17 Burst results for "Carol Lam"

"carol lam" Discussed on Into America

Into America

08:05 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on Into America

"Is that there have been a number of the people on federal death row who have been involved in a lawsuit challenging the lethal injection protocol, so the method and the drugs used for lethal injections, which has the form of execution in that the federal government will use to carry. Carry these out so for a number of years that lethal injection those direction lawsuits have been under consideration by federal judges in Washington DC and the most recent judge who had an opportunity to examine the record on those decided that there should be no executions moving forward. Unfortunately, the DC Circuit Court of Appeals reversed her decision, and so at this point, there are a lot of questions concerning the safety of the drug used the method that they're planning to use a single drug. Now. Instead of a cocktail had been used in previous executions, and there have been botched executions at the state level, and so there are still major concerns about. The safety of the drug and obviously when we talk about safety, people might be thinking well. What are you talking about? The person's going to be killed with it. So why does it need to be safe? But the eighth amendment. Prohibits cruelty in the carrying out of a sentence. Now some of US believe that killing somebody is a cruel and unusual punishment in and of itself, but even if you don't hold that belief I think many people would agree that even if you're going to execute somebody, you don't want them to be tortured. As they are meeting their death, and unfortunately some of these botched executions witnesses who have attended them have described very disturbing physical reactions that appear to suggest that the people who are being executed are in great pain, excruciating pain and unable to express themselves verbally while the executions being carried out, so that's why the Federal Court had been permitting hearings and testimony and evidence on the issues related to the the method of the execution. We'll be right back. We choose to go to the moon and do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. I'm Chuck Rosenberg on my podcast. The oath I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good. Leaving collective responsibility who do things because they are hard, our conversations on the author, thoughtful, civil, respectful essential, we bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life this week. Former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else. Join me for season. Three of an MSNBC podcast searched for the oath wherever you're listening right now and please subscribe new episodes. Everyone's Day. Hey It's Chris as this week and my podcast wise is happening. I'll be talking with philosopher and former police chief Brennan. Del Pozzo about police accountability and reform. When you physically struggle with someone, even if you can overcome them, and they don't hurt you and you win that fight so to speak you have Adrenalin and chemicals in you that make you unsympathetic to the person you're dealing with is a human being and puts you in a different place than the bystander an policing his ignored that. That and policing hasn't taken seriously the fact that it has to build in safeguards to stop those emotions from being what leads to the decisions I think the army does a better job. The army knows its soldiers in combat like are filled with crazy uncontrollable emotions, and they build indiscipline checks as much as possible to stop it from leading to war crimes. Policing has yet to take that seriously. That's this week on wise happening search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. So, let's talk about these specific cases coming up these specific federal executions. Four of them have been scheduled at this point as you mentioned. Can you tell us a little bit about these cases in these men were scheduled today. So they're all white men, and that's something that I imagined that the federal government will mention whenever issues around the systemic racism of the death penalty in the United. States are raised one of the things that they'll say. Is that the first man up for execution? Daniel Lee is a white supremacist. That's not true Daniel Lee was a misguided young person who like many misguided young people in this country fell under the influence of older people, he was a traumatized, neglected and abused, young man who found family with a group of people who, at the time espoused white supremacist abuse. He has long since renounced those of us. the federal government has said that all four of these men are selected for execution in part because they'd killed children Daniel Lee is according to the government's own evidence, not the person who pulled the trigger on the child and his more culpable co-defendant. Actually didn't get the death sentence on top of that the trial prosecutor and the victim survivors all have asked that he not be executed. They've all made statements. Saying he was convicted on junk science, and that the outcome of his trial was unfair. Miriam there are a lot of people out there. Who say you know what you're? You're committing heinous crimes. You're murdering children, and some in really despicable ways and that if there is anyone worthy of death, it's people like this are the crimes that are worthy of the death penalty. Every single one of these crimes was a tragedy. These are not crimes. Anyone is suggesting one should take lightly. These are not crimes that anyone is suggesting weren't a slap on the wrist, but what one has to ask when looking at capital punishment is whether. The person who committed the crime? themselves. Are directly culpable for all the harm that they experienced. Before they ever harmed anybody else and. We all would agree. I think children deserve protection and children deserve nurturing, and children deserve to be safe, and I've never once represented. person's been convicted of homicide who is not extremely underprotected, neglected abused harmed not only by family members, but by institutions that were entrusted with their care, and that's that's a common experience of all four of these men who have been selected for execution, and sometimes those institutions were previous. incarcerations sometimes, they were juvenile facility. Sometimes, they were in group homes. And that is where we have to begin to shine the light on. Not, what does just this individual deserve? But what role did societal neglect divestment? Inadequate health care poor education, inadequate support a family is how did all of that play a role in this specific tragedy that the government is deciding to prosecute and carry out a sentence for today? So it comes down to the question, not just what punishment individual person deserves, but what punishment we deserve, or we want the government to impose in our names, when so much has failed these people before? They ever committed a grievous harm to another family. Do you believe there's any crime worthy of death? I personally am morally opposed to the death penalty. I don't understand how it helps to kill somebody who has caused harm. It just perpetuates a cycle of violence, and it produces a level of public consciousness that is ignored to the brutality of our criminal legal system generally, and so personally, the is now. Where do you think this issue? Those who want to end the death penalty fits in this moment in this time of greater protests. I think it's all of a piece because what people are talking about when they talk about defunding police or abolish prisons is. Let's think about how we could put all of that money. All of that training.

federal government Daniel Lee DC Circuit Court of Appeals Washington army Federal Court US MSNBC Carol Lam Chuck Rosenberg Del Pozzo Adrenalin United States Attorney Chris prosecutor Miriam
"carol lam" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

01:40 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"On the intelligence, indicating that Vladimir Putin. Is Trying to kill American soldiers in Afghanistan. We'll be right back. Hey. It's Chris as this week on my podcast. Why is this happening? I'll be talking with philosopher and former police chief. Brennan del Pozzo About Police Accountability and reform when physically struggle with someone, even if you can overcome them, and they don't hurt you and you win that fight so to speak. You have Adrenalin and chemicals in you that make you unsympathetic to the person you're dealing with is a human being puts you in a different place than the bystander, an policing his ignored that and. And policing hasn't taken seriously the fact that it has to build in safeguards to stop those emotions from being leads to the decisions I think the army does a better job. The army knows it. Soldiers in combat are filled with crazy uncontrollable emotions, and they build indiscipline and checks as much as possible to stop it from leading to war crimes. Policing has yet to take that seriously. That's this week on. Why is this happening? Search for wise's happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. We choose to go to the moon and do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are hard. I'm Chuck Rosenberg on my podcast. The oath I speak with those who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things because they are hard, our conversations on the author thoughtful, civil, respectful essential, we bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life this week, former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and I would think to myself I know what you're.

Vladimir Putin army Brennan del Pozzo Afghanistan Carol Lam Chuck Rosenberg Adrenalin United States Attorney Chris
"carol lam" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

02:47 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"His <Speech_Male> looming trial <Silence> last year. <Speech_Male> It's a big <Speech_Male> story. Meanwhile, the <Speech_Male> top Manhattan Federal Prosecutor <Speech_Male> which trump <Speech_Male> fired is <Speech_Male> actually going to speak out <Speech_Male> to Congress. <Speech_Music_Male> We have the update on <Speech_Music_Male> that related story <Speech_Music_Male> next. <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Donald Trump's <Speech_Male> justice department <Speech_Male> William bar had all <Speech_Male> kinds of controversies, <Speech_Male> and here's an update <Speech_Male> on one aspect <Speech_Male> today from Capitol <Speech_Male> Hill. The House Judiciary <Speech_Male> Committee <Speech_Male> says that ousted <Speech_Male> SDN. <Speech_Male> Why Attorney Jeff <Speech_Male> Berman? That top Federal <Speech_Male> Prosecutor York <Speech_Male> has now agreed to <Speech_Male> a closed-door interview <Speech_Male> next <Speech_Male> week, so we're GONNA. <Speech_Male> Get a lot more on this <Speech_Male> soon. Berman <Speech_Male> had been investigating <Speech_Male> trump associates <Speech_Male> and finances. <Speech_Male> He ultimately <Speech_Male> resigned last <Speech_Male> month, which <Speech_Male> came after <Speech_Male> very public pressure <Speech_Male> from Attorney General <Speech_Male> William. William Bars. We noted <Speech_Male> on this program. <Speech_Male> Attorney General <Speech_Male> made a very rare <Speech_Male> move to announce <Speech_Male> that Berman <Speech_Male> was resigning Berman <Speech_Male> than said that wasn't true. <Speech_Male> Effectively <Speech_Male> accusing the attorney general <Speech_Male> of being <Speech_Male> misleading or <Speech_Male> lying about it, so <Speech_Male> there is a lot to get <Speech_Male> into. We're going to keep a close <Speech_Male> eye on. That closed <Speech_Male> door session. I think <Speech_Male> anyone who watches Congress. <Speech_Male> No, sometimes <Speech_Male> we get a fair amount <Speech_Male> of leaks, clues, <Speech_Male> and even follow up action <Speech_Male> from those. Those <Speech_Male> closed door meetings <Speech_Male> a lot riding on it for <Speech_Male> Attorney General Bar, <Speech_Male> so that's an update <Speech_Male> I wanted to bring <Speech_Male> you one more <Speech_Male> thing before we go. <Speech_Male> Sometimes we <Speech_Male> work for <Speech_Male> days or weeks on <Speech_Male> special reports. <Speech_Male> Then we try to bring you <Speech_Male> if you've watched the before, <Speech_Male> you may have seen one from <Speech_Male> time to time. <Speech_Male> We have been working <Speech_Male> very hard. Our whole team <Speech_Male> on something very <Speech_Male> special that <Speech_Male> we're gonNA debut <Speech_Male> on tomorrow night's show, <Speech_Male> if you. You happen to be a regular <Speech_Male> viewer or you're watching <Speech_Male> right now. Waiting for another <Speech_Male> program I urge you <Speech_Male> to consider coming <Speech_Male> back six. PM Eastern <Speech_Male> tomorrow. We have a special <Speech_Male> report on the history <Speech_Male> of police <Speech_Male> brutality in America. <Speech_Male> What we <Speech_Male> can do about it what we <Speech_Male> can learn from it. That's tomorrow <Speech_Male> six <SpeakerChange> PM Eastern <Speech_Music_Male> on the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> way. Choose <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to go to the <Music> <Advertisement> moon and do the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> other things not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because they are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> easy, but <SpeakerChange> because <Speech_Music_Male> they are hard. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> Rosenberg on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> way. Choose <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to go to the <Music> <Advertisement> moon and do the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> other things not <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> because they are <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> easy, but <SpeakerChange> because <Speech_Music_Male> they are hard. <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Chuck <Speech_Music_Male> Rosenberg on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> my podcast <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> youth. I speak <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with those who sacrificed <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the common <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> good. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And collective <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> responsibility <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> who do things because <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> they are hard, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> our conversations <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thoughtful, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> civil respectful <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> essential, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> we bring <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> these leaders and their <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> struggles and successes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to life <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> week. <SpeakerChange> Former judge <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in the United States <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Attorney Carol Lam. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> When I walked <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> through that door. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> They would all look at me <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and then. I would <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> think to myself <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I. Know what you're <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thinking about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> me right now, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and by the time we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> leave this room. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> You're going to <SpeakerChange> be thinking <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> something else. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Join me for season. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Three of the of an <Speech_Music_Male> MSNBC podcast <Speech_Music_Male> search <Speech_Music_Male> for the oath wherever you're <Speech_Music_Male> listening right now and <Speech_Music_Male> please subscribe new episodes every Wednesday.

Attorney Berman Donald Trump Rosenberg Congress. Manhattan MSNBC Prosecutor William Bars justice department House Judiciary United States America. Jeff Carol Lam.
"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

03:38 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Right or wrong, you know however you WANNA. Look at it. That will be the shorthand version of this sensibly. The rationale that was offered for your firing was that you weren't bringing enough. Cases of a certain type and I think that leads to a really important discussion about what the role is of federal prosecutors in federal agents, and whether we ought to measure our work quantitatively or qualitatively, and you have any thoughts on that. Yes, a lot of thoughts on that and I had been. Pretty Upfront about this. Since the time was being considered to be attorney, our district supporter district I know that you were. The US attorney for Awhile in a border district as well, and you know what it's like. You have thousands of border related crimes coming into an office with a hundred to two hundred assistant US attorneys, which sounds big, but in the end is not sufficient to process all of the cases that would come off the border for instance. Yes, all the that could potentially come off the border because in any given year you might have. Estimates vary but five hundred thousand to a million illegal crossings drug cases. You have other types of smuggling cases, and so you could do endless cases on the border and on the border. The job of US Attorney is defined. As much by what you have to decide not to prosecute as what you decide to prosecute, and so you have to look at the capabilities in your office, and you have to look at something that I think not enough people understand. which is you have to look at? The careers of the people in the office and the types of people. You're going to be able to attract to that office. If you don't give them interesting and satisfying work and flexibility and flexibility. That's right because that thing I talked about at the beginning about learning about yourself, and what kind of person you are, and how you exercise judgment. That's you have to cultivate in your prosecutors to make them into better people better prosecutors if you have people, and and I've known US attorneys with said and done this to people in their office. They said you're lucky to have a job, and so you're going to do whatever cases I tell you to do, because I want to look good to whoever I'm answering to the really good prosecutors or people who could potentially be good prosecutors. Are Not going to stay around in your office if they're doing the same kinds of very limited small cases for twenty five years, and not that that should define how your office does it stop, but it defines what your job is. A manager is and so if you can find a way to do effective law enforcement in your district. And Challenge your prosecutors. You should do it, so this is what I was trying to do. And my view was always I would much rather prosecute. One case with ten defendants in it then and make it a larger organizational case. I would rather do that than prosecute those ten individuals individually in the first instance. You have one indictment in the second instance. Theoretically, you have ten indictments if you're only measuring the worth of your work quantitatively. It would move you toward the second model away from the first. That's right. You've got exactly right, so if the Department of Justice decides as they always have that, we are going to measure our success by the number of cases, we bring the number of indictments or the number of judgments we get..

US US attorney attorney Department of Justice
"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

03:23 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"He's out on bond pending appeal, and if I can get the sentencing appeal moved quickly because the issue is a little simpler I, can maybe get him into custody faster wants the ninth circuit rules, so you don't want to join the appeals. You want to handle them one at a time. Time, but frankly carol. This is not up to you. That's right. It's not up to me, but nobody had made a motion in the court had not joined the appeals, and so thinking I was very clever. I finish all the briefing, and indeed the sentencing appeal is moving much faster than the appeal of the Roving Wiretap I finished the briefing, and we get an oral argument date for the sentencing appeal, and we're just finishing the briefing on the constitutionality roving wiretaps. So you know one case is in fact way ahead of the other case. Case we get the oral argument. Date I buy my new shoes. I Polish them up I drive up to Pasadena to argue the appeal in the ninth in the ninth circuit at beautiful stately courthouse, and the defense attorneys Oscar Goodman. Who later became the Mayor of Las Vegas? And he's representing Chris Petty, and we walk into court and three judges file out, and they banged the gavel, and they call our case and Oscar and I. Walk Up to the podium. We walk across the bar and Oscar walks up to the podium and I said. Oscar this is my appeal, so I go I and he looks at me, puzzled and the judges say. Is there a problem council and Oscar says well. Your honors misled seems to think she goes I and I. Think I go I i. wish point out that the appellant. The one appealing the case is the one who would go first. That's right. I will remember these words till the day I die. The presiding judge says well council. We're going to hear both issues anyway, so Mr Goodman. Why don't you just proceed with the constitutionality of the roving? Roving wiretap and you had absolutely no idea that your argument. That day would involve that issue. That's right. I was completely unprepared to argue a case of first impression as we call it the first time this issue has been heard by an appellate court on the constitutionality of federal statute meaning. It's a very big deal a huge deal. Probably the biggest appeal ever argued in my life not only was I unprepared to argue the appeal, but I stat down in a days. I looked at the blank piece of paper in front of me and I thought. I don't have the briefs with me. I don't have the transcript of the trial because I thought this was just a sentencing appeal. In fact, I don't even have the statute with me. I had nothing with me and I had only a blank piece of paper in front of me I went on to argue the appeal, probably more generalities than I would have liked. I remember on the drive home, thinking. Wow, I'm either going to be great hero or a great goat off because I. Don't know how I'm going to explain to my. My supervisors if I lose this case that I was completely unprepared to argue it, and what had happened was the court on its own motion, had decided to join the two appeals, but they had not said anything to the parties about it and afterwards, although your opponents seem to know, he seemed to know and afterwards I said to him Gee Oscar I don't know what happened and he shook his head. Head, he said you know..

Oscar Goodman Oscar carol Las Vegas Chris Petty Pasadena
"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

03:43 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"That's the nature of judgment and how we start sliding, we hope towards wisdom as opposed to just being capable or just being clever wisdom is I hope the first step towards great leadership? A lot of your career is federal prosecutor involve the prosecution of health care fraud, including very large healthcare fraud cases. You say a few words about that probably one of the most gratifying efforts I had as an assistant us attorney was tackling fraud against the Medicare program particularly in the area of clinical blood laboratories, and what we found was very interesting. Billing and marketing scheme that resulted in. Tons of unnecessary tests being run on people's blood samples, and then build to government health insurance programs, and what was great about this effort to me was it sprang out of a large case I did that got a criminal conviction of the president of National Health Laboratories. As well as a hundred million dollar fine against the company and ten point, four million dollar, reimbursement or judgment by a group of Medicaid, control fraud units so the state insurance programs, and at that time in the early eighties that was huge. It was twenty times larger than the next largest judgment that had ever been gotten out of that case. We realized that this sort of marketing and billing scheme was being done by a number of other very prominent. Publicly traded. Corporations and that's what made it so interesting and so talented. These were all very public companies and Smithkline met path met West Corning Damon clinical laboratories, all very reputable companies we. Did a coordinated criminal and civil enforcement effort against seven blood laboratories and. It required a huge amount of coordination with the DOJ Civil Division, the criminal frauds division at DOJ, three law enforcement agencies. Eight different US attorneys offices, and what it really required was everybody putting aside their territorial concerns and doing what was best for the country, and at the end of the day we got more than eight hundred million dollars, and this was actually money back into Medicare's pockets. This was not just a judgment that we couldn't enforce. Because these were all publicly traded companies and we got a couple of criminal convictions. We got some criminal convictions, not only individuals, but also of certain companies. But what it really did was. Because of the selfless nature of the entire project. We created a blueprint for future healthcare fraud prosecutions of these major corporations how to coordinate with the state's how to coordinate between civil and criminal and how to coordinate among different. Offices. In the same Justice Department and Chuck you know how hard that can be sometimes I, actually had an agency official when I explained to him that we were all going to do these investigations together, and at the end of the day we would decide where the best place to prosecute them would be. He actually looked at me and shook his head, and he said well all believe. Believe that when I see it and who saw it and he saw it, and it required I. Don't know if you remember Joanne Harris but she was of the Criminal Division, Wonderful Woman, it required a sit down in her office with everybody there, and we all laid out what we had done, and she made the decision where those prosecutions. We're going.

fraud DOJ Civil Division Chuck Medicare National Health Laboratories assistant us attorney Joanne Harris Smithkline US Medicaid Justice Department DOJ president official
"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

05:27 min | Last month

"carol lam" Discussed on The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

"Investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and then I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God help me God, so God. Welcome to the oath. I'm Chuck Rosenberg. I'm honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with fascinating guests from the world of public service this week I guest. Is Carol Lam a former judge in federal prosecutor in California soon after graduating from Stanford Law, School Carol found a job. She loved and the Justice Department as a federal prosecutor in San Diego which handled complex healthcare fraud investigations, and though she enjoyed the work. She later accepted an appointment to the California superior. Court bench from Governor Gray Davis. Carol envisioned a long tenure as a judge, a difficult and complex job. But that all changed when she became the presidentially appointed, United States attorney for the Southern District of California the office in which she started as a prosecutor. Carol is a thoughtful and contempt of public servant with important insights into our criminal justice system from two very different perspectives. She is also my colleague on NBC and Msnbc where she is a legal analyst. Caroline, welcome to the thank you very much took real pleasure to have you on the show pleasure to be here. So where are you from I? AM originally from New York. City I was born there as were my three siblings, but my parents are from China. China they were both born there in both emigrated here in the nineteen forties, so you and your siblings were all First Generation American? That's right, and what brought your parents to the United States? My father was a businessman. My parents stories were so much more dramatic than my own as is probably true for so many first generation US citizens, but my father's father actually was a banker, and during the rising communist revolution, he was bedridden with a stroke and. He was asked by his colleagues at the bank whether he could take the fall for a capitalist since he was already sick, and they probably wouldn't do anything to him. And he agreed to that, and so after he died, the bank thanked him by moving his family and his wife, and his remaining children out to Hong Kong, so he literally took the fall for being a quote, unquote capitalist during the rise of communism in China. Almost everybody in China especially. Especially those in the middle class or upper class probably middle classes where I would put my father's family. Almost all of them have some really difficult extraordinary story. It's painful to listen to. It has made me realize how much I value my American passport. Frankly before that, my father had gone to Saint..

Carol Lam analyst California China Governor Gray Davis United States Chuck Rosenberg prosecutor Justice Department United States attorney Hong Kong Stanford Law New York San Diego Caroline fraud NBC Msnbc
"carol lam" Discussed on Into America

Into America

07:57 min | 2 months ago

"carol lam" Discussed on Into America

"Should be fired. Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners? When somebody disrespects our flag to say, get that son of a bitch. OPT appealed right now out. Then we saw backlash from fans. What does it feel like when you have white fans? especially who are cheering you along love that you run fair catch a ball jump high hit a guy real hard to have them turn on black players so quickly when the impetus was there killing US industry? They're beating us and this is what the protests about. I can't speak for every guy in the locker room. But I think I can speak for the majority. it didn't take this. For us to know that. That's one of the things that we're saying like. We've been dealing with this forever. so we know it. You know you gotta think about it. You know when you go to when you're in college and you go to West Virginia to play the mountaineers or you go to. Virginia and you're planning against Marshall. You're probably GONNA get beer bottles thrown at you, so we hear these stories, so you know there's there's not there wasn't a big difference. We're just having a discussion. Does that take away from the experience. You work harder entire life. No, there isn't a huge difference. To, man. I mean I've been in Baltimore. have been in Kansas. City they're great fans, majority of them but I've been in Baltimore. City that similar to a place where I've grown up where I grew up. In Buffalo there's been there's been some times where those nfl fans have heard them. Call you know my my teammates or gown another team. You know I've been called out my name. You know it's just one of those things is just it's it's life. So. That's why when I when I say when Kat took that neo was kind of number. Two is because in our neighborhoods in how we're raised. There's an extra. There's an extra phase toward the development of a black kid. You know we have to learn how to survive. Our parents have to teachers how to survive. You're not a good black parent if you're not teaching your kids about. Police brutality. If you're not teaching your kids how to. Operate when you get pulled over like a lot of those discussions we we have when we are in elementary middle school. Right a lot of our teachers teachers that in-school. So. You Know I. Just think it's a way of life and for me. That's why I. Always go back to like Dang. It just didn't hit me as hard in really George Floyd when it's when I really start feeling for the first time. Because I'm like man I. I'm built to survive. I'm built and trained. To make it. You know I'm always prepared. You know, and now that I'm out of the NFL. I'm not in that institution anymore. I'm starting. I'm starting to feel for the first time in. It's really interesting because I'm trying to find you know I've always been outspoken person, but it's almost like outspoken in a box so now trying to find my voice outside of the NFL and how do I talk about these topics in deal with certain things and what I would say, this and I'll go. This may even go to like the drew brees discussion. Why are we getting mad when people stand up on their platform and and speak their truth. Like let let people speak their truth. Because now we know exactly who is who, and now we can have these we can use them as examples and have these conversations of this is what we're talking about. This is the privileged we're talking about. We can't get wrapped up in the heart of man. Now we need to use men and women as the example to show people like this is what we're talking about, but they believe what they believe. We need to change the system. That's what we need to change. We need to put our energy there anything outside of just using people's. tweets and instagram post are their statements. examples is a waste of energy. Because drew brees believing where he believes in his grandfather served this country. Great, thank you. He fought for freedom. Thank you so much, but this has nothing to do with this topic. We'll be right back. Stay with us. Hey It's Chris as this week on podcast. Wise is happening. I'll be talking with Jesse Wegmann about his new book about the Electoral College and its flaws called. Let the people pick the president. Wouldn't you think that a sixty to forty split in the popular vote would lead to a six four allocation of electors so just to be clear, the constitution says nothing. It is a essentially a blank check to do whatever they want. Want in allocating their electors, the state lawmakers can give the electors out themselves. They don't have to hold a popular vote. You have no right to vote for president. In the constitution, there is no constitutional right for you or I to vote for president. There isn't even a constitutional right for us to vote for electors. That's this week on. Wise is happening. Search for wise is happening wherever you're listening right now and subscribe. To Go to the moon, and do the other thing, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, I'm Chuck Ruse. On My podcast, the youth I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the oath are thoughtful. Respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life this week. The oath returns with former secretary of Defense Panetta the toughest job I had was to sign deployment orders that placed the young men and women in uniform in harm's way. This season I will also be speaking with other accomplished than thoughtful leaders including former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess, former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam and former surgeon general. Murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. Join me for season. Three of the oath and MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now. Please subscribe new episodes everyone's Day. For, those that might not have been paying attention drew brees hall of fame level quarterback for the New Orleans Saints last week, told Yahoo News that quote that he will never agree with anybody disrespecting the flag of the United. States of America he also invoked the military services family members. The NFL has been responding to comments now in a way that has surprised many people. What do you make of the response now? Saying you know what we now realize that we should have. Have, allowed our players to speak. We now realize that it's not about the flag in the military. We now realize it. What do you make of this turnaround? There's no turnaround to me. This is this is this is what they're supposed to do. Because it's so much bigger than NFL. It's hard to be big in fell. There will never be a player bigger than the NFL. There will never be a team bigger than the. NFL, no one can push the NFL round. But Man. We're talking about this movement. Black lives matter this is bigger than the NFL. Sit like you said earlier. Seventy percent of the NFL is.

NFL brees president US Baltimore West Virginia Virginia George Floyd instagram Kansas Kat elementary middle school MSNBC Baltimore. Chuck Ruse Marshall NASA Jesse Wegmann Carol Lam
"carol lam" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

02:22 min | 2 months ago

"carol lam" Discussed on American History Tellers

"Because they are. Hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg. PODCAST I speak with people who sacrifice for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that made that promise and serve this amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director. Leon Panetta the toughest job. I had as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed the young men and women in uniform in harm's way, former NASA. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping nature. The pieces are coming together that unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and know that their loved ones riding bombs, living the highest ranking woman in the FBI amy. Hess I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show i. knew he had young children and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five. ninety-five struck me former judge and united. States Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now. And by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand to serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good. Despite the turmoil they remind us of the need for good and honest. Public servants join me for season three, the of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

director Vivek Murthy Carol Lam secretary Chuck Rosenberg Hess Leon Panetta Kathy Sullivan FBI MSNBC CIA NASA Oklahoma City Attorney
"carol lam" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"carol lam" Discussed on The 11th Hour with Brian Williams

"We choose to. Do, the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I, speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess I. Remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe I knew he had young children and I watched as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April. Nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former. Surgeon General Vivek. Murthy, there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath they still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Carol Lam Chuck Rosenberg secretary General Vivek Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta MSNBC NASA United States FBI CIA Oklahoma City Amy Hess Murthy Attorney director
"carol lam" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

MSNBC Morning Joe

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"carol lam" Discussed on MSNBC Morning Joe

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of Defense and CIA director, Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of defense was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut. Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there. There and know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI. Amy Hess, I remember he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's show. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth, nineteen ninety-five struck me. Former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam walked through that door. They would all look at. At me, and then I would think to myself. I know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Carol Lam Leon Panetta Amy Hess Oklahoma City FBI NASA MSNBC CIA United States Attorney director
"carol lam" Discussed on AM Joy

AM Joy

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"carol lam" Discussed on AM Joy

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta the toughest job I had, as secretary of Defense, was to sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way. Former NASA astronaut Kathy. Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess. I remember, he was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden, the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April nineteenth nineteen ninety-five struck me former judge and United States. Attorney Carol Lam when I walked through that door. They would all look at. At me and then I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room. You're going to be thinking something else and former surgeon. General Vivek Murthy there are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season, three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

Carol Lam Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Leon Panetta NASA MSNBC Oklahoma City FBI CIA Amy Hess Sullivan United States Attorney director
"carol lam" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

02:27 min | 2 months ago

"carol lam" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"We choose to. Do the other thing not because they are easy, but because they are odd, hi, this is Chuck Rosenberg host of the oath podcast. I speak with people who sacrificed for the common good who believe in collective responsibility who do things that are hard. Our conversations on the youth are thoughtful, civil, respectful essential. We bring these leaders and their struggles and successes to life in the third season of the oath. You'll meet more inspirational leaders. People who took that oath made that promise and serve this amazing. Amazing country in various ways, leaders like former secretary of defense and CIA director Leon Panetta, the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was sign deployment orders that placed young men and women in uniform in harm's way former NASA astronaut Kathy Sullivan in your role as an astronaut. One of the key things you're doing is helping. Make sure the pieces are coming together. The unknowns are being probed carefully. The risks are being evaluated carefully, and it's very hard on families to stand there and. And know that their loved one is writing bombs for living the highest ranking woman in the FBI Amy Hess, I remember. He was kneeling down on the ground, and he was holding a baby's shoe. I knew he had young children, and I watched, as he just dissolved in tears, and all of a sudden the evil that happened there in Oklahoma City on April Nineteenth Nineteen, ninety-five struck me former judge and United States Attorney Carol Lam. When I walked through that door, they would all look. Look at me and I would think to myself I. Know what you're thinking about me right now, and by the time we leave this room, you're going to be thinking something else and former Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. There are fundamental core values around decency round kindness around compassion. It's part of our shared humanity. We are truly interdependent. We are stronger when we are together. We live in an uncertain world public faith in our most crucial institutions waivers when we most need those institutions to thrive. But remarkable people still take the oath. They still raise their hand serve, and they still sacrifice for the common good, despite the turmoil reminded us of the need for good and honest, public servants join me for season three of an MSNBC podcast search for the oath wherever you're listening right now and subscribe new episodes everyone's..

General Vivek Murthy secretary Chuck Rosenberg Kathy Sullivan Leon Panetta Carol Lam MSNBC FBI Oklahoma City Amy Hess CIA NASA director United States Attorney
"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"They can do that. But you know, neither neither bar nor Muller are individuals who call a lot of tension to themselves. And I don't know that they're going to get a lot more out of Bob Muller than he's putting in that in that report. So, but again, I I don't see a lot of tension between these two I could be wrong, but and they may have some professional disagreements about the scope of of executive privilege or the strength of the the executive branch. But, but you know, I think they're both extremely professional, and if Bob mothers called called to testify he'll testify, but he's he's probably put everything he can into that report. And I wouldn't be surprised, frankly, if they coordinated with respect to, you know, maybe maybe creating a section that Bob Muller thinks can be disclosed. And then section a section that has information. He doesn't think can be disclosed. I mean, he could have he could have put the report together that way the Franks big Lucy's sort of said having worked with him. That he understood from the beginning what he was working towards that document that may have to have some sort of compartmentalization. He may have already scrubbed it and sort of given it to William bar ready for disclosure, and that's not uncommon. What do you mean? I don't think it's uncommon to compartmentalize. There are portions that by the for national security reasons or criminal Justice reasons or public sensitivity reasons, we might not want to disclose. So we see that. Sometimes. All right, Elliot. Williams, Glen Kirschner, Carol Lam, and Harry Littman. Thank you all in this big day for making time to come on by here that does it for all in. You can catch us every weeknight at eight o'clock on MSNBC. Don't forget to like us on Facebook. That's Facebook dot com slash all in with Chris. Hey, it's Christie's from MSNBC every day. I come to the office, and we make television show in every day. I think to myself there's so much more. I want to talk on. And so this is our podcast. It's called why is this happening and the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see out every day. They're driven by big ideas. Each week. I sit down with a person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening episodes of why is this happening every Tuesday. Listen for free wherever you get your podcast.

Bob Muller Facebook MSNBC executive Christie Elliot Carol Lam Lucy Franks Harry Littman Chris Williams Glen Kirschner
"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Yes. So so Christmas stakes are really high here. So the judge the Manafort is getting the not the book during that Muller's throwing the whole library at him. And the question is whether mother is really that mad at manafort's failure to cooperate that he wants to lock them up for the rest of his life. Or on the other hand is Muller still hoping that Manafort will come clean about this crucial aspect of the investigation. So we know that the judge found that Manafort lied about his contacts with Kalinic. We also know that there's this mysterious meeting Kalymnos, it comes all the way from Russia to meet with Manafort at the time that Manafort is a campaign chairman. So why is the chairman of Trump's campaign giving private polling data to a person with ties to Russian intelligence? And then why is he lying about that? When that lie is likely to send him to prison for the rest of his life. You know, there's also Carol. There was an interesting ruling today or government response in motion. Roger stone's case Roger stone. Basically saying look I have the same judge as the judge has a case of the indicted Russians who committed the hacker allegedly committed the hack we want a different judge. And then the government the special counsel's office responded by being like, no these are linked the defendants arranged released through organization one that's the defendants meaning the Russians or ization won't being WikiLeaks. Some of the documents they stole, including documents, the democrat Democratic National Committee defendants horrific tissues online persona they created Gustav or to winnow also interacted directly with stone concerning other soa materials posted separately at online, and it appears that they have already issued search warrants for stone coming out of that case, what does that tell us? Well, first of all, it would be very very unlikely that a judge would actually send a case somewhere else. For reasons such as such as those, and you know, we're getting little breadcrumbs here. Right. And unfortunately, that's all we're getting some bread crumbs that that indicate that special special counsel's office is not looking at all of this and saying, gee, we don't know what to make of this. They are actually putting a story together. Paul. The stone got also got a gag order that he has to stop making statements the media. What is what is the normal sort of protocol? Here stone has been obviously a very anomalous defendant in so far as he's throwing up the Nixon victory sign. He's fundraising. He's out doing stuff like that. What what what are they sort of legal issues whether or not there's a gag order. So, you know, there are obvious first amendment concerns about people both have the right to freely express themselves, and to defend themselves in the best way that they know how the judge is saying, well, really, Mr. stone. I'm doing this on your behalf in part because everything that you say on TV can be used against you. If you take the stand in a court of law, you're also possibly trying to tamper with the jury pool. So you're putting your own right to a fair trial at risk. You know, the other thing that's domed has common with Paul Manafort is not. Neither one of them really has a defense and they're looking at possibly dine in prison, but they seem to be willing to do this on behalf of Donald Trump. So the question is do they have some kind of harden for our kind of promise of a pardon from Trump is that where they're banking, or is it again that they're so afraid of ticking off Donald Trump that they're willing to die in prison on his behalf. All right, Carol Lam and Paul Butler..

Roger stone Paul Manafort Donald Trump Muller Carol Lam special counsel chairman Trump Democratic National Committee Russia Kalinic Kalymnos Paul Gustav WikiLeaks Paul Butler
"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Angelo Carson. Thank you both next. Breaking news tonight. The special counsels team is recommending up to twenty four years in prison for Trump's former campaign manager, Paul Manafort the details right after this. Breaking news tonight in the ongoing criminal cases, plural against Trump's former campaign managers tonight just an hour ago. The special counsel's office submitted its sentencing recommendation for Paul manafort's conviction on financial crimes in the eastern district of Virginia last year. Prosecutors are asking the judge for jail sentence of approximately nineteen to twenty four years and a fine ranging from fifty thousand at twenty four million dollars suspended for two sixty-nine that could easily amount to a life sentence. The sentencing requests came as William Barr started his first day as Trump's brand new attorney general he is now in charge of overseeing the Muller investigation. Joining me now, Carol Lam, a former US attorney for the sun district of California who also serves Superior Court Judge in San Diego and MSNBC legal analyst Paul Butler, a former federal prosecutor, Carol let me start with you. I guess this is not technically a recommendation the government saying, essentially, these are the guidelines, and we agree with those guidelines. What do you think about the special counsel filing in the mother case today in the metaphor case today? Well, it's really not a surprise Chris. That they're going for a very high sentence here. What's shocking to me is that is that Paul Manafort has done pretty much the worst one can do in terms of defending oneself against very serious criminal charges. He put the government to its test in taking him to trial. They prevailed in that trial on eight counts. He then said he would cooperate. He broke that plea agreement. He lied to the special prosecutor, the judge is now found the DOJ in that case has now found that that he lied and his attorneys made the special prosecution prosecutors team very angry by continuing to brief the president's lawyers while he was purporting to cooperate with the special counsel. So it's very clear that the special counsel feels they owe Paul Manafort nothing at this point, and they are going for a very heavy sentence and of and a lot of money we got some transfers from the hearing on Wednesday Paul, and this is what the judge found in that. Which I thought was interesting. Because it goes to the crucial issue of this meeting or contacts with constant Kalinic. I find by preponderance the evidence of Mr. Manafort made intentional false statements. The FBI and the grand jury with respect to the material issue of his interactions with Kalinic, including in particular, the redacted..

Paul manafort special counsel Trump Carol Lam Angelo Carson Paul Butler attorney Kalinic Paul FBI MSNBC Superior Court William Barr San Diego financial crimes prosecutor DOJ US attorney
"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"carol lam" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"But some of the things that he gathered were correspondent city had with members of the Trump campaign during two thousand sixteen summer and fall that key period. Wikileaks was releasing dumps of information from hack DMC emails there are damaging to Hillary Clinton the democratic candidate the time, and they had all of that really lined up. So that you could see who it came from the one piece they didn't have Chris. And I think this could speak to possibly a window that could exist were acting attorney general could be right. That is wrapping soon. But this stone thing keeps going, and that is that they could say that there's not a connection from stone that looks like conspiracy with a foreign government, and they're. Before they can answer the question of whether or not the Trump campaign conspired with the foreign government because that piece that conspiracy piece is not in the indictment, even from all the information, they have Ainsley. Thank you very much joining now, Carol Lam attorney for southern district, California. She also serves Superior Court Judge in San Diego, and my Wiley senior vice president for social Justice at the new school and NBC legal analyst I want to start with you Maya in terms of what you make of the filing in these three data points. We know they're fighting about this subpoena with the secret company owned by the secret nation. They've told Andrew Miller who's a stone associate you're not off the hook. Because we might we still need your testimony and the filing today. What does it at up to you that this isn't wrapping fast? And I say that not because to the point of what not wrapping me, you know, we don't know. But if you look at the indictment itself, one of the things that's interesting is if you're only looking if you're prosecutor really only looking at per. Jury witness tampering obstruction. You don't actually have to make reference to contact with the Trump organization with the Trump campaign. Right. Your point make the claim to now it so there signaling something there because it's not necessary for those indictments it doesn't mean that they're saying they're going to charge something, but it's a signal. Now, we know they have all these records. I mean, we had the all the swirl around this FBI raid, which you know, from my vantage point looks like they wanted to make sure there wasn't evidence that was destroyed and that they're going to take their time going through that evidence. Remember, we have re gates who sentencing was postponed because they were not done with those another. You're right. That's other data point in the delay category. And remember that Roger stone is connected at least in relationship to Manafort and Rick gates, particularly Manafort because of their forming a lobbying firm together. So what this does?.

Wikileaks Trump Hillary Clinton Roger stone Ainsley Carol Lam acting attorney general witness tampering Chris Andrew Miller Superior Court Rick gates senior vice president FBI Manafort prosecutor attorney NBC