fifty days did it take a lot of time for people to really catch on or where people extremely extremely excited. And you just had like this deluge of people. Saying i want this. It took quite a long time and a lot of media. Initially was quite Surprised and listen. That people would dare. She used a poison as a treatment for something based saw so frivolous as wrinkles. But rico are not frivolous wrinkles are self esteem. Self esteem is what powers us through our days through our lives but we understand now that the drugs are drugs because we know the dose that we're using not a wheelbarrow full talks and we're putting in a very very tiny amount and so. I think that it's been around long enough that it's almost a generational drugs. So that baby boomers now see it as not something that's unusual. It's quite a quite an average thing to do. We've definitely heard of people in their twenties. Getting preventive botox. One is that true and to what's the science behind that is it that the muscles are relaxing and then therefore the wrinkles don't ever form or what's going on there. Yeah i think that there's A lot to this it comes under the heading pre juvenile. Which is this the ability to treat people before they get the signs of aging. I think a lot of people have realized that with near modulators you you actually can prevent those full tapping 'cause when you think about it. The muscles are like little irons in their folding. The skin again in a gain an already in those wrinkles so if you can prevent the muscles doing that so it in my practice over the years. I've seen certainly lots of of younger Younger women come in and then the next time they come in they bring their mother because they've gone home for dinner on sunday night and she says darling. What have you been doing and obviously today. The use of botox is pretty ubiquitous. How do you feel about use of botox today. Oh i think it's wonderful. Think that most of the people who are injecting bone talks are pretty well trained. I think that there are obviously people who can improve their technique. But i think there are still a lot of people who think about the kind of horrors of botox because we've seen it in some celebrities We all images on like the internet and videos of people who cannot move their faces because they're frozen How do you feel about taxes reputation. I think that people realize that it's important to go to somebody who knows what they're doing. I think you need to know the antecedents of the people who who are treating you and with that being said. I think it's the most remarkably safe and effective treatment around. But obviously there's always gonna be. Somebody tries to do something without knowing what they're doing and i think Point about you know about dosage. And and what you're actually dealing with here in terms of the toxin. I a couple years ago was lucky enough to get to go to the factory. Were both talks. Made in ireland in westport. Have you been there been there. Nate was amazing. But i learned so much one that one of the most fascinating things was that the source drug travels to ireland on a private plane with a full security detail from an undisclosed location in the us. This is a very dangerous substance but it only takes one gram of the purified toxin to make the entire world supply of oh talks for a year. Whoa Which i thought was fast. And so you have just the tiniest of the purified toxin is all the talks At all the dermatologist's office around the world for a year so that to me was kind of amazing is totally. I totally agree with you when you when you come cone down on. How much is actually in each vial. It's actually five grams. five billions of a gram is in each vial. Some people ask so how much is too much and nobody really knows that because we obviously would never do that. Study on humor and know there've been some studies about Talks and depression kinda looking at you know that feedback loop with your mind and when you can't frown when you can't make those lines. Does it actually lift your mood. He gets an interesting of research of. There's a lot of studies that show that there's are various depression scales news ericsson's in american dentist logic surgeon and the he showed me nine out of ten patients that there was tremendous in pre improvement in the mood. Just treating this area in the bella. Dr carruthers thank you so much. I feel like we've learned so much. Thank you dr. There was an honor. You changed our beauty lives. I know our listeners. Can't see what dr carver's looks like but i've just got to say she does look truly peaceful. She really does. Maybe we should all take a science of beauty field trip to vancouver to get treated by the doctor. Yes once canada's willing to let us and again okay well after the break. We'll be talking to a dermatologist. Who can tell us all about how she uses botox and all the other tools in our arsenal to deal with wrinkles. We'll be right back all right jenny. If you had to pick one skin-care ingredient to use for the rest of your life. What would it be choosing a favorite child but and have to go with vitamin c. It's a total powerhouse. What's your favorite. What he use it. I liked to apply overlays brightening and vitamin c serum. You can't miss that beautiful white bottle. In the islet target. The formula also has vitamins. B five and b three for lasting hydration and i know vitamin c. Smooths texture. Invisibly brightens skin ryan. And that's why it's my favorite child. I mean ingredient. We're back and here with the doctor. Who knows all about wrinkles. How they work where they come from what to do about them and why. There's also a lot to love about them. Hi i'm melissa. I am certified dermatologist and founder of on tier dermatology. Okay so we're gonna get straight into it. What are wrinkles. And where do they come from. So wrinkles are they can be creases or they could be old and ridges in the skin. So you know. People typically will think about wrinkles forming as we get older and that's usually from natural expressions or the skin getting thinner and less bouncy over time so we call that elastic and all of these changes. Make it so that. Your skin is unable to protect itself from damage. So if you think about it when you're young or you look at your baby's skin. The skin is so bouncy right you press on. It bounces right back. And that's because the skin has so much elasticity but as we get older. The skin loses that flexibility. So that's aging facial expression so that we can start developing when we're younger. So smiling frowning squinting this leads to development of fine lines and wrinkles at a young age and then as we get older. They can deepen so theoretically. Could you be like a really cranky young child and have wrinkles like have frown lines. Though you know the other thing i tell people is just like look like you probably as a baby always headlines lines around your mouth right. We call them laugh. Lines and getting rid of those completely is weird because it's normal to have lines increases even even babies and kiddos have them so you can absolutely get wrinkles when you're when you're young dehydration so a lot of people don't think about it and then i think when i say to its natural for a lot of listeners to think about body like internal dehydration what i'm really talking about is skin dehydration and lack of moisture or the disruption or the break of your skin barrier And some wish risings basic easy things If your skin is chronically dehydrated that can lead to wrinkles. I know that it's almost become cliche at this point. That people who have nice looking skin sometimes like oh. I a lot of water. Is it a balance of drinking water. Plus hydrating your skin from the outside to so in general. I only saw the bodies actually really smart and so when you're drinking water the body is actually going to use that water and shuttle it to unfortunately as a dermatologist. I say this but the more important organs. So it's gonna take it to the heart and the brain and your lungs. And even though the skin is the largest in our body most of the hydration in the moisture for our skin comes with topical but of course living a well balanced healthy diet and lifestyle which is drinking water having like a well-balanced mediterranean diet with lots of fruits and vegetables. These are all really important for your overall health and subsequently the skin we've tried to pretty much ban the water answer at a laura. It's not easy but sometimes you even have to ask like give me your best beauty tip and it cannot be about water so i'd like to ask for friend if jain and and alcohol consumption does that cause wrinkles to come on earlier. Deeper everything in moderation right. So we know that certain alcohols can have anti-oxidants repair tall with red wine That have anti oxidant capabilities but in general you should drink less alcohol rate so alcohol. We know dehydrates the body. You know people asked me. Like what should i eat to make sure that you know. I have the best possible. People are super into collagen supplements now But i always see like what we do know is that sugar and refined carbohydrates was eventually become sugar also accelerate skin aging as well and then we definitely have heard quite a lot about collagen supplements in many different forms. Put him in your drink. Maybe their gummy bears. What is your take on them. Are they doing anything. There was actually a huge study And you know a lot. There's there's not that many good diet studies with the skin because actually very hard to do a lot of diets that he's actually sponsored by companies like nestle because they have invested interested in that. So i always tell my patients listen. If you're super into supplements i'm not gonna say don't do it. There are things that you can do. That we know will help with the college in story. Protect your skin sunscreen every day. Protect your skin more than just from uv. Radiation use an antioxidant serum right because we now know that free radicals age the skin and it's generated by infrared radiation heats different environmental triggers like pollution. The current technology that we have for skin right now is antioxidant serum that you apply not ingest and then repair what we do know vitamin a derivatives holy grail. This is why we just say over and over again. Retinol retinoids the genetically modify your expression of college. What about gravity. I've noticed as i've aged sounds like you were talking about the lines around your mouth that you you know you might have even as a child and then as like a everything starts to fall feel like those lines get deeper but more just blaming gravity is that i mean gravity is part of it right so like gravity is true but what i was saying that expression lines right. They can start really early. That's not from gravity. That's that's from just repeated expression so then that gets into like. How do we categorize wrinkles. So we categorize wrinkles either static so not moving or dynamic so. I always compared like think about a sheet of paper if i keep on folding the paper over and over the full is going to get deeper and deeper in the crease will develop so dynamic. Wrinkles are repetitive facial. Movements that then result in wrinkles. So that's really what a neuro modulator. Like botox is treating now saccharin. Goals can also be due to gravity as women. We tend to think about losing bone so we're very conditioned to think about taking calcium and vitamin d for our bone health. But you're you're losing bone in your bones are getting smaller everywhere your skull your cheekbone your jaw line your nose but things are what creates structure and they hold everything up so our bones get smaller. We have fat pad and because of gravity. They start moving down so this fat pad rate here. That is right above my last line over time. It's gonna go down down down down down rate well. That's bad news. So i think you know this is a part of why we use fillers which is highly onic acid that we use as an injectable to soften sometimes a deeper line and 'specially you know these laugh lines is a lot of it has to do with the loss of your cheeks and your jawbone and that structure and support. So that's why we put a little bit of filler out here to kinda support that bone loss. And can we talk for a minute. Crow's-feet i feel like crows feet. They're having a moment. I think this this mass existence living in crows feet. I fe- so you realize when you can't see the bottom half of anyone's face how much we rely you know. The crow crows feet. Are the only way you can kind of know how someone's reacting to you if they're smiling is there leah like as yeah no totally because if they're like joy ring instead of sadness ring i think you know you know the question of like our wrinkles bad you know. There's obviously like a stigma right. That's why you know a lot. People feel like they want to treat their wrinkles. Because yeah there certain wrinkles on our face that will elicit like this this human kind of reaction of the oh that that person looks so sad or that person looks angry when like they don't feel that way and we know that has like rb afraid But on the other end resting on the other end some wrinkles like highlights sincerity And i think crows feet is one of them that is genuine expression and there's actually like people study the psychology of this. So there's like a type of smile that the psychologist will describe. It's non chan's like smile where it's perceived as a non genuine smile or a polite smile right ray. Just kind of smile with your teeth. Not showing the not activating that muscle here. So in general for my patients out tend to maintain crows feet Unless we want to open up the is in off in the crow's feet. But i i like to maintain that michelle member that story. We did liz. Seagull wrote it and was about crows feet and we looked at a study. Showed that deep. Crows feet are good predictors of lower divorce rates election victories. And how wealthy people think you are so these researchers had looked at like yearbook pictures politicians headshots dating profile photos. Anyway it was kind of a fascinating. You know it's interesting like you actually wanna maintain wrinkles for men and women because it is associated with wisdom and wealth and success. Yeah i am too. I feel like the thing i hear. The most is people saying they don't wanna look so tired. It's kind of like that really happy. Ground like there's like this spectrum of what people and depending on what society like you know where you are in the world will accept as as something that that we want. Men have a few advantages over women Especially for fine lines around the mouth and there was actually a study that looked at men's skin and not surprisingly men have a higher number of oil. Glands we call them cetaceous lands particularly around the mouth area. Less not surprising. They have beards so actually having more oil. Glands makes it so that your skin is thicker and then it's more resistant to movement So that's why men tend to develop goals Later than women. I know you said earlier. You know wrinkles or a sign of wisdom and they could be wonderful. But i think there's still a certainly a double standard about you know how many wrinkles are wonderful if you're a man versus a woman. Do you have a lot of men coming in for wrinkle treatments. I do but you know. I'm i'm a female dermatologist. So the majority of my patients are women. I would say about ten to fifteen percent of my injectable. Patients are men. And when you're using fillers to treat wrinkles so not not neuro modulators not talks fillers like hiraoka said. Is it mostly using them in like the cheek area to kind of lift that skin or or different things you're doing. Oh we we use it all over. You know i think there is now. There are new heireann acid that just came to market. But i think we're getting close to thirty different hyler on acid fillers that are fda approved in the us the hyrog- acids are linked together. How much lifting capability The filler has we use it in different ways. So the filler. That i may use to lift up a cheekbone or kind of sculpt a jal line is going to be different than i used to soften a laugh line To soften a tear trough to soften a wrinkle in between the brow. I mean you know. I always tell people it's like so nice to age now Because we have so much choice and we have you know so much technology that allows us to to to make these decisions with education. And with the partnership of your whoever you're seeing but is there anything else. Any other ingredients that you found personally are in your practice are really helpful. Like as a as a moisturizer. I know we talked about hydrating. Skin from the outside in your definitely like anti oxidants is huge. You know as germs will always like retinal retinol but there are alternatives to vitamin age. Erivatives that simulate collagen so the big one is peptides but peptides are kind of just like this umbrella term of like broken up protein and so there are different. Peptides that have been actually properly studied more so than others that stimulate collagen and there's certain brands that just focus on peptides because they can be finicky. Molecules can you. Can you tell us what what some of the most studied peptides are and or some of the brands that are really doing it. Right with peptides. So one of the leaders in terms of peptide medical grade skin care is a lasting Elastic skin care. Really that's all they focus on And they have created this very special Niche market of studying peptides and their products in the setting of procedures. That we do so laser. Resurfacing micro needling radiofrequency and hyler onic acid injectables So i really like lasted the other one. That's older is called revision. Revision was probably one of the first kind of kind of leaders when it came to peptides And then neo. Qaeda's is another one that has good peptides as well. I have a question asking. I is it. Is it overkill. If you're using all of them know what is what do you think. Germs are doing all right doctor levin. We have some listener questions. Now shoot them. I've noticed ring lake wrinkles on my neck. What can i do ring like wrinkles. I think a lot of people are noticing that would zoom So there's a couple of things that could be happening so actually a lot of people own naturally have these circular rings since they're very young and then as you get old your skin will get thinner and you'll notice more of those deepening lines so there are procedures that you can such. As skin tightening procedures you can do. Laser resurfacing micro needling I do a lot of bio stimulatory fillers in that area as well with hyper diluted was called brady assets an injectable filler. That stimulates your own body to make more collagen. Sometimes they'll actually thread very delicate. Onic acid filler. Along the wrinkle as well So there's many procedures that you can do the other cause of Banding around the neck is what's called petitional banding. So we have a muscle That starts kind of like in your mid lower fees and it helps all the way down to your collarbone and over time we strain and used that muscle more and more so if you go this a lot like e or you like pull that muscle we actually can use both talks or neuro modulator. to soften. so you're not banding so much. If i get filler and i don't care what are my options. So one thing is that filler. Doesn't last forever. It will naturally breakdown in your body but hydraulic acid. Fillers are the leader in fillers. For a reason. We have an enzyme that our body has but we have in an injectable form and that enzyme is called highly rana days. And that breaks down the filler. So let's say you don't it you want to soften it. It's still there after a year or two. Then we can actually use how the ron days breakdown. The hydroponic acid filler and it turns into water within twenty four to forty eight hours in my practice. More and more. I'm actually taking away filler. A lot To restore kind of the look at a lot of people want because they just kind of lost perspective too far. Yeah i mean. I think you see that i mean. I think that's kind of what's hurt. Our industry where you see you know work out there that looks abnormal and not what we want to look like and that hurts our industry And sometimes there's something called perception drift. You see something you see your face over and over and you get used to it. But it's really important to to have a relationship with your dermatologist or plastic surgeon. Who gives you this kind of like check like hey that looks good. We've be And i find that a lot of especially people that we see on media can can sometimes look a little bit in that makes people scared for good reason. Thank you so much doctor levin. That was so fun. thank you. you're welcome. This was really fun. All right jenny. We just heard all about what products doctor levin suggests. Let's talk about what we use for wrinkles. I use a retinoid almost every night. i've used prescription retinoids in the past right now amusing over the counter retinol and i've been alternating between Shawny darden in la aestheticians has A retina retinal reform. Which i really like and do not find irritating. And then every other night i will use Dr sobel dr howard sobel as a dermatologist new york city and he launched a line. Recently that includes a four point. Five percent Retinol still over the counter but a powerful over the counter. So i wanna use it. Every night i get to get a flaky so and do that one every other night. And then of course sunscreen. Sunscreen sunscreen our favorite. It's hard for me to separate. What used for wrinkles because they view my skin care routine as sort of holistic. And i use so many different things But i think if i had to really figure out what was making an impact I love s k. two's essences patera. it's obviously like a classic product. I feel like it's really plumping on my skin. That is a great first step. After cleansing i also for is use an ice serum as opposed to an ice cream during the day because ice creams make my makeup run. I love the one by M sixty one An also have stopped breastfeeding recently. So i i can start using retinal again which makes me very happy And i've been using the augustinas baiter the cream. Which has i believe. It's a retinal poverty in it Seven been using that one. And i just started a couple of days ago i am gonna be looking for like a stronger retinol pretty soon. You can have some of mine. I'll give you the doctor snowball. Four point five percent okay. Good i want to try that. One and of course retinol vitamin a derivatives and vitamins are actually what our next episode is about. We're gonna be talking all about vitamins. How to use them and what they're good for. I can't wait. It enjoyed the show. Make sure to rate and leave a review and subscribe to the podcast and helps new listeners. Find the show. You can find additional information and episode references in the show notes. Follow laura on instagram allure. And i'm out. Hey michelle lee and jenny is at j. by b. a. I l. l. y. On our audio team are lead producer. Karl green executive producer is share. Morris associate producer is cape michigan and sound. Engineer is scott somerville on the laura team. The editorial these are so you need nickel and diana zone lead. Researcher is julie. Orissa voodoo and project manager is monica. Perry the theme music is by oshawa. Yvonna bitch special. thanks to jewish and meow hub.

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AP Headline News Feb 05 2019 19:00 (EST)

AP Radio News

05:01 min | 2 years ago

AP Headline News Feb 05 2019 19:00 (EST)

"Space some regions are vast empty other areas we call closets. Fortunately, Kevin from the container store has answers. Right. Kevin. What gives you the power over space? I'd say alpha, customizable, closets with free, design and Elvis adjustable shelving and drawers, I can create space in any size closet. Kevin master of space and closets or just Kevin plus right now save thirty percent on elfin installation and earn up to five hundred dollars credit through February tenth at the container store where space comes from who wears music coming from you deserve a current account. That isn't all take take take. That's why lived we're doing thirty for thirty. Just open an easy to use current account with us launch thirty euro. And we'll give you another thirty euro for free to open a current account like Gibbs pumping to your local post office today or search on post current account, terms and conditions apply. Offer ends March thirty first two thousand nineteen see smart account dot ORG for details. On post is authorized by the minister for finance to provide payment services, and is regulated by the central Bank of ardent in the provision of such services. AP radio news. I'm Tim Maguire. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, says President Trump will call for cooperation in a state of the union address tonight is gonna lay out what have we have accomplished? He's had an incredible and historic first two years in office. You're going to hear him talk about that. You're also going to hear him talk about some of the achievements that we've already had in a bipartisan way like criminal Justice reform, and how if we work together we can do more of those things but the AP saga megani post. Congressional Democrats aren't in any mood to cooperate with Trump. Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer's not giving him the benefit the number one reason the state of the union has such woes is the president the president can say what he wants. We're not focused on. The president's rhetoric is usual boasts or bluster or blame the nights key visual is likely to be house speaker Nancy Pelosi looming over the president's shoulder before. Audience full of newly empowered Democrats. Saga megani? Washington. A former Kalamazoo Michigan. Uber driver who shot and killed six strangers inbetween rides in February twenty sixteen has been sentenced to life in prison without parole. Deanna Carruthers was one of the two people wounded by Jason Dalton. You failed. I'm standing here right here in your face a front of you. How does it make you feel look at me? How does it make you feel for women a man and a seventeen year old boy were killed? Dalton pleaded guilty last month, a Middletown New York fire Lieutenant is charged with being a major drug trafficker as a ringleader of a cocaine dealing motorcycle club and another operation the sold pills containing federal state police say Paul Smith is one of twenty nine people charged after morning rates today that netted some two hundred thousand in cash handguns cocaine and Fenton. Oh, this is AP radio news. A federal grand jury in Kentucky. Indicts of former armored truck driver on charges of stealing more than nine hundred thousand dollars from his truck last December. Investigators say twenty nine year old Mark Nicholas Espinosa fled from Louisville to Connecticut after the theft and was found in Connecticut with eight hundred fifty thousand dollars in cash on January thirtieth victory parades are becoming old hat in Boston. But as far as Lauren mills is concerned. Visit each Indians. You got to keep it up. The New England Patriots holding their six Super Bowl victory parade in recent history in Boston today. David Garcia says quarterback Tom Brady is the reason and is a legend. Eighty six. Shuts up everyone that they they has any Dow of him being the best episode. He has six now. The patriots beat the Los Angeles Rams thirteen to three in Sunday Super Bowl. I'm Tim Maguire EP rich space, some regions of fast and empty other areas. We call closets. Fortunately, Kevin from the container store has answers. Right. Kevin. What gives you the power over space? I'd say alpha, customizable, closets with free, design and Elvis adjustable shelving and drawers, I can create space in any size closet. Kevin master of space and closets or just Kevin plus right now save thirty percent on elfin installation and earn up to five hundred dollars in credit through February tenth at the container store where space comes from music coming from space. Some regions are fast in empty other areas. We call closets. Fortunately, Kevin from the container store has answers. Right. Kevin. What gives you the power over space? I'd say alpha, customizable, closets with free, design and Elvis adjustable shelving and drawers, I can create space in any size closet. Kevin. Master of space and closets or just Kevin plus right now, save thirty percent on elfin installation and earn up to five hundred dollars in credit through February tenth at the container store where space comes from music coming from.

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SYSK Choice: Stop Being So Busy & The Real Fountain of Youth

Something You Should Know

38:16 min | 1 year ago

SYSK Choice: Stop Being So Busy & The Real Fountain of Youth

"Today on something you should know what makes a person. Creepy will explore the characteristics of creepy nece. Also being busy everyone is so busy. How many times have you heard? Oh she's a very busy person in a way that's code for. She's important that impressive right. It seems like all the most impressive people in our world are busy busy busy but that is a big cultural lie. Plus most most cooks today know that if you cook with wine or alcohol. The alcohol Burns off accepted doesn't and it's important to understand. Why and wouldn't you love to find? Find the Fountain of Youth will one well respected. Doctor has in fact discovered it. The founder of youth is something I discovered last Fifteen years I've been in practice it turns out no one wants the bound view. Find Out why today on something you should know. Have you ever thought about being an AIRBNB host and turning your extra room into some extra income there are actually millions of airbnb hosts in over one hundred two thousand cities around the world. In fact I have a very good friend. WHO's been an AIRBNB host for a while now so Melissa? What's it like I love being an AIRBNB host? I I just got through my third summer. Which is the most fun time because people come from all over the US and from Europe Argentina? I guess the big question the people would have is what about the financial payoff here. Scrape money for me. I actually have my mortgage paid every month and when it's really busy. It's my mortgage all my utilities. So I'm living rent-free I imagine. There are some people who would be hesitant because of the idea of having strangers in their hole. I can't say that I've ever had the feeling of any kind of un-safety no matter. What kind of space you have you too can be a host Airbnb you can decide when and how often you WANNA host. So it's perfect for every schedule and lifestyle visit AIRBNB DOT com slash host post to learn more how to turn your extra space into extra cash. AIRBNB DOT com slash host somethingyoushouldknow fascinating Intel. The world's top experts and practical advice. You can use in your life today. Something he should. Now Mike carruthers others. Hello and welcome to our weekend episode. This week of something you should know and I want to start with something I think is really interesting and very appropriate as we head into the holiday season because it is this time of year when people start to do a lot of cooking and oftentimes holiday cooking involves alcohol. And I've always heard and I imagine you've heard this too that when you cook with alcohol alcohol it Burns off. I would guess that nine out of ten cooks if you ask them would say they believe that and yet it turns out to be false. It's in general. You would have to cook something for three hours to get rid of all the alcohol. Of course it depends on the food and the cooking method and Pan there are other factors but generally speaking alcohol does not disappear quickly in the cooking process. Many cookbooks say that when in cooking a sauce for example you simmered for twenty to thirty seconds to remove the alcohol but experiments show that it's just impossible couldn't possibly happen so when cooking for others remember the fact that some of the alcohol does remain could be a significant concern to recovering covering alcoholics parents of children and others who might have some ethical or religious reason to avoid alcohol and that is something you you should know. So let's talk about the problem of getting things done and multitasking. And being busy and I'm sure you can can relate to it on some level which is why I'm sure you're going to enjoy listening to my first guest today. Christine Carter Christine is a happiness expert at UC Berkeley. He's Greater Good Science Center. She's a speaker and a writer and a mother and like you. She's very very busy. Christine has a book out called the sweet spot pedophile your groove at home and at work and she believes this preoccupation. We have with always being busy trying to multitask all the time. It's taking a toll on all of us so Christine. What's what's the problem here? is you see what's what's so bad about being busy. That problem is is that we are so busy busy busy all the time and that we see that business overwhelm as a sign that we are on our on the road to success. We see business as a marker of significance. And it's not it's not. It's actually a sign that we are not fulfilling are potential dizziness closely resembles what researchers call cognitive overload in our brain that cognitive overload makes us less if decisive. It hinders our ability to think clearly to plan to organize ourselves to resist temptation to remember social information then like are. The name of our boss's daughter are daughters boss. It it hinders our ability to control our emotions really and makes it harder or to do all the things that we want to do. Well who knew that I thought being busy just meant you were busy than that. Maybe you didn't have time for things but who knew it had all these other side Defects yeah absolutely does and you know when we say oh you know. She's just really busy in a way. That's code for she's important important. That's impressive right. It seems like all the most impressive people in our world are busy busy busy and pressed for time but that is is a is a big cultural lie and when we dial back those feelings of overwhelm and business using sort of really strategic tactics. Ex- We can do this. We actually can accomplish more. So how did I get so busy being busy. Well you live in this culture which values in in prizes dizziness and is is throwing data. Act You all the time you have. You have unlimited opportunities to be busy all the time because even even if you're just standing in a line you can be busy checking your email or checking your social media feed or reading an interesting Article So you know there there. We live in a culture that says more is better especially more information more stuff more things to do and And so we we all end up here at one time or another. The trick is understanding that this is causing us to enjoy our lives less and also from accomplishing as much as we can when we are operating in our sweet spot so what is operating in the sweet spot. Look like if I'm not cut super busy. I think people have the tendency to think well. If you're not busy you're bored. Yeah or you're lazy or you must not be very important so operating in our sweet sweet spot. Is that place of maximum impact where we have our greatest powers where we're living our greatest strengths but also there. It's the least resistance right. The sweet spot in sports is that place where the bat doesn't break right or it doesn't move there's no impact On the athletes shoulder for example. So knowing that it's your greatest power but also the least tension the least stress because that tension and stress hinders. Our performance hinders our power. So the great news is that we can grow our sweet spots we can live our lives from our sweet spot both at home and at work we just need to dial up the the ease element of things and also increase our art power or love that I want to dial up the ease element and so but where do you even begin if you're one of those people who so super busy you don't don't even have time to barely have time to listen to this interview. I mean we're how do you even start to get off that. Merry go round the the business treadmill ever get out of the rat race K.. The first place to step is to start stinks single tasking so when we get really busy a lot of times we feel compelled L. to multitask and and a lot of times. We actually really pride ourselves on our multitasking ability. So the first step is to realize that when you're multitasking Jose tasking. You're much less efficient than if you were single tasking and you're increasing the strain and stress on your brain and sometimes even your body so so doing allowing yourself to focus singularly on one thing at a time without having your phone on without getting you know message alerts without checking in your email at the same time let yourself do with most powerful work by focusing on one thing at a time. You're going to complete each of those tasks much faster so actually actually be at work for less time at while. Still checking all the same things off your list but you're also going to do those tasks better there you're gonNA be. LS error-prone in In your work but if I am to do everything one at a time what if I I find that then. I don't have time for everything but you won't though this is. This is part of that myth. So yes the first time you you do this. It's GonNa be a leap of faith because we've all been taught that multitasking is the only way to get things done because it's more efficient but what research shows is is that it's actually considerably less efficient. We're not actually doing two things or three things at once. Our brain is switching back and forth really rapidly league between those different tasks and we lose time in that switching back and forth and become more error prone so not only does it. It take a lot more time to correct mistakes. We might make well multitasking it takes more time in general so you you just have to try it out one thing at a time. Move from one task. Start all the way to finish then go to the next thing. Start all the way to finish. And don't interrupt yourself during that with by just taking a quick little glance at your email or you know actually turn your phone off so that you can. You truly can focus well. It seems like from what you're saying. Is that that if you do that and you do the things well that you do that you decide tried to do that. That the superfluous will kind of fall away on. Its Own. What falls away is that is the tension that comes and and the ear it ability that comes from trying to do to operate in a way that your brain just really wasn't designed to operate we were not designed designed to multitask? Our brain was designed to be most powerful when we're doing one thing at a time so it's like switching from a tractor engine to a Ferrari Ferrari engine. It's it's unbelievably rewarding to work this way and you say that that I'll get more done. I promise you so you will actually be able to get more done. It's not about become doing less. I'll tell you you know. I was in a position in my life where I'm kind of a a recovering perfectionist. overachiever and I was. You know I had this great career. That was very successful. I loved it I did not want to give any part of it up. I had children. I love my family. I've ridden parenting book and didn't want to be less of a parent right. Everything in my life was really hard one. I DID NOT WANNA give anything but I was exhausted. I was busy. I was overwhelmed that with multitasking. All the time and I it really took a toll on my health. I was so exhausted. All the time and I had chronic STREP infections. I landed one day in the hospital with a kidney infection of all things and I realized that if I didn't WanNa give anything up I needed to learn to do things differently and so this is why I wrote this book. This is the sort of my recipe book for living within your sweet spot so that you can have it all so that you don't have to give up the things that you love. It's about learning to be more powerful and more efficient in the things that you do do well since you brought up parenting. I think that's really good. Example of if you've got three kids and they all want you now. How do you do that one at a time? Well if you you know you've just you've just said it so when you can group and activity into you know into one one actual activity activity from your brains point of view. That will work right so I have four kids. We eat dinner altogether for example right. That's one activity. I'm doing with them all. It is also so really important for me to remember that if I'm helping one kid with their homework that it's very hard for me to do another cognitive initiative task. I can't really helping to kids with their homework at the same time or reading a recipe. For what I need to Cook for dinner at the same time. I'm helping somebody with homework. I can do however. Here's a great caveat. I can do I can multitask if they're not too intellectual tasks at the same time so I just don't want my brain to be switching back and forth between two cognitive tasks so I have found. I'm I can fold laundry for example at the same time. I'm helping one kid with their homework because I don't have to pay attention really when I'm folding laundry. I'm not very good at folding laundry but I don't really care about it either right so errors don't it doesn't really matter. I can focus all of my attention on that one child. You know a lot of times people. When they're really really busy? They get less done because the they they spent a Lotta time worrying about all the things they have to do as opposed to doing it. They're stressed out rather than productive. How do you how do you switch from from one to the other you know? It's that's super common and and it's just this horrible snowball effect right. You're you have so much to do that. You feel feel stress and the more stress you are the less productive and efficient and effective that you are at that so it's stopping that snowball from rolling down the hill. One quick tip for how to do. This is when you make your task list. You're likely to feel really overwhelmed by it. If you don't tell your unconscious brain when you were going they do things so if you make a big long list of things that you have to do but your brain does not know. When you're you're planning on doing those things it will keep reminding you? It will wake you leaped in the middle of the night and tell you what it is you need to do. And it's not actually trying to remind you to do it or to help you complete it and none of those intrusive. Russa thoughts are helpful at all. Especially if you've got it written down on a list it's just basically asking you. What are you going to do this? When are you going to do this? When are you going to do this? And as soon as you say I'm GonNa do do that Thursday lunchtime. Your brain will quiet and those feelings of overwhelm will start to die down. So if you're feeling stressed out make a list and then tell your brain when you will do. It actually plotted out on your calendar. I love that. That's a great idea last Last question and just any other like really clever tips like that kind of wet people's appetite and kick start this process. That could get them going. Yes you know. The book is loaded with really quick and easy things that you can do that. We'll dial back overwhelm. One of my favorite things to do is to think about social connections any sort of social social connection is going to be a real force for power and also create easing our nervous system. It's just how we're built so smile at the Barista. The next time that you're rushing shing in to get yourself a cup of coffee to keep yourself going in the afternoon. Slow down enough to make eye contact at the Barista. How they're doing Chit Chat with somebody the in line any sort of social connection like that where you're smiling is basically helping your body reset itself from stress S. those social connections have tremendous power? It's magic to our nervous system. I always enjoy talking to you. Christine you always. You always kind of put Oughta fresh light on everything so I appreciate your time. Christine Carter is author of the book. The sweet spot how to find your groove at home and at work. There's a link to a her book on Amazon Dot Com. You can find the link on the show notes page for this episode of the podcast. Thanks Christine L.. Thank you lots of fun and good luck with a book. Thanks Kris Jenner. Thank you you know. People are often surprised when they hear statistics about home burglary for instance that only about ten percent of break ins is our planned beforehand. The rest of time it spur of the moment crimes of opportunity and most break INS happen in the middle of the day. When you're likely not home yet given that only one in five homes has home security and maybe that's because most companies really don't make it very easy? There are different plans at different prices. They can all add up to be pretty expensive in confusing. which is why simply safe is my top choice simply safe protects your whole home every window? Oh Room and door with twenty four seven monitoring for just a fraction of the cost. There's no contract no hidden fees no fine print. It's designed to blend right right into your home. There's no wires and no drilling and it's easy to order. An easy to set up takes about an hour and their prices are always fair and honest around round the clock monitoring is just fifteen dollars a month visit simplisafe dot com slash something and you'll get free shipping and a sixty day risk-free trial while you've got nothing to lose. Go now and be sure you go to simplisafe dot com slash. Something so they know this podcast sent you that simplisafe it dot com slash something this year. The Home Depot can help bring the holidays home for free with free delivery on online awed decor like artificial Christmas trees big small white lights or multicolored one hundred and forty varieties. Pick one out. We'll deliver it over over the river through the woods right to your door for free free delivery on online holiday decor only at the Home Depot. More saving more doing. US only see store for details staying healthy. It involves a lot of things and you're about to find find out some of the most important things for living a long and healthy and active life things both to do and some things not to do from Dr Davis Slew who is a board certified family physician and author of the book the thrifty patient so doctor. Let's begin with what I think is one of the cornerstones stones for many people when it comes to their healthcare and that is the annual physical exam which new believe is not necessary but the recommendation for a yearly. Physical goes back way back. I mean decades I. It's kind of like senior dentist every six months and I asked him. I think that's been hundreds of years. I at least one hundred years at least for dentists and they just because it seems like a reasonable thing who would question that and yet you say that that perhaps that's not necessary. Yes at least for the last few decades Recent article as recent as two thousand seven hundred this two thousand two said that. There's no medical evidence that saves lives and it makes makes sense We don't bring our car in just because we want to bring it in and get a checkup. So why would they checkup. Just out of the blue make any sense either and yet insurance earns companies still will pay for your you know your one free annual physical. I think it's benefit And if you can use it you should only use is it However a lot of evidence of one in twelve visits turns out are for physicals? And frankly there's no proof that save lives and whether it's worth your time or money I guess it's just people think well if there's something early you'll catch it you'll find it early on in a physical that if we wait till L. Symptom show up that then it might be too late. Yeah so I think the difference is what times might you seek to get a physical and so certainly in places like Ontario Canada. They've actually gotten rid of the physical but for people between eighteen and sixty four. What they offer it's called a personalized interview and they. Let's see what risk factors your at with things you're at risk for and should bring you in for a physical so absolutely true. Maybe not annual physical being mindful of certain milestones stones. Your life might be important to see a doctor things like what your age I think. Certainly at age twenty one Forty fifty sixty five important screening test. Come do at that point point if you have no family history of any illnesses then you don't need to see anyone sooner but if you have Those age points. You should be able to see a doctor then but otherwise if you feel okay you should just leave it alone and just not worry about general if you have no family history of diabetes heart disease you don't take classroom medicines for anything The keys are number one on your birthday. Check your blood pressure and your body. Mass Index makes you. Those numbers are normal. Check a website called Health Finder Dot Gov. I see what you're doing for. But in general eating healthy maintain a healthy weight and exercise are really critical staying healthy. So yes. If you're otherwise healthy and well you may not need annual physical physical. Do you find though as a practicing physician that people may not be leading such a healthy life and they come to you. May maybe fix that with a pill absolutely true Enforcing if they come to my practice. It'll be disappointed because they'll talk about the unsexy things of moving ten thousand thousands steps per day. I'm removing Lee eliminating a soda a day Because there are no quick fixes despite all the hype it really is as boring as eating less than moving living more and that's been shown to actually increase lifespan by quite a few years. Just those simple things simple things like five servings of fruits and vegetables so both don't smoke if you drink in moderation and exercise at least thirty minutes a day sounds sounds not to be very earth shattering but turns out. They've done some research. Searching people extend their lives by a few years. It is discouraging. Though when you hear about people or you know people who seem to be leading a fairly healthy lifestyle gal and yet at an early age they get cancer or something happens and they die at a fairly young age yes that's true. So we as his doctors have things we can do. Hence the importance of certain ages. You should see a doctor age. Twenty one to screen for Several cancer for women each forty cholesterol and blood sugar screening for both men and women age fifty for both men women for colon cancer screening. And then he's sixty five osteoperosis for women and and those age was ages. You probably should see a doctor for a physical and to see what things you need to be screened at at based on your risk factor. That plan your doctor may wanted to see every year at that point but prior tired of those ages particularly under age forty. Most of us don't eat physicals but certainly ages forty fifty and sixty five. We must check in with the doctor when I go to to the doctor for a physical. It doesn't seem to be as as a thorough or intense as I remember physicals when I was a kid you know it turns out a lot of physicals back when I was growing up to. We did a lot of tests. We did chest XRAYS for smokers. We did urine tests and it pans of the last probably twenty years or so a lot of these tests. We did thinking we were doing. Something actually had no value scientifically so a lot of those things aren't necessary anymore so a lot of it is asking patients during fiscal while your risk factors for certain illnesses and cancers might be taking a look at your blood pressure number one cause of death is heart disease. That's the silent killer and check your body mass index so most of my time if patients see me for physical remind them and get the important screening tests done for cancer. Get some blood work if they need it. And more importantly a big discussion about lifestyle changes maintain a healthy weight and eating healthy isn't though a lot of the reason that people go to the doctor. Sure when they're not sick is to be reassured that they're not sick absolutely and I think for those patients who absolutely feel that a annual fiscal helps them stay. Motivated helps them stay focused on what they need to do to stay healthy and well for another year. I think that's an absolutely great thing to do. And and certainly I welcome it however for those of us who think there's medical evidence that it's as live. Their answer is no that caveat is one eight tell all my patients is on your birthday. Check to see if you're that year they need to see Dr as at twenty one forty fifty or sixty five and those who Have a family history of diseases or not. Sure about. They'll talk to your doctor and see a A. Do you need to be tested. And Be Hoffman with your doctor to check on you. It seems like I guess. People think that if they if they're doing something then they're actually doing something. Yes I think they key about annual physicals is if you feel like you're actively doing something to see a doctor make sure you're gonNA evaluation kind of your overall health status. I think it's a wonderful thing and from patients who actually find that helps them stay motivated for the following year. Please continue for those who just wonder the minimum. Oh I'd say on your birthday check your blood pressure. Checked by mass index. Ask yourself getting enough fruits and veggies. You know five servings a day typically and moderate exercise thirty minutes a day can be broken broken up throughout the day and if you maintain a body mass next under thirty which is under obesity. I think that's a great start. I'm speaking with Dr Davis Lou. He is a family physician and author of the book. The thrifty patient with the capital. One saver card you can earn four percent cashback on dining earning an entertainment that means four percent on checking out that new French restaurant and four percent on bowling. With your friends. You'll also earn two percent cash rush back at grocery stores and one percent on all other purchases. Now when you go out you cash in. What's in your wallet? Credit approval level required capital one bank. Na macy's Veterans Day sale has our lowest prices of the season on furniture with cooler temperatures. Here's here you can stay cozy and update your home for holiday guests. The Joe Lean two piece sectional created for macy's seeds crowd for just nine hundred ninety. Nine dollars keep your bedroom germ clutter free with the TRIBECA. Queen Storage Bet. Only four hundred eighty nine dollars and get our lowest prices of the season on mattresses plus great Sealy closeouts Shop Kevin Sort at macys DOT COM or call. Eight hundred five. Maybe so Dr Lu when people get sick as they age when they get get diagnosed with something terrible like cancer or serious heart disease or diabetes. Something would a trip to the doctor earlier. Maybe have have caught it sooner or if there are no symptoms you are unlikely to catch it either. Great question so for illnesses like diabetes which are becoming more common as we get older facts one. In four adults over age sixty five it turns out having been overweight or obese body messing over thirty it can get caught sooner. So there's some things you can be done sooner for certain cancers like colon cancer breast cancer cervical cancer. Their test. We can do so. I encourage encourage patients to be screened at age. Forty and fifty for those But unfortunately turns out some cancers. There is no test for and there's no way the doctor would have picked it up that being said if you ever have symptoms of anything Don't don't let it wait too long. Usually if things improve within two to three weeks if things don't seem to be improving took a doctor and see what they may have to come up with. So what. What's the difference between the normal aches and pains of life and maybe getting older versus something? It's really worth going to see the doctor for great question so symptoms that don't make sense one of the biggest worries. I have when I talked to. Patients is when I see how you've been they say great. I've asked him. Have you lost weight. They go yes I have I say. How did you do that? They go. I don't know so any unexplained symptoms that don't make sense like weight loss. Unexplained would be one thing in terms of joint pains arthritis pain things like that. In general typical aches and pains. We get as we get older. Our Joey get better in the morning we get up. Even a little stiffness for the first hour as warm but by the end of the day. It's get- getting better and by nighttime they kind of can get it worse but then when you go to bed and get next morning it gets better so join paints tend to get worse as the day goes on but then better with rest. Joey more aches and pains. We get as we get older things that might be. More worrisome is joint pains the how with fever weight loss or swelling that seems continuous. Not Improving on its own when you talk To patients about leading a healthy life. And all how. How big a factor? Because we here it's a big factor. How big a factor do you see stress as being I think stress stress can be healthy? And when it's perceived the correct way Stress we all need a little bit of stress in our lives. It just becomes when it's not in balance with the rest of our lives and and when we find him balanced with stress it turns out we have different habits. Most of US respond in three different ways with stress. We have emotional changes behavioral changes changes or a physical changes Giving example one of the things that I can do actually is for behavioral changes when people drink more or they smoke more or they avoid exercise because they don't have time so that's one example of how stress can impact our lives because it changes the behavior so stress can play a role by. I've seen plenty of people also cope with stress and makes them be better. The question is how do we balance stress alive and do that in a healthy way. What are the things that if if if you could scream them from the mountaintop that you wish people would do well you and I were talking the other day about how you know the the Fountain of Youth and you said well? I'll let you repeat what you said. Well the founder of youth is something I've I've discovered last You know fifteen years. I've been in practice. It turns out. No one wants the Fountain of Youth because because it's incredibly hard. It is a magic pill everyone asks me for its exercise and turns out. I've got patience in their eighties. Who Do fabulous in fact? They're they're playing golf people in their sixties because when can keep up with them and beating them so they're real inspiration to me. I've got a paratrooper in world war. Two he's in his nineties now. He walked six miles a day and does easily one hundred push ups a day easily. Beats his doctor on on on a on a push up so these are my inspiration and it it turns out that is the only thing that keeps people healthy and well and very vibrant. So That's a fountain of Youth Hard to do but also the good news easy to do. You know I I remember number Talking to someone on it's always stuck with me it was a doctor or somebody that I had interviewed that said that. A huge percentage of people who are in nursing nursing homes rest homes. Aren't there because they're really sick. So much is that they just can't function they can't get the peanut butter jar lid off or they can't you know. Get in and out of the chair. I mean it's. It's just that they've atrophied into into an old person because they didn't stay active so another really great. Strive thread vine is this. debilitation is what you're referring to in just getting the basic stuff of work and life done and one of my patient remember many years ago still in my practice practice he He came with a Walker one day and and really looked his age. And ask what I could do and I can only offer some prescription medications for joint pains. So he thought about it went in home and then came back six months later without a walker without a cane looked fantastic and I said well. What did you do because clearly? I didn't do anything he was. You know what I heard what you said. I started exercising. And he loves to trim bonsai trees and so he did that and it said you know what Dr Lu that almost killed me. I tried that for two hours and then almost kill me but I stuck with it rain or shine and he started adding more time in gardening and now he's doing great and he looks fantastic but when he asked when people ask him what he did he goes IOS lying. I work in the garden four hours a day and people say well. I don't WanNa do that. What else can you got here? That's the only thing I got and so I again. A lot of patients inspire me. It is a lot of it. Is We lose function and our ability to move and do things as we get older so to fight back Father time exercise really pushes that back quite a bit and yet it is amazing. How people who when they say you know they hate to exercise and they hate to work out or they hate to do whatever it is they're going to do? I've never heard anybody. Do it. Go to the gym or go on a walk and come back and say God. That was horrible. Wish I hadn't done it. It's everybody always is is thankful that they did it but they hate doing it. Yeah that's really what makes us human isn't it is that we have an emotional part of our brain and irrational national part and the rational part knows we need to go out and move around The emotional parts as well. Maybe not today. Today's Kinda rainy. Maybe tomorrow or maybe not today because after all I'm really tired I deserve a break. And so how do we manage both sides of the brain having a partner exercise with you really helps Having little tricks like saying I'm I'm just going for a five minute walk and afterwards I don't like that by Milwaukee I'll go home because I'm done Turns out to your point after we get these things done. We get the motivation. Then emotional national park kicks and goes you know what that five minutes pretty good. I wonder how I might continue to do that. One other trick I learned is maybe to record yourself after a great walk that day. He Davis Lou. I finished the thirty minute walk today. It was a great day was sunny. Lot of fresh air because see treasonous scrolls running around and record that on your phone own so one day when you need to exercise. I don't want to play back. That voice and hear about high mostly excited you worry about that particular excise and saving do that. We'll grade right and those are some really practical tips on what to do to stay healthy. Not only things you can do but maybe some things you don't have to do like the annual physical that could would save you some time in money as well. Dr Davis Lou is a board certified family physician and he is author of the book the thrifty patient. There's a link to his book on on Amazon. You can find it on the show notes page for this episode of the podcast which you can check out on our website which I would love to have you check out if you haven't already and the website is something you should know dot net finally today on the podcast. What makes a person person creepy? It's a question. You kind of intuitively know the answer to but probably not one you think about very often but there's actually some research that looked into what makes someone a creep over thirteen hundred people were surveyed and it's widely believed that if you're a clown a taxidermist the sex shop owner or a funeral director pretty much people are GonNa think you're a creep. I guess until you prove otherwise. They're also so some behaviors and nonverbal cues. That makes someone come across as croupier being extremely thin. Sends that signal. Not Looking you in. The eye does well when people ask to take a picture of you. And you don't know them you're GONNA think they're a creep watching watching people before interacting with them tends to make people creepy when someone asks details about your personal life when you don't know them that's bats a pretty clear signal. That's just really creepy displaying too much or too little motion make someone creepy. Being older makes a person crappier and well. That's that's kind of age discrimination but I guess when you're young people who are who are very old and look very old can can sometimes kind of freak people out or creep people out and steering the conversation towards sex will pretty much give you the brand of of

cancer Airbnb US Christine Carter Christine family physician Fountain of Youth founder Dr Davis Lou dizziness AIRBNB DOT Dr Lu Intel Mike carruthers Home Depot Europe kidney infection Melissa Kris Jenner
Paul on Badlands

Movie Crush

1:02:57 hr | 4 months ago

Paul on Badlands

"What's it like to drive the Volvo xc ninety plug in hybrid. The thrill of four hundred horsepower eight twin engine. The joy of impromptu road tramps. And Serenity. Of Electric power in pure Eko mode. Visit DMV evil retailer today to experience the xc ninety recharge plug in hybrid, for yourself. Hi, this is Malayan verve air and this is Kim as a rally and where co hosts of Seneca's conversations on power and purpose brought to you by the Seneca Women, podcast network and iheartradio launching a brand new season of this podcast, which brings you fascinating conversations with leaders like two time gold medalist author and activist Abby Wambach and actor producer and entrepreneur. Justin Balboni among many others. Listen to Senegas conversations on power and purpose on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcast. Welcome to movie crush production of iheartradio. Hey everybody. Welcome to movie crush Friday Paul, edition back in the his e how you doing Paul. I'm doing good man how `Bout Yourself? Well, you know behind the scenes you know what just happened we had some trouble with my recording setup and happens because McCabe man I want to pick this shit up and thrown into a trash can. Chuck Chuck Chuck Hawks out a little bit but we've brought him back to Bruce Banner status. So I think this should be a nice relaxed. Discussion about. Badlands. Man So, here's a little bit of short history for this movie. Is, I was supposed to this. Movie with you know the ban the hold steady Oh. Yeah. Craig Finn. The lead singer. Away. Yeah, he was supposed to do this like. Cheese probably I mean it was pretty early on actually in I think probably like eight months into the show or something. And I'm not blaming him whoever it was handling his business though really screwed it up like he was supposed to. He was performing it The the venue, the city winery right next to the building. Yeah and I was like all he's got to do is come right over the building I got the time set aside an engineer coming in on a weekend. It was on a Saturday evening before his performance and then literally like no show I'm up at the office and like thirty minutes after he's supposed to be there I got an email from his handler that was like. So. Wherever here at city winery are you coming over and bringing equipment or what I'm like it? It's like we had this all set like, how did you screw up every barter this? So I got really salty Long. Way of saying I've now watched this movie twice for this show and then another Oh probably five times on my own for pleasure. Well. First of all, it's nice to know that. He's a fan of the movie. Yes that was his favorite movie. Speculate what he thinks. I'm no Craig Finn but I will do my best to bring some of that hold steady energy to. What I think of the film but you're better thanks man well, that's awesome to know. You've seen it that many times I've probably seen it. At least probably four or five times, I came to this movie. In College in one of my film history classes actually local. When we were studying the nineteen seventies Kinda the American new wave. and. This was the film. Our teacher decided to show us kind of representative of that and I think at the time I don't think. I really knew Malik at all. I don't think I'd seen any of his stuff even heard of him since then I mean he's without a doubt one of my favorite filmmakers and this is one of my favorite films of him by him. and. So I'm really excited to talk about it. Yeah. Man to it's terrence malick first film written produced directed. he made it when he was in his late twenties, which is crazy to think about. a movie that was fraught with problems with financing, and we chipped in some of a lot of his own money. a lot of problems on the shoot itself I. Think I read that you know there were some injuries during certain scenes. There were people that walked off the crew and what I read was the last literally the last two weeks of filming it was him and his wife and maybe Jack Fisk and like a couple of other people and that was kind of it. Yeah. By the end it was I. Think I read the same thing four or five people? Yeah and It was a non union crew and what I read was at the movies total budget was roughly three, hundred, thousand dollars. As you said, some of that was Malik zone money so. Even for one thousand, nine, hundred, seventy s standards. That's a that's very much low budget independent film and Yeah. About by the time they got to the end I saw thing where they were filming UNB limped. Which means I'm sure you know this but basically, with film cameras, they generate noise when you're shooting and so you have to basically put this blimp around the camera to. Dampen the sound. And because they just didn't have time in were on the run, just grab those last shots showed a lot of it unblemished meaning all the sound they got was unusable. So they had to record. I think something like percent of the dialogue had to be re recorded and post for a while. For the whole. That's what I read. Yeah. That's and I feel like you can kind of tell like I was watching the BLU ray and like sometimes it's like kind of easy to tell when stuff is clearly eighty yard. Yeah and I mean still. Even, if you notice that it's not something that sticks out is taking you out of the film by any means. Yeah and I mentioned Jack Fisk he was the production designer and I'm sure he had a very small crew and did a lot of it himself. You know he very famously met he space on this film young just sort of perfect and beautiful young sissies basic when she was in early twenties playing I think like a fifteen year old. and. She and Jack Fisk fell in love and got married and they're one of the great enduring Hollywood couples. If even want to call him that they're really not a Hollywood couple but movie couples. And He he's become one of my favorite production and set designers to works a lot has worked a lot with Mallika. In just. does a great job in this movie maiden seventy three, but it really looks like it was made in the nineteen fifties it. So authentic looking yeah and it it's funny. You mentioned Jack Fisk me when your favorites 'cause, it's like how many set deck art directors do people know by name in the movies like a? Jack Fisk is one of the few. He's he works David Lynch. Lot among other great directors but. Yeah I agree with you. It's interesting though to think about because the movie takes place in the fifties. And at the time they're shooting that was only fifteen years prior. Yeah. So that's like us me making a movie about two thousand and five right now. I mean it's crazy to think about, but it doesn't look like I have no idea. Baggy cargo shorts cargo I still have those cargo shorts. But you're right about the the look of it and it's interesting because Malik. Malik is famous for not doing interviews are press or anything, but he actually did do a handful of interviews when this movie came out for a few magazines and there's some. Really fascinating to read because he's very open about the process of shooting the film in his intentions with it. Even talks about. How When it came to like the period piece aspect of it he didn't WanNa overwhelm that he just wanted to be sort of subtle because he said nostalgia can kind of overwhelm a picture. and. It's interesting. You mentioned how you still feel like it's the nineteen fifties because it's not. It doesn't hit you over the head with it, but it's just that there it just it just feels so natural yet it's not like. A movie I love but back to the future. Which is they just they smash you over the head with an Algebra over and over and over as soon as they get to the nineteen fifties, which was kind of the point of that movie but this movie just feels very lived in. Very. Real think shot it mostly in Colorado but it certainly has the look of. The flatlands of the dakotas in Nebraska and the great. Plains. In Colorado, I, don't know if you've ever been there. It's one of the states that's very varied you you think Colorado's just nothing but mountains in the Rockies, but there are all these big huge wide open plains areas of Colorado to. Yeah. Well, I'm. I'm originally from Western Kansas small. Town. In Western Kansas Oh. That's right. You know and. Yeah so You're right the first time. I haven't been to Colorado that much despite me being from St next to it but the first time I went to Colorado I was so surprised when we crossed from Kansas into Colorado how it was still flat. Still looked exactly like Kansas for quite a while. Eventually, you can start to see the rocky mountains in the distance but. Yeah, one of the things I love about this movie. Is it feels so much like the town I grew up in like that small town vibe wide wide neighborhood streets main street where everyone parks doesn't parallel park but the park kind of angle you know yeah. That does space. Yeah. Yeah and just those vistas that you can just look out for miles. It really feels like kind of where I grew up, which is another reason I kind of have a soft spot for this film. Yeah and you know malic would go on to be known for exactly what this movie embodies Aesthetically. I mean it's all there from the beginning those The only things really different is the running time. He made a very short movie he went onto make much longer films but. The the the magic, our stuff, all the shots of nature, the closeups of nature, the dappled sunlight and shadow, and it's just interesting to see like right from the beginning. He sort of had a very clear idea of what he wanted to do aesthetically with his camera and with his lens and I think what makes badlands interesting to talk about is because? Unlike his subsequent films. You know when you talk about a lot of Malik subsequent work, it's easy to throw around these vague words like transcendent. A. Beautiful all these words that are hard to define poetic. Yeah lyrical. Yeah and those are all true. But there also these kind of words that you're like. I get it but they don't. They don't do much for like talking about a movie whereas badlands it's a little easier to sort of. To talk about it in more grounded terms because unlike a lot of his other films, this is a very grounded story in the sense that it has a very clear narrative progression from eighty to be we know where the story's going. and. I think it's just very accessible. In that sense. Yeah. Yeah and you know I don't know how big of a fan are days of heaven. But that's always been my favorite terrence malick movie and I did find it very interesting with those first two films they both very much a narrative plot. You know that you could follow point eight A. B. to see and then went. Away for many many many many years. And then started making different kinds of movies and that they saw that Malik look and I and I love thin red line and. You know. It's been a bit of a mixed bag since then I think but this in days of heaven are both just. I think malick kind of at its best. You know my favorite film is actually the new. World. the the the John Smith Pocahontas one from two, thousand, five of that movie. And I think the reason that's my favorite is because I think it's it's the best blend of his sort of. still kind of in telling more narrative stories from his older films while still having that very roving camera that lyrical poetic quality I think that John Smith Pocahontas story really lends itself to the merging of those two styles. Yeah. Got About that movie I. Love that movie. Yeah. Yeah. But but badlands might is definitely my top three for sure. Yeah, and It's just like the fact that this was the first film like to have your first film. Be This good at what age twenty twenty, nine you know it's like I made a film as you know feature film last year and like either I'm proud of it or whatever but it's not badlands well for sure yourself up. Yeah, but it's it's it's like did a human really make this you. Yeah it's astounding especially for someone in their twenty s to make something this sort of mature in focused and assured You get the feeling that just out of the gate, he knew exactly what he wanted I think Martin. Sheen still says that it's his best movie or his movie that he's been in. And he so good. and seeing this again, through this lens was. It really hit me how much they are their children not only she's supposed to be fifteen. He supposed to be twenty-five but the way they act is at the same time very childlike but also they're immediately this old couple somehow. In. The way they interact with each other it's a really really interesting. Yeah. That I noticed that too the old couple were there certain scenes where? Maybe, it's when they're hiding out in the woods and she's just walking around with like curlers in her hair. And she you know he he like what she walks up to him and she takes the cigarette out of his mouth. She can smoke it and it has this feeling of like the way a couple who's been married for twenty years would act around each other a totally. And yet, you also get the sense that they're kind of. They're doing it maybe because that's what they like their play acting a little bit like an old would yeah. One hundred percent but they're also like very childlike especially him. like setting up codewords in in the scene where that really got me was where they go to the rich guy's house and Kinda hold up there for the afternoon and he just he rings the Little Servants Bell and he goes next time. You hear that that means it's time for to get up Outta here instead of just saying, Hey, we gotta go he sets up a little. Something like a child would do like I ring the bell when it's time to go yeah it's he. He is without a doubt. One of the most fascinating characters I've ever seen a movie. Yeah. And Martin. Sheen. is perfectly cast him as as kit carruthers, and I. I WanNa talk a little bit about the real life story that real life case that inspired this movie are you familiar much with it a little bit the Charles Stark Weather Charles Stark whether and Caroline fugate. Yeah Nine thousand nine hundred fifty eight murder spree that started in Lincoln Nebraska and ended in a Wyoming. And he was nineteen and she was fourteen and they killed I think ten people all over a few weeks about a month. Maybe that's roughly the body count in this somewhere. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. and. Stark weather when they were caught stark weather was sentenced to death by electric chair and he was executed and Caroline fugate actually received life imprisonment. But she was paroled in nineteen, seventy six. And this is an interesting fact. But to this day, she's the youngest female in US history to have been tried for first degree murder at I. Think Fourteen maybe fifteen by the time she was tried Oh interesting. So this is clearly the inspiration for badlands and yet Malik. Takes. A lot of these details, but he doesn't you know the movie doesn't say based on a true story. Yeah. It's not a not interested. Yeah. He's not interested in in telling that exact story but. Stark whether in fact, did sort of model himself after James Dean. And some of the lines in the movie that Kit says were things stark whether said like I always wanted to be a criminal just not this big one that was. A great. Line. Such a great line and I just think that case like. It's such a fascinating case because. It, it sort of grip the nation as it was happening, it was almost like a modern day Bonnie and Clyde at the time in the nineteen fifties and the nineteen fifties you think of as being the sort of innocent. sort of like the way back to the future depicts it. You know when everyone's drinking milk shakes and you know go dancing at the hopper whatever. But. This kind of shook the nation you know and they portray that in the movie you know that one kinda great sequence where it talks, it shows the guards walking the kids from school and she's in the narration. You know we I guess we might as well talk about that a little bit that great narration. Through the whole movie from her which Quentin Tarantino. blatantly ripped off. Along. With the score for to. this movie was very much a model for to romance a movie I love and he is not like he ripped it off very much said like. A stole it. I stole it from Badlands. It's one of my favorite movies. So. That's fine. You know he borrowed it. But. It's really good a good lesson in. Like. If you're going to go and go all in yeah. The narration is. Different than what we think of unusual narration because it doesn't, it doesn't give you exposition for the most part. It kind of tells you things that are not really related to the story which I think is what good narration does it Malik is not using it as a crutch to sort of fill in storytelling gaps. Necessarily it's her it's our mental thoughts really more than anything. Yeah and it's sort of like Maybe this is her diary or journal or something, but but the thing she talks about are so fascinating and this is related in some of the interviews Malik gave back in the seventies about the movie He, didn't want you to think holly is like dumb or simple yes. That she's she's she's a typical southern girl sort of and she has this like weird sense of propriety where it's like I'm not gonNA. Talk About Myself. You know and so she relates this story as if she's like giving a school report on how you how she spent her summer vacation or most. Yeah. So it's like here's what we ate and here are some of the flowers we saw and just very childlike things. Yeah and I, mean there's some of my favorite lines to AH jotted if you have them down or through her narration. And this sort of shows a little bit of the cracks early on in their relationship when she goes. Kid accuses me of only being along for the ride and sometimes I wish he would fall into the river and drowned so I could watch. But she says it so. Childlike matter of factly hits just the impact as donal. Hey movie crushers the stress of daily life ways on us all especially these days whether you're an elite athlete or just a regular old person like me trying to get through the day muscle pain and tension is a real thing. Just ask my back and that's why I use Thera gun I to tell you these things are great. It's a hand held percussive therapy device, the releases, your deepest muscle tension using a scientifically calibrated combination of depth speed and power and boy I'm telling you it has depth speed and power, and now it's about as quiet as an electric toothbrush. That's because the all new gen four thera gun has a proprietary brushless motor that. So. Quiet. 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To what degree do you think? We're supposed to take holly as. An accomplice or somebody who complicit or culpable for these these crimes do you think Malik wants us to see her as just? One half of the team or is it something else? Is She more of more of a victim than perpetrator? What do you think? Well, definitely don't think that he wants her to be seen as an accomplice. Because she never really takes part in anything actually physically. but I think it's interesting in that he also doesn't player as. Captive in until sort of near the end, there's this one part where is it here? Have written down where They're sort of a switch that happens. And It seems like she's a little more captive. But they don't. They don't play that up like You know like she doesn't ask to leave or anything and he says you can't like. It's all I mean you see all the dial in this movie between them is just so Mundane that he will kill somebody. and. Then talk about you know you know a something sitting on the table that looks weird to him. You know. I. Mean He's He's not smart. It's like you're talking about her not being smart. He's kind of a real dumb shit. And unknown guys like this that like he thinks he's smart but he's not. A true narcissists like when he's recording all of his thoughts in advice into the dictaphone, he really thinks he has something important to say, but he doesn't a hundred percent and I think it's so it's so ironic that at the beginning of the film when he first meets holly when he walks up to her when she's twirling her baton in the yard, he says something like Oh i just got some things I want to say, yes people don't have anything to say at all and then throughout the film everything he does end up saying are like you said not smart things these sort of like received. platitudes and ideas that clearly, he doesn't have that. He probably just heard someone say. They sound smart. Yeah and he's any also belittles her at times for being dumb like when when they're parked under the train track and you know he clearly has no plan what the fuck he's doing any he spends the bottle but the bottle get in a direction that he clearly doesn't want to go and he's like well, I'll just go pick a direction if I can't. Do that. Then what kind of a man am I and she says I don't know or and he and he says something like what he's like you understand that she's like well, I, don't know in our what do I expect from you anyway or you know the like the guy that feels like in order to make himself feel smart he has to put down the woman's with. Yeah and you never get the sense that kit really. Loves her or cares about her I it feels much more like he just feels like. I'm a guy that should have his girl by his side and so I. Picked a girl and I've got her now again. So much of I think he models himself is again that James Dean idea of like I'm a rebel without a cause even though I don't know what any of these things mean. But I've received them perhaps from TV or movies, and this is how I should act as the self made outlaw. Yeah and the things that are important to him like in the end in that final chase sequence you know he's he's looking in the mirror and check in his hair he after he gets caught or he doesn't get caught. He gives himself up shoots up the tire and the first thing he thinks about after he checks his pulse, which I thought was great was. Stacking up those rocks. As like a monument to wear like the outlaw was finally captured. Yeah and you know along the way, there's a scene where they bury some of their their tokens in like basically like a time capsule and. People think if they dig this up in a thousand years, he he he he very much treasures. The idea of being remembered he thinks his life is of great importance of like to to to society like people should be interested in who he is and. I mean the ironic thing is that they are like when he gets captured Aman when he's in chains in the airport hangar. So great literally stage. Yeah. He's on a stage. He's holding court. He's he's handcuffed by asking him like you know who's your favorite singer and he's like he throws them his the things he has in his pocket guy's lighter his comb and they just eat it up. You know he's kind. Of like a modern day or for that time like the prototypical like reality TV star or something yes man that whole last bit was. So fascinating you know you see it turn when he's in the car getting taken away and the the deputy in the back says that he looks like James Dean and man he you can just see him light up when he hears that that's like the nicest thing anyone. Could ever say about and then his mind. Yeah and then when he's on that plane wing, he's literally standing on a stage and just holding court and they're laughing Adam and it was interesting how he played or how Malik chose to have the deputies play that as. Them being so interested in him and you know he shakes their hand at the end. Sorry calls you any trouble and eastern says good luck to you. I mean it yeah man it's really really fascinating as they're getting walked off with. Exactly, how he would want with the literal army like escorting him out like that. This is what in his mind is like, yeah, this is what they needed. They needed an army to to to take care of me and he says, you know I could have I could hold out a whole army if I got behind the mounds and Miami didn't Denia. And I love those two, those two policemen who who actually capture him when they're in the car because you can see them, they give these looks where they're I, think even say like, Hey, we did it. We caught him like the they know that they're sort of going to be etched in history as the guys who caught him to yet. They're very much. Happy about that fact. Yeah I think it just speaks to how? Fascinated we are with. With both celebrity and Killers you know like think about how people fascinated people are with Charles Manson or all these other famous Ted Bundy's famous killers. It's just as Morbid fascination that I think is a very. Very American thing. More so than in other places. Yeah probably. So And you know natural born killers I think played off of this movie. Like the Cup Calvin the movie. California. The K. like the couple on this murder spree. springsteen. Fans will be really mad if we don't mention this on Nebraska Also based on the the stark weather case. And we didn't start the fire really Joe, he says, I wrote it down here stark weather homicide children of the little is so he's home aside. Yeah. He gives it a little name to start weather two words. I I. Really Love the scene where they had where she loses her virginity and 'cause they don't show any of that literally to shows kind of buttoning up and he gets up and. She's just sort of like you know that it is what? What's everyone always saying what the big deal is about that and Mike you can tell it Kinda. wounds him a little bit because. You. Know he's the man and but he plays it off like will yeah it's no big deal at all. And then in. Like I don't know how you write dialogue like this but he said we should take this rock and smash both of our hands. So we'll always remember this day. Like who? What twenty nine year old thinks of to write dialogue like that it's just amazing. Yeah, and and it's it's also you know you can kind of sort of teases out holly's psychology without putting a fine point on it because. Again, she's supposed to be fifteen. She has a child in many respects and. You know when he says we should smash this rock and she's like that her and he's like that's the point. Stupid. Yeah. It's just. You know malic doesn't Overdo it, but there is this kind of Very notable imbalance of power that's there on the edges of the film that Probably if you made a film like this today, you see that pushed much more to the forefront. But in this film, it's very, very subtle. Just kind of there in the background. Yeah. Absolutely. and that scene kind of buttons up with a there's so many tiny little moments that just make his character so much more interesting where he goes will young GonNa keep this rock anyway and he walks like three feet. His big ASS rock then throws it down and it's like. Well, let me get a smaller one. Yeah just to just. To follow up on sort of kits character, he has all these little idiosyncrasies. Like. Like when they're walking in town and he gets mad at somebody for littering and he's like, if everyone did that hometown a mess or something like that. Yeah, and these killings diesel. And this is so interesting and it's one of another thing I want to touch on that Malik did talk about again these aforementioned interviews I keep going back to you, but he saw kit is very conservative. And he thinks most of the people he kills or kind of worthless and has these very sort of traditional American values like don't litter. When they decide to go on the run, he has holly bring her homework so she won't won't fall behind in her studies. And the one person. It's interesting to note that the one person he doesn't kill is the rich man. Well, I mean. You know the one person he very clearly it seemed like he was GonNa Kill Yeah. And I think that's interesting because it's like. The. One guy you know. I think there's a sense of kit maybe like has some like sympathy for this guy or he sees himself as like this is what I could be this rich man living in this fancy home. Yeah and it's like the one guy who doesn't need our sympathies is the guy kits sympathizes with the most. Yeah. Here's an interesting code. I will say that because. You know she even talks early on when they invade the camp which the way the production design on on their wooded camp was just so cool like every little kids dream to like you know set traps living the trees but he. She. Even says in the narration she's like well, Kit said they. They deserved it because they weren't law men they were just out for the bounty reward. So. Like he has a code in that shouldn't these men in the back but an shooting his friend, Kato? But. He he doesn't kill the couple. He locks them in the thing he fires off two shots into the thing we got him. So yeah. So we don't know I mean maybe he does but yeah, he it's hard to know if he actually did kill them but yeah. But he doesn't like outright kill them and then the right guy and his housekeeper. He doesn't kill them either. So there is a weird code But. Like I said I think he's a dumb shit I don't think he knows what is code is for sure that makes. I think. Again it's like these received ideas of what? A man should act like you know and. There's there's one quote you know I. Love to bring quotes in. A quote from one of these Malik interviews. I WanNa hear what you think about this because I think Even speaks to sort of our current. Time political climate or say. About some everything is yeah. A by he's talking about the conservativism of Kit and Malik said quote, it's not infrequently the people at the bottom who most vigorously defend the very rules that put and keep them there. Speaking about quick kit. Yeah Cheese. The more things change Here's another mallet quote actually in this really drives him. Appointing. About who this character is and you probably read this one but he at a news conference, he said that kit is so desensitize. that. He can regard the gun with which he shoots people as a kind of magic wand that it's a small nuisance. And that's kind of the thing through the whole movie he's wantonly killing but. It's You know he kills her Warren oates the Great War notes. As her father, who's WHO's GonNa call the cops on him he's like This gun you know will stop you from doing that his friend Kato that's clearly kinda running to go turn them in. Like this gun will stop him from doing that this gun will stop these people from trying to rattus out in the woods like I don't even think he sees it as murder. Yeah and I think this is one of the strongest parts of the movie is the way the violence is depicted or should I say not depicted? Yeah. Because you'd think a movie about a spree killer who? Probably, almost ten people by the end of the movie you would think that would be a very violent film to watch. Yeah, and this film is not violent at all and when there is violence, it always happens very quickly and like there's barely any blood, you might see a little blood on a shirt and it's just over and done with very quickly and it doesn't linger on it. I think it's very much sort of A. Maybe. A commentary on the the. Nation of violence in the way Y You know we tend to want violence in this morbid way but also I love how watching it this time. What I noticed was how there's so many times where like they'll kill somebody and then they'll kit in Hollywood just kinda hang around just just hang out in kind of very blah especially after he kills her father, they just sit in the house for like the whole night before figuring out what to do and they just kinda stare out at the at the window or something just like you'd think if you did that you might WanNa like immediately have a plan and run away but they just Kinda hang out and just just a relax almost yet and she never. You know it's so underplay like she never. Gets, hysterical holly just is sort of. Nonplussed about it all you know when when he shoots Kato. She goes in the room with him where he's extensively just sitting there dying very slowly. And she just goes into starts having a conversation with them and asking a question. very childlike again. Like neither one of them I don't think understands the gravity of what they're actually doing. But she slowly does and I think that's that turn it takes toward like the three-quarter mark where she feels sort of captive. But she doesn't know. Even whether when they're in the back seat and he's kissing her when she has the rollers in her hair like. It feels like he sort of forcing himself on her but it's not you know she's not pushing them off and saying, no, no no, it's not like that but you can tell that she's not there anymore with him. Yeah. Exactly and shortly after that, I think is the scene where they're dancing to not king Cole. Yeah Oh man which is a in the headlights of the car, which is a great scene but yeah, if you if you pay attention, it's really like. It's really just a kit. Is the one who's feeling these emotions holly just they're going along with it. Yet you know the line I couldn't quite tell what he said. So I had to turn on the subtitle but it's another great line of dialogue. he's listening to Nat King, Cole and says if I could sing a song like that a song about the way I. Feel Right now it'd be a hit. Such a great line in the narcissism again, you know, and the fact that if you look at the lyrics to that Song a blossom fell. It's it's all about like love coming to an end. The dream is ended true. Loved is and stuff like that. which I think is maybe sort of lost on kit. Yeah I think. So but it's very appropriate for the movie because I think shortly after that is when they get to that. that area and the planes were the the helicopter starts chasing after them and that's holly finally says, no, I'm not going to go with you. And she finally makes that decision to break off from him. Yeah and does it again in such an understated childlike way she she kinda just sits on the ground. And she's like I don't want to go. And you he gets more frustrated and ask why what's going on and she was like I don't know just don't want to go and like that's her big stand The way that she handled handles it is just so child biking. and he knows you know he tells her you know we're going to meet up on this damn on New Year's Eve and what eventually damned. If years from now. It's like, where do you come up with this shit man but can you imagine the relief that she felt when he left Oh yeah. I mean. When you and you mentioned the sort of childlike aspect, I mean. I know you have a young daughter. I'm sure there have been situations where she's like I don't want to do this and you ask why and she's like I don't want to. Yeah. It was very much like that seen right before that scene too is one of my favorite parts of narration that again is just shows what a master writer Malik was from the very beginning where she goes She's talking about what again like what he's doing what she's doing what he's doing what she's doing. and. She goes I spelled out entire sentences on the roof of my mouth with my tongue were nobody could read them. Just, like how you write that shed so brilliant and also like in relation to what's happening in the movie. You know the idea that that's what her fictional audience would be interested in hearing about. Yes. It's just it's such a misplaced sense of misjudging who audiences you know. Yeah the whole last sequence when they're driving through the badlands in the Great Plains just hauling ass in that sweet Cadillac. Off off roading it basically was just. Such a cool decision to not put it on the highway somehow you know yeah, and and once the cops start chasing the car, we get an actual chase scene. That's like again, you don't really think of Malik as the Guy who's GonNa fill chase action sequences but it's it's really gripping. It's a really gripping chase sequence even though they're. They obviously filmed it with not much money but it it works when when he speeds through the field and the cows are running out of the way and a dirt road where the the dust is kicking up behind him and you can't you know the cops probably can't even see ahead of them because of that it's it's really really well shot it is and it feels genuinely dangerous these cars kind of fish tailing in the dirt hauling, ass right next to each other these big old cars that don't handle that. Well, you know these aren't like stunt cars I guarantee you they were just. Old Stock caddy that he bought to destroy basically. It does feel very dangerous. Yeah, and I noticed watching it this time where the cops are chasing him and they're on a dirt road. Kit makes a sharp left turn and the cops fall and do the same in the c the COP car tips. Yeah. It doesn't upside down but it tips like straight up because sideways were second slowly comes back down and I'm like. There's no way they meant that in its. Other takes where it flipped completely like I can't imagine how. They just got really lucky with. The car tipped you know well and I think that's the ones who ended up getting them right I mean. Yeah it is. It doesn't really show that doesn't draw that line, but you get the feeling that that cars drove away from that that brief. Tip. The yeah. Because it seems that's when kit it seems like he's going to get away from them and that's when he to stop in and shoot his tire because I think he needs again like we talked about earlier he needs that sort of movie script ending to his tail where the cops apprehend him in a high speed chase. Yeah and it's a really interesting decision to shoot out the tire rather than just give up and she even said so in the narration you know. that. That she thought it was her. She was onto him basically in suspected that he shot out his own tire instead of the tire actually just blowing out naturally yeah. Because it's almost like he feels he needs. He can't be seen as having given up right his own volition. So it's like there had to be something that stopped him you know. Yeah absolutely. I'm pretty sure new house may be haunted. What makes you say that the furniture is levitating on the ghost welcome home? Yeah that's that's spooky. You know what's really scaring. Missing, out on Geico for help with homeowners and renters. Insurance GYCO makes it easy to save a bunch grace. You're not sticking around. The party's just getting started. A week call today and see how easy homeowners and renters insurance can be. GEICO, PRESENTS MONSTER COUNSELING DRACULA. Tell me how you're feeling. No one understands how. These no one will even let me into their house I knock and Menaka, but aid noar me. What else I look in the Mirror To don't even see myself anymore if you don't see yourself clearly can you believe expect others to I'm having a breakthrough it's not easy to be a vampire, but with geico super easy to switch and save hundreds on your car insurance. Let's talk a little bit about that KEDO sequence because you know I mean we talked a little bit about it but they've they go to his friend's house that I, guess he just knows somehow and he goes to tournament they shoot him he dies very slowly and that's I. Feel like when? A couple of interesting things happen. That's the first time that you see him. Imo and like act upset. After, he locked set couple in the in the cellar whatever, and then you see him kicking rocks in like really can't get a hold of himself but beside that big truck and that's the only time you see him sort of. Not. At least pretending to be in control of himself. And that is where it Kinda turns to where I feel like she's feeling like a hostage for the first time and I think onto him a little bit like he doesn't even know what he's doing and I think that's when the voiceover says he's the most trigger. Happy Person I ever met yes. A very interesting way to describe him murdering. People. But. Yeah that scene where he's walking walking by himself in sort of kicking rocks in cursing. It's interesting because we don't hear what he says. Yeah. I think there's either music or maybe voice over on top of it, and so again, we were never really allowed. An entryway into psychology. Even we see we see that emotion, but we don't really know. What he's thinking yeah, and I think maybe. That's one of the brilliant things about this movie. Is that Malik never? He never attempts to psychology is. Never explain his actions He never says Oh kit you know grew up in a broken home and this is why he is the way he is or he had an abusive father is this is why he is the way he is. It's nothing about him you know nothing about him. Yeah. Except a little bit at the beginning when it shows him just kind of work in these dead end jobs. Exactly. Yeah. And and the fact that early on we see Kato as like maybe his one friend. Yeah. From the garbage today's on the garbage route you know and the fact that. He has no problem killing Cato. Cato at the beginning. When when they're hauling garbage in? Yeah at the very beginning. The other thing happens in that sequence to which is very instructive I think of her. Is when the couple shows up and that he's walking him out to the field to put him in the cellar and she and the girl or talking, and it's just girl talk. She's like a kid she has connection that she hasn't had in weeks. And she's asking him and she loves her boyfriend. which man I mean just what a great way to play and write that scene. You know it's so banal like again like you said, Girl Talk just Do you love him why gotta stick by Kid I? Think he feels trapped. You know as they're clearly walking out to a field where there is a very good chance. They might die. Yeah and she even asked you know what's He gonNA do? And she's just like Anna. No you know you'd have to ask him basically. Yeah it's very it's. It's incredibly chilling in a in a very detached way. How these scenes play out yeah, and also for a movie that sort of plays out like a fairy tale in a Lotta ways. it's somehow not grounded in reality the way they play all the stuff. and. Not Reacting to you know there's never like I said earlier there's never one moment even when her dad dies where she gets upset about stuff. and. That that point is interesting too because Malik talked about how It's not that maybe she never felt emotion about her dad's death. It's maybe she did cry buckets but she would never think of telling you that like that wouldn't be proper to to share with the audience because it would you know she's again doesn't WanNa put too much attention on herself and she just wants to come in this. The best possible light so to speak. Yeah I mean there's a brief moment when he's dying where she runs to his side. But even that is pretty underplayed and she says, are you going to be okay he's like basically dead. Yeah and kits great line is like he doesn't need a doctor. You know he's he's gone and the way that murderers played out as so just Loki and in real. You know my favorite moment of sequences when a kit moves the body into the. Basement. Yeah. He drags into the basement and then he comes back upstairs and he's like I found a toaster. And he's just holding a toaster a toaster like why we're like, what is he? What are your values man like why do you take these things? Yeah. I mean he's a dumb shit. The things that he chooses to do like he's Burns the house down in that one great kind of the only handheld sequence in the movie. So it has a lot of impact when he's dumping the gas everywhere and Malik shoots fire so well it's just so like with that score so haunting and he takes he he puts on the record. of him, a loop of what he's. Trying to throw the cops off the scent and takes a lamp. Yet. In at the rich Man's house, he takes that Trophy Cup. And in the hat and the jacket in a couple of other dumb things like the things he finds in wants to collect is just weird and it's kind of ironic because especially when he's On his garbage route. He talks about like he's kind of disgusted by all the junk people have or throw away yet. He has no problem collecting the same kind of junk for himself. He said that about Cato when he when he was in his room, you know look at all this junk. Yeah exactly and That I think again, points to that sort of disgust. He has with the lower class almost like especially at the beginning how he's SOC sort of ashamed of being a garbage collector and he's like listen I don't like the stuff. Okay. But. I'm just doing it and he feels like he he clearly feels like he's way above being garbage collector. Yeah. In SORTA takes an attitude into his first meeting with her father when he goes out in that great great shot, which is so cool where her dad is hand painting these billboard signs on the highway. and again with Jack, this is a production designer such a small detail that his work truck had all that paint splatter all over it just little things like that. Make it so rich but I love that scene where he basically goes out there to. SORTA tell his her father like, Hey, I love your daughter and I'll do right by her but the way he does it is is not correct. No I mean he. He clearly thinks. He's above the dad you know he plays it. You know the way you shouldn't play. It was just sort of like I'm kind of amused by the fact that I have to come out here and do this song and dance but I'll just do it just to humor you. You're right. Yeah. Love that scene and more in you know legendary Warren oates in such a small part. But still very effective. Yeah. He he has only I think a handful of lines in the whole movie but. They're not wasted and he's just he's so. Kind of menacing both as person, but also probably as a father, he's clearly a A. Probably a strict father to say the least you know and Warren oates played very well. Yeah. I mean there's not a ton of dialogue in the whole movie because everything is so underplayed like this movie got remade in it sort of has been through. wild at heart in California and natural born killers like I was saying. Nobody would take this kind of approach. There would be so much more emotion in. When the father die she would just be like screaming and upset and. Everything is just so between this like here in here. In this movie and such an like not brave. But like just a very confident thing for a twenty something filmmaker to do right out of the gate. Yeah. It's it's it's a very strange movie like I would very, very much call it strange and. it's it's even more of a kind of a miracle when you think about like we talked about the troubled production of the film. That the fact that the end product. Feels so seemless. They have three different directors of photography over the course of the. Novi. And it never you never noticed that if feels always feels like one clear coherent vision yeah. Yeah totally in Malik has great cameo. And the rich Guys House that I'm sure you know the story there he That actor didn't show and so he just filled in planning to reshoot at later. In in Sheen right now, man I'm re shooting that you're great. You gotTA leave it. And he will. He is really good I mean it's just a small role but school Malik has that kind of like very soft spoken Texas drawl. And It's it's weird because again. We, know how Malik is you know? Since then he doesn't do interviews or press or anything, and so just to see him like in his own movie with dialogue. Yes. This kind of this we're whiplash feeling like oh I'm sure a lot of people watch and don't even know that that's Malik. Yes or or if they don't aren't just as sort of a student of him might think Oh. Yeah. The director given himself a Cameo Night Chamlan and like that is not Malik Steal. At all like he didn't, he didn't want he wanted to reshoot it. It is He did it as a one hundred percent last resort. I'm sure if there was anyone else on that set, he could have stuffed in that suit. He would have done so but it ended up working. It's Kinda Fun Fun to see him and I love that Martin Sheen was adamant that he's like I'm not going to repeat that same terry you have to. We're keeping it. In, little Little Emilio and Charlie Sheen on it to I. Don't know if you knew that I didn't until Yeah. I was just scrolling on the Wikipedia last night I was like, Oh, they're the two little boys on the street that holly kind of looks out of her window at and yeah. Very cool. Their first appearance on film I. Think Yeah, and You're talking about Hollywood couples I didn't know this put Martin Sheen and his wife they were married obviously with kids at the time of this movie but they are another couple that have been together. That this whole time. Forty some years in. Yes. Still going strong. So that's cool. There's a of them jeff bridges in his wife like. There's a no Hollywood has reputation but the ones that endure like Kevin Bacon and Kyra Sedgewick is. I think it's school but also think I think that school when any couple states together forever like from Hollywood I think it might be a little more challenging, just due to the scheduling and not being around each other and all that. But Mating for life is admirable. You know yeah. One hundred percent coupling up. You got anything else out of notes could certainly talk about it more than if you have some more stuff My favorite movies me man and there's just so many great lines like I. Don't want to spend the rest of the time just quoting lines from the movie or throw a couple of out on. Well. One of my favorite moments not necessarily necessarily align is where kit shoots the football. So Great. It's so funny because right before that you hear the voice over holly saying we would sometimes ram a cow with the car to say bullets. And then the next scene Kit decides to shoot a football because he's excess baggage. Again that childlike thing He probably wanted to know what would happen if he shot a football like there would explode or something. Yeah Yeah, and there's a that reminds me just to put a bow on some of the you know analysis of Kit as a character Malik talked about how which I think is a really fascinating aspect of it. This idea that suffering makes you deeper profound like people who suffered especially in movies usually like you see it on their face, they have this maturity this wisdom from they're suffering but Malik said in relation to kit like you that sometimes but sometimes suffering can just make you like. Closed off and narrow minded, and I think that could very much be applied to kit that he sort of. He thinks he has a great. Depth of knowledge and wisdom, but he doesn't at all and he's very just sort of simple and a dumb shit. Yeah he's simple in a dumb shit, but that is the classic sort of. story of the of the narcissist I mean surely there are intelligent narcissist but man, I've known people like this that. That think they have so much to say this roots he wisdom. And they don't know what the fuck is going on. They don't have a plan kit never has a plan. And it's interesting. Drawing that line to politics these days there's some lines that can definitely be drawn. Yeah. Well, also movie with the Folksy Wisdom and how Malik makes it very. Regional in sort of the way kit talks like he has kind of that. That southern accent that sort of Texas southern accent. Yeah. And the way he says things like you know takes all kinds donut. Yeah. No, just he speaks in. A lot of those those folksy aphorisms yet. You here in that part of the country, you know I know and And listen man I don't WanNa like disparage anyone. I have known people from parts of the country that use those aphorisms in. Of having something of their own to say. And they just regurgitate a saying. Like. Like it takes all kinds because there's no critical thought going on and you know to be fair there's certainly a a an amount of that that just like. You say it as kind of something to say like it isn't meant to be. You know. It's just sort of like a polite thing to say or I don't know you know like. It's not always it's not always said by people like Kit who think they're super deep sometimes it's just said yes, nonchalantly but we see all that stuff. Oh Yeah. Sure. But when somebody thinks that these sort of aphorisms have a lot of truth and they think that they're the one who's like. A blessing the world with this knowledge. That's where you can kind of run into trouble you know. Yeah Man I really really loved this movie and I'm glad I got to watch it again We should do days of heaven to I mean. I you know I would do any and every Malik movie you would WanNa do man I I hesitate a little bit because I know Casey Would WanNa do some is as you'll be so mad. He's also big disciple of Malik but but yeah, man any any time just to. You know how to reach me. I wonder maybe if you and Casey and I could all do days of heaven that'd be fun like you and your closet him in his closet in the other room. Yeah me and my base I was listening Casey and I are roommates. What he means. Yes days of Heaven is just. I mean I rank it as my favorite terrence malick film. and you know I had the Great Brooke Adams on this show as a guest on. That? Yes. She was on on. You know she's married to Tony Shalhoub and I got a line into Tony and I was like would burke to be onto because I'm going to a New York. She could you guys can book coming together and just do it back to back and he's like sure she'll come in. So what movie was she? Waiting for Guffman ooh which was which was good. But I got to ask her some questions about days of Heaven, which I had always wanted to ask about that shoot Encana. Hear it from you know one of the horses mouths. Which is great and another movie with there are there are a lot of similarities here in those movies with an Asian and not just the aesthetic because that's all of Malik but they're the relationship couple on the run There's some kind of same DNA going on and that that that theme does a lot of sort of paradise gained in paradise. Lost Yeah. You know like in badlands it's maybe when they're out in the woods living this sort of Adam and eve style life nature and same with days of Heaven where they they retreat to the Texas, panhandle. Yeah. To live in this sort of idyllic setting, and then of course, that never lasts reality always intrudes you know. And the. Violence to both of those movies is very similar. Yeah Yeah. Very true I was just GonNa say also gotTa give a shout out to a Linda Man's from days of Heaven just passed away. Did she oh, you didn't know that. Yeah. Within just within the past couple months she passed away man I don't know how I miss that. Yeah. Just just a bummer 'cause she's I forget how old she was but. She wasn't that old God. She's so great that that voice in that accent and that narration she didn't really do much else. No, I think she was in maybe a couple of other projects but really didn't become an actor fulltime. You know man so sad Rei dude. Well, that was great. I think we should try and do get all three of us in there because. I love that movie so much in you guys are both big Big Malik dudes. So let's Let's do that totally down. Well, thanks buddy. Thanks for having me man. So is fun. All right everyone go out and see badlands or watch badlands if you haven't yet ninety three minutes long and one of the all-time all-time great movies very tight, very tight ninety three minutes. You'll see that from Malik very often so. Enjoy. It enjoy. All right. Thanks everyone. Crash is produced and written by Charles Bryant and no Brown edited and engineered by Seth Nicholas. Johnson scored buying all Brown here in our studio punk St Market Atlanta Georgia for iheartradio for more podcast for my heart radio visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Are you ready mistress the hit fixing PODCAST TUMAN BAY? Yes. Reaches this. Final season. Wild not as. If you to saved. Must. For my how radio and Gold Hope Productions Stephen Coming of mighty child affiars wealth destroy. She's dead. She came back. Something's going to happen. You need to be ready for creators John Scott Dryden and Mike Walker me. Because going, you are the hinge of history skulls never about the past they were about the future coming October Ninth Tuman may season four take me to to Monday listen fully Timon Bay on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or have you listen to podcasts what now? We wait to in me.

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From the Vault: Shrooms Like Cedars in the Devonian Wilds

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

58:19 min | Last month

From the Vault: Shrooms Like Cedars in the Devonian Wilds

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That's a firm dot com slash stuff or download the free affirm app for eligible customers. Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is robert lamb. And i'm joe mccormack in it's saturday. Time to go into the vault today. We're going to be listening to an episode that originally published december seventeenth twenty nineteen about gigantic prehistoric fungus. That's right pro tax. it's is the pronunciation. I think i think we we labored over enough. That it stuck in my head But this one. I think we we did a little skit for this time. Travelers at the beginning the time traveller for so it will be convenient speak of in turned his attention. At last the devonian period is pale. Grey is shown twinkled and is usually paleface became flushed and animated. The comb of morning was upon the would world in its greening. The springtime of the environment was arid and warm and everywhere i walked. I observed forests of moss and clusters of shrub like ferns. Statements amid them crept primitive arthropods in something that looked remarkably like a winged insect. I did not catch it in the act of flight. But they were no leaves. No trees to lift a canopy above my head but what i had i took for primitive. Conifers proved anything but each of these cylindrical. Giants stood some twenty feet high or a good yard why they towered above devonian world. Like stielike pillars. I observed just a hint of spores carried away from the heights. I wondered then mike. These organisms be giant mushrooms. But that's when the morlocks came at me. The morlocks i said surely the morlocks existed for in the future. What were they doing in the devonian where they stole my time machine and they followed me. You arrived there in your time. They stole it from the future. The but look time. Travel is very complicated. No further questions. Welcome stuff to your mind. Production of heart radio network. Hey you miss stuff to blow your mind. My name's robert lamb. And i'm jerry mccormick and in that cold open. We had a little fun with h. g. wells. The time machine would of course is is wonderful novel. Well worth seeking out in. Today's technically advanced times. I remember liking it when i read it. But i don't recall. Actually go into the prehistoric past. Well he certainly goes into the far far future kind of my inspiration for that. Because he goes he goes so far into the future of the world is just an alien landscape but one of the fun things. Is that if you travel back far enough. In time you also encounter an alien landscape like that is what the surface world of the devonian period. Four hundred million years ago basically was and so it was in resistible to use the time traveler. Here is is a way of sort of imagining what it would might be like to walk amid strange strange Specimens there's all this weird devonian flora and a glimpse in the wild a living specimen of an organism that continues to mystify us in the past. It's been called a mystery fossil even and that is proto tax. It's yes today. We are going to be talking about the world of prehistoric fungus. This is something that i've wanted to talk about for a long time because fungus in the fossil record. I think there's actually a lot of interesting stuff we could explore but the keystone of today's episode is going to be. Yeah the fossil remains of these giants stylized organisms from hundreds of millions of years ago. That were the tallest standing things of their time. And we don't know for sure what they were we. We have better ideas than we used to. And we'll get into that as the episode goes on but yeah try to imagine yourself as a paleontologist digging into the strata from a period hundreds of millions of years ago where there were no trees. There's no there no forests on the earth but you find these six meter high giant pillars of something. That was alive. Yeah and you can see if you look up. Images of prototypes. It's you'll you'll see people posing with the fossil remnants and it looks like Like a massive pillar or even in the way. It's broken in some of these these fossils. It looks like it could be the the the neck bone of some of some enormous creature. Like there's an enormity to the fossil that that makes it so irresistible. It is a giant of the past but it is not it is not an animal it is it is something else we don't know exactly what prototypes. It's looked like when it was alive. Their different interpretations of it but some of the interpretations in resulting illustrations. Really give it a kind of almost like a giguere. Ask or lovecraft. Dan appearance of something. That looks truly like a like a pillar is like towers little like not little you know towering monoliths and certainly they were the largest and tallest feature of devonian terrestrial Environment it dominated the early and early middle devonian period though it eventually gives way to the rise of shrubs and early and other early plants in the late devonian but it is to say the least. Stay very tantalizing fossil. They can continues to be something of a mystery fossil so To to get the origin of the fossil find itself. We have to go back. roughly one hundred and seventy six years and that is when in eighteen forty. Three canadian-born geologist william edmond logan unearth. Fossil remnants of devonian flora in the classification of the devonian period by the way only dates back to eighteen thirties so it was kind of a revolutionary time and just geologic discovery in general. The name of the devonian of course comes from the the devon area in england where some of these Fossil finds come from so logan found the specimens in the exposed sections of devonian rock on the shores of the gospel bay in quebec in particularly areas called seal cove which was mapping for coal and other minerals. All this fits in with the great canadian tradition of Of awesome fossil sites being discovered in not originally by paleontologists by people developing industry in heavy heavy transport and stuff like i think about how the shale beds like the burgess shale in the canadian rockies were really found because railroad workers who were building railroads through the area. We're finding these stone bugs everywhere and that eventually attracted the attention of paleontologists to come and investigate. Oh yeah In the world of trillo bites right and other creatures. Of course which will get back to later. So i want to note that one of One of my key sources on the the early history of fossil find Comes to us from paleo biologist of francis huber of the national museum of natural history in washington dc. Who wrote a two thousand and one piece titled Rotted wood algae fungus the history and life of prototypes. It's dawson 1859. And it's just a tremendous source on all this but it's also very concerned with naming renaming and miss naming things even getting into the various names. Used by logan and others to designate the cove. In which they they found this but times it may seem like a little tedious. If you read it but fair enough citation and in this citation and the illegitimate renaming of things is a vital part of this fossils human history. Yeah well you know you got to get people to agree on what they call things or it's going to be a lot harder to talk about them and different can become quite. A dramatic issues will unravel here. So in eighteen fifty-five logan's devonian flora flora fossil passed into the hands of noted canadian geologist. John william dawson. Who by the way. The mineral dasa night is named in his honor. He was particularly taken by a large specimen with the with the peculiar interior structure. It resembled a large tree and under a microscope. Became clear that the the fossilized was solidified containing an entangled mesh that resembled fungal my sillier. He even noted the my celia resemblance himself in his writings but he didn't really explore it further He did not explore the explore the fungal angle further but he was very interested this fossil. He traveled to seal coat himself in obtained additional samples. Okay so they've found this giant fossilized trunk of something. It looks like it could be the trunk of a tree. But examining it on microscopic level. It looks more like the texture of fungus than it does the texture of plant matter right. Yeah particularly my sillier now is the vegetative part of a fungus. Just reminded everybody. It's a it's a massive branching vein like high fe that you'll find underground or whatever the mushroom or the the fruiting body is emerging from mushroom itself is a death. Emergence life is actually thriving beneath the surface. The mushroom comes up to To release spores. Yeah the reproductive organ. Yeah now the way dawson interpreted this this This fossil was okay. We have something that looks like like fungus so what we have here is probably a rotting conifer tree. An early conifer tree. It's rotting it's decomposing. So i'm seeing the decomposed fungus within the decomposing specimen all preserved in a single fossil specimen. Well that would make sense. It's is a trunk. It's infested with fungal my sillier type structures right. And so he gave it the name prototypes. It's or essentially i you referring to the u. family texas So the the u tree right. Okay yeah so. so the. The actual name is is referring to conifer resemblance so Is it ideas out there. And then You know quite as a surprise to dawson. A scottish botanist by the name of william. C carruthers proposed a different interpretation. He said it will. This is perhaps. The fossil remains very large algae aquatic or perhaps terrestrial in nature. Algae of course can grow weird places like on ice and snow So he declared a new name he said no we're not gonna call this prototypes. It's we're gonna call this nematode okay but wait a minute. An algae the like a giant fossilized algae the size of a tree trunk. Yeah yeah. I mean that's creepy. Well yeah the one of the things this is pointed out by other studied is like there's basically no non weird explanation for this fossil. We'll get to several comments like that later. Yeah there's no normal way of looking at it now. Here's here's the thing about carruthers coming along and saying no this is nima first of all. There are rules with with the naming of things even at the time. So you're not allowed to just come in. Give it a new name. That it's an illegitimate renaming as so. That alone is kind of weird and and rude but then also according to huber carruthers was scathing and very personal in his criticism quote. Scathing and slanderous in terms of criticizing dawson and it seemed to like really caught dawson off guard. Based on these descriptions one is tempted. Do not know much. About william c carruthers but but just based on huber's writing one is tempted to view is something of a bully in his field also being an extremely respected botanist but then again perhaps our. Our vision of this rivalry is incomplete. If that interpretation is correct he would not be the only legitimately good scientists who also is lacking in manners. I another so. According to huber dawson fought for his initial classification but but then later he is rejecting apparently even trying to to make it seem. As if he never connected the fossil conifers at all and then he himself in his eighteen eighty eight book the geological history of plants illegitimately used the name name instead of prototypes. It's So i imagine that at least to the time that huber was writing in two thousand one. You don't do this just like switch the name to something else without a. I'd imagine a lot of fields have like an international naming committee that if there is going to be a name change would have to agree on it or something. Yeah i mean it's it's why for instance Ones fossil that we've discussed them. There's the show before Basil of sorace okay. I hear sorace in there that means lizard. It means king lizard but it was not We now was not a lizard at all. It was a mammal but we go back and change the name in this case. So it's a similar case here. The name protests. It stuck and did stick despite carruthers notion that we should switch to a different name. Yeah and that name. also prototypes. I-it's is still used today but names aside. So carruthers is pushing this interpretation okay. This is not a rotting conifer tree. That's full of kind of fungal infestation. This is a giant alga. So what happens with this interpretation. Well this becomes the dominant interpretation for awhile and it basically goes unquestioned until nineteen nineteen when one. Ah church brings up the possibility that this is a fungus after all considering the size is achieved by by certain contemporary fungus specimens such as Various woody Decompose they're fun guy. But this idea didn't take off. He seems to according to huber. Basically this guy was ignored. And the algebra interpretation continued with papers in a reasonably to say nineteen seventy nine and nineteen eighty-three continuing this threat of interpretation. I think it is worth stepping back to just appreciate again. The physical form of this thing. We're talking about the fossil records. Indicate that whatever this was alga rotting conifer tree or even fungus. It was huge. You know i've seen estimates of a maximum known the height of six or even eight meters twenty to twenty five feet. So you've got a giant six meter high stock of whatever it was so this is something that was alive at a time when we have no evidence that any vertebrates had yet left the water. There were no trees or anything like that. Yeah it's it's kind of like a treat. It's not a tree. Yeah it's it's a. It's a weird column of life that exists before there should be anything like a call them. Yeah you mentioned earlier. I think that this would have been at a time where this would have been without question. The tallest living thing on land no trees nothing stood above it. And i'm trying to imagine the implications of that if we were to live in this world. Because here's one for you. When you think of the word nature was the first thing that pops into your head might vary person to person. Maybe you're not like me. But i think most people at least intrigue filled eco regions. Think trees when they think nature. Yeah or you know. Even if i you know i really love the landscape of Say arizona which of course and karaoke encompasses as a variety of different environments. But but even if you're thinking about the desert you're probably thinking about cacti because Like the tallest features in a landscape. I think naturally become definitive landscape for us. When you think city you think buildings right when you think nature. This might be different for people who live in say like treeless environments they if you live in a step or something but if you live in an area with trees. The trees become synonymous nature the iconic life form. What is the speak for. The the suggestion is that he speaks for nature but he speaks for the trees because the trees are nature by being the tallest living objects on the ground in some sense assume them to be the iconic nature itself. So what is this thing. It's almost like you could imagine that if you were to walk around the landscape of the period where these things were dominant. Maybe early devonian or whatever th- this might be your idea of nature these giant mountains of whatever they are. Yeah i mean they were basically the floral lords of the earth. There is nothing else to derive them. So i think we should explore more the The continuing scientific debate about what the tax. Id's is but before that let's take a break and then we come back. We can delve into mushroom theory. Shopping is a lot less stressful. When you've got a firm on your side with the firm you can pay overtime. Thousands of stores like walmart pottery. Barn casper sleep posh mark and priceline and more whether you're shopping for one big ticket item or a few wishlist purchases affirm gives you a smarter and more transparent alternative to your credit card with no late fees or hidden charges firm tells you exactly how much you'll oh and win you'll be done paying so you can make the perfect purchase today with no gotcha tomorrow. Visit affirmed dot com slash stuff to shop. The latest in electron ix fashion homegoods travel and more. Then pick the plan that works best for you head to affirm dot com slash stuff to get started today. That's a firm dot com slash stuff or download. The free firm app for eligible customers this episode of stuff to blow. Your mind is brought to you by infiniti. Make your car buying experience as convenient as it is luxurious during the infinity winter sales event with infinity. Now infinity has rethought every step you take to get into a vehicle so each aspect of the process can be on your terms that means purchasing and leasing is offered online so you can do it in the comfort of home test drive without going to a dealership and get sales service from anywhere with pick ups and drop offs that come to you. It's the type of luxury that's made to fit you and your lifestyle so you can shop and buy and service the way you want. Infinity now experienced the new way to buy an infiniti at senator now dot com available at participating infinity retailers. We're back so we've been talking about these. Fossil organisms from of millions of years ago known as prototypes. Id's these giant pillars that used to be by far the tallest thing on land. And there's been this great debate about what these fossils were when they were alive. Was it the the trunk of a rotting conifer tree that was full of Fungal fibers was a giant alga. Or was it in fact a fungus. And now we're going to get into the details of the fungus theory. Yeah despite the conifer versus algae past for prototypes. It's the most popular hypothesis at the moment. Seems to be the fungus hypothesis not to say there are not criticisms or questions regarding the fungus hypothesis but it does seem to be the most popular interpretation amazing a giant six meter tall pillar of fungus. Right now i i do think it is important to note that we are not saying giant mushroom per se because that brings to mind a certain image. The shit talkies shape right. Yeah sort of super. Mario brothers kind of world or or something that you would see on on a black light fantasy painting in a room. Nobody is interpreting. Looked straight up Cliche mushroom right here. Brush ferry sitting on top of it right but the basically the fungus interpretation comes Comes down to the organism's internal structure. It's composed of interwoven tubes. Just five to fifty microns across and this would indicate not a plant but fungi a lichen or perhaps even an algae some of this points in that direction here as well but On this issue. I want to turn back to huber again because this is what he has to say about the algae interpretation and ultimately the the move towards the fungal interpretation. Okay quote in my opinion protects. Id's does not have the structural anatomy nor morphology of an algebra kimmo taxonomic analysis by nicklaus nineteen seventy-six concluded that the chemical constituents found in prototypes. It certain fatty acids cute and subaru differed from modern algebra but did not preclude an algebra affinity lack of evidence of liquefied supporting structures and the otherwise week tissues and presumed erect habit would have imposed considerable stress in a terrestrial habitat the presence of the compounds associated with a terrestrial habitat raised the possibility that the genus could survive on land did not prevent reiteration that the algebra affinity was still possible the anatomy morphology and occurrences cannot be refuted so easily. He also points to nineteen seventy-six transmission electron microscope findings from rudolf schmid in this a paper titled deceptive pours in pro-tech. It's an enigmatic devonian plant in this he reveals that septa pores are found here suggesting Fungal affinity septa pores are specialized dividing walls between cells. Septa found in almost all species of fungi in the file. Them bassetti. oh my cada. He points out that the inherent size of prototypes. Id's has long been a barrier to some when it comes to accepting fungal entity and he counters this by pointing that we have you know various examples of of quite large contemporary fungi and extensive my cillian networks. He poses that perhaps prototypes. It's itself had a vast underground network as well but we just don't have fossil evidence of that my silly a network but the possible picture here is is fascinating. An underground kingdom pro-tech zaidi's erecting enormous fruiting bodies high into the air to send its spores on the breeze spreading its kingdom even wider which causes me to have deeper thoughts about the role of fungus in the evolution of land creatures land ecosystems. Yeah this is the kind of of of mental image that the real hardcore Fungus fans. I think could really get behind. This is like this is a pulse statements Dream right here. I question here you you ever wonder why. We live on land and not underwater less wet. I mean it seems like a stupid question but you know. I stand by that like why. Why do we live in this. Evolutionary context land-based ecosystems rather than under the water where we our ancestors came from where we very well could have remained If you picture life on earth in the cambrian period about five hundred million years ago peak under the surface of the water and you would find lots of life ocean swarming with strange armies of scuttling undulating bilaterally. Symmetrical animals billions of trial bites. You've got you know these extinct. Bottom dwelling animals shaped kind of like death metal really police and a mini legged proto arthropods with hardened plates of armor on their backs but also all these other organisms Like the the lobe legged spiked worm that we call lusa genia. We've talked about that does yeah. Before group creatures called open baena which are swimming arthropods with five is a single long hose like process tentacle reaching out the front of the head and it was also the time. When complex predator prey relationships probably first evolved with predators possibly including the huge creature called a nominal occurs and it was a time of Geologically rapid evolution and diversification of marine animal body forms and survival strategies if you look in the period just before the cambrian period which has noticed the akron period. There you don't find any of this stuff you find you. Know maybe little indications of soft bodied worm spent like where are all these animals and then of course they didn't occur in an instant but on a geological timescale all these different animal body forms with all this morphological diversity. It all happens pretty rapidly. But of course it has long been the case that we understood all this was taking place under the water in the oceans that was simply where the life was back then. like we know from the fossil record that if you go back. Far enough all archaic life on earth lived in the oceans and the pre cambrian world. It seems the difference between ocean and land was like the difference between a lush forest in a lifeless desert in order to survive on land. Animal would have to find a way to tolerate dryness. Of course. I mean that's a big one but as well as other threats direct exposure to radiation from star which we now know is sunlight. Seems nice us but if you're not used to it it's probably pretty bad because it contains potentially deadly uv radiation And then perhaps most owning of all this would be a barren landscape and environment impoverished of chemical nutrition. Where do you get your nutrition and food from if you decide to go live up on the land. The land is dry devoid son blasted plateau of death. I think from like cambrian period. You could think of land as being like mars like what could live there. What could live there at. The time is probably limited to the kinds of things. We imagined possibly living on mars if there is any life on mars right you know maybe like microscopic bacterial type organisms. So how did our rich modern world of plants and animals and everything else come about. What did it take to turn these lifeless protrusion of rocky crust into living breathing ecosystems. It appears especially after some research. In the past few years that the answer might well be little tiny sprigs of fungus. That is what it took to make the land livable So let's back up a few years. I wanted to mention that. I was reading. Twenty sixteen scientific american article about research. Postulating that the first earth organism to take up life on land was actually a fungus Now there have been some developments since then but this was back in two thousand sixteen This was a now extinct. Fungal organism called. To- tubas and immediately thinking i want t shirt for my neighbor toward tubas Based on research published in two thousand sixteen in the botanical journal of villain society based on physical evidence including samples from libya and chad. That were four hundred. Forty two four hundred and forty five million years old and this again would have been a time when the land was basically barren but these fossils contained evidence of microscopic film and so fungus that are normally used to leach chemical nutrients from soil. But this would have been at a time when there was essentially nothing else that we know of living on the land. So what does this have to do with uh us well. Land ecosystems of course depend on soil. Right soil is the life. Plants need nutrient rich topsoil. In order to thrive animals need plants. In order to thrive. So where did the soil to support the evolution of land plants. Come from perhaps it came from early land. Colonizing fungus like toward a tubas according to paleontologist. Martin smith of durham university. In britain. He was at cambridge when he did this research. And he's quoted in this article quote by building up deeper richer. More stable soils torture would have paved the way for larger more complex green plants to quite literally take root in turn providing a food source for animals and allowing the escalation of terrestrial ecosystems. So the idea here is the fungus is the foothold. It's what creates the opportunity for land to be colonized by life. Forms evolved from the marine life forms below. I liked that. The fungus is the foothold shirt for you right And then Featured in the same article smith says quote by the time toward a tubas wind extinct the first trees and forests had come into existence. This humble subterranean fungus steadfastly performed. It's rotting and recycling service for some seventy million years as life on land transformed from simple crusty green films to a rich ecosystem. That wouldn't look out of place in a tropical greenhouse today so you go from almost mars to forest and plants and it's fungus like this tour to us. That probably helped make the soil to allow that to happen right because otherwise the to your point like it's the difference between the rich complex and perhaps in many cases overwhelming life beneath the waters and the desert of of the surface in the desert might be a fine. You can flop out. There might be a good way to get out of the competition for life and of course all the death it's going on below then the there's nothing to eat. You're you're you're out there away from all your food sources. You're going gonna have to flop back down right but eventually with time. You reached the point where there there is food. Here there is a the foothold is there. There is there is now a a a a new domain to colonize and conquer right So about towards the tuba. Specifically i i want to say that. Did it have a mushroom. Did ever fruiting body like like a mushroom cap that we know of at the time this article was published. There is not evidence of whether this fungus produced a fruiting body like a mushroom so so if you make you t shirt. I don't know if you can righteously depict the the mushroom form for toward the two best on maybe a little microscopic philemon. Yeah but anyway so early fungus that colonized land was actually able to mind lifeless rocks and minerals for some nutrients. And that's also pretty amazing right Generally you need to get your nutrients from other life forms and of course fungus does decompose other life forms like fungus helps the rot and recycling process. We were just talking about but it can also extract some nutrients just from the mineral crust of the earth and using that process can help turn lifeless topsoil into something more like the rich stuff you think of in your garden today but it doesn't stop there of course wants early. Land plants like liverworts so often thought to be one of the earliest forms of land plants. Once they come on the scene plants and fungi also form. You know complex symbiotic relationships with one. Another in different ways benefit from each other's presence. I i was reading a piece about a there was based on the bbc documentary about prehistoric fungus and the there was a quote from an associate professor of plant soil interactions at the university of leeds named katie field. And she said ultimately quote fungi plants. Move away from being these marginal tiny little things on the waters into large forests and entire ecosystems. So the fungi. Pave the way for plants to move away from the water's edge and colonized the continents. Like these these essentially become the small-scale forests in which the devonian animals would live things that were essentially like like millipedes and centipedes and things like mites and so forth like very small scale life but they they need an environment. They need a place to conduct their business. Need things to eat and this was. This was their jungle. Yes another really interesting point brought to my attention by that same. Cbcp's that. I'd never read about this before. But this is about the role of prehistoric fungus in shaping the evolution and eventual trophy dominance of the mammals that became are direct ancestors without fungus. We almost certainly wouldn't exist in multiple ways. And here's another one of those ways all right so the thing about the katie extinction event. We've discussed it many times on the show it's the the event that killed the dinosaurs. The non avian dinosaurs the dinosaurs that did not become modern day. Birds died in this event. about sixty five to sixty six million years ago. There was a great and sudden dying of many life forms. Maybe something like seventy percent of all life on earth when extinct think about eighty percent of animal species disappeared. Many scientists think this was probably mostly due to an enormous impact from space that there's still some disagreement about the relative role of other things like volcanic eruptions and other factors but the impact hypothesis. Which is the most common most important factor. That's attributed these days. It states that a giant comet or asteroid orbital speed struck the earth in an area that is now the cheek shoe crater in the yucatan peninsula and this impact of course it kicked up stuff. It kicked up an unbelievable amount of dust and particulate matter which clouded the atmosphere and blocked sunlight possibly for months at a time which kill off a huge amount of earth's plant life which of course needs sunlight survive. He cut off the sunlight. The plants die right. This is of course the same concept that is employed in the concept of nuclear winter in which a nuclear war would send up enough material under the smoke of of firestorms burning cities burning flores sending all that stuff up into the atmosphere in creating a kind of a sarcophagus on the earth preventing a as much sunlight from reaching the earth. Yes surface yeah yes similar concept so Of course the the most direct problem with this is it would disrupt the food chain at its source right. The food chain is typically based on photosynthetic organisms That make their bodies by using sunlight. They die without the sunlight and then with them dead. What can all the animals and other things eat. So it's it's going to kill things all throughout the food chain to resource deficiency but. There's another thing here that is worth considering which is the role of fungus so a blotted sky with lead to an earth just covered in dead decaying plant matter And again the sky is dark the this is almost a perfect condition for fun to thrive Think of earth. kt impact as mold. World it's mold planet maybe not literally but know the probably mold. I don't know i didn't look into its fungus so it would be boomtime for fungus and it would represent a threat to surviving animals which could succumb to fungal infections. In a world where fungus is all over the place and thriving and suddenly in this context in world where for hundreds of millions of years the dominant animals have been reptile formed. Our tiny mammalian ancestors would quite suddenly have a powerful survival advantage over reptiles being warm blooded in fact it seems that one of the pressures driving the evolution of warm blooded nece is the threat of infection by fungus. Like your warm body. Your dogs warmed by the warm bodies of the rats under the floorboards are in part machines for fighting parasitic infections. By fungus to quote arturo Divall a professor of public health at johns hopkins university Quote the reptiles are quite susceptible to fungal. Diseases be your typical mammal which maintains temperature in the mid thirties. Or so i guess that'd be celsius. Not fahrenheit creates a thermal exclusionary zone for fungi manuals being warm blooded gave them a foothold to become more successful in dominant across multiple ecosystems. During this time of doom and rot for the cold blooded kingdom of reptiles i. I think that's fascinating. Tens of millions of years before the discovery of penicillin killer fungus was already offering us a leg up by having shaped our evolution in such a way that we resist our ancestors resisted. It and the reptiles could not as easily resisted thus making helping mammals become more dominant and just one more thing on this Subject of general prehistoric fungus. There is a a twenty nineteen study was looking at the the chase land-based fungus development even farther back into prehistory so we would already We'd already seen evidence that the first living organisms to To to colonize to fully colonize the land where probably these little Fungal organisms there was a paper published in nature in two thousand nineteen by laurent called early fungi from the procure azoic era in arctic canada. And there was an excellent article about research and the new york times by former stuff. Blow your mind. Guest carl zimmer. I recommend checking that out. It's called a billion year. Old fungus may hold clues to life's arrival on land but the short version is that in two thousand nineteen this group of researchers they published findings of fossil remains of an ancient fungus which they named orissa firearm giraldi and this fungus is apparently about a billion years old like six hundred million years older than the previous last common ancestor of all fungus had been thought to emerge and if this is correct it would definitely mean that. Fungi were colonizing land on their own before plants before anything else that we know of lived on land except maybe some bacteria If so what were they eating ma- possibly bacteria we don't for sure. So basically zimmer saying that we are stardust we are golden we are billion year. Old fun guy. I don't think there's the suggestion that the fungus is an ancestor of our. But it is. It suggested that this fungus probably played an important role in shaping. The ecosystems lowered our direct ancestors to survive. So we are not of but we are at least unwitting. We're in the dead. We're in her debt all right on that note. We're going to take one more break. But when we come back we will return specifically to interpretations of pro-tech. It's hey everybody today. We want to talk to you about caserta by lutron. Smart lighting control brought to you by lutron pioneers in smart home technology. People think you need smart bulbs to get smart lighting but there is a smarter way caserta. Smart dimmers switches. Replace the switch in your wall making all of the lights that switch controls act smart now. Obviously this allows you to save money and control lighting in your home the way you want but also smart bulbs are only smart while the switch on the wall is on if someone you know your kids your spouse visitors inlaws etc flip it off. 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Let's put smart to work with ibm dot com slash watson assistant to learn more all right. We're back all right so we were discussing the proposal. That the protests. Id's fossils were actually gigantic stalks of Not a rotting conifer tree with fungus in it not a giant alga But just a huge piece of fungus at tree sized piece of fungus. What is the evidence for this. Well there was some. There's been more and more evidence supporting the fungal hypothesis in the recent decades To a quote from an article. I was reading about this new scientist from See kevin boyce a geophysicist of the university of chicago quote. No matter what argument you put forth people say it's crazy six meter fungus doesn't make any sense but here's the fossil and so why does boys wise boys so confident that it is a fungus. Well boyce was involved in research that attempted to look for clues to the classification of prototypes. Id's fossil's by analyzing different levels of trace carbon compounds within them I thought this was really interesting. Note that this is not carbon dating. These fossils are far too old to be subject to accurate carbon dating methods. And they're not they're not trying to establish dates for them but it does follow some similar principles to what's done in radiocarbon dating which is looking at different isotopes of the element carbon within the object and so in carbon dating these isotopes i think are usually carbon twelve carbon in the research on pro-tech sight it was carbon twelve and carbon thirteen and basically the reasoning went like this plants get essentially all of their carbon content from the co two in the air. Again one of my favorite facts about nature so counterintuitive plants make their bodies out of co two that they absorb from the atmosphere using energy acquired from sunlight to do the chemical work but the atoms that make up the carbon content of plants. That's from the air while you think about it next time. You burn charcoal. You're burning carbon. That was once the body of a plant that was made out of gas from the air. I don't think i'll ever get over that. I mean i. It always seems like the natural thing to assume that the matter that makes up a plant comes up out of the ground right And i think you know some small telling minerals and trace elements and stuff like that might be absorbed through water of course absorbed through the roots. But yeah the carbon content comes from the co two in the air out of thin air yeah And so for this reason of course because plants make their make their you know the carbon in their bodies out of the air the ratios of different carbon isotope. S- found in plants are fairly predictable for plants that were alive at the same time. It's based on the ratio of carbon isotopes found in the atmosphere but the ratios of carbon twelve and carbon. Thirteen found fungus are not always so predictable. Since like us they get the carbon content of their bodies from food rather than from the air and that food could potentially include a number of sources producing wacky isotope ratios between carbon twelve and carbon thirteen in what the researchers found was that in fact the carbon twelve carbon thirteen levels in these prototypes. Id's fossils not consistent suggesting that they are that they were not plants the carbon in them was coming from somewhere other than the air and thus that they were less likely to be plants more likely to be something that was making their bodies out of food that they ate which would include fungus another quote from boys in that new scientist article quote. A six meter fungus would be odd enough in the modern world but at least trees quite a bit bigger plants. At that time were a few feet tall invertebrate animals were small and there were no terrestrial vertebrates this fossil would have been all the more striking in such a diminutive landscape again standing up above anything else. That would have been around. It just yet dwarfed everything else to based on what i've read. I think i'm fairly convinced by the fungal hypothesis that this was a a giant six meter. Twenty foot tall piece of fungus. I like the idea that is often presented to that. it would have need. It would have needed to to grow that high so as to help spread. The spores have a tangible reason for achieving that height. I don't is there a reason In the in the algae theory about why an a giant alga. We need to be that tall. I is that it's not told they were supposed to be horizontal or something You do see the horizontal aspect of that brought up at times so that's certainly seems to be a possibility. But we'll get into another horizontal theory here in a minute. Now as we mentioned earlier the that algebra hypothesis has never completely gone away. In one of the morning arresting angles on it is that prototypes. It's might have been a composite from algae living among fungal filaments. This is of course nothing completely alien because we have these today We have liken right so this would have been essentially a parasitic or symbiotic relationship between the the algae and the fungus up but it would have essentially been a giant liken all right then now another tantalizing theory relates to liverworts which we mentioned are already being primitive form of of plant life. Kind of like like moss. A proto terrestrial plants. Yeah and so. It's been suggested that instead of these things in being vertical pillars instead of it being this landscape that is that is so hauntingly depict it. In some of these instances of paleo art detailing protests. It's what if instead. Yeah they were just rolled up carpets of liverworts. Now let me read a description. Here this was from a This was discussing a two thousand and ten american journal of botany paper by graham at all. And i'm gonna read just a quote from it here. Quote our comparative analyses instead indicate that prototypes. It's formed from partially degraded wind. Gravity or water rolled mats of mix. Oh trophic liverworts. Having fungal and santo bacterial associates much. Like the modern liverworts genius marsh. Antea we propose that the fossil body is largely derived from abundant highly degradation resistant tubular rizal. Aids of marquette liverworts intermixed with tubular microbial elements. So that sounds like a bit much for basically the idea here is imagine astroturf has been laid out across the devonian landscape and then the wind starts blowing wind or gravity or water right. All three of these things begins to roll the the astroturf backup wrestling mat wrestling rolling them up into these. A big tubes then these big roles of astroturf and those big roles of astroturf just sit there and then eventually fossilized. i basically. that's the idea. Except instead of it being astroturf it is The liverworts that have grown across the surface of the planet. Now the okay. I won't deny just because it's less exciting than the giant pillars of fungus innocence. It's exciting yes. The it certainly less exciting but i would argue that. It is equally weird. His his also just like a weird idea of the landscape like a landscape. That looks like they're just bunch of rolled up. Old carpets made out of green slime. That's that's strange and apparently this is not the apparently use. Some commentators have some issues with this particular theory. it's not. I don't think it's widely accepted but it is still such a strange idea. I can't help but find it. You know weirdly amusing. There's a actually a gain to be amused by there. Was actually a bit of art with this. Study tour looking up if you can find it. And it's it's just bizarre. It's like this bright green landscape. And then they're all these just rolls of moss carpet out there just laying around like somebody left them. As if the gods came to install vegetation on the earth and simply got bored or win break and just left everything half-finished. Now one last question. I thought we should look at is. Obviously you know there are no tree sized columns of fungus or whatever they were today so something happened to the prototypes. Id's to drive them. Extinct any idea what that might be. I think we don't know for sure. But huber has suggested something. The same researcher you were pointing to earlier huber has suggested that actually the prototypes. Id suffered parasitic infestations from recently evolved insects. Soon this this would be also a time. When the land is being colonized by various forms of invertebrates and these land willing arthropods would dig little holes into the stalks of prototypes ideas. You can apparently see evidence of these. Probable insect bore holes in the fossil remains of protects. Id's today and these might have played some role in driving giant fungus extinct again it comes back to the idea that the the fungal world essentially drives out into the wilderness and remakes it into something that's habitable but then come the new inhabitants then come the inheritors of the earth and the inheritors generally do not treat those that came before them so well so true but of course the fungus never really goes away goes underground and it is true i think we do have to reminder like we can get so obsessed with species did we. We forget sort of the broader view of life itself. You know so yes. It's not like it's not like the day the fungus died. It's not like the day. That the fungal legions loss. No they continued and continue to thrive on the planet but they thrive where they Where where there is a niche for them to occupy the fit right in there. Yup sometimes sometimes there's a sure he's the shrew for is particular time and place absolutely so there you have prototypes. It's obviously this topic. Where you know. Hopefully they'll be more studies in the future. That will shed more light on this fossil mystery. This mystery fossil. But but hopefully we we were. We did a good job here but just you know introducing you to its world to. It's strange world. we're not done with prehistoric fungus. I'm sure there will be more to come back to in the future. yes praise moi. We probably will speaking of the the demon queen of fungus from Dungeons and dragons in the dark in dragons. They have a particular Tree sized mushroom that everybody makes would substitute for the under dark. Called circle would so i can't help but sing An affinity here between circa would and prototypes. It's is basically the same concept well. Let's hope insects. Don't start boring holes in the dark. yeah also. I'm not completely sure you'd be able to build a log. Cabin out of prototypes. It's but but huber does mention a particular species of large mushroom that that was traditionally carved into some sort of shape By native peoples of north america. I believe you know one thing one question. I didn't find the answer to yet out. There is how hard would this thing of been. Yeah i mean could you. Yeah like could you carve it into boards and make lumber out of it or would it have been relatively soft and easy to knock over with a good shove. Yeah i mean i guess. Luckily they're there. There aren't going to be any large animals that are gonna come and push you over. It's gonna it's gonna come down to a kind of like we're talking with the roles it's gonna come down to win to water and gravity and these things are inevitably going to fall over. They did fall over. That's the that's how they are preserved as fossils horizontally and not vertically in the same way that our tallest and most impressive trees today will inevitably at some point fall over and become more zongol But i think it comes back to what he said about this. Being kind of the sticking point of sometimes for people with the vertical fungal interpretation people. Just say we'll have how could that be. How could these things have existed. How could they have stood. How could they have grown like this again. It just comes back to intriguing nature of it as well. It was just such an alien world in. This was the largest alien on the landscape desert for me. All right in the meantime you want to check out other episodes of stuff to blow your mind. You know where they are over stuff to blow your mind dot com. They're also wherever you get your podcast there million places to get a podcast these days. We just ask that you know wherever you go get stuff to blow your mind. 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robert lamb dawson carruthers huber caserta logan caserta lutron joe mccormack stielike jerry mccormick william edmond logan gospel bay francis huber John william dawson lutron huber carruthers william c carruthers huber dawson
SMNTY Book Club: Unapologetic

Stuff Mom Never Told You

42:19 min | 6 months ago

SMNTY Book Club: Unapologetic

"Did you know GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what guy could already save you. So what are you waiting for your dentist to actually believe you and your flashing every day? Absolutely great and you're cutting down on your sweets, of course wonderful then I don't even need to look in their great see in six months. Months, there's never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by October, seventh limitations apply visit GEICO. Dot Com for details. Hey, I'm Steve Greenberg the host of our hearts new podcast speed of sound speed of sound is a music history podcast that gives you an all access pass into the songs and sounds that become the soundtrack to our lives. You'll hear how the hits really hit the top of the charts straight from the artists and innovators who created the speed of sound premiers July twenty eighth. Listen and follow speed of sound on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts for wherever you listen to podcasts. Hey this is Anne and Samantha and Stefan never told you production of iheartradio. Today we have another episode of Book Club for you, and we are very excited to be talking about unapologetic, a black queer and feminist mandate for radical movements by Charlene carruthers, and this is a very timely book for a lot of reasons, probably a lot of them obvious. It takes a look at black intellectual thought and organizing and grassroots movements like the Haitian Revolution the civil rights movement here in the United States. Semitism and LGBTQ plus movements. To provide a flexible model for organizing while also calling for a more queer and feminist approach to black liberation, and and more radical approaches, well, the book delves into all the tools of white supremacy. Diet white supremacy uses to function to keep oppressors and power tools like the patriarchy and feminism and Homophobia and able ISM. Through her years of organizing cruthers also has recommendations for improving the longevity and effectiveness of social justice movements with things like healing justice within these movements, themselves and developing leaders. So very very timely. Yes, she also reexamines several other common issues that come up in organizing that unhelpful comparisons to pass movements or the generational disconnect social media infighting burn out questions of accountability pinning hopes on one single leader pastern present in only remembering the good things, a leader did not apologetic matic aspects, and how that hinder social justice movements, and she knows what she's talking about she wrote quote, says twenty, thirteen I have steered the growth and development of be Y. P., one hundred, which is the black youth project, one hundred and one of the most prolific and integral, black. Liberation. Movement organizations of the twenty th century. Yes And I very much enjoyed this book. It's a pretty quick quick read, but there's just so much. A wealth of information and there. Yeah so if you haven't read it yet highly highly recommend that you do. We did want to start with some definitions before we get too much into discussion, because just so we're all on the same page. So, one is queer. carruthers defines it quote queers I defining it here represents a continuum of possibilities outside of what are considered to be normal, sexual or gender, identities and behaviors. And she defines the Black Queer Feminist Lens as she says quote. The Black Queer Feminist Lens as a political practice practice in theory, based in black feminist Lgbtq, traditions and knowledge, through which people and groups see to bring their full cells into the process of dismantling all the systems of oppression. So this black we're feminist lens is so important throughout the book and as frequently shortened to be Q. F., but it's. Her approach is all about centering that. Using that as Not only a guidance, but in the title like a mandate. Just, really using it to inform. How to organize and just the kind of A. An understanding that that's what's being left out in most movements in white so important today exactly yeah. And we also wanted to include this quote from the book about the unique oppression of black people, anti blackness system beliefs and practices that attack a road and limit the humanity of black people. It was cultivated through the Trans Atlantic slave trade and continues today, and the policies and practices of Nation States, corporations, individuals and entire societies right, so we did one talk. A little bit about themes carruthers makes an impassioned informed case for the power organizing early on in the book. She quotes Frederick. Douglass quote power concedes nothing without a demand, and she says I believe that we must go further and say that power concedes nothing without an organized demand. Right, so let's talk about organizing. It's pretty key book She writes organizing by using the Black Queer feminist lens calls for us to be individuals and to work collectively with neither being at the expense of the other and that that's one thing I really loved about. Her approach and this isn't really an auto biography. She some personal stories throughout, but. There it's more. Lessons learned and history just as all of the history of. Black Liberation Movements and radical movements But I loved. Has She really emphasized that? There needs to be both sort of this individual. What do I want? What am I fighting for? What do I want to see, but also collectively? Because you can't achieve something in a vacuum I need to work together, right. She also talks about activism versus community organizing to important foundations. Developing leaders and strategizing to take action. Also note. Not all community organizing is radical. Many work to keep systems of oppression in place, who and those outs are pretty hard, yeah. So asking yourself. What world do you want to build? And what do you want for future generations? Who Are you? Who are your people? What do you want? What are we building? Are we ready to win? Yeah having those answers in place. Will really help. Guide you and what you feel that you can. Contribute, and what do you want to see and what you're fighting for? BURNOUT is a big problem and she discusses the killing of black imagination along with that of imagining. What this world that you're fighting for could look like. And the importance of that imagination comes to envisioning this world that you want to to live in. You want future generations to live in. She also discusses the importance of transformative change as opposed to reforms. So for example, she describes a quote from a black actress. I believe of black women. Being at the bottom of the social ladder. and hanging onto that bottom, rung and career there's. is a proponent of imagining. Different ladder like instead of you've got to kind this. Why do we have the time that letter at all think outside of that? Let's get a better. Are No ladder. WHO KNOWS LADDERS? Yeah, that'd be lovely. She also talks about the need for accountability in organizing and one of the things she does about within her own organizations is very raw as the example of the metoo movement within their own organization, she wrote she writes an amazing personal manner. That really does feel like hits close to home for anyone, and honestly is true if the truth is that there more women that are victimized than not than we must also know who the perpetrators of these. Incidents and we have to hold that person or even that accountable about what it is, and what it means, and and if we truly are saying, believe women and believe victims. And how do we actually do that? In regards to people, we know that people we respected and work with and just realizing at the same time that these truths can be devastating and I found her Relaying of incidents with that happening with her leadership in her own program was really beautifully raw of. It was kind of those levels of. How do we handle it? What does it come down to? And how do we hold our own accountable and without? Completely ostracizing someone and completely giving up on someone, but at the same time making sure that they take responsibility in their part to this, so it was definitely a nice insight to see how she opened up about her own struggles and try to come face to face when she has to be the one that says, what do we do? How do we Hindus and what do we do when our friend? Yeah! I really appreciated that too and I could feel like the anxiety in my own. Stomach reading that by what would I do? And I've thought about it because. Unfortunately as you say, the numbers indicate right. I probably do someone who's done. been involved in some kind of nonconsensual sexual thing and. That's a scary thought of. What you would do, but I know you have to have to hold people accountable for their actions to live out what you say, and if we truly believe, the victims needs to be believed in, there's so much connotation to. How do we do that? And at the same time? How do that as an organization that's supposed to be a leadership organization to impact these type of wrongs and do make change these types of wrongs as a whole big nutshell that you have to. Time her. Y. P. One hundred was in the national spotlight before this happened. It was a very stressful right. I felt that I. Do have other themes that we wanted to touch on, but first we have a quick break for word from our sponsor. This episode is brought to you by audible audible is the leading provider spoken-word entertainment and audiobooks ranging from bestsellers to celebrity memoirs, News, business and self development every month members get one credit to pick any title to audible originals from a monthly selection access to daily. News Digest and guided meditation programs, and that's not all they have. They also have podcasts at the ethical performances alias comedy and exclusive audible originals that you won't find anywhere else, and since a lot of us have more time at home, you can listen while cooking, exercising gardening, writing, or just relaxing, and you can also listen to our famous book club. Pick like unapologetic black, queer. Queer and feminist mandate for radical movements, and during this time of social distancing school closures audible has launched a special website where people can stream of their titles completely free, no strings attached for as long as the coordinating last. You don't need to be an audible member to access these stories simply visit stories dot audible dot com just click stream and listen as podcast listeners we know audible has something that is for you. visit audible dot com slash mom stuff. Our TEX MOM Steph to five, hundred, five hundred. That's audible dot com slash, M. O. M. S., T. U. F., R. Text, mom stuff to five, zero, zero, five, zero zero. Money is something we've talked about a lot on this show especially when it comes to women and the Awkward Taboo that there still is around it for a lot of us. How are you with Money Samantha? It took me a while to finally get to an kind of. Finance growing up I definitely did not talk about it with my parents. That was something that we learned about. Honestly. I don't think I even knew how to do a checkbook. Until I got a checking account, which was right before I went to college. I think and even when I was at home, it was my dad made the money, and my mom handled the finances and she would tell us whether or not. We could afford to McDonald's. Well I I was really fortunate because I was the banker at my elementary school, bank, and all my friends as I've grown up. We've been really open with money and how much we make, and how much we spend on things, and then has just been a huge benefit for me when it comes to things like go shading salary or Knowing how much is too much to pay for a my apartments, and when we talk about things as we so often do on this show like the gender wage gap and patriots parents, it's just it's such a big deal to talk about finances. Right Man I'm kind of jealous I wish I had that, but luckily there is a new podcast called friends who talk about money, and it is from John Hancock brings friends and families and couples together to take on the money taboo. By writer and financial add Claire Wasserman friends who talk about money as a show where you get to listen in as people discuss the role, money plays in relationships from sibling sharing a foam plan. Who Two couples navigating career change so east drop on the financial conversations. You've been avoiding and get advice from the experts to help you navigate those awkward many moments in your own life find France who talk about money from John Hancock wherever you get your podcast. And we're back. Thank you sponsor. Something else the book examines that we wanted to discuss is gendered violence and anti blackness so in the book she quotes Beth Ritchie. WHO's a scholar and anti violence activists? And Ritchie wrote surrounding the Violence Matrix is the tangled web of structural disadvantages, institutionalized racism gender, domination, classics, station Hetero Patriarchy and other forms of oppression that lock the abuse of black women in place. Responses need to be developed a take all the forms of abuse and all the spheres within which injustice occurs into account. carruthers uses the Bq up in Richie's violence matrix to demonstrate how all of this violence is connected social spheres, communities, home, governments, corporations, and how the US normalizes violence against black people women lgbtq community by limiting access to healthcare, not allowing self-determination in in who gets funding. Yes, so really driving the point home that all of these things are connected. You can't separate out. Sort of structural violence and say this is the only problem. But. You have to recognize the influence. They have on each other. She is also adamant about not leaving people out. There is of being inclusive in these movements she writes. And it's offering homophobia and transphobia half no place in our movement to allow us to go unchecked as counter revolutionary, if you're a liberation movement as people on the sidelines or absent altogether than it's not really laboratory. And later she goes on to say I want the lie that black people cannot be Black Queer Trans and women at the same time to die a swift death right I mean she has those points pretty quickly pretty fast late throughout the book and she didn't studying black liberation movements, carruthers identifies three commitments. Movements should collectively make to regenerate so one is building many strong leaders that means knowing yourself interests which. Does just a lofty goal in the so that's just like a year long meditations lesson. And also not quote passing the torch the need for multiple strong leaders and room to grow instead of just polling at your own. The ones that you know it should have an ability to bring in new ideas New People. Right I love that It was a quote shoes quoting somebody. I can't remember who. But about passing the torch, he said there is no torch to pass. like if you're waiting around for somebody to say, give you torch. Yeah, yeah, then. You're not going to get much done. The importance of creating spaces for healing She writes in the words of car page from the kindred healing justice, collective healing justice identifies how we can holistically respond to intervene on generational trauma and violence, and to bring collective practices that can impact and transform the consequences of oppression on our bodies, hearts and minds as she also about how the term self care needs to be rephrased and it Kinda hit me because we what we actually need is a care of others to help us and to help each other. Other, and it can't just be done by ourselves. But by trusted collective and I know it was a small bit the book, but it does hit me pretty quickly and obviously her, too, because she kind of sat there as she was speaking with a mentor, and they said that they were like Oh. Wait what yeah. I guess. That's true that the if if a movement if we're part of a movement at the a collective, we need those that we trust to help us in our care of ourselves as well. Yeah and that. That part. Of the book really. Resonated with me too just. She talks a lot about how this work can be. Almost always is very traumatizing. And when you're in it all the time, just the physical toll, not only mentally and emotionally, but the physical toll. It can take. And then as you say. We. Say this in so many episodes that I. Don't think it was this one, but in a recent one. That can take you out of the game and what? You're not helping anybody right, but it's it can be so hard to tell yourself when there's so many things so many injustices in wrongs to be corrected. There's this will have to keep going to keep going right almost like I don't i. don't have time. It's not worth. Stopping, but You do need to take those moments and have people. In your community can share that with you and help you so that you can regenerate. which is what this whole is all a part of so that. Has Been They. Don't die out or people just keep creating out of them right and I did love. Also she did talk about because it was so me. As it is so me, it's be especially being new to actually being a voice as opposed to being behind the scene about being silenced and being so traumatized that you are silence that you do the bare minimum, because you are petrified or just triggered so hard, like your emotional physically not able to put into words what needs to be done so therefore you just sit silently and waiting. Waiting which is more harmful as well which is like a double whammy, and she talks about that so loudly and about what that meant that she was say that she would make a point, but not make a point that she would stare something, but not to the depth, because you couldn't put into words, the trauma and the pain, because she was continuing to suffer from the trauma and the pain weather forth from your past experiences, or just being victimized to that moment, and being triggered in those moments from your past trauma and I was like. They, girl, you just got me. You got the real hard because I it to me. One of the hardest things as an ally is to know when to speak and to know when not to spirit, and because of the trauma that I've and both of us have gone through as children as later on in our adolescents in being silenced so hard through whether it was through violence whether it was through abuse Or, whether it was just pure neglect, in general that it kind of sits on you in a way in the level that you that emotions to try to bring that courage of stand up for something that you know it is important, and it is an heavy heavy issue it's. Stunting literally puts you in a place that you cannot grow, and not only that you're frozen to try to put any action, so she talked about that and and going beyond that, but it was. It was too close to home for that one. Yeah Yeah. That's a good segue to you. So that was part one over. Three commitments that she thinks movement should collectively to regenerate the second one is adopting healing justice as a core organizing value and practice. And then. The third one is combating liberalism with a principled struggle. She compares social movements to the human body to to cells, human beings being sells. Again, this one was challenging for me because she isn't talking about the damage of white liberalism, although she does include it, but liberalism as a whole, and how it has been bogged down by good intentions, and honestly mixed with if not grounded with. The idea of capitalism, and the growth of capitalism, and the change of that is too easy to compromise I guess honestly we can say this is where we are in our presidential election. This is exactly where we have come into this moment of liberalism me at one point in time was about freedom and rights and justice, but as we talk about what is happening. Liberalism is starting to become more of white. Speak for compromise and don't change too much, but I wanna be better human than that person. You know and jobs like. I'm not sure I can quite I'm not exactly sure can swallow all of this but I. Hear you down. That's a lot. Yeah, well, she. She definitely goes into into that, and that's one of the things I really appreciated about her writing as well is she's. Very. She doesn't romanticise things shows. She talked about the Obama era unlike the good things, but also all these bad things, and that's what stands on. Is that you cannot as we said at the beginning her her, all thing was, you cannot sit here and pretend. Everything was great when it wasn't. And you have to acknowledge the false in order to progress and to make change. Yeah, and that is. She makes that point throughout and I really really appreciated it because it's true if you're like ignoring. All these other issues that are happening if you're not using this. Cab Black Queer Feminist Lens and are okay with these injustices are they're just not in your you're. You're not worried about them. then. Yeah, things aren't going to change. The system will continue on right so. I really appreciate it how she did that and she did bring up. With the liberalism and white liberalism how it is so often. Black Women. Working, to get. Democrats elected or that has been the case for a long time and then. Not Getting anything that they ask for right like being largely ignored right. Yeah. Yeah Another key aspect of the book and of organizing is understanding history and context, and in this sense, the history of black people and black radical movements, so carruthers focuses and on a couple of things, but one of them is the history of Modern Day Haiti. which was previously the militarize colony of Santo Domingo which became the Western Hemisphere's first independent black nation, she uses L. Bakers, understanding of radicalism here quote in order for us as poor and oppressed people to become part of a society that is meaningful. The system under which we now exists has to be radically changed. This means that we are going to have to learn to think and radical terms I use the term radical in its original meaning. Getting down to an understanding the root, cause, it means facing a system that does not lend itself to your needs and devising means by which you change that system. So before the eighteen o four Haitian. Revolution Enslaved Africans died from overworking or violence within ten years on average over one million Haitian freedom fighters overthrew the fridge colonizers and established a black republic, the first in the western hemisphere this disrupted the trae for France the UK and the US and these countries made sure to make things ridiculously difficult for Haiti creating and exacerbating things like poverty as we can see today. And she expounds on the hammer home, the importance of telling the stories of black radical traditions and recognizing contradictions to move forward like the historical lack of lgbtq plus voices lack of women's voices, and some of these movements even though a Lotta Times. They were the ones doing the work. and. A lot of these histories are missing from our popular narrative the history that we popularly tell. She uses the case of Mrs Rec- Taylor. Who In nineteen, forty, four was kidnapped and raped by ten white men and boys. Investigating this Rosa Parks organized, bring together prominent black activists and organizations in Alabama where this occurred. To create the Alabama Committee for equal justice for Mrs, REC- Taylor, the Chicago defender labeled this campaign as the strongest effort for equality in a decade led by black women. This campaign drew level support and coalitions previously unseen. or at least around that time very very rare to see something like that for combating the Sexual Violence Black Women and girls faced, and it became key in the fight for black liberation taking place. Is Largely told largely forgotten, we just said and another example she goes as Bayard rust, an openly gay black man, being pushed aside for quote, more palatable, black leaders or the stories of Marsha p Johnson and Sylvia Rivera that we touched on in our protests and organizing episodes. Yeah, and she. She makes the point that there's so much power in seeing yourself reflected in people like this in the Liberation Movement and the value of it when it comes to dismantling homophobia and transphobia. In particular, but just being able to to see these people. Making these changes. Being. Fighting this fight, and and being powerful in it and then thinking. We always say if you can see you can be it. It's just. I don't know if people. I think people often forget. that. Will you mean that outside of? A representation in entertainment right I, think has changed as the rate at least like if you don't see it, become it. Yeah, I know that's become the new kind of power. We don't have that. Let me try this right and I love it. I Love I do too. Yeah I mean it definitely is changing now when we look at who is leading a lot of these. Movements are unlike. Again! What they were before. We would just weren't seeing. Them are hearing about them as much. She have to go through these deaths of rape crisis in order to be willing to see who actually have been trying to push it forward. We've just been in a system where it is not advantageous for us to know of them. Yeah, she makes the point like. You have this big Hollywood movie with Sean Penn. multimillion dollar for milk, but you don't have anything. For Marsha P. Johnson Sylvia Rivera. What if we did right like with the same funding, not just. On the same level, right, yeah! Yes. So we do have a little more for you listeners, but first we're going pause for one more break for word from our sponsor. Hi I'm Heidi Markov host of the coming. What to expect podcasts on iheartradio. Motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood. Did you know that black moms in the US are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy, related complication because of a lack of quality care that's unacceptable, and that's why I'm asking you to join US unto lie. Twenty-second are six annual bump day to celebrate beautiful bumps in healthy pregnancies and show your solidarity and support for MOMS everywhere. Just share them pastor, present yours or bump. You love with the Hashtag bump day for more information. Go to what to expect project. Dot Org. and. We're back. Thank you sponsor and we just wanted to touch on a few points. That may maybe particularly. Resonated with US and. One for me was I. really appreciated her honesty in terms of feeling. Doubt. Or that she wasn't sure what to do at times. And making mistakes in growing and recognizing that and she shares the story of. A conversation she had with somebody you. She was working with and. He said you know I'm not I'm not fully woke. I'm pretty wokers. He says. I'm not quite fully woke, but I'm waking up. Yeah, but yeah, basically being. There you, you want to have room to grow. There's just no instance where being like oh I'm perfect right now. I don't need anything else. That's never good and I feel like a lot of times. We hold ourselves back, or we hold ourselves to unachievable standards that do prevented from being as effective as we can't be. When it comes to fighting for change and I, know we've talked about that. In specific before when it comes to feminism, and how for a long time I felt like. Well here all these. Examples well. I'm not a good feminist, because of this and this, how can I speak about it? And it helped me back and it kept quiet and that's. The opposite of what we want and need. Right now and When I when I do think on it. especially. As, I've been on this show, there are things I. Look back that I've said or done or times that I've really failed. That I wish so desperately I could change, and it did keep me quiet. For a long time. But. I learned from those things like as painful as it still is I'm not gonNA. Lie some of this. Still painful, I did I learned from it and. You can't let that. Stand in the way. Of doing something right like we were talking about just being silenced than being so traumatized that we are silence. And she did talk about about not just cancelled. People without actually teaching people, and that's not the way to go either and we've talked about this before, and we've talked about culture before and I know that's a big subject right now. With the Harper's article, not gonNA. Talk about, but in the fact that there's nothing nothing happens. Change happens just by saying you're wrong and dismissing them, but change happens when you can teach in in show the what is the better, or why is wrong or what's happening of course? The conversation would also be laid at the fact that we put that on most of the Times The marginalized community. We put that on people's shoulders. Who should not to be responsible to be the burden to teach us or teach others? In on all of this, but yeah, I think it was. Bringing up so many good points all like large and small, but I was just like okay. How do I grasp all these and she did talk about education. And the work never been done and part of our responsibilities well, but she she also talk about the entire blackness as adaptable in the face of resistance to oppression, and I found that really like Oh. Let's less true. It is and weather is adaptable for people to say, but I'm not as racist as this or I'm not racist. Anti blackness when you say in terms of these levels and she talks about this also as an educational access, being privileged and again. I think that's kind of goes without saying which is part of the problem we see all the time is who afforded the better education, and why and why is it so limited? And why is it so Segregated for making sure those who are already in the good spot to be elevated would continue to be elevated as Nag into opportunities for those who may have never had that same opportunities and I thought that was really good conversation about that as well about growing and how? Not, only do we need to look at those as problematic, but we also need to be willing to share that wealth of knowledge as well. Oh, yeah yeah I love that too, and I think there's something super. That's so important that. We do share. I mean exactly what she did. She did it in Book Form Yes we share our knowledge of how how do we make these things work or What our? Lessons I've learned through my experience. I can share to someone who is a younger person or looking to lead or both of those things. So not as intimidating, and you can just be open with your experiences. And it. It just. It's like the opposite of `gate-keeping. Gates. We need to come up with the term for this I'm sure there are. Yes well, it will come to his later later. Dr Health. Just the. Welcoming Committee that banned welcoming committee. Being transparent and she's very open about kind of radical honesty rate. Is Unapologetic and I loved that everything about this is why I think is. An easy read `but hard read. Right everything mattered all those conversations. A Yes, okay! Oh okay. Oh? Okay type everything in in all of that is how she kind of just make sure that you're. Aware that she's seeing these problems, she's had time to sit down and have conversations with people and see it in the system and see why it doesn't work this. This has to be talked about, and it's all important, and I don't have time to be just cute and give you a cutesy anonymisation of what might be wrong. It's literally here it is. I'M NOT GONNA. Apologize for how honest it is, and how organized it is like she is absolutely there with a plan is a plan. Is a guide Yeah Oh, yeah. And one of the things she touched on that I. Really liked is the importance of a multi pronged approach that there's not just one way to be an activist or to organize that we do all of these different ways. Working in tandem working together. And you can tell like she's seen. Some of this infighting of people kind of judging others for this is the way to do it and no other way. But keeping people out, you don't want to keep people out who are? In this fight. And Yeah, she definitely does an amazing job. Highlighting Black Queer women who organized in history and also just acknowledging. What they had to do in order to dismantle so much of what is happening. Today so she doesn't amazing job and making sure she she highlights black where women who have organized in history, and acknowledging that in order to dismantle so much of what is happening is to dispense sexism and racism in that one without the other is not fruitful. She does an amazing job and making sure. We have a conversation about why intersection. is so important and what that truly truly means which again she talks about women in history where women history acquire identifying gender non conforming communities who would come together, and or maybe own their own try to dismantle the entirety of what is the problem and it's not one without the and talking about why these people are so important, and why is been failing? Because oftentimes one ignores the other, and you can't do that whether it's the suffragette movement with a white women say all about us, or versus some of the even civil rights movement, which talks about only black men and acknowledging only black men. So I think that's kind of conversation that has to be the big point is we have to dismantle both an order to see any type of reform? Yeah. Yeah and. Able as well so many so many things, yes, about being intersectional that. We do have to keep in mind and they are all connected. And Yeah, I guess in conclusion this. Very timely of very much needed. Centering Black Queer women who've been doing the work and getting things done and what we can learn from them throughout history and bright now without. Forgetting our racing, them are being like a white lady, showing up to your first protests, and like I know what to do, listen to me, no! No. sharing knowledge about what worked for her and what hasn't lessons? She's learned how to move forward. It really is a great. Primer on organizing, and and how can. Be More efficient as we move forward. And also acknowledging that we have to allow the Black Queer, women to lead or those identifying women to be the leader in movements like those, and why that's important and not trying to overtake for. US Yes. So. Definitely definitely recommends. We. Love getting these recommendations from you. Because I know, some of your listeners wrote in about this one. Please keep sending those. We got to choose our next book and we want your help to do it. Our email is steph media. MOM stuff at IHEARTMEDIA DOT com. You can also find us on Instagram at stuff I've never told you or on twitter at mom Steph podcast, thanks always to or super producer Andrew Howard. And thanks to you for listening stuff I'm never told US production of iheartradio for more podcasts from iheartradio visit the iheartradio, APP apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Hi I'm Heidi Markov. What to expect when you're expecting and host of the upcoming what to expect podcast Iheartradio? I always say motherhood is the ultimate sisterhood, but did you know that black moms? In the United States are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy, related complication, because of disparities in care and more than two thirds of those deaths are preventable. That's unacceptable and that's why I'm asking you to join us on July twenty second for our six annual bump day. Day to celebrate futile bumps in healthy pregnancies raise awareness and show your solidarity and support for every mom everywhere just share a bump pastor present yours or bumpy love with the Hashtag bump day, so every mom can expect a healthy beginning and a healthy future for herself and the baby. She loves on July Twenty second. Please spread the word share the love help save lives. See you on bump day for more information. Go to what to expect project DOT org. Guys, it's bobby bones. I host the bobby bones show and I'm pretty much always sleepy because I wake up at three o'clock in the morning a couple of hours later on my friends together we get into a room and we radio show wish our allies. We tell our stories. We try to find as much good in the world. If you possibly can, and we looked through the news of the day. The you care about also your favorite country artists are always stopping by to hang out and share their lives and music, too. So wake up with a bunch of my friends. I ninety eight point seven W. Q in Washington dc or wherever the rotates you on the iheartradio APP.

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Podcast: A Guide to Augmenting VoIP Services with Collaboration Offerings

Telecom Reseller

27:13 min | 3 months ago

Podcast: A Guide to Augmenting VoIP Services with Collaboration Offerings

"This is the green and the publisher telecom reseller. In. Today's with Todd carruthers. WHO's the CRO of Kanter Pass Tod, thank you for joining me today. You'll probably face always like to have a part of these podcast and things for reading me back. So we're GONNA be talking about something we haven't been talking about lately on the podcasts we've been doing lately I'm going to be talking about a guy to augmenting voip services with collaboration offerings. Seems to me to be very timely. Tuck I WHAT IS THE COUNTER PASS So kinda pass. Company that started right around two thousand and two We have sold millions of clients into the industry since that time and when I say class there what I would call Sophos that work across any platform and he space from for. in the market we have been to Kinda either defacto standard sometimes called that and That's because a lot of early work we did in the ICS. To help to find the standards for SIP phones really everyone uses today and for us. You know the user experience for UC and ucse starts from this off Oh 'cause it's really the face of the service. So for us, it's a very important component of of the entire user experience and something that that we're you know for the industry and providing and you know since the the I started can be in this market and folks in the south. We we expanded and and offer other You know either products or services from other products around team messaging, videoconferencing screen sharing about the things that we see some of the other solutions. But we go back to our unique place in the market where we work against any call server farm out there today and just overlay those services to that. So it seems to me that in the last few months is we've been going through this crisis. The word collaboration has gone from. You know something we sorta talk about to something we seem to be doing almost every hour by the hour with these types of meetings. absolately and and I can almost pinpointed down to the to the the time already happened in this kind of turn over in the market and an overnight and probably more accurately over a weekend the value proposition went from you know everything about productivity cost savings, things like that too it's. Now because really that that weekend of March. Working Fifteen. People left on the thirteenth of March and things, and basically a studio next. Monday, and on that sixteen and said, don't come into. Kind of thing, and so we've seen large growth and a lot of different solutions and I think you know a lot will would look at the lice of Zoom and teams though certainly come up quite a bit and others I think all of us in the market of seeing growth to during this time. I think it's important that you know what we're seeing now is a little bit different than what I mean by that is that that kind of overnight necessity forced a lot of hands of lot of icy and operations teams just quickly get a solution in place, and now we're seeing particularly through through the lens of our channel partners is kind of this reinvestment or this is really evaluation of the solutions and and panicking. Now, what makes sense for us more long-term instead of staying with what we had to jump into? So that's that's an interesting. Kind of twist to the story because I think a lot of folks just kind of assumed that people chose to begin with but they're gonNA stay with and and I think that's not necessarily true. So I think there was the next year. This you know kind of keeps the this to be as strong as it is and influencing our our work decisions like that insane and work from home. You know it's GonNa Really be a little bit different process and I think that you're gonNA, see reevaluation of a lot of these tools going forward So it sounds to me like, yeah, we we have this sort of scramble and people kind of just sort put together a kid as best they could back in March or April. So are you saying that now people are starting to see hey, I've got a creative writer strategy. I've got to put together something much more coherent. Yeah Yeah and kind of the as an example for for for just illustrated purposes here. Basically, it's you know we need to have people work at home. So that means needs to have some kind of conferencing solution quickly that is more robust provis what we tend to overuse industry collaborative services and things like that Now it's like, okay. Now, we have this almost dysfunctional set of tools that we scrambled to put in place, and now we users that are that are in our company that are using you know. Two to five or seven tools that are disjointed don't work well together and and more importantly don't necessarily interface nicely to to our external customers or external you know folks that we work with. And and more importantly doesn't doesn't really work well with our existing infrastructure that we've you know he's their selves over the years to have a proper evolution plan migration plan to support our everyday services such as voice. So even though today, for example, we're on a lot of Video conferencing calls into the phone is still really important. In fact, you know the ways that we think about it is that you know the mobile phone is your is is your social security number of your of your personal life, and in your business number is the same thing for your business life. So that's the one number that someone gets you They're not gonNA scramble looking at what's up facebook Instagram, all these other tools that you can communicate talk to each other. Trying to get a hold of you, they're going to call that number. Of course, they can email us well things like that, and then with the rise of estimates and other services attached to the business number, it makes it even stronger. So that's what I'm talking about is is now that reevaluation kind of a pro, you know Phase I'll say we're going through in this in this. ICU tools is stepping back and saying, okay look how can I reduce my costs? You still have that mandate as an icy organization operations organization and how can increase productivity and that story now is changed from the use of the tool and the theme of being able to use video collaboration things like that. To reduce those tools to have a more seamless you know kind of kind of user experience and and we're seeing that pretty pretty well. Through the lens of our product, because we are the face of the service as a client, we're the first part of that kind of user experience of being able to make phone calls and for US Adeane T. messaging adding on video conferencing comes very easily on top of that of that business. I. Did that business phone number and it's an overlay to what they already have today a place that they've had for years in place it, which is the. Common P. X. hosted PBS service, they have from other vendors. So we're starting to see more and more of that. I. Think it's GonNa be interesting over the next six to twelve months how this reevaluation goes in happens but I think you're gonNA see kind of switching of tools and and consolidation more importantly of tools going forward. So tablets breaking down and let's start with the end user if I'm an enterprising user. And as we've been discussing, you know back in March I scrambled maybe I've been doing refinements now I'm trying to get a bigger picture. What are my next steps is an enterprise end user? Yes I. Think it's really important that then user has an upward communications into the icy organization operations team to. Let them know what tools that you're using and and because we're finding a lot of it folks are surprised that a lot of their employees and different tools communicate externally or internally of the business i. think that communication helps to help guide kind of. Doing what you're looking for and and also a main use cases and user experience that those those users want I'm going back to you know talking about the phone number, it's you know the phone number's always essential kind of Identity that. Enjoys external folks will use to contact that person. So having a solution that centers around that and branches off to other services that can be used internally externally I eagerly is very important. So as an example for us, we have a Solution Korea teams and teams has has done well because it centers around that kind of. Core value proposition of everything happens around the phone number yet most of my communications especially since since Kobe come around the video conferencing side of it so I have one application is my phone that's my cell at works mobile device. DESKTOP UM media I don't have a sacrifice, my user experience in the mobile I. Don't check quality that kind of thing. and. Then it also as on that team messaging and also the video often capability. So basically most think of it as a UC, remote control in my pocket or my desktop that gives me the voice services used for the past twenty years for for Voice Communication but also extends itself estimates communications into by t messaging or videoconferencing, and spring operation. All within one single. You don't need three or four different applications soon, have zoom. We don't have your your so hard phone you don't have your slack. Key Messaging. Just have one and it's games in this in this example, and that's a very powerful type of a proposition because for the end user, it simplifies life simplifies how they communicate It makes it agnostic that people that don't happen have the breeze solution because they can still access the same services when they're when they're interacting with the person that does have British teams, and then it also gives them the ability to use their though system they use in. voicemail medication things like that. They can have the kind of the best of both worlds converge into one. So I think that's absolutely you know kind of where the end user enterprise side is coming from, and as we know most of us out, there are not gonna be technical enterprise ties to really juggle a bunch of different tools and understand all that. But I, see team loves having a single too because it's easy for the Damenich, less diminish like Chili's or experienced better. So makes it easier for the end user to from that standpoint? And and I. Understand from what we've talked about before the team also is a little bit easier to use for the actual end user especially in companies where you know maybe some of the people doing may have not have limited technical skills. Yes that's correct, and in fact, we embrace web technologies and web services that make it easy for sterile users to access the services that are powered by teams. But also the application that we deploy with brief scenes is super intuitive. Very easy to use but also probably the most important thing is very reliable particularly in the mobile space and I think that's something that we kinda talk about the industry and a wave our hands at in. That, kind of thing. But you know the mobility mobile experience is so important to the overall usage of of ucse specially with with the current pandemic because users need to have they have their mobile phone on them all the time the need to be able syndicate with that. So have an application that is on the business side that is very reliable. Reachable dozen fail. For example, when you switch between Wifi and and and the mobile network is very important and those are the things that that are that are important to this. But the Casper half I'm a I'm easier experience and and that's why I her factory really start with the mole experience I and work our way back into the desktop because the desktop a little bit easier to manage because you're you're at at worst matic at best year fixed of the mobile device, it's always changing the environment is always changing. Everything from network connectivity issues and having that at that throughput that you need in in being able to respond to it on application basis but also being able to work with different accessories that are attached to it and being able to make the user experience super easy I mean you can even start eight video conference call right from your mobile device. So that's why the mobility aspect is really important in these into that team story as it relates to that So I picked up in what you were talking about just spin also improved utilization of features. Yes. That's been important focus for us and You know coming from the smartphone only out of a lot of our users obviously, you know think of us as. A. Way Provider by being able to interject the key messaging videoconferencing I think is actually going to be almost more important for us you know down the road than than just voice services because the interaction between the two makes it very important for them to be able to communicate on a universal basis with not just other team members that are on the same network, but also external users as. Well. So that's been a big focus of us and making it easy to utilize those services away that This was in the workflow of of our customers are end users what regardless of what channel we go through whether it be through service provider or traditional bad bar channels that type of thing we met that make it very easy for us to use that technology and that's been a focus for us. So switching gears and looking at it from the point of view of the channel. And the MSP's and other companies that are that are actually selling reselling. Services, you know it's a really complicated moment because there's all the changes that are happening with their customers. There's a lot of questions about you know what should I be offering in my portfolio? So how does this pan out for them? Yes. So over the last Say Twenty four months. We've really focused on our go to market and to make it very easy for I, access our technology and our products and solutions 'cause obviously, you know we've done a lot of work around the user experience as we talked about earlier in this in this podcast. So we have a couple of days mark I think. Start there the first way is we have our one hundred percent digitally delivered go to my channel, which is our store online store, and we sell two solutions there. Once called Brea Solo, which is for the individual user just wants to have a solution that they have screen sharing built in They can also be able to have a voice capability against the PBS thing, but then they can go to us. Teams, which enables video collaboration services as well and he messaging that type of thing I think that's that's really important for the for the customers as well because they're able to quickly develop their own team with an online portal and they don't have to have a PhD in technology to do it it's a very simple online setup. So we have a lot of folks in different roles at aren't. Testicles are signing up for for pre teams and base their effectively they get the deal seen collaboration screen, sharing and of course, the voice over to their pbs but they want to Hook that up but they don't have to and that's what the solution. So it's a little bit different than the. So I I think I mentioned that so last year and it doesn't even have that in brea teams. Regardless the idea about eight able to have this overlay solution quickly but start with team boys. So you can communicate with your team having seen messaging right away. It's super important for estimate so that that product is delivered hundred percent digitally and anyone can sign up for it. We you know, of course, is trial program there. You can add us through the portal very easily that type of thing. So we by the way, we've seen a different use cases there. You know it's targeted toward the SME you know side of in Hughes's but you know in some case, I know that families have used to communicate within the family and family. Get togethers. Virtually so I think it's you know we've had a personal trainer, use it for his personal training business and using it for you know the classes. So we're finding that it's kind of branching out into different areas. So it was kind of fun to see the different use emerge. So that's that's solution. Now, I'm the traditional that bar channel enter ICS, P., S. p. business, those types of channels we have a protocol brea enterprise, which is the same thing really is what I described with brea teams. It's just branded as re enterprise by. On the channels vitamin for bad bars, we have integrated into a partner portal. So you can have a bad have an account that sets up a bar. Within the bar and of. It has a very nice parent child relationship be down the chain and they can Parisian users within a second, really and and and have them running very quickly, and that's great because they get access to all the services talked about before collaboration depend on the Pakistan collaboration t messaging, it can overlay with their current also resolution. Thing and the channel like that because they don't have to get involved into the Sophos so much they can sell it over with they've already sold to customers and the other thing a lot of gentle partners that we deal with at least have a lot of open source based appointments like free switch and free. PBS. Those kind of things and a lot of those companies don't have access easy access to the video cooperation or screen sharing tools. That are directly related to to those platforms. So they have to later on other services like resume or things like that, and then we get into that dilemma we talked about earlier we have multiple tools that are that are causing additional money and. Causing more general and if they went with our solution as an overlay, get the business phone and then there's other services for in some cases you know third half. A sixth of the price that they're paying today with with all these other tools that they may be using. So that's a very powerful solution that we found US only channel and our channel business is doing very well and I. Think it's because of that we have the right offering for that that type of scenario, and then for the MSP's in the ICS's and even the larger traditional service providers that want to get away from being Metoo, we see that they're taking our enterprise solution customizing with. Their logo, their brand, their technical customisation. So they can differentiate in market, and then they resell it and they so virtually oem in and shoot their and their customer base and I. think that's an interesting space as well because I think these these over the top providers just by skype did early on boy are Kinda paving the way for for the market and showing that people do use services. So I think a lot of these service providers to use the same kind of tools to compete against them. Those other over the top providers and with their rant and do it their way and leverage their current infrastructure to to have the cost competitive high value solution to their to their customers in through their channels as they put a market. So we're very excited that we have these three different approaches to market. You know hundred digital dress the VAT var channel to this channel, and then the service provider channel as well. So how is this playing out on at the vertical? Industry by Industry. Yes I think that's a great great question and kind of what we're seeing and we're we're focused on is that you know what? I'll call the horizontal space, which is really everything we covered up to this point this discussion. is becoming more and more competitive and everyone's racing. You know kind of the bottom in terms of price higher value. Of course I'm GonNa away about what we see kind of what we're focused on is the verticals because the technology we've developed for the Horizontal Space Fits nicely into the future roadmap or the features I think I've heard of those into the road methodist. And let me give you some examples. So we are back and. I think it was January we announcer relationship with Honeywell and honeywell leverages us in their safety tippety group with the handhelds to it through a variety of different verticals that could be traveled justice after be healthcare that can be retail hospitality. A lot of those you know vertebral that need that that handheld device and these are rugged devices That would be used these cases better typically. based. And that market you know big focus on applications pusher talk which we house voice communication messaging. But if you think about in kind of you know think about the future that you can imagine that a lot of those verticals could leverage UC UC. So t messaging instead of doing push to talk as an example, certainly would fit with the you know the younger worker frontline workers better used to gene as first line of communication and also video conferencing and someone may say, well, why would someone at a retailer one video conferencing? Well, but do you think about the the shopping experience? It becomes every day more and more competitive. Differentiation still really comes from one area that customer experience. Making. Sure. The customer has the best buying experience and doesn't have any kind of business after the purchase and and doesn't you know second guess what they're doing as. So when you think about video compensating, you can start at your home pick on the retail side of here you can start at your home with a call into the reseller that you're that you want to discuss probably by and that it could take you to a video conference session with these sales associate where their sales associate. You would see that I associated screen and then we. Would see. Perhaps is something that you're trying to share whether it be a You know a kind of drying a how you WanNa lay out your speaker system for your house whatever the case may be and the negative actually show you the product on the floor actually do a demonstration on the floor of what they what you can buy and especially in the pandemic you know that's a safe way to show they demonstrated you start developing that relationship with that that salesperson I've been the phone, and then when you go pick it up and it makes that kind of transition very easy if that's cold as it is without. So I think those kind of scenarios are going to happen as we progress down the path and those verticals and healthcare's already seen it. We have some customers today that are you know into telehealth and and Leverage C K for example, into different solutions out there. But being able to do remote health is very important and having video conference falls in that regard to to work with your doctor on on stickle particular medically, shoes is kind of a very obvious I used taste. So I think as we go for these verticals, actually benefit a lot from all the technologies that we've developed in this horizontal space. For for we just does you know unified communications and collaboration is GonNa be even more profound in these verticals and more helpful to the different use cases that fit within the workflow, which is a big big important piece of this F was in the workflow of those verticals. I WanNa thank you for joining me today and giving us an overview of I. think a really really timely topic right now because I think we really been talking about what are the next steps in the coming months as we move into the new year in making the services that channel fell very relevant to the enterprise, and now enterprises should be thinking about their next steps to working with learn more. So definitely. Go to www dot com. Our website is perfect place for that. I think also our social media channels is perfect. We we produce. Contents that really deals with a lot of the kind of the issues that a lot of unusual space and UCSE, and and how to leverage the the best tool sets and things like that. It doesn't discover kind of covers these kind of. Things that are helpful for users. So I think that's a great a place to. Keep keep rising. What's going on the space is moving very quickly and definitely would strive to to Arlington and twitter and and he's in the really can pick up on a lot of what we're. We're producing there and and learn a lot for what we do. We also work a lot of different partners in the industry to share information and best, practices so. Definitely I think that's a great way to. reprise of that just how about but the industry in general? Todd thank you. Always timely counter path. Thank you very much. Look forward to our next podcast. I'm sure it'll come up to. Thank you very much and appreciate being on.

Sophos Todd carruthers MSP Voice Communication Kanter Pass Tod publisher Korea Brea Solo facebook writer
SYSK Choice: Why People Cheat & Get More Done by Being Less Busy

Something You Should Know

39:59 min | 3 months ago

SYSK Choice: Why People Cheat & Get More Done by Being Less Busy

"Today on something you should know how much you eat and how much you in what you eat depends in part on the room you're sitting in, I'll explain then cheating in relationships, how much does it happen and why is it so tempting to so many the problem which actuality is, what's forbidden is often very, very enticing to a sexually, very, very attractive to us. So same with the rule saying within lines sometimes, it's not such a turn on plus when you have to wear a name tag at a business function, there's actually a proper way in a proper place to wear it and some great advice for people who feel like they're always busy and. To rushed in I had nine hundred busy people track their time for I found that the people who felt most starved for time this stressed and rushed actually spent more time watching TV and on social media than the people who felt the least. All this today on something you should know. Distracted driving is a serious problem on our roadways, leading to the deaths of thousands of people and injuries in the hundreds of thousands each year when you take your eyes and your focus off the road, even for a second, it can be deadly not just for you but for other drivers as well as pedestrians and bicyclists. Sadly many Americans use their cell phones while driving whether it's texting checking e mails, scrolling media feeds or any other form of distraction drivers are putting themselves and others around them at great risk. It's important to know that forty eight states, Ban texting and driving. Also Twenty one states prohibit. Rivers from using cell phones while driving distracted drivers are not only putting people at risk. They're also breaking the law look it's dangerous to use your cell phone behind the wheel. That's why law enforcement officers, right tickets and enforce hands-free an anti texting and driving laws. When you're driving, put down your phone, keep your hands on the wheel your eyes on the road and your mind the task of driving. Remember you drive you text, you pay brought to you by Nitsa. somethingyoushouldknow fascinating Intel, the world's top experts and practical advice you can use in your life today something you should now. Mike. carruthers. based. Welcome to something you should know. If you're one of the several thousand people who have left a review of this podcast on on apple podcasts or cashbox tune in spotify stitcher. I do pop around to all the platforms and read the reviews and I appreciate the fact that you took the time to leave him I like the good ones better than I like the critical ones but I do read them all and appreciate them all. We have a lot to cover today, and so I up does the environment your in influence how much food you eat we'll find out an experiment was conducted at a fast food restaurant. In Illinois, it was a hardee's fast food restaurant. A section of the restaurant was equipped with soft lighting jazz music and it was transformed into basically a fine dining environment participants were randomly selected to eat in either the unchanged part of the restaurant or the fine dining part of the restaurant. The food was the same regardless of which part of the restaurant people sat in and then their. was recorded. Interestingly even though participants in the fine dining area eight for longer than those in the main dining area, they actually consumed less food those in the fine dining area were also no more likely to order extra food. Another surprising result is that even though participants in the fine dining part ate less food, they actually rated the food as more enjoyable. So changing the atmosphere can change food consumption and food satisfaction. Specifically, the researcher said dim lighting slow music and more relaxed atmosphere can help people eat slower and eat less, and it will likely work just as well at home as it doesn't a restaurant and that is something you should know. For as long as there have been people in relationships, people have cheated on those relationships and yet in any relationship probably nothing causes more hurt more pain and more problems than when a partner cheats. However it's also long been argued that humans are not naturally monogamous that having only one partner for a long period of time is a natural humans like variety. So. Why is cheating considered to be so wrong? And is the damage done by cheating irreparable these are questions you've probably thought about and here with some really good answers is Dr Kenneth Rosenberg. Dr. Rosenberg is a Board Certified Addiction Psychiatrist, a sex addiction counselor and author of the book. Infidelity. Why men and Women Cheat Rosenberg welcome. Thank you so much pleasure here. So at some level, it seems that cheating is and always will be a byproduct of relationships. Affairs happen. flings. Happen. So, let's start with how often do they happen how how many people cheat Twenty percent of married people cheat fifty percent of dating people cheat. The numbers are pretty stable except for the women women are cheating much more than they used to and it doesn't matter if the numbers are big or small. If you're the betrayed partner who finds on email or the phone, which is Al usually happens that your partner is having an affair or multiple affairs. The numbers me nothing you're devastated the big issue. And everybody knows that there is probably nothing that's going to screw up a relationship more than infidelity. So when you ask the people who do it who knowingly cheat? Why they did it. What did they say? Well. They have many reasons as many reasons why people are unfaithful about half of them say I was happy in my marriage I just had the opportunity. I had the opportunity, it was affordable. It was accessible. It was a good way to escape from my life whatever it was to escape. You know the many people have the Sir Edmund Hillary answer to why did you climb Everest was just because it was there and so people do it because they have the option to do it some people to it because dissatisfied some people do it because they want something new and their novelty seekers everyone has their own reason but we are biologically primed to look for different partners and that's often the struggle that most people deal with in some way shape or form, and we can't have our cake and eat it too although some people try. And often fail miserably. But what about the argument that people and maybe men in particular are biologically not monogamous that they're here to make babies and to procreate with as many women as possible. So the urged is, is to do that, and the urges not to settle down with one person for the rest of your life. Well the men and women chief for different reasons and traditionally speaking women cheat more for an emotional connection men cheat more for sexual slang or connection. That's changing increasingly. We see particularly under a among people under the age of thirty five years old. That men and women are looking to cheat for the same reasons but biologically, women are just as prime has been to cheat. In fact, there's a biological model for this. There's an animal called the. Video, it's a rodent that lives in the prairies and the meadows, and there's a certain kind of all. That is monogamous. And study this fall you find, it's not completely how can this that in the middle of the night some of those monogamous voles who are bonding for life go out and find another partner just for a sexual fling and they come back to their part. In the morning there. Biologically prime. Then there's biological reasons why they're optimistic which we can talk about later but. The point is that both male female voters cheat just as much. In fact, when you see who cheats more is the females not the males. So yeah, there are different reasons why people cheat manner driven by testosterone they have more testosterone than women have. There's some biological reasons why men might be drawn more towards sex and women on more towards emotion but when women have more sexual agency and their lives more economic independence and their lives that picture is changing. Can we say with any kind of certainty that human beings or men or women are more monogamous than the other or are not monogamous at all, and the marriage and fidelity is really kind of an artificial a restriction that we're putting on people. I think we can say that as a species that we struggle with dual mandates. We struggle with desire to socially bond and stay committed, and often that means staying faithful. We also struggle with the desire to procreate as much as possible. and. To live with that imperfection and we have to live with the fact that we can't always satisfy and scratch hitch. that. Sometimes, we have to sacrifice one for the other. Pardon me. Why can't I break question we're talking about. We're not talking about poly-amorous or an or any kind of thing you WANNA do we're talking about staying to your partner? I'm there for you and not only there a socially for the kids I'm there for you sexually and sweetheart I never wanna be with anyone else I'm yours forever. So you're basically lying to your partner that's the problem. That's what we're talking about. That's cheating in poly-amorous relationships you could have three partners you could greet at four partners. But then sometimes people five or six, and the problem with sexuality is what's forbidden is often very, very enticing to a sexually. Very very attractive to us. So staying within the rules saying within lines, sometimes not such a turn on, we could do whatever we want. We can make up the rules but the only thing I'm advocating is that you be honest about the rules are what the rules are, keep your word and do you try to live in accordance with your ideals? And that's not so easy. We are talking about cheating and my guest is psychiatrist Dr Kenneth, Rosenberg, he's the author of the book infidelity why men and women cheat. Okay. Some good news challenging time for everybody, and this could really help. 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Here it is call eight, seven, seven, sixty, four, Bible that's Eight, seven, seven, sixty, four, Bible Eight, seven, seven, sixty, four, Bible support for this podcast comes. From Microsoft teams. Now there are more ways to be a team with Microsoft teams bring everyone together in a new virtual room collaborate live building ideas on the same page and see more of your team on screen at once learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams. So Dr Rosenberg question do open marriage is really work. Oh, often they do of course. All kinds of marriages work open marriages definitely can work, but they require more negotiation than monogamous relationships. In a relationship, if a partner cheats, let's say the husband cheats on his wife because as you said earlier, a lot of cheating happens simply because the opportunity presents itself and I did it because it was there. But that that excuse or that explanation doesn't ever really hold much water with the other injured party because they never say, oh, well, if that's the only reason, you did it no problem. People often feel a great sense of betrayal on hearing it right and often the people who experience. That betrayal have what I would call betrayal trauma. They feel devastated. 'cause you know when you think that. Your life is one way and then you discover another way that could be devastating to a Lotta people, men and women, and yet the person who did did it just because it's there and that does seem like I ate the cookie because it was there it's no big deal I just there it was and I was hungry. So I aided. And and yet. But when you eat the cookie, it isn't devastating to your diet but it's devastating to your marriage. It can really be devastating to the marriage I mean you know every partnership is different some people could tolerate you're eating a cookie. Some people could tolerate you're thinking about a cookie. Some people cannot tolerate you're even looking at it because. Every marriage has its own set of rules in every couple is unique. What do you do with those feelings than if you feel like you really want to cheat and and yet you don't want to cheat and ruin your marriage what are you supposed to do with that? There are many solutions. One is to talk about it and have an honest conversation We've been married for twenty years. Do we still feel the same way we did earlier about fidelity and keeping Our marital vows, can we see other people? What's how are we going to do that but I I would say that you know life is full of compromises and there is no perfect solution and early on the book I say if you're looking for five steps to happiness or sure fire way to have your cake and eat it too kind of return this book and just get your money back. Because I am a psychiatrist I see people who struggle and I know that struggle is Roy part of the human existence and when I ask people for to understand this struggle understand where it comes from biologically psychologically culturally and really try to be compassionate towards themselves and the other I know there's no one single answer to this but. If human beings are programmed to want variety if cheating is so available impossible. Why is it? So devastating I mean I I know that seems like an obvious question but but as a psychiatrist will, what's your answer? You. Know when you look at the research on relationships, what makes a relationship work is not necessarily sexual fidelity but emotional fidelity that the willingness to have your partner's back to keep your partner first and foremost and to not betrayed the trust of your partner to not you know that something else or someone else take your heart away. If someone in a marriage or Relationship. Believes that infidelity is unforgivable is it unforgivable? Well, people change to find out why they feel. It's unforgivable. A lot of people feel it's not forgivable because they've been so hurt in the past where they feel so insecure or they feel so helpless. You know anger a lot of anger and a lot of resentment comes from a place of feeling really helped us in your life and your marriage. There's a lot of reasons why we feel we feel right and it doesn't always have to do with the other person and often has to do with us and our background and our predicaments inner our own psychology. I'm not saying that infidelity is a forgivable offense. But when someone cannot forgive and forget and they're they're often are reasons why and those need to be uncovered and discussed well, how do you ever forget Would you ever forget if your partner cheated on you and they had made a promise? The problem people don't forget. You know I have many couples in my practice in which the man or the woman who's cheated on the betrayed partner becomes what I call a surveillance monster. They're constantly checking the emails and constantly going into you know the other person's personal stuff and checking their phone and going back to reading food all through old emails and doing what I call pain shopping pin shopping where they're just kinda relentlessly going through it you know the brain is capable of a little bit of forgetting. But if you reinforce it every day deluge it with trauma and repeat the trauma, there's less likely that you're event who maybe not forget but at least put it on the back burner. Can Imagine people hearing you say that and think how could you not do that? How could you not be suspicious going forward and how could you? How could you trust somebody when the? In many people's eyes is the ultimate betrayal. Yes. When Trust has been broken, very, very hard to get it back and that is in fact, the real dilemma of the betray partner, you can never know for sure. You can you know there's no test you give your partner to figure out if they've been cheating I, mean, what are you going to give them a polygraph test every time they come home you know connect them up to electrodes and say you know what did you do and then you don't have a marriage you have a hostage takeover situation you know. So you can't really know for sure and you have to like many things in life if with the uncertainty. We're not or separate but you know the grass is not always greener looks at but is you know in every relationship is the challenge and That's why some people rather not know and I really understand that respect that 'cause once they know they can't get over that grass is always greener thing. I mean that that isn't that a big part of this that that is a big poll to a lot of people. That no matter what your circumstance there's always something better and maybe you ought to go look. So we like novelty, we like newness. We often think the grass is greener and we're biologically primed to do that. Our species has dependent on it as dependent on our desire to procreate. Tired from the hunter weary from the day. So that's a very strong biological imperative, well, that that need for novelty flies right in the face of this need for social bonding that that marriage create. So you've. Got Two opposing forces here. Keeps me in? Business. Right and writing books and showing up on podcasts and all of that. So. There's no easy answer for this but but it I guess there's comfort in the fact that I think probably everybody struggles with this well I, think that's the point and You know it's much. It's very easy to make this an US versus them a show and vilify the the cheater and vilify the people who are having unfaithful relationships but it's very very common and as I say, fifty percent of people who are dating cheap twenty percent of married people at least cheat and depends on what you call cheating thinking about another person fantasizing another person. Are. You know for better for worse new national pastime of watching pornography You know some people consider that cheating. So this is something that that as humans we have to live with and in a virtual age is of the Internet we have to live with more because cheating is now easier than ever. It's very easy to find a partner my patients say you know they're like rockstars yester- here you know they have all these options simply because they have a phone. And they could reach out to people very easily or they could get lost and fantasy very easily. Lastly I encourage couples to talk about this. Don't you think that even the bringing up of this topic could cause a lot of trouble. So talking about this it's not for everyone I mean there are some couples who really can't address it as they can't address a lot of conflicts and that's why I wrote the book because at least you could open the book and see that this is not an uncommon phenomena and that people often struggle with this. There's strong biological reasons doesn't excuse cheater, but there's something to be said for millions of years of evolution which brought us to the point that not only do we wanna family and I always do we want to Bond but we also want to procreate and we also want novelty and human struggle that I think we have to come to terms with, and as I say the the book I say you know if there's six easy steps to happiness, sell this book and The one that says, sixty steps happiness because it's not so easy. We have to live with conflict as humans indeed we do, and this is a source of conflict for a lot of people. So it's really good to kind of get it out on the table by guest has been Dr Kenneth Rosenberg. He is author of the book infidelity why men and Women Cheat, and you will find a link to that book in the show notes. Thank you Ken. Thank you so much. Support for this podcast comes from state farm with surprisingly great rates. State farm is the real deal when it comes to home and car insurance state farm agents are in your neighborhood ready to help personalize your insurance and you can manage your coverage, pay your bill or even file a claim right from your phone with the state farm mobile APP visit State Farm Dot, com today to great without sacrificing great service that state farm dot com when you want the real deal like a good neighbor state farm is there. It seems to me that for as long as I can remember, there has always been in our culture. There has always been this desire to save time to get more done in less time. So everybody is running around trying to be more productive and get more things done. But it also seems that those people who get more things done quicker. Than just take on more things to do to fill up the time they saved getting those other things done quicker. Maybe. There's a better way to look at time and productivity and joining me to discuss that is Laura Vander Cam Laura's been looking at this exact topic for a while. Now she has a great ted talk called how to gain control of your free time. She's written several books on this including one called what the most successful people do before breakfast and her new book is called off the clock feel less busy while getting more done I laura welcome. Thank you so much for having me. So how do you look at this? I mean today we have more gadgets more apps more virtual assistance, more things that help us get so much done so quickly. And yet, we still WANNA. Get more done I. Are we ever going to get to the point where we can just go? Okay. Good. That's fine. Where's productive as we need to be or will this just go on? Do we is it just human nature or something that we must cram more things into less time? Well, the funny thing is people have always felt that they were busy and star for time, which is sort of funny if you think about back in the day of people being sort of. In the same towns, their whole lives, and not having any of the electronic things that we have You know people have always felt like they have a lot going on. It's just the sort of nature of life and they probably did I mean if you consider like you know washing your clothes by hand milking your own cows I, mean these things you know take time. I think that it's it's really more about what stories we choose to tell ourselves and If you walk around with the story that I'm so busy, I have no time for anything then you start to find evidence to support it. But if you walk around with a different story, namely, I have time for the things that are important to me. Then you can start to find evidence for that too and I think that's a much more useful story. I couldn't agree more because it. It does seem to me anyway that a lot of people. Say they're busy. But when you look closer, it's not that they're really busy doing anything they're just. Busy being busy and a lot of the times when people say. My perception is that when people say I'm busy. It means I'm too busy to do what you want me to do. In other words I don't want to do what you. WanNa. Do so Mike Excuses that I'm busy. I totally agree and you know every moment has every life has moments of feeling a bit crazed and busy. It's just whether you choose to make those into your narrative and into your identity and I think there's certainly something with modern life that we like to talk about how busy we are. It's a nice way of saying how important we are But. You'RE NOT GONNA walk around being like I just want to tell you how important I am so instead it's like, Oh, I'm so busy everyone wants a piece of me both at work and at home I've got all these demands on my time which means that the demand for my time is high, which is again a way of saying how important we are. But, but it's one thing to tell other people how busy you are because that keeps keeps them out of your life because you're too busy for them but it's another thing to tell yourself how busy you are when maybe you're not in I'm wondering in, you would know when people are so convinced that they're so busy. Is there something else going on? Well, I think that it's sometimes about building up our own sense of self right that. We we want to make sure we feel that our time is in demand that you know lots of people want our time our time us very valuable, and that's one way to convince ourselves I. Think we also just become sort of part of this identity of of you know a person who has a lot going on, and then when we have open space, sometimes, we look for ways to fill it and I'm not saying that there aren't. Times of life at are very busy. You know I'm sure you have listeners who have for instance, new babies or who are in a really crunch time at work or possibly even both you know these these times of life do happen but but certainly looking over the whole of life, they tend to be relatively limited periods of time and so I think we need to have that broader perspective both in terms of sort of a micro. Sense like I always tell people to look at the whole week instead of any individual day like there's never gonna be enough hours in the day to get to everything there probably are enough hours in a week to get everything and then also looking over the whole of our lives like you know there's there's only a few years where things are really crunched and then there are periods of life where things are a little bit less crunch too. But I think that gets back to priorities as much as it is time management problem because if somebody has something they wanna do and they claim they want to do it, they can find the time in the next week to get it done. So. It's like a I'll sometimes ask people to be a guest on this show and and people will sometime say. Oh I'd love to, but I'm booked out for the next three months. And I'm thinking what you know wait a minute to be a guest on this show I mean, yeah it's Nice if you are prepared to be a guest but the interview itself only takes twenty minutes and you do it from your, house so. If you can't find twenty minutes in the next three months. Then maybe this is priority problem more than it's time management problem. So anyway, if people are feeling that, Gosh I feel. So busy I don't WanNa feel so busy, what are the strategies that work? What can people do to kind of turn that off? Well, one of the best strategies is not to fill time what you talked about earlier or some people just like to make themselves busy for the sake of being busy I. think a really good question whenever people ask you to do something and the funny thing is the further it is in the future the more it feels like we're kind of assigning it to a different person like Oh. Yeah. I'll never be October November October me won't be busy right like I can. I can take this on but you too. So in order to actually feel like the real of what it will be to have the thing in your schedule, ask yourself if you would do it tomorrow. and if you will do it tomorrow, then great you. If you'd move stuff around canceled things to make this opportunity fit, you probably feel the same way later on. But if your answer would be absolutely, no, no way would I ever do this tomorrow? That's probably your what your answer should be for the future too I. Think another thing you can just do when you're asked to do something is instead of looking like do I have space on my schedule I ask if it's the right thing to do you know just because you have space on your schedule, it doesn't mean that you have to say, yes, that's something and one way to think about this is that some awesome opportunity might come up. And if your schedule is absolutely jam packed, you won't be able to take it on whereas if you have open space, they can sort of invite these opportunities into your life. How do people that do this well? Look at their time. How do they schedule it? How do they prioritize it? How far in advance do they schedule it and how do they schedule it to they? Is it? You know This ends at twelve o'clock. So this starts at twelve o one or is there space in between me? What does it look like when you when you're doing what you're talking about? Well Well. The first thing it looks like is being clear on what you would like to have in your time. Because you know, there's all these things that are coming to you questions like Oh should I do this this that people are asking to, but you have to start with I what I think is important for me to be doing What practical steps could I put into my schedule to take me closer to those goals and where can I fit those in and not just professional goals? I. Mean I always ask people to make themselves a priority. List. That has three categories, career relationships and stuff because it's pretty hard to make a three category list and then leave one of the categories blank so that right there can kind of nudge you to think about what is important all these fears of life and then consider where these things can go on your calendar. So I think that's the first aspect is people are incredibly mindful of their time and whether they're making progress toward their goals. What about though because my experiences that life is messy and you can plan things great. But then something happens the car breaks. The something happens with your kid in school and you've got to go down for a meeting and you already have a meeting scheduled and. Life gets in the way of your schedule sometimes. Well, that's one reason not to schedule tightly and to leave open space because the more open space you have the more you can deal with things that are going to come up like the fact that things are gonNA come up it's not surprising. You don't necessarily know what those things will be but they fall into that category of you know known unknowns I think quoting Donald Rumsfeld there. But the things that are known unknowns. You don't know what they will be, but you know something will come up. That's that's almost a sure thing in. In the course of a full life. So for instance, one thing you can do is you know if you think about your work day don't schedule eight hours of meetings as much as possible. Maybe only commit for hours of activities because that way when stuff comes up, you've got four hours to put it in particularly people who have you know kids and stuff comes up with that as much as possible doing all the things that you have to do as close to the start of the week as possible means that when things come up, you've already made progress as opposed to feeling behind. His there a good strategy. Do you think for how to plan a day like what do you do better in the morning that maybe you other things could wait till the afternoon Different people have different energy peaks at different times however, most people. are more, focused and disciplined in the morning, and then they start getting a little bit more tired in the afternoon. So in general, if you have work that requires a lot of mental focus and discipline, you are better off scheduling probably around eight nine in the morning right after you had that First Cup of coffee and you're ready to take on everything you can put that there. If there's also maybe if it's a meeting that requires a ton of concentration like you're dealing with a very difficult issue that might be better done in the morning to So generally more focused work in the morning more give and take type stuff in the afternoon but always make sure you build in some breaks during the day too. So you can manage your energy. It's my experience. Well, it's my experience but also what I've observed with others is that. You're more likely to schedule and plan out. You know work or or busy things school kids that kind of thing. But you're less likely to plan you know a bike ride or trip to the beach because well, that's so frivolous. I know a lot of people don't like the idea of planning their leisure time like this is just like a contradiction in terms but but if you're a busy person like if you've got a lot going on in your life, I mean your leisure time is too precious to be totally leisurely. and what happens if you don't think about it is that you'll just wind up doing the most effortless things which tends to be watching television. Surfing the web. Of just puttering around the house and that can be fine for some of it but you know it, it's not terribly rejuvenating to do any of those things Then you have effortless fun and then you have the category of effort. Full Fund effort full fun take some planning, take some work and stuff like meeting friends for dinner or you know organizing a picnic. With your family, but you you tend to enjoy those things so much more and draw so much more energy from them in create great memories by doing them and so you WanNa, make sure you have a good balance between the effortless fun and the efforts will fund and don't automatically skip the effort for fun just because it seems like a little bit of work. I love your message that. So much of this is just the story we tell ourselves that we're so busy when maybe we're not so busy. I find it's about being intentional about your time. It's about not filling time with things that you don't find important. oddly enough it's it can be about putting adventures into your life because the more kind of cool fun. Well, as I said, the effort full fund things you put into your life, the more in control of your time you feel, and thus the more time you feel like you have and finally tells about spending time with friends and family. It turns out that people who spend a lot of time with the people that they enjoy and are close to have a different perception of time. Then people who don't spend as much time interacting with people in person what do you mean? Well? You know I I had nine hundred busy people track their time for day and I. Ask them questions about how they felt about their time and found that the people who felt most starved for time as stressed and rushed spent more time watching TV and on social media than the people who felt the Li stressed and people who felt the least stress tended to spend more time interacting with human beings in person. Rather than online and you know the Internet's wonderful, but it can't do everything for us. It's really those the face to face a personal interactions like especially friends and family that really make us feel like life is good. I make us feel like we have the time for the things we WANNA do sitting more time we invest in those things the better off we are well, that's really interesting. I'd never thought of that. Then what you said about scheduling intentional fun. Changes your your feeling about your business that who would have thought. People have the sense sometimes that time is slipping through their fingers I can't remember where all the time is going and part of that. When we say you know what we don't remember where the time went in. We don't know where the time goes. It's that we don't remember where the time went because there was nothing memorable about it, and so this idea of putting an effort for fun is what makes these memories you know you think about the memories you have in life it is often things like. Going to dinner party with a friend or you know a a special vacation you took a great concert you went to or or even some professional awards you got. But that took a lot of effort to achieve I mean none of these things are effortless and yet they're so amazing as we look back on, these are the things that make up our lives so you want to try. To, do a few more of those things and and then maybe a little bit less time with the sort of mindless curling around. Great. Thanks Lower Laura Vendor Cam has been my guest. Her book is called off the clock feel less busy while getting more done, and you'll find a link to her book at Amazon in the show notes. Thanks for spending time with. US Laura. Thank you so much. I'm sure you've been to convention or a meeting or a seminar or just at your Kid's school at a parents night you're often presented with a name badge to wear on your chest. So people know who you are. So where does that name badge go? Well. Even though it's easier for right handed people to put the name tag on their left side, it should actually go on the right side and the reason is purely functional. When you're shaking right hand to right hand the other person has easier I contact with both you and the name tag if it's on your right side. That way helps the person remember your name and associate your name with your face, which is the purpose of wearing a name tag in the first place. And that is something you should know do subscribe to this podcast it makes it so much easier because when you subscribe you get the show's delivered right to you and it's free I'm Mike carruthers thanks for listening today to something you should know

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If Your Heart Has Ever Been Broken - Listen to This & Amazing Ways Numbers Affect You

Something You Should Know

45:20 min | 2 years ago

If Your Heart Has Ever Been Broken - Listen to This & Amazing Ways Numbers Affect You

"Today on something you should know if you need to solve a problem lie down. I I'll explain why. Then everyone has had their heart broken and the effects can be more devastating than you think if you're heartbroken, and you'll heart is ripped out of your gut and you'll all you can do is be in bed and cried for a day. There's no medical organizations like logical organization that feels that it actually tempting merit its own category or its own consideration. And it's remarkable the bench the case. Plus, we have a real food problem. Too much of it is thrown away and the fascinating world of math and numbers. For example. Our number system is based ten but very system of youth by two million years ago with faith sixty K, basically, it's kind of seems crazy. But that's why we have the fifty seconds in a minute. Thirty minutes of the now all this today on something you should know. You know, my car insurance company is Geico has been for a long time. That's because Geico saves me money, and maybe they could do the same for you. If you switch all it takes fifteen minutes to find out if you could save fifteen percent or more on car insurance. And Geico also offers coverage for motorcycles are vs and boats. Do you have renders or homeowners insurance perhaps? Geico could save you money there too. And there's so much more. Geico could help with plus don't forget the discounts. Go to Geico dot com today and see how much you could save. That's geiko dot com. Somethingyoushouldknow is sponsored by ADT. That's a name, you know, when it comes to home security, and now ADT can install a state of the art smart home. You can set up custom automations unique to your home to automatically do things. Like lock the doors and set the thermostat when you leave even close the garage. Door from virtually anywhere. You can control your smart home with the ADT app, or the sound of your voice and ADT will install the entire system for you. Visit ADT dot com slash smart. To learn more about how ADT can design and install a secure smart home. Just for you, ADT dot com slash smart. Somethingyoushouldknow fascinating Intel world, Tom experts and practical advice, you can use in your life today. Something you should now. Mike carruthers? Hi, welcome. So a couple of feet away from where I'm sitting in my studio, I have a couch, and I use that couch frequently not because I'm because I'm lazy because often what I do is. When I when I'm trying to come up with things to say to introduce a segment to introduce a guest, I often go over to the couch lie down close my eyes and things pop into my head, and that is part of my creative process. And as it turns out, I'm onto something it seems that the next time you're struggling to find a solution or to come up with a creative idea. Lying down is a good way to do it in an Australian National University study participants were asked to solve problems specifically what they were asked to do is solve anagrams. And when the volunteers were lying down they solve the problem ten times faster than when they were standing up. The theory is that when you lie down it slows down, the brains production of chemicals, which can actually help you think more creatively and make connections between unrelated concepts. And that is something you should know. Do you have a Valentine to celebrate with this year lucky you if you do many people don't and many people are reminded around Valentine's Day of past loves who broke our heart. I suspect almost everyone at some point has had their heartbroken by someone. And if you've ever felt that feeling you know, how crushing and horrible. It can be yet. We often don't take it. Seriously. We toss out phrases like, oh, he just had his heart broken as if it's nothing is it nothing. What is a broken heart? What can you learn from it? And what's the best way to get over one guy? Winch is a licensed psychologist in New York. And he's author of a couple of really interesting books, including how to fix a broken heart. I guy welcome. Thank you very much for having me. So anyone who's had a broken heart knows what it is. But from a more clinical perspective is is. A broken heart are real thing. Oh, it's very much a real thing. A broken heart is a phone of grief. It's full of unsanctioned this enfranchised grief, and that it's not one that we tend to take very seriously, although we should but it's a form of loss. It's full of grief, and it impacts people as much as other films of grief. Do well. It is interesting that everyone gets their heart broken. It seems I I don't know if there's any statistics on it. But it seems to be a pretty common experience. And yet when you talk about it in a more clinical medical way, we give it another name, it's depression, or sadness or something. But heartbreak is not a medical diagnosis, and that's interesting, right because medical diagnoses, I mean, really very in a very wide. It's like what the moment we consider to be problematic. Let me keep up dating these things as you know. But if you think about the result of hot Riddick can Ren to people. Reading on functional. It can be as severe in its initial impact as the most severe clinical depressions, and yet while those things you can -pletely consider, you know, legit and the mental health is soda and comfortable by insurance into the vet if you'll heartbroken, and he'll literally a heart is ripped out of your gut. All you can do is be in bed and cry for a day. There's no organization that that feels no company no medical organization, psychological organization that feels that that is actually something that merits its own category or its own consideration. And it's remarkable that that's the case. How do you define a broken heart? I define a broken heart by anything that really causes a shock response of loss and grief and massive massive yearning that comes with it. The thing about heartbreak that makes it complicated. Is that we yearn for the person who broke hot in intense, intense ways, a brain chemistry, brain functions, really get altered in that moment and reflect a huge systematic, physical and psychological change that's happening in us in those moments. And so it's not just the reef and the loss. But it's the intense intense yearning that comes with it. Isn't it interesting how and it's probably happened to lots if not most people where there's someone in their life who. Not necessarily take for granted. But, you know, th they're not madly passionate about until they're told they don't that person doesn't want to be in their life anymore, and then that person becomes amazingly attractive, and that's really about the fact that a lot of walk around without really being fully appreciative of the things in the people. We have in lives until they've actually taken away, and it's always reminded to me to practice some kind of regular gratitude about those things and the people that you have that make your life good. But it's also true that we tend to value things once they gone often more than they do once we have done all once they hot it to get. So so when something is hot to get because it's gone. It seems like it might be sudden the get, you know, much more motivated to pay attention to it. And that's just thought of us. It seems to be human nature, and perhaps it serves some sort of evolutionary purpose. But it does compound the problem of when you feel sad that someone's broken, your heart. Amplifies it to such an extent that it. It's really all often debilitating. That is the case the other thing that happens though in pot Wyatt. So debilitating is the way online responds on a heart is broken. A mine's job is to keep us from home. Right. It's it's job is to revise was to. If something we did is very painful, very damaging. Let's make sure we don't do that again. And so when we experienced hot break, and it's very painful, a mine job is to say, oh, if that's painful, I'll make sure you won't forget how paying for this. So he won't make mistake again. But our job is to actually indeed and we've on so we can make the mistake again, quote, unquote, and find love, and then therefore a mind is working to keep the pain as shop as possible as present as possible to keep the person as fresh in thoughts to give them as much stage time in a brains as possibly can while up is legally the opposite. And unless we realized on. Booking at cross-purposes to what actual needs. We keep going down the wrong rabbit holes. And we'll keep responding to what got to us to do even though it will be absolutely the wrong and harmful thing to do in terms of ability to recover. So what's the best thing to do where do you where do you make the break and say, okay, I know, I'm my mind wants me to dwell on this. What do I do instead that that breaks away from the supposed to, but you have to be aware? I think this is true of all emotional injuries. Including heartbreak, you have to be aware that you'll mind is not going to serve you. And you have to know that when you you know, you is lay open. It's being in the morning and you'll remembering oh, my ex's cousin's wedding was last night. Maybe I'll go and Scala that cousins Instagram because the other guy blocked me, you know, and you find some good excuse to spend three hours four hours, you know, soaking somebody on social media, and it seems like a great reason at the time on the you need to be able to catch it and go. Oh, no. No. No, no. That's just me trying to, you know, get more of a taste of what that relationship felt like when I had it, and we do that. Because the way brain works responds to break the way heroine had brain responds to a withdrawal. We just become intensely intensity needy of that fix of having some kind of taste of what that felt like. And if you don't have the actual person can have the methadone of the memories of them seeing them in an image, except that's really bad for us. We need to get off the heroin, quote, unquote, and they need to be able to re-engage in a and rebuild our lives. And so when you say what can people do one of the things you need to do is the to reformulate what life is about? Now, you know, then that relationship anymore. You'll no longer we. So now, you're an eye against who is that. I are you the same person you were before that relationship updates. You need to do to your life to your identity to you know, the people. Around you to what, you know, do hubby's do everything. So we really have to pay attention. This is a rebuild of our lives. Both in the external, and the internal and we actually have to focus on that rebuilding job in that immediate aftermath when your heart just gets crushed in the moments in minutes days after you hear I don't wanna see you anymore. What's the best advice, surround yourself by people who care about you get that emotional and social support had the beginning. But pretty much the beginning trying to come up with a good understanding of the best one you have about why it ended and tried to come to terms with the fact that it has with all forms of grief. We tend to do the bargaining right in heads, even when someone dies. Oh. But if only I had done this maybe would have caught it in time. And we always do that bargaining. The the counterfactual thinking of what if trying and get to the point and try working on that reality to absorb the reality of this. Is over because that will help you move full more quickly and on wanted to wrestle with that. And to deny that and every time the phone, you know, the beeps with a message to think maybe it's them, and they changed their mind. Probably not that very very rarely happens. It's interesting at least, it's my observe -ation that people tend to take their own broken heart. Very seriously. It hurts so much. You can't possibly understand what I'm going through. But we look at other people's heartbreak through a lighter lens, particularly I think maybe with kids teenagers middle school kids who are perhaps coming out of a first romance and getting their heartbroken, which hurts a lot. But we tend to minimize the impact we tend to I think minimize it more for adults because at least with teenagers. We think it goes with the territory. Oh, just discovering. What that feels like except when you discover what that feels like when you're a teenager. And then it happens. Diva new v. As it turns out. Oh, it sucks just as badly. It's just as painful, and so we tend to be on sufficiently unsympathetic and not compassionate enough. At all ages. You know, in other words, somebody gets the flu can go. Yeah. The flu happens. It's bad. It really is debilitating. When you have it. It's nothing nothing to it's a health miss gets a health concern, people take all kinds of drastic steps when the hunt is broken. So Tom is one of them, but also desperate measures of I'm going to sell my house and buy a ring to prove my love. She just dumped you what are you doing? That's the thought you'll have. And so, you know, it's a big deal. I'm speaking with guy winch, he is a psychologist who practices in New York, and he's author of the book how to fix a broken heart. You know, this is the time of year when a lot of people and their and their New Year's resolutions kind of go their separate ways. But here's one New Year's resolution that you can. Really stick with and be happy about its brushing and maintaining your oral health with a quip electric toothbrush. I use a quip every day, and I'm never going back to a plain old toothbrush. Why? Because the quip has sensitive sonic vibrations for ineffective clean that's gentle on your gums because often people brush too hard, and some electric toothbrushes are just too abrasive. And there's this great built in two minute timer that pulses every thirty seconds to remind you when to switch sides and help you clean your whole mouth evenly. And you get a new brush head for your quip delivered automatically on a dentist. Recommended schedule. Every three months for just five dollars. These are just some of the reasons I love using equipped toothbrush. And I know you will too. In fact, over one million happy, healthy mouths brush with a quip toothbrush whip toothbrushes started just twenty five dollars. And if you go to get quip dot com slash something right now. You'll get your first. Refill pack for free that your I refill pack at get quip dot com. That's G E T Q U IP, get quip dot com slash something. So guy when when people get their heartbroken is everybody different in terms of how much time it takes to get over it. Everyone is different and circumstances often very different if you'll someone that hasn't dated in seven years, and then you had two months of dating with this month with one person. And you said, oh, finally this is going to now happen to me. That's wonderful. And then that gets taken away and you'll facing another leak period of like, I don't know what I'm gonna meet the next person because it took seventy s to meet that one that's gonna be a huge impact from a two months relationship as opposed to somebody who's been a serial relationship Essen in another one ends, and it's very very difficult, but they will find someone else. They tend to those people around them that are in the circumstance by which they can meet. People. So it the circumstance Mata's almost is not just individual personalities because Julie people get Todd broken sometimes multiple times in their lives. And it's not that one circumstances. Exactly. Like the same. They experienced them in the same way. It can come at a time and in place, and in a way that can be more or less damaging and more or less debilitating. And there's a lot of it depends when it comes to that how bad it is. Do you think that when people finally do move on that the baggage of the broken heart has a tendency to creep into the next relationship? Yeah. That's often the case often when people get divorced, for example, they go and look for the person that's not like my ex. And then they get very chagrined because then they join all these, you know, apps in the suspect and the app is going to suggest as their ex because still consistent in their taste. And that happens so many times that somebody gets divorced and the next person to the app recommends is you should try this woman just devotchka. But we we often want to go, and do, you know better than differently than, but it depends? If there's a gap between those those events might not and sometimes when the hottest broken, they wanna go and find the clone of the person who broke a hot and give it another try with that Glenn. So what I have to go and look for the exact same kind of person. At least if often physically or with attribute, so Korea putz, and that can equally be funny because whenever you're going for a specific thing, you'll actually going to sign up something, maybe when you shouldn't and toss on things that you should not possum. So it just limits are thinking not options in unnecessary way. You'd seems to happen, and perhaps one of the reasons broken heart is so painful is because it seems to happen out of the blue. I don't wanna see you anymore. I think we should see other people are I met someone else or something. And as. Where did that come from wanting to keep in mind is this when people break up when people say, okay, I'm out whether it's in a relationship short term one, certainly if it's in a longtime one or marriage, they have been thinking about that way before they verbalize it. They have been going through a psychological exit process or distancing most of the process for a long time before they'll actually vocalise it, that's very very standard. And so when you hit it for the first time as the person who's hot broken, you think but just lost weekly on vacation. And they seemed happy how can that possibly be? And the answer is. Yeah, they'd nothing to tell you that thinking leaving. They will go through the motions of regular life until they're ready to tell you whenever that is. And very often they'll thinking, oh, that's gets the vacation not ruin that. And then and then I'll tell them, but what happens to the peasants hottest broken. It's like well something must have changed in the last four days. What was it? But nothing has it's been changing the possible months. You know? So you hear it after it's been pretty well, processed on behalf of the other person. They are the very different point than you in getting ready to leave this relationship. They already by the time. There's nothing to talk about it all getting ready. And so that has been going on for a long time. You have to understand that you haven't been privy to that boasts us any might have feelings about that. But that they it's you being brought into the loop at the much later stage. I guess the the eternally optimistic advice for for this is that you know, you will get over it because people pretty much do get over it, don't they most? Some don't though I mean in other words, you really have to do some work to get over it you and I keep talking about a recovery process. It is a recovery process when you have severe physical injury, you might get over it. But you probably going to need some physical therapies, you know, constant attention. This is true of heartbreak this is to of any most injury. But certainly of heartbreak as well. You have to manage that recovery. Not be on autopilot and just wait for it to happen and to manage. It means to limit the damage and things that can really interfere with your ability to to recover like stoking hillocks on social media say oh spending hours going through the great memories that you had together when you're trying to get over a person. And no, you can't be friends with them note right away, and the vast majority of people if you wait long enough once you're over them, you don't necessarily want to be friends with them. So but taking over means that you have to repay your life. You have to they are gonna be empty things in your apartment with it. Possessions used to be and they and you'll weakens are gonna look different because you don't have a partner with whom you spend them now and you'll socialize is going to be different. And who you text joined the day to say how you look they is going is going to have to be someone else. And the idea is you need to find substitutions and ways to fill these voids and ways to reformulate your life and you'll see. Sense of who you are. And what you're about. And that's an active process and time does some of that. But slowly, and well, you have to contribute so time helps but you have to make it make that recovery. Go more quickly and more efficiently and more comprehensively by the actions. You take the ones you avoid taking what about the action of obviously not the next day but relatively soon to, you know, get back on the horse get another get another mate. I have a guideline about that which most people don't agree with or look at me sideways when vocalized, but I say almost not joking knees that if you can get through your date without talking about your ex all bursting into tears, you might be ready. That's the test. Yeah. I mean, it's a low bar. But maybe low bar is better. You know, because then, you know, and and you know, you can feel like your heart isn't in it. And certainly I wouldn't portray to the person who's on that date with you that I'm ready to jump into relationship right now. You don't have to say that or otherwise, you just don't touch it. But but the idea is get that seal of because there's nothing like going on a few dates to remind you that yes, this is going to be the path forward. And even if it's not necessarily an appetizing one that have that reality to get a sense of. Hey, there are the people there for me to meet even if I'm not necessarily that opened all that interested in going, you know, fully full at right now to remember that is out there that that exists and to remember that you can be in that world and even present yourself decent, and maybe even have a better time than you would sitting home, and and and and going over a pint of ice cream and binge-watching whatever net flicks. Like that might be a better thing for you to do. Now, if it makes you. Absolutely miserable. Then don't wait a little bit longer. But you don't have. But most people say, I I'm not ready when I think they absolutely radio point. Oh, I'm going to be off dating for a year. Now for what what do you think you're gonna be more confident in a, you know, you'll be more anxious, and you'll be more demoralized because now you've really been out of it. And now you'll really lonely, so you're more desperate. So it's not necessarily a great idea to, you know, wait until you feel absolutely amazing part of getting to the amazing is putting us back in that world. I see that a lot where people after a break-up decide, you know, off the market have no interest in dating for a while. But as you say to what end what's the purpose of that? That's an anxiety response. Right. That's a fear of I I'm really worried about being rejected because I'm feeding so shaky etcetera etcetera, and I understand that. And it feels terrible to be rejected and go in the first date. But if you go on a first date, knowing I am barely ready, and I'm certainly not ready to jump into relationship. So even if this person ends up, you know, rejecting me. It's not as if that would have gone somewhere in the but let me go and interacting may. And look once in a while you do that. And you meet somebody who's so amazing. You clicked so well with people say to me like, you know, I really good time on that date. It's amazing and miserable again 'cause I got home and missing my ex. But that was actually a good time. I for now we talked and I was distracted. And I didn't think about my thought this is an interesting person. So, you know for those experiences it's worth it. Well, this is a subject that people. Don't talk about a whole lot or talk very deeply about. And yet it is a fairly universal experience to have your heartbroken, and it is painful, right? And the people around him have to understand that this person is going to be compromised emotionally for a while. I either going to be suffering for a while. And and therefore they need support not judgment. Oh said ridicule, but they need support and understanding and compassionate encouragement to. Build an ice. And that compassionate. I think if we could have more of it for people who are heartbroken would do other good, well as we discussed it's a pretty universal experience. I don't know too many people who haven't had their heart broken who aren't in the middle of a heartbreak or who one day won't get their heartbroken. So it's good to get some some of the science behind the best ways to fix it guy. Winches been my guest. He's a licensed psychologist in New York. He's the author of a couple of books, including how to fix a broken heart. There's a link to the book in the show notes. Thank you guy. Thank you so much having me with the quicksilver car from Capital One. You earn unlimited one point five percent cash back on every purchase unlimited unlimited. All. Anyway, you said only unlimited one point five cashback on every purchase just sound capital. One butts in your wallet. What's in your wallet? Plus in your wallet capital? One Bank USA a. Every single day of your life. You use numbers and math multiple times. And yet many of us claim not to like math. But it's hard and not particularly useful in everyday grownup. Life someone who would disagree with that is Alex bellows, Alex is a writer and broadcaster in the UK who writes a lot about math and numbers. He's written several books, including Alex's adventures in number land. He also has some other projects, including a book of handcrafted Japanese puzzles called puzzle ninja and a series of books called soccer school, which teaches kids about the world through soccer. And he's here to take us on a fascinating journey through the world of numbers. Hi, alex. Welcome to be. So do we know where numbers came from do? We know the origins of those numbers that we use commonly every day what we? What we can do can get back to the earliest civilization that we know that had simple for numbers, and we can say, well, that's where number started. And that would be about six seven thousand years ago in Suma, which is where Iraq is now and they develop the first system for numbers which had symbols and those have different words for those numbers. So interestingly, the very first words it was ever used for the number one was the same as the win for man. And the very first would use for them to with the wood for women. No one knows why this the case. But that's what we why do you suppose that some people love math love numbers in the whole concept of that. And others of us like run the other way. I imagine it has to do with aptitude. I mean, if you're good at something you're going to like it more than if you suck it something. But math in numbers seem to divide people between those. People who like numbers and math and those people who don't. Yeah. I mean, I think everyone has their own personal story. My personal story that I was getting numbers. I enjoyed it. And when school bike when I was a kid if you're good at something masters be getting something right or wrong. And I would get it. Right. And so I was told I was good. So I liked it. Because it made me feel good. It also kids who don't get it. Right. And they don't like it because it told right from the beginning that his role, and it's one of the subjects where there is. Right. And there is a rogue and no one likes being told that that Roe. There's also the whole sort of social cultural attitudes towards math. You know? It's fine to say, oh, I'm terrible at sums can post do that. I'm rubbish math so much a badge of own people say that. Whereas people would never say ho Haikal raid that I'm terrible to reading right. But there does seem to be a shift. It used to be that, you know, math and science those were nerdy subjects that, you know, cool kids than get involved in. But now, I mean, you've got shows like the big bang theory that that celebrate math and science you've got movies about Stephen hawking. And and you know, he was a rock star. I mean, this there is a shift. Absolutely. I don't say who all the icons of the modern day. Steve Jobs like well. Biggest nut Stephen whole king. Another huge nut hero. We have kind of nerd role models in a way that that we didn't before I can that can only be a good thing. One of the things you talk about that. I think is really interesting is this whole concept of zero the fact that we have a symbol that represents nothing. And that that's a fairly recent concept in math, and yet imagine trying to do math of any sort and not having some sort of Representative for nothing for zero zero has not been around since the beginning of numbers. It really hasn't until and five zero. It was invented or invented it kind of emerged in India one in hall fastened years ago before then it wasn't easy. Right. So the first people to realize that you can actually have. Describe some snow that with India, and what I find fascinating about one again in India is the Indian already that time had these spiritual ideas of nothingness, Nevada dude of nothingness, you need to kind of chief Nevada, you need to get rid of all your worldly, desires and cravings, and then just kind of disappear, but having that nothing is something the reason why we need hero. He's because it makes county so much easier and makes arithmetic so much easier. The reason why we can't count calculate is that we have developed a positional way of describing numbers. We have one called two units position. The unions. Call them one position for ten the one for hundreds etcetera, etcetera rid a positional system. You need a symbol when there's nothing in that position. And that's the zero is. But just imagine. I mean, really stop and think about what if there was no zero how hard life would be. I mean, it would be so difficult to figure out anything. Everything becomes so much more long winded and complications because you to rephrase everything in such a way to avoid it. I mean and make sure zero will the the problem is there have so kind of infiltrated. They lives because we have numbers everywhere. And we take it for ground zero is a number that it's almost impossible to extract and one final thing I want to say about zero which is interesting. I realized when I started looking into it is that Lovie the new movie that we use for one to nine have changed loss since they fest emerged zero has always been suckle always. And he's the first thing. By maybe that's because it's like a hole with nothing there. But that's the misunderstand. The origin zero the circle represents sort of a tunnel everlasting circle of life and actually represents kind of Infinity. So every time you see zero every time you write the died. You're actually thinking about Navonna one of the things I think is so interesting is whereas the world has a lot of different written and verbal languages. There's really only one number system everybody on the planet more or less uses our number system, and it is a base ten number system. It it's it's based on the number ten that wasn't the case the very full system. The system used by the Samaritan six thousand years ago with sex adjustable base sixty okay, basically, it's kinda seems crazy but site they was based sixty that's why we have to this day, sixty seconds in a minute sixty minutes now. But as a bit too complicated. So when the other people have come along be other different basis than around the world, but the one which is the most sensible really is based hand, and it's not because there's anything medically good about ten is because Egypt for us to learn because we got ten fingers on a on by the hand of the five and one five on the other. So what did we start counting ten is easy thing to count? So we've chosen ten for amateur McCall reasons were we to have chosen the best base for counting reasons. Our medical reasons for what is going to make mess easier. Kathy easier. We would have chosen twelve. So we would count one two three four five six seven eight nine. Deck which is people like to kind of like that with who van which is be single digits for what ten L, she's the one was us eleven and then twelve would be one zero. Okay. So that's how decimal system would what we would have twelve digits rather than having ten. Why is that better? So the thing about multiplication tables won't the multiplication tables of Egypt wants to learn in base ten well two times tables daddy's that he people six eight ten who also the five times table today's easy five ten fifteen twenty why too in five easy. Well, that's because two and five divide into ten. In other words, the timetables are easy are the ones are devises over the base. If we had base twelve to divide into twelve three dividers twelve. Food divides into twelve and six divides into twelve which means the two times table the three times table, but full-time stable. I'm the six times day would be incredibly easy talk about randomness. Because it's one of those mathematical ideas that I think people think they understand that perhaps they don't easiest way to show people that understand randomness is to ask them to imagine flipping a coin you're gonna flip the coin. But I don't have a just imagine it and tell me is it heads titles. And if you get someone say thirty results over the magic coin, and then you compare that with what you actually get a coin flip it, and you'll have the real causes the real coin tosses random, you'll see that the one imagined by human is very different for example. It's very rare that if you're. Flicking in your head that you will have three heads of three titles in a row. He think oh, well, I've done it enough. You know heads has has often enough head eleven tales now. So in other words, you're thinking there's a memory that you sort of thinking, well, if I too much of that I'm going to have one or the other night. But obviously the coin that you're flipping has no memory and is more likely than those in thirty confidence. You'll get a row by the full heads or tails, there are ways that humans. Misunderstand this to make kind of bad decisions, for example. But probably the most obvious example is on the slot machines. You think this machine has not paying out for awhile? It's ju- it's used to pay out. But now it's not to pay at the probability for paying out. Anyone time is exactly the same. That's why they're so dictates because you kind of think, well, it must remember that having paid them for a while is gonna pay out didn't Steve Jobs. Have a problem with randomness back in the days of the ipod when he first when you put it on shuffle. Can you tell that imagine a black piece of paper and say we're going to just randomly put there? If he was around put this blank piece of paper, you wouldn't get a nice sort of gray shading of dogs. You would get some clusters of dots. And some bits of the white paper where there's nothing there. So randomness is not older like that. And when the aren't you ipod I had their shuffled if it was perfectly around them, you expect it to be clusters. So you would expect it to play. Sometimes the same song several times in the road. Because it's not remember each time. It plays that song. It's not remembering the played it. Love time before is just the most chums it might play it each time and people started to complain, and they write in and they said, you know, whenever I put my ipod on it plays just for my Led Zeppelin album, not for my black Sabbath album. And then is perfectly predictable within randomness. And so they Steve Jobs changed the shuffle to not really be random tool, but to be more of a selective going through the you will Konta logo the songs you've got on the list and not repeating them. And that has not random because if it was random you'd end up getting clusters you'd end up getting repeats. So people think that putting something on shuffle is random, but what you're really getting is deliberate variety. Correct. Correct. You know, we really what my whole randomness. We want variety you talked earlier about zero and what a novel concept that was when it was first introduced that. You would have a symbol that stands for nothing. So I would imagine that the negative numbers had to be even more perplexing people. How could you actually have a negative number of something and? And yet, it it turns out negative numbers or minus numbers are really important. Mine is numbers early. Few hundred years old. They were in the same way that people will have we have a number zero. I'm the how can we have a number of something, which is mine is I what is the minus number main and actually minus numbers confuse a lot of people. I think that's one reason why for example in enlists when you see the the numbers of fluids gang up is one two three four five when he go dad never goes modest one Muncie, minus three those that in the UK, very ready. It will say basement or lower grounds and then basement and then garage, wh whatever, and I think that's because having the numbers coming down, and then stop going up again, but they're actually going further Dan is really quite hard to understand. And the you understand the history of. That you know, they was even just a a hundred years ago. They were mathematicians who are writing books that have no negative numbers in them because they thought the negative numbers. How can they exist? And then you follow on from that you thinking. Well, there's consented math, which all square roots of minus one like how can minus one have a square because whenever you square anything you becomes positive and the square roots of minus one such amazing idea that without it. We wouldn't have modern physics. We wouldn't have kind of electronics is such a powerful idea quickly something you talk about. It's really interesting. Everybody knows what dyslexia is and it causes people to have trouble with words. But there's a number version of that. There's people who have the same problem or more or less the same problem with numbers as people with dyslexia have with letters and words, and it's called the dyscalculia. Talk about that. I think about five percent of the population have dyslexia. So everyone knows dyslexia is studied a lot. 'cause Calcuta is a number quivalent of that people who see numbers, we'll see the symbol for numbers. And just it just doesn't go in. They just there's some kind of blindness to it. They just don't get it. And this is happens to affect probably about the same about five percent of the population. And it's a lot less well researched. And if you do find numbers really really difficult, they just sort of don't get away. And you just don't quite gross them. You feel blind by them. It could be the case that you have this calculator and just go Q. There is nothing about mathematical ability. You can have Britain mathematicians who are little bit discount cubic when it comes to actual numbers. And if you do this co Q to do your children might we just calculate if you look online there. Little things that can help you assess whether you are and give you strategies on how to cope with numbers in. In life. Well, as I used to say to my parents, and as my son says to me about the math. He learns in school. You know, this is never going to be helpful to me in real life. I'll never need to know this stuff. But in fact, numbers and math are integral parts of our lives, and it is important. And and in many ways, really fascinating, Alex bellows has been my guest Alex written several books, including Alex's adventures in number land. He's also got a book of handcrafted Japanese puzzles called puzzle ninja and a series of books called soccer school that teaches kids about the world using soccer. There's a link to Alex's book in the show notes. Thanks, alex. Appreciate you. Joining me. One of great doesn't it? It is interesting that so many of us go to the supermarket, and we comparison shop we look for bargains. We use coupons were very price conscious when we shop for food and yet so much of that food ends up getting thrown away. In fact, it's estimated that a family of four could save about fifteen hundred dollars a year by being more careful about the food. They buy that's over a hundred dollars a month about forty percent of the food. America produces goes to waste when you separate out households from commercial entities like restaurants. It's about twenty percent of what we purchase at the supermarket that eventually finds its way into the trash. This is according to Dana gutters. Who's a senior scientist at the national Resources Defense Council and author of the waste free kitchen. Handbook nobody wakes up in the morning wanting to waste food. It happens in little bits and pieces. According to Dana gunners where so price conscious when we go shopping. But when we get the food home and eventually throw out say a quarter of the cheese. We just bought we don't realize that's the same dollar fifty. We were trying so hard to save when we went shopping, and now it's just down the drain, and it all starts with being more deliberate about what you buy. And that is something you should know. Join us follow us. We're on social media on Facebook, Twitter and linked in I'm Mike Carruthers. Thanks for listening today to something you should know.

Alex bellows Geico soccer Steve Jobs New York ADT Tom Mike carruthers Intel UK Egypt flu Australian National University depression
6.09: Impact Winter (with Ben Murray)

The West Wing Weekly

53:32 min | 2 years ago

6.09: Impact Winter (with Ben Murray)

"The voice start the show. A quick announcement very exciting on Saturday June. First we are going to be doing a live show from our nation's capital has right. We're going to be taping the season six finale two thousand one hundred sixty two votes at the beautiful Warner theater in Washington DC and tickets around sale now at the west wing weekly dot com slash DC. That's the west wing weekly dot com slash DC. Last time we did a live show in DC the tickets sold out in an hour so move quickly. If you want to get one hope to see you there the western weekly is sponsored by ever lane. I love ever lane. They make great close. Yeah. They do two of my favorite pieces of outerwear. Come from this company. I've been wearing the men's renewed lightweight hooded Puffer. It's one of those puffy jackets. It looks very cool. It's very comfy to wear. It. Kept me warm in San Francisco this weekend when we did our live event, I've been staying warm with ever lane to I've been indulging in some Kashmir courtesy of ever lane. Nice. It's really nice. There's a Kashmir Scott. And a cashmere sweater that I have from them. And the crazy thing is they aren't crazy expensive. I'm shocked by how well made these clothes are and how good they look. And how inexpensive they are for what you're getting is because ever lane sells directly to consumers. Their prices are thirty to fifty percent lower than traditional retailers. They take a transparent approach they want you to know what you're paying for. And why if you go to the website, and you read you can see what their costs are you can learn about every step in the process from the materials, they use to the ethical factories that they work with we love them. And right now, you can check out our personalized collection of favorites at ever lane dot com slash west wing. Plus, you'll get free shipping on your first order if you go to the website and start shopping now. That's right. Good ever, lean dot com slash west wing and get free shipping. Again, that's ever lane dot com slash west wing. The Westwood weeklies made possible by care of a monthly subscription vitamin service that delivers completely personalized vitamin and supplement packs right to your door. I'm an unabashed fan Ritchie unhooked. Yeah. You take an online quiz, which only takes a few minutes, but helps you hone in on what you're trying to achieve with your vitamin regimen in your life, it makes gestures as to what supplements and vitamins, you might like to take. And then even gives you information about how much research there is behind each of the vitamins are considering taking would you feel comfortable sharing? What one of your personal health goals is well, my main health goal is to not feel as old as I am. And how's it going? I'm feeling much better taking my daily packet of care of vitamins. Amazing, and I've got my daughter on a tuna. And if you want to sign up you can take advantage of this month's special new year offer for fifty percent off your first month of personalized care of vitamins. Just go to take care of dot com and enter the code west wing fifty remember ninety percent of people fall short of FDA recommended guidelines for at least one vitamin or nutrient take that care of quiz and find out how you're doing again, go to take care of dot com and enter the promo code west wing fifty to get fifty percent off your first month of personalized care of vitamins. Hello. You're listening to the west wing weekly. I'm Joshua Malina. And I'm reshi case your way today we're talking about season six episode nine. It's called impact. Winter this episode was written by Deborah Kahn. This episode was directed by Leslie linka gladder this episode first aired on December fifteenth two thousand four two ago in episode six oh, seven the title was a change is gonna come. And I think in this episode. The changes arrive, the president goes to China, but he's severely impaired by his MS. Charlie pushes CJ to consider her next step after she steps out of the White House. And Josh considers his next step. After turns out, the Donna has already considered what her next step will be indeed leader in this episode. We're going to be joined by Ben Murray who made his debut on the west wing in the last episode. He plays Curtis. The president's new personal assistant to replace Charlie. A man who has held Martin sheen in his arms. I mean, I've done that off camera. He did on television. Little do our listeners know that Martin sheen insists on being carried everywhere. That's right. I was amazed. All these years later when Martin shut up presenter view with us. Ben was carrying. It was the first time we met him. Yup. Yup. What did you think of this episode? I liked it. The physical stuff and the deterioration of president Bartlett is painful to watch. But compelling. Yeah. I'm impressed by how much happens in this episode. Yeah. In terms of those changes, there is a lot of kinetic energy in this episode. You know, I feel like we're used to seeds being planted and then paying off over the course of a few episodes, especially in the last couple of seasons. But things really move here. Let's start at the beginning. I mean at the beginning, it doesn't feel like anything is going to happen. It's slow day. And Josh Don are kind of wiling away. But then CJ calls, and let them know what we already knew from the previous episode, which is that the president has had an incident because of his MSN he can't move his legs and his arms of only just come back and about this in fact, like talking about how there's not that much to talk about in the briefing room. But then suddenly all hell breaks loose. Josh scribbles get Leo on a pad to. Donna this right before the titles come in. And something about the way that he like writes it and then taps on the pad that when the titles did come in. All I could do was sing the theme with the lyrics. Get leo. The whole time. We're just variations on get Leo go. Get Leo go. Get Leo now. I like that it works pretty well. And I think everyone should try it when they watch this episode. So vice president Russell after we come back. Vice president comes back talking about. I was playing tennis when I heard it couldn't believe my heirs. We were just discussed, and it feels really weird when he says it to the staffers, and then he goes, and he does the briefing, and he says that there and you're like, oh, he was just practicing that garbage line. That's exactly what I wrote down. I liked that. I liked that. I did sort of bump on it that first time it was like, wow. That was clunky. And then like, oh that was the test run. And he felt it went over well enough that he's going to give it another world in front of the press. I thought that was great. This is another one of those moments where I wish they hadn't hung a light on it because then subsequently, although I kind of liked that too. But subsequent to the moment. Josh actually gives will a little grief about it. Free advice for the campaign trail stop at the ceaseless mentions of his tennis game doesn't make him. What? Young and vigorous makes them. Look like dilettante can't settle down with thick book. I I was disappointed. It was like, oh, I already noticed. I felt smart as the audience. I yeah. I kind of picked up on the fact that he seems to be trying to kind of draw distinction between the. The president state and his own more youthful physically fit state when I was disappointed the Josh brought it up, but then there's the little couplet talk about tennis. It makes them look young and vigorous exactly that had value. So that that saved that moment for me. But I was like, oh, why why China late on it? I love that about this episode. There are few moments. Like that where you're like, why are you doing that? Oh, and then it, but then it pays off. Yes. I was like, okay. You got me. Yeah. Yeah. It was good very clever. She's a good writer that Denver calm is my favorite stuff about this episode. It has to do with the presidential campaign. I think this is going to end up being my refrain for all of season six all the stuff in the Bartlett administration on all the stuff in the White House. I'm like, yeah. Okay. Yeah. But then anything that has to do with campaigning positioning for the primaries. All that stuff. I love I cannot get enough of it. And this episode there's a lot of it. And it's so great and the showdown between Josh and will is fantastic that moment of him saying, hey, you know, what watch yourself you and they candidate and the like stop with the mentions of his tennis game. But there's a part. You know, Josh says watch yourself you in the candidate. And I really like you in this episode a lot Josh give you have just utter dripping contempt on your face your line has just done. But the way you deliver. It is us just like so much. Go gear self, man. This does come easily to me. This take you. That's great. I mean because at this point, you know, we know will set things up to try to bring Josh in. You know, an and be like you run the campaign like he was going to a position of power to Janisch. And he said, no. So now, it's you know, there's a little bit of a declaration of war, even though even in that moment, it's not like Joshua's declared for somebody else. He said that he doesn't wanna see Russel b the president. That's right. It's great great dynamic and. Yeah, the turn of like out of Will's earshot, Josh thing. Yeah. It's a good move like wills, right, right? He he is grudgingly admires. He's not going to college. That too. Will certainly be out. Yeah, I'm enjoying this to actually these are now, we're definitely in a Bank of episodes possibly between. Here. The end that I think I've never seen. Really? Yeah. I think this job is always fantastic. And I was thrilled to have it even then. But at a certain point, I think lost any interest in watching the show, and that kind of did my thing. I don't have that much to do here. I love it love when I'm at work loved the people, but I wasn't running home to watch it on Wednesday nights. Yeah. So I'm feeling a new appreciation for this story line. We're getting into I feel like I've never really, you know, I know everything that happened read this cribs. And but I don't think I ever really experienced what it was. We were making. I I really think there are just nap tons of episodes. I've not seen a frame of. Yeah. We talked about this a lot about how things synchronized with the real world our discussions lineup and to be talking about the stuff in the run-up like people declaring their candidacy is while. It's so great to be doing it right now. While this is happening in twenty nine thousand nine it just makes our discussions crackle for me in a way that I don't know even if we would have done this. It's not like the show would be different. But it just I love what the outside world is bringing into this watch. Yeah. It's credibly weird. I mean, if we had decided somehow to schedule this podcast, so that things would coincide with the world where we could have accomplished. It's true the remark I me time and time again, this this we're preternatural synchronicity between our rewatch and events happening. The real world it is bizarre. He delightful so back to the China stuff for a second. Sure. At this point in the episode. They are not yet in China. There's trying to figure things out, and I really liked this one moment between the president. And Toby as they're trying to like, he's trying to set up what their dynamics should be for the negotiations and Toby's trying you know in the interest of time and what they do. He says that'd be like, oh, the conversation cut straight to. No, it's not going to budge on to bed. Anyway, we talk about Tabet. So that they can be implacable talk about Taiwan. So that they can hold the line against the capitalist imperialist fo-. We do it all so that when we get to North Korea, and they agree. To do dirty work. They won't have lost face at every other step along the way, cancel the Bank would cancel whatever the hell you like, but we do not skip one step. Not one moment of mine ago. She -ation with president lay on I love that. I love that. You know, there are a lot of times in the president seems like he's the guy who's the least informed in some ways. And he's like counting on the advisors to give them the best information that they gather, and then he makes his decision. But here it's just like he's like he knows what the dynamics are with the players, and he knows how to play that game to their advantage. Yeah. Right. He's an experienced statesman by this point. Yeah. And it is fun to hear his take. I guess. I've been feeling like maybe the president. He seemed less powerful or less knowledgeable or something. He's been kind of diminished. I think recently, I don't know it just feels like it's been a little while since we've seen him just like kick ass in a way that even just this one line just him schooling. Toby in reminds me of that other. Yeah. No. I think I think it's very well done. There's no fluffy here in the president. I think president Bartlett's sharpness and his mental acuity in this episode highlights the physical degradation that he's going through. So that he's, you know, he's like this brain in a chair that they're willing around to wear needs to be, and it it just a really weird thing. Is it brings up images of Krang from teenage mutant ninja turtles Virga. Yeah. But the contrast is stark and think that's done intentionally and its effective. Yeah. They're really smart things that are done in this episode and how they lay out the plot points. And one just to jump way to the end. You know, the just heartbreaking moment later, you know, when the president falls he has his tumble. Ooh. Yeah. That is tough to watch. And he has this incredible moment with the first lady when he says, I can't do the job Abby you understand. I can't do it. I cannot do the job may. Got up part is just brutal. But it was so smart to have that story beat at that moment before you go to Josh in the final moments of the episode talking to congressman Santos about running for president. Like, there's another version of this where they don't think about that. Or they don't have that setup. But I think there's something for us for the audience like you need, the president to kind of own up to this idea of like, hey, it's okay for us to acknowledge that my age, and how long have had this job in that things are changing. So that you don't somehow feel you don't bring some kind of like bitterness to the idea of replacing him with Santos like it's a way for us to buy in to the idea of a new contender for the presidency because they've already given us the president saying I can't do it anymore. Yeah. I think that's true. That said it's still painful is still an emotional mixed bag. I do agree. There's almo. Other than on the scene together. There's almost a passing of the baton as the president admits is not up to it. He just physically can't do it. There's also flashes there to me of the young Martin sheen and smashes a mirror and Apocalypse Now wrestling there's like that fury in mad spark in his eyes as he self flagellating zone legs, which you know, I guess you have no feeling of that point. It's it's very intense moment and what a performance from Martin. I totally thought the same thing. I felt like this is acting from like a nineteen seventies school of cinema that you don't see on TV really ever, especially not like network TV in the early two thousands. It just felt like, wow, he brought some other world onto the screen in that moment. And I it's so incredible. It's electric. Yeah. Yeah. He brought it. So as I mentioned Curtis actually did appear in the last episode. But we really I think he really makes his presence felt here. When the president says, hey. Let's make a break for it. And he actually picks him up. And you get a really appreciate how enormous this guy is. And how strong years he just picks up the president Perez them off of the plane down the stairs down the stairs. Yeah. It is pretty incredible and bringing new meaning to the term bodyman, boom. Okay. Here's a part of the episode that I didn't like so much. Sure. Walter sprout. There's a character that gets introduced a comes in and tells the White House there's an object coming towards the earth an asteroid our calculations could be wrong. But. If they're not they indicate that an object following that trajectory would strike the earth in approximately forty eight hours. Forty-six, and I just feel like we've been here before. Oh, I agree. Am I wrong? When we spoke to Jacob Keaton for warfare of Dan Gascon, did he not complain that the west wing treats, NASA and the certain way. Well, the portrayal of the NASA people first of all is just about the lowest stereotype think you can pick out her NASA people, we don't know where name tags don't on a medically looked like nerds. And that certainly not the way we would approach meeting at the White House. So there you go. That's what I thought. I thought of that interview as soon as this scene began that said, I'm a huge Patrick Fischler fan. I think he's a great actor. I love him. I don't know if you've seen him he's done if you look in his IMDB ages done like a million things. He's he's always such a scary, dude. I feel like have you seen happy on scifi? I haven't it's incredibly great. I mean, if you look at recommendations out there, people violent and crazy and out there, and addled and marvel. Leslie original, but be prepared for you. You're stepping into great show. I love to an Patrick Fischler plays an extremely odd character named smoothie on it. And he's pretty fantastic as all show. I remember him mostly from lost. Yeah. Sure. But he introduces the subplot which to me reminded me of season to the falls gonna kill you. Do you? Remember that one where there's a piece of a satellite that's hurtling towards earth. It's pretty similar. Yeah. And Donna says Chinese satellite zodiac has fallen off its orbit, and we'll be falling to earth at an unspecified time and place. This giant things falling to earth or watching on radars. There's something we do like what like sound the alarm? I dunno sound. It's just I understand. It's different one is an asteroid. And it's more dangerous. It's a bigger thing. And in the fall is gonna kill you. It's part of the satellite, and they're like, oh this happens. All the time. Donna just doesn't know how frequently this thing happens. But in both cases know, there's a sense of like, oh my God. This thing is her lean towards the earth. And hey, look everything's fine by the end. Yeah. Especially in terms of being a revisit to familiar terrain. You gotta take it to another place. I think it's gotta go somewhere else. I I get wondering first of all it almost felt to me first of all as it sort of just clunky metaphor for the end or what's facing, president Bartlett and the kept wanting to be more of a real plot. And rather than something that was I think just a sort of sinister be your see plot that somehow heightens everything else that's going on. And then it just kind of fizzles out is these things, I guess generally do. So I kind of wanted to either some bigger payoff in terms of learning how a government would deal with situation like this. It turns out they deal with the mainly by treating it as if it's highly unlikely and that the people talking about it or just odd weirdos. You kind of have to Hugh. Humor tumor. Thank you. Yeah. The idea of like a paranoid nerd coming in, and you know, warning of dangers, and you just have to sit through it is just a we also had Bob angler played by Sam, Lloyd, you know, this feels a little bit like Bob angler reduction. We already had Bob Engler twice. Anyway. So it has kind of crackpots vibe this is like big block of his. Space really big buck. Yep. Yep. The talk about the size of this thing. It's four hundred meters that's considerably smaller twice the size of the astrodome gives new meaning to the phrase duck and cover thought. No, it doesn't. It's not a great joke. It's not even like it is in the clothing of a joke without actually being joke. Like, there's nothing it looks like right? The one thing I did like about that story line is like that. There's a certain point where president Bartlett is talking to Curtis about all the potential cataclysms that could come of it. And he's so relishing it occurred Curtis. Just look stricken. Which is funny. Bill look Benz phase. Yeah. That's just like that. This is like prison Bartlett's, enjoying it. Okay. Back to stuff that I love I found this whole thing about CJ Kate trying to give the president of way to let them know that he's tired or needs the bathroom. Really funny. It's sort of like the signal. It's the other signal it's like the much less cool signal. Yeah. Right. Exactly. Or my own personal story has Grammy. The yankees. I would've loved president Bartlett had turned to the. Yeah. And said, so how's grandpa? Transit. She said. If you need to take a break at any time. I don't know talk on your ear lope or something. We'll make something up. I desperately hope you're not serious. It's really meaning. I'm going to want to take a break, then you should go on your ear lobe, and this one will make something she's better. It's great. But then later the president. See he is tugging on his ear lobe. And he says the plan was flawed. Ideally, the recipient of the secret science stays in the room. Yes. Almost pulled. My I had to step. The whole thing reminded me of the classic Seinfeld moment when they are trying to devise a way to help each other get out of a terrible conversation at a party in the episode the stranded. There's a great subplot about trying to come up with a signal at listen. Let's keep an eye on each other tonight case one of us gets in a conversation. We should have a signal that you're in trouble. So the other one can get us out of it. Chicken wing. Got a better way head padding. What have you been doing? I've been smacking myself senseless. People think on the mental patient. Basically the same scenario executives. I've been smacking myself senseless Elaine says that's an president. I will support my ear off probably really got it from. I think so. There's a great thread in this episode between Leo and Josh trying to figure out what's going to happen. And I love the way that the two of them sort of debate horns and Russell on the relative strengths and weaknesses of each candidate. And sort of what they're faced with. And then how they compare to Vinik and that kind of analysis is just exciting, and it feels really real. And I I just I love hearing the two of them pick that apart sitting VP's going to raise a lot more money. And he's in the position offer more favors guy without a job that said horns is much more experience in the job. Russell hall was elected Senator of a huge in complicated and usually Republican state and Russell gone elected Representative of the district size of my thumb, orange smarter. Russell kick his ass, not debase, and he's got more foreign policy experience could happen. Yeah. I like that too. And then the part where it gets like exciting in west wing e. Especially as when Leo says, you know, the people who pick a candidate in the back room. That's us. That's us right now. And this is so great to pick your dream candidate. This works. You pick the smartest most capable most. Honorable individual, you can think of and you have a conversation. I can't pick up and leave the White House to go run a campaign for some dark horse. I pulled out of a cornfield. I did. Yeah. So good. I also appreciate Leo saying there are no stupid by. And then walking it back because it's true. There are stupid ideas there. Many stupid ideas another moment similar to your dripping contempt with. Josh there's a great little micro performance moment on Gary Cole's face when Leo decides he's going to intervene in the cabinet meeting. The vice president when he goes, and he makes the announcement about the president's MS. He says he's going to, you know, go speak to the cabinet will has sort of set this up not as an ambush, but like not as a four one. He's just like I'm gonna go meet with the cabinet. And then by saying that it's going to look very weird. It's been announced. You don't think it'd be more awkward if it doesn't happen? He's kind of forced the heck. End of the administration. Now, the vice president gets to meet with a cabinet and do this very presidential thing. Right. But so they are way to defuse that as they put Leo in the cabinet meeting as well. And this exchange when Leo tells Russell the that's going to happen. This really great. You know, he says mind if I join you and Russell just gives them this. Look, he says join you. There's a moment or like a whole thing passes across Gary Cole's face, and it's beautiful. It's great. It's a good moment. So the thing that I think that has been built up to the most that finally pays off here is Donna quitting. Yeah. This has been a multi episode attempt to try to get his attention and have him sit down and have a conversation with her a wonder why actually I mean, of course, there's payoff emotional path. But why has he he's been so dismissive for so long like he's been much worse than usual. I think in some ways to motivate this change, but it might also be his own self-absorption like he's had his own problems to deal with and his own fate and between things that he screwed up in season five, and then now having to work for CJ and everybody being like, what are you doing? What are you doing next, but he has been especially dismissive to Donna of late this even for him. Josh is usually pretty wrapped up in Josh. And he. He has a tendency to take Donna for granted. What did you think when Donna finally tells them like I actually think that despite all of that? And you know, the fact that we know that there's something brewing that he's ignoring when she just lets it out when she's like, I quit. I actually cheered. Oh, yeah. I was happy for. I was it was definitely you. Go kind of moment. Yeah. And at the same time, I felt that you know. Although I was taking a little joy in it. She clearly isn't even though she's serving herself. She also looks kind of stricken. I mean. Yeah. That had to happen. It had to happen. The way it does. Yes. There are two personal things that I thought of while watching this episode in this one there is someone who is close to me who was at one time in a relationship with a guy and cared from very much, and they had a plan that they were going to move in together. But it was important to her that before they moved into gather that they would be engaged, and it was made clear with plenty of. Time for it to not feel like an ultimatum. I guess though. It was I suppose, you know. And the dude in this scenario was just like a really laid back kind of guy and got all the way up to the point where it was like, okay. It was time to move in. Like, it was time like packing up stuff, and this person who's close to me was like, yeah. This is not happening and ended the relationship, and I was so proud of her for being like like making that painful move. Vic, there's no joy in it. And I think it takes it takes so much courage to make that decision. You know on your own behalf. Even though it's not something that you feel good about right? Well, that's a very apt store. You shared because there is also a blurring as there is with all things Josh and Donna of the personal the professional and this feels like both a professional moving. I also like the moment went Josh tells Leo that Donna's leaving Donna quit. Donna march. Has gone. She has a new job for her. She tried to tell you this people move on it feels a little bit. Like he's talking about a relationship breakup. And then, you know, Leah's responses could for her that's great. You know, people move on this is that's how it's supposed to work. Leo. So harsh I think actually because he says Donna moss. Like that felt like like just an extra. I actually liked that. Because I like that that's an enormously world the normal White House. The former chief of staff might have to take beat. Rather than in this superhero ventures, right? Click of where all family people that are like a family does. Yeah. I liked. I really cracked me up. But I just felt like especially painful to Josh in that moment. Right. Right. Well, that's what I like is. He's hoping to get a little bit more out of Leo's like, oh, that's great. Yeah. Goodness. Good for his. And he says like I said people move on. Right. And that's where the two I guess plots also brush up against each other. We're Josh's having trouble with concept moving on his responses. If you got a president I'd like Bartlett third-term Josh has to realize like it's time for him to move onto. He's got to figure out. What is next chapter is? Yeah. The other thing from my own life that came up while watching this episode is that part when Russell says I was playing tennis. I couldn't believe my ears. And you hear him say it again, there was remember a Christmas party that I spent with the family of someone who I was seeing and it was like a big extended family thing. But there was one guy who was there and somebody arrived from out of town or something like that whatever he's a you're already here. Where'd you park the plane? And then they came in and stuff. And then I was still standing in the foyer in like four minutes later. I hear him say to someone else. Where'd you park with the plane? Look like, the I was just a practice run up it. So then, you know, I'll tell you where they parked the plane on the tarmac and the plane was Air Force One. And that's what you call the segue. Nicely done. Where'd you park the Seguin would you practice? Sorry. I should've let you say that one as a classic duck and cover. For some reason, by the way, when Donna did quit, and I gave a little cheer in my head. I went Donna Martin graduates, Donna Martin graduates. Wow. Do you remember that from Beverly Hills nine O two on oh? So have you had a theme song to with Leo in your head, and you had tongue in Martin graduates, your fixating and the Seinfeld? Yeah. Yep. By the way, Brad engine L singing in the opening scene. Name showed it to me. That was kind of fun. I thought it was cute, by the way. So after the president has his fall, and there's an incredible performance from Martin sheen. He says I am not in the room. I can't do the job shades of Hamilton. Right. But then he is able to talk his way into the room, and he managed to negotiate away from everybody else he manages to negotiate away into multilateral talks that includes North Korea and China, and Japan, and you know, he's done this really deft bit of statesmanship. And he does it using the tactics that he had given his staff, you know, bring up the old president, and you can get some leverage because that's the point of that's a sticking point for the new president. And he does it and he managed to pull the whole thing off in. It's amazing. But I love how the toll from it is. So high physically like, you know, they say the president's choice Milly come out when he wants to come out, and he's going to suffer the consequences. And then it turns out the consequences are pretty serious, and he has another attack after boarding Air Force One the way they all kind of shuffle. Into that room on their own the door closes behind them as very scary. It is scary. But it gives so much energy to Joshua's trip to Texas. It puts pressure on the show to be like who is the successor. We know it can't be horns, we know that like we don't believe in Russell. We don't feel about Russell the way anybody feels about president Bartlett. And so who's it going to be? And so it's a great way to line those things up where you really are. Like, oh, gosh, what is gonna happen with this guy? Yeah. And beyond the single episode. It also feels to me as indeed I think it was a show looking to reinvent itself and possibly to continue in a new way. You know? I mean, you know, it's kind of almost you can almost feel the behind the scenes what's going on with the west wing itself potentially coming to an end and looking for a way to extend and find new creative life. Yeah. I'm sorry to bring yet. Another external cultural reference, but please do there's something akin to the new Star Wars movies in comparison to the old Star Wars movies. You know in the force awakens, which I enjoyed very much. There are a lot of story lines that are basically the same as in the first Star Wars movies. And so you kind of feel like, okay, they're reinventing things in their new things. But they're also playing from a playbook that they know works, and they're tying it to the legacy in this way. And there's a little bit of that here like where Leo is Josh Allen and Santos's Bartlett. But I actually like it better here because we never actually got to see that stuff. We heard right audit. We did see a little bit in flashback. Right. But it was like before the time of the show. And so now we're getting to like see what that's really like in the present tense, and it's really cool. So smart way to reinvent yourself is by still taking some of the things that you know, work story beats at you know, work and felt good. But you got to realize them for the first time. Yeah. You're right. All in all pretty good episode folks now and suggest further. Good stuff coming. Yeah. I'm excited. Let's take a quick break right now when we come back, we'll be joined by Ben Murray defense attorney, but formerly he played Curtis Carruthers, the president's bodyman, and that'll be coming up after this. The west wing weekly is sponsored by squarespace. We love squarespace the west wing. Weekly's website is a squarespace website rish. Use website is a squarespace website. That's true. 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Joining us now is Ben Murray who chatted with Richie in me from his office in Nebraska. Thanks so much for joining us. Ben, thanks for having me. I was wondering if we could start at the very beginning. How did you first end up on the west wing? I had just come off the show. I think it was actually my first TV audition. It was a show called American dreams. I ended up kind of being on off and on for the three seasons. It was on a good show. Yeah. It was great. I loved it. And it was a great experience. I had done a bunch of commercials before that and my wife, and I got married in June. And I was supposed to come back two weeks later for the start of season three at the season finale of season two I ran into a cave and upon my return to Hollywood was informed that I wasn't in fact coming back out of the cave. So I was in a deep depression after my marriage, and it was not much longer after that. I got a call, and they wouldn't tell me what it was at first. And then they said it was west wing. And that I had to wear a suit. So I had to borrow a suit. And they sent me the sides. It was the actual scene where I carried Martin off the plane was the audition scene while. Yeah. That was the one you probably don't know what it's like to be six five and three hundred pounds, but wearing a suit without suspenders as a bit of a chore. So I borrowed a suit from guy was actually bigger than me. And I went in for the audition, and I had to bend down and act like I was going to pick somebody up, and I had my borrowed suit pants precariously perched on my love handles, and when I went to stand back up man, they just I just lost him. Let my pants fell off. And so I called him about MS by and I was just, you know, just humiliating. I just finished the audition. I was like, well, I thought it was funny. So I kind of enjoyed it. And nobody it wasn't like nobody even laughed. It was just like stone face. It was. Yeah, it was just crickets in the room. And so I had a walk on pass. So I couldn't even drive onto the lot. So when I got off the lot I called my agent, and I was like, yeah. That's not gonna happen. The literally could not have gone any worse. And he was like, I don't know what you're talking about. They already called. That was awesome. They loved it. Wow. I don't remember. I don't even think I had a call back. I think I got it at that point. I I still think I had a TV. So I mean, I knew what the show was. But I didn't know how big it was. I didn't know how big a deal. It was. It was crazy. It was just like I remember my agents were going crazy because they were trying to get everybody on it. And that's probably part of the reason I got it because I wasn't really overwhelmed by the whole thing. It does help to not seem overly hungry in the room. When you're addition. Right. And I mean, it's it's, you know, go in and play a big dummy. I mean, I'm the Marlon Brando of big dummy. I can get that me out of the park every day of the week. We have a lot of range as an actor. I'm a one trick pony. And that one trick is what you see right here. Did you realize sooner once you started working on this show? Did you realize it was a big deal where people psyched people around you? Yeah. They really were. And I noticed like immediately after the first one aired the number of auditions I got really shot through the roof, and I shot to shows while I was shooting west way. So in the audition, you had to do the scene where you carried Martin sheen. What was it like when you actually had to film that scene with Martin sheen are knew going in that that was it even though that was the audition? I was actually in the episode before that, and so I'd gotten to know him. And so we already kind of talked about it. And we I showed up on set the first day, and he kind of just pulled me aside, and he ended up being an amazing person. And I ended up spending Christmas with his entire family that year which was odd to I showed up on set. And he said, you know, what kind of work have you done on this character? And obviously haven't done any. And I was like, oh, no I've been working on stuff. And he said would you care if I told you what the back story? Was. Wow, you know, I don't wanna step on your toes. And I was like, no, man. You know, I've got some ideas. But I want to hear you out. And he has his long story about how first of all he thought the character should be played by an African American, but he was able to move past that, and then he said that he thought they brought me in to be the new Charlie because I had played football at Notre Dame. And he had this whole back story. And so yeah, I just went with it. But the episode before we did a scene where we carried him down the hallway of the plane on a stretcher now that was actually physically harder because I I like literally did not fit between the hallway of the plane. I was like two wide and the other guy that they had on the other side. He was pretty small guy because I had to shoot over his shoulder. And like he was doing none of the carrying. So that was harder the day. We did the shot where I picked him out of the chair. The actual caring was not a problem. It was when I was picking him up over and over again because it was tough to reach down into the chair. You're gonna fall off. Somebody brings the damn chair. So he kept a little bottle of that Evian spray water in his like his pocket of his coat and between every shot. He would soak my face with this oughta, I'm I'm like, man, I'm a one hundred percents white already. I'm like, I'm good. I'm really okay that you don't need to spray that and every time he was like off it's gonna it's gonna look great on camera, and he'd call the makeup people in Intel him to dry me off in between. So it was process of in-between. These people were coming in drying me off they had like three different shirts for for me because I was sweating through everything. And then before we would go he would spray my face the whole time. I mean, he he really was could not have been nicer to and we shot at late really late. We were shot at up by magic mountain in Valencia. And I think we were there probably almost it seemed I guess looking back. It seems like it was midnight. But I don't remember. But he asked what I was doing. And I said, well, I was just going to go home. And he's he. Actually said, well, let's go say at a hotel, and he he rented a room for me at like Hilton garden inn, which you know, at this point I hadn't been anywhere about a studio apartment in either Chicago or north Hollywood and the ten years prior to this. So it was it was the first time I had cable in years, and I was able to just lay in in this hotel with air conditioning and order a pizza and watch movies all night long. It was just it was awesome. He paid for the whole thing. And yeah, it was great. It's a Murcia. I think had a little crush on. You thought he treating really liked you a little street urchin. He was taking under his link. He was at one point. He was feeding me from his plate and this gets better. And better. It was so embarrassing. So were there and then at one during one of these episodes he asked what I was doing for Christmas. And I said I wasn't doing anything because my wife had flown to visit her parents in Texas, and he invited me to the sheen Estevez family Christmas at Charlie's house. Did you have to sign a nondisclosure? For it was so Charlie was married to Denise at the time. Denise richards. Yeah. And they had just purchased a house from Kirstie alley. The biggest house that ever seen in. It's just like a comedy sketch like I've pull up and my Kia Rio in like, they're like, you know, you guys can park around back, and I'm like really not here to work. I was actually invited to this thing. To talk my way into it. And then it's like, you know, everybody's famous and they're like who's this guy? And I have to say like your dad actually invited me to this thing. And my wife wasn't around to cover me. So she told me to bring something nice. And so I went to this big re involved fifty dollars worth of these really fancy Christmas cookies, and so I ate half of them on the drive to the house. Sweat. I walk in and a hand in this. And they couldn't have been nicer. They said thank you and everything in about halfway through the party. I realized there's not another car, but in this house, the only person using a car in ten years. So I'm probably the worst gift possible. And at the end of the night, then Martin pulls out all these pieces of paper and puts them in a hat when he said we have to do the this is what we do every year. This is our Christmas tradition. And so you have to reach in and pull out a piece of paper. And so I'm the first one to go. There's no explanation for what this is. So I reached in I pull out a piece of paper, and it says four calling birds, and I'm like, oh, God almighty, we're going to have to sing the twelve days of Christmas, and I'm four so there's only three people that have it worse than me. We sing the whole thing. It takes twenty minutes start to finish belt out four calling birds because you know, it's Martin sheen. You know, what are you gonna do to sweet tradition? Yeah. I know I was obviously never invited back. So, but yeah, I mean, it was like it was the greatest experience being on the show. He was so nice to me. Everybody was then I was gone. I left probably less than a year later. I left LA left L together. Yeah. I didn't studio sixty on the sunset strip after this. I did a couple of episodes of that. And then I was on the show. I did a couple of episodes of show called heroes. It was just miserable. And how come I wasn't enjoying myself? We just had our daughter and she was allergic to the frigging air in California. Like, we're doing like eight nebulizers day. And I went I was supposed to sign up for a couple more episodes. And I call I went home, and I just said to my wife was like conscious be done with this. And she said, what do you mean kind just leave? And she was like, yeah, you can leave. God. That's all I've ever wanted to do. Then she was like she was this a long time ago escaped from L A. Well, yeah. So that would have been the following like November. I think we laughed if you think you'd had better experiences like you'd had on American dreams in west wing. Do you think you would have still felt like leaving at that time? I just I don't think it was for me. I think it might just be for some people because I kind of fell into it. You know, it wasn't like I think it needs to be your dream to get through stuff like that. I think had it been my dream my entire life to be an actor and to be on television. I think that would have carried me through some of that stuff and the stuff I was doing wasn't stuff. I really like want my like west wing is one thing. And even American dreams was great. You know with a lot of the commercials. I was a fat guy with my shirt off talking about don't drink the water in Mexico and making a fat face like this. I'm like I really wanna kid to see that is that the legacy. I want to leave. I don't know enough. So now, the big question is what have you done with your life since I went to law school? I'm a criminal lawyer. I currently have a death penalty case, which is the only one going in Nebraska now. The first one since the legislature overturned the death penalty. And then the fine voters of Nebraska decided that wasn't good enough. And they want the death penalty again. So here I am fighting for somebody's life. I guess the majority of the stuff I do is criminal defense. That's what I did all day today. I was in court today. Congratulations on raising the stakes of your life. Substance of your work. It certainly makes me more interested. I don't sleep as well at night. But yeah, I mean, it's great. But it is very stressful. But I do feel much more fulfilled now than I did when I was dancing around with my shirt off. I'd like to think that just like Martin sheen invented a backstory for Curtis. We can also create an epilogue story for Curtis to and in that he also becomes a defense. Attorney. I think you've really modeled something for Curtis to. Yeah. That's probably right. But the way I was playing Curtis. I think he only had a future maybe throwing trash cans from the back of a truck. I'm not really one of those actors. I kinda just say what they put on the page. I don't really put a lot of thought into it. You'll be both my friend. I think Curtis has some hidden depth. That's how I read the character. So I haven't actually seen the episodes. I went back this last week and looked at I don't remember which one it was. But it's where like there's a an asteroid flying towards the earth. And the look on my face was actually me thinking, I I remember it exactly what the hell am I doing here like this Martin sheen telling me about an Astra? I mean, there was no acting at all it was just me thinking, you know, I'm from destler, Nebraska. What in the hell am I doing here with all these people who know what they're doing? And I am just this moron here. None of that was acting. There was no depth in. That was as honest as a comes. Then thanks so much for talking to us. This has been fantastic. Well, God you thanks for having me on your my kind of actor Ben from the same mold. I don't miss it much. But west wing was an amazing experience. I really loved it everyone that I met was nice. Does it ever come up these days for you? It's only ever come up in a case. I defy. Ended a kid. I actually went to high school with and it came up in jury selection because one of the jurors just knew it. And so that's the only time it's ever come up in a case. But I think we just booted everybody who ever seen the show. It's a lot more stressful than acting ever was, but probably not as much glory the other upside to being on the west one is is the first time I found out I was balding when I was carrying him off the plane they were gonna shoot from above and behind me. And so I'm sitting in the makeup chair. And they have like what was like a pepper shaker. They sprayed some stuff. And there shaking. I said what are you doing and were just covering your bald spot? So we talking about she goes, she goes to cover your boss. Oh, I'm a bald spot. It's like, oh, yeah. You do and she holds up the mirror. Yeah. Yeah. And if you look at that shot, everything from infront is me, but from the back when you see the trucks and stuff at some skinny stuntman with like a dollar store wig thing you've ever seen. Wow. Yeah. So they shot that I think that the Burbank airport or something it was a fun time. Well of thank you for taking the time to do this and good luck with your case in June. Thank you very much. And that does it for this episode of the western weekly. Thanks so much. Ben Murray for joining us. Thanks so much to you for listening to this episode with the help, of course, as always of Nick song sack mcneese and Margaret Miller and the west wing weekly is a proud member of radio topa from PR ex a collection of fantastic, independent podcasts. You can learn about all of our shows at radio, Topi dot FM. In the meantime, you can follow us on all manner of social media, and you can leave anything you'd like to say about this show on our website, the west wing weekly dot com. It's not too late to give us. View on itunes. I've noticed we're getting very close to seven thousand five-star reviews. I would like to hit seven thousand and if we do nothing special will happen. Speaking of unimportant, milestones were also close to one hundred thousand followers on Twitter. That'd be exciting. That would be fun. If three point one thousand of you would join us on Twitter. Great. I just passed a milestone that sounds painful, it was a little painful, but worth ultimately. Okay. Okay. What's next? Radio too. Ex-?

president president Bartlett Josh Martin sheen Leo west wing Donna Martin Donna White House Russell China Vice president Curtis Carruthers Joshua Malina Ben Murray MS. Charlie west wing Ritchie tennis
Why Coincidences Happen & Inside the Minds of Thrill-Seekers

Something You Should Know

52:56 min | 4 months ago

Why Coincidences Happen & Inside the Minds of Thrill-Seekers

"Support for this podcast comes from state farm with surprisingly great rates. State farm is the real deal when it comes to home and car insurance state farm agents are always ready to help you personalize your insurance plan. You can create a policy that fits your needs. You can manage your coverage, pay your bill or even file a claim right from your phone with the state farm mobile APP and you can always call one of the state farm agents in neighborhoods across the country. Get a great rate without sacrificing great service when you want the real deal like a good neighbor state farm is there. Today on something you should know what's the connection between Pumpkins and Halloween then understanding why coincidences happen and they happen a lot. We love the romance coincidences but they are bound to happen and it would always be an amazing coincidence if you went for ten fifteen twenty years and nothing really free here. Amazing happened in that time because something somewhere is destined to happen also, what's the? First thing to check when your check engine light comes on and Thrill seekers do some people love rollercoasters, scary movies or skydiving and others don't these people that we think of as thrill seekers or high sensation seekers actually have lower levels of cortisol but higher levels of dopamine. So they feel more pleasure but less stress during those high sensation seeking activities all this today something you should know. I WanNa talk about our newest sponsor thinker. In this fast paced world, it's tough to make reading a priority or at least it used to be. You see at thinker dot org they summarize the key ideas from new and noteworthy nonfiction giving you access to an entire library of great books in bite size form. You can read or listen to hundreds of titles in a matter of minutes from classics like Dale. Carnegie's how to win friends and influence people to recent bestsellers like Jordan. Peterson's twelve rules for life. Thinker offers a large variety of titles across many categories, current affairs, politics, business education, history biographies, and relationships. You'll find titles and authors that you've heard as guests here on this podcast like the power of habit by Charles Duhig made to stick by chip and Dan Heath outliers by Malcolm. Glad. Well, I mean, really, if you enjoy this podcast, you're really going to appreciate thinker if you want to challenge your preconceptions, expand your horizons and become a better thinker. goto thinker dot org that's T H I N R dot org to start a free trial and download the APP today and let them know you heard about it on something you should know that's thinker dot org. somethingyoushouldknow fascinating Intel, the world's. First and practical advice you can use in your life today something you should now. Mike, carruthers. Welcome to something you should know. Just over the last couple of days. At least for me if it started to feel a little more like fall I, don't know there's just something in the air and plus it the stores you know the Pumpkin this and the pumpkin flavored that those things have started to show up and Pumpkins. Symbolize fall, but they also symbolize Halloween. Got Me to thinking what do pumpkins have to do with Halloween. So I looked it up. Pumpkins have been grown and eaten in north. America for centuries, they are native to this part of the world, but it was the Irish who made them a Halloween tradition. In Ireland people carve turnips, potatoes, or gourds at Halloween and put them on porteous to welcome deceased loved ones and to ward off evil spirits. Burning lumps of coal were used to light them from the inside. Seven hundred thousand Irish people came to the US. In the mid eighteen hundreds because of the Irish potato famine, they brought their traditions with them but found that American pumpkins made a much better jack lantern than a turnip or potato. Can't even imagine a potato Jackal Leonard. So anyway, the Irish made the switch and Pumpkins are now part of our Halloween celebration. And that is something you should know. We humans like to know the reason why when something happens we wanNA know how come? What caused it? For example, why do coincidences happen? Why did traffic jams occur for? No apparent reason why is it almost impossible to find a four leaf clover in your front yard? And why is it so hard to get the temperature of your shower? Just right. Well, you're about to get some answers to these and other interesting life questions from Rob East away. He's the author of the book. Why do buses come in threes? They hidden mathematics of Everyday Life I rob. Welcome. Thank you very much. So, let's start with the title. Why do buses come in threes explain that phenomenon there is this tendency when you're waiting for public transport that. You hang around for ages waiting for a bus to turn up, and then not just one but two or three will come together and it's a big joke in London. So why why are they spaced out why? This curious phenomenon happen and it turns out that what is behind buses bunching as? The term that tends to be used is Not Anybody's fault really because even if you send out these buses, let's say they're going out regularly every fifteen minutes from the terminus unfortunately people on nicely spaced out and you just need to get a cluster of people waiting at a stop. When the bus arrives they will get on together. They slow that bus down slightly. So the bus behind has caught up a little bit. Then the buses move along. Now, less of a gap between the first and the second bus. So there's less time for customers or passengers to accumulate at the next stop, and meanwhile the front buses being slightly slowed down and so all passengers have gathered waiting for it. So can you see there's a kind of almost like a magnetic force pools busses together? It's buses being kept evenly apart an unstable situation and plus is a much happier when they're together. So there's no particular law that says buses will. Cluster in threes that we tend to not threes, but they will tend to to bunch up in groups of at least two. Isn't that interesting and you just said that that we tend to notice threes what do you? What do you mean I think in life? There is a lot situations of the rule of three where comedians use hits as well. Actually. First Time something happens. Okay. You Register when it happens a second time you think okay I've noticed it's happened. A third time as our brains are wired to think, right there's a pattern here something happening so. Your kind of the third one is more significant. So when things happen threes generally I think. As as humans, we are curious to know what's going on and we assume there's a clause even if does not necessarily cause in the case of buses, they might come in two three or fours joke about incoming in threes. Interestingly, we talk about misfortunes in life unlucky things are white about things always happen to me in threes. I mean the truth is they don't, but we'll tend to notice them when they happen in threes. A friend might get ill, we might you know have some kind of scrape on the car, and then we're almost looking out for bad things to happen, and we'll really notice that third thing and we will reinforce this myth that bad things happen in threes. Well, there's that whole thing about celebrity deaths always happen in threes, but they actually don't. They don't exactly. We're just reinforcing a myth. We've all heard and it is just this. This innate way of counting of. Three's enough to be significant and to register brains probably one of the most important numbers in terms of looking for things in life. So things happening in threes is is intriguing. Why is it so hard to find a four leaf clover? It's a classic thing that four leaf clover are the things you should be searching for, and in fact, if you look out in your yard Ratnapala code ever and are looking for flowers and count the petals or count believes on a daisy or whatever. There are certain numbers that seem to crop up full far more often than others in leaves and petals, and a particularly common number is five but quite often you'll see three you often see eight you might see thirteen and there's a connection between these numbers and it's a sequence known as the fibber Naci sequence and it was known about and discovered way back in twelfth thirteenth century when talion mathematician who got nicknamed FIBONACCI I. Sort of published a story about it But the pattern itself You can recreate it by starting with the numbers one and one you add them together one and one makes two. Then you take the previous two number. So now one and to make three two and three makes five. Three and five makes eight. So you can see how I making each number by just adding the previous two and you could write this out five eight thirteen. Now for very also reasons these finarsih numbers turn out to. Have particular properties that make them crop up in natural growing things in plants in particular in petals and It's a wonderful thing. So you know five tends to be the most common number of petals on a flower and the reason why it's five and not four six is because five is a fifth Bernard she number you're GonNa have to take my word for it that FIBONACCI numbers are connected to another beautiful thing in math, which is known as the golden ratio which is. A particular shape of rectangle a particular ratios of the two sides of a particular rectangle which. has some very lovely and elegant properties and was known about by Leonardo. Da, Vinci and he I think probably made it most famous most popular. He experimented with it. He felt it was the source of the most beautiful shapes. He drew a famous image of a man, which was where every part of the body was in the ratio of this so-called golden ratio, which is about one point six something. And the reason why it's linked with nature is because it's such. An efficient ratio is a beautiful ratio plants make use of it to space out at lls to give themselves the best chance to get as much sunlight as possible and so four leaf clovers than are just an anomaly. Yeah. If you found one, it's not a FIBONACCI number. So nature isn't naturally going to produce things in force unless it does so by spitting. Because to is. An easy number to make and it's also a financially number. So you say that it's better to buy a lottery ticket on Friday I've I've. I've bought plenty of tickets every day of the week they never they never win. So what what why, why, Friday? It's Well it does depend a lottery draws happen on different days of the week. So let's take the UK lottery where I. Know that draw happens on Saturday the idea is not so much. There's anything special about buying on Friday but to just recognize that luxuries winning lotteries is extremely difficult it's extremely unlikely you will win and therefore when something is so unlikely you have to start thinking well, look what other things are more likely than this, and so if we go back to original theme of buses then Not. Very many people in a year on October by a bus, but it's got a one in. Two million chance or whatever happening to you over a twenty four hour period party rival less than that. But the point is there comes a point where if you buy your lottery ticket too early, then you're more likely to meet some gruesome end like being knocked over by a bus than to actually make it as far as picking up your winning numbers. So the tip is to wait as long as possible to buy your ticket so that at least you have a chance of if you do win it of celebrating and enjoying the experience. So this has nothing to do with increasing your chances just has to do with surviving to celebrate. Exactly you can't increase your chances of winning the lottery and. Unless you buy lots of tickets across the more tickets you buy the more charge you have winning. Although there is a tip for lotteries across the world actually one way of. Increase your chance of winning. But if you do win, you want to win and not have to share the Jackpot with lots of other people. So the idea is to pick numbers that other people don't pick and it seems to be a curiosity of the way. People are are lucky numbers tend to be linked with things like birthdays and months of the year, and so and so there's a disproportionate number of people who pick numbers in the rage one to thirty one, which is the maximum number of days there are in a month. So, if you're lottery happens to include numbers that are higher than thirty one, then picking a smattering of numbers that are bigger than thirty one is good because it's numbers that are less likely to be picked by other people. So that's the that's the secret. Really. The other thing to point out with lottery numbers some. Selections of Lottery Numbers Look Random. You know if I picked two, eight, twelve, twenty, one, thirty, seven, you might say, oh. Yeah. That's good. That's nice in random and if I picked one, two, three, four, five, six, think Oh, that will never turn up I won't pick one with such a pattern. Well, the truth is both of those selections I just gave you. Are Equally likely to happen the reason why we never see one, two, three, four, five, six come up is that it's millions to one against the will but then it's also millions to one against the whatever said to four, twelve, thirty one would come up to so we this fallacy of thinking the certain patterns are more likely than others whereas they're all equally likely. So you can improve your chances by simply trying to not think like all other people think. Why there is one other. Sorry go ahead. One other thing I would say to that I mentioned a one, two, three, four, five six is just as likely as any other combination. There's a lot of mathematicians out there who know this and they think I'm going to be smart because I know one, two, three, four, five six is just as likely as anything else. So I will pick those numbers. The trouble is if those numbers ever come up in a luxury anywhere in the world, there will be tens of thousands of smart people out there who did the same thing? So you'll end up. With all those people and not getting much money yourself. So don't try to be too clever because as other cliff folk out there who will ruin it for you. We are talking about these fascinating little life questions and why they happen and my guest is rob east away. He's author of the book why do buses come in threes the hidden mathematics of everyday life? Okay. So good news during challenging time for everybody in this could really help. You may know hundreds of thousands of people have already made the switch to Meta share, which is the affordable alternative to health insurance and with so many people looking at how they pay for healthcare right now, seeing premiums going up or the cost of Cobra plans medishare has extended their special offer. A lot of people have taken advantage of it simply apply by September thirtieth and they will waive your new member fee that's one hundred and seventy dollar savings, and of course that's. Just, a start, the typical family saves five hundred dollars a month after making the switch Meta share is a Christian community that shares each other's healthcare costs and it's worked beautifully for decades. I'll give you the number here in a second, and if you call, you can get a price within two minutes just tell them the Promo Code share to get your additional savings. Here it is call eight, seven, seven, sixty, four, Bible that's Eight, seven, seven, sixty, four, Bible, eight, seven, seven, sixty, four Bible support for this podcast comes from cdw and Microsoft surface and teams. And cdw we get a future remote meetings works differently. GOING, right from launch directly into meeting that could be awkward. But with Microsoft surface devices with teams orchestrated by cdw, the future works better touchscreen voice capabilities keep teams engaged in productive enabling you to wall. We collaborate with confidence wherever noon. Thanks for joining works. You have a spinach in your teeth x for the tip man it orchestration by cdw people who get it find out more at cdw, dot com slash surface. So rob what's the math behind why it is so hard to like when you turn on the shower two to get the temperature just right it's either too hot and then it gets too cold. It's really hard to get it just right. The reason why? This is happening. You're getting this oscillating temperatures never right. Is To do with the way your reacting to something that. Happened a few seconds ago a bit of a time lag it you haven't waited until the right temperature got through the system. So hot and cold shower over hot and coach hours a part of a general. Phenomenon of of systems and how systems behave and how we react to things, and it's a really interesting part of applied mass because. It explains a lot of what happens in the world we react to things thinking you start hearing that we're running low on toilet rolls because everyone's buying toilet rolls seek out and buy them, and for other people stop buying an and suddenly the nation is short of toilet rolls is if there's a crisis, well, actually there's not a crisis is just where reacting to quickly to something rather than letting the system settle down so. The way. That's causing effect in something that happens caused you to take another action which happens to another action. This knock on effect is fascinating to model and when you understand it and when you step back and look at the often mathematical relationship between the way things are going down zone, it can help you. To take, cooler and more reason decisions by just saying, okay. Let's look at the big picture here. Not just immediate things that I need to respond to straightaway traffic jams, I find interesting. I'm. Not. Sure why? I guess because so often traffic jams happened for no reason than than the traffic clears up and it's very frustrating. Why? Why does that happen? Who screwed this up I imagine there's some interesting math or physics or something going on there. It's because of a knock on effect of you reacting to the person in front of you re too quickly and you put. Your brakes on too fast. The car behind catches up with you and it can in the wrong circumstances just caused all the cars, stop the ones that front then start going again and they lead off and you can watch from the air. It looks like this pulse is passing through the cars knows what's going on but actually this is just individual humans. The way they react causing the whole system. To. Flow or not flow. Which is why sometimes we need Traffic Signals to tell us what to do to control us to say, don't try driving too fast because if you will try and drive too fast ironically, you might all end up going much slower because you have a knock on effect on each other. Well, something I've always wondered about that I I've been stuck in traffic jams as I'm sure everyone has where you're you're kind of creeping along for a long time and and there's no reason for it. There's no accident there's no nothing but at some point, it does just open up and. why does it open up there? What happened that all of a sudden now, we can all go that. There's so many things that could be causing it but. It might have been a temporary thing that caused a driver near the front of what became the jam to slow down slightly bizarrely sometimes it seeing an accident or seeing a police car that's pulled up or whatever people stopped to look. But as soon as one person has slowed down, the pulse of slowing down, is going to feed all the way back because the person at the front. Is Now free to go again nothing was nothing ever physically stop them. They just may be slowed down a little bit. So I think very often it will be caused by one individual not driving smoothly just just slowing down for whatever reason they might have been reached over for Coffee Cup or who knows what reason the knock on effect that can escalate so. Eventually behind them some people stop. But of course, we can see that guy the front never had anything was actually stopping them. So we're just releasing the pressure out a gain at the front and it works its way through the job. So I want to change topics here and talk about coincidences because I think they're so interesting because everybody experiences in their life. Amazing coincidences and I think it's very human to want to find an explanation. Why did that happen? What does that mean? And so what does that mean? Well. Yeah. We we love coincidences is I. Think most people have had some amazing coincidence happen to them. I've had several I think one. Sticks in my mind was a time when I was with a friend and her daughter was there and I was drawing a little picture for the daughter and I drew a moon in the sky and I I was making it up as I went along. I said, Oh you can tell from the moon the date must be August seventeenth I just completely made out of nowhere I've done a and said it and the mother said I can't believe you just said that because August the seventeenth is our daughter's birthday and it's my birthday and it's my husband's birthday and was this cold shoulder of how this is just amazing. It was meant to be and when we when we hear coincidences. It comes back to this cause and effect thing. We assume there was a reason why this happened something psychic something whatever. But actually. The thing about coincidences they all going to happen by chance and one way to look at coincidences is to say. Look, how many opportunities are there for coincidence to happen in a day? And you imagine you know I came home from work and a just as I got home. I saw someone and Oh, their name was completely different from mine and that number plate was completely unrelated to my so lots of non coincidences a happening all the time we don't notice them and. They happen in the hundreds and thousands and millions over year. So many chances for coincidence to happen. We just don't notice the boring things were two. Unconnected things came together when suddenly they're lined up to names of the same, it's a neighbor. We see when we're on holiday in someone in the middle of nowhere I wasn't expect to see you here. We noticed those and. And they freaks out but they are bound to happen. So so one of the interesting the way we love the romance of coincidences, but they are bound to happen, and it would always be an amazing coincidence if you went for ten fifteen, twenty years and nothing really free here. Amazing. Happened to you in that time because something somewhere. Is. Destined to happen just like rolling dyson gathering three sixes come up. One of my favorite coincidence example sometimes, math will actually. Get throw up examples which give coincidences more often than you'd expect. And that is what sometimes called the birthday paradox. You imagine you're in a group of thirty people, which is about the size of a typical class at school or whatever. And you think okay. Well, I wonder what the chances are in that group of thirty two people have the same birthday. and. There are three hundred and sixty five days in a year. So you'd think well, thirty people out of three, hundred, sixty, five, two of the same birthday it kind of feels like a one in ten it doesn't sound like it's likely at all because that's not many people and that's a lot of birthdays. Now I'm GonNa State to the fact that which is which is extremely counterintuitive. If, there are thirty people in room. Then there's a way higher than fifty. Fifty chance is like a sixty percent chance that they will be at least two people in that room who have the same birthday and I do this as a little stunt. If I've got a big audience if I've got fifty or more people are say I feel an energy coming from you as a room I think two of you got the same birthday. And I don't know who it is, but I can I can sense it now I go around the room and it always works and the reason why it works. How many different combinations there are of those thirty people this this twenty nine people could be had with on a on another twenty eight could be pad with Burton Sony Admiral I. Think There's hundreds of different possible Pez in this room. So maybe we shouldn't be so surprised if one of those pairs of all this combination do have the same birthday. So it's the lore of numbers and big numbers in the end coincidences happen but in the end. As, a coincidence phenomenon is one of my favorites because it feels so surprising and you can do it as a as a little stunt at parties or whatever. I bet there's two people in this room of Saint Birthday and you can win bets on it. It's great fun talk about that Black and white hat game that you play that because I've been thinking about it ever since I read about it it it's really interesting is a little game I play where I have to volunteers common sit faced facing each other on chairs in front of an audience. and. I have in a bag three hats to prove them all black hats and one of them as a white hat. And then come from behind each of my volunteers. So they can't see I, put a hat on each of them. So they can't see what hats on their own head, but they can see what is on the other person's head. And what they don't know is I put a black hat on each of their heads. Remember that were two black hats one way. And they're sitting there looking at the other person they can see a black hat. Am I say, right? I want you to put your hand up who will be the first a few who can predict with pure logic what hat is on your own head? Now. This is a a quite famous puzzle, but I love what happens in the real world because with most adults in the real world, what they do is they look. The other person they think, right they're wearing a black hat. I know there were two blacks and one white. So I'm either wearing a white or a black and I don't know which it is. And both of them thing that way and you can wait for thirty seconds a minute and they just sit there saying I just don't know. But. Actually what they should be able to do if they think about a bit further extinct will what is the author person thinking if you go the extra step and say, let's suppose I've got a white hat on. There's anyone why The Guy Opposite is not stupid. So if they can see a white hat, they'll put their hand up and say I must be wearing a black hat that has not happened. Why has that not happened? The only reason has not happened over the last thirty seconds is because I must be wearing a black hat so it should be possible to did use that you're wearing a black hat in that game and the puzzle books say that's what happens the real life says it very rarely happens and I just find that fascinating and there's a broader principle of logic and life and statistics that I find really interesting with that game because. Often, we can deduce things not just from what we're told, but also from what we're not told this has been really fun and it's answered some questions that I think everybody has because all these things happen to all of us and we always wonder why and and now we know why Rob Eastwood has been my guest. He's author of the book. Why do buses come in threes the hidden mathematics of everyday life and you will find a link to that book in the show notes. Thank you for coming on here rob. Thanks Mike. That's been really fun. Some people are very cautious. Other people take huge risks in life and the rest of us are somewhere in the middle. So those people who take the big risks who bungee jump and and skydive and go on roller coasters why do they do it? Are they just different or do they really get joy and pleasure out of that risky behavior? Or maybe they just do it to say they did it here to discuss what makes thrill seekers do what they do is Ken? Carter he's a board certified clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Oxford College of Emory University, and he's author of the Book Buzz Inside the minds of thrill seekers, dare-devils and Adrenalin Junkies can thanks for having me. So there is this theory I guess people have that thrill seekers are basically Adrenalin Junkies. They do risky things they go on scary rides because they like that Adrenalin hit. Interestingly it's not necessarily adrenaline. So there are two different chemicals in our body that control. The, influence stress reaction one is court all that stress hormone that a lot of people heard about sort of initiates the fight or flight response and then there's another neurotransmitter called dopamine and that. Creates a sense of pleasure and so these people that we think of as thrill seekers or high sensation seekers actually have lower levels of cortisol but higher levels of dopamine. So they feel more pleasure but less stress and. During those high sensation seeking activities so there's physio logically they're a little bit different. Interestingly. Though the people that I know that like roller coasters and like you know those kind of thrilling things that they do, it's not like they crave them like if they don't get get it every day or every week. That they start to Jones for it. It's just they like it when they get it. Yeah. And so there are different sort of you know range of of Asian seeking. So there are the low sensation seekers like like you and me who beach. Is All a need to best. That's the most thrill I get, and then they're the average sensation seekers that sound like the people that you know, and then there are these high sensation seekers that really crave that and if they aren't getting those experiences, the it's really tough for them and so a lot of them that are not doing that right now are having a tough time because some of them can have a tough time with boredom and so they start doing things to create chaos because that's where that that's sort of the sweet spot for them is sort of chaotic excitement. So they do things like what? So. There are some expensive ways to do thrill seeking activities like you know, bungee jumping or base diving but there's some cheap ways to do it to like driving really fast and the highway or three fights with people things that might that might get them into trouble but there are some other things that they could do for example. trag unusual foods or these sort of cultural experiences that are sort of that are not necessarily dangerous but high sensation seekers tend to down play those risks, and so they can sometimes get themselves into trouble when they're looking for those sensations. Do people who? Seek thrills. For example, they'll bungee jumper they'll skydiver they'll do some thrill seeking behavior. Do they tend to seek out thrills in all areas of life or do they find a few things and they say I like that? It. Depends upon a little bit. There are two different aspects of that through seeking personality in terms of the mix of things they like to do. Some are what are called throughout adventure seeking people, and then there's another one that's called a experience seeking these people that like sensations of the mind and of the senses these the people that travel to unusual places and try unusual foods, and so there may be some people like I met this woman who wanted to travel for three hundred days all around the world couch. Surfing, on other people's Sofas. Nothing that I would ever do, but she hates roller coasters right and so there are different aspects that people tend to gravitate towards an some high sensation seekers like both of those things, but they may find it in their jobs. Or if they don't, they're going to do it in their recreation. Is it safe to say that thrill seekers are generally risk takers Interestingly not necessarily. So the risk taking is really the price of admission to what they want to do, and so if you if you've looked online, you see these people that climb these buildings and they take these incredibly scary photos. They want the sensation of being on top of the building and the only way you can get there is to climb to the top of the building right and so they wouldn do risky things because risky. They do the risky things because it gets them the experience that they want. And the experience that they want is just that that rush that that feeling that sense of all you know we all enjoy that sense of awe but it does you know things that bring are different for different people for me. It's the beach right but for thrill. They're going to want that experience that they can't get any in any other way. So they're not necessarily risk taking for the sake of being risky. They're doing the risk because it gets them the experience that they desire. You know what I wonder because this is so subjective. Do Thrill seekers see themselves as thrill seekers or do they just see themselves as normal and they? See people who don't like the thrills they like is Kinda dull. Yeah. It's interesting sort of perception. So they did the study a couple years ago where they put people on a track and they said, Oh follow the car in front of you. The low sensation-seekers drove really far away from the target car and they were really anxious the entire time the high sensation seekers stroke. Like really really close to the person, but they were totally chill. And then they asked people how dangerous they thought a experiment was they said they rated it about the same and so what makes us think that something is dangerous is usually our body that's telling us what you're doing is dangerous stopped doing it. Yeah. That's that's really interesting because I wonder if that's one of the reasons that even though people know, for example, the texting and driving is dangerous it doesn't necessarily feel dangerous when you're doing it. So it's like, yes, it's dangerous, but it's okay if I do it. Because it's not dangerous for me. Exactly exactly and the range of things at high sensation seekers feel is okay is much larger. There was a guy that contacted me a couple of months ago. That said that he was thinking about sea kayaking around Iceland and wanted to know what I thought of it and I said you know I I'm not the person to ask I think everything is. Well, that brings up the question and I think an important question that I hope you can answer because there's this sense that. People who don't like roller coasters who or who don't WanNa Bungee jumper what they need to try it I. Yeah. It's going to be terrifying but just, but if it's not you. Then why would you try it I mean. So do you get if you do it a little bit? Do you like it a little bit and then you like a little bit more because that's not my experience and you know there's a psychological concept that's called habituation, which means the more you do something that scary the less scary it is, and so that might create lower levels of cortisol that steph that hormone that's related to fear but I'm not going to like it more right and so I tell people I don't have the hardware to run that program. You know. So high sensation-seekers do they're gonNA feel? And Thrill, and excitement at those things and they want me to experienced the world the way they do. But I can't. You know I'm not pumping out the same mix of chemicals as they are I'm just GonNa pill terrified in overwhelmed and rather not feel that way. Yeah. But it, and if you did it enough, you might feel less terrified and overwhelmed but you're never going to feel pleasure because that's just not in you. Yeah exactly, and so I say find the mix of things that are right for you but I understand it from their perspective. It's the thing that brings them so much. Pleasure and thrill, and they want me to experience that too. But I probably won't. Well I I remember hearing that advice many years ago that you know when when you go to the amusement park in everybody wants to go on the roller coaster and they say come on now you're gonNA. Love it. No, I'm not and so I. I don't I don't feel compelled to go because I've heard some of what you've been saying here that. It's just not me and I don't enjoy it. So why would I do it? Yeah I know the things that I enjoy and a lot of the high sensation seekers say to me you know. I know I'm not made of glass. It's okay to get hurt if you're going to have a wonderful experience, but that's not on my list like if I was talking to one guy who said when he's going to do something important in, he's doing some bouldering or those kinds of things will try not to do something that's going to break a leg. And I thought you I never do things that are going to be even remotely close to bringing to breaking a leg. You know that's just not an my list of fun things to do. So is being a thrill seeker just different and they they're wired differently and they they do different things because that's what makes them happy or is there more to it than that are are there some darker sides of of Thrill seeking that people don't often consider you know breaking a leg might be one of them. Or is it just people are different? It spits people are different but there are some influences that can change that over time you know there was chemicals in our body don't remain the same throughout her whole life and we also. Influences And a lot of high sensation seekers tend to not be as high sensation seeking as they get older usually for two different reasons, the chemicals change, and also there's more to lose, and so some of them as they could older will not do some of those thrill seeking things because they want to protect their families or or because they just don't feel like it as much because some of the chemicals have changed over time is there any sense that thrill seeking runs in families or doesn't run in families or it's just random or one? Yeah. It tends to it does tend to run in families and researchers aren't quite. Whether or not is because those relief thrilling expense e experiences bring heisinge in seeking out in people or the some genetic component to it as well. I talked to a food blogger awhile ago who loves eating very unusual foods, which is typical a lot of high sensation seekers, and so they're feeding their kids those unusual foods well, and that might mean that they're going to be more adventuresome with foods as they get older it might be because of the genetically they're similar and they're they're more likely to try those unusual things well, that word adventuresome does that define thrill seekers and if you're a thrill seeker, your proper, probably more adventurous. In other areas of your life like Fuji We'd or places you go or whatever yeah. It's interesting because I I think a lot of people think of thrill seeking something a person does, but I think of it as as Hula person is it can affect their work it can affect the foods they like the things they do for fun. Even the jokes they like to tell and what kind of traveling they liked to do you can see all different parts of a person's life. So I sense you're from the things you said, you're not a big thrill seeker and yet you tackled this project on thrill seeking. Are you more of a thrill seeker? Happy not to be what were you I thought? That working on this project about thrill seeking would make me more of a thrill seeker, but it's actually made me embrace the things I've already done. You know I. I might try it unusual thing every now and then sort of influenced by the people I've talked to but it also makes me realize that a lot of the people. Who bungee jump or based dive or eat unusual foods that they're not necessarily doing it because they have a death wish or those kinds of things they're seeking that sense of awe that we all do. But just in a different way I wonder, and this is one of the things that thrill seekers will tell people who typically haven't sought out thrills that. Try it like do people who don't like thrill seeking Seems like most of them have probably tried roller coasters or. something. That would that they would get the message? nope. This isn't for me. Yeah Yeah and the in that happens relatively early on where you sort of know the range of things that you want to to experience. But a lot of the thrill seekers in you ask me about this earlier, some of they they're just trying to get mastery over their own emotions I talked to this one woman she calls herself slack line girls she you. Know does type roping across these big ravines and for a while she was doing it Free Solo with means with no safety at all and she did it because she wanted to create some mastery over her emotions. In some way, which is something I would never do and it seems incredibly dangerous, but it seemed really important her to be able to. Control her emotions in that way, which is really important for a lot of heist -ation seeking activities. Yeah. See I don't get that. I don't understand I understand wanting to master your emotions but not at the risk of death. Now I do very little at the risk of death myself. But if you don't, if your body's not telling you that it's dangerous then your perception of it. is going to be very different and and I get that. Intellectually it's tough for me to get emotionally I. Wonder if there's a difference between the kind of thrill seekers like you just described where someone walks on a wire across ravines without a net that's really thrill seeking. That's very dangerous versus people who like scary movies and roller coasters and things like that where they know there say they know it's scary but deep down inside they know they're not endanger. Yeah, and so a lot of those people are at that middle average range of sensation seeking. And since I'm at the very low range of it, I don't like scary movies I just I just have to close my eyes and try to get through it but a lot of people who are in the average range they are pumping out a low a really nice mix of cortisol and dopamine. They're experiencing that pleasure and thrill from it and but they're not necessarily going to do things that are dangerous like slack line grow might. Yeah. So if slack line girl does what she does. If she goes on some big roller coaster at six flags or something. She go home or is that because it's a new experience that might be still might be scary to her even though. She's not risking her life. She would probably be able to yawn or do a crossword puzzle during a roller. Coaster. Yes she she you know a lot of those of professional thrill seekers that are ice climbers and based on Jumpers They might do roller coasters as a snack, but it's not gonNA be a a main meal for them probably. So this really should be of comfort to people particularly people who aren't especially big thrill seekers to know that it. It's not a question of you know your chicken or you're not brave enough. It's not bravery. It's it's more of a physiological or a fundamental difference. There people who really enjoy it and are people who don't one of the goals of psychology is understanding ourselves and understanding other people, and so I, I've gotten emails from people who say. You know this really helps me to. Understand. My brother or my son or my spouse in a way I was trying to get them to stop doing that because I thought it was foolhardy but they need it. To because it's part of their personality and we need them, you know a lot of people who are first responders and firefighters and you know in the police and the military. These are heison station seekers that are using their high sensation seeking to help the rest of us. So we need them in our society but I also think we need people like you and me who are. Lookouts to tell people maybe we shouldn't do things that are that dangerous very much it's really interesting because it's not it's not right or wrong or good or bad. It's just either or it's just some people like it. Some people don't, and if you don't like it, why do it and if you do like it, why not do it? Yeah, as long as it's safe and as long as you're not putting other people in danger I, think that's absolutely right. WHAT ABOUT GENDER DIFFERENCES? I assume slack line girl is a female but I would imagine that testosterone plays a role in this and that there are more male thrill seekers than women, right? Testosterone does play a role for both men women and for men and Interestingly for the fifty years of research. In this area, we've seen sensation seeking levels get higher for women. I think because of the role of Culture you know I think that a lot of people thought you know women's shouldn't do these kinds of things and so you would see higher levels of experienced seeking and women but it over the last couple of years that difference between men and women in terms of these thrill seeking activities has actually gotten smaller but. There is also that pressure though when when when you're with a group of people and most if not all of the other ones, WanNa go on the roller coaster and you don't then you know they don't be a baby come on come on but you're not going to like it but there is that kind of like be a man man up and do it. You know it's really interesting because we know that fear is something as perception from your environment. You know the chemicals at your, you know pumping out. and. The way you think about that environment tells you what's frightening or not. And so I tell people, it's the low sensation seekers. Those brave ones. If I'm doing that roller coaster, I'm gonNA feel more terrified than an average and or high sensation seeker. You know it's not the highest station secret who's being brave if they don't feel that they're what they're doing is dangerous. Well, it's good to hear that I and I think it's good for low sensation seekers to hear that it's okay to say no, because there's no joy in it there's just no you're doing it and you're going to close your eyes and grit your teeth and feel like you're going to throw up the whole time. What would be the point of that and on the other hand if you're a thrill seeker and you can engage that and satisfy those thrill seeking desires in a safe way. Well, there's nothing wrong with that either. This has been really interesting Ken. Carter has been my guest. He's a board certified clinical psychologist and professor of psychology at Oxford, College of Emory University, and he is author of the Book Buzz Inside the minds of Thrill seekers dare devils and Adrenalin Junkies, you'll find a link to his book in the show notes. Thank you can. Yeah, thank you so much. It was really fun talking to you. If, you've been driving a car for any length of time. Sometime in your driving career, you've seen the check engine light come on. So what does it mean? What are you supposed to check? Well, according to automotive expert Phil Edmonston the first thing you should check is the gas cap because very often if the gas cap wasn't put on correctly after the last time you filled up your car, it can trigger the check engine light. In fact, on one of our cars, there's even a little sticker on the gas cap warning that if you don't put it on right, it could trigger the check engine light to go on. Most of the time, you fix the gas captain the light goes out if the light for the ABS brake system comes on or the airbag light comes on. The gas cap isn't going to fix that. You really need to get that checked out by mechanic as soon as possible, and that is something you should know. Like most businesses are growth depends on referrals, people who like this podcast and tell other people. So they can like this podcast. I'll bet you have some friends that you know that would like this podcast after all you do a bit your friends would so please share this podcast with them I'm Mike carruthers. Thanks for listening today to something you should know.

cortisol Mike carruthers dopamine cdw Adrenalin Junkies Ken Intel professor of psychology US Carter America Rob East Carnegie Peterson Dale
Where Great Ideas Come From & How Diet Affects Your Mood and Mental Health

Something You Should Know

47:30 min | 6 months ago

Where Great Ideas Come From & How Diet Affects Your Mood and Mental Health

"Today on something. You should know if you have blue eyes, you're related to me, I'll explain how then where do great new ideas and innovation come from sometimes it's predictable. But many times. Great innovations come in strange ways and I tell the story of the Pill Camera, which is a thing slowing in Tex- picture insides we adopted to look at it and it came about after conversation over the garden fence between a gastroenterologist and a guided missile designed. Also, why less is more when it comes to bragging on social media and did you know what you eat can affect your mental health? Understand. This is that all these different foods whether they good for you or the bad for you can impact your gut bacteria and this then impact the effect on your brain in a good way or a bad way all this today on something you should know. Something you should. Fascinating Intel. The world's top experts and practical advice you can use in your life today. something. You should now Mike carruthers. I. This part of the PODCAST I think I've mentioned this before in a previous episode. This part of the podcast of me talking to you right now is actually more or less. The last thing I do before an episode is finished. So although it's at the beginning of the PODCAST, it's the last thing I do, and so I already know what's coming in the rest of this podcast because I've already heard it and I think you'll agree it is a particularly good episode and let's get to it. We start today by talking about your is they are truly fascinating and here are some things about your is you probably didn't know. According to studies defined limbaugh rings can make you more attractive. The limbaugh ring is that dark round line around your Iris and apparently you're more likely to develop a crush on somebody who shows them prominently. The muscle is the fastest reacting muscle in your entire body. It contracts in less than one one hundredth of a second. There are approximately seven million cones and one hundred and thirty million rods in your retina that respond to light. They help you determine color and detail. Around six, thousand to ten, thousand years. Everybody had Brown eyes, and then the first blue eyed baby was born and all blue eyed people since then are related to that first baby and to each other. Your eyes can see about ten million different colors. But if you're part of that one percent of women with a rare genetic mutation, you're able to see one hundred, million colors. Both sides of both parents, families can all have Brown eyes yet still produce child with Blue Eyes. and. Your eye color isn't set until you're two years old and that is something you should know. When it comes to innovation, we live in exciting times. It seems like new ideas and prove moments to existing products and services come out at a rapid rate and often from unexpected people in unexpected places. So just how does innovation work? Where do great ideas come from and what's the difference between innovation and invention? These are all really good questions that can help us all better understand how great ideas grow and prosper, and one of the best people to talk on the topic is Matt. Ridley he's a journalist writer and businessman. He is a member of the House of, Lords, in the United Kingdom and he is author of the book how Innovation Works and why it flourishes in freedom. I met welcome. Thanks for having me on the show. Sure. It seems to me that when you look at innovation and where new ideas and products and services come from that, one of the things that makes it. So fascinating to look at is because things often seemingly come out of the blue or they come from places that you would never expect. Which I would imagine, makes it also difficult to study innovation and find any kind of common thread or guiding principles on what makes innovation work? That's. That's right. Tell the story of the Pill Camera, which is a thing you swallow. It takes pictures insides for your doctor to look at, and it came about after compensation over garden fence between a gastroenterologist and a guided missile designer That's quite a nice example of very unexpected combination of talents coming together and doing something something different a an interesting. Yeah. Well, that's the perfect example. Two guys talking across offense. They come up with a great idea, but but just coming up with a great idea. Isn't enough right. Does also the. Difference. Between. Invention and innovation in the sense that a lot of hard work is turning a bright idea into something that's practical, affordable and reliable, and that people actually want to get held of a what I call that innovation essentially is turning inventions into practical realities, and that's often neglected. People think it'll you have to do is design it, but trump in the world will be to path to your door. Doesn't happen that way. You've got to make that much trump reliable, affordable, and available again when when you've got two guys talking across a fence and they come up with this great idea, it is so random, it is. So who would've thought that? It seems almost impossible if not a frankly pointless to try and figure out innovation. It's not. that. Random. Rule. It happens a heck of a lot more in silicon valley than it does in the middle of Central Africa or somewhere like that, and a thousand years ago. It happened a lot more in the Yangtze valley than in Silicon Valley. So the something about certain places at certain times, the Bernice. On Lee, the city states the ancient Greece. Modern in Victorian Britain, you know there's there's something about each of these places that they get together the critical mass where the innovations happen, they attract the right people. People have an opportunity to share their ideas in a way that they don't in other places. There is money available or is energy available Larry's? Talent available to help them So the non random in that sense, it's also non random in terms of which sectors get innovated. So the last fifty years have seen extraordinary changes in computing and communication, but very disappointing changes in transport, and you get a feel for that. If you go back to the fifties and look at their ideas about what the twenty first century would look like it's full of routine space travel, supersonic flights, personal jet packs, Jar Copters for all. There's very little about mobile telephones and things like that. So. You know for some reason, we've hit limits that make it very hard to innovate in transport. Well, we made it more reliable and affordable, but we've not made it faster. Whereas we've made. And computing much much faster as well as a more affordable over the last fifty years. and. So there are things you can say about why that happened about what's going to happen while does know much us about what happens next because because it's also surprisingly unpredictable? Well, it is interesting that I imagine that there are new innovations in all kinds of industries and all kinds of technology. But I think when most people when I think of innovation I think of. Computers Electronics digital innovation seems to be what? I think of, and I think most people think of when they think of innovation. That's partly because. Digital Innovation is permission Louis. Whereas if you want to build a flying car, you've got to get got get licenses from pretty well everybody and it's You know there's a very heavy regulatory hurdle to get over, which makes it very expensive whereas if you building a new social media platform LIZ radio. Nothing you have to do to get permission is the point of talking about innovation writing books about innovation to just shine a light on it that who isn't this interesting or is it to come up with a recipe? I'm more interested in the former I. Just think innovation. Itself is a very interesting topic. It's the reason we are living lives of extraordinary prosperity compared to our ancestors. It's the reason we have technology and rabbit and rocks don't have technology. It's it's one of the huge themes of the modern world, and so I just wanted to understand it. But I deliberately set out to do something rather sort of bottom up here in other ways to tell stories about innovation about many many different kinds of innovations. Hi, tech runs low-tech ones. No. Tech. Ones virtual ones. And always kind of things, and then see if the common themes said to let the evidence speak for itself rather than sort of going with a theory and try and make the evidence, fit my theory, and so what are some of those common threads? What are you when you look at different things being invented an innovative? What do you see that they have in common? There's a really interesting phenomenon cold simultaneous invention whereby the moments was invented by four different people independently around the same time. The Light Bulb was invented by twenty one different people independently in the eighteen seventies. The search engine was invented by hundreds of different people independently in the early nineteen, Ninety S. Without lost example, you can see very clearly what's going on which is not that there is some deity out there in the sky who is sudden, they injected the phrase search engine into the brains of lots of different people at the same time. But that. The the contributing technologies that you need. A ripe that ready to come together. In the case of the search engine. The Internet has arrived. People are going to be exploring the Internet. It's kind of obvious that. Devices that helps them find what they want to look for in the Internet are going to be important and possibly lucrative while it's obvious in retrospect. But did anyone in the late eighty? Say You know once we've got this Internet thing up and running. I'm, GONNA. Make a lot of money out of search engines. Almost nobody did that in fact, Sergei? Brin Larry. Page the two people who made the most money out of search engines. Didn't even think that's what they were doing. They thought they were cataloging the Internet. They didn't realize they were inventing search engine for a surprisingly long time. They say that themselves. So the surprising. Phenomenon here where it looks very obvious in retrospect what comes next, but it doesn't look a tool obvious. What comes next when you're there in the moment looking forwards, and so from a broader perspective that you have taken, what is it? You can say about innovation in general one, it's more gradual than we think we tend to think of it as disruptive innovation that suddenly changes will actually if you look closely does a lot of hard what goes in before the disruption, a lot of hardware guys in off to the disruption. It's evolutionary in the sense that there is descent with modification. Each technology gives rise to another technology and so on. You have to go through the steps and runs a sort of trial and error phenomenon that is very like natural selection. There are lots of ideas thrown out there some survive in some done Google glass was a failure Ya. Google, itself was a success. It's serendipitous. We've already touched on how you get these strange meetings of ideas that produce new ideas. It's recumbent. Every single idea that every single technology that we have is basically a combination of other technologies. It's got this Guy Fascinating Cycle whereby it tends to disappoint in the first few years, and then it exceeds expectations after that so. Roy Amara was a computer scientist in silicon valley in the nineteen sixties who said. A new technology Exceeds expectations in the long run. But it. We underestimate its impact in in the long run, but we overestimated impact in the short run, and I think that's very interesting. I think about the incident I, you know by the end of the nineteen nineties, quite a lot of us were saying. I don't know I'm not sure about ECOMMERCE. It's Snot really that interesting is not gonNA work. COM, make it function ten years later, nobody's saying that. So this is this is sort of takeoff phenomenon that is quite important. We're talking about innovation and where it comes from and we're talking with Matt Ridley, he's author of the book how Innovation Works and why it flourishes in freedom. One thing. I. Know I'm really good at is getting other people hooked on best fiends. Best fiends is this fun exciting puzzle adventure that you can experience anytime anywhere. You don't even need an Internet connection. I've gotten so many people to play it. Have you tried it. You really should try it my wife and son play it, and I think my wife's more into it than I am because it's so much fun. I'm on level eight, hundred and something, and the game is all about these cute characters you collect as you go in each level is a little more challenging and adds new twists and turns to the puzzles. and. The goal is to defeat the slugs with your bug characters and you can earn diamonds and other things to evolve your bugs and make them stronger. Best. Is really craze. Now I, mean there have been over one hundred, million downloads I play when I'm waiting in the car for someone or sometimes in the morning when I'm waiting for the coffee brew, it's just a lot of fun best fiends has thousands of levels already with new levels, events and characters added every month. It is hours of fund right at your fingertips and you can even play offline with over one hundred, million downloads and tons of five star reviews. Best fiends is a must play download best fiends free on the apple APP store or Google play. That's friends without the our best fiends. So Matt, when you say that innovation has this kind of false start where people over hype it and it's a kind of a disappointment, does that tend to be? More, digital kinds of innovation. It seems like if you invent a better mousetrap, it's either gonNA worker at dozen, it's not going to get better. It's it it. This is it. Well. No I think you're right that because what you're talking about is the mousetrap having already been invented in someone coming along inventing a better one. That's quite late that sort of mature technology. But if you think about something like genomics. Okay. Pretty. Well, exactly twenty years ago, months ago, twenty years ago. Bill Clinton and tiny blad joint press conference to announce the sequencing of the human genome, and if you read speeches from the that day they extraordinarily. Utopian. They say this is the beginning of the end of disease. This is when we start to kill cancer. This is the most important breakthrough in all of human history in the long run I think they're going to be right. But if you think about what genomics is delivered in terms of new medicines today, it's pretty disappointing and that's not a not an electronic technology Another example is airplanes by the late nineteen twenties. The idea that you could build planes strong enough to fly over the oceans had largely been dismissed. Everybody thought, right? Well, you can build planes up to a certain size and you can use them in wolf air over the trenches and you can do acrobatics in them, but frankly would never really gonNA, use the much to get across the oceans at least not with many passengers cargo on board, we're going to have to rely on ships for that, which is why there was a lot of shipbuilding around the nineteen thirty. It's only. Twenty to thirty years off to that that we start to say hang on, we can build aluminum fears lodges that enabled us to fly lots, passengers across oceans. Don't you think there's some resistance to innovation that people say they like the new thing, the new shiny object, but people also say like things just the way they are they. There's even a longing for the good old days. Partly I suspect because I to adopt new innovation means a learning curve. You've gotta learn how to do the new thing when you you just mastered the old thing and all of this access kind of pushback against innovation. Actually, there's a huge amount of opposition to many innovations and it's often based on spurious imaginary problems that might come of technologies and a lot of organizations get very rich fanning the flames of this opposition and just ram the point home I, give the story of coffee, which was an innovation that came into Europe in the fifteen hundreds and pretty well wherever it went. People were furiously against it. And rulers in particular kept banning it or trying to ban it. They usually failed because people liked coffee. But there was the medical reasons you know this was going to dry up your kidneys or something There was commercial reasons. The line and beer industry didn't like it and there was social reasons. Kings didn't like coffee because people would gathering coffee houses and have animated conversations about whether kings were doing a good job and quite often they came to the conclusion that they weren't and Charles. The second of England was very explicit. Is that why he was banning coffeehouses 'cause he didn't like people to spreading fake news in them. Now. That's all quite familiar when we look at what's happened to genetic engineering agriculture in Europe, oil shale gas in Europe A. Nuclear power where we haven't been able to develop new technologies in the last fifty years. There is a there's a lot of vested interests and a lot of scam mongering that holds back innovation even today. In fact, more today I would say that in the post. Well I've certainly experienced that resistance to technology innovation myself and and I. Think everyone has in the case of you get a new computer or you get a new cell phone and in no time, there's a newer one that's cooler and better, and you really need to a new one and I think. I. Don't this one works fine. It does everything I needed to do I don't want to get a new one, but there is that that pressure to keep up and to get a new one and I push back and say, no, this is fine at least at least for now. Well that's a very interesting point because if you look at the history of the mobile telephone. Everybody drastically underestimated the attraction, the importance, the commercial significance of mobile funds. I mean, there's a famous prediction from a t and t I think it is they'll never be a market for more than about four million mobile phones in the world well, the date they put on that prediction One hundred million in the world and climbing. So again, and again, people adopted mobile phones and through old ones and adopted new ones at a terrific rate. Until recently. And if you look at what's happening now in the mobile, the smartphone market. People on no longer changing muddled. So fast because that finding that the the advantages of the next muddle, not as great as they would like them to be in. It's just not worth the bother. and. So, the the market projections for the number of sales of my events have. Had to be downgraded in recent years, and this is the first time this has happened. Yeah, well I, think that's true for a lot of innovation especially incremental innovation because, yeah, you can make the phone a little better. You can make the computer a little better, but you have to weigh that against the huge hassle. It is like if you get a new computer and you have to move everything over to the new computer and reload the programs and the set all the settings for your email or whatever it is, you have to do. It's a big hassle and nobody's ever figured out how to make that really easy to do so. So that's a big push back, I think to innovation. Well. I think. One of the reasons for that is because people want to keep you trapped on their own systems. I mean I migrated from. Microsoft. Bates, computers to apple buys computers about ten years ago and I was very, very nervous about doing so. Wasn't sure. I was doing the right thing and to start with. This is using, but quite quickly, I found actually that I preferred. The MAC based system is sort of more intuitive. So it can be done, but you're right. There was a lot of that. There's a big transactional huddle, Larry and changing and very few people have a vested interest in making that easier for you may to do. One of the things it's, it's always interested me about innovation is that you would think well, maybe you wouldn't think, but I I would think that if if somebody comes up with the next big thing. That there's something special about that person or that group of people that they'll likely come up with more next big things, but they almost never do you know Microsoft came out with what they came out with, but then they kind of fell behind apple kind of took off, and we we we haven't seen any big edge, the next personal computer kind of innovation from Microsoft, and maybe it's because they're very vested in their old big thing and want to keep that going. But but it it does seem to strike like lightning in terms of where it comes from. That's absolutely right, and the reason for that is because success breed size and size breeds. Complacency invested interest in the status quo and and general tendency not to be innovative. So, you know knock, you became the biggest mobile phone company out of nowhere, but then knock, it was so invested in voice that it didn't really see the data revolution, the mobile data revolution coming, and it was blown out of the water by basically apple and others and Kodak. Didn't invent digital photography actually invented. It just didn't see the point of it because they didn't want to cannibalize business in film and as you say you know Amazon invented online retail in his being spectacularly successful in his has also device to to keep being an innovative company and Jeff bezos ethos of you have to swing. Mace in order to occasionally succeed is an important part of that, but there will come a time. When is a great big clunky dinosaur and somebody else eats lunch. One of the interesting things about innovation to me and you touched on it in the beginning of our conversation is the difference between invention and innovation that for an innovation to really work and take hold and get people excited. You have to sell it because you know if if it's a brand new product. And we've lived this long without it. You're going to have to really convince me to buy it because I really somehow need it. I, haven't needed it till now. That's that's exactly right now, I mean the this is the point about the different state invention innovation is that the the innovator knows that he's gotta go at the end, sell the product. And he's got to get it into a foam where people wanted. Say where Edison was brilliant is that he he saw the need to do the hard grind of turning the pretty good prototype into the very good model. Henry Ford was the same So these guys were innovators not inventors. and. You're right. Marketing is a big part of that and it has resulted in US missing items. Some very good technologies because the inventors didn't know how to how to market the MO cell by find it. So interesting as you discuss that, we have this love hate relationship with innovation that we like things the way they are. We resist the new thing until we stop resisting the new thing. Then we love the new thing, and then we resist the next new thing and it. It's this resistance and giving in and adopting, and then resisting again, that is so fascinating Matt Ridley has been my guest. He is a journalist writer businessman, a member of the House of Lords in the United Kingdom, and he is author of the book how Innovation Works and why it flourishes in freedom. You'll find a link to his book at Amazon in the show notes. Thank you, Matt. Appreciate you being here. Thank you. Michael I really enjoyed the conversation and some very good points that you've made to. We all know that food can affect your physical health, but it also seems that your mental health is also affected by your. Diet. How you think the mood you're in, can all be influenced by what you eat or don't eat? That's according to a NATO. She's a board certified psychiatrist and director of Nutritional and lifestyle psychiatry at Mass General Hospital. She's author of the book. This is your brain on food. Doctor. Thank you much. It's lovely to be here. So explain what's going on here because I don't think people generally think about this about how I eat can affect my mind and my mood and how I think. So explain it if you would. Thanks Mike I, think that's a great question because most people know how to eat to lower their cholesterol or hard worry about hypertension. But many people don't think about the fact that food also can impact mood and mental health and actually several conditions, and the reasons will, that is as real connection between the guts and the brain. And by understanding that people didn't understand that what we eat does ultimately impact on emotional stage. Well, I. Think. It's hard for people to imagine that whatever food you choose some great food to eat like I, don't know blueberries that that if I eat some blueberries, somehow that's going to improve my mood or change the way I view the world, it seems A. A little, it seemed farfetched. So you're absolutely right Mike eating little handful of blueberries not GonNa immediately make you feel better, and that is because the positive impact of these healthy foods that have things like antioxidants and other good nutrients don't work immediately. But they start to do things like he'll your gut bacteria, they start to improve your emotional state over time. An interesting thing to mention here is that when we don't eat good foods, we may say we enjoy ice cream. I'm not saying you shouldn't eat ice cream just have it less often not every night. But when you eat ice cream, you may have a really good feeling. The truth is that that feeling is very real. It is the ongoing and more lasting effect that is negative for your. Your brain. So I think that sometimes we feel a little trapped by this because we think that eat something good something bad for supposedly as the doctors say you know we have a good feeling. So that doesn't make sense. The best way to understand this is that all these different foods whether they good for you or they bad for you can impact your gut bacteria and this then impacts. Impact the effect on your brain in a good way or bad way, and another thing to say is that when you eat a food that is more but less healthy, it kind of gives you a good feeling, but it's very short lived. It's much for the long term effect. It'd be worrying about his doctors and generally speaking is what people think of as a quote healthy diet is that what is a good mental health diet? Some of the principles are the same. But what I tried to do is really look at the research around specific foods that were linked to specific mental health conditions, and what I found is that there was not only for my clinical look, but they is not a lot of research to back up some of these interesting food. So a lot of people may know things. Things like eating a mega three, fatty acids and fatty fish like Salmon a good for you because they are good brain food ingredients. But it goes beyond just those healthy so-called foods. There's a lot more to it, and a lot of the nuance is around the foods that may negatively impact you because by disrupting the microbiome and feeding the bedbugs and out got. What happens is inflammation can get set up and that can lead to. With your mental health conditions. So it's it's What I hope people will understand that there's more to it than just a few healthy foods. I think the second thing to mention as well. Mike is that many doctors tell you to eat a salad, eat more fruits and vegetables, but they don't often explain why and the biggest issue is that those food beans, nuts, legumes, seeds, food, and vegetables have five of natural fiber and fiber actually fuels. Our got balance in a good direction. So when you make those recommendations, it's also based on. Improving your health, but. Importantly. From a mental health perspective, it really can improve other symptoms to. And so explain, and maybe pick a specific food. Explain, how how it works? It's going to help you your mental health. How long does it take? You have to eat just. Take an example in explain that show. So I'm going to choose something that people may be aware of, which is I mean to salmon because it, it is bay rich in several substances. But one of the leading substances is mega three fatty acids. Why? Why do we suggest that because it make it three fatty acids help. The different aspects of how are brains function in in a better way. They'd reduce inflammation, they have a rich antioxidant effect and they help ultimately to lower anxiety and improve mood and and research studies in human subjects have shown this quite quite. A in repeated fashion. And so you might eat you know one two servings of Salmon, which is about four to six ounce. FILET healthily prepared at least say twice a week, and that is a source of a good lean protein few. Well, the richness of how you are feeding your brain with the maitree, fatty acids as part of a regular healthy diet as well. Because then you transient everything you eat that can add to work for you or against you. So something with high sugars will work against you Off To consuming like this over time and and making healthier choices like say including salmon twice a week and your died you will stop to notice that your mood will improve possibly over a period of time, it could be one to two months. It's not the same effect as a prescription medication because he because mechanism is different, not pharmaceutical food is really meant to be an additional strategy that people can use. They should not be using. Eating Salmon only if severely depressed and suicidal, it's that then in that case, it would be something. They can do as well as seeing a doctor for medication, but we're these strategies work really well is when someone is not feeling good. They have mental health symptoms. They want to feel better. They may may not be seeing a doctor for medication, but it's It's a way that they can really boost their own mental health through something that they can do on their own, quite safely to the use of foods and the appropriate food different conditions. I would imagine people are thinking listening to that saying, okay. Well, but two servings of salmon every week for the rest of my life seems like an awful lot of salmon. That's GonNa, be maybe they don't like Salmon. It's I, think it's more that I'm I'm conveying a principle of of how to include a healthy food that actually brain healthy as well. I'm not saying it's GonNa cure depression, but it is something that can tote completely augment and approve symptoms of both mood and anxiety. So when you asked for. Food, I suggested one that I think most people would know and most people may have heard whether they eat it or not that it can be brain healthy. Now, there are things like fruits and vegetables that people often overlook. But some of those are very high quality foods that feed you in a good way because they help your balance, which ultimately helps your brain. So you know it, it may not be. Be Someone's fest choice. But then more options that that one can can break down for people as well. Give me a sense of like how much in what I mean by that is like if so if you're on a scale of one to ten, if you're feeling a two and we'd Salmon for six weeks twice a week, are you going to get to a three or you're going to get to a nine? And show. So I, the science is not there yet mike and and and we don't have food doses for mental health. But what we have a research studies that show that including these in your died going to boost your mood or low, you're inside and it's difficult to capture this type of information in a nutritional science on nutrition epidemiology study, because many of these us question as and they rely on people letting. Letting us, know what they ate. So unlike say a test for Fluoxetine, which is PROZAC, which can be done in a lab which can be done through a capsule food is quite different. So I, you know there's a lot of evidence behind about people eating these and showing improvement on mood scales on anxiety scales. For example, a study of medical students than many years ago, looked at giving them a mega three, fatty acids and. A real lowering off things -iety levels. So I would be I would be leading straight. I, said, well, it's. It's you know two answers or something, but there are general guidelines that provide as part of a nutritional psychiatry treatment plan for people, and it's highly individualized because everyone's got is so unique. Is it the case that these foods that you're talking about it and I wanNA give into more specifics in a minute but. These foods you're talking about, these are good for your mental health are the are there foods that are bad for your mental health or they just bad in the sense that if you eat those, you're not going to be eating these and therefore that's not so great. But are there are there foods that have been proven to actually turn your mood sour? Yes. There are and what what I've done is looked at different mental health conditions and tried to provide people with. Actual list of foods, they should what I call them as foods to embrace and foods to avoid. So for example, people don't realize that cured meats, things like Bacon Salami sausage and other cured meats have nitrates in them and nitrates have actually been shown to wasn't mood and you know they may be taking something in a sandwich to work every day And you know they may not realize that if they struggling with their mood, this could in. In fact, be worsening it. So they're actually more things beyond you know the things that we know as general. Health. Principles like Fried Foods For example, that'd be should be eating in moderation or try to avoid a sudden how conditions that we we know as general helps, and so there are some of those. But they're also very specific things that people should should be avoiding because they they drive mental health symptoms, the wrong direction depending on the condition. So. In addition to process, meet what else in terms of depression nitrates is one of them. Then you know we get the we have artificial sweeteners kit which have been shown to be problematic and worsened things like mood as well as anxiety, and so there are. There are a couple that you know. We suggest that if you really have a sweet tooth and you and it's hard to give that up to try those one of them is a reputable on the other Stevia. But in general, a lot of the everyday sweetness that we get have been shown to be on on multiple levels not helpful. things you know in anxiety things like moderating the been such as that have shown that avoiding gluten actually beyond individuals who just have senac disease is actually helpful for people with anxiety, and then you know there are things like. glutamate in. Certain foods. MSG. People know it has been linked to worsening symptoms of PTSD. So you know, I, think that when when people put the specifics together with symptoms, they might be having that they would would understand the things to avoid a little bit better. Is there a general diet prescription or is everybody into if you're not having mental health symptoms if you're not overly concerned that you're depressed or whatever is there just a general maintenance diet that that is recommended. So. That's a great question and and and even though it is highly personalized because each person's symptoms can be quite different. What I do like to suggest to people is A. Health healthy diet and always including a treat day of the week, and so the way that I say that to individuals, it's whether it's pizza ice cream, all your favorite food that you know someone unhealthy. Make sure that you enjoy that at least once a week in moderation using appropriate portion control but enjoyed. In start to correct your healthy diet by the vein next meal, and you know healthy healthy foods to include are the basic principles which including proteins. Well, source proteins, fruit vegetables, beans, not seeds, legumes, prebiotics, and probiotics, all of which will really help you in in the best direction forward, but it's not just mental health. My focus is mental health because I'm a nutritional psychiatrist but. The truth is by by embracing those foods and that type of died, it's going to lower things like inflammation in your body. Inflammation is linked to mental health conditions, but it's also linked to several other disorders in in in the body. These foods will bring back a high level of natural fiber, which is not found in meat seafood, but is found in the fruits and vegetables, and the other items I mentioned, and those help you got in a positive balance. By doing that. Again, you are helping every other condition that could be inflammatory in your body. And then the third thing is that these these they're also antioxidants in these foods which are going to help your brain and help your body, and unfortunately also an innumerable number of nutrients, vitamins, minerals, and especially fighter nutrients of which I think at last combat with twenty, five, thousand in different foods So so the every food that you consume has generally a healthy food has so many. Many more ingredients that are healthy for you. Most importantly to me is that it is going to improve your mental health symptoms. If you follow a generalized healthy plan included day, so you don't feel deprived and then You know. You might also help other conditions in your body and example of that. My is someone doing covert who was a businessman patient of mine who? Noticed that by not traveling as much eating airports eating fast food and having to be confined at home was had had had had a skin rash. He has mental symptoms for Jim Proving, but also had a skin rash which had started at the beginning of covert and really didn't have a chance to see a dermatologist just by eating at home eating home prepared meals, eating more healthy foods than fast foods, restaurants on the go and drinking less alcohol because he also admitted that when he was traveling, he was so stressed in his sleep is always disrupted that he needed to Gosselin to go to bed. He noticed that the skin rash improved. So this was an example of inflammation being set up in his body. That was probably largely related to the Diet that he was consuming and it improve. As. As Kobe discontinued that rationale gone away. So I think that. There are more than one example of this type of thing that I've seen in my practice and I would. Therefore encourage people if if they can to stop to stop to move toward healthier diet because the Diet that is called the fad diet, standard American Diet, you know mostly full of unhealthy ingredients for for our brains. Are there. Any foods beyond just the standard Prescription of eating healthy diet and. What you've talked about so far. But are there any like real standout foods like if you do anything at least eat? BLUEBERRIES or at least is there anything like that show. So base, definitely a good one. But I, when I go to with this is actually to spices because spices a calorie free salt fee easy to add flavor to your food and easier to transport for people to travel, and some of the best prices Dad have been shown to actually have a positive mental health effect, as well as other physical health effects and things like turmeric and the the trick with to make. Make, which is a spice that you know. If someone doesn cook with it, they can add it to smoothie. They can attitude a soup and still get the benefit studies have shown that a quarter teaspoon day is all that you need. But the trick is that to make it more effective, you always add a pinch of black pepper because that makes the active ingredient in turmeric more active. So I if there's one tip you take with you because it will help so. So, many different conditions in your body. But it really impacting Zeidan depression and the brain that would be that would be something that you know people may be taking it for information, but but not know that So foods like that, have you just spices and there under spices that have actually stuck out in terms of their positive benefit for mental health as well. So well, clearly diet is not a first aid approach to mental health problems. It's good to know that. That that, what you eat, what you don't eat can really have an impact on your mood especially now. I. Think with with people being stuck at home and not going out much maybe being lonely and anxious that this is another Arrow in the quiver to help stabilize mood. My guest has been Manado. She is a board certified psychiatrist and the name of her book is this is your brain on food and you'll find the link to that book Amazon in the show notes. Thank you for being here Dr. Thank you so much affect you to talk to you. Social media allows anyone to tell the world about their latest accomplishment, but does the world really care? Well, not as much as we like to think in fact, self promotion on social media often backfires in an article in the Journal. Psychological. Science. The Humble Brag. Is often not well received by others. Posting a photo of your brand new car on facebook or bragging about your promotion to co workers not only doesn't get the reaction. You might think it gets the opposite reaction. Think about it yourself. You've probably experienced emotions other than pure joy. When you're on the receiving end of someone, else's self-promotion. Yet. When we engage in self promotion ourselves, we tend to overestimate others positive reactions and underestimate their negative ones. The idea that by telling others about our accomplishments, we improve how people view US might seem right. But in fact, it often has the opposite effect and that is something you should know. And oddly after saying what I just said, I'm going to engage in some self promotion. You've heard a lot of interesting things in this episode of the PODCAST and I'm sure there's someone you know that would find it interesting as well. So please share this podcast with friend. I'm Mike carruthers. Thanks for listening today to something you should know.

Inflammation Matt Ridley Larry apple Google Microsoft Mike carruthers Silicon Valley Mike US United Kingdom writer limbaugh Brown Intel Salmon
The High Cost of Being So Busy & What if You Get Hit By a Bus Tomorrow?

Something You Should Know

49:41 min | Last week

The High Cost of Being So Busy & What if You Get Hit By a Bus Tomorrow?

"Wanna hear something. Amazing discover matches all the cash. Back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically with no limit on how much you can earn. How amazing is that in fact. It's even more amazing because of all the places where discover is accepted ninety nine percent of places in the us that take credit cards so when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash. Yes twenty twenty. Nilson report limitations. Apply today on something you should know. The few essential ingredients that will give you an overall sense of happiness. Then the problem with our obsession for being busy being productive and getting everything done when we try and do everything. We actually achieved nothing. Our lives turned to grey are used to paint as a kid. When you mix too many colors on a pallet. you don't get a rainbow you kind of get this gray sludge. And that's when i become when we try and do everything and never quite do anything. Brilliant then do you know which part of your body requires no rest at all to function and have you made preparations for the day you die. Who gets what and do you have a will. A big part of having a will is to make sure that you name a guardian in case something happens to both parents. And if you don't name guardian for your minor children then a judge can appoint somebody all this today on something. You should know something. You should know fascinating intel world. Tomek and practical advice. You can use in your life today. Something you should now with mike carruthers. Hi there welcome to something you should know. It seems that what. With the pandemic and the increase in the number of cases and the stricter lockdowns it does seem for many of us harder to be happy although there is no one secret to happiness research indicates that there do seem to be some necessary ingredients for a person to have a general sense of happiness. And most of them you can do and find even in a pandemic the happiest people spend the least time alone. Humans are social creatures and we need to connect with others. We may not be able to connect with as many people as we used to right now. But chances are there are some people that you could connect with. And it's worth making the effort signature. Strengths are important doing the things you are good at and enjoy doing brings a sense of happiness and then there's gratitude and forgiveness. Happy people tend to be grateful for what they have. And they don't hold grudges and altruism is important that rewarding feeling that comes from helping others breeds happiness in almost everyone and that is something you should know for many people. Being busy is a way of life. We take pride in being busy. We look at busy people as important people because they have so much to do. And there's certainly a sense of accomplishment. I know i felt it. When you have a million things on your to do list and you get them all done well. That feels pretty great. But if you're busy doing all these things on your to do list what are you not doing instead. If you weren't so busy what would you do. What would you rather do is being busy. A good state to be in well with an interesting perspective on busy. Is tony crab. Tony is a business psychologist. Who has worked with companies like microsoft disney. Hsbc and the world bank. And he's author of a book called busy. How to thrive in a world of too much. Hey tony really nice to be him. I so as i said a lot of people where their business as a badge of honor. I know busy people who if they weren't so busy they really wouldn't know what to do. So how do you look at busy is a good thing. Is it a bad thing or it. Just is what it is now. I think busy is dumb. I think it's i think it's the natural response to a world of too much. I think it's an ill thought-out strategy. I think it's a set of bad habits. And quite frankly i think it's the easy option and yet i think people would say well so if i wasn't busy what would i do. Being busy is my life is busy is what i do it to not be busy means to do what instead and you know what. There's a lot of research shows. People have a fair of idleness. People are unhappy with idleness. And maybe that drives some of the activity but but let me just be clear about what. I mean by busy busy. Is this kind of racing cramming juggling multitasking for netted pace where we flatlined through our day. We i've zoo ourselves with coffee in the morning and colossal down with alkaline evening that fills so much live and for me. The opposite of business isn't relaxation on a beach or sitting idle doing nothing. The opposite Busy is the ability to bring sustained focused attention onto the people. You love most of the people that are important to you and work and the piano things that problems of the activities that you can most about. So how how did we get here. How did we get to the point. Where being busy means you're important. That's going actually in in the pre industrial age. If you were in paris in the late eighteen hundreds and you were cool. One of the things that was really fashionable to do is to walk a turtle on a piece of string and the reason is turtles walk really ready slowly so it was a it was a manifestation of quite how much time you had on your hands. We've completely flipped that one. Actually the research shows today that when we moan brag about our business when people say how are you and we go into this long about quite how busy our lives are. We're actually subtly competing we researchers we actively compete about. Who can be busier. Changed our our sets of values in a way. That's that fits with some of the needs of the industrial revolution but doesn't necessarily fit with either what we need an attention economy. All what works well for us from a wellbeing perspective. Also think it's a set of dumb habits that have come about through the digital age. I mean most of us reach for our shot of businesses or email far official caffeine. We some eminent psychologist. Put people in an empty room for fifty minutes with nothing to do. Apart from electrocute himself in. Most people chose to electrocute themselves because we hoped on this world of hyperstimulation. A lot of this drives. This need to be busy. Well one of the things. I've always found interesting about this business. Thing is our obsession. With an i interview people on this podcast all the time about you know productivity and it seems like the idea is to find ways to do things faster so you can do more things and then do them faster so you can do more things and the goal always to get more done. It isn't to free yourself from. It isn't finding a way to get things done so you don't have to work so hard. It's just making room for more work but ready. We've got hooked and why called the mall game. Which is we end to see. the rules. Assembling has the way we think about success. The we do the foster. We do it. The quickly respond the mall will succeed. That's kinda dumb. If in the last twenty years the amount of information we all consume increased by a factor of five but over the same time period the amount of content that the average worker produces increased by a factor of two hundred. So if you hold those numbers together of all our well-meaning more based productivity is just white noise nobody can really consume it. And i think that's part of the issue kind of hope in endlessly doing more but it doesn't capture attention which is the heart of the point around the attention economy with the stuff that stands out in an attention. Economy is the stuff. That's kind of interesting that kind of different and very few of us have the were so busy racing and crumbling. We don't create the space for us to have the insight that leads to fresh thinking. So what do you say to the person who says okay. Well this this all sounds great. It would be great to have more time. But but here's my day. I i have to do this. And i have to do this and i have to do this. It takes this much time to get it done and that fills up the day so it would be great to have more free time but it is impossible. It's funny. I would always get a question that would be the end of a talk and it would go something like this. Look tony you say busy as a choice but what about me. I am a single parent. Got seven children around three multi million dollar projects. My mother-in-law's coming to stay. And i've got a dog with leukemia. And the look me as if you know. Surely i haven't got a choice and then invest energy in convincing me and in some respects what they were looking for almost as absolution they are looking for me to say actually for you. Busy isn't a choice. But when i dig further in almost all cases there is a difficult conversation or tricky choice. That isn't happening. And so what do you say to that guy. The guy who's mother-in-law's coming in. His dog has leukemia. What's your advice to him. Yeah well it starts with making choices so the standard question starting with if we should do something or if we wanted to do something is whether or not whether or not. I should go to that meeting whether or not. I should cook fancy meal for the mother-in-law whether or not i should saimaa child up for other after school activity or whatever the case may be now the answer all these almost always if we asked to ask the question that way is yes because these are all worthwhile things. These are all valuable things but if we start from an assumption that we can't do it all and actually if we try and do it all when we try and do everything we actually achieve. Nothing in our lives turned to grey we. I used to paint as a kid and when mixed too many colors on a pallet. You don't get a rainbow you get this gray sludge. And that's allies. Become we try and do everything and never quite do anything brilliantly and so of saying whether or not maybe we should ask a different question which is something more like. If i'm saying yes to this. What am i saying no to. What's the what's the cost. Because what happens most often is when we choose whether or not we should do something. The thing that we often forget about is the is the important thing that might be the plane. Lego with jani might be thinking about the new strategy for the business. It's a work related. Thing as opposed to the amiga an urgent and pressing thing which always gets the noise so part of it is just actually having the courage to make trade offs and allowing yourself to be a little bit sloppy because actually trying to be perfect. We end up being very inadequate everything. It's not that we start with sloppiness. But it it comes back to getting really clear on the people on the conversations on the activities that you care about most and putting real energy into those and just accepting as a consequence the other things won't be able to be perfect if we start from trying to get all the everything perfect walker squeezed out. What get squeezed out. Is this stuff in years to come. We will always look back on with regret. We're talking about being busy and the problem of being too busy too much time in my guest. Is tony crab. He's author of the book busy. How to thrive in a world of too much. So you own or rent your home right sure you do and i bet it can be hard work you know what's easy bundling policies with geico geico makes it easy to bundle your homeowner's or renter's insurance along with your auto policy. It's a good thing too because you already have so much to do around your home. Go to geico dot com. Get a quote and see how much you could save. Its geico easy. Visit geico dot com. Today that's geiko dot com. The great outdoors is calling. And if you want to answer the call back country dot com is the place to go because when you shop at backcountry dot com you can pick up the phone. And this is so cool and talk gear with an actual former olympian back. Country dot com was founded by a former olympic skier. 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And enter promo code s. y. s. k. that's backcountry dot com slash s. y. s. k. And then don't forget the promo code s. y. s. k. So tony this idea of not being perfect that perfection isn't always better and being sloppy is okay. I mean when you look at kids i mean. He used to be the kids after school. That was their time to hang out with their friends and ride their bikes and do what they want and now kids are very scheduled. It's not sloppy. It's very very structured. But we know one of the things that happens when children have this kind of massively structured environment albeit well-intentioned is part of the brain. The central executive doesn't develop properly not substantial for creativity is essential for autonomy is essential for self management. If you let go go through life later on and so one of the funny what are the things one of the phrases that our children most associated with us and kind of grown. If we say it we still say it is whenever we say look technology off kids and they turned to his inevitably in say but daddy. I'm bored as if it's my job to fix that our responses and that's our greatest gift to you because unless we have bought him and this applies ruttles as well by the way but automative hugely important thing for the brain to allow brain to make sense of what's going on. I mean when do we have. If i've asked most people. When do you have your best ideas. They will nearly always say in the shower. Winds dot com is about the only only time of the day when the not either producing something stimulating themselves all consuming something and and when we're off task or free play for children. Parts of the brain can fire up that that are important for making sense of things that are important for creativity and we you know even with the children. We know the kind of decline in free play. That's that's hit. Society has been associated with massive increases in mental health in the uk was. There's been so i can. I think a forty eight percent increase in mental health issues or children over the last decade. And that's partly associated with his lack of unstructured freedom sloppiness even so the next time. My kid says i'm bored. I'm going to tell them. And that's my gift to you exactly but you know what two or three minutes later. He'll be making some kind of cool thing with a with a wash bottle or whatever. I'll painting a picture and doing something that is genuinely interested or actually quite frankly just having a conversation and so what do you say though to people who just i can imagine people listening to you going. Yeah well this is really great. You know for other people. I'm sure is really good. But i i wouldn't know how to even approach what he's talking about. How would you even begin to put your toe in the water here. If you're one of those people who gets up and starts a hundred miles an hour. Well look there's if there's a few things i mean actually the the doing nothing is one of the one of the hardest things i think what i would say is think about rather than thinking about time because managing time is a really out of date thing to do. I don't think that times are ultimate commodity anymore. The ultimate commodity in short supply his attention and that's supported by some research by the one of the chief economist at the bank of england. But when you think about attention what it means to manage attention. There are three elements to it. Attention has a direction like a flashlight points. In different directions. Attention has an intensity intensity of focus and attention has a generation halloween lingers in any given place so thinking about day about how do we intentionally point our attention onto stuff that we truly care about. How often have we got to the end of the day. We've been visible car really. Remember what we actually did but it seems that so much of the day you may it may be mundane things that you don't remember doing but it doesn't mean they weren't important or necessary to get done the head to get done. They just weren't particularly interesting or exciting. You still you know you have to drop the clothes off of the dry cleaners because if you don't you don't have clean clothes so those things are necessary but i guess what you're saying is that that we have a tendency to gravitate to those things. Those are the easier things to do. There there quicker. They're easy to check off to do list. And we tend to go towards that in any given moment given a choice between simple deliberatively something. That's a little trickier that might be a deep conversation with your son. It might be starting that complex report. The you're going to write in any given moment the choice between these two things. You're going to choose the symbol. And delectable often happens we get into this frenetic activity and we feel because we got loaded dopamine flowing around like we're being super uber effective but actually probably what we're doing is just making lots of choice in the gripper temptation for small meaningless stuff as opposed to two big things when we're home we for beach other familiar with the word. Funding make is word. that's funding. is this notion of snubbing. Someone with your phone effectively route to someone with you. Find it mid compensation you just whip out your phone and have a quick glance or you're in a meeting and you open the laptop. Don't mind me undoing. A few male. I'll join the meeting the right time. And we thought people all the time and therefore never fully involved in those conversations and just getting into some simple habits around being fully present putting the phone away. We actually know that. Just putting your phone on the table makes the other person like you. Ll ask because they know your only semi president actually my. I've got a friend of mine. Who who start a fight back against any carries a book of poetry and if anyone ever zim. He whips out book. Poetry reads a couple of verses and puts it back in his pocket with no explanation whatsoever. Just to make the point that just because it's a phone it's still odd to disrupt our conversation by looking at it so thinking about your day less about. How do i maximize my minutes and thinking instead. About how do i persistently part my attention to what matters. How do i get really immersed and present with the people. I care about matter to me on the problems. And how do i avoid. The temptation of distractions will be a small place to start. I wanna get you to talk about the idea that you know there are people who are busy and the concept of not being busy makes no sense to them. What would they do. I mean if they weren't busy that's that's what that's what people do they do stuff. They go places. They run errands. They they do what they do. And and there's a joy there. There's there's like a sense of accomplishment of i i got all these things done. Things are off my to do list. And they're they can't really comprehend what you're talking about. I would. I'm christian so many different ways. So i is we to differentiate buzz from joy so the fact is business gives the birds because the dopamine but actually it undermines the joy our reduces our ability to be fully present in our conversation. We see surrounded by people who are just living lives of partial attention. Never fully president. If you think about the times when you were most joyful when you were most truly happy over the last few few weeks months it would have been a time when you're immersed your attention with reckless abandon into the conversation or the activity you were doing and that is in business. That's just because business is again going back to my point at the star business. Kind of racing and kremlin and juggling so moving away from business doesn't mean our lives on full. I'm not. I'm not arguing for doing a lot. Less necessarily what i'm suggesting. Is we do things for longer with less interruptions. We focused deeper with more intensity And we bring our attention more regularly to the things that really matter. I mean fifty. Eight percent of knowledge workers a saying they do less than thirty minutes. Thinking you day thirty percents. They do know thinking tall each day. Which kind of is because we we see empathy levels of. Us students has dropped by forty percent over the last couple of decades. Because we're getting into this also married by the way organizations because we're getting out with the habit of being fully present with people so what i'm not arguing and suggesting is that we just everything going to idle idle life. What i'm suggesting is have a look at your life and ask yourself to. What degree are you doing the things that truly you truly care about twenty feel fully present with really love and if the answer is well i could do better on that than make small choices that allow you to spend a little bit more time with deep attention with the people that you love most with with the people that matter to you most in the organization and your work or on that titties that you know will truly add value that your life or the organization and small shifts and small choices that we make to put a bit more time into those even if they require tricky choices are tricky conversations to allow us to do those will make a big difference not only in the quality of our lives in the quality of our work but would also make a big difference in the sense of we feel over our lives while speaking just from my own experience. I know that trying to change the way you live your life. I spend your day or get things done changing. That is hard but with more and more coming at us. Maybe we could be a little more intentional. Because you know as i go through my day a lot of it is on autopilot and by maybe making some more intentional choices about what i choose to do. Things could be a lot easier and a lot better. Tony crab has been my guest. He's a business psychologist and author of the book busy. How to thrive in a world of too much and you'll find a link to his book at amazon in the show notes. Thanks tony it's been a real pleasure. I mean obviously you're going to be given the success of the work that you do but but it was very very easy to talk to you and thanks so much. Want to hear something. Amazing discover matches all the cash. Back you earn on your credit card at the end of your first year automatically with no limit on how much you can earn. How amazing is that in fact. It's even more amazing because of all the places where discover is accepted ninety nine percent of places in the us that take credit cards so when it comes to discover get used to hearing yes more often learn more at discover dot com slash. Yes twenty twenty. Nilson report limitations apply. There will come a time when you're not here. Hopefully that's a long way off but that day will come and when it does come what will happen to all your stuff all your money. All your possessions. What will happen to all the people you leave behind. The fact is you could unknowingly make things very difficult for your family if you don't make the proper arrangements and if you don't decide what's going to happen after you're gone someone else will and it may not be what you wanted at all. That's why adam safer is here. Adam is an entrepreneur and founder of ever plans which is a life and legacy planning company and he is author of the book. In case you get hit by a bus a adam. i mike. It's really good to be here. Thank you so much for having me. So we hear that phrase a lot you could get hit by a bus tomorrow so you better be prepared. But people don't really seem to think that's going to happen because they're not prepared. Many of us are not prepared for that day. When we're not here and people don't think that they will get hit by a bus. I mean you know. What are the chances. They're actually pretty low. But what we've discovered is that buses come in a lot of different sizes and flavors and we all got hit by the covid bus this year. And so i think this is more than just about actual buses and so before we get into the details just in kind of a shopping list form. What are the big things. What are the big things people should do that. They regret not doing or their family. Wish had been done beforehand. What are they. I think there's some foundational stuff that they can really make things difficult for your family if you didn't get it together. Things like your critical passwords. Some basic information about your assets and where they are some some contacts like who. The lawyers are advisors. You may have worked with then. There's a there's another chunk of stuff which are kind of like the big juicy pieces that the wills trusts the the medical directors information about any insurance policies you have in your digital accounts and then and then there's this last bucket that we like to think about which we call the finishing touches. It's it's the way you want to be remembered. Its information about your funeral. It's important family memories that you wanna make sure. Don't evaporate too And i think if if you do have those things things go great. And i think if you're missing big chunks of that that's the thing that people end up really regretting because it leaves their family with a big mess since we all inevitably will die and i think people have a real problem with addressing this stuff. Why do you suppose that is why when we know. This is the final result. We all must go. Why do we leave this undone man. I think there's a lot of reasons. I think for some people. It's the effort and the logistics. Nobody wants to take three days off from work to organize information and can get everything together. But i think for a lot of people. It's it's it's something more than that. It's it's getting into this stuff is acknowledging that you're going to die and and i think people don't really feel comfortable with that until it becomes an easy thing to push off for some other. Yeah i mean. I've i've felt that there's almost this sense. I think people have that if you address the issue that that somehow brings it on that that you're you're dabbling in your own death. Yeah but like you just said a couple of minutes ago. It's happening whether you think you brought it on or not. And so you know. I think for most people finding a way to put aside superstition and and and just get into it They're gonna end up. Feeling heroic. Everybody that i know who has actually put some time into getting together. A plan for their family has has felt great about themselves. And and it's it's an having ended up feeling feeling badly. Well you said a few minutes ago that you know nobody wants to take three days off. And i found that when i looked at my own stuff that i need to make sure is taken care of. I couldn't do it in a three day blitz. i can do a little bit at a time. And i have done a little bit at a time but i would no more be able to to dive into this for three days than i mean. I just couldn't yeah and we don't think anybody should I think what you're talking about is exactly what we hope. People will do Guest build up a little bit of momentum. Do a couple of things that'll make you feel really good and then you wanna do a few more and then you want to do a few more. And there's no reason to to sit down and and and make it a day product. So what would you do. I like if you wanted to get people to kinda yank him into the pool here we were. We put our toe in the water. Yeah you know. There's there's a couple of things that we think are are so important The first thing is critical passwords. To your phone your laptop and maybe your primary email account. 'cause in the old days if something were to happen to everybody wait around for the mail and they would start looking through bills and stuff. They came in as a way of of untangling. Your mass but a lot of people aren't getting bills in the mail anymore and so that doesn't work anymore and so if somebody doesn't have access to your email account and phone because a lot of people have to factor authentication on a lot of their important accounts They can they can really end up having a long-term mess to unwind so we love to have people start their um we also like to make sure that you share a little bit of information about your key assets. You don't have to tell your family. How much money you have in. Which bank account. But just letting them know that there's an account at this bank or you've been working with that adviser can really make a big difference there billions of dollars in unclaimed assets floating around out there because the family never even knew that they existed in the first place. What does the law say. Or what what is the general practice of if someone dies and they have money in their bank account that is maybe the primary source of money is it okay for other family members to log in and use that money or is that are we committing federal crimes here. I'm not sure about a federal crime but generally the way it's supposed to work is that After somebody dies on you go through something called pro. And that's where there's a full accounting done of all of the assets and the executor of the estate. Which is the person that that you've appointed can show a centrally a judge that that they've done in accounting for everything and then now it's time to open things up and make sure that the people who were supposed to get each thing actually get it and that any liabilities or debts that you have are paid off before everybody goes out and buys a boat if somebody does die and the family does have access to their bank account Unless it's a joint account with joint tenancy with a with a spouse or partner is probably not a good idea to get into account and start taking out big amounts of money because it can interfere with the parade process. What happens though. I what. I was meaning. More is is like whoa. You got to pay the electric bill. You got to pay the mortgage and if the monies in that account especially auto paying any way you can't wait for probate judge. I mean that could be weeks away. Well yeah and that's what happens to a lot of people who don't do planning and that's why we've been such on such a mission for the last ten years to help families get these plans in place. Ida situation with my own parents where My mom died about a year ago and for some reason despite all of our best efforts to put good plans in place the primary bank account that She had with. My dad was not a joint on account and so When she died he was not able to access that account. And so i had to step in and help them. Make sure that the bills kept getting paid indian durham while we worked on probate. And so you don't want that to happen. It's pretty easy to not. Have it happen and it just takes a small amount of planning ahead. What did you do. How did you make sure the bills got paid well. My dad knew how to pay most of the bills because he did pay the bills. But i made sure that he had some money in his account. While we sorted out the pearly okay. I don't know what the statistics are. But i remember hearing that. They're amazingly low in terms of the number of people who have a will. Yeah do you know what what the stats are. I think it's less than fifty percent and it's a real shame because it's something that's very easy to get and we think everybody should have one For most people will doesn't even really end up being about who gets which part of their assets because a lot of people don't even have that much to leave behind. It's more way to make sure that your family doesn't go through any sort of unnecessary drama and stress I if you have children Is a big part of having a will is to make sure that you name guardian in case something happens to to both parents. And if you don't amo guardian for your minor children then a judge can appoint somebody which means that you know. Everybody's got a family where there's some crazy sister-in-law or or uncle Who probably wouldn't be your top choice for raising your children. They could competition judge ultimately. Get custody of your children. If you don't have a will that names a garden and then on the other side of things you need to name an executor in your well and so even if you're not leaving anything behind naming executor can really help your family out a lot because without an executor someone in your family. If you die we'll have to petition a judge to become the administrator of your estate and frequently they'll have to put up a personal bond against the value that might be in the state Until probate is settled and so it's time consuming. It's annoying it can be expensive and it's it's really easy to avoid there so many places to get a basic will done for for cheap or even for free on a lot of them are online so you can do there. Mike from what's the difference between a will and a trust and wendy you use which a trust is a way of putting aside certain assets so they almost don't really belong to you anymore. They belong to the trust. The trust is almost like a little mini company that you set up to manage that asset and so one reason that people use trusts is to make sure that that money or that asset has very specific rules around When somebody can access it and how they can access it So for instance If you if you die and you just leave your assets oil At some point the the assets distributed but if you put them in a trust you can leave behind a whole series of instructions to make sure maybe that somebody has to finish college before they can Get that money Or that they have to Take good care of of somebody that you left behind. In order to to get that money another reason that people will put something into a trust is for tax purposes Trusts are taxed differently than individuals are and so there are a lot of different strategies around putting assets in a trust to to maximize the tax outcome. Don't people use trusts so for example. My wife and i might set up a trust and then if i die will nothing happens to the stuff. That's in the trust because my wife is still alive. And she's managing the trust and basically just moves over to her exactly yes and so that can create a kind of continuity that avoids the probate process. Because it's not really part of your estate. It's it's in a trust. And there are a lot of people for instance who create trusts just For their life insurance policy payouts. So that the powder from the insurance policy will go right into that trust when you die you leave instructions or if you say you know when i die i i wanted to be buried in this suit or what whatever it is used. Do those words mean anything. I i want to donate my organs. But i didn't sign a card or i mean is everything has to be written or can people say well. Bill said he wanted to. You know be buried upside down. And i don't know what it would be but i just mean to those words carry any weight or is everything got to be written down the good question. Words do carry a lot of weight but frequently. They only carry the weight with the person that heard them. And there maybe other people involved. That weren't there when you set it and so you may end up putting someone in your family in a really difficult position. If they're the only one that knows that you wanted to be buried upside down the rest of the fairly might not agree and make things very difficult but as soon as you commit something to paper then then it's much harder to dispute and if you go the extra step and you committed to paper in a way that's sort of legally acceptable and legally valid and and something like a will then. You have a much better chance of seeing your wishes carried out. I don't wanna get too far into the legal weeds here but but when you die if you leave instructions when you die and they're like know i guess not really legal like you leave all your money to your cat kind of thing. What does that do if you really wanna leave all of your money your cat. That's a good example of why you should probably have a trust. Because i think if you put that in your will you're going to get people in your family that are going to contest it and we've seen that happen with some some some celebrities. I think leona helmsley left a whole bunch of money to her pets and there were some family members. That really didn't like that very much. What are some of the other. Gosh if only that that happened when people die that things that didn't get done. That should have gotten done and would have made life so much easier if they had gotten done. what else. besides what we've talked about thus far comes up. Yeah one area. That can be really really dramatic. Is medical directives It's it's always. The case are mostly the case that towards the end of your life. You reach a point where it's very difficult for you to properly advocate for yourself and somebody else has to start making decisions and you put your family in a really tough position. If you've never communicated your wishes about what you do and you don't want First of all because individuals have to start making really tough decisions that they're going to have to live with the consequences for the rest of their lives And there can be a lot of guilt involved but but also people in your family might not see eye to eye and that's where you get issues like with the terry chevelle case years ago. Where where some people in family wanted to take her off life support and some people wanted to keep her on and and ultimately nobody was really able to follow her wishes because they were not properly specified and so setting up a legal will sorry A living will and a naming a healthcare proxy Can be another thing that people can give as a gift essentially to their family on a practical level though if you're on life support or your incapacitated and can't make your own decisions even if you've written down pull the plug and you know. Let me go if family members don't wanna do that won't doctors typically go along with the family to avoid lawsuits and everything else. It definitely does happen and so the more paperwork that you can arm the person you trust to be your healthcare proxy with The the better chance they have of of making sure that the doctors and the hospital feel like. It's an easy decision to go along with what you wanted. I had an experience with my own. Mom when she passed a year ago and and thankfully Because of of what. I do i knew ahead of time to sit down with her and my dad six months before and go through everything that you did and did not want and made sure that we got her advanced directive in place which included her living will enter naming me properly healthcare proxy and then when the end came and and hospice came the sort of like a bunch of defaults that they were expecting to do. None of which my mom wanted. My mom wanted to be at home and surrounded by family and you know the the default hospice path was to to take her out of the house and bring her to a hospice facility for her final days. Which is exactly what you want. And it was so great to know what she wanted and it was so great to have that the things in place that made it easy for me to to enforce those decisions so instead of having these agonizing conversations with lawyers at the end. I just got to sit and watch. Tv and talked to my mom and be with my dad and it was. It was amazing it was really was a gift. Yeah it it is so interesting to me how people don't address this until it's late often and and then it's too late and and yet it is inevitable i mean we're all going to go and yet it avoids this like the plague. What's really phenomenal. Is that for people that we can push hard enough to actually sit down and do it. They can't believe that they had been avoiding it. That whole time. The the the feeling of relief that they got from doing it was far greater than any trepidation. They had had going into it and some sometimes it just takes a little bit of nudge from from somebody who knows what they're doing or somebody who cares about you and has been through it themselves. I think that's the real magic to this. Because i've even felt i mean i. I still have things i need to do but having done what i've already done has made me feel better. It actually does provide a little momentum to keep going and it was just like the initial. Do i really want to up this. Can of worms kinda thing and and but it was nowhere near as more bitter horrible as i thought it would be and and at the end the day. It felt pretty good. Like i like. I did the grownup thing. Yeah totally and when i was sitting and talking to my mom and dad the the first few minutes were a little bit awkward. It was tough to break the ice and get going but we got into it. The more it ended up feeling like a a almost scavenger hunt of their lives and they felt like here's an opportunity to remind atom of this or or. Oh you know what i bet. I have this document somewhere in a file cabinet that no one would ever know about. I should probably go look for that. And it almost a life of its own and and as i said it can almost be fun to to to have an opportunity to not just unburden yourself but also start reviewing the great things that happened in your life. Well it's not only an important topic because it's gonna apply to everybody but actually it's. It's interesting when you. Can you know distance yourself from the fact that it's your own death you're talking about. It's really rather interesting. And so crucial to understand. Adam safer for has been my guest. He is the founder of ever plans a life and legacy planning company and he's author of the book in case you get hit by a bus and there is a link to his book and to ever plans in the show notes. Your eyes are amazing. I they're very busy blinking over ten million times a year. Your eyes can distinguish between five hundred. Different shades of gray is can process thirty-six thousand bits of information per hour. And under the right circumstances. The human i can discern a candle from fourteen miles away. Did you know it's impossible to sneeze with your eyes open. The i is the only part of the human body that can operate at one hundred percent ability at any moment without rest although your eyelids and muscles surrounding your. I require rest. Your eyes do not and that is something you should know. I know i ask you frequently to share this podcast with someone else because it's how we grow our audience. Our audience grows pretty much organically from people. Like you telling someone else to give it a listen and then they become listeners to it really helps us and i would really appreciate it. I'm mike carruthers. Thanks for listening today to something you should know.

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Full Episode: Friday, April 04, 2020

20/20

1:21:07 hr | 10 months ago

Full Episode: Friday, April 04, 2020

"Remember the moment you saw that. How could I forget? How crazy is great developments in that horrifying massacre and guber driver driver hoover driver? We all of hailing a car with an APP. The truth is you really don't know who's in the driver's seat could have ever imagined that these strangers lives would forever be connected because of an uber driver. Suspects wants to the victims shoots point blank. No no it's not myself. Things died and my mom was a basket case capacity and why and then finally he says well if I told you it would blow your mind. A devil had popping up in your Uber. App evolve visited a place that we thought we might be insulin. Warm all across Michigan. Everybody heading up to the forties and some may even touch fifty. Today saw February twentieth. Two Thousand Sixteen was just a normal day. Ordinary people doing ordinary things friends and family hanging out together. I was going out some friends that night. I worked the night before so was working twelve hour shifts. Which allowed me to sleep most of the day. It was just a normal day. This is an ordinary day in Kalamazoo Michigan and the lives of ordinary. People are about to intersect can be changed forever because of one man. Jason Dalton. The Uber driver. We all hailing a car with an APP. It's easy it's convenient. Truth is when that car shows up. You really don't know who's in the driver's seat. Overdrive driver accused of raping his passenger. Stepping into of a total stranger. Could harm you car. So there's any era volmer ability to teach Byu real. When an Uber passenger places a request it gets routed to a nearby driver and as soon as they accept it they go drive to the passenger. That passage will actually see the picture of the driver and they can follow along on their route as they drive to pick them up. It's four twenty one in the afternoon Uber driver. Jason Dalton is picking up his first right of the day. Matt Mellon Uber had just come the Kalamazoo area and he decided. That was a way to make some extra money to raise money for a vacation. He was Nudie. Hoover was just learning how to figure out the APP. They had good reviews of his ride. This one ride would unleash eight hours of terror. Count to and we've been covering the story for years now. From the very beginning Matt Millen was going to pick up his car after leaving at the night before at a friend's house so he picked me up here. Notice the names of the Uber Drivers and you get in there. I mean sure I mean I was looking at their photo. Pay Much attention to that. Not really map was one of the first of many people whose life would be affected by Jason Doll Matt. Day did have a dog aspects seat in the front seat because the dog was in the backseat. Jason took his dog for a walk before he started driving. Riders in the Uber See hopped in started off on the road. At this point. Everything was fairly normal. He did receive a telephone call and he took it over the Bluetooth Speaker. There was one of his children. How long phone call? It was rather brief. I would say maybe two three minutes. His son calling wanting to know if he wanted dinner at dinnertime he hung up the phone and things change. Then out of nowhere was like he was dealing with a completely different. That's when he slammed the gas pedal and then we were off. How fast you go again? Street is pedal to the metal. Probably seventy five hundred miles an hour down this road. I was racing for impact. Basically Jason is running stop signs. He's speeding through. Traffic is in the front seat thinking he might die or that their cars GONNA get t-boned. He wants out of that car. He was worried that he was acquainted. Make It home. He was acquainted to see his family or friends again. He was terrified house pleading for him. Stop at this point. It was like you hit that car. And he's like in. Your car is his tone normal conversation issues rather call him. He was like what's wrong with the way driving as is going seventy five miles an hour. The United Traffic Yeah. We're gone so fast right through this at one point I even thought about hitting him go. There's my friends street French street which wasn't believe past it. Just trying to get him to stop anyway. Yeah yeah basically. I was cleaning out. Random houses and I was like all my friend's house to my friend's house friend's house. Finally he likes slammed on his brakes. I heard this loud. Screeching noise in our neighborhood is normally very quiet and very subdued. There's not really any traffic so I ran out into the front yard. The Silver Chevy Equinox Kim screeching to haul in a door flew open like this guy does the tumble roll out of the car. And I couldn't tell if he had been pushed shoved or he actually jumped on the car. I see this driver. Dark heavy rimmed glasses. Crazy gray hair. He looked very agitated immediately. Take off again. Burn tires out. Call wine at that point. I was also dialing nine one one. I was just sitting car with Uber. Driver weaving in a range car. Chevy you talked only put out an alert over the radio. I wanted to just wanted to record and I understand what you're saying but I need to know if you WANNA talk to an author or if you want me to have an officer being lookout for it at the end lookout thank you. People call any rennick drivers. There's not much that the police can do unless the police witness that vehicle driving erratically themselves which unfortunately in this incident the officers did not see them. Vehicle Millan Do not wish to be contacted if there's no complainant. There's not much that the police can do when I got home. That's when I filed through the APP and context Uber which was like the Dow back in two thousand sixteen. Believe it or not there was no way for a user to immediately. Call a human at Uber in case of an emergency. Who exactly is this buber driver? Jason Dalton what do we know about to me? The most remarkable thing about him was how unremarkable he was going into February twentieth. Jason by all accounts was a fairly gregarious character. He was an insurance adjuster. He was an average person with a nine to five job in a family. He's a father like so many other midwestern father's posting pictures on facebook and you see him there with his wife and their kids on the couch remarried for over twenty years. He seem what seems like a pontoon boat and also playing in the snow with his kids to seem like a normal nice guy. Jason grew up in Indiana he moved to Kalamazoo during high school. The Co captain of the football team and he had pretty good grades throughout high school. I was the best man in his wedding. He could make conversation with just about anyone. He was not afraid to speak his mind but definitely not out to ever 'cause anybody trowel he liked to work on cars. He liked to figure out how cars worked but he also likes going on. There was a weekend ahead occurred. I believe someone stole some of his price tools and it really bothered him. It's what he said. What drove him to start collecting gloves. He owns several weapons. But not a number that were causing just go. Oh my gosh had fifteen guns at the house. Those guns were all legally owned. There was nothing to prevent Mr Dalton from owning any guns he was in possession of. I think you're GONNA find in this league many others. I don't think his ownership and the number of guns was anything unusual a frankly now before Jason Dalton had taken Matt Melon for this incredibly unusual ride Jason Dalton's Day had been completely ordinary at least for him. He met a friend and during that afternoon him and his friend visited a couple of local gun stores which was typical for them. Jason Dalton goes to the gun shop. He buys both a holster and jacket. He would be my manager. Talk to Jason. Jason was very friendly with them. Smile laughed gave them a little one arm hug as they walked towards the cash register my manager told they have a nice day and he turned and smiled and said. I'm going to enjoy the weather though that was after Matt was able to escape from the wild ride with Jason Dalton. Jason don't then when he ended up going home to his house and retrieving his weapons. At that point we know he had a glock nineteen nine. Jason also put on a bulletproof vest gets back into Chevy Equinox. He's off to pick up passengers at this time his packing heat. He's off to that fateful router. He's going to intersect with so many unsuspecting say. Things can change and a second and in this case chains like hurried up somebody fires shop the activate Zuber and he starts picking up the whole again. Eighty eight point three W C X K Kalamazoo. We hear again clouds tonight. Thirty five forty six right now working our way up to a high of fifty three Kalamazoo where it's at in western Michigan is just about halfway between Chicago and Detroit is sort of a bigger town. That still has a town feel. Kalamazoo city contains a lot of businesses. A lot of restaurants about one hundred polar plunge is fine out tonight after jumping into Turk late this afternoon. The attraction to Kalamazoo Michigan is that it is a safe mid western town with those midwestern values. The cost of living is good. You can buy a nice house within the country if you want but you're close to the city it's one of those ideal talents where parents dream about ways. It's not the kind of city where you would expect. Jason don't to go on a rampage February twentieth. I remember so vividly. Talk One. Our first one days maybe in the forties in the snow was melting. It was the break from the winner. Dionne occur others a twenty five year. Old Mom she had one daughter. I just remember happy smiling laughing. That's what the sun does to you. The first warm days here in Michigan. Because you never know when the sun might be out again for sure. Tiana's afternoon and in fact our whole life would change Jason Dalton's rude would cross her path in that on that day. Things started to seem to unravel after man. Doll those home in. He retrieves his weapons. What is so unusual about this? Is that Jason Dalton after having this terrifying ride with Matt Mellon holds back to driving deeper. Is it nothing happened? The fair Had called for a ride. Her name was Mason at the time. Us Fifteen. Macy ordered an Uber at the meadows apartment complex. Jc got the call so he headed over. The meadows is a typical Kalamazoo County condo apartment complex with a parking lot of families. Live their kids outside. Playing people were walking their animals. So when Jason showed up he was looking for the picture he saw in the account. But he didn't see her he was calling me and telling me like saying. I was giving him wrong directions and was getting upset with me and then had hung up on me just kept texting and takes day and I was like are you there. Yeh Tiana carruthers lived at the meadows complex. Where Jason Dalton comes to pick up his next fair talk about being in the wrong place at the wrong time that was Tian. Carruthers was in the house. Just finishing up a workout. You know trying to get this summer and my daughter was with some young ladies and they came in like my mom. Oh we really want to go over this girl's housing joy. Can we go over her house and so I was like okay? I'll walk you over there. We'll go me her. Mom had Kanaya Adriana Salinas and myself snow's melting blue. Cross the street yes. Do you remember what you were talking about? We're just talking and laughing and all that ended when I saw. This car is speeding. Right is about to cross the street. Tiana and those kids. Jason Dalton calls peaches instantly was a fright in front of me like I was this close to this man and I just remember our dog. Barking wouldn't stop barking and saw Hannah and he approached her down the window. S If she was macy is kept asking me are you. May I said no and I said hey quite aggressively because like you're driving crazy at this point. He seems to really angry because he's having trouble his fair. This person named makes him. He speeds off after. I said No. We continue to walk but at the time I still have my eyes on him. Like just you know paying attention. He turned the car around drawback towards her. I saw a car coming fast. Slow motion in my head took the Glock model nineteen out of his pocket and as he got even with her she saw him. Pull the gun. Remember the moment you saw that gun. How could I forget the Girls Brian? No matter what you run into not come back. She had no idea that she was looking into the face of a man who was going to commit these crimes by just keep more just keeping only. It's the sunny unseasonably warm day in Kalamazoo Michigan driver. Jason Dalton's Day so I'm getting darker pulled his gun on John Carruthers. His mother was just trying to shepherd these children across the street. I'll never forget his face. I'll never forget the pain that I saw. His eyes. Never Forget. Anger Shaw him over gone. After I realized the kids were firing Nassau decision and to just start. Start shooting shooting shooting again and again and again. I guess kept hearing bullets. Just Bang Bang Bang. Bang fifteen rounds. I shot four times a then. Fill the bullets right away. It was like a bee sting. At first I ran to the door. And everybody's just kinda screaming. Someone got shot county nine. One one need an ambulance. Please hurry up somebody. Fires shots nine ten gunshots from A. You need someone here. Okay for one split second. I was like this might be a charter. Get UNDER A car. Then I realized just keep moving in fact. Just keep moving thank discontinued shoe dead myself. Thank could make you. The children are okay. Please forgive myself. I thought it was like maybe like your acts or something like hit the siding and that's when I like checked out the window I saw a car is speeding off When he pulled off I figured it was okay. To call out in are just started. Screaming are the kids advocate. Okay and then I heard a woman she wanted to know. Better kids go here then. I heard more voices. Bunch of people dislike came out and started like helping her in like are. Okay okay. I just kept telling him. I wasn't going to respond to any of their questions until I knew that the kids were OK. Okay please don't move. I've never met her. This was the first time. And it's the wrong way to meet your neighbors saw. She's very lucky. And those kids are very lucky to physically blocked some of those bullets from where those kids were going. You took those bullets with your own body to protect them daily and one of those children. I don't think I could be your child. Who's in her life? But I do it all over again how you doubt for how dispatchers fielding those panic calls from the meadows are now starting to see similarities between those calls and the call made by Matt Mellon just an hour earlier about that erratic driving both of these reports are of a man driving a super suv with a dog in the back and he's driving radically crazy but the vehicles are similar. Though with a dog the nine one one dispatcher is called Matt Millen bag high. Could you call earlier about the Uber? Driver me up from my house? You know. We're trying to get involved in another bad. Okay I I haven't named from Uber. Kate Them I did send her a picture. I remember that Of Him because they took a screen shot of his of lubar profile and send it to her with this name. It appears that there was a missed opportunity. In this case where law enforcement may be could have stepped to uber early on to identify and locate Jason. But for now Jason is still on the road. Tiana is raised to the hospital in serious condition. I remember just being any nine. Consciousness variable. Are those bullets fractured? Both of Tiana's legs her left arm and another bullet actually entered her liver. Where it still is. When you feel something moving your body As a woman you remember your baby growing inside of you and that's supposed to be a great feeling bullet traveling in your body list. Not Whatever would imagine that I would have to go. I remember being so angry because I kind of walk. You know I was a child at all over again in the newsroom. You're always listening to the scanners. You're always monitoring the scanners one thirty three seven nine. Just the advice currently taking a hall of one individual Shot High. That does drive. It male down. She's been shot several times their report shooting the initial shooting involving. Tian or others for didn't hear anymore. So that pretty much went by unreported odd during his getaway ultimately strikes a nearby. Raja Web Lady Sites Ripe Socar headed North with my wife. We were going to a place to pick up some ice cream. He came out of nowhere he just came out behind the other cars over. Parkway that red light then depending county nine one one. Oh I need an officer to come out. I would just involve an accident where a guy ran. A red light and elections. Equinox was still operable but it has some very obvious front end damage to it would have been easy especially for police officer to identify if there had been a bullet on the news that we're looking for a silver equinoxes front end damage. It was very unique. You wanted to switch cars at this point. Jason called his wife and asked her to meet him at his parents home. He gave her a God. Said Not GonNa tell you what I'm going to do but when you watch the eleven o'clock news tonight you'll know that it was. After Jason Dalton shocked Janaka others then sped off driving radically sideswiped a car and then went and met his wife at his parents house. His parents spend time Outta state. They weren't home at the time he started having a conversation with his wife which she thinks is very strange completely out of character for him he told a story to explain. The damage to their vehicles told her that he was shot. At by CABDRIVER. I made some statement and they don't like Uber Drivers. He went not look her in the eye. He refused to look for an active paranoid. He went into the House retrieved a Taurus handgun in tucked in her waist. Band said you need to. You need to keep this on you. He also told her just to stay with the kids and not to leave the house. He said you can't go to work on Monday. Can't take the kids to school on Monday? Totally out of character for him and she was the wilder she didn't know what was going on or why he was talking about. She had never seen anything like that from him. He said I'm not gonNa tell you what I'm GonNa do but when you watch the eleven o'clock news tonight you'll know that it was me. I don't know that there was anything that she could ever should've done in that moment looking back at it now it. That's the place where you say. I wish she would have done something different. And then he left originally. There was a Humvee at the home that he wanted to take. However when car wouldn't start. He took a different car. That belonged to his parents at dark-colored Chevy hr in this dark colored hr so now the person they were looking for who was involved in shooting in this silver equinoxes was in that car anymore. Switches Gums God? Other seen didn't work took back Glock Model Mateen left on his work bench and Brad. The baltar nine millimeter and went back out. He took so he's already shot this woman he doesn't even know if she's alive. You probably assume she's dead and these picking up people and dropping people off. Just think about that. Some of these writers said really the only thing that was unique about their ride was. They're keeping an eye out for a silver equinox. Here comes a guy in a dark. Hr and he said Oh. Yeah I'm Jason. I'm the guy you're looking for. Sorry had car trouble something like that and they get in the car. One passenger said that he was listening to the radio sending long being one of those people Matt Hooper. Can you imagine without would have been like for them? I can't I can't even. It's just something that you would in a million years thing and all around Kalamazoo unsuspecting families have no idea what Jason Belton is up to or that he could pose a danger to the community. We're talking about families like the smiths were about to have their own encounter with Dalton at local car dealership when you think of people who live in Kalamazoo County you think of the Smith family. Mom Laurie Dad. Bridge Son Tyler daughter. Emily close-knit very tight family branch. The life of the Party my brother and my dad third personalities were identical. They were super close seventeen. He was a soccer player. Very carefree attitude thought that nothing could touch him. When I first met Alexis his first true love. They were just inseparable. I told him I said Tyler. Don't you dare break her heart? She is a sweet girl he realized. Yeah you're right. Tyler and rich Smith were headed to the KIA dealership to look at treks. My brother wanted to have a vehicle that he could take up on the dunes. I was out with friends and my phone battery had died by ended up getting sick and not feeling well and so I went home and I went to bed when rich and tyler went to car lot to look at trucks. His girlfriend Alexis stayed in the car in the back seat. Rich and tyler. I started looking at the trucks. That tyler had been looking at and wanted to show them. Can you imagine being a seventeen year old and going to a car lot with your dad and that excitement in how happy they were? What an exciting time. This was for them. Jason Dalton has just dropped off some passengers when he spots a father and son checking out some trucks and he goes on them and starts heading their way nine one one commercial one business ninety four we passed the Kia dealership and we just passed with somebody shooting a gun at two people lying on the ground. It's been about four and a half hours since Jason Dalton Shanty carruthers and at this point. He's actually been thinking of other passengers. Switches cars switches. Gunson meets with his wife and now he's pulling to a local car dealership used car. Lots in the car are that. It's a very busy intersection and is a pretty popular dealership. It's considered a safe area in Kalamazoo and Tyler was gone out looking at trucks during the day and then he was going to go back and show rich them. We hated dealing with car salesman so we always went after hours. Richard and Tyler Smith Sealy for stadium drive under a bright light looking at Ford F. One fifty pickup truck. It's this electric blue color. Kitschy our attention. As you're driving by there with Tyler's girlfriend Alexis Cornish. Who's sitting in the CAR team out taxes? Cold outside Tyler in Richard. Looking at the trucks when Jason Dotson pulls up chasing gets out of the car. This is different from the other seeds. He walked up to Tyler. Instead of what they were looking at turned around and relate the blue trim go Hi We just drove by the KIA. What what what are we on ninety four business on a guy just shot in the parking lot Jason Doll walked up to them and then started to shoot and shoot and shoot round after round after round and tell each other each of them sixteen shell casings on the scene. One shot nine times. One Shot Seven Times Doc. By the so he can look at me. That's the most terrifying thing in my mind. Alexis Korner's hiding in the back seat of a car wondering how many seconds she had left in her life. The Range Rover parked headlights on sitting there. Jason Dalton is just steps away from Alexis human. Hit THE BLACK MEDICAL. Hugh went to try and open the door to that they call. It was locked. He turned around. She didn't have a cell phone so just think what her glowing. Screen have called attention to Jason. Her life spared. That out of the car looked around see if I could see shadows wanting grab talent shone out of his pocket in called emergency in your daddy's got shot the first auto group on the ground. Yes okay fan the phone gotta get officers out okay. I'm an apartment complex literally less than a half mile away across the street from the scene from Auburn Lights on a win over and the The person that was shooting knows. I just turned. 'cause we heard gunshot could see the smoke from in gone and here it is. We drove by where we have several officers on the way. Okay one tweets officers just pulling in my head. I'm midst preparing myself for a real shooting. Possibly suspect still their it. New move onto checking for. There's any sites life checking pulses. Obviously still keep in mind. You may be suspect in the area and I'm by myself at that point. You know sometimes when you buy yourself it feels like forever. After I identify the victims were deceased. I saw female unfold in the backseat. He okay where eighteen and okay so you ran off down. Won't be viewable arrange over vehicle vehicle director behind the KEA building. When officers arrived female was patted down for weapons. A Lotta Times callers suspects. We treated everyone as a potential danger. Very very calm but she wasn't panicking but she was inside the building. Jason Dolton is just shot carruthers. He is also just murdered in cold blood. This father and son Tyler Enrich Smith now. He's back out there on the loose. No one knows raise headed to the dealership prideful to go to Canada. I was probably the fourth or fifth officer on scene here. I knew that my job when I got here was the dog out and now we're told that he left on foot so my job was to track him around. The building was an easy for your dog. Boaty to pick up the scent. Yeah actually was we. We locked onto the relatively quickly The order was still fresh and was not hasn't been that long since the crime had occurred. Lead you we track. Basically from where the victims were found. We're right past the KIA dealership. The track ended their consumed. He got into a vehicle and being able to take your son to a car. Live and dream about what could be when I think about that and what happened. It's really unbearable to think about the police officer got there. And so he's like I'm sorry man by your husband and your son were shot. And they didn't make and then I screamed and then I had Saddam Isis. My twin sister I said you know the father and son that were shot at Sealy and she just started freaking out. Then she's like no no it's not. It was incredibly cold blooded at father and a son shot a teenage girl hiding in the car and fifteen minutes later. A call comes in multiple at the cracker barrel parking lot. It was a madhouse. People were terrified. Kalamazoo is a city with low cry and so imagine as this crime spree went on and on police. Were just overwhelmed. Move Tera must've been enhanced because at first everybody was looking for Silver Chevy Equinox Greg that it's a chevy. Hr completely different vehicles. Please say that. They didn't know that the scenes were connected at people were picked. What is going on in Kalamazoo County when the big question? Everybody wants to know is why what could possibly explain this. He starts talking about the devil and red black and then he said something. You've not going to believe took over. Cinderella deactivates Zuber. That's when the horror begins all of a sudden you hear power power. The alleged gunman is an uber driver from being a normal man. No criminal history to killing all of these people in one night thinking. Let's get another shooting just not going to tell you what I'm GonNa do. Watch the eleven o'clock news tonight. You'll know that it was literally took on her body over. I just talent booker. Devil head the Devil Ted. How is that not madness? It's been about five hours of terror in Kalamazoo. Jason Dalton has shot a young mother. She's fighting for her life. He's murdered a father and his son just minutes later. Five more people are shot. Kim County nine one. One I'm at Kalamazoo CAC around. There's been gunshots car. Okay hold get anybody could have been shot up. I had just lay down in bed when my cell phone went off that we had quadruple homicide though bill and saw two male subjects waving me down trying to get my engineer went over to to park vehicles which ended up being the two victims vehicles hurt. This is the third shooting that day and it's a tragic ending to what it started out as an ordinary night for a group of old friends. Mary Lou Nine Mary Jo Nye. Judie Brown Barbara. Hawthorne and a little girl who considered Barbara Her grandmother Abby cough had gone to a live performance at a theatre abbey was around a lot of older women to hang out with barb and all her friends she was adopted. Bake Bar Gremlin Barber taker car games or tour sewing class or whatever Barbara. Hawthorne was a retired worker from Kellogg's the cereal maker Mary Jo. Nye was a schoolteacher and her sister in Law Mary Lou. Ni- WHO's retired employees from Linda? Department of motor vehicles in Michigan. My wife May Heckman Apple Pie. Nobody's ever may want better. As far as I'm concerned. Judy Brown was a caregiver for senior citizens she took care of older people met at cracker barrel. Dinner took one car and my wife didn't like drive anymore chair too so after having a wonderful time together the women and abby returned to the cracker barrel parking lot Mary Lou. Nye was in her Van. The other women in the girl. Abby were in the Car Jason Dalton drives up and opens fire on Mary Lou. Ni- in Her van. The women respond. You know are hysterical. And then that's when he opened fire on the other car shooting all of them. So you go up to the cars and I saw one victim in the driver's seat of the minivan and then I saw I saw three subjects in the sedan. Thank you heard Barbara talking to dispatch on the phone so ran around the right side only Information Cape as so trooper. Dna as talking to Barbara in the back right. He's trying to help her out. Guess what point do you notice that there? Is something actually living alive in the front seat? Sergeant Nielsen comes up and we both happen to look at the same time and seeing there was something moving. He opens the door and sees abby in the Floorboard of the car. We see that she has an obvious gunshot wound to the head. We knew that we needed to try to stop the bleeding and try to preserve as much as we could. We could packager up so that when the ambulance got here that we could get hurt on their way to the hospital. I believe we are on the first ambulance Got Her out of there right away. Pay Barbara was still talking with us. Jesse tried to help herself. Out of the vehicle She was actually still conscious and talking when ambulance staff. Probably my aunt called me. She asked me if I heard from Barbara Abbey and I said No. I've tried calling on that. I haven't and she said of all those crazy out income zueschen shooting spree my heart song because I kept texting them. There is no response. Kept calling her cell phone messages. I've tried calling my sister cell phone and of course on both on the I was getting just fake voicemail. We had cell phones from all of the and like we always do. It removed them and set them on the roof of the car. And I still remember to this day. All seem like they were ringing at the same time you got. The black dirt flew surveillance video from both the cracker barrel and that car dealership show that the shooter is driving an HR. What police don't know is that he is the same person who was called in the Radic Uber driver in the Silver Chevy Equinox and Jason continues to go on and Dr Zuber and pick up passengers throughout the night the house rain and it was about an outward midnight but she subtler from Bronze Mother did. She said I'm trying to find the parents of Abigail. That is our mother. I said what's happening. What's going on. And that's when she told me she was shot in the Hatton. Her comment was that you need to get up here some. It's possible because she's going to make it through the night breaking news coming in out of Kalamazoo County right now after the shooting at the cracker barrel that when the live news coverage begins as people try to figure out what's going on please have responded to reports of a shooting here at the cracker barrel. Currently we have three here in to being treated for life threatening injuries at Bronson as I was falling asleep. I saw that there was a shooting them within the half an hour. We got a phone call. They said come down we have Barbara at the hospital. We need you come down by the half hour drive randwick. Almost every red light made it towards the hospital and they had the hospital walk down. That was already such a random series of events. How do you know that this shooter? If you live in that area isn't gonNA show up in your street on your street and start shooting at you. Two people were afraid they want loving people and I. I was called down here to see my aunt. Can you tell me what she's here for? And they said well she's been shot and there was no. There's no story in my head that would lead to aunt Barbara ever getting shot. They walked us up to this room in the Icu that's what. I saw happy for it. I think COUPLA hours later she tried to do that was worth it to see the letter. Go though it was meant to be. It was meant to be the appointment sort of household bananas and I loved her. So everybody can hit me on. This is normal as if you can hear me. I said give me a sign and she squeezed me part very tense situation in Kalamazoo County. Multiple people have been shot and killed search. Definitely a serial killer. We have multiple crews on the scene. A white male in his fifties. At this point we know that there are multiple shootings. There are still questions. Is this one person. What's the connection between these women and the cracker barrel a father and son in a car dealership parking lot and a young mother and the parking lot of her condominium complex? Everyone was starting to really panicked. People were back what is going on in Kalamazoo County. We know. This is terrifying all police. That are possible to collect are on this tonight then. Fear and panic in the community is not at all unreasonable. Because what they don't know is at Jason. Dolton is back in his car and he's picking up passengers again. Their streets were just asked the public to be extra vigilant. Not Approaches individual Saturday night in Kalamazoo. People were out eating dinner at bars. Planning to take an uber and as this is going on shooting after shooting after incident poured starts to spread. My Dad said the guy was driving Chevy. Hr in the car said a Chevy Equinox. I Dunno know maybe I could be him but I always had this feeling now that I shouldn't get in the car. They didn't get into the car with it but other passengers did and they later told the media that not only did they ride with Jason Dalton but they asked him point blank if he was the shooter like half Harder League got him and said are you and he said no shirt. No I'm just tired. Scott actually sends said Hey. This isn't being chased arguing that the guy area and you kind of know would seem so unique about this red which is that. Jason Dalton seems to toggle between this murderous rage and just calmly driving passengers. There is even surveillance video that shows Jason Dalton dropping off riders at a hotel up the reason that law enforcement hasn't caught up. Jason Dalton hasn't yet made the connection between the rampage shooter in the Dark Age. Hr and the Radic Uber driver in the Silver Chevy folks. This was a cold blooded killer an active shooter that was on the loose thinking. It's going to be another shooting. Yeah that was their fear. We look for the suspect. White Male Aka. John signed the guys that were working for me to star monitoring the downtown district on any given night. There's hundreds of people out walking around. I would start checking the look into the Kalamazoo News and that's when I started reading about shooting cracker barrel said so many dead one person one injured. I was just hoping the Mary was one of those injured. Going to the show that night turned out to be the last outing for this group of friends. The four women were shot and killed turned on the Porch Light and sat in that chair until six o'clock in the morning or whatever it is. The state policeman showed up to give me the official news. A mother was shot and killed oil. Still trying not to believe and the doctor and it's just like the movies come in and say you know I hate to tell you this but your hands then. There's very surreal abby surrogate grandmother. Barb has just passed away and in that same hospital little. Abby is given up on life and her death is reported on live. Tv unfortunately the other female teenager fourteen years old has passed away as well. Unhook from living later received. They started hall and stuff out of the room. They put a blanket almost neck and that way. We started saying goodbyes. I I told her I heard something I told the nurse of I thought she had her feet others came over to check. During that at that point she was smacking buttons on people were Flying Badge in. They had her all back up again so it was actually in saying goodbye to her that you actually realize you still alive. And at that point I was holding his hand and I made everyb- you can hear me. So this is as give me a sign. And she scrapes. I knew right there. She was back and she was GonNa fight like Holy Hell. It has been eight hours of complete terror in Kalamazoo. Jason Dolton has killed six people to others clinging to life in area hospitals but with Dalton doesn't know is that now police are closing in on him. You start to patrol again around midnight. Things start to heat up. I contacted a friend of mine sergeant Harrison and Tim and I were talking and he says I think I heard radio traffic advising that. He's showing a black. Hr that just left on the bars downtown. Sound like they're right at me and within minutes I saw the black. Hr coming towards me and followed by hairs believe he was the eighth or ninth Black Chevy. Hr We'd stopped the vehicle turned onto ransom street which plant curse. I excite him and activated when he came to a stop he just fat vehicle okay boating and I got up behind Sergeant Harrison. We got up to the side. In case for some reason he decided to flee foot. You had no idea whether or not he would start opening fire on you absolutely not. We just assume police were expecting the worst next year. So we're side by side windows down trading post in contact with the driver. You got him on the card. He said that the Friskin gone. He's caught in the Chevy Chase. The gun that killed the people at the cracker barrel and Sealy in his pocket. Replace Dan and I found a bullet was pockets surrendered to them peacefully. I can't believe then he didn't want to go at it. We're talking with Dr. Then we put them in a patrol car. Jason Dolton is now headed interrogation. These detectives probably heard everything. But not this those who over was like he was up Jason Dalton now sitting in this squad car arrested after this shooting spree. And he's headed to the first of two police interogations been served budget per protocol search. They are trying to figure out why is happening. What was the motive Jason Act? Okay how does he react to you? He was very soft spoken very average. Jason Dalton's demeanour was docile. I would say passive. What would you like to do right now? The real key and getting people to talk to you is getting them to feel comfortable. And the police start with very mundane nice approach. Get him talking. You See. We'll see you soon to be over or human thank you. We try to then hysterically beginning of his day. I Ain't going on in twenty four hours the aggressive at all. He just chose not to answer some of our questions. He keeps pleading the fifth. I don't WanNa talk about it. I don't WanNa give you particulars. What would you like to talk about? But as time goes on he becomes more comfortable once. He starts to finally given scare specifics of what happened that day. He started talking about this moment. He had his first passenger of the day Matt Melon. Once he has Mellon in the car he starts driving erratically. Mister Melon obviously is getting extremely upset. A celery I'll the what Hill Carter hit. Each detail is important because it's another piece of the puzzle in this entire crime where you have multiple crime scenes in turn the car and then you got a apartment complex and came across a black female. I know why are you assume is how you survive? Would so bizarre about this interrogation is that it seems that Dalton is marveling at his own handiwork and there was absolutely no emotion there was no fluctuations voice rush as he goes on he reveals details that we did not know previously such as when he approached Mary Lou. Ni- at the cracker barrel parking lot. Excuse me Yeah Berdon. Person Burst Voice. Change his voice changed drastically. Shallow girl felt badly for the child in the family of a child but he didn't express any remorse for anybody else. This that's the part. He said that he's not a killer but he knows he's killed. During the course of the interrogation police spent a lot of time trying to get Dalton to explain to them why he chose these particular victims but Dalton said it was all random connection between all you can actually for you. We just kept asking him why what happened. What what happened in your life to make you do this third. Finally after a long pause you had quite the response. My name is Harry Campbell and I'm the founder of the rideshare. It's a blog podcast and YouTube channel for Buber Uber and lift drivers. I've heard a lot of stories from people out on the road but never anything as crazy as what Jason Dalton told. The police retail obviously goal of these detectives is to get to motivation. What drove Jason Dolphin to commit these crimes? The one thing that no one in this entire country will ever forget is a killer who says he was motivated by an UBER APP but it literally over and it made no sense to anyone that the uber APP would take over him and force him to go on this shooting spree. This is the APP as it looked in two thousand sixteen. Jason Nelson was driving for Uber. Driver right yes. He remembers seeing the symbol of the eastern star. And that started this whole thing eastern starlight Masonic Jason Golden Talks about the eastern star. Yup I mean could this has been the eastern star Hexagon. The minute is Axa. This part I think really looks like part of the eastern star. These are trying goals. But I think it's kind of mind games where you see what you want. See what with some I? I just found the devil head. Sorta like four or cowhand urged that. That's where on believable. Nobody believed Jason talked about seeing a devil somewhere. You have any idea what he was talking about. So this is actually the Uber logo at the time on the passenger out to me. It looks like you but I think Jason Dalton and may have been the devil horns right here at the top Jason's not the first person that come up with this totally absurd justification for killing someone that was scooter thing when it takes you over. Usually as a story went on about what he said happened. He said the UBER APP changed from red to black and that he got an assignment so it was like he was a puppet read. When I first started took the really has control. What's he talking about? I'm not really sure? Yeah I mean the only thing I can think of when he said that is the surge pricing and whenever their search pricing? You're GONNA see large swath of red on the driver. It looks like most of the screen is read as you can see in the APP. I mean there's not much black. There are a couple times where there's going to be a little more black on the screens is what a ride request. Looks like this point. There's a lot more black on the screen. I wasn't believing any of it. But if it's something that's GonNa make him talk. You're not gonNA WANNA shut down due breaks the phone. I understand what those saying. Hi I believe that when Dane means yes to being seen so when you get a request from passenger you hear a dinghy no one or two ways. It'll keep digging for ten or twelve seconds unless you screen to accept the ride. He said he was hearing. These sounds coming from the phone and he said that was reason why he did not shoot the police officers pull over eighteen. It was weird. He says the APP went from being black. Back to being read from lack. It was back I had life is making it up as he was going on. How do you go from being a normal man? No criminal history to killing all of these people in one night. I remember both his mom and dad just crying saying we just spend Christmas with many misfire or many people. Most of us. I suppose have some coma subtle idea. We obviously don't act on D. Get from thinking about that too actually doing that. There's usually some event some trigger. Digest Dalton have merit trouble not that we're did Jason Dalton. Have any no emotional trouble not that we were not criminal record. Jerem financial problems now that we know was extremist of any kind. There's no evidence in my view. There's nothing obvious to sort of that stands out. Can you really sit here and say what caused station to do that? And I think the answer is we just so is using the excuse as an Uber App away to be thinking. Helen Insanity Defense Uber App. Was He that smart and I think the detectives also thought that that this guy is keen. The ball up of I'm not in my right mind and I might be able to get out of this. That's the problem is. He's so rational throughout the entire interview. He's basically blows his cover store for Jason. The next step is facing a judge in court victims. GonNa have to figure out how to move on. And she walked in and tip shed this untouched. It and she said people were heartbroken over. And if you help us. They felt helpless so they could do was mobilize community one of the survivors of fourteen year. Old Girl Abigail cough still days after the shooting. There was very little hope that she was going to survive. She had plate put into her head because her skull was blown apart. There were so many ups and downs her recovery. But then here's this'll key wave doing rehabilitation at the Mary. Free bed hospital and we see her lying in her hospital bed with that smile and then seeing the images of her learning to walk again good job she was shot in the head and this little girl refused to up things died and my mom was a basket case. She set my bed the whole eight days five days however long every. She sat there waiting for me smile when she saw you open. Your eyes again. Is it happy motive? I remember crying happy tears and then a couple of weeks later I said what happened to me in. The doctor said don't trigger. How'd it and she walked in and said done your shot and I liked this untouched. Patrick in the bullet shattered my skull. She cried and she didn't say anything at that point a couple of hours later. She'd asked me again. What happened to me because she can remember Jane? Did you have to go through the same reaction of her? Yes absorbing crying in each time are your memories from before the shooting foggy. Yes especially my past younger. That's gone gone. I asked about environment. I find that she was shot. I almost lost it. I did lose it. What's your last memory of being with her? Hugs shed the bugs in the best lab. If it wasn't for her I wouldn't be here. I miss her unconditionally every single day. Have you watched any of the news with seen Jason Golden Kiss Standing? Sometimes I like to trade places with him where he could add wind and I could be normal but not in jail. The first time I was one client I wasn't ready. It was an early hearing all the emotions. Were still very raw to everyone. From the moment he sat down and I I was just a few feet from at the time you could tell there was something not right about him. Miss carruthers was afraid. She was going to walk into a courtroom and face. A man who had shot fifteen rounds at her who had changed her life forever. Please the court call for others trying to prepare myself and to to those you know you have to do the. I was the only one who really talked to this man and if I was GonNa play him away then I needed to step up to and I was like he has no control. He had to control at that time. Then what happened? I've seen coming in at a solid car. O bags the people they have. These black fans are gave black black people and you get real people then. That's who you're turning 'cause you received Okay do we need to take a minute says it took to took me? Right back? Town became obvious that he was at the very least trying to emotionally terrorize a witness and barry properly very quickly. The deputies moved in was talking about some obscure things like black plastic bags in the old people. And it seems these ramblings of a madman it seems awfully convenient right if you put them in a situation where now he can say some nonsense. That doesn't make any sense and that will support this idea that something's going on until he exploded the moment. I think so I agree for someone to have lived a completely normal life for forty plus years and then one day do everything that is counter to what normal same people do. How is that not madness? Whether or not. It's an act of madness or act. The same person is different. From the legal standard of what makes you criminally responsible for your actions. The fact that he changed cars the fact that he changed guns the fact that he put on a bulletproof vest that shows that he knew what he was doing that shows that he knew his actions were wrong. There is no other way of defending this case other than for him to make up some story about mental Elman's. He has zero history of mental illness. This isn't how mental illness works. That you have a sudden onset. Where at five o'clock in the afternoon on Saturday February twentieth you become overwhelmingly mentally ill and unable to control your actions and then it turns off at midnight and you surrender to the police and it never happens again. That's not how this works as the trial date do near there is anxiousness. Is Justice going to be served then the prosecutors get a call that no one was expecting a shock to everybody this for quite a while as the Child. Eight do near anxiousness. What's going to happen. So Action Begins Tomorrow in the murder. Trial Jason Dalton. This trial is about to start and then suddenly what everybody had been expecting. Jason Dalton is going to somehow try to plead insanity goes away. Figures influence These last few days by his family. Jason a phone call with his mother where he told her. It was going dead over there. Stop it I was surprised and a little bit shocked because I was getting Oliver Material. Ready to go to trial and I gotta text from the Prosecutor's office. Doing this voluntarily wanted this for quite a while but he plea guilty we did not expect a guilty plea from Jason Donald Matt Day. He goes psychological professionals head examined. Mr Dalton and did not find that he met the legal standards interesting. Some Jason Dalton might still think that he had been controlled by the devil hoover APP however his attorney said that's not GonNa hold up in court because nobody believes that certainly possible you Jason Bryan Daulton sentenced to cured of life in prison without the possibility of parole. I reported on lots of horrible things. But this is what the sequence of events and these families and these victims. It'll stay with me forever. I've lost the woman I've been married for forty one years and I lost my little sister. You are nothing but a pile of worthless evil worthless where you mad walks to shoot them over and over and over again until they don't move. I've tried to hit you. I've tried to. Hey you applause replay and relive every single moment. You try to kill us off you failed. I'm standing here right here in your face in front of you. How does it make you feel that we give me to make you feel me? Please got into Berkeley. Where are the answers? We know there are victims. We know an Uber. App is blamed but it is frustrating. Why did this happen? We may never know what we do know is that Dalton says it all started with an Uber tells. Abc safety is a priority now. When you're taking an uber you can reach nine. One one directly through the APP Uber tells us it now has would. It calls a critical safety response line. It's a phone number that allows a user to directly reach goober in case of emergency but it only launched this feature two years after the shooting. Could it be easier? If if there were reason they wouldn't even feel better. I don't understand why me why you mean why had become barb. We Wilton deserving. She always wanted to go on a hot air balloon ride so I took her ashes to Sedona and when a hot air balloon and left her out there in the desert. So she's right where she wanted to be. We always believe that she's GonNa me. We may discuss what to do when I died. We never really can't believe what I would do. I don't WanNa go grocery shopping because I ended up picking up things for getting. They're not here and so it was just painful. Don't want them to be remembered by. Oh that's the people that got killed by the Uber driver. I want them to remember. Oh those are the two loving caring compassionate people were taken way too soon. Him Donna me down. It doesn't define a stronger than I ever could imagine they say Kalamazoo strong. This is a community. You can knock us down. But we're GONNA get right back to this country's filled with anxiety and questions other math really effective in particular from the corona virus as corona virus continues its relentless spread across the country. We WanNA help and give you the latest information. I'm Aaron Katersky from news and I'm hosting a new podcast called Cova. Nineteen what you need to know. Surface cleaning does work each week day. We call on our chief. Medical correspondent Dr Jennifer Ashton and other experts to respond directly to. What's on your mind about this virus? It's Cova nineteen what you need to know a new series weekday afternoons on your favorite podcast APP. See Headlines Across your screen all day. But you're busy. What do you need to know? What's actually shaping your world. I'm Brad Milkey from ABC News. And every morning we start here. It was extraordinary for US watching here in. Singapore this is ABC News daily. Podcast a handful of stories just twenty minutes director Comey thanks for being with US. Newsmakers smart reporting taking straight to the heart of the story. Starting here to listen for free on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP.

Jason Dalton Jason Kalamazoo Kalamazoo Michigan Kalamazoo County Chevy Jason Dalton Shanty carruthers officer Matt Mellon Jason Doll Matt Jason Golden Jason Dolton Equinox Matt Millen Abby cough Tiana carruthers Judie Brown Barbara Mary Lou Nine Mary Jo Nye
Why Some Things & People Become Popular & How to Use Logic Effectively

Something You Should Know

52:32 min | 2 years ago

Why Some Things & People Become Popular & How to Use Logic Effectively

"Today on something you should know, is it okay to cook with hot tap water? The simple answer is no. And explain why then why do things catch on and become popular? One reason is something called social currency. For example, a couple years ago beyond say, came out with a new album, no advertising and just put it online because she knew that her followers want to be the first person to tell their friends. If you know about something before everyone else does makes you special in the know and so you pass it on the sofa currency plus. How often should you change your oil? The answer is nothing close to every three thousand miles and Mr. Spock on Star Trek struggled with logic and emotions are they incompatible with each other, no logic and emotions aunts in a strict each other. And I think it's very dangerous to believe that if you are emotional than your definitely not being logical all this today on something you should know. Hi, I'm Christy Carruthers. Mike's wife here to talk to you about Madison Reed hair-color. I've always gone to a professional salon to have my hair color, but as you know, it can cost a lot and eat up a lot of time. So I was up for trying Madison Reed. I've heard a lot of good things about it. So why not? Now this isn't like buying a bottle at the drugstore and just squirting and on your hair. It takes a little time in a few steps, but I'm telling you the results are fantastic. This is real salon-quality hair-color without the time and expense of going to us law n- I love it and it's all done with ammonia free products. You can feel good about. Imagine you can experience beautiful multidimensional hair-color made in Italy delivered to your door for under twenty five dollars. Hundreds of thousands of women have tried and loved Madison Reed, and I'm sure you will too, and because you're somethingyoushouldknow listener, you'll get ten percent off plus free shipping on your first color kit with the promo code something. Madison dash Reed dot com promo code something and Mike put that link in the show notes for you too. Somethingyoushouldknow fascinating Intel, the world's top and practical advice you can use in your life today. Something you should know Mike Carruthers. So here's a big deal on Monday of this week. We for the first time ever in the history of this podcast, which is a little over two years old. Now, we hit one million downloads one million listeners for the preceding thirty days. That's a big deal given when we started, we were lucky to have one hundred listeners in the preceding thirty days. So since you are now listening to this episode of this podcast, you are part of the reason we hit that million download milestone and for that sincere. Thank you first up today. Have you ever been in the kitchen, ready to cook pasta and thought? Well, one way to speed up this process is to start with hot tap water because then the water will boil faster since it's already hot out of the tap. Well, that turns out to be a pretty bad idea according to the EPA, the heat in tap water can actually dissolve toxic. Well, in the plumbing, exposing you to lead and exposure to lead can cause all kinds of health problems. Now, lead is rarely found in source water, but it can enter the water through corroded plumbing. The says that older homes are more likely to have lead pipes and fixtures, but even newer, plumbing advertised as lead-free can still contain as much as eight percent lead. So the best advice is to turn on the tap and let it run for a bit. If it's been offer several hours after the pipes have been flushed out, you're good to go, but stick with cold water for drinking and cooking and only use hot water for washing, and that is something you should know. Have you ever wondered why some things catch on white is one restaurant become really popular while the one across the street fails. Why does one book hit the bestseller list when millions of other good books don't? Why cat videos go viral. White is movies and TV shows become big blockbusters and others don't. Of course, quality is a factor, but there's a lot more going on here. Jona burger set out to find out why things catch on. Jona is a professor at the warden school at the university of Pennsylvania, and he is author of a book called contagious why things catch on. Joan welcome. Thanks so much for having me. So it may not be possible to answer this because that's why you wrote a whole book to answer this question, but is there sort of a nutshell answer as to why things catch on? You know, we say safe things catch on all areas of our lives after. From new products at the grocery store movies at the multiplex books, television shows lots of different things catch on ideas, viral videos. But when we try to understand why we often think it's random, it's lock, it's chance, but it turns out there's a science behind it. Actually, we understand the drivers of word of mouth of why people talking share. That's a huge reason why things catch on and explains all sorts of products and ideas and behaviors across a range of domains. So talk about some interesting things that we might know of that that have caught on and how they caught on and and how in retrospect it worked and maybe what the takeaway is from the one of my favorites is this hot dog restaurant in New York City. So it's a place called Kristoff. You walk down a flight of stairs into this sort of subterranean hot dog restaurant as dozens of of different hot dogs from a New York style water dog with traditional, you know, just catch up and mustard hotdogs, United pineapple. They have a hot dog with bacon and eggs and. Geez, it's sort of like a breakfast, hotdogs, every hot dog you can imagine and tucked in the corner is this little phone booth. And if you have a minute, you walk inside this phone was quite small, but on the wall, there's a little rotary dial phone. And if you stick your finger in the phone, you dial around or circle like we used to many years ago and you pick up the receiver. Something really interesting happens. Someone else picks up the other line and they ask you whether you have reservation and what I love about this terrorism reservation on a phone booth inside of a hot dog restaurant, what can I possibly have a reservation for? But if you're lucky and they happen to have space or friend of yours made a reservation, the back of that phone was open, you'll be led into a secret bar called, please don't tell now, please don't tell is really neat. They've never advertised at every day. They're full three PM phone lines, open up by three thirty. All the seats are gone. You have to read. I'll again and again, and again, trying to get through and it's not like a competition right. There are dozens of other bars offering great drinks in New York City. So what led this bar to become so popular and. If you look at it, they did something really interesting. They made themselves a secret thing about the last time someone told you something and they told you not to tell anyone else, and if you think about it, what's the first thing you then did with that information? And if you're like most people, you probably told them what else? Because having access to information that not of else has makes you look smart and makes you look in the know it gives you what I'll call social currency, like the car we drive and just like the clothes we wear, the things we talk about and the things we share affect how other people see us. And so one reason people talk about something they share it is because it makes them look good or flex positively on them. So the basis for the popularity of this restaurant is that people tell people, and the reason they do is because it makes them look good. They're in the know about this secret place that nobody knows about. So they tell people about the secret and makes them look definitely an and this idea of social currency happens. All the time. You know, parents brag about their kids SAT scores. You know, people take selfies with celebrities that they see or pictures of themselves online on vacation. We love to make ourselves look good. We love to share things. We pick the stuff from our lives that make us look good rather than bad. But what's really need about that as it leads, things that make the shared a look good to be more likely to to catch on a couple years ago. Beyond sake came out with a new album, no advertising. She just put online because she knew that her followers want to be the first person to tell their friends that there was no out. Now, if you know about something before everyone else does, it makes you smart makes special makes you look in the know and so you pass it on to get that social currency, you know, listening to you, it sounds as if these are kind of quirky ways that things catch on that are kind of below the radar. Do things ever catch on from a more conventional approach, traditional advertising, traditional marketing that we would think of or is it usually the stuff you're talking about? Word of mouth tends to be much more. Impactful than than advertising. Very nice research shows that a dollar spent on word of mouth goes ten times as far as a dollar spent on traditional advertising in their kind of two reasons why the I I think is is pretty intuitive and that is trust right? We tend not to trust ads because we know as trying to convince us of something. So if you think about shampoo ad, for example, there's always a man or a woman with short or long flowing hair. They use the shampoo and then they get an attractive spouse. You've never seen shampoo ad where the person doesn't get an attractive spouse. If it's -cation destination, the kids always look like they're having fun. If it's a restaurant, the food is always tasty, but because those organizations are trying to convince us because it's always good, always says the product, the service, the idea's great. We don't know whether to trust it or not, but our friends will tell to a straight, they'll say, hey, I, I love that restaurant or, hey, it wasn't really good or, hey, it was good for these type of people, but not these type of people. And so because that were much more likely to trust, our peers were much more like a trustworthy mouth, but the. Second really interesting aspect of word of mouth is, I think, is a little more nuanced and and that's the targeting benefit. If we think about it right as often tell us about things we're not interested in, right, you watch television. There's a lot of ads for things you're never going to buy. You might not need a new car. You might not be interested in a certain brand of shoes. You might never like traveling or not want to go to a particular destination, and so there are lots of ads it's sort of don't really fit your interest. Whereas word of mouth tends to be really targeted to you. Sure. We know some people that talk about themselves and blab on at a party about things that don't interest us. But for the most part, people tend to shape what they say based on us. If you don't have a kid, no one's going to tell you about a website for baby clothes. If you don't like spicy food. No one's gonna tell you about an Indian restaurant with really spicy curries though, pick stuff to tell you that they think fits with you and that's really the targeting benefit of of word of mouth. You know, it happened to me actually couple years ago. I got a book in the mail. Academics often get books from publishers. They send into us with the hopes that will assign them. Students, and they'll sell more copies in the process. But this time they didn't send us one book on me. One book they sent me two copies of the exact same book sitting there, my desk going, why the second copy somebody must have made a mistake. But there's a note in the back of the book said, hey, professor Berga we think you'll like this book. We think you'll also know someone else will like this book pass the second copy onto them. And that's really the targeting benefit of word of mouth because I went out there and figured out who might like that book. And and so because that word of mouth reaches more interested targets, much more likely to be impactful because we trust it and because it's more relevant to our own interests. Talk about emotion in how that that enters into this. We looked at a motion actually in a study did a number of years ago we were interested in what makes online content viral. So you know why to certain newspaper articles make the most emailed list. And so we worked at the New York Times. We got six months of articles, thousands of thousands of articles from their website, and we've done similar work with other newspapers and other online outlets, and we analyze them on a variety of different dimensions. Sure enough. You know, more interesting or surprising articles got shared, but then we looked at at emotion and we saw something quite interesting more emotional contents is more likely shared. But when you look at specific emotions, it's actually more complicated. You might think that people share positive things in a void sharing negative on. So you know, we talked about the fact that people like to share things that make them look good. You get promoted. You talk about it and you celebrity talk about it, but maybe get fired. You don't talk about it. If you're bummed out, you don't talk about it. And so we share positive things and avoid sharing negative ones. When we looked at the data, we saw some the interesting so sad things. People that made people more sad were were less like share more sad and article more sad video makes us the less likely to share it, but not all negative emotions were like that. We looked at anger or anxiety. Anger actually increase sharing even though angers negative emotion. It doesn't feel very good actually increases are like good of sharing. And so one question is, will what's different between anger and sadness, they're both negative emotions. Why does one decree sharing. And and one increases sharing. It turns out it's about the behavioral tendencies associated with these emotion. So think from it what you do when you're a sad versus what you do when you're angry when you're sad, you kind of power down a little bit, right? Yeah, you want to curl up in a ball or be alone or watch your favorite movie or kind of power down or angry. You're fired up. You wanna yell at someone. You wanna throw something you wanna take an action and it turns out that this action, this activating aspect of emotions, what's what's called physiological arousal actually drives a lot of sharing. It's not about whether motions are positive or negative. It's what they power us up or they power down. And so all sorts of high arousal emotions from negative ones like anger, anxiety to positive ones like humor and excitement and inspiration. All of those things drive us to share, where's these power down emotions, things like sadness or contentment lead us feel less likely to share. So often people say what? Why folks share funny videos on YouTube because it makes them laugh. And why do they share. Angry, political ranch because they're pissed off, but actually they're both exactly the same professor. Jona burger is my guest. He teaches at the Wharton school at the university of Pennsylvania, and he is author of the book contagious why things catch on. 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Go to take care of dot com and enter the promo code something that's twenty five percent off your first month of personalized care of vitamins. Go to take care of dot com and use the promo code something, and that Lincoln promo code is also in the show notes just now just before I recorded this, I finished using this great new app on my phone. It's hotel tonight. Here is why it is so cool and why you should get it on your phone right now. Hotel tonight, partners with unique tells to help them sell their unsold rooms, which means you get incredible deals. You see, Bouteine and independent hotels have a lot more flexible. Ability to discount than the big chains do. So you get incredible values at really great hotels. Now their name is hotel tonight, but you can actually book in advance as well as for tonight. And this is really cool. 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You should eat more of her here. Six tips to interview better. If you have a friend who's gone on important interview, we share this helpful information not just because it makes us look good, but because we wanna help other people be better off. There's this great example I talk about in the book of this viral video. They got ten million dollars net by itself is not surprising. Lots of videos, get millions of us. What is the prizing is the guy who made it is eighty years old and the videos about one of the least exciting things we can think of and that is corn. And so how does an eight year old make viral video about one of the least exciting things you could think of corn. And so it turns out he has a trick for eating corn better. When eat corn there, two issues, right one, it gets stuck in your teeth. He can't solve that one, but the second has was annoying. Thing is called silks along the side, right? Once you take off the husky can never get rid of all the silks. They stay on there and they're, they're sort of annoying. So he is trick for getting rid of them. It toss of your core, your of corn in the microwave for couple minutes. You take it out. You hold the hus-. You caught the bottom quarter inch off and out drops the hus- clean ears. Every time. Is this extremely remarkable? No. Is that either emotional? Definitely not, but what it is pure useful information. And so one of the reasons we share is not just because it makes us look good because it helps make others lives better. Well, I think everybody everybody can relate to that because we like we like to know something that we can share with someone else that they would find valuable. It just it makes us feel good. It certainly makes us feel good. And you know, I think what's interesting about the motivations behind sharing is some of the make a lot of sense. The ideally share things that help others out, make a lot of sense, but but triggers is one when I talk about it, that people go. I never would have thought of that before. And the idea very simply is sometimes. We don't talk about things that make us look good. We simply talk about things that are top of mind. So if I said peanut butter, for example, what word might you think of Joey jelly? Or if I said rum and you might think of coke coke? Yeah. So the first word is a trigger for the second makes us think about something even if it's if it's not there, and there was a great example this a couple years ago. So some of your listeners might remember the insurance company gyco had this ad about hump day with a camel in it, so annoying camel walk through an office going days today. What day is it every Nores him? He's a very annoying. Camel finally comes across this poor woman, and she goes, it's it's hump day, and the camel gets very excited. Woo and the ad says, you know how happier people save money was gyco happier than a camel on hump day. Now this video is a little bit funny, but it's not that funny. It's a little bit funny certainly yet. It's one of the most shared videos from a couple years ago, not a car ad, not a beer ad, but an insurance ad. And so what is so many people share a boring thing like an insurance at with you dig a little deeper. You see a really interesting pattern. There's a spike in shares, and then it goes down another spike, and then it goes down another spike and then it goes down. But if you look closer, the spikes aren't random. They're actually seven days apart. And if even close, you'll notice that there every Wednesday as it's colloquially known hump day. So this videos equally good or bad funny or not funny everyday of the week, but Wednesday, rolls around and provides a ready reminder, what psychologists might call a trigger to make people think about it and talk about it and share it. Because something top of mind, it's much more likely to be tip of Tom. And so we don't only share things. We like we share things because we're thinking about them often particularly face. Face conversation. We don't share the funniest. Most interesting thing that happened us. We share just whatever's top of mind because we don't want to sit there and silence we wanna fill in that conversational space. And so things that are top of mind or things that are cute by the environment are much more likely to be talked about. And so companies try to make their products top of mind which essentially is what advertising is to keep the name and the brand in front of the public. So they remember it, certainly. So there's a great example I talk about in the book about kit Kat. So great candy bar that many of us love and associate with maybe Halloween and so few years ago, you know, people still liked kit Kat. For some reason, they weren't buying it. Sales were down around thirty percent. Kit Kat was trying to figure out what to do. You know, we should talk about a delicious. It is what what should we do? And they ended up coming up with a really interesting strategy. They linked kit Kat to coffee at a bunch of radio campaigns. It said, you know, having a coffee break, have a kit Kat. Thinking about coffee about kit Kat coffee and kit Kat kit Kat in coffee, best friends forever. And if you think about it. Coffees a perfect trigger for kit cap, right? Not only is there a lot of alliteration, but people drink coffee lot, right? We drink drink coffee, multiple times of day millions of people trinket. And so by linking herself to a frequent trigger in the environment, you can come to mind fan and get people to talk about you more. And that's fact what happened with kit Kat right after this campaign sales up over fifty million dollars just because they link themselves to a reminder in that environment didn't change how much people liked kit Kat. They changed whether they thought about it or not. And I know one other thing you talk about his stories, the importance of telling a story rather than just telling people facts and figures because stories are more emotional. They're more personal when we wanna convince someone, we think about standing up straight speaking slowly and using lots of facts and figures swimming that that information will win the day. But information often goes in one ear now out, the other makes us seem credible, but cocaine, remember it, whereas people are much more. Likely to remember stories. So a good story goes a long way, but if you think about it, certain stories are more effective than others. A good story carries a message or idea along for the ride. It's almost like vessel or a carrier of information, right? If you think about the boy who cried wolf? Yes, it's an interesting story, but at the end you learn immoral, right? The moral is don't live bad. Things happens. If if you lie the lots of great stories have a moral, lots of religious text us stories to to communicate morals where ideas and and these are what I call a Trojan horse story. Yes, there's an engaging exterior, right? Yes, there's something that makes that story. Interesting. Otherwise, someone wouldn't tell it, but along the way, it brings an idea message of brand because too often people tell really engaging worries that they're funny. They make people laugh, but people can't remember the point right? If you can't remember the point of the story, it's not gonna help people change their behavior. It's not going to encourage people to do what you want them to do. And so when we think about being good, storytellers write stories are great way. Sell ideas. We just have to make sure they bring Armitage along with them. I couldn't really find a way to to work this into the discussion in the flow of word of mouth and what makes things contagious all. But part of what you talk about in the book that is word of mouth or the example that you give that fascinated me is why so many people who work in nail salons are Vietnamese, and and word of mouth is the reason why it's a fascinating story. And I don't know if it's true everywhere, but certainly here in California, a Ugo by any nail salon, and you look in the window and virtually everyone who works there looks Asian. And if you examine a little closer, you find out they are primarily from Vietnam and why that is is fascinating. So so explain that word of mouth shapes, everything shapes the products we buy. It shapes the that the nannies we hire the every. Thing in our lives including what jobs we get. And I was looking into writing this book contagious. I was looking around for interesting stories, and I came across this amazing thing that said, basically two thirds of not three fourths of of manicure Servian AMIS and and basically what happened is initially, there was a couple of people who were Vietnamese, they became managers. There's a famous story of Tippi Hedren a famous actress who kind of help them guess careers in that area. And then they told their friends who told their friends who told their friends who told their friends and suddenly now a whole industry is driven heavily by certain ethnic group, and this is true in in lots of areas of life, right? Word of mouth shapes almost everything we do. If we understand the science behind it, we have a lot better idea of why things popular. It's really interesting, Joan Burger's been my guest. He is a professor at the Wharton school at the university of Pennsylvania and his book which is enough for a and still sells very well because people really like this topic, the book is contagious. Why things catch on. There's a link to his book. In the show notes. Thanks for being here Jona. Awesome. When you're the member of team, any team how you communicate and collaborate with your other team members is crucial to your success. That's why glimp- is so important to know about when you use glib to communicate with your team, you and they perform better much better will sixty four percent of glib users deliver projects faster than before eight percent of glib users are more informed about their organizations. Projects. We use glib to communicate between our somethingyoushouldknow team here. When we schedule interviews or share other information or were working on new projects, it just helps us do our jobs better and you'll love this. 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On Star Trek part of what made Mr.. Spock an interesting character. A big part of it was that he was half Vulcan and half human vulcans are logical and without emotion and humans are full of emotions. The implication is that logic, any motion don't go together very well. That's why Mr. Spock was always in conflict, but is this really true? Can't you be logical and emotional and just how well do we use logic? What does it mean to be logical when you're talking about something? It's an interesting topic and here to discuss how you can understand and use logic better in your life is Eugenia Chang. She is the scientist in residence at the school of the Art Institute in Chicago. She has studied logic and is author of the book the art of logic in an illogical world Genia high. Have a male. So what does it mean to be logical? What is logic? I think that Knojic is a process of deducing things from other things that that really has to follow. And so it's not guest look, it's not evidence. It's not feelings. It's not opinions. It's things that really have to follow from each other and it set the the absolute central route of how must medics constructs arguments if this than that. That's right. Now we have to careful about that because in normal life, we say, if event in situations, aunts necessarily logical, for example, we might say, if you won't, my dog pay twenty dollars, which isn't a logical statement. It's a promise on. We could also make them as threat. Like if you don't eat, you'll broccoli than I'm going to put you in time out ten minutes. That's a threat that's not logic. And then there's also if you don't. If you missed two clauses menu will fail this cools, which is also not logic that's lose. And so it can be confusing because in normal life when quite as precise as we in mathematics, swooping I've always wondered about is, is logic science or is it art? Is it two plus two equals four? And that's how we make our argument, or is it all about interpretation and building a logical argument that supports your theory? Interesting question now. I don't need to draw boundary between science and art, and I think that we have constructed a lot of autism boundaries between subject areas between disciplines just to the probably Feburary critic reasons, but then not really that one of the things that I do as Santus in residence at the school of the ought instituted Chicago is I work to woods inundating the boundaries between sons and. What and showing the, yes, there are some things that really, really sons some things that really, really off. But at some point that Beryl parts of the same thing, which is that little trying to understand the world around us, and there are different ways of doing so. And my students annoy decided doing one interesting discussion close, we decided that science is sort of about understanding the world and that ought a selective about interpreting the world. But in order to top the world, you kind of need to understand it in order to understand it, you kind of need interpreted. So it's really two different slightly different emphases on the same idea, which is how can we make sense of the world around us? Maybe another way to ask the question. 'cause in in math in science, you know, if you have a formula than ex equal seven, it doesn't equal anything but seven, and there's only that way to get there in logic. Well, Soto's, but not necessarily because everything is always only true in context, and that's a really important thing in mathematics that xc seven. Maybe if you sold that question in one will numbers, but maybe in some other world of numbers. Excellent equals seven tool. Do you think? It's just my observation and maybe my experience that it's easier to see the logic or the illogic in what somebody else says than it is in what you say. It's hard to it's hard to find the flaws in your own argument. It's easier to find them in the in the argument of others. That's an interesting question. I mean, I think that most of us like to think that way right, exactly. All the time the 'cause we, that's why we say things. We don't deliver most of us anyway, deliberately say things that we know to wrong, get some people do, but but many of us only say things that we think we think. All right. And then from Allah point-of-view, the things that other people saying might be wrong, I think it's really important. And one of the things I stress in my book is that it's important to find what's right in. What other people say, not just fine, what's wrong. And then by the same token, it's important to understand what could be viewed as Rome in what we say so that we don't just think of as being right and I- impose discipline on myself where I read commence online on school, Pete, some people say, never read the Coleman's, always wait the comments until I feel ill. About what people are saying. Because I think it's really important to to remain a wet of viewpoints that different from my own. So I can remember to challenge my own viewpoints and see if I really think that. And I think that an important aspects of a Russian person is that open to changing them lined a, they get new information on new ideas. Can you use a well? I guess you can attempt to use. Can you use logic to make any argument? I mean, in some extreme redundant way, I'm thinking like mathematician hit in some repaired on way. Yes, because he can take the conclusion is an axiom than it is in fact, logical. For example, some people say, I don't believe in sim sex marriage, the Cho's I believe that marriage should be between a man and woman and will they really don't marry say the same thing twice. And so they've really taken that conclusion as. Fundamental belief declared that to be the reasoning now that is not illogical. It definitely is logical, but it's not very usefully logical because it hasn't really got us anywhere. It hasn't really unpacked why within king the thing that way thinking. And so I think that it is possible to be logical without being pathological will helpful all getting anywhere. And so maybe really the answer is, can every point of view be unpacked to some very basic beliefs via a chain of deductions. And I think the answer to that is yes, Joe I said at the beginning of this segment that that one of the reasons mister Spock in Star Trek was so interesting was because of this inner conflict between logic and emotion with the implication being that there is a conflict that that they are oil in water that they don't mix. Do you believe that? Do you believe that that in order to be. He lodged, you must be devoid of emotion. No, and Arava I think that that not emotions aunt in a strict each other just like aut and science on. And I think that that did awesome science completely different from one another is very similar to the idea that logic and emotions of different from one another and they all different. They can both be used at the same time, and I think it's very dangerous and quite widespread to believe if you are emotional than you will definitely not being logical, and I think that's very unfortunate, especially because it tends to be. I mean, this is not always the case, but I would say a general trend tends to be applied to women because women tend to express emotions in seal that emotions most strongly, and then other people often men, but no always will accuse them of being not logical just because then being motion. And I know the. I am very emotional. I feel emotions though he strongly that I quickly, but I also know that I'm extremely logical. I am a professional research mathematician on my whole profession, depends on use of logic, and I know that I use both same time even when I'm doing mathematics for Giampa l- when we doing research in math, we don't just take logical steps to see where that would get us because it probably wouldn't get us anywhere. What we do is we develop an intuition feeling about what we think is true, and then we try and prove it. Once we decided that something feels like it's going to be true. I think that this should be the case in life as well. But if we feel something very, very strongly, the surface of that feeling is emotions, but there's probably some reason for deep down such as if you feel some very strong fill of something that looks irrational to some other people, it might release them down to some childhood experiences have stayed with you. For example, just like I. I'm very afraid of dogs. And most people think that this is ridiculous because most people really like dogs, but it I think it stems from my childhood experience of dogs and a lack of similarity with them. And so I didn't think that it is irrational. You can understand it if you want to stand my life experiences. And I think that that's true of almost all I'd like to say old. I'm very castle mathematicians. I'm gonna say, almost just in case, but I think that's will most all of peoples emotional responses that we need emotions because motions woke foster than logic, but we can often then find the logic behind how we react to something. Can you talk about some of your favorite examples of in the modern world of how logic has been used brilliantly? How logic is abused and used poorly? I don't wanna be just theoretical here. I want to talk about some some real life. Examples of of how logic works in the real world. Two one fantastic example of logic being used badly happened last week when a male physics professor at sun gave tool claiming that women simply all was physics than men and his logical justification for that was the women's research papers off flighted less than venza such papers and he said citation, the amount of citation tells you how good some look is unethical that Preuss that women a worst physics men and that sounds logical, but there's another possibility which is the people that there are some imbedded sexism so that people fight mend work more because they assume that men's look better until it could go in both directions. That was an example, some full logic amend a couple of days. Later, of course, a female puffins women about price. Physics. So that was very satisfying. Oh, it's. Another example happened last week was the announcement that same-sex potent of visas would no longer be available? I think it was for the UN people working for the UN the same sex potent visas would would no longer be allowed for unmarried sim, sex couples. And this is very difficult for people from some countries where same sex marriage isn't even allowed. So they have no chance than than even allowed to get married. So they will have no challenge of getting the visas and the all the I read said that this was to be consistent and gala -tarian with it fix couple because opposite sex couples have to be married in order to get opponent of visa. And previously same sex couples did not have to be until the argument was. This is to make it again Attaran, but we can see this is fully loaded. Because there are plenty of their other ways that you could make it gala -tarian which is the other way round allowing opposite sex couples to get visas if the unmarried as well. And so when some general principle is claimed, that isn't actually general, especially if that principle Ben causes great disadvantage to a certain group of people in this case, gay people, then the principal has have prejudice embedded in it, even though it sounds like a logical principle. We can tell that it's not an entirely article principle if it doesn't. If it doesn't work in the generality that it was claimed. In this case, it was claimed that it was in order to be gotta Attaran, but that could have been other way. So then to be logical, you'd have to justify why you which using that method being gallatin instead of the other method hubbub an example of in your view of logic being used. Used? Well, oh, good question. There are so many examples of logic, Dan us badly. I could give an example of how someone used logic to convince me to change my mind about something quite dramatic. And that is to do with whether voting in elections should be compulsory not though in Australia it is compulsory on hit. Obviously it's not compulsory and I previously like many people thought it should not be compulsory because voting should be a right. It's not an obligation and we can't force people to vote amend. Someone explained to me a different principle which is about full postive false negatives. So we can think about who votes on. We can think about the the full positive, which is fulsome people to vote when they don't want to vote as opposed to the full negative, which is preventing people from voting when they have the right to vote and someone. Pointed out to me that the point of compulsory voting is to stop the disenfranchisement of some voters who either feel disengaged from politics that don't think it's will it think that vote won't count all that they unable to get enough time off to vote, or they get transportation to go and vote. All that vote to being suppressed because of lose around will ide- need in order to get in, get to vote. For example, I read the other day somewhere in Texas has declared the only driver's license is allowed as former by d. voting and also that all the places you can get a driving licence. One of them closed which meant that some people from place would have to go fifty miles to get to driving licence if they don't have a call and there's no public transportation may simply have no way of getting that, which means that they come vote. Whereas in a system, web voting is compulsory than. Everyone has to be given away to vote. And so I've now changed my mind and I believe in that despite my initial objection, because I think that the issue of false positives and negatives outweigh my objection about the fact that voting should be a right notably, Dacian I'ma someone pointed out to me if you don't want to vote for anyone, you can still show up and abstain on new balance. Lushly. Are there any major flaws that you see people use when they try to use logic of people kinda misconstrue how it works. Yes. I think that one of them is related to what I just said about thinking that you'll using principal when it doesn't count as logical if you're not applying it in all cases. So for example, from people criticize so female politicians for saying that that dishonest, but they didn't criticize the male politicians. The being dishonest mean let's face it probably will petitions, dishonest, some, that'll about some things. And if they don't also criticized the male politicians for the same thing than that, not using the general principle of criticizing someone for being dishonest on that means that we should ask ourselves, whether it's actually because they're female personnel available and something similar is true about allegations of sexual harassment where some people say that we should hold people innocent until proven guilty. But in fact, they're only really applying that to the accused person than multiple. So applying that to the accusa who. I should also be held innocence innocent of accusations. And if we hold trying hope in both innocence at same time than we are likely to run into a contradiction because it's very unlikely that they can both be innocent until we have to find some of a principal to get those out that contradiction in general as you as you talk to people in walk around and listen to people talk in our people generally fairly logical on a scale of one to ten, where where are we? I say, no. And I think that that we've got into situation where everyone largely believes that their opinion is valid and that there are some people who don't think that they have to challenge their Pinon all that any evidence, they don't believe experts. They don't believe scientists. But then on the other hand, there are other people who think that that better than that when not necessarily better than that and just believe something else without really challenging. It. Even scientists mathematicians who very good logic in their research, all prone to making mistakes when they're talking about real life situations such as this male professor talking about women just being worse, physics and other side HUD where where male scientists say things like I know that women different from men because I have two daughters in for me, and that's absolutely miniscule sample size that somewhat scientist would never use in their actual such somehow when dealing with real life situations, emotions tend to take over on. What I think is that if we pit logic against emotions in a battle than logic is never going to win because emotions stronger on death foster. And so what we need to do is try news logic and emotions together. So the instead of trying to change people's emotions using logic, we somehow tap into those emotions just. In the same way that people do with advertising undivided videos, and memes, it's unfortunate that those things acquitted manipulative, but if we can find a way to convince people emotionally of something that we think is logical than I think that the will have a much better chance as opposed to if we just let logic emotions flight with Jilin wasn't that the whole premise of that character in Star Trek Mr. Spock who was at human. So he struggled with his logic in his emotions in they often did not agree. Yes. And I think when logic and emotions don't agree, some people say you should just get rid of Normans because the low to correct, but I don't think that's right because I think in motions always true and I find it much more interesting to examine why some logic unsee emotions don't agree on. It can be very interesting. For example, I used to be very afraid of flying despite all the statistics. My new the statistics say that flying is much safer than traveling to call example. And people told me this over and over again. I was still completely afraid of flying. And so instead of trying to squash, my motions, which doesn't look, I examined very closely why I was afraid of flying and it was simply the the ACTA takeoff is so so isolated in its, it's just bad takeoff. It's a moment. The just cools me to think about the possibility of doing a plan crush on that terrified me. And so I realized that what I needed to do with distract myself during takeoff rather than anything else. And that was how I overcame fear flowing. It does seem, especially today that people use logic or attempt to use logic in large part to prove somebody's wrong that it's it's not to make case, but it's the show how wrong you are. Yeah, I think that having an omelette way, trying to show the other. Wrong is almost always pointless actually on. I wish that we could have augmon's where we're trying to understand things more rather than trying to win the kind of augment where you'll really seeking to understand why the other person thinks things they do. Hopefully they will try to understand why you think things you do. And then we can find sense is in which we agree as well as senses in which we disagree. And I think that would be much more productive than the kind where we're just trying to everyone's trying to show the everyone else's role in you. You've been highly logical. So thank you. Genia Chang has been my guest. She is the scientists in residence at the school of the Art Institute in Chicago, and her book is the art of logic in illogical world, and you'll find a link to her book in the show notes. Thanks, you Genia. Thank you very much. True or false. If you want your car to last, you should change your oil every three thousand miles. The answer is false. In fact, Edmunds dot com says, we are wasting millions of dollars on unnecessary oil changes and disposing of millions of gallons of old contaminated waste oil into the environment. The three thousand mile change. Your oil rule is really a marketing tactic to get you to bring your car into the shop. More often. In fact, in an article in the trade industry publication, national oil and lube news. They state a few extra services or oil changes can go a long way to increase the amount of money a customer will spend. Here's the truth. Your car's owner's manual tells you when to change your oil. Go by that on average it's about every seventy eight hundred miles the three thousand mile rule. Cool was once accurate, but oil and car tecnology have rendered it completely obsolete. There is no car manufacturer today who recommends oil be changed every three thousand miles not a single one Porsche recommends you change the oil in their cars every twenty thousand miles just because the last oil change place. You went to put a little sticker on your windshield telling you to come back and three thousand miles, which is another very effective marketing tactic. Don't your car doesn't need it, and that is something you should know. Reviews are always appreciated wherever you listen to this podcast, apple podcasts tune in Spotify. Google play. Please take a moment and leave a review. I'm Mike Carruthers. Thanks for listening today to something you should know.

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