35 Burst results for "Carroll"

No. 5 Duke holds off No. 1 Gonzaga for 84-81 victory

AP News Radio

00:32 sec | 2 d ago

No. 5 Duke holds off No. 1 Gonzaga for 84-81 victory

"Follow Ben Carroll scored twenty one points to lead number five Duke over top ranking jacket eighty four eighty one the Bulldogs clawed back from a nine point second half deficit to take the lead but the blue devils closed on a thirteen nine run Wendell Moore junior scored twenty points and Mark Williams added seventeen with nine rebounds for the blue devils do took control of the seventeen six run after the zags scored the game's first four points Julian Strother leg inside with a career high twenty points and ten rebounds due to me added seventeen points and Chet Holmgren had sixteen points for the zags I'm Dave Ferrie

Ben Carroll Blue Devils Wendell Moore Bulldogs Mark Williams Julian Strother Zags Chet Holmgren Dave Ferrie
"carroll" Discussed on The J.R. Hoeft Show

The J.R. Hoeft Show

05:01 min | Last month

"carroll" Discussed on The J.R. Hoeft Show

"Welcome aboard in is episode. Ninety seven of jr heff show and i am very happy to have kevin carroll who is the director of operations and maintenance for the coastal virginia offshore wind projects with dominion energy onboard. Today to talk about that incredible project that i think some of us insularity Or maybe tangentially no or have thought about but don't really understand how much of a credible project this actually is They just completed about a year ago. to all column test platforms To test turbans of six megawatts each. They've gone ahead and run that line from about twenty seven nautical miles offshore into virginia beach and they're generating electricity upwards for about three hundred homes. What they wanna do is by twenty twenty six since they have. The proof of concept are done by twenty twenty six go ahead and put another hundred eighty terminals out there and so kevin walks us through this entire process. He takes us back to twenty. fourteen Began walks through a how department of energy is involved and why this is such an important project for the region. A good conversation with kevin. I really hope you enjoy it. I certainly did. And so let's get underway with. Kevin carroll of dominion energy podcast. Thank you for.

kevin carroll coastal virginia virginia beach kevin department of energy Kevin carroll
Who Should USC Hire as Its Next Coach?

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

00:56 sec | 2 months ago

Who Should USC Hire as Its Next Coach?

"So i think. Usc should go get a nfl coach. I think name image likeness is going to be a little bit of an avalanche the next decade and these nfl coaches are not control freaks. They've dealt with players getting paid. They're very comfortable with it. They've got owners in the nfl. they're not in the. I have to control everything. Business i said doug peterson to me matt. Nagy if the if the bears fired him anthony lynn. All one playoff games in the nfl. All have a presence If you go. Look at usc miami and ucla three urban universities. If you look at the coaches that are had the most success. Pete carroll john robinson. Usc pro coaches chip kelly. Pro coaches getting it rolling dick for meal. Ucla pro coach. How 'bout miami. Last time they won. Butch davis dennis. Erickson jimmy johnson.

NFL Doug Peterson USC Anthony Lynn Nagy Pete Carroll John Robinson Ucla Bears Matt Miami Kelly Dick Butch Davis Dennis Erickson Jimmy Johnson
A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

02:13 min | 2 months ago

A Look Around Good Vibrations - The Antique Vibrator Museum

"The good vibrations antique vibrator museum is about the size of a living room. And in glass cases around the walls arranged in chronological order are about one hundred vibrators dating all the way back from the late. Eighteen hundreds up to the early nineteen seventies and some of them are these beautiful lustrous jewel toned pieces of plastic others not so much they were super steam punk looking in the early twentieth century in and before they were definitely little machines. This is our tour guide carol. Queen carroll is the museum's curator has a phd in sexology and has worked at good vibrations for decades for a first stop on the tour. Carol wanted to introduce us to one of the oldest vibrators in the museum's collection. It's called the v. d. vibrio tori massager. And whether it was supposed to make you think of venereal disease. I don't actually know that's lost in the midst of time at least as far as my information. Sources are concerned the v. is old school. No batteries no electricity. It's got a hand crank. It kind of looks like an egg beater. If i'm honest and the museum has an old photo of a doctor holding a similar vibrator using one hand to operate the crank and the other depress the applicator end of it against a standing woman's back. Yes her back. In the late eighteen hundreds most people would have come into contact with vibrators in the context of a doctor's office in the vibrators early days it was seen as this kind of cure all for all kinds of medical problems and it was used at first in the doctor's office and then later in the home there is an nineteen teens book that was published by the hamilton dietsch company. Yes the same company that makes the blender that we make our margaritas on friday night which made vibrators and was one of the major vibrator manufacturers. There were many but they're one of the major ones in the nineteen so hamilton beach made a vibe and they published a book called health and how to get it

Queen Carroll Venereal Disease Carol Hamilton Dietsch Company Hamilton Beach
Blinken Says Taliban Must Earn 'International Legitimacy and Support'

Dan Carroll

01:06 min | 3 months ago

Blinken Says Taliban Must Earn 'International Legitimacy and Support'

"Breaking now the United States, wrapping up its military presence in Afghanistan Monday and moving a base of operations to nearby Doha, Qatar. Secretary of State Antony Blinken at the State Department said the U. S government will continue a modified evacuation plan with the coalition of Allied Nations who are watching the Taliban to do what it has pledged to do. Secretary, Blinken said. The Taliban has said it wants to be respected. But the world is watching Taliban seeks international legitimacy and support. Our message is any legitimacy and any support will have to be earned. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin, issuing a statement at the end of the American war in Afghanistan, thanking the amazing troops for their work and telling our new Afghan friends that we will provide the displaced with temporary living spaces, medical care and sustenance at military facilities at home and abroad, continuing to screen them. And process, some of them to lead new lives in America. He also said, We'll work to defend our citizens from terrorist threats emanating from anywhere

Secretary Of State Antony Blin Taliban U. S Government Coalition Of Allied Nations Blinken Afghanistan Secretary Of Defense Lloyd Aus Doha Qatar State Department America
Louisiana Hospitals Stretched as Ida Knocks out Power

Dan Carroll

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Louisiana Hospitals Stretched as Ida Knocks out Power

"As well as much of the Gulf Coast knew enough to reinforce their safety measures after Katrina, with generators keeping the power going, however, Hurricane Ida making landfall Sunday as a Category four storm really tested them. ABC is Victor a kendo reports. Officials say the pumps that keep the flood water out of New Orleans are running on generators. And the levees and flood walls built after Katrina held the worst case scenario. It did not happen, however. The impact is absolutely significant. We've checked in with many hospitals in the region. Many have lost power. They're running off of those generators. Some sustained external damage and for those in the really hard hit areas they did have to transport some of their patients. Meanwhile in Mississippi, the governor there said Monday that state and local emergency responders conducted 20 rescues from flooded areas in the states. Three coastal communities He said he decided to let federal search and rescue teams leave Mississippi to go back to Louisiana to help out with bigger problems There. The

Hurricane Ida Katrina Gulf Coast Victor ABC New Orleans Mississippi Louisiana
ODH Issues Warning as COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations Surge Across the State

Dan Carroll

00:39 sec | 3 months ago

ODH Issues Warning as COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations Surge Across the State

"The Ohio Department of Health Friday giving an update on the rise in covid related hospitalizations. Director Dr Bruce Vanderhof said on July 9th only 200 Ohioans were hospitalized with the virus. On Thursday, the number was over 2000. Sadly, it continues to be true that unvaccinated Ohio Islands are by far and away. Covid 19 patients who are filling our hospital bets. Doctor Vanderhof also saying the delta very it is putting even younger people in the hospital, Ohio Friday with the report E 800 new Covid 19 cases In the last 24 hours. There were 165 new hospitalizations, 21 to ICU admissions and 70. More deaths were

Ohio Department Of Health Director Dr Bruce Vanderhof Ohio Islands Covid Doctor Vanderhof Ohio ICU
Biden Addresses Nation in Response to Kabul Airport Attack

Dan Carroll

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Biden Addresses Nation in Response to Kabul Airport Attack

Maryland Board of Education to Host Special Meeting on Statewide School Mask Mandate

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Maryland Board of Education to Host Special Meeting on Statewide School Mask Mandate

"Vote today may change that. A special meeting is coming this afternoon to be held by the State Board of Education, which is considering an emergency regulation that would require face coverings in all schools. Some local districts already have mandates in place. Others like Carroll County, do not. As the first day of school approaches for some counties next week on Monday, Governor Hogan has not favoured a statewide mandate giving local school boards the option to choose their own path. If adopted, the emergency regulation would need final approval from state lawmakers before taking effect. Ken Duffy, w T. O P News special education teacher at Paint Branch High School in Montgomery County, has been placed on one

State Board Of Education Governor Hogan Carroll County Ken Duffy Paint Branch High School Montgomery County
Preparations Underway Ahead of Hurricane Henri’s Impact

Dan Carroll

00:59 sec | 3 months ago

Preparations Underway Ahead of Hurricane Henri’s Impact

"For on re I'm Sean Gallagher breaking now. Hurricane Andre is expected to make landfall in the Northeast later today, so evacuation efforts have been underway in areas where people usually look for summer getaways along the Atlantic. ABC, Trevor Alders in New York on Montag. There's now been 500, New York National Guard members deploying and FEMA preparations underway and up into New England. They're expecting to be hit hard as well. Voters there in Massachusetts are pulling their boats from Marina's officials are warning about destructive winds, flooding rain and widespread power outages. We could see wind gusts up to 80 miles an hour and dangerous storm surges up to five FT. A tropical storm watch in effect for New York City until further notice as New Yorkers prepare for potential. The impacts of on re. The city's Office of Emergency Management also issued a storm surge watch for the Bronx and northern Queens officials warning that heavy rains and gusty winds could limit visibility and create difficult travel conditions into Monday. Beaches in New York City are closed for swimming today and Monday.

Hurricane Andre Trevor Alders New York National Guard Sean Gallagher Montag Northeast Fema ABC Atlantic New England Marina Massachusetts New York Tropical Storm Northern Queens Office Of Emergency Management New York City Bronx Swimming
Joe Biden Slammed for Defending Reckless Withdrawal From Afghanistan

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:02 min | 3 months ago

Joe Biden Slammed for Defending Reckless Withdrawal From Afghanistan

"The european nations are starting to condemn the united states over the afghan collapse here at home. Look at these. Headlines got a stack of headlines over the daily wire. Senator rick scott. Republican from florida tweeted inflation is raging the debt ceiling expired. Us debt is headed to forty five trillion. Coppell is falling to the taliban encounters of the board at the biden border crisis. Just hit a twenty year. High democrats control the house senate and white house. What in the world is joe biden doing after the disastrous events in afghanistan. Senator rick asked we must confront a serious question is joe biden capable of discharging the duties of his office or has the time come to exercise the provisions of the twenty fifth amendment other headlines biden's approval rating has taken another hit now a two to one wrong direction. Trajectory the lakers latest rasmusen report survey forty five percent of likely voters. Approve of the job. Biden is doing fifty four percent disapprove. How about the washington. Examiner headline biden's cowardly afghanistan speech after blaming everyone but himself for twenty minutes biden stopped reading from the teleprompter turned and left the room without taking any questions from the assembled reporters the white house then announced biden was returning to his vacation at camp david conn carroll over at the washington examiner observes considering how terrible the speech was. At least he won't be missed. Who cares if he's on vacation better to be on vacation. Maybe i don't know. I don't know what was worse him being a no show for four or five days or giving that disastrous speech yesterday

Biden European Nations Senator Rick Scott Joe Biden Senator Rick Coppell Afghanistan United States White House Taliban Florida Senate Lakers David Conn Carroll Washington
Seahawks Have Offer out to Jamal Adams; No New Talks With Duane Brown

The Herd with Colin Cowherd

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Seahawks Have Offer out to Jamal Adams; No New Talks With Duane Brown

"Jamal adams there but not practicing dwayne brown there but not practicing. My theory is was seattle. That pete carroll push for this jamal adams trade and they gave to i a third and a safety for jamal adams and it looked terrible if they don't get this deal done so the seattle times has to reporters this morning that have said the seahawks appear to be willing to move to sign atoms. But not the left. Tackle dwayne brown and i'm like timeout. Left tackle safety but my my belief is pete carroll lashed last year the defense was a mass bottom half of the league they had no pass rush and i think seattle over and i liked jamal but they went crazy on him and now they're back into a corner 'cause they can't just bail on jamal adams they gave up too

Jamal Adams Dwayne Brown Pete Carroll Seattle The Seattle Times Seahawks Jamal
Cuomo Is Under Criminal Investigation and Facing Legal Jeopardy

Dan Carroll

00:39 sec | 4 months ago

Cuomo Is Under Criminal Investigation and Facing Legal Jeopardy

"Craig Apple says Governor Andrew Cuomo could face a possible misdemeanor charge. It follows a criminal complaint filed against him by a former New York state employee. She alleges the governor groped her at the governor's mansion in 2020. I cannot get into the nature Of her specific allegations at this time. Obviously, we're in the very infant stages of this investigation. We have a lot of fact finding to do we have interviews to conduct Sheriff Apple says no reports will be released to the public, he says. Authorities sat with the woman and her attorney for an hour on Thursday. Cuomo has denied all allegations of sexual misconduct. Michelle Franzen ABC News and I'm Rob Carpenter, Your next update at the bottom of the hour news radio

Craig Apple Governor Andrew Cuomo New York Michelle Franzen Apple Cuomo Rob Carpenter Abc News
"carroll" Discussed on Awards Chatter

Awards Chatter

08:05 min | 5 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on Awards Chatter

"Never linger with it. Go and have a cup of coffee maker phone who isn't bathroom. Take a wall do not linger with that feeling and later. I thought i thought that was interesting. Shift in neither on. I realized that he was also protecting yourself. Because otherwise you might actually developed develop feelings right okay. So another you you were. You were really of your time with another movie that you did bridge the sun in nineteen sixty one. Where you are in love with your character is in love with james. Shigeta this japanese actor at a time when that kind of the war and everything. It was a beautiful beautiful story about actress. Story about quinn. When tear sake who did marry a japanese diplomat and the war then broke out and he wasn't welcome in her country when they went to japan. She wasn't welcome. There was a really beautiful story but not the first one who was offered that they offered it to like five more famous actors than me at the time and what he wanted to work with the japanese. I never gave it a thought. They said the asian said to of these girls. You can't see kissing a japanese man. But i had just seen the french movie here. Seem mona more. Nothing of it. I thought it was beautiful. Now were there any people in your circle. You know any agents or anybody advising you against doing that movie. No no no no thank new nettle not to advise me about anything and was there. Was there any kind of a backlash from the public or anything. No no yeah oh totally. Absolutely okay. So this next one is today concerned. I think one of the most influential independent movies. That was the first one of the first to really breakthrough in a in a way and that is something wild from that same year. Nineteen sixty one. This is your Then husband directing it it. Is you know a rape scene. There's nudity it's very edgy. But i i guess. I wonder know it was the first time a rape scene had been filmed. It was the very first time. And the the thing is We were able to do that film because they were doing low budget films. But i mean really low budget films. The actors get paid. I mean would. I came to the hairdressing. I was counting. How many off. Because we were using. And so my husband jack who was a very good director. You know he's a very famous broadway director and he went into them with the script. And because you know we're going to it for nothing. They agreed to let us do it. So it was great. And then jack wanted all kinds of special things which were never anywhere near our budget like saul doing the titles beautiful titles and he wanted the composer. Aaron copland yeah copeland so they were not gonna pay for aaron copeland but they did and thing was that i owed them phil because of that i had to do for them. Free another phil and i They put me into Mister moses with robert mitchum yes and africa. Yeah so i hope. This question isn't out of line to ask but i think about something wild and and your performance in how you know a emotionally toughed up character. Must've been to play and you have said that you. I just wonder if it if it hit home in a way. That was because let's talk about this character is basically is raped then is kept captive by somebody else now. You have said that you had had sort of a a rough time with your first husband and then that in a in a tie in with the second husband. Who's now making this film. The way you've later described it was that you almost felt prisoner captive by ham right in your book. You've said that so. I just wondered. Did this in some ways feel. I have as presented myself in many ways as rather deep person. Within that case i was totally superficial. I thought the movie was too grim. I didn't want necessarily to play a rape scene and also it was our first chance out with our company called prometheus. The movement didn't make any money so permit theis went back to the underworld for a long time. I resented that movie. Because i thought if we had just done something commercial we would have gotten another soldier to do so. It was years later that the the famous films story in foster hirsch came to me and he really revived film. He he said that this was one of the great fills. He made me aware that it was the first rape scene and then it was put on special disc special company so and now i appreciate it i do but i still of think would have been nice against four other movies so you did too with john ford how the west was won in sixty two and then cheyenne autumn in sixty four and i think that p rightly people remember him as one of the greats. I don't know if he was the easiest person to work with. So i just wanna ask you about those two in three years. Oh yes yes well i. I loved toward. I thought he was brilliant man but also he was so wonderful to everybody know. Apparently book has come out or they're talk about meaning was but he had dinner with all the cast every night. He had lunch with us every day he was he had us all stand up and recited poll more. Play the guitar do something. He made it a real family. And okay you know. I was pretty young girl so we he really loved me so he was very kind to me. So you're i love doing how the west was. I thought it was a terrific script. I thought it was a wonderful store. I thought it was a great way to talk about the west and debbie reynolds was my sister and then she became my dearest dearest friends and your love interest in that. I believe was jimmy stewart. Who could do a lot. Worse than well jimmy. Stewart was just an angel. You can't compare him to anybody else. He was an absolute angel. He was the sweetest. Kindest generous man is you ever want to meet. And there were a ton of stars in that one. I mean that was unbelievable casts for tell you something that foster hirsch just came up with the fact that. Mgm advertise that film as the. I don't know fifty greatest.

Shigeta Aaron copland Mister moses phil jack quinn mona robert mitchum foster hirsch copeland japan james saul theis africa john ford debbie reynolds jimmy stewart jimmy Stewart
"carroll" Discussed on The Storyteller

The Storyteller

04:45 min | 5 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on The Storyteller

"My savior and from that time i've ever looked back. I had my struggles again else. I never when i understood that that he give me a turn life. Who's no way. I wanted to go back and feeding the garbage. I just wanted to walk with god so that fall. I went to bible school at nevada baldwin student and i was there for three years where i met my wife kathy then we went to the mission field and that was interesting to thought about going different places about the lord letters to work with native people and it was interesting. I was working native. Because i wasn't here and i was kinda cool. A lot of people are are struggling. You can't seem to forgive her against him to get clear of bitterness from the past and we have leave behind. Only reverend mountain ourselves is to get away from that people questioned about that too. They said how how could change your attitude. You seem to have such a different attitude. And i said holy god did it because after i got saved i i had a compassion from other data him that but now i wanted to see him save. I want him to go to hell or be destroyed. I just wanted to see him straight. No god when you left home. He ran away eventually. Took off into remarried out in washington state but i see him for twenty three years but i hunted him down. I went to see him. I spent four days of them surely gospel into shadow. Chrysler chrysler done for me. And and i seem to be really open to it. I don't know if he got save i. I don't know that my brother and i had is when you seventy four years old when he died there now so that was tough but the all at and i know my my brothers and sisters went through a terrible time. I often think though When especially as day when you hear so much about abuse. I shared some of this with different ones and say well. We thought we had been abused until you tell your story. But it's it's not. How much of an abuser this just abuse but the forgiveness when when god forgave me i just knew i had to forgive him too and guy just gave me a piece of art and i've never had any resentment took that away completely away and i just all i can say it had compassion for that and all my brothers and sisters moisture murray comes to lord now and diarrhea changed our hearts and had to be god. There's no no question about it. The blessing this to to know christ the with him to see so many different ones for different tribes coming to trust in. jesus christ. We're doing a serious on revelation raimondo. Says some from every tribe and nation tongue people. They're looking forward. See all tribes. Different people that we met all over the world at From all over the world different tribes aboriginals trusses. Jesus christ are you trusting. Jesus christ he will save you just like he did for carol and give you power to change. It doesn't matter who you are or what you've done. God tells us in his word all have since we all need to save you or will face god's judgement for our sin. Did you know that. Christ jesus came into the world to save sinners us my friend. It's time to turn to god and led him forgive cleanse and heal you. He'll do that if you come to him through his son. Jesus christ he tells us believe on the lord jesus christ and you shall be saved if you would like to know more. Please visit our website without reservation dot com and click on the tab new life. You can also write to us at the storyteller. Po box one thousand and one bemidji minnesota five six six one nine. That's the storyteller po. Box one thousand and one bemidji minnesota five six six one night. We're also on facebook at without reservation. And if he wanted to take the storyteller with you be sure to download our radio app. Thanks for listening and remember. The greatest story took place at the cross for the wages of sin is death but the gift of god is eternal life through. Jesus christ our lord friends. There are more amazing stories to tell so. Be sure to join us again. Next time as we listen to the storyteller..

twenty three years three years jesus christ washington kathy christ Jesus christ facebook five one night Christ jesus Chrysler carol four days seventy four years old one thousand and nevada minnesota bemidji
Third Person Arrested for Firing BB Gun at Homeless People in Cincinnati

Dan Carroll

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Third Person Arrested for Firing BB Gun at Homeless People in Cincinnati

"Of using BB guns to attack homeless people in Cincinnati, where in court Wednesday the third suspect that was attacking homeless people and over the Rhine has now been identified as 30 Year old David White. Police are saying that white is the man seen in surveillance video, shooting innocent people with a BB gun. On June 3rd. He was riding in a car with Brittany and Kelsey Hopper, who were the two sisters who turned themselves in earlier in the day. On Tuesday, Kelsey Hopper was cited Britney Hopper and White had to answer to outstanding charges. In addition to the misdemeanor assault charges. White also faced a domestic violence charge against Brittney Hopper from May of 2020 adjudged that bond for wide at $6000 that bond for Brady hop. At $2000 I'm Sarah

Kelsey Hopper David White Cincinnati Britney Hopper Brittany White Brittney Hopper Brady Sarah
TAPS Helps Military Families Cope With Loss

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 6 months ago

TAPS Helps Military Families Cope With Loss

"Families of America's fallen heroes come together on Memorial Day military families grieving the loss of a loved one have a huge support group that's thanks to an organization that's been around since nineteen ninety four called taps which stands for tragedy assistance program for survivors body Carroll who lost her husband in battle is founder and president we lay a wreath at the tomb of the Unknown Soldier and our families are present when president Biden delivers his Memorial Day address at the Arlington National Cemetery and that they are there and there is also time to remember family members also important time for them to be at their loved ones and remember the sacrifices that their family has made over the weekend one of the things that taps did was hold a good grief camp for children I'm surely Adler

President Biden Carroll America Arlington National Cemetery Adler
TAPS once again helps families cope

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 6 months ago

TAPS once again helps families cope

"It's an important weekend for families of America's fallen heroes the organization is called taps which stands for tragedy assistance program for survivors we come together when it happens you learn how to cope to connect with each other to find resources and support taps founder and president Bonnie Carroll this is our twenty seventh annual national military survivor seminar good grief camp and they got hundreds of families together since nineteen ninety four taps has assisted over one hundred thousand surviving family members and caregivers who are grieving the loss of a military loved one the one thing we can do to find comfort and support is to be with others who have walked this journey hi Charlie Adler

President Bonnie Carroll America Charlie Adler
Takeaways From Day 1 of 2021 Seahawks Rookie Minicamp

News, Traffic and Weather

00:42 sec | 7 months ago

Takeaways From Day 1 of 2021 Seahawks Rookie Minicamp

"14th must be time for Seahawks Rookie football practice details from Como's bills warts 13 undrafted free agents assigned to the Seattle roster along with three draft picks, and they were part of orientation meetings in a rookie minicamp workout at the V Mac this afternoon. Head coach Pete Carroll, trying to evaluate new guys with a shorter camp. They'll get the same amount of reps they would get the normal camp have to adjust the temple. A little bit T get that done, but they'll get the same snap so that that's that's the main thing so we could make good evaluations and also, Carol says the Hawks were still talking with some veterans about plans for a mandatory minicamp. Seattle's returning players there were already voted not to attend in person, Voluntary O T A S Because of covert concerns. The Seattle

Seattle Roster Seahawks Como Pete Carroll Football Hawks Carol Seattle
US Unemployment Claims Fall to a Pandemic Low

Dan Carroll

00:12 sec | 7 months ago

US Unemployment Claims Fall to a Pandemic Low

"Expect the data to show employees hired 975,000 workers last month about the same as in March. First time jobless claims fell to 498,000 last week, the lowest point since the

Jesse Winker Homers in 10th Inning to Beat Dodgers

Dan Carroll

00:18 sec | 7 months ago

Jesse Winker Homers in 10th Inning to Beat Dodgers

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

04:00 min | 10 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"Do. I'm here for it. I mean stuff from the seventies here for it. I just been listening to just a little bit of everything but yeah definitely. Add those to my my Spotify lists people give me crap. It's like i want from here. Like trat music to meditate in to this is this like vicario beats the hip problems sleeping. So the last one. I'll give you the choice here because both baltimore questions. One of them is both a word association and the other one is one part. So which one do you want to do. And okay so under normal circumstances so this is just like more so finish the sentence so under normal circumstances in baltimore you will be doing. What three different things that you would like to be doing under normal circumstances snow snow-covered everything kinda like simple okay A normal circumstances in baltimore would be if kobe was was not a thing you i would. I would be living in museums. I'll be going to galleries installations exhibitions performances I'd be going to live concerts Mythos and i would. i would Because sinophile i would be you know in the back of the theater somewhere you know watching watching some independent random obscure films. I'm here for similarities there because I'm kind of stressing right now at you know. I usually go to be oscar. Best picture showcase every year ago. So i was literally like our first date. She's like you ought to be with me. I was like sure those dogs to sixteen hours. It was good. But yeah you're you're coolest talk to you so If you have anything that you wanna plug Here's a moment to shamelessly plug anything. You're social you're even though you don't really use your website. Whatever you want to plug and again thank you for coming onto podcast and thank you again for having me feel free to follow me on instagram. I do you know. Keep up to date with it. angela underscore in underscore carol Also hit my link tree which has links to recent articles has links to recent conversations That have done Check out the baltimore. Museum of art's youtube page. I just had a really beautiful conversation with my mentor and amazing. Contemporary artists salary menard Who has a show up at the baltimore. Museum of art called lost and found Is a beautiful extraordinary showcase. Kind of many retrospective of her work and she is An elder and powerful person in our community that if you're not familiar with police get familiar with her her work and her legacy. She cares about us. She loves us And we We need to honor her her in her flowers and hurt in the receipt of her flowers is long overdue You can see Virtual clips of the exhibition At at the baltimore museum of art and again you can catch our my conversation with her in a virtual gallery tour on the baltimore. Museum of art's youtube page. So again thank you. For coming on the podcast. And i'll do my masan off so for for angela. in carroll i'm rob lee and this is getting to the truth and his art and i am saying there's are in and around baltimore he's have to look for..

both rob lee One sixteen hours youtube baltimore one part instagram carol Spotify first date kobe angela oscar one seventies three different things year ago baltimore museum of art them
"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

06:54 min | 10 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"But i do believe i am hopeful and have seen particularly during the pandemic that more people are willing to To put themselves out there right and to To stand for something right to use their platform to stand for something significant. And i think we definitely need more more of that right because these tools were were created as a means through which to distract us. You know and it's our job to To reimagine into to utilize these tools for whatever it is that we need right To not get caught up in in the design of these tools which is to keep us engaged to keep us distracted to keep scrolling in clicking through But not necessarily activating these tools and away that can lead to actual social political reform or social and political change or social political dismantling things that cannot be reformed right or changed right And so i've seen a lot of that. And i've been encouraged most of the stuff that i follow. Were all people who actually stand for something you know. And i'm curious to see how that will evolve as technology continues to develop as new apps takeover. I'm curious about this lawsuit right now with facebook. You know whether or not it's a monopoly and you know and how that will be countered in what what what social media platforms will be able to compete with With facebook if they exist ten years from now what that interaction will be. How much of our our sensitive information are images are posts. Right will be used against us will be used to profile us will be used to you. Know all of these things right because they've already been briefs about how much information is sold away way to advertisers and how much information is already gone into surveillance technology and so these are things that we need to be very very very very aware of and that we need to be okay speaking out against Absolutely because when you hear these things about these different trends and so on and if we consent is a knowledge is that i like to look at it like whenever these trends in these different things pop up there league five six. Maybe probably about six months behind. What black people actually doing. And it's like we don't even do that anymore. I know it's super successful. Train came out of nowhere when we were doing and detroit. Like you know like months back without even doing that now. I got a few more than. I'll give you back the rest of your your afternoons over there in sunny kelly. But so i'll say once. I get a wig and a double bass. I'll be charles. Maga's bio pic look out for me yelling at people talk about. How great virginia's i. That's that's my goal. Actually okay okay. As regularly as long as you do a remake of fables and babe's i'll just changed the lyrics so let's see i obviously going to have a music question for you. Then i'm going to wrap on the baltimore question that i have for you and then that'll be that so. I read that music and meditation are your medicine. What are three songs that are currently your rotation or if you don't have like a rotation. What are the three songs that you recently listened to. That's high. I listen to music all the time. I have a homeboy. Put me onto a brother named brother. I who came up with a series of albums and he has one song that has been my affirmation like every morning called transcendental march and it is brother transcendental march and in this song. There's a poet. And i haven't been able to find the his name but she saying this poem but the refrain of the poem is i am not afraid and she goes in you know and over and over again. She says i am not afraid. You know. I'm a part of the cosmos and the pardoning intergalactic when she's speaking to us she's speaking specifically to black people in it is a means through which and the beat is just raw. You know and so. There's a kind of meditation in that. Be an imitation that energy. That just keeps you. That is so affirming charging right to say you know what you are. Every day you were potentially going into battle right every day you know being a black body in america is is to be in jeopardy right to. There's the to be a precarious situation. There is no guarantee for the safety of your of your body. as tommy. He coates says right. You can have all the education the world you can. But you're your safety has never secured and transcendental into march. Brother has been that you know regardless of that. I am not afraid right. I will keep pushing forward There's a an another new song. I've been listening to buy And that's an old joke. Came up with that. In the seventies i think sixty seventy s. There's a new joint by with assistance name Our our links Who called grounded. That has been on rotation As well how and where. She's basically you know she's like you know you can't the choruses you can't grow until you're grounded And so she's talking about you. Know put should put some get a few pot those plants. You know that'll make you feel ground to clean your living room. You know that will make you feel grounded. And so that's been a really beautiful or really beautiful song and then there's one song by alice coltrane. Who is like a god goddess to me as my guru Called transcendence and that song are probably listen to every probably every day multiple times a day and Because it's just in the whole album which is called transcendence is very beautiful but that's on a particular is just a very beautiful meditation And reminder to to consistently evolve. You know that every day is a means through which to you. Know to grow to expand to excel Beyond yourself beyond your limits to transcend your expectations to transcend the expectations. That others have for you And that that's a choice and that you have the power to do so Every every minute of every day every second of every day. I'm still in all three of those songs by the way please.

alice coltrane facebook america one song three songs tommy three seventies about six months charles ten years every second once Maga sixty seventy s. transcendence every every minute sunny kelly virginia
"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

07:01 min | 10 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"Politics to our are two different affiliations to our ability to have actual interactions with each other. That are that are impactful right to our ability to organize for our communities in any a way that is more than just taking a picture at a protest right to all of these. I'm i'm very interested in doing a lot of writing researching about that right now. Because i think that this is a. We're in a kind of new landscape right like The ways in which we engage technology and social media have deep impacts on on on our political world on our social world right and Because we know that the social the personal is always political right And we know in have seen right the ways. In which our engagement or disengagement with these these platforms has been used against us right Like the russian hacking and Just so many. So many different instances right we also are seeing the ways in which we are being surveilled through these through these platforms in the ways in which we allow ourselves in many ways to be surveilled. We give up right. We give up ownership. We give up These things in. I'm curious about that right like what why. Why is that right so in many ways my engagement with these platforms is is in a more kind of curious and skeptical Way as well as as a professional means. But i think that. I'm kind of hyper vigilant about what i do and what i do. Not coast but I don't i don't post too much personal stuff. Yeah that's that's the thing did of trying to get away from just being on. You're absolutely right like some people. Like i was born eighties mid eighties. And you always hear about mr microwave generation. You wanted immediately. You want it now and it's like that instrument of gratification thing is just right there and it's just at for us to just gobbled up and especially if you're trying to be an entrepreneur if you care about whether people are consuming what you're doing as podcast that someone check out the episode would you think and all of this. You're engaging with people this way because you know e mail people believe that email doesn't exist anymore even though it's you need that to sign up for a lot of these things you need to have that or your your cell phone and i think social media in social media with this last year have you kind of show where some of these gaps are at and how we communicate and how we choose to communicate and know if you were to talk to someone like some gonna make it super my version obliged to fill type away about slotting into people's dm's to be on the podcast because people get weird about it and it's just like look. I'm trying to reach out to you. It's going to look weird. If i contact you in a postage just did so direct messages to easiest thing to hit you with but then people think oh because of how this was created. That means you're trying to have sex with someone that means you're trying to hook up with someone. No i'm trying to send your message. That would be a private message. And i don't know if it needs to be out there and people don't really get that in it's like where did that notion come from. Where did the idea come from. It's that communication is more restrictive and as much as we try to be america here and look at other countries. That like really demonstrative. Say you're not allowed to communicate knees ways. We talk about my freedom but then really we are more of vanessa. We do it in a more finessed way. We've had a long time to come up with how we're going to do this. And how we're going to finesse it and the thing that really catches me on social media side of things is if you're entrepreneur or if you're trying to put your thing out there and just had people look at it it's an update or some change that somehow impacts of certain group more than another group and as you talked about earlier you can have certain images. You have a pitcher words on air. You know five likes you have a meeting or something. that's while problematic. Wow fifteen hundred lakes and you know. I have a few different accounts and i. I'm curious as well. I try to check these things out. I'm like i don't agree with us. I just think it's funny. And i'm gonna posted. I'm gonna see if other people think it's funny. It's like nah. I read somewhere that it's only really ten percent of the followers that you engage with howard. They considered an engagement. Has i remember. Years ago had explained to my parents that Like i don't know what kind of music you listen to. You know kind of john rasiah really into but i've recently gotten into more jazz jazz vinyl for for the holidays and all charles maga's shells maintenance charles mangoes so some of the songs are like super long and their song you know and i remember years ago explaining this to my parents. S like you know. I apple. They define a song. It's like three minutes like so. This charles gonzaga's twelve minutes as four songs their language. So i'm i'm going to ensure that social media describes interaction as this many characters. This many emojis that this person like it in a worthy. So they're just modifying in their massaging. Were communication is shaping. I think that that's that's my two cents on it. Yeah i agree completely. And i think mingas is such a great example of someone who understood that his role as an artist was not just to create. You know cool sounding music right like he His work particularly in his later later in his career was not just about mastery. Right of his of his of his skill would also was about Creating works that spoke to the political climate social climb and the violence that was happening too. Historically it happened to black folks right Mingas have so. He was such a pioneer in that in that regard and really wanted to be understood as a genius in his own right Not just a black genius genius in his own right who was very interested in black subjects but also interested in subjects beyond beyond his blackness or beyond the constructive race right beyond the construct of cast. And there's something really powerful about that. And i think that there are many artists who who are doing that work and taking on that vanguard as well but then there are others who again for our generation are more concerned again with the instant gratification. Because it's like why would i use my platform. why would i Jeopardize right platform to speak to speak to something that has weight. And but.

john rasiah twelve minutes eighties two cents charles gonzaga ten percent two fifteen hundred lakes five three minutes four songs russian america last year mingas mid eighties maga Mingas years ago black
"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

08:29 min | 10 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"Landscape because again for me. I am a writer in an artist as well so it is important that i don't just stay in that particular line because then i'm not growing as a writer I'm not expanding so my work at this. Point is sort of evolving into more like critical essays that are inclusive of reviews or not You know that are not specifically categorized within the landscape of a review or a critique of a particular artwork or a particular exhibition rather. It's it's more broad to talk about sort of the social systemic issues that are affecting us in that the work or were several works may speak to because i think that that at this point is is for me but also i think conceptually is what we need to be reading more about right. How is the popular culture. That we are consuming. How the artworks that we are consuming How do they speak to or relate to either brought in and or dim right the our contemporary world writing the political and social landscapes that we are living in contemporary. Well yes and i have one comment on it and then it actually is a way to get to my next question so the common i have when i remind people all the time. Just you pretty much dorn covid. I'll say that. Every tom dick and harry just became a podcast. Or and i'm very sensitive to that field because a lot of people considered just some dorgan abasement. during no i do this artfully. I've invested. I know how to do my stuff and i take you serious and then i look at it from a reputation standpoint. You know i'll get me and my one of my good friends. We do a podcast. Call unofficially black. Because some of the stuff that we're into inconsiderate black enough by people who look like us. Oh you're into wrestling like you don't like that. I was like what are you talking about. Or a different things in that kind of vein and we did Based on literally an argument of not feeling represented. And then it's already late. Exists that this idea. That podcast is black to begin with. So it's like i'm damnest place of i'm not considered even worthy of being in the field because well look like but then i'm not considered black enough in this space and it bothers me is as much but it's just an interesting bank to observe and just kinda work within and especially doing doing this podcast in the people that i've had on i don't demonstrability say hey is only going to be bad. Black creators says only be these type creators. only real prerequisite is you have to be about baltimore. That's literally what it is. And i find that i've been introduced to so many like dope creators creatives of all backgrounds. And you would think that here because baltimore city. That's a black city. If we were calling me what it is but there is two different baltimore's and just being here never having any like idea that this is would oblige creative is in baltimore. This is what creative is in baltimore. It's just more so like all right. I just want to show everyone. How broad and how unique we have it here and that's all where it comes from but i think the same thing is in always applied in depending on what you're doing as a creative so you talked about you touch current events little bit and kind of where you're going nat as far as like what we should be talking about right now. What kind of. So how how d- stay up on current events. I wanna say it's very easy to fall into the trap of living on twitter or living here and We see that that's corrupted and racially biased. And all of these different things. But how do you stay. Stay up to date to be informed while being to be. Because i think you're a bit of a critic and you have an experience in being able to critique things you're like that's not real so how how do you stay up to date informed so i mean it's i mean it's a it's interesting right because again i'm a little older and i'm not infatuated with social media and the ways that i think folks were may be boring five or ten years later. I was are mike. I don't necessarily have to check twitter instagram every single day. I certainly don't post every day. Grabs his right. I certainly don't post every day. I mean i think i do. I am a nerd. Though i follow a lot of list serves right so it's like old school right. I get a lot of emails with like updates subscribed to a lot of different places. I i listen to. Npr almost every morning. Like i am a little bit of a of a a nerds in regards to just like news. I'm a little addicted to to to news international end and local I read a lot. I read an insatiable reader have a lot of books. I collect a lot of books. I have a lot of really longs beautiful conversations with elders about their thoughts in their opinions. i have a lot of really beautiful long conversations with members of my community a lot of really long beautiful meandering conversations with my partner you know and In that between all of the and sinophile right so watch a lotta film. I watched a lot of short film. You know so. And i love hip hop you know and i love music period. So there's a lot. I just like to learn right and i think that when you like to learn and when you're curious you able to kind of negotiate Different landscapes in in a way that is not oppressive right and in a way that is not That again doesn't kind of feed into the the addiction in nor feed into the kind of neil. Listen that that social media platforms rely on and kind of require of us right. There's a deep kind of insecurity that many social media platforms like rely on right and we know that the algorithms also speak to that insecurity right so if i post a picture of words right like excerpts from an essay and check out this essay or check out this book The algorithm is not going to send it to all of. My father is in the same way. That if i posted a selfie. Or if i posted a picture of myself half-naked right like derek different. They're different beats right. But also there's a different kind of conditioning for us as navigators of these sites right where Again what are how are we conditioned to to like certain things or to tune in or follows certain trends or to follow certain images right. And that's something that. I'm very interested in this moment. Is the ways in which that conditioning affects our our actions right but it also affects our our our connections with each other and our connections with community. Great so if we if we know that. There's a kind of instant gratification in posting selfie. Right because i have friends who are like you know i feel like shit today or i feel like garbage in garbage today I'm gonna post a picture of myself. Great on on instagram. Because they know that when they post a of themselves particularly. If it's a cute picture you know or maybe a little flashy picture right bill. Depending on how many followers they have they're gonna be guaranteed at least one hundred. Maybe two hundred hits right if they are on more often than it'll be three four five six hundred hits if they're on they're pretty consistently and then they'll it'll be thousands of hits and there's something that feels good about like the hearts right of strangers right strangers clicking and saying. Oh yeah you're beautiful. Oh yeah you're gorgeous. Oh yeah you're you know there's something to be said about that but there's also something to be said about our need for that external Kind of gratification. To for that. External validation as it were and i'm curious about for generations in particular how that is being manipulated. How our need for external validation is is being.

twitter mike today harry five two baltimore instagram tom dick thousands of hits two hundred hits ten years later one comment six hundred hits one at least one hundred works three single day
"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

07:08 min | 10 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"More on kind of more dynamic documentary because that's what community needed and that's what i had skill sets to create that I realized again in that regard. Just how vast how much of our history has not been told you know. Just across all mediums really across all disciplines and. How much work has yet to be done right in unearthing much of our history and in telling our stories beyond the transatlantic slave trade right. Were telling the stories that precede the trans atlantic slave trade and chattel slavery in the americas and the caribbean and europe. And because so much of that history has been omitted. A lot of my early so make work. Kind of focused on again Unpacking revealing that. Work as i When i graduated from school and began to come back into community. Hey ends you can right right right. Well we have conversations about. We would go to would go to different exhibitions or i would go. To different a performance art works and installations and have conversations with friends. You know about about the work. And sometimes you know it'd be critical critical responses. You know particularly if the work engaged black aesthetics in some way or engaged performative of black subjects but there were people in the work right. So it kind of objection. Gross appropriation of black culture. That happens all too often right. I mean even when we think about Some of the major commodities or the major exports of america right entertainment and popular culture. She noted earlier is remains one of the primary exports of america But that export is blast cultures right like popular culture. American popular culture is primarily a predominantly black culture And but that has never contextualised those ways. And so when i would get into conversations and i would give my my thoughts opinions critiques about these things friends would say Would encourage me to write these things. Why don't you. Why aren't you writing the stuff. Why aren't you contributing to publications. You know and i realized i was like let them come not critic you know. I'm not a reviewer. Like i'm i'm an artist. I'm filming right. You know but i'm not interested in critiquing anyone else. But i realized again the deficit of of that Field and of that work in that there were many contemporary friends artists to visual artist performance artist. Whose work in in baltimore Whose work would be completely ignored by so-called critics and publications or if the work was covered it would be completely decontextualize. Meaning that many of the people would not understand you know the context for the work that founded the work which largely was steeped in black culture. Right in the nuances of black culture. The nuances black history. But again because black history is elective. Right that people can choose to or choose not to engage right. There are very few people outside of our communities and even within our communities who are are well-versed within the nuances of black culture. And we're not able to sort of make those see those intersections between The the iconography or the histories Or the narratives or the themes that These artists were were drawing from to inform their work which meant that the review was deeply lacking right and and and in not incredibly critical right and journalistically lazy for the most part When it came to a lot of black black artists reviews a black artists and so again i started the writing as a means through which to kind of stand in the gap as it were to into rightly contextualized the works of of of contemporary artists. In what was amazing to me at the time because it was like okay. Well you know. I'll do this. I'll do this thing. Support folks you know and because i love writing i love art. You know so. It seemed appropriate. And what made me about the deeper. I got into it. And you know the more i wrote. Was that for many of the artists. It was the first time that someone had critically written about their work. For many of the others of the artists they'd been written about before but it was the first time that their work had again contextualized from a black lynn's that was critical And because i have a history in have an mfa right. I have an understanding of art history. A deep understanding of black art history in particular So it was very rare that someone could speak to all of those nuances again in a in a critical review form. Sure that fully understood the work. And i and so i continued in that lane up into the president largely again because i wanted to make sure that our communities in particular in specifically our communities in baltimore felt seem so recognized and again because if it's not written it's forgotten right if it's not written or contextualized often. It isn't considered for grants. Citizen considered exhibitions in museums. It isn't considered for collect for for a private collections right to be included in a publication as a significant thing a significant aspects or in artist and to be to be written about in a critical way is particularly important for contemporary black brown and indigenous artist. Because if that writing never happens oregon if that writing decontextualize is the work that they're creating than it limits the opportunities that may come to them where the kind of press or the exposure that they may get for future opportunities to for their work right and so So so writing. As i didn't necessarily again understand this going into it but the more i did it the more i understood. How significant This this work is and i'm proud to say that you know over the last three or four. Four or five years i've written extensively about covered many many Contemporary in emerging artists Contemporary artist based who are based in baltimore. Many of whom have gone on to have really extraordinary careers and Including drill gibbs. I think it was one of the first to really write about his work when he was still doing Rift zone the peanut series in no And you know had the opportunity. Work right about amy cheryl's long before she again. She was already an established artist but before she was commissioned to the The michelle obama work and so so many other theresa komati and so many other artists who again are early in their careers and have again since gone on to do to do other works so that an and i think in many ways that is why i continue that work and at this point. I'm kind of moving beyond the review.

Four americas five years europe caribbean first time four america American one Rift zone first three komati people theresa black transatlantic trans atlantic cheryl
"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

MTR Podcasts

06:47 min | 10 months ago

"carroll" Discussed on MTR Podcasts

"Welcome to getting to the truth in this art I'm this podcast. Not for anyone else out. So welcome to the podcast. I want to introduce my guest. I have a writer. Archivist purveyor a investigator of art. History and culture. Contributing writer for sugarcane magazine black art in america art black and of course the art. I have angela in carol. Welcome to the podcast. Thanks for having me. I tried it three or four times before. I put mics on. If we're being honest. Dad always good to go through lessons like people to say yay right stuff. I'm like okay so if you work. Could you describe your work because i never do a good job of it because i think is better for the artist creator to really get into the nuts and bolts of what they do so. Could you describe your work. Sure so again. Thank you for having me on the show. A great deal of the work. That i do is as an i consider myself an archivist. And i think i use that word lightly or broadly Or more dynamically. I suppose because the original context for that word is usually someone who takes you know objects that are deemed as relevant to culture or to history and then sort of placing them of preserving them in in some sort of way and in many ways. The work that i do is a means through which to to counter histories of exclusivity that in basically systemic racism in the ways in which black histories have been removed and purposefully omitted from historical cannons and from the projects of institutions that are charged to to preserve all histories right history with a big age. But we know that especially for our generations a little older that when we were in school history that did not focus on white subjects were inherently deemed electives right. Meaning that they enjoy if but if black history or histories about limit or histories about queer subjects are deemed electives or indigenous folks. Then that means that you have the choice to engage or not engage with those histories and so too often because all of us have had a choice right to engage or not engage and because institutions that again are charged to have an inclusive telling of history have chosen to engage in historically have chosen largely not to engage. Much of my work has been to correct. Correct that lack of engagement. Until i call myself. An archive is because much of the writing that i do is about trying to highlight contemporary african american artists. Who were older who have significant bodies of work but because of that systemic omission have been largely ignored in remain for the most part fairly obscure have not been have been maybe largely collected within communities but have not been largely collected by major institutions. And as such they're like see their history and their bodies of work may not be remembered for future generations and so a another significant portion of my work is about making sure that black memory is maintained as it relates to contemporary art works in post were art works created by folks within the african diaspora that is exceptional work. I dig it. I am now go to just follow everything for me. 'cause i'm lake. I sometimes and trying to do this. I find myself feeling. I need to put on a shirt and tie tying whenever. I talk to people because i'm trying to sell more like yeah man. I'm down with it. Not that. I'm down on my cellphone again. Sounds really interesting. And it's always does but my thing is i always jump to pop culture really quickly and you know sit there and i'll have conversations with my girlfriend i was like. Why isn't this person. Got his roses. Why did she got her roses. And it's like it's very randy thing but it's always kinda right and and one of the things that you mentioned early on that made me. Think the context right. It made me think eventually going to saying dig right. But the context made me. Think of being morgan lak- i was there grade. No seven so. We're i think we're in the same age group kind of and i remember the african diaspora. Of course we had and that was my favorite course there and i was like can i take more of these while steel. I was a business major but while still doing what i wanted to do like through my degree can take more of these because these courses are more interesting to me and it was just the one and as you said it was an elective like this is. I can't can't absolutely this. You can't so it's great to hear the work that you're doing that you're spending a lotta time and focus there so you've touched on it but i'm going to be remiss if i don't ask it again and maybe a little bit more in so your inspiration speak on that a bit like your inspiration for getting in into like your your focus area and how have your personal experiences influence that like that pursuit. So it's funny. Because like i have always written right like started off and again i'm old so back in the day. Poetry was kinda cool. You right kind of love jones era. You know swimmer cafe. You know when you know when we when we engage in a more dynamic way with each other and with when in with language but never never necessarily consider myself critic or like reviews or anything. Like that i was writing more creative. You know thought pieces and maybe critical essays from my styles with the cultural nuance. But i that informed what. I went to school for what i studied. Which is animation and film With an emphasis in ancient studies and history again focusing on the african diaspora in our and our histories and our and our history of creative genius and so much of so much of my early work is in the language of film. Right is in the aesthetics of stone language. And i think that those images and that iconography our language in and in and of themselves and as i started to develop those films largely experimental early on and then focusing.

america angela one african american seven carol african things three times four morgan love jones
"carroll" Discussed on The Auideo Show

The Auideo Show

05:43 min | 1 year ago

"carroll" Discussed on The Auideo Show

"Okay yep mike I can't think of his last name. Mike was running open mic. Sounds like mike my my house. Who made the first move who made. Oh funny okay. So well i walked it wasn't it. No maybe ida bad liar d- he was playing the wait on the microphone Thought man voices really cool and it was literally. I think it was that day that tony said. Hey play with as many people as you can. And he came up to me or i played. And then you know everybody's kind of getting their stuff together at the end of the night and he comes up he said hi. Isaac and i said oh yeah. I'd like to get your phone number. I think we should play sometime. He's like whoa whoa. I was just trying to tell me. my name. says it's easiest phone number. He ever got like he liked the assertiveness. Your phone number. This usually works. Yeah that's awesome livingston That's awesome what's it like out there compared to being in bozeman. Well i like livingston reminds me a lot of belgrade growing up a lot. You know a little bit smaller. I really like it over there. Very very creative. Lots of Art and writing and music and not that there isn't over here but We were living kind of west of belgrade so we weren't in town and all the action it was like we had to drive commute back and forth for belgrade. It's funny. I live about the same distance from bozeman in livingston that i did on the west of belgrade but no i still like coming over here. I mean obviously covert. I haven't been able to hunt down too many gigs. But i think i've just been trying to figure out what my next moves are totally in in the career. Why did you choose livingston. it's so funny. Because before we settled into that house we were prequalified for about a year and a half and just nothing good was popping up and Or affordable and i was telling isaac. Let's get outta here. I'm sick a winner and and then this house came up and it was kind of the perfect fit in and so we move over there and it was perfect and is like a standalone Yeah it is well..

belgrade mike ida isaac Mike tony bozeman livingston
"carroll" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"carroll" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"The whole idea behind these conversations is to learn from people who have committed their life efforts towards mastery in what we WANNA do is we want to understand? What are they searching for? How did they organize their life? What are the mental skills they use to build and refine their abilities to adjust and pivot to the unfolding unpredictable unknown, and that's really what this is about is to learn, and then to organize it in such a way that you can apply those insights to your own life. And this conversation, it's a little different. It's with sage, Steele and Pete Carroll and myself and P Carroll's the head coach of the Seattle Seahawks, and he's my business partner at compete to create. In this conversation, we decided to do something different. We flip the model a bit, and it's really fun. Reason I. AM incredibly excited to show that my first book. It's actually an audible original. It's coming out on July ninth and I couldn't be more honored to Co. write it with P. Carol. Head coach of the Seattle seahawks. It's titled Compete to create an approach to living in leading authentically. So it's an in depth, look on how world class athletes and artists, entrepreneurs and top business leaders how they organized their inner lives to explore the edges, the reaches of their potential in at the same time. Live life with purpose and meaning. Now this book, it's really about celebrating the insights and practices that are at the center of human flourishing and I think we found that sweet spot between science and story and very applied ways for you to be able to practice those skills. So. We pull back the curtain. And hopefully the design is to reveal the psychological framework and mental skills that are common to great performers and leaders. And again the whole goal is for you to be able to apply those same practices in all areas of your life, and if you've already taken our online course finding your best as it's called, this is a great companion. To your.

Seattle Seahawks partner Pete Carroll P. Carol Steele
"carroll" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"carroll" Discussed on The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

"Jennifer welcome to the PODCAST. How are you I? AM good good <hes>. Thank you for having me. Here of course I'm so excited for everyone to hear from my plus one from the she. The people list and learn why I just had to choose you. First question is winded your love of politics begin. Believe my level of politics began when I saw that. Being in a position of power away to make real change, and so I was just you know, gripe all the time about being in traffic traveling, you know two hours to go twenty miles and <hes>. Why are schools segregated employees funded? And you know trying to help my foster children, and there's so many a deficits in the system. And why weren't anyone speaking about? These issues got frustrated with those things that I wanted to be a part of the solution <hes> to solve a lot of these problems and I figured out with early that politics. Politics is a way to do it. That's the way that you are invited to the table and <hes>. Your brother's decisions are being made, but we're definitely GONNA dive into all the amazing work that you have done, but you are a laser in so many ways. You became one of the first black woman to graduate from the historically. All Mel Virginia Military Institute, which just Kudos to you I did Air Force Junior ROTC in high school. That was enough for me, but what made you apply? And what were you thinking when you got accepted? So I applied to Virginia. Military Institute because I was watching the Virginia Military Institute. Supreme Court decision on TV. Them is one of the top military colleges in this country, and they spent millions of dollars to keep women out of doors. And when I was in that high school classroom I remember hearing men in the class. They think like women don't belong where fear your. We can't run as fast as hard and we're not as smart. And <hes> I remember hearing justice. GINSBURG say <hes> basically that women can do all things if given the opportunity and I agree. And Tokyo's men that I'm just smart and just as capable and powerful as any man in that class, and I mentioned. So is that that time that my best friend? He was going to go to west point, and he walked up to me, and he said I'm going to go with you when you go to them. I because I want to be there to watch you when you fail. Even dough right? We were friends. Don't forget them still female and therefore interior. So I looked at him, and said challenge accepted. And, so he went to BMI, so did I and other meal in our class. And when they got their head shaped ball, so did I and they gave me a management for 'cause. The might have changed any of his standards for women. And actor years of marching wedding and bleeding beside over a thousand male cadet. Out of the other two men who with me to be a month, I'm the only one who of us walk across that. Virginia military stage, and so that's what I would lie and that's why I'm happy that I graduated succeeded. Oh my goodness, so we know that was not the first time he had to deal with men. Telling you that you couldn't do something. It wasn't your turn. You also experienced this. When you ran for office when he ran for Virginia. Delegate, you were not the quote. Unquote preferred candidates by Iran. Anyway you did our emerge boot camp. You are my emerge sister and you also ran your campaign while pregnant with twins. So tell everyone just the whole story about when made you WANNA run running for office while pregnant and just the entire experience of knowing that you were the best candidate to represent your district. Yeah, absolutely, so I decided to run in two thousand seventeen, because you know I was just tired of the partisan politics and the divisive rhetoric that was happening, and I always thought. How could we lack someone so bigoted and racist and xenophobic and homophobic to the leader of the free world and I knew then that we needed a response to talk. We needed a response design of politics that were happening in Richmond where they were trying to pass. A transactional ultra sank town bill and they put politically. Politically motivated and medically unnecessary restrictions on women's reproductive health care, or they weren't fully funding education in a way that makes sense, and so I decided to do something about it, and being one of the first public defenders ever like Virginia. General, assembly <hes> when I was practicing as a public defender I just saw so many of the inequities in our system, and how we have a two tier criminal justice here, Virginia one for the wealthy, and by themselves out of prison in one for everyone else. And, so I knew I could continue to be you know a community organizer in foster mom, and do all these things to help the community and fight against that laws, or I could become a delegate impact. Good one. So those are the things that really put the fire and leave me in order to <hes> for office while pregnant was not just one with two baby. And you know run against what was pretty much. Thought is as the establishment candidate who had all the endorsements? He outraced me four to one, and it didn't matter because I knew that I was the better candidate, and even though I could. I would be outraged. I knew that I would never outworked.

League of Women Voters Yuri Coalition Yari Jennifer Carroll Eileen Davis Google broncos connell data Sorority Inc. Richmond Virginia
"carroll" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"carroll" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Carroll described what this strange fact of physics might mean for every day idea of time in our place in the universe from the Ted stage this is really big we live in a galaxy the Milky Way galaxy there about a hundred billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy there approximately a hundred billion galaxies in the observable universe the hundred billion is the only number you need to know the age of the universe between now and the Big Bang is a hundred billion in dog years which tells you something about our place in the universe but we also like to understand it as a cosmologist I want to ask why is the universe like this one big clue we have that the universe is changing with time if you look at one of these galaxies a measured its velocity it will be moving away from you and if you look at a galaxy even further away we moving away faster so we say the universe is expanding what that means of course is that in the past things were closer together in the past the universe was more dense and was also hotter if you squeeze things together the temperature goes up that kind of makes sense to us the thing it doesn't make sense to us as much as that the universe that early times near the Big Bang was also very very smooth at early times those hundred billion galaxies were squeezed closer together and you have to imagine doing that squeezing without any imperfections without any little spots where there were a few more Adam's then somewhere else because if there had been they would have collapsed under the gravitational pull into a huge black hole keeping the universe very very smooth that early times is not easy it's a delicate arrangement it's a clue that the early universe is not chosen randomly there was something that made it that way we would like to know what which brings us back to time physicists use a special term to describe that early state of the universe when everything was delicately arranged.

Carroll Adam
"carroll" Discussed on Cars That Matter

Cars That Matter

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"carroll" Discussed on Cars That Matter

"On always the thing that I'm so terribly proud of we took mm-hmm hot waters from Japan Australia. France Spe England Germany Germany and went over and beat the best in the world. And there've been a hundred companies. Come to me WanNa make a movie of IT and Until the move is made the way I wanna make it giving them the credit. I'm not gonNA make the move. That was the voice of Carroll Carroll Shelby Automotive Designer Innovator Racer entrepreneur philanthropist owner about a million other descriptors could be accurately applied that clips from a conversation Carroll Shelby and I had in two thousand ten where he discussed the possibility of making a movie about his life. His impact on racing history and the stolen victory of his friend and collaborator Ken Miles Oils. The twenty four hours of Lemons in nineteen sixty six carroll shelby unfortunately passed away in two thousand twelve but a story was made into a movie in two thousand Nineteen Ford versus versus Ferrari at Twentieth Century Fox film directed by James Mangold and starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon and while the film is honorific to the people and events surrounding that historic race. I couldn't help but think about the Carroll Shelby I knew the man that I was honored to call a friend. This is Robert Ross with cars that matter and today I'm going to share two who previously unheard conversations I had with Carroll Shelby one from two thousand two and the other from two thousand ten but before we dive deep into car talk. I wanted to take take a moment to introduce you but where I even start with his racing. Victories at Lamont's with his revolutionary development work for Ford or maybe with his foundation dedicated to children children in need of organ donations. No I I want to introduce you to the person. Chile's a state of mind. I May WanNa Make Chili one way and the next day I may you WanNa make it some other way. And that's the beautiful thing about Chile. You can make it chilly verity. You know like they make it New Mexico read like they think that it has to be in in Texas but there's so many different variations Cincinnati. You know they don't eat chili without putting it over Spaghetti and that and there's more chilly eaten in Cincinnati Eddie. Ohio than any place in the world per capita that. No where else can I get this kind of information but talking to you Carol Shelby was who to talk to about anything. He had lived through so many adventures and taken so many chances that all you had to do was push a button and he could talk for hours and of course things he learned in one field would always always lead to life. Lessons in another is bashing for Chile brings to mind a likely apocryphal quote attributed to him that applies to life as well as famous recipe. If a guy tells you you have to put Hilo Monster meet in your Chile. You don't argue with him you just don't eat with him. So why did you live life. So Unabashedly L.. It was more fun to try to fail and it was is not tried it. You always learn something out of every failure that you get into to introduce carroll shelby as a Herculean task because what he did was achieved Herculean results results with the most modest resources. Shelby was one of the greats who defined the golden era of racing. He was a self talk. Guy Gives a Texas chicken farmer. He took his little little. MGB To the race track and won some races and next thing you know he's in the big league gender shelby would be to say. Here's a guy that went up against the greatest race car maker and probably narcissist assist of the Era Enzo Ferrari and considering that shelby was able to outclass Jimenez other competitors with a team passionate gear heads working for as he says. A pittance was remarkable but carol was a complicated and controversial guy. He probably made as many enemies as he made. Friends made sue anybody. Nobody making a big Cobra and told lots of stories. Some of them true but above all he was more humble than what imagine in wasn't false. Modesty see with a heart transplant. A kidney transplant. Some mornings I feel like getting up some mornings. I don't be eighty next birthday. I'm the most fortunate person in the world because I'm not supposed to be here. The doctors told me in one thousand nine hundred sixty. Then I'd be lucky to have five years and as big finger. Jack says I bypass last all American from Yale. He says Shelby every five years they find another pill or another operation to keep you alive and I don't know whether the world better off or not for this. His genuine empathetic regard for the people who work together to make the shelby named great set him apart and shelby worked with the best guys like Phil Remington. who was a genius and Einstein of the automotive world guys like Kim Miles? who was irascible as he was talented? A driver and kind of a bootstrap engineer into the bargain guys. Like Chuck Cantwell went onto perfect. The shelby mustangs Pete Brock. who was a great designer and created the look and feel of the Daytona Coupe and even the stripes and logos of the shelby? Gt Three fifty. These were the men under shelby's command that Ford trusted revitalize the racing program these men working together at cramped little shop in Venice were tasked bring about a singular goal beat Ferrari at any cost and they grabbed that bull by the horns and held on tight eventually they moved to lax La International Airport Board rented some hangers on the backside of imperial highway and they rolled up their sleeves and set to work and brilliantly after a disappointing season in nineteen sixty five they went on to a decimate Ferrari in nineteen sixty six. The Daytona Twenty four hour race at the stage with Kim Miles when winning in the GT forty mark to and at what is perhaps still. The most talked talked about race finish in history. The twenty four hour of Lemons Ford took first second and third place in nineteen sixty six with a trio of GT forties unheard of. It's an underdog story of men working together problem solving strategizing and achieving the impossible even if the true winner would never be acknowledged by the race. But we'll get to that what I'm trying to say is that by the time I met Carroll Shelby. The man was already a legend so one day my friend Jeff Pearlman calls me and says hey. Hey I've got a guy with me carroll shelby if you WanNa meet him you can do an interview to well of course with about thirty minutes notice. I cobbled together. Some questions grabbed recorder and we had a conversation in June of two thousand two shelby. You pitched the idea for the Cobra and to Ford and a C.. But am I correct creek. Ford came to you but Racing Mustang. What do they propose yes? It wasn't so much the racing the proposed in the Mustang was first developed by Don Frye and the people at Ford. It was built With a six cylinder engine of three three speed transmission and it was more or less a secretaries secretaries cars and we're going to deliver this car for twenty three ninety five. It became an immediate hit with secretaries and Lee. IACOCCA wanted more than that that he wanted to have a performance version of it so the people at Ford went to the Sports Car Club of America and says we're going to make a sport car out of the Mustang Stang talking to John Bishop at Sport Car Club America and he said what do you intend to do. He says we just wanted to be considered a sport sport car so I said Well No. It's not a sport car. There's a lot of things would have to be done to it anyway. They came back and talked to Lee. He picked up the phone and says says shelby. I want you to make a performance car out of the Mustang and really. I didn't WanNa do it because we were tied up with five. Different racing racing programs. The building of the cobras moving into a new facility and I really had my hands full because I was in over my head but Reagan who was actually afford employ but was assigned to coordinate everything between Shelby American and Ford has not. We gotta do this as if I cook wants. That's it done. He says we're going to have to do it so I said okay so I said we'd better put a budget together. Well there wasn't any money to speak of so they decided that fifteen hundred dollar budget was going to reduce this prototype of. Gt Three fifty. Fifteen hundred dollars. Yeah amazing. I went back the sports car club. America John John. I've.

Carroll Shelby Carroll Carroll Shelby Automot Ford Shelby Chile shelby mustangs Ferrari Cincinnati Texas Mustang France Spe England Germany Ger Kim Miles Ken Miles Oils Lee Japan Australia Sports Car Club of America James Mangold
"carroll" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"carroll" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Carroll described what this strange fact of physics might mean for everyday idea of time and our place in the universe from the Ted stage. The universe is really big. We live in a galaxy the Milky Way. Galaxy there about one hundred billion stars in the Milky Way. Galaxy there are approximately one hundred billion galaxies in the observable universe. One hundred billion is the only number you need to know the age of the universe between now and the big bang is one hundred billion in dog years. Tells you something about our place in the universe. But we would also like to understand it as it cosmologists. I wanna ask why is the universe? Like this one big clue we have is that the universe is changing with time. If you looked at one of these galaxies and measured its velocity it'll be moving away from you. And if you look at galaxy even further away, we'll be moving away faster. So we say the universe is expanding. What that means? Of course, is that in the past things closer together in the past the universe was more dense, and it was also hotter. If you squeeze things together, the temperature goes up that kind of makes sense to us. The thing that doesn't make sense to us as much is that the universe at early times near the big bang was also very very smooth at early times those hundred billion galaxies were squeezed closer together. And you have to imagine doing that squeezing without any imperfections without any little spots where there were a few more atoms than somewhere else because if there had been they would have collapsed under the gravity. National poll into a huge black hole keeping the universe. Very very smooth. At early times is not easy. It's a delicate arrangement. It's a clue that the early universe is not chosen randomly. There was something that made it that way. We would like to know.

Carroll
"carroll" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

04:06 min | 3 years ago

"carroll" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"So I wanna be that right in human form. Right. I want to be able to spark you and provide for you. So that's why I'm actively always collecting curated on behalf of others not for myself. Yeah. To your point. I get joy out of that. I get my own kind of satisfaction from that. But ultimately, I know I'm in service of others because people are in service for me for so long for so long my, and so this is my, you know, this is my way of paying back. Right. Would is that Mohammed Ali saying the debt the rent you pay. I I don't I'm paraphrasing. But something about the rent, you pay in life is like the gratitude that you give back or whatever. Right. So for the time that you're here on earth, you should pay it back through gratitude. Axe right of grace for others. Basically what he's saying? That's for the time that you get to spend on earth. That's what you have to pay back. Not just believe that's what I'm supposed to be doing. Because so many people did it for me so many, and I don't forget them. And I'm always, you know, I think about in many ways the last least the left behind the left out in the forgotten. I think about them a lot. So I'm always looking at the back of house people at hotels in events centers. Malware, talking to people who are doing catering food service. Custodians, right. I'm always talking to them in airports, always have stories to they're more than just that. And we walked past those people buy in were so transaction with them. And so I'm always trying to be transformational. I don't wanna be transactional. I wanna do something with you. Okay. No. Something. So yes. -solutely? Yeah. Like come on. We we we can do creative collaboration. We could definitely do that. Maybe this is what's going to be the outcome of this. Where can people find you? So you can find me Kevin Carroll catalysts dot com. Cattles with the K K A T L Y S T Kevin Carroll to ours and two ELS. Oh, forget those two ours into ELS people. Do it all the time at his incorrect. Do not go to Kevin Carroll dot com. That is not me, and you will see very quickly. He is not the same hue as me. That's all I got to say. So it's all good. Yeah. That's what we find. And my Twitter handle and socialist KC catalysts Bryant Bryant. Thank you again for time. Thank you again for the care. Thank you again for taking up space in my life. That has been there for I don't know how many years we're like I wanna say seven eight years may nor more than oh, please is more them. Yeah. It was more than wasn't two thousand eight when we started before that was it when we were doing the wind forever nothing before that yet. Well, well that was the beginning. But I think it was before two thousand. Yes. Let's call ten years. Again. What was twittering social it's Kevin Carroll catalysts dot com. And my socialist, Casey cattles, Casey catalysts cattles with the K Brian. Okay. So. If you're listening. Thank you. Thank you in part of the tribe that community celebrate Kevin what he's doing. If you are driving a community of vibrance and creativity and want to make game changing moves in your business. Bring Kevin out is fast. Yeah. That's fair. Yep. -solutely is the gator vis beret barechested have no problem come into stirring up some trouble in Lieven. Yes. That's my. That's my mo-. Right. Catalyze him out. You will not be disappointed. If you bring you out from. Absolutely, yes. So celebrate Kevin by doing that. And then, you know, at the same time Fontham online awesome. The questions give them some some juice to to wrestle with their. So again, thank you for being a friend. Thank you were taking up space inside of me. And thank you for celebrating genius today. My pleasure moment, you not got you. It's all good peace. Enjoy dots. Be appreciating. My Keno the deal done in dime.

Kevin Carroll Mohammed Ali Cattles Casey cattles Bryant Bryant Twitter Lieven Fontham seven eight years ten years
"carroll" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

02:59 min | 3 years ago

"carroll" Discussed on Finding Mastery: Conversations with Michael Gervais

"So I wanna be that right in human form. Right. I wanna be able to spark you and provide for you. So that's why I'm actively always collecting curated on behalf of others not for myself. Yeah. To your point. I get joy out of that. I get my own kind of satisfaction from that. But ultimately, I know I'm in service of others because people are in service for me for so long for so long. And so this is my, you know, this is my way of paying back. Right. Would is that Mohammed Ali saying the debt the rent you pay. I I don't I'm paraphrasing. But something about the rent, you pay in life is you know, like the gratitude that you give back or whatever. Right. So for the time that you're here on earth. You should you pay it back through gratitude and. Axe right of grace for others. Basically what he's saying? That's for the time that you get to spend on earth. That's what you have to pay back night. Just believe that's what I'm supposed to be doing. Because so many people did it for me so many, and I don't forget them. And I'm always, you know, I think about. In many ways the last lease the left behind the left out in the forgotten. I think about them a lot. So I'm always looking at the back of house people at hotels in events centers. Malware, talking to people who are doing catering food service. The custodians, right. I'm always talking to them in airports, always have stories to they're more than just that. And we walked past those people buy in. We're so transaction with them. And so I'm always trying to be transformational. I don't wanna be transactional. I want to do something with you. Okay. No, I'm so. Something. So. Absolutely. Yeah. Like come on. We got we we can do creative collaboration. We could definitely do that. Maybe this is what's going to be the outcome of this. Where can people find you? So you can find me Kevin Carroll catalysts dot com. Cattles with the K K A T A L Y S T Kevin Carroll to ours and two L's. Oh, forget those two ours into ELS people. Do it all the time at his incorrect. Do not go to Kevin Carroll dot com. That is not me, and you will see very quickly. He is not of the same hue as me. That's all. I gotta say. So it's all good. Yeah. That's what we find. And my Twitter handle and socialists KC catalysts Bryant Bryant. Thank you again for time. Thank you again for the care. Thank you again for taking up space in my life. That has been there for I don't know how many years, I know we're like I wanna say seven eight years may nor more than oh, please is more. Yeah. It was more than wasn't two thousand eight when we started before that was it when we were doing the wind forever. Nothing was before that yet. Well, well that was the beginning. But I think it was before two thousand dollars. Yes. Let's call ten years. Again. What was those.

Mohammed Ali Kevin Carroll Bryant Bryant Cattles Twitter K K A two thousand dollars seven eight years ten years two L