35 Burst results for "Carrie Johnson"

Simone Biles to Testify Against FBI in Larry Nassar Case

NPR News Now

00:52 sec | 4 months ago

Simone Biles to Testify Against FBI in Larry Nassar Case

"Biles and three other prominent. Us gymnasts are scheduled to testify on capitol hill today. Npr's carrie johnson reports. Lawmakers are examining the fbi's failure to fully investigate. Dr larry nassar following abuse complaints. The justice department inspector general says the fbi failed to act with urgency after received tips. About larry nassar in two thousand fifteen in all more than two hundred fifty women have since. Come forward to say that. Nassar sexually abused them as girls or young athletes including gymnast. Simone biles michaela maroney maggie nicols and allie razman all. Four women are expected to testify before the senate judiciary committee. Lawmakers say they're probing fundamental mistakes by the fbi that allowed nassar to continue to prey on young people. He's been sentenced to more than one hundred years in

Biles Carrie Johnson Dr Larry Nassar FBI Larry Nassar Nassar Capitol Hill NPR Simone Biles Michaela Maroney Justice Department Maggie Nicols Allie Razman Senate Judiciary Committee United States
"carrie johnson" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

NEWS 88.7

04:16 min | 5 months ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on NEWS 88.7

"He's set to resign at midnight. First, these headlines. Live from NPR NEWS. I'm Janine Herbst. President Biden is calling the FDA approval of fighters. Covid 19 vaccine quote key milestone in the ongoing fight against the surging coronavirus across the country. NPR's Scott Detroit has more At the top of his remarks, Biden spoke directly to Americans who may have been hesitant to get a vaccine. Before any of the three in use have been fully approved by the FDA outside of emergency. Use. The moment you've been waiting for us here, it's time for you to go get your vaccination. Get it today. The FDA approval will likely lead to more vaccine mandates by employers, colleges and other institutions. That's already starting with the U. S. Military vaccination rates have been rising in recent weeks as the Delta variant has led to more cases and hospitalizations. Biden pointed to three straight days last week were more than a million shots were administered. Scott Tetro NPR NEWS Washington U. S. Capitol. Police have cleared the officer who shot Ashley Babbitt as she stormed Congress on January 6th during the insurrection by pro Trump supporters. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports The officer won't face any professional discipline for his actions that day. Capitol Police officials say the officer's use of deadly force was lawful and he was following department policy since he believed he was acting to protect lawmakers as they fled during the capital Riot. The officer was not named because he and his family have been receiving death threats. He shot Ashley Babbitt after she tried to climb through a broken door near the speaker's lobby on January 6th. Babbitt's relatives have sued for more information about the shooting. In April, the Justice Department said the officer who killed Babbitt would face no criminal charges. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said his farewell to the People of New York today in the wake of a damning report that found he'd sexually harassed multiple employees. Cuomo ends his decade as governor two weeks after announcing that he would resign rather than face a probable impeachment. When Hogan from member Station W. N. Y C reports In pre recorded remarks, Cuomo still insisted he'd done nothing wrong and said he was resigning for the good of the state prolonging this situation. Could only cause governmental paralysis. And that is just not an option for you, and not an option for the state. He mentioned landmark accomplishments of his decade in office, legalizing same sex marriage banning assault rifles and raising the state's minimum wage. Cuomo's resignation comes after a scathing report from the state attorney general that corroborated sexual harassment and misconduct claims of 11 women. Lieutenant governor, Kathy Huckle will take his place after midnight tonight. She'll be New York's first woman governor for NPR news. I'm Gwen Hogan in New York. Wall Street higher by the closing bell the double up 215 You're listening to NPR news live from news 88 7 in Houston on guild water. Thousands of H I s D students have now returned to in person instruction. The district has a mask mandate, and many kids 12 and older are now vaccinated. But even some fully vaccinated students are anxious lyric. Williams started seventh grade at Lanier Middle School, She says she's excited but also worried for herself and her friends. I feel like it's not safe because they're just putting us in a huge building with a whole bunch of kids. And I mean, like, how are you supposed to know? Because just because they don't have a fever doesn't mean they don't have covid lyric attitudes happy with a mask mandate and wants to wear her mask on campus to stay safe. Oil giant Chevron says it's now mandating the covid vaccine for some of its employees. Mad Harem looks at who is now required to get the shots. Chevron says they will require the shots for Cruz, who work on platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. In a statement, the oil and gas giant says the mandate is for quote certain jobs out there. Earlier this month. Valero also mandated shots for some field jobs and new workers has also said they were making similar vaccine mandates. Texans can expect an increase in their gas and electricity.

Carrie Johnson Gwen Hogan Janine Herbst Ashley Babbitt Cuomo Scott Tetro April Houston Williams Kathy Huckle January 6th FDA Trump Gulf of Mexico Hogan NPR 11 women Scott Detroit Lanier Middle School last week
Carrie and Boris Johnson Are Expecting a Second Baby After Miscarriage Heartbreak

The Money Hour

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

Carrie and Boris Johnson Are Expecting a Second Baby After Miscarriage Heartbreak

"The way for the wife of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Instagram. Carrie Johnson said she was incredibly blessed to be pregnant again after suffering a miscarriage earlier this year. The couple's first child, Wilfred was born in April of last year. I'm Pam Pouso, and

Carrie Johnson Boris Johnson Wilfred Pam Pouso
"carrie johnson" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:05 min | 6 months ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on NPR News Now

"The centers for disease control and prevention announced today mask wearing should resume indoors in a huge swath of the country. Those areas where despite the agency's best efforts chronic virus infections are rising and vaccination rates remain low and. Cdc director was show. Alinsky did not pull any punches today. When describing the biggest reason for the policy recommendation and most importantly the associated illness suffering and death could have been avoided with higher vaccination coverage in this country. The numbers would seem to bear that out with almost all the new infections and hospitalizations involving the unvaccinated the white house meanwhile said to be strongly considering requiring federal employees to show proof of vaccination or submit to regular testing and mask wearing some of the. Us capitol police officers who defended the capital during the january six insurrection by loyalists a former president. Donald trump gave emotional accounts of the attack. Today the officers testifying in some cases they were beaten as the mob overwhelmed them breaking windows and doors as they sought to disrupt the congressional certification of joe biden's presidential win new house committee today. Launched its probe with the focus on the law enforcement officers who protected lawmakers. Some officers said they thought they'd be killed in criticized republican lawmakers who sought to downplay the violence. The senate has voted fifty eight to forty one to confirm. President binds nominee lead the environment division at the justice department. Npr's carrie johnson reports. Todd cam is a veteran of the unit. Todd kim joined the justice department through its honors program for young lawyers spending seven and a half years working on environmental cases. Now kim we'll rejoin that division as it. Senate confirmed leader eight. Republican senators joined democrats to advance his nomination. Kim says he's called a public service to enforce laws against pollution and protect native american land rights. He says he'll work to preserve america's natural treasures for his own kids and future generations. Carrie johnson npr news washington..

centers for disease control an Alinsky Donald trump carrie johnson white house Todd cam justice department Todd kim joe biden senate america Npr kim Kim washington
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:03 min | 7 months ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"The so called resident appears to have resisted going there for some time after this Live from NPR News in Culver City, California I'm Duane Brown in Washington, D C. The Supreme Court ruled today that a cheerleader's profanity laced social media message complaining about her school and posted while she was off campus is protected speech under the First Amendment. As NPR's Carrie Johnson tells us, the justices laid out what schools could police in speech off campus, but said Brandy Levi's messages did not cause the kind of disruption that would require them to punish her severely. The high Court ruled that schools can police some off campus speech by students giving an opening for things like policing, bullying and harassment off campus. But the court majority found the school here in Pennsylvania was out of line that it went too far. That there wasn't a substantial disruption in school because of those Snapchat messages. Brandy Levi sent NPR's Carrie Johnson New York Times reporter Nicole Hannah Jones says she told the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She will not teach this fall without being granted tenure as NPR's David Folkenflik reports. The demand is the latest twist in a controversy. It's caused a furor at the school. The U. N c husband School of journalism and media sought to grant Hannah Jones tenure. After all, she's a Pulitzer Prize winner, a National magazine award winner, a MacArthur Genius Award winner, and she has a masters from the school itself. Arkansas newspaper publisher Walter Husband, after whom the school is named, pointed to questions about claims made in the 16 19 project at Times Initiative about the legacy of slavery and prejudice in American life. The university's board of trustees declined to take up her nomination. Some black faculties say that's making them question how welcome they are. At Chapel Hill. The husband school gave her a five year contract to teach anyway. Hannah Jones now says she's rejecting that offer. The trustees next meet three weeks from now. David Folkenflik NPR news Stocks finished mixed on Wall Street. Today You're listening to NPR news and at 5 32 on Wednesday, June 23rd. This is KCRW. I'm Larry Peril. Singer Britney Spears says she wants her 13 year old court ordered conservatorship to be over. She made a rare appearance in court virtually today, at times, expressing her anger, sadness and frustration. Since 2000 and eight. Her father, Jamie Spears, has been the conservator of the pop star's estate, which is estimated to be worth about $60 million. Some of her fans like Kevin Wu, who attended the free Britney Rally in L A Today want the conservatorship ended, too. It's a civil rights issue, and for that reason alone, everyone should be interested in this because anyone can be affected by conservatorship abuse. Um, I think this flew under the radar for too long. Singer also made some explosive claims in court, saying currently she's not allowed to get married and have babies. Spears also accused her father of being abusive. Adding the cheese traumatized. She asked the judge for an end to the conservatorship without forcing her to undergo any more mental evaluations saying, like quote, Deserve to have a life. Vice President Kamala Harris will be traveling to the southern border on Friday. Former California senators excursion follows months of criticism from Republicans over her failure to go there Also comes amid outcry over the Biden administration's handling of a large increase in families and unaccompanied minors arriving at the border from Central America Here's will visit El Paso, Texas, should be accompanied by Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. The L. A native is the first Latino and former refugee to fill that cabinet position. President Biden has been in office less than 160 days. But those already looking ahead to the next presidential race will have one eye fixed on Simi Valley tomorrow night. Former Republican vice President Mike Pence will be addressing a sold out crowd at the Reagan Library. Political buffs will not only be listening for what he says. But looking at how he's received, KCRW's Matt Dillon explains. Regardless of if you agree or disagree with Pence's politics, he carried out his constitutional duty on January six and certified the election results that declared Joe Biden the winner. Following the Constitution has caused pence dearly in GOP circles. A decade ago, he was a presidential front runner. But today he may not be winning overall Republican voters. Just last week he was booed and called a traitor by some in the audience at a Florida event. Here in Southern California. The Reagan Library will host pence Thursday as part of its time for choosing Speaker series. The Reagan Foundation is tapping conservative thinkers, politicians and what it dubs emerging 2024 presidential candidates to share their insights on the future of the Republican Party and what it should stand for at his KCRW's Matt Gillam and Elton John getting ready to say goodbye to the L. A brick road. Singer announced new dates for his farewell tour today, and it may set a record for the longest retirement tour ever. John started the tour in 2018 with the expectation that it would end in 2020. But then this thing, the pandemic market John's final two performances in North America will be here at Dodger Stadium. November. 19th and 20th of 2022 support for NPR comes from T Mobile for business dedicated to using unconventional thinking to help businesses realized new possibilities. Delivering a five G network to unlock productivity. T mobile dot com slash unconventional Right now it's 81 degrees in.

Kevin Wu Joe Biden Matt Dillon David Folkenflik Jamie Spears Brandy Levi Carrie Johnson Elton John Nicole Hannah Jones 2018 North America Pennsylvania Hannah Jones Britney Spears Larry Peril Matt Gillam 2020 Southern California Duane Brown Republican Party
Judge Says Bill Barr Was Misleading on Trump Obstruction

BBC World Service

00:54 sec | 9 months ago

Judge Says Bill Barr Was Misleading on Trump Obstruction

"Of a document that the Justice Department used when it declined to charge. Former President Trump with obstruction. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports that the judge is raising questions about misrepresentations to the court Judge Jamie Berman Jackson delivered a victory for the nonprofit citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington crew. Crew sued to get a copy of the memo that Trump Justice Department cited when it decided not to indict the former president for interfering with the probe by special counsel Robert Mueller. Judge Jackson has now reviewed the document, and she says it appears the Trump DOJ had already decided not to charge the former president with a crime. She says some of their explanations were misleading and incomplete. A spokesman for new leaders at the Biden Justice Department declined comment. The DOJ has two weeks to respond in court. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington The former Minneapolis

Carrie Johnson President Trump Judge Jamie Berman Jackson Justice Department Citizens For Responsibility An Trump Justice Department Judge Jackson NPR Robert Mueller Washington Biden Justice Department Minneapolis
Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

Morning Edition

06:35 min | 11 months ago

Merrick Garland Confirmation Hearing For AG

"But today is all about Merrick Garland. He'll appear before the Senate to take questions from lawmakers for the position of attorney general. Most people know Merrick Garland's name because of something that didn't happen. Garland never got a hearing after President Obama nominated him to serve on the Supreme Court five years ago. Here's NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. Merrick Garland has devoted nearly 45 years to the law. But he didn't start out that way is, he told Professor Martha Minnow at Harvard Law School in 2016. Why don't you go to law school in the first place? Chemistry, well chemistry and math. Garland had planned to become a doctor. He wanted to help people one on one, but his collision with the hard sciences spun him toward the law, where he's looked for that sort of direct connection ever since. In the mid 19 eighties. At his law firm in Washington, Garland became a rising star. He made time for a young college graduate who worked in the copy center to Randy Thompson says Garland reviewed one of his papers, photocopied it and rearrange the paragraphs. That was the beginning of In essence and becoming a riding coach. For me, it was just extraordinary experience and became my coach. Eventually, my mentor and 30 something years later, a friend. Eventually Garland Road, MMA reference for law school and has kept in touch ever since, Thompson says garlands Still a little old school still humble, still looking to help. The only thing that really has changed about him, And I guess me as well is the color of hair. I don't know, well respected judge as attorney general. Help get the department under the quagmire of partisan politics that many people think it devolved to under President Trump and Attorney General Bar That's Georgetown law professor Paul Butler. He says the DOJ has been reeling from political scandals and racing to confront the threat from homegrown extremists. Merrick Garland has faced both before. After clerking on the Supreme Court. Garland took a job as an advisor in President Jimmy Carter's Justice Department. In those years after Watergate, DOJ struggled to separate partisan influence from law enforcement and establish new boundaries for the FBI. Garland also played a bit part in some of the biggest investigations of that era from political corruption to national security that Garland says later turned into hit movies. American Hustle about the Abscam case. Argo about the ex filtration of hostages in Iran and the most important the miracle on ice. Which was about the Lake Placid Olympics, where I did work on the security for the Olympics By the 19 nineties, Garland was prosecuting a violent gang that terrorized people in a public housing project. And helping build a case against DC's mayor Marion Barry. On drug charges Back inside Justice Department headquarters, Garland became the man to see for the hardest problems. The car bomb exploded outside of a large federal building in downtown Oklahoma City, Garland would soon travel to the site of the most deadly domestic terror plot in American history. 168 people died in that bombing in Oklahoma. Former deputy Attorney General Jamie Go Relic remembers watching that day with Garland by her side, he basically said while watching Children being pulled out of the wreckage. That he had to go. He really wanted to go. We both had young Children at the time and What we saw on those screens was so affecting. Garland oversaw the search warrants protected the chain of evidence and insisted that reporters have access to court proceedings. We wanted somebody Who could make sure that the investigation was done by the book. And that any indictment was bulletproof. Prosecutors later convicted Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols for their role in that bombing. Former prosecutor Beth Wilkinson says Garland played an important role in other confrontations with extremists in those years, including a standoff with the heavily armed Montana free Men. One of the examples I can think of is sometimes and there were these stand downs where there would be, you know, arrest warrants for someone, or there would be some kind of controversy between people who were challenging the federal government. America's first instinct wasn't to go in and arrest everyone. It was to try and along with the FBI to see if there's a dispute could be resolved. Wilkinson says. The FBI went on to arrest those men later. She credited garlands, quick thinking and cool head that may have prevented a tragic outcome. Just about the only criticism Garland's nomination has drawn is in the area of civil rights. Garland is a moderate, so I don't see him as the bold and visionary leader or racial justice that some people were hoping for again. Georgetown law professor Paul Butler that he's not an ideologue is both discerning for people who want an attorney general. To meet this moment of national reckoning inspired by the movement for Black lives and the killing of George Floyd Butler says he thinks girls just from the White House long time civil rights advocate Wade Henderson says Garland is up to the task. But Henderson says it's a big one. The next attorney general, for example, has to do everything In his or her power to fight for voting rights. Police reform Criminal justice reform and LGBT Q equality. For the past 23 years, Garland has been a federal appeals court judge in that role, he doesn't have much of a chance to share his personal views. Carolyn Lerner, the chief mediator at the courthouse, says Garland took an early, an important lead to update policies that protect workers from sexual harassment and other misconduct. I think it's very clear that Judge Garland cares a lot about these issues, and he really wants employees to be happy and comfortable in the workplace, and when he was chief judge, he took his responsibility. To these employees very seriously, she says. Garland wants to continue another of his projects at the Justice Department tutoring sessions with a young public school student. This year. The judge is working with an 11 year old boy and his twin sister. Your mom is Andrea Tucker. He makes this so interactive for them and so much fun and they can't get enough of it. It's the kind of public service that Garland has always wanted to

Garland Merrick Garland Justice Department Carrie Johnson Professor Martha Minnow Randy Thompson President Trump Paul Butler Supreme Court FBI Harvard Law School Jamie Go Olympics Georgetown NPR Beth Wilkinson President Obama Marion Barry Senate Jimmy Carter
Biden orders DOJ to phase out private prison contracts

Morning Edition

02:56 min | 1 year ago

Biden orders DOJ to phase out private prison contracts

"Joe Biden is pledging that racial equity will be at the heart of his administration. I ran for president because I believe we're in a battle for the soul of this nation. And the simple truth is our soul be troubled as long a systemic racism is allowed to persist. But in signed executive orders this week that cover housing, private prisons and the treatment of Native Americans and Asian Americans, NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. President Biden says the country is at a turning point in its attitude toward racial justice after police killings of unarmed black people sparked protests last summer, those eight minutes and 46 seconds. It took George floors, life open the eyes of millions of Americans and millions of people around all over the world. Over his first week in office, Biden reversed the so called Muslim ban and paved the way for a return to diversity and inclusion training programs in the government. On Tuesday he signed four new executive orders. Susan Rice leads the White House Domestic Policy council. Today, The average black family has just 1/10 the wealth. The average white family. While the gap between white and black in home ownership Is now larger than itwas in 1960. The first bite an executive order directs federal agencies to overcome a history of racism in housing and restore tools to uncover evidence of discrimination when people apply for rental units and mortgages. The second executive order instructs the Justice Department to phase out its contracts with private prisons. This will not end mass incarceration, but it's an important step toward taking the profit motive out of incarceration. That's David 40. He directs the National Prison project of the American Civil Liberties Union. Varty says the president has an obligation to doom or because of his promises. On the campaign trail. There is much, much more work that needs to be done Most. Obviously, this order does not apply to immigration detention, where more than 80% of detained immigrants are held. In private for profit prisons. The final two executive orders promised support and respect for Native American sovereignty in call on federal agencies to fight xenophobia against Asian Americans. Hateful rhetoric against them has spiked during the pandemic. Males. A bear directs public policy at the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights under law, she expects to see more from the federal government, since it's already hired experts and racial equity across the administration. One of the strongest signals to the civil rights community has been the appointments of key administration officials. Who come from the civil rights community and are committed to their core of their work to racial equity and justice. Biden says to expect Maura executive orders soon Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington

Carrie Johnson President Biden White House Domestic Policy Co Joe Biden Susan Rice NPR Varty Biden George Justice Department American Civil Liberties Union Lawyers Committee For Civil Ri David Federal Government Maura Npr News Washington
NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

The Takeaway

01:02 min | 1 year ago

NAACP LDF Announces Marshall-Motley Scholars Program

"Of peril but also a time of tremendous possibilities. The head of the end of the Legal Defense and educational Fund says the organization wants a new generation of civil rights lawyers in the South. Now it has a $40 million gift from an anonymous donor to put them through law school. Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson. LDF president, Caroline Eiffel says the scholarships will focus on the place where most of the LDS cases originate. The South is a critical region in this country for civil rights activism. It is still the region where a majority of black people live. The program is named after two LDF alumni late Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall and Constance Baker Motley, the first black woman to be a federal Judge. The scholarships will cover tuition, room and board and other training. In return, applicants agree to spend at least eight years working on civil rights cases in the South. Eiffel says they're likely to handle voting rights disparities and housing and education and other cases. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington This

LDF Carrie Johnson Caroline Eiffel Justice Thurgood Marshall Constance Baker Motley NPR Supreme Court Eiffel Washington
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Today it's worth noting is is a day at the Department of Justice is it's the last day of Attorney general Bill Bars tenure. Who isn't in charge of the DOJ. Once he leaves the deputy attorney general, Jeffrey Rosen, will be at the wheel for the final weeks of the Trump presidency at the Justice Department. He's going to be under a lot of pressure from the White House. Trump wants him to appoint special counsel's A prosecutor. Look at Trump's baseless claims of election fraud, and Trump also wants a special prosecutor to look at the taxes. President elect Joe Biden's son Hunter, The U. S attorney in Delaware is already doing that and Bill Barr told reporters this week. There's no basis to appoint extra special prosecutors. He thinks the investigation's being handled responsibly. We will see if his successor, Jeffrey Rosen, can resist some of that intense criticism that is likely to come at him from President Trump in the next month. Carrie Johnson covers the Department of Justice. Thanks carry my pleasure. Alright, Covert 19 has become the leading cause of death in parts of Latin America. The region has been particularly hard hit, and that's because of a combination of health, social and economic factors. Here's more from NPR's Jason Beaubien. In Peru on all Saints Day. People traditionally visit the graves of loved ones, particularly loved ones who've recently passed away. They bring flowers, food and loaves of specially baked bread to their graves. This year, However, things were different level Lance a cemetery on the outskirts of Lima. Lines of police and soldiers in riot gear blocked the entrance to the graveyard. Peru has the highest death rate from Cove it in the Americas. That's the pandemic continued to spread. In late October, the local mayor Raul Diaz, Perez, told residents not to come to visit their deceased loved ones. Mahoto. The dilithium intake will appoint an apology in Peru. Napoleon decision as growing up standing in front of lines of police outside the cemetery, Mayor DEA said on a video posted on his Facebook page. That entry to the graveyard is prohibited. Siam was Zobelle way have been hard hit, he said. In these measures to avoid crowds or to reduce the spread of the virus, the fact that Cove it has hit Latin America harder than other regions isn't a fluke. The continent had all the ingredients to ignite a pandemic, crowded living conditions, poverty, social discord. Poor governance and fragmented, underfunded health system's not in America is one of the most unequal regions of the world That's caress attend the head of the Pan American Health Organization, the WH Ose Regional Office for the Americas on Corbett 19. Excess abated, This inequalities chances. The pandemic has highlighted and exploited long standing problems in the region. The virus swept through dense urban metropolis is like Mexico City, Bogota and South follow where physical distance It was difficult, if not impossible, and many people have jobs that they simply can't do from home. The many millions so rely on the informal economy for their livelihoods didn't have the option to stay home. The region has high levels of obesity, diabetes and other underlying chronic health conditions that during this pandemic have made the virus far more deadly. Jeremy VR is a senior health specialist with the World Bank specializing in Latin America in there, who which is one off the countries where you have had the highest number off excess death from covered 19. Doing this summer 85% off the people would died from Covent 19. Where in overweight or obese, Another factor in Latin America is the hodgepodge of ways that people access healthcare some go to private clinics and hospitals. Some rely on government programs. Some on Lee visit a doctor in a pharmacy once they're sick. These siloed systems offer dramatically different levels of service to residents based on what if anything, they're able to pay. Frederico Go a nice, the deputy head of the health division of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, says in the midst of a national health crisis, it's hard to get all these different health systems to work together, and there's also often mismatches in resource is in Brazil. The suits right. The publicly funded health system has roughly 40% off the ICU beds. The majority of Brazil's ICU beds. Aaron Private hospitals, which served less than 25% of the population, and this is in the system that is supposed to be universal system, like the national health System of Finding these structural inequities in Brazilian health care can mean that for the masses with limited resource is a severe case of cove. It could be potentially fatal while if they had money, or they live somewhere else they might survive. And this is part of why covert is now leading cause of death in the region. Jason Beaubien NPR news Israel will have its fourth national election in two years. NPR's Daniel Estrin explains what's going on? Israel's parliament dissolved automatically at midnight because it failed to pass the budget. It was Netanyahu who resisted passing the budget, triggering new elections and he did not pass the budget in order to remain in power. Throughout his trial. Yohannan pleasanter of the Israel Democracy Institute says Netanyahu wants to strengthen his position as a defendant on trial facing bribery and fraud charges. New elections means Netanyahu was no longer bound by his power sharing agreement to step down and hand over the job, too centrist rival Benny Guns Now Netanyahu gets a fresh shot at a new term. Elections are expected to take place March 23rd and you could you have. It's a whole another world people on TV last night, Netanyahu said his right wing Likud Party would win because of his success is procuring Cove in 19 vaccines and forging diplomatic ties with four Arab countries this year. But he doesn't have a clear path to victory. Many Israelis they're sick of Netanyahu after more than a decade and office he's been blamed for a botched response to the pandemic, and polls showed these three elections could end in stalemate just like the last three elections. Netanyahu has had strong support with voters. But his corruption charges a reliability and he may not have enough support in parliament to lead a majority pleasanter of the Israel Democracy Institute. This won't end until either Mr Nathaniel is replaced or If he finds a way by legislation or political maneuvering, tow either put his trial on hold or suspended In the last elections, Netanyahu faced a centrist challenger guns, but his party is largely disintegrated. This time Netanyahu is leading challengers are all right wing former allies no matter who wins, it'll likely be a right wing leader who supports Jewish settlement expansion in the occupied West Bank and opposes Palestinians declaring independence on that land. And that could place Israel on a collision course with the incoming Biden administration. Daniel Estrin. NPR NEWS Jerusalem And this afternoon on all things.

Netanyahu Latin America Peru Trump Jeffrey Rosen Department of Justice Israel NPR Justice Department Jason Beaubien Cove attorney Daniel Estrin Americas Israel Democracy Institute deputy attorney general fraud Delaware
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For the North Bay in the East Bay until nine this morning, partly to mostly sunny today, 7 30. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Dave Mattingly that were prosecutors are being advised they have the authority to investigate any major voting irregularity is related to the 2020 election. Guidance is in a memo from Attorney General William Barr. NPR's Carrie Johnson says bars memo is leading One Justice Department lawyer to resign, claiming bar is weaponizing the DOJ to help President Trump Richard Pilger says he will regretfully resign as director of the election crimes branch at the Justice Department. The move seemed to be a protest to a memo from Attorney General Bill Bar. Our told prosecutors they could launch investigations into voter fraud, even though there's been no evidence of widespread fraud in the presidential election. Benita Gupta, justice official in the Obama administration. Says the bar memo is a scare tactic that gives Trump a political talking point. The president has refused to concede the election so far in his campaign is suing in several states, but he's provided no solid proof to back up any fraud claims and courts have largely rejected the cases. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington The U. S. Supreme Court is hearing a challenge to the Affordable Care Act Today, the Trump Administration and Republican attorneys general in 18 states want the law struck down They argue in Congress eliminated the penalty for not having health insurance in 2017, the law became unconstitutional. This's NPR news. Live from Kait VD News on Brian What President elect Joe Biden's new Corona Virus Advisory board includes three faculty members at UC San Francisco Doctors David Kessler, Eric Goolsbee and Robert Rodriguez. All professors at the school will serve on the 13 member board. The group is set to advise Biden and Vice President elect Kamala Harris is the transition into the White House. Kessler served as FDA commissioner under two previous administrations whose be worked on AIDS policy for two presidents. Rodriguez also works at San Francisco general and Highland Hospitals. If a new Covad 19 vaccine should become available, would teachers be among the earlier groups to receive it? That was a question fielded yesterday by a panel advising the state on its vaccine distribution plan is Julia McAvoy reports. It's going to be a while before we can protect Children from the cove. It 19 virus, said Dr Randy Bergen immunization lead it, Kaiser Permanente's Bergen said that means teachers are more likely to be exposed until there's a vaccine that safe and effective for Children. So, Bergen says teachers should get their vaccine whenever it becomes available for them. It's like any other vaccine..

President Trump Richard Pilger NPR Carrie Johnson Justice Department president Joe Biden fraud Bergen David Kessler Robert Rodriguez San Francisco Attorney Dr Randy Bergen Dave Mattingly Trump Administration Washington Kamala Harris
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning edition from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin and I'm David Green. President Trump has made the U. S. Justice Department one of his most frequent targets. This is despite the fact that Attorney General Bill Bar has largely carried out the White House's policy agenda and even intervened in cases to help the president's friends. Well, now a member of special counsel Robert Mueller's team is speaking out about this. NPR national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has his story. Over two decades that the Justice Department Andrew Weissmann made his name prosecuting mobsters and corporate kingpins. But it's his last assignment that prompted him to break his silence. I worked in the Justice Department for over 21 years. Under Republican and Democratic administrations. And seeing the rule of law be really trashed by the attorney general, is Soul crushing many of the people brought to justice by Weisman and his colleagues on special counsel Robert Mueller's team were convicted, then freed President Trump's former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, one early release from prison near the start of the Cove in 19 pandemic, even though he did not fit the Justice Department's own criteria. Trump's friend Roger Stone got a break in his sentencing, then got his sentence commuted by the White House. Now, Wiseman says he's watching for the president to take more action after the election. I suspect strongly that if the president does not win reelection, that he is going to pardon a lot more people related to the Trump organization, his family People that work there and even himself. That's never obviously been done. Where President has never pardoned himself, curtailing a future presidents power to pardon himself is just one of the ways experts want to overhaul the justice system for a president who would try to inject politics into the DOJ. In a new book, Weissman describes the frustrations he encountered. While investigating a president constantly threatening to fire him. He says Congress and the next administration need to think about ways to strengthen the special counsel system. For one thing, making it clear lawmakers can access the evidence investigators gather. Even today, Congress does not have our underlying evidence, and there's litigation over that next, he says, is a change to make the special counsel report public. Wiseman says people expected to read a clear set of findings from the Mueller team. But it took weeks for the full report to emerge and only after Attorney General Bill Bar issued a misleading summary. I think that the big picture problem is that the current special counsel rules really have the audience for our report being The attorney general. In a private report that no one sees, Weisman says Congress should be able to trigger the appointment of a special counsel, not just the attorney general. And he says persistent attacks by Russia on American elections require a major response. He says the justice and homeland Security departments need to create permanent teams focused on election security. So that those people are not doing it part time. They're dedicated career people to making sure that they are looking for ways to detect. And prevent election interference. And speaking of career people, Wiseman says he's stunned by the number of prosecutors who walked out the door in protest these last three years. Carrie, I can't tell you how unusual that is again. I've been in the department for 21 years, I have never seen that he thinks a new attorney general who's committed to transparency can help restore public confidence of justice. But he says that won't be quick or easy. Carrie Johnson. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news. It's.

special counsel U. S. Justice Department president Wiseman Attorney President Trump Robert Mueller Justice Department NPR News Carrie Johnson Weissman Bill Bar NPR White House Congress Weisman Rachel Martin Andrew Weissmann Paul Manafort David Green
Federal appeals court: Trump must turn over tax records to New York prosecutor

Forum

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Federal appeals court: Trump must turn over tax records to New York prosecutor

"System and had district Attorney's entitled to President Trump's tax returns. We have details from NPR's Carrie Johnson, the U. S Court of Appeals for the second Circuit is giving a green light to district Attorney Cyrus Vance. The grand jury in New York wants eight years of President Trump's tax returns. It's part of a broad criminal investigation into tax and insurance fraud. Trump has been fighting the demand. His lawyers say it's politically motivated harassment, but multiple federal courts have disagreed. The president still could make a last ditch bid of the Supreme Court. New York, prosecutors say Trump is trying to run out the clock. They want to move fast to avoid problems with the statute of limitations. This is

Donald Trump President Trump Attorney Cyrus Vance New York U. S Court Of Appeals Carrie Johnson Supreme Court NPR Harassment
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"Will continue, Tio Provide expertise in the resident's He's in the residence now on and in true fashion. He's probably critiquing the way that I'm answering these questions. First Lady Melania Trump tweeted that she is also experiencing mild symptoms. Meadows said that other close aides, including himself, social media director Dan Scavino, and the president's son in law, Jared Kushner, all tested negative today. Tamara Keith. NPR NEWS The Bidens air negative. A short time ago, a physician issued a statement that Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden, we're cleared for infection. They were tested after the White House confirmed this morning that the president and first lady have tested positive for Corona virus. Both couples were in the same space for Tuesday night's debate in Ohio. At the event hosted by the Cleveland Clinic. Biden wore a mask except while he was on stage. Trump did not. They were physically distance well. Several other people who might have been exposed to the president recent days or weeks are also getting tested, among them, Attorney General William Barr. NPR's Carrie Johnson. Reports of Justice Department says bars result turned up negative. A spokeswoman for the attorney general says he last saw President Trump on Saturday at a reception for a Supreme Court nominee. Amy Cockney. Barrett. Bill Bar got a Corona virus test Friday morning out of an abundance of caution Bar has a busy travel schedule this month. Carrie Johnson. NPR NEWS Washington The U. S economy still gaining jobs, but at a pace that has been slowing over the last three months. The Labor Department reports nonfarm payrolls increased by 661,000 jobs in September. Over millions of people are out of work due to the financial carnage of this pandemic. Some of those jobs have been lost permanently. Elite schools senior economist with a think tank Economic Policy institute, highlighted some of the main areas of concern. Honestly, the public sector is particularly concerning to me. We saw many jobs lost in public sector, particularly in state and local governments. That was concerning another concerning note in this report was a significant uptick in long from unemployment. Those that are unemployed for at least 27 weeks. And that is concerning, particularly as a recession drags on, and more and more workers are unemployed for longer periods of time. US stocks air training slightly lower this hour. This is NPR and support for NPR comes from the CMC Foundation, working to improve postsecondary educational outcomes for underserved students through evidence based innovation. Learn more at ecmc foundation dot org's It is morning becomes eclectic. Here on K. C. R W so much music rolled in this morning. Some of it I didn't even get all the way through bunch yesterday and last night, So it's always that Friday sort of rush to absorb as much as humanly possible. And Kurt vile, released a new epi. One song is a cover of John Pride Song and this song. Features John Prihn. It's morning becomes eclectic to T three..

Lady Melania Trump NPR Jill Biden president Carrie Johnson Attorney Jared Kushner Meadows Tamara Keith John Prihn US Kurt vile Cleveland Clinic Ohio Amy Cockney Dan Scavino Bill Bar Justice Department
Amy Coney Barrett front-runner to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg

All Things Considered

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Amy Coney Barrett front-runner to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Is narrowing a short list of candidates to replace the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. Women dominate the list. Sources familiar with the process tell NPR that Amy Cockney Barrett Barbara logo and a mole for par are being seriously considered by the Trump administration. President Trump could announce his choices Early is Monday or Tuesday. Barrett is the front runner for now, the sources say she's a judge on the federal appeals court for the seventh Circuit and was a finalist during the last high court vacancy. Barbara Logo is a Florida native and a Cuban American who could energize Latino voters this fall and a multi part of Kentucky sits on the appeals court for the sixth Circuit. He's a favorite of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. Trump says Republicans should move on his nominee without DeLay. Carrie Johnson. NPR NEWS Washington

Barbara Logo President Trump Carrie Johnson NPR Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Trump Administration Barrett Mitch Mcconnell Senate Majority Washington Kentucky
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:49 min | 1 year ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"From NPR news. This's all things considered. I'm Elsa Chang in Los Angeles and I'm Sasha Pfeiffer in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Attorney General Bill Bar is not known for mincing words. But his remarks at a Constitution Day celebration last night are reverberating far beyond the walls of the Justice Department. Bar, criticized his own prosecutors and made incendiary comments about slavery and the Corona virus pandemic with us to talk about what theater knee general said, is NPR, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. I carry high there. Let's start with bars. Comments on lockdowns over Copan 19. What did he say about that? A member of the largely conservative I ins last night asked bar about restrictions on the attendance at religious ceremonies because of the Corona virus pandemic. The attorney general pointed out that his Justice Department has been sending letters to state and local governments about religious freedom. And then he started talking about proposals for a national stay at home order. Let's take a listen. Other than slavery, which was a different kind of restraint. This is the greatest intrusion on civil liberties in American history. Now, the reaction of those comments was Swift. The highest ranking black lawmaker in the House of Representatives, Jim Clyburn, called those comments by bar among the most ridiculous tone deaf and awful things he's ever heard. Another striking element of bar speeches that most of it seemed to focus on his own employees at the Justice Department. Absolutely. This was a very unusual case Oven attorney general calling out career prosecutors as a permanent bureaucracy, one that bar says is sometimes motivated by politics, he said. Too many prosecutors are looking for high profile targets to go after he called them headhunters and then Bill Bar said this And as I said, F b, I agents whose agent do you think you are? I don't say this in upon this way. But that that is the chain of authority and legitimacy. In the Department of Justice and Sasha by the way this morning, the FBI director Christopher Ray, told Congress that his agents work on behalf of the American people. And this, of course, is is not happening in a political vacuum. Critics have accused Bill Bar of interfering in cases to help allies of President Trump people like presidential advisor Roger Stone, former national security adviser. Michael Flynn. So carrying that larger context, How are these comments landing? You know, Bill Bar never mentioned the Stone or Flynn cases by name, but they definitely appear to be on his mind. The attorney general says he's thie ultimate decider at the Justice Department. He says prosecutors need supervision and he like in some of his own workforce to little kids. Letting the most junior members set. The agenda might be a good philosophy for a Montessori preschool. But it is no way to run a federal agency now. No surprise this speech offended some former Justice Department employees. One of them is Jody Hunt, who tweeted his support last night for the career workforce. Hunt was an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department until he Left that job earlier this year, and other prosecutors pointed out that even though Bill Bar has previous experience at the Justice Department, he actually has never prosecuted a case. He's done other things there. Carrie, You've been on the justice beat for a long time. And so you know that they're there often are always political controversy. Is there. Is there anything about this moment with Bill Bar that stands out to you? You know, certainly we've had some very controversial attorneys General Ed Meese and the Reagan years, Eric holder under President Obama in then Attorney General Alberto Gonzales and Michael Mucus E under President George W. Bush. The difference this time is that Bill Bar seems to go out of his way to touch the third rail. He really seems to relish this combat with reporters in his own workforce. I'm not sure what the upside is for Bart to pick a fight with his employees right now, But maybe he just likes to get a rise out of people. He certainly has succeeded at that Sasha this afternoon. His spokeswoman carry Kopeck has pointed out that some of his speech may have been misrepresented and she urges represented, and she urged people to read his words for themselves. That's NPR's Carrie Johnson, who covers the Justice Department. Cary Thank you very much my pleasure. On the Gulf Coast cleanup is underway after a devastating blow from Hurricane Sally. The storm is now a tropical depression dousing the southeast. At least one person died in the storm. Hundreds of people had to be rescued from rising floodwaters, and it has left nearly a half million people without electricity. NPR's Debbie Elliot checked in on the recovery efforts on the Alabama Gulf Coast today. You have to wade through knee deep water to get to Jodie Phillips house in the Bear Point neighborhood of Orange Beach. You know, even yesterday went down from yesterday. Yesterday It was.

Bill Bar Justice Department Department of Justice Attorney Carrie Johnson Sasha Pfeiffer NPR Massachusetts Elsa Chang Los Angeles assistant attorney general Michael Flynn House of Representatives Jim Clyburn Copan Jody Hunt Cambridge Roger Stone
Barr Criticizes Prosecutors, Makes Incendiary Comments On Slavery And Pandemic

All Things Considered

01:09 min | 1 year ago

Barr Criticizes Prosecutors, Makes Incendiary Comments On Slavery And Pandemic

"Attorney General Bill Bar is not known for mincing words. But his remarks at a Constitution Day celebration last night are reverberating far beyond the walls of the Justice Department. Bar, criticized his own prosecutors and made incendiary comments about slavery and the Corona virus pandemic with us to talk about what theater knee general said, is NPR, national justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. I carry high there. Let's start with bars. Comments on lockdowns over Copan 19. What did he say about that? A member of the largely conservative I ins last night asked bar about restrictions on attendance at religious ceremonies because of the Corona virus pandemic. The attorney general pointed out that his Justice Department has been sending letters to state and local governments about religious freedom. And then he started talking about proposals for a national stay at home order. Let's take a listen. Other than slavery, which was a different kind of restraint. This is the greatest intrusion on civil liberties in American history. Now, the reaction of those comments was Swift. The highest ranking black lawmaker in the House of Representatives, Jim Clyburn, called those comments by bar among the most ridiculous tone deaf and awful things he's ever

Bill Bar Justice Department Carrie Johnson Attorney Jim Clyburn Copan House Of Representatives NPR
Barr Defends Deploying Federal Agents to Protests in Showdown With House Democrats

Morning Edition

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Barr Defends Deploying Federal Agents to Protests in Showdown With House Democrats

"William Barr is defending the federal response to a rather response to protests in Portland. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports on Tuesdays Contentious House Judiciary Committee hearing. Chairman Jerry Nadler of New York, says federal agents are going after protesters to help the Trump campaign promote a law and order message. Democrats say the crowds are largely peaceful and filled with parents and military veterans. Of the attorney general says attacks on a federal courthouse in Portland are the real assaults on Justice Bill Bar says there have been multiple attempts to set the building on fire. Federal prosecutors in Portland charge 22 people with violence there last weekend. The attorney general's been clashing with Democrats who say he's working to protect the president. Bar maintains he's acting independent of the White House, even in cases involving longtime Trump allies.

Portland Contentious House Judiciary Co Bill Bar Jerry Nadler Carrie Johnson William Barr Donald Trump Attorney White House NPR Chairman New York President Trump
Before House committee, AG Barr defends aggressive federal response to protests

The Takeaway

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Before House committee, AG Barr defends aggressive federal response to protests

"Attorney General William Barr is defending the federal response to protest in Portland and other cities. NPR's Carrie Johnson has been monitoring today's contentious House Judiciary Committee hearing. Chairman Jerry Nadler of New York, says federal agents are going after protesters to help the Trump campaign promote a law and order message. Democrats say the crowds are largely peaceful and filled with parents and military veterans. Of the attorney general says attacks on a federal courthouse in Portland are the real assaults on Justice Bill Bar says there have been multiple attempts to set the building on fire. Federal prosecutors in Portland charge 22 people with violence there last weekend. The attorney general's been clashing with Democrats who say he's working to protect the president. Bar maintains he's acting independent of the White House, even in cases involving longtime Trump

Portland Attorney House Judiciary Committee Bill Bar Jerry Nadler Carrie Johnson Donald Trump William Barr White House NPR Chairman New York President Trump
Judge blocks federal executions hours before first lethal injection in 17 years for triple murder

Morning Edition

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Judge blocks federal executions hours before first lethal injection in 17 years for triple murder

"In Washington, D. C has blocked federal executions set for this week. The judge says lawsuits over the lethal injection process should proceed. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports the Justice Department is likely to appeal. The ruling comes hours before the first federal execution in 17 years. Judge Tanya Checkin says the last minute court ruling is unfortunate. But she says the Justice Department rushed to set execution dates before lawsuits involving lethal injection had been fully decided. The judge says lethal injections are very likely to cause extreme pain and needless suffering. The DOJ has been preparing the federal death chamber in Indiana for three executions this week. Courts in the Midwest are also hearing legal challenges filed by victim families and religious advisers to the men on death row. The US Supreme Court may ultimately weigh in on the cases. Carrie Johnson. NPR NEWS Washington One of the

Justice Department Carrie Johnson Tanya Checkin Us Supreme Court NPR Washington Midwest Indiana
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"I'm Lakshmi Singh. President Trump is holding his first in person fundraiser in a month, eager for a strong turnout, even with the expanding reach of the pandemic, he campaigns today in his home base of Florida, one of the nation's Corona virus hot spots. It's also a must win state for Trump's bid to get re elected. The president will meet with members of the Venezuelan community. During his visit, NPR's Franco Ordonez reports on Trump's ongoing outreach to Latin American voters. After a meeting with military leaders about the fight against drug trafficking. President Trump plans a campaign stop at a church in the center of the U. S Venezuelan exile community and around this will be the third event in three days where President Trump has focused on his relationship with Latin America and its supporters. But the meeting with Florida Venezuelans, who have generally supported Trump may also include some political cleanup after alleged revelations by his former national security adviser John Bolton writes in his new book that President Trump Sol Venezuelan leader Nicholas Maduro as too smart and too tough to fail. And Trump was not necessarily committed to a democratic Venezuela Franco or Dona as NPR news. There's more political backlash for Goya products, which can be found in the kitchen cupboards of millions of households that have a love of Spanish and Latin American cuisine. Nagoya's loyal following could be in jeopardy after its CEO, a grandson of the Spanish immigrants who founded Goya, continued to defend his support of President Trump Today. Celebrities who have railed against Trump's disparaging remarks about places like Mexico and Puerto Rico. A US commonwealth have joined the call to boycott Goya Foods in protest. The Justice Department is preparing for the first federal executions in 17 years. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports. Three men are scheduled to be put to death next week. Attorney General Bill Bar says he owes it to victims and their families to carry out the death sentence is authorities at the federal death chamber in Indiana will oversee lethal injections against men convicted of killing Children and teenagers. Executions are scheduled for Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Lawyers for the men in their religious advisers are suing to block the process. They say holding executions during the pandemic exposes them to serious health risks and forces them to choose between religious obligations and their safety. The president says it will require temperature checks and masks, but social distancing in the crowded and poorly ventilated facility could be difficult. Carrie Johnson NPR NEWS Washington The Chinese ambassador to Andy says both countries. Frontline troops are disengaging in line with an agreement between their commander's last month cross border clashes in the gall One valley left at least 20 Indian soldiers dead. China did not say if it's side.

President Trump President Trump Sol Venezuelan president NPR Carrie Johnson Lakshmi Singh Franco Ordonez Goya Foods Goya Latin America Florida gall One valley Nagoya China US Justice Department Venezuela
US judges block Congress reaching Trump's tax records

All Of It

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

US judges block Congress reaching Trump's tax records

"Supreme Court says President Trump may not prevent a New York grand jury from seeing his personal financial records. But in a mixed ruling, the justices say, Ah lower court should decide whether congressional investigators can see those documents. As NPR's Carrie Johnson reports the high court to setting a higher bar for Congress. The court majority here basically ruled that the lower courts will have to review this case again and think about a number of factors like does Congress really need this stuff? Is there any other way to get this material? And the Congress will really have to show it needs this information. NPR's Carrie Johnson. Meanwhile, President Trump is denouncing Thursday's Supreme Court ruling as a witch hunt. And calls the case that prompted it. Ah Hook's

Supreme Court Congress President Trump Carrie Johnson NPR New York
Trump Supreme Court tax rulings don't mean new information for the public, or Congress

PBS NewsHour

00:52 sec | 1 year ago

Trump Supreme Court tax rulings don't mean new information for the public, or Congress

"Some major rulings out today by the Supreme Court. One highly anticipated decision finds that a New York grand jury can have access to President Trump's financial records. But another equally anticipated ruling sets a higher bar for Congress's request. NPR's Carrie Johnson explains what this means. The court majority here basically ruled that the lower courts will have to review this case again. And think about a number of factors like does Congress really need this stuff? Is there any other way to get this material and the Congress will really have to show it needs this information. Grand jury materials are secret, and it's against the law to leak those documents, Johnson said. So it's unclear if Trump's tax records will ever be public. On Twitter, the president writes. This is all political prosecution in courts in the past have given broad difference, writing in all caps, but not

Congress Carrie Johnson Donald Trump President Trump Supreme Court Twitter NPR New York
Judge Orders Trump Adviser Roger Stone to Report to Prison by July 14

Weekend Edition Saturday

00:54 sec | 1 year ago

Judge Orders Trump Adviser Roger Stone to Report to Prison by July 14

"A federal judge's giving Roger stone a longtime political adviser to president trump is short reprieve NPR's Carrie Johnson reported stone will not have to report to prison until July fourteenth Roger stone says he's worried about contracting cove in nineteen in a crowded prison facility so he asked a judge to delay his surrender until September but judge Amy Berman Jackson has decided to give stone just two more weeks of freedom the judge has ordered stone to serve home confinement between now and then since he lives in Florida which has become a hot spot for the virus this week Congress heard testimony from the justice department whistleblower who said stone got special treatment from higher ups to justice because he's a friend of the president trump has said stones cases quote very unfair raising questions about whether he might win a

Roger Stone Donald Trump NPR Carrie Johnson Amy Berman Jackson Florida Congress President Trump Justice Department
Prosecutor to testify Roger Stone sentencing was politicized

All Things Considered

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Prosecutor to testify Roger Stone sentencing was politicized

"A justice department prosecutors preparing to tell Congress that Donald trump's longtime political adviser Roger stone got special treatment because of politics NPR's Carrie Johnson reports the prosecutor says supervisors at the justice department wanted to change your sentencing recommendation because they were afraid of president trump prosecutor Aaron Zelinsky says he and others were pressured to cut presidential adviser Roger stone a break instead the Lynskey withdrew from the case this year because he worried about favoritism the Lynskey will testify Wednesday at a house Judiciary Committee hearing about alleged political interference in the justice

Congress Donald Trump Roger Stone NPR Carrie Johnson Prosecutor Justice Department Aaron Zelinsky Judiciary Committee President Trump
Supreme Court blocks Trump from ending DACA

The Takeaway

01:21 min | 1 year ago

Supreme Court blocks Trump from ending DACA

"The U. S. Supreme Court delivers a long awaited and welcome reprieve to data hundreds of thousands of young immigrants in a ruling that for now shields those who were brought here illegally as children from being deported they include many healthcare workers now on the front lines of the fight against corona virus like jewels which tell you I'm happy I'm super excited I think you know I think I can do what I what I love to do what I wanted in my life the High Court determine the trump administration acted arbitrarily in trying to end the deferred action for childhood arrivals program NPR's Carrie Johnson says today's ruling came down to a five to four vote Chief Justice John Roberts and the high court's four liberal justices have handed the trump administration a major defeat the court majority says the decision to wind down daca three years ago he is subject to judicial review and the rationale offered by the homeland security department failed to consider key aspects of the program nearly six hundred fifty thousand people commonly known as dreamers have one temporary relief from deportation under daca the program allows them to work and go to school if they meet certain requirements and pass a background check many of them have gone on to work in healthcare in the legal profession and have given birth to their own children in the United

U. S. Supreme Court High Court NPR Carrie Johnson Chief Justice John Roberts Homeland Security Department
"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The tornado in lazuli rates. N e f three on the damage scale with winds of one hundred sixty miles per hour. That's according to the national weather service, I'm Jamie Floyd. This is all things considered. I'm WNYC. New York state lawmakers plan to provide congress with President Trump's state tax returns, which will include some sensitive information, the president make money or lose money year-by-year, and that is the bottom line. There will be a lot of other important information that won't be revealed. And the New York City parks department is testing. All of the city's public drinking fountains for lead contamination WNYC is analyzed data from the early stages of that testing. And we'll tell you what we found after news headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Jack Speer Wigan leaks, founder, Julian Assange has been charged by Virginia grand jury for receiving and publishing classified information. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports superseding indictment at seventeen new criminal charges. You as prosecutors accused Julian Assange, violating the espionage act, they say Assange, conspired with former army private Chelsea Manning to obtain receive in disclose national defense information Assange, also faces charges for publishing documents. That reveal the names of human sources in places such as Ron China in Syria, thorny, say those allegations are narrow and would not endanger US press. Freedom Assange, maintains he's acting as a journalist. He's currently serving time in a British jail for jumping bail Sweden. Recently reopened a rape case against Assange and may one him sent there. It's not clear if or when he'll ever face Justice in an American courtroom. Carrie Johnson NPR.

Julian Assange WNYC Carrie Johnson NPR New York City Jamie Floyd Jack Speer Wigan President Trump New York rape president Chelsea Manning congress Virginia Washington US Ron China Sweden
U.S. attorney to review Russia probe

Morning Edition

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

U.S. attorney to review Russia probe

"Attorney general William bar is directing federal prosecutor in Connecticut to investigate the origins of the Russia probe this led to special counsel Robert Muller's investigation. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports US attorney John Durham made his name prosecuting public corruption and organized crime. Now, the attorney general wants Durham to look into intelligence collecting activities in at the Trump campaign in twenty sixteen Bill bar has called that activity quote spying, but former FBI officials say the Russia probe was lawful. They point out the surveillance was approved by Justice department, lawyers and judges be inspector general has been investigating many of the same issues. His findings could become public in the next couple

Attorney Russia John Durham Us Attorney William Bar Carrie Johnson Robert Muller Durham Special Counsel NPR Justice Department Connecticut FBI
"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:25 min | 2 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of government are working. I'm Tanzania Vega. Live from WFAN view in Washington DC, also on the show is surprising strong showing by far right party in Spain could have major implications on Europe as a whole historically the far, right? Parties have up splintered up into little tiny groups inside the European parliament. And now they seem to be trying to form a single-party or at least two parties and despoilers really spoil. I get anxious without spoiler sometime. I am religious to putting boilers per game of Brown. I enjoy a movie far more if I know the broad strokes who dies who makes it through. Spoiler alert. The takeaway. We'll be right back after these headlines. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. The US now has custody of North Korea's largest coal ship. The Justice department says the vessel is linked violations of sanctions imposed by Washington NPR's. Carrie Johnson reports on the latest dispute since an anti-nuclear summit between the US and Kim Jong North Korea collapsed months ago. A Justice department official says the ship known as the wise, honest is approaching US territorial waters in court papers. Authorities say the vessel was used to illegally shipped coal from North Korea. Evading American sanctions North Korea's barred from doing business in the US. But prosecutors New York say US dollars paid for upgrades to the ship. They were funneled through unwitting. American banks. The Justice department says people connected to the wise, honest, misrepresented its origins in paperwork, Manhattan. US attorney Jeffrey Berman says the action represents the first time the US has seized. A North Korean cargo vessel over sanctions violations. Carrie Johnson NPR news, Washington. The US is in a different standoff with North Korea's most powerful ally. China Chinese negotiators are in Washington. DC this hour working with the Americans to reach a trade agreement before midnight as NPR's Windsor Johnston explains. That's the deadline for avoiding another US tariffs increase on Chinese goods tariffs on Chinese imports are set to increase from ten to twenty five percent. And President Trump says he's filed the paperwork to impose an additional three hundred twenty five billion dollars in goods Rodney. Luma an economics professor at Georgetown, University says the administration's get tough negotiating tactics may end up backfiring. If they were to take the next step and actually go after the additional three hundred or so billion that we import from China that would be more significant because that would extend to. Directly to consumer that. We would see higher tariffs on iphones. For example. China says plans to retaliate if the US goes through with the additional tariffs Windsor Johnston. NPR news, Washington. President Trump is addressing health healthcare sticker. Shock senior administration. Officials say the president is working with members of congress both Republicans and Democrats to prevent a practice known as balanced billing for emergency room visits. Another other circumstances in which a patient, maybe hit with an unexpected big Bill for services that turn out to be out of network at the White House today. Trump wanted to to.

US North Korea Washington NPR President Trump Justice department China Carrie Johnson Washington NPR US attorney Windsor Johnston European parliament Tanzania Vega Europe Lakshmi Singh Spain WFAN
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:51 min | 2 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And Russians and Muller did not conclude. No, no of -struction or that. There was struck structure. NPR justice. Correspondent Carrie Johnson joins us now in carrying oh, you've been poring through this just elaborate there for people maybe who are just tuning in. What does the report say about the president of strutting the investigation into his campaigns connections with Russia, the special counsel investigation eggs? Sam in numerous episodes in which President Trump may have attempted to obstruct Justice. Now, just the firing of FBI director, Tim Komi, but his constant berating of former attorney general Jeff Sessions his attempts to fire the special counsel, Robert Muller himself and the president's mistreatment of his former White House counsel, Don Mcgann for refusing to follow orders like trying to get sessions and Muller bounce from this investigation. Ultimately, the special counsel concluded if we had confidence after our thorough investigation that the president clearly did not obstruct Justice. We'd say that. But we cannot say that at this time, they obtained a lot of evidence from witnesses and documents and the report doesn't conclude President Trump committed a crime, but it also does not exonerate him. They seem to be throwing the ball to congress where congress and the House Judiciary committee may be able to investigate further and follow up on these facts. And yet before congress could catch that Paul you have attorney general William bar. Drawing up his summation. We remember carry one members of Muller's team came forward disagreed. They were anonymous, but they disagreed with his characterization. They said we had our own summaries. We is there a sense that and you are the Justice correspondent is there. A sense that William bar is part of shading this report, and what Muller really meant well in his own words today, the attorney general told reporters in a news conference that the Justice department doesn't just investigate a whole bunch of stuff and then throw out the Pat and the facts for public consumption for everyone to see and decide for themselves. The Justice department makes decisions charge or no charge. And as the head of the Justice department. He made a decision no charge for obstructing Justice for President Trump that said congress has a different set of standards and evaluations under impeachment. It's high crimes and misdemeanors in congress may decide to pick up that ball and run with it. The attorney general's actions, however, have been very very harshly criticized by. Senior Democrats in congress. Some of whom accuse him of basically, enabling a crisis in confidence in the Justice department by downplaying the facts to favor, President Trump will carry you or at the press conference this morning with William bar, and you did ask him if we should the Democrats, then maybe get the unfiltered view of Robert Mueller and not your view. Let's listen. Ask for Robert Muller himself.

Robert Muller President Trump president congress Justice department special counsel Jeff Sessions William bar attorney Carrie Johnson NPR Robert Mueller FBI Tim Komi Don Mcgann Sam Russia White House House Judiciary committee
"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Troy. Advisor, Steve Bannon wise men's move follows the departure of the lead FBI agent working for Robert Muller, another sign. The office is wrapping up its work. Carrie johnson. NPR news, Washington, a Saudi human rights official says Riyadh opposes any international role in the investigation of the killing of Washington Post columnist Jamal cut Shoghi NPR's. Peter Kenyon reports he was killed at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul. Last October, the head of the Saudi Human Rights Council. Bunder bin Muhammed of Yvonne appeared before the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva and said any effort to internationalize the probe would amount to unacceptable interference in Saudi domestic affairs, referring to the killing of the journalist as both a heinous crime and an unfortunate accident he said there have been three hearing so far for the defendants Riyadh is charged in the killing the Turkish government continues to claim that Saudi Crown prince Mohammad bin Salman, ordered the killing and has criticized the Trump administration for quote whitewashing the crown. Grinches involvement. Peter Kenyon reporting. This is NPR from this is WNYC in New York. I'm Richard Hake. Good morning. Forty three degrees. Overcast in New York City. We do expect a partly sunny day today with a high near sixty degrees following Paul manafort's conviction in federal court, Manhattan. DA Cy Vance has brought a mortgage fraud and conspiracy case against Manafort under state law, Rebecca ROY fee teaches ethics criminal law New York law school, and as a former prosecutor, she says, it's unusual for a state trial to follow a federal one. Vance maybe motivated by speculation that Manafort could be pardoned by the president. So the possibility that he may face no consequences for these criminal acts is a consideration that prosecutors should take into account when they think about whether or not to bring charges for crimes that were committed manafort's legal team has commented on vans a suit authorities are investigating after a poster about supreme court Justice, Ruth, Bader Ginsburg was defaced with antisemitic. Fiji at a subway station in Brooklyn a swastika and slurs were scrawled across the poster located at the Nassau avenue. Stop on the G. It was advertising a photo book about Ginsberg's life. The NYPD says the graffiti has been removed in that it's investigating and the governor's also ordering state police to help multiple New York City council members are under investigation with the legislative bodies ethics committee the group met yesterday to discuss the alleged rule of violations, but did not announce who was being investigated speaker. Cory Johnson says a high number of cases have come before the standards and ethics committee in the past year. But that does not mean members are misbehaving more frequently. I'm eating say Senate committee does not oh, let's try to work this out or figure it out. I think that's part of the reason why we've seen so many more referrals members found to have broken the council's rules by misusing public office harassing or any of the number of batters and could face fine censure or expulsion, New Jersey. Governor Phil Murphy says once a Bill passes legalizing adult marijuana. To us. It'll be easier for residents with prior marijuana convictions to get a job on WNYC's ask governor Murphy last night. He says the expunge moments will not be automatic people will have to take affirmative steps to get their records cleared, but employers won't be able to discriminate against people. In the meantime, just as race gender religion, ethnicity, whatever can't be used against you for housing or a job or education. It'll be in that same category until that individual takes that affirmative step in and pursues, the expunge legislators will still need to agree on a Bill and say they're looking for a vote at the end of the month. We have delays right now on Long Island railroads Babylon branch. Also, nj transit Morrison Essex than the main Bergen port Jervis lines. Number six. Subway trains are delayed due to switch problems at Pelham bay park..

New York City Paul manafort Saudi Human Rights Council Peter Kenyon governor Murphy NPR Riyadh New Jersey UN Human Rights Council Carrie johnson marijuana Saudi consulate Cy Vance Crown prince Mohammad bin Salm Washington Post Robert Muller Cory Johnson New York law school
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"Meet the challenge at AWS is how dot com from NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro. And I'm married. Louise, Kelley Democrats were exercising. Their newly minted oversight powers on Capitol Hill today, the subject of inquiry acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker and his oversight of the Russia probe at no time has the White House. Ask for nor have I provided any promises or commitments concerning the special counsel's investigation or any other investigation. This hearing could turn out to be Whitaker's one and only the acting attorney general could be out of a job next week. That's when the Senate is expected to confirm a successor William bar NPR's. Carrie Johnson has been following the story, and she's here to talk more about it. I carry as we mentioned, this is really the first time. The Democrats have wielded the gavel for oversight. This was the judiciary committee. What are the takeaways of the hearing? Well, most of this hearing focused on the ongoing probe into Russian election. Interference Matt Whitaker says he's been fully briefed. He did not interfere with the investigation. And he says it will be done when the special counsel. Bob Muller says it's done Whitaker. Also said he didn't talk to the. White House about this Russia probe, but he wouldn't answer another question about whether he talk with the president about the campaign finance case in New York. The one involving President Trump's former fixer Michael Cohen and Whitaker. Also refused to say whether he considers this Russia investigation a witch hunt. The president does there was a lot of tug of war over whether and how this hearing was going to happen. And once the hearing started there was also a lot of tug-of-war tells about some of the fireworks in the room, lots of raised voices. Lots of interruptions, at one point a democratic congresswoman told Matt Whitaker. We're not joking here. Your humor is not acceptable. And things actually got off to a bad start. Ari? Take a listen to this early exchange between Jerry Nadler of the democrat who who is the new chairman of this committee in Matt Whitaker. Now in your capacity as acting attorney general have you ever been asked to approve any request their action to be taken by the special counsel. Mr Chairman, I see your five minutes is up. And so..

Matt Whitaker acting attorney general special counsel Matthew Whitaker Kelley Democrats Ari Shapiro Russia president NPR White House Mr Chairman Carrie Johnson Jerry Nadler AWS judiciary committee Senate Bob Muller Louise
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Make things happen from copywriters, and you X designers to web developers data scientists upward. Hire. Freelancers make things happen. It's five O six in this escape. From NPR news. This is all things considered. I'm Ari Shapiro, and Mary Louise Kelley Democrats were exercising. Their newly minted oversight powers on Capitol Hill today, the subject of inquiry acting attorney general Matthew Whitaker and his oversight of the Russia probe at no time has the White House asked for nor have I provided any promises or commitments concerning the special counsel's investigation or any other investigation. This hearing could turn out to be Whitaker's one and only the acting attorney general could be out of a job next week. That's when the Senate is expected to confirm successor William bar NPR's. Carrie Johnson has been following the story, and she's here to talk more about it. I carry hey there as we mentioned, this is really the first time. The Democrats have wielded the gavel for oversight. This was the judiciary committee. What are the takeaways of the hearing most of this hearing focused on the ongoing probe into Russian election. Interference Matt Whitaker says he's been fully briefed. He did. Not interfere with the investigation. And he says it will be done when the special counsel. Bob Muller says it's done Whitaker. Also said he didn't talk to the White House about this Russia pro, but he wouldn't answer another question about whether he talk with the president about the campaign finance case in New York, the one involving President Trump's former fixer Michael Cohen and Whitaker. Also refused to say whether he considers this Russia investigation a witch hunt. The president is there was a lot of tug of war over whether and how this hearing was going to happen. And once the hearing started there was also a lot of tug-of-war tells about some of the fireworks lots of raised voices. Lots of interruptions, at one point a democratic congresswoman told Matt Whitaker. We're not joking here. Your humor is not acceptable. And things actually got off to a bad start. Ari? Take a listen to this early exchange between Jerry Nadler of the democrat who who is the new chairman of this committee and Matt Whitaker. Now in your capacity as acting attorney general have you ever been asked to approve any request their action to be taken by the special counsel. Mr Chairman, I.

Matt Whitaker Mary Louise Kelley Democrats special counsel Matthew Whitaker acting attorney general Russia Ari Shapiro president White House NPR Mr Chairman Carrie Johnson Jerry Nadler judiciary committee Senate Bob Muller New York
"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:56 min | 3 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The world interviewing fabulous people of a certain age with fabulous. Love stories are in to his favorite subjects will join us in a few minutes, then how digital natives fine love online part. One a recent article in the Atlantic examined how the hookup app Tinder has changed finding a match part to what about the algorithms dating apps us how they work do they promote 'isms racism classism, and what about exclusive apps like the league and Raya we have questions to tech reporters. One from vox, wasn't the Virgil be here with answers. We'll get to all of it. After the news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. Roger stone. One of President Trump's longtime confidant is pleading not guilty to charges of lying to congress and witness tampering. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports on the political consultants arraignment in Washington DC today, Roger stone entered the courthouse flanked by at least four police officers who shielded him from a rowdy bunch of protesters and supporters inside the courtroom stones attorney entered a not guilty plea to seven criminal charges magistrate judge. Deborah Robinson advised stone, not apply for new passport and not to contact any witnesses in the case. Prosecutors say stone will be tried by lawyers for the special counsel team and the US attorney's office in Washington DC both sides of agree to a protective order to keep secret any materials they exchange stones due back in court Friday afternoon. Carrie Johnson NPR news, Washington. The. Embattled California utility p genie has filed for bankruptcy in San Francisco for member station K Q, E D lily Jamali reports. The move comes as the faces billions of dollars in potential liabilities from wildfires last. Week officials cleared PG any of responsibility for the deadliest of the 2017 fires, but it's still being investigated for its possible role in sparking last year's campfire the worst in state history. One major investor blue mountain capital management calls the move deeply disappointing. It's pushing to replace the entire PG any board. That's all Jamali reporting. The British government is up against an end of March deadline to break with the European Union. And Prime Minister Theresa may is forced to once again appeal to the UK's European partners to reconsider making some concrete changes to the Brexit agreement. So that it passes the British parliament, and here's Frank Langfitt has the latest on this. From London Brussels repeatedly said it won't renegotiate Brexit. Delete spent. How much of the past two years hammering out? But may can't get that deal through Rome parliament. So social ask Brussels for concessions on the Irish border to void the UK becoming trapped in a permanent customs range men with the EU what I'm talking about is a further exchange of letters. But a significant and legally binding change to the.

Roger stone Washington Carrie Johnson NPR Brussels classism Lakshmi Singh Atlantic UK Virgil witness tampering lily Jamali European Union Deborah Robinson congress Rome California San Francisco
"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"carrie johnson" Discussed on KCRW

"Paul on Trump's agenda today. The Washington Post report that the president can seal details of his talks with Russian President Vladimir Putin and confiscated his interpreters notes. Komo's dismissal lead to the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller who has been investigating Russia's intrusion in the two thousand sixteen election and. Closely examining ties to Trump's inner circle. Well, President Trump's nominee to serve as attorney general is expected to tell senators at his confirmation hearing that the special counsel should be allowed to continue working on the probe. NPR's? Carrie Johnson offers an early look at testimony. William bar will deliver on Capitol Hill beginning tomorrow can advance of his Senate confirmation hearing William Barr says it's vitally important that the special counsel be allowed to complete his investigation. Barr says he's a longtime friend of Robert Muller, and he believes the public and congress should learn about Muller's findings in the Russia probe as a private lawyer barmaid comments criticizing aspects of that investigation. And he drafted a memo suggesting the president could not obstruct Justice by firing the FBI director bar, hold a strong view of executive power. Not something Senate Democrats will highlight during his hearings public interest groups say it's the most important confirmation hearing for an attorney general since the Nixon era Carrie Johnson. NPR news Washington for the first time in thirty years public school teachers in Los Angeles are on strike by the tens of thousands NPR's psycho tau says some parents decided to keep their kids out of school today..

President Trump special counsel Robert Muller president William Barr Carrie Johnson NPR Russia Vladimir Putin Washington Post attorney Robert Mueller William bar Senate Paul Komo FBI Washington