35 Burst results for "Carney"

The Road to Bouillon

Gastropod

05:09 min | 2 d ago

The Road to Bouillon

"Today's story starts as soon as many good stories. Do with a german chemist whose family vig was one of the people who invented modern chemistry as a field and his contributions are vast in laboratory science and culture in nutrition. And once again we have the wonderful flavor historian nadia bernstein on the show and for the purposes of today's episode leagues contributions to agriculture are. Not the most important. We're interested in his nutrition. Science at the time in the eighteen hundreds scientists were hard work trying to understand. What the heck food actually was. This is kind of what chemists were up to you back then in the nineteenth century they were like. There's all of this stuff in the world what is it made of. Let's figure it out and name it. It's not just name it but decide which bits of it were essential chemists. Were trying to break food down into its elemental parts and understand exactly which parts we needed to survive in the eighteen thirties. Scientists named and identified protein and they found it particularly fascinating so why not just keep breaking things down was the trend at the time and scientists noticed that different protein-rich foods seem to be made up of slightly different building blocks. These are what we call amino acids today. If you think about proteins as molecules i mean most of us aren't thinking about perkins molecules. But if you imagine it it's sort of long molecule that's composed of a lot of different component parts of which are amino acids and what hydrolysis is basically this process of blasting that big molecule apart into these constituent pieces. This is in fact. Exactly what did hydrolysis he took hydrochloric acid and used it to break down or dissolve matt and then figure out what the different kinds of amino acids were lee bigs. Big breakthrough was identifying one particular amino acid creating which he then also found in the muscles of living animals. He found it in especially high levels in the muscles of a fox that died while it was running. And that's what led him to the conclusion that creating was the key to muscle action. People had been claiming that meat was important for health for a really long time but leagues contribution was to show at least based on his science at the time that the protein in meat was critical for muscles and so it was an essential component of a nutritious diet. League went as far as to say that the protein element of food was the only true nutrient meet. Was it said when his friend's daughter came down with typhoid league. Knew exactly what she needed me but she was too sick to digest solid foods. So league took some cook chicken. He grounded up. He soaked it in hydrochloric acid to dissolve it altogether at what he thought was critical creating. Then he added another chemical to neutralize the acid and turn it into table salt and then he gave the young girl this salty savory broth and she recovered and this led to what became one of his most popular discoveries at the time league was able to use chemistry to create a modern version of beef tea leaf. Tea had been popular with the sensitive and the sick leave for a few decades. The idea was that invalids. He were too delicate to eat. A great big steak could still get all its goodness by boiling that stake in water straining it and then drinking the resulting meat juices. Basically the idea is if your sickly. If you're wasting away with any of the numerous diseases that may have afflicted the dickensian populace mid nineteenth century. What you want to do is to get an easily and readily absorbable. Both sort of strengthening food of protein leagues was different from traditional beef t. He didn't need to boil meat for hours. To break it down. He could use hydrochloric acid to league. This meant he could keep in more of the good stuff from meat in the broth. He thought boiling. It was less effective. So liebenberg's beefed. He was kind of this. Concentrate at this sort of hydrolysed blasted part beef proteins made into a liquid broth that sickly little orphans and delicate women could sip and thus beyond the way to restoring their health lee big published his beef tea formula and a quickly became all the rage with fragile elite searching for something to pep up their delicate constitution pharmacists would make up a big batch. Evaporated and zealot under the name extract. Carney's extractive meet. It was classified as a legal drug. in germany. in fact it was considered so essential that pharmacists were required to keep it in stock. Doctors reported that league's formula for extractives. Carney's could be useful for tuberculosis. Typhus various dumped arrangements. and scruffy. One doctor said it could be a useful substitute for brandy and cases of exhaustion. Depression and despondency. I'd rather have a brandy but the point is leaving. High tech version of beef d. was a wonder drug in the eighteen fifties. It was thought of as a way to give the goodness of muscle forming meat to the week in puny

Nadia Bernstein VIG Perkins Typhoid Matt Liebenberg Carney Typhus Germany Tuberculosis Depression
Ice Cream vs. French Fries

Smash Boom Best

04:32 min | Last week

Ice Cream vs. French Fries

"Hello kimchi. Hello thank you for being here. So kim t just to start off. I like to know. Do you love ice cream. yes. I love ice cream so good. What is your favorite flavor. Probably just straight up vanilla classic. Do you do toppings. I'm going to like chocolate and caramel phase. I think that just tastes really good right now so most likely chocolate caramel and are we a cup or cone. A cone conscious tastes really good. It's crunchy it goes so wealthy you and then when you eat down all the way to the bottom of the phone you have the little baby cone. I know so q. And what about french fries. Do you like french fries. Of course french fries is always a staple so good and do you have a place. You like to get french fries trauma you make them at home frozen ones. My mom actually makes them so. I like my mom's ones the best. That is amazing to live with a french fry. Find kim t. Do you ever get into debates about food. Yes with my sister. Can you remember any of the topics you've debated it's usually like someone's cooking to someone else's we have like. I dunno in bengali. Culture food is such a main thing that we talk about. So we'll compare like cooking's from different on that we have or like maybe our moms versus her dad's it's just really fun to talk about food and see what we don't like see. You are very familiar with judging food somewhat excellent so let's get our debaters in here today. Defending team ice cream will have tommy mcnamara. Hi tommy the low. So excited to be here. Tommy in just one sentence why is ice cream. The most awesome look the moment that ice cream hits your tongue. You are instantly transported to a sweet creamy flavour. Heaven where the clouds are made of whip cream. And the angels are also made of whipped. Oh man for all gonna come out of this hungry today. I know well. Now let's meet. Tommy's very fierce opponent here to wrap a-team french fries. It's britney carney. Hi de hi. Hello britney in a single sentence. Tell us why french fries are. The most fabulous. They are crunchy salty satisfying and eclectic. Few people on this planet. I know for a fact deny french fries unless they're specifically allergic to potatoes but that's still maybe relatively small fraction perfect well before we get started. Let's review the rounds of debate. Are debaters will compete in four high octane. Rounds of debate are judge. Kim t will award points to the winner of each round will start with the declaration of greatness where each debater has to present the coolest facts and stories about their side. Each team will also have thirty seconds to make rebuttal to poke holes in their opponents declaration. Then it's the micro around a creative challenge. Both debaters have prepared for it in advance. Then we've got the sneak attack. A surprise challenge to keep our debaters on their toes and last but not least the final six where both sides have just six words to win. Our judge over. Kimchi will award points as we go. But she won't reveal. The tally for the winner until the end of the debate. Alright kim t you have two points to award this round one for the best declaration of greatness and one for the best rebuttal. Are you ready. Yes awesome brittany and tommy. Are you ready yes excellent. then it's time for us. Declaration of greatness are debaters have come armed with the coolest facts history and arguments. We flipped a coin. And tommy. you're up. I give us the scoop. Why is ice cream. The coolest treat of them all. It's the hottest day of august. You're playing catch outside your sweaty and sunburned and exhausted not to mention hungry but then as if sent from heaven you hear a sound is that could it be. It is the greatest sound of summer the ice cream truck. You run as fast as you can. Too sweet sugary salvation.

KIM Tommy Mcnamara Britney Carney Tommy Britney Angels Brittany
Indiana University fraternity shuts down for remainder of academic year after COVID-19 violation

Noon Business Hour

00:52 sec | Last week

Indiana University fraternity shuts down for remainder of academic year after COVID-19 violation

"You've salon fraternity at Indiana University has been shut down until next fall. After being accused of violating health and safety rules. Officials had warned fraternity and sorority members about gatherings and at the start of the semester had suggested they just closed, university spokesman Chuck Carney said at the time. Tests were showing positivity rates of nearly 90% of some houses. Are you Bloomington highly encourages closing all 40 Greek houses, doctor Aaron Carroll is the director of mitigation testing at the school. The number of close contacts and some of these houses get so high that almost the entire house and not the entire house has to be placed in quarantine. The county Health Department says members of the fraternity that was shut down we're less than cooperative after police were called to break up a party at which there was no social distancing or mask wearing and said that presented problems for contact tracing

Chuck Carney Aaron Carroll Indiana University Bloomington Health Department
The Latest: Rays beat LA 8-7, tie Series at two games each

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

The Latest: Rays beat LA 8-7, tie Series at two games each

"The Tampa Bay rays rallied from five different deficits including trailing seven six with two outs in the bottom of the ninth inning to defeat the Los Angeles Dodgers eight to seven Tampa Bay got home runs from hunter Renfroe branded allowing Kevin care Meyer but it was Brett Phillips RBI single that tied the game when Chris Taylor couldn't field the ball cleanly allowed Randy arose arena to score the winning run the reserve outfielder was understandably elated anyone can come up on any given night especially the Tampa Bay rays and help the team went and we've proven that since I've I've been here since I got traded from Kansas city win ties the best of seven world series at two games apiece with game five set for Sunday evening I'm Steve Carney

Los Angeles Dodgers Tampa Bay Chris Taylor Randy Steve Carney Hunter Renfroe Kevin Care Meyer Brett Phillips Kansas
The Latest: Lowe hits 2 homers, Rays even World Series

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last month

The Latest: Lowe hits 2 homers, Rays even World Series

"Brendon Lau homered twice in Tampa Bay rays pitcher struck out fifteen Los Angeles Dodgers in route to a six four victory while homered off Dodgers starter twenty counseling in the first night of the two run shot off does demand the fifth two of Tampa bay's ten hits on the night the most in a game for the race since game three of the American League division series against the Yankees eight rays players head hits it manager Kevin cash says that type of across the board production is what he expects we have a complete offense and I know they've been quiet we have a lot of confidence in this group that we can be really ballots and have good at bats and put pressure on insurers in opposing defenses Blake Snell allowed a pair of runs and struck out nine but finished and out short of qualifying for the win I'm Steve Carney

Brendon Lau Los Angeles Dodgers Tampa Bay Yankees Kevin Cash Blake Snell Steve Carney American League
"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

05:30 min | Last month

"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Our conscious or not. It's an attempt to skew the election in sort of suppressed the trump enthusiasm. I don't think it's an attempt to. Skew, the election I do think that we are there, and in past years we've gotten almost all the results on election night and we're sitting there and and and used to be able to count what the. Media wants this to be exciting. So that means we have to have information that's valuable, and that requires two things assuming it's close and assuming that we actually have real information. This year may or may not be close. I think I. Think you're silly if you rule out trump but I also think it's possible. Binding gets a blow out but also there's a possibility that on election night we're not actually gonNA. Get. On Christmas morning as it is, we're not actually going to get our presence that a lot of the results are not going to come in because of unprecedented vote by mail and so Pennsylvania, which very possibly is going to be the swing state. The they stay court just ruled that their votes don't have to come into a few days after the election day. So then they start being counted a few days after election day. So it's GONNA be tough. We're GONNA WANNA cover the election results as they come in but we're used to a few hours of saying late in crunching numbers, and this could be few days trickling in. You know like like the election of eighteen o four. So. dispiriting. It's so dispiriting leaves people with the sense that things are not fair and and I find that erodes every institution that the fabric that binds us the sense of nationhood. All right. Tim, I know you like to report auto pine, but I'm going to put you on the spot. I'm GonNa give you the state. And you tell me not who you want to win obviously who you think will win. Pennsylvania. I think Joe Biden is going to win Pennsylvania and he's GonNa win the presidential race. By that one state. It's going to be just that margin and that Pennsylvania's going to be the the tipping point state and I think Biden hangs on and wins by only a few electoral votes. I think that one goes trump. I do too. I'm really surprised that it's it's it's been that close. I'm assuming you've got Ohio for trump Florida for. Florida for trump. Yes. Wisconsin. This concept for Biden. Michigan..

Joe Biden Pennsylvania Tim Wisconsin Michigan Florida Ohio
"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:30 min | Last month

"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Effect that this having people over seventy especially over eighty over eighty high rate of death if you can track this virus. So, for while most of the country were saying, this is how we're going to have to live with a lot of the elderly. No, they can't. Florida's are the oldest state in the country. So that could offset some of these games there. That said I agree with you in general. I think in Florida he's he's going to help perform normal. That's a bigger than Lizzo. It's a big but. We're talking to Tim Carney. He writes at The Washington Examiner and we are examining an article that he just wrote about the likelihood that trump wins and really kind of going against what what might be conventional wisdom will continue that conversation coming up. A quick reminder, you can get your Michael Berry show merchandise gear you name it. At Michael. Berry show dot com click on t shirts, mugs pins. Bumper stickers all sorts of fun stuff ten percent goes to camp hope our residential Treatment Center for veterans. With PTSD, the other ninety percent of profits will be donated are given or earned by Chad, Nakanishi and Ramon Bliss. It's our way of creating kind of a virtual tip jar for those two. Thanks for everything you buy on there it goes to a great cause. Tim Carney is our guest. He has written a piece related to the fact that the pollsters seem to have written Donald Trump off in his point is not so fast. Let's go state by say what the hell is happening Tim in Arizona Arizona has always been to me the most reliably red state what has changed in that state. So to some extent. is immigration although that said trump is doing decently among immigrants and frankly immigration is an issue is more The desire for immigration restriction is highest in Arizona in any state I think and that you've got a huge demand for somebody to actually build the wall is there so. Trump trailing in the polls they're a big part is the suburbanization and the suburbs upper middle class suburbs in the United States have been trending towards the Democrats steadily for thirty years to what tree that. Okay. So variety of things one is that you you just have more isolation of those suburbs used to be that somebody making six figures husband and wife both college degree. They were more likely to live next door to a blue collar person. The story of the last forty years is a story of the wealthy college graduates more and more living in places where they only live next to other people. So that creates his more of A. Bubble and when you have more of a bubble, you're going to be less sensitive to things like Well, in this in some immigration, for instance, immigrants people know your lawn, not the people who go to your kids public school and then make it harder for the teachers to teach everybody For another thing, it has to do with social issues. The parties used to be more more divided were pro choice Republicans and pro. Life Democrats that doesn't exist anymore for middle class tends to be socially liberal for everybody else while themselves living socially conservative lives and those two factors I think add up to it but so different baselines..

Tim Carney Michael Berry Donald Trump Florida Arizona A. Bubble PTSD residential Treatment Center United States The Washington Examiner Ramon Bliss Chad Nakanishi
"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

03:08 min | Last month

"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"Let me ask you? On a kind of a by state let's start with. Florida. The president seems to be doing better, and this is purely anecdotal with the Cuban American community than I've seen a Republican do in in quite some time the numbers bear that out. You're correct. Yes. You also have a lot of, New Yorkers who have moved to Florida and retired who may not exactly be Republicans but it seems to me they have a lot of similar characteristics to trump and I would assume would be less bothered by him but would you find? I'm a New Yorker I know exactly what you mean so. What I know people like that, and you go to the wait in line at the bus, stop right on the bus you go to the local pub there's somebody like him and if he's not your best friend, you laugh at him, maybe you wouldn't want a guy like that dating your daughter, but you don't mind running into them at the at the coffee shop in the Mall I. It's a lot of these are sort of regional court people come to Houston from New York and they love to tell you they're from New York and I've always been of the opinion. I'm a lot less impressed with that than you are. But but but I think to New Yorkers there are certain courts you know when, when Ted, Cruz said of Donald Trump when they're running against each other in the two thousand, sixteen primary he said New York values and people said that was a really dumb move I felt like no, it wasn't I think a lot of southerners are can can be put Off by New York quirks but I think a lot of those folks that this sort of New York Diaspora who've moved to Florida it strikes me that there is a unique blend of people perfectly suited to a trump candidacy and that maybe that gives him a better shot than usual to first of all, win the twenty nine in Florida. Would you agree? Well. So a couple of things one I was about to say as a New Yorker who's been to Texas and into the south quite a lot. I don't think that I've. encountered a lot of how silly. But maybe a New Yorker I just don't know we're quiet about with C. quietly about. This is what we say. New. York. We be We may not act like we like you but we do in the south they may not like you but they act like right exactly exact in the mid west both they act like like you and they actually do. And then California they don't like you and they don't pretend to. So that's that's my summary of the country but anyway back to Florida. It is true that the the new. York. I asked for as you say, sort of stands trump a little bit more and he is just kind of your uncle, your next door neighbor he's very close in the polls and right now even though he's behind in the real clear politics average and the five thirty eight numbers I would bet on him winning that in the human thing is a big thing but. Big But for you on on Florida. So but is. The elderly population. There's evidence that the the high numbers of deaths among the elderly in the United States, and the increased need for the elderly to Nazi their grandchildren and that sort of thing because of the worry the.

New York Florida New York Diaspora Donald Trump C. president United States California Texas Houston Ted Cruz
"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

The Michael Berry Show

04:22 min | Last month

"carney" Discussed on The Michael Berry Show

"We are all about telling stories stories. Hollywood doesn't want you to hear stories. The media mocks stories about everyday Americans the elites ignore you can think of Redfield America as audio documentaries and we promise only one thing the truth visit the iheartradio APP right now to listen to Redfield America. Tim Carney is a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute which does great work a e is he works on economic. Competition. Cronyism Civil Society localism and Religion in America he is also the commentary editor at The Washington examiner. So he does a busy fellow we're talking to him about a recent article in the Washington Examiner entitled Election Experts say trump is ninety nine point five percent likely to lose. Here's the simple reason they are wrong Mr Kearney says Donald Trump is going to win why I don't think Donald Trump is going to win. I say it's not a done deal and there's a lot of reasons why the the first thing is that trump needs to pull off an upset or we could say outperform the polls in about six or seven states. Now, if I told you, if you had A, you know a twenty five percent. Chance of hitting a free t three point shot and I said, you have to six in a row. Yeah. The odds of you hitting six in a row would add up to about zero point five percent. But what if I said you have to hit one three pointer and that that counts for everything and that's basically what trump has to do. He's Bad example because I'm a really good three points year really good three point. Okay. court shot regimen. Hit a a right, a major league pitcher slider into the outfield whatever whatever it is a Tim Wakefield knuckleball Tim. Wakefield knuckleball. The point is he doesn't need to pull off an upset. Six different times to win Pennsylvania Arizona North Carolina etc. He just needs to surge nationally in the polls about four percent maybe six percent depending on which polls you believe realclearpolitics average has him down about four percent of Pennsylvania and I just wrote on at the Washington examiner, he's closer than that in other states where he trails slightly such as again North Carolina Arizona Iowa..

Donald Trump Tim Carney Wakefield knuckleball The Washington examiner Redfield America Tim Wakefield North Carolina Hollywood American Enterprise Institute Cronyism Pennsylvania Mr Kearney Arizona Iowa
Climbing Out Of The Weeds

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:41 min | Last month

Climbing Out Of The Weeds

"Over the years, the accelerate your business growth podcast has gained recognition as a great resource for. A small business owners, sales, professionals, business leaders. And that is because of the guests, these are folks who have expertise in a particular area of business and they join me to have a conversation where they share their expertise with all of you. Today is no different. My guest is Kate Carney. Kate is an experienced business consultant lawyer and Strategic Advisor. She, scales business she help scale businesses so companies can grow revenues and reach profitability. She takes a founders centric approach to performance focusing on leadership talent strategies and organizational design. Kate believes alignment of these critical areas results in a culture that supports sustainable growth. Over fifteen years of legal experience working with corporations, hedge funds and startups. Thanks so much for joining me today. Thank you for having delighted to be with you. I am thrilled to have you here. We're going to be talking today about. Founders transition excuse me transitioning to the role of CEO and the in sort of sounds obvious that founders would do that. But. They struggle with that kind of thing. Why is that? Initially it's this mindset that being able to go from. It's my baby to the business right you start off and founder mode and you know the market you know. The product or service your customer you had this idea it was your blood sweat and tears and all of a sudden you Kinda have to step back and say it's not about me the. Achievement and success of the business are not necessarily mine. It's business and it has its own reis and it has its own people and as you grow team etcetera and so it's just mindset shift that I think founders struggle to make, and maybe because many of them are execution type people and they're not best manager leader type of person that takes. A transition and skills as well. senior that's interesting. It is It's tough to remove that emotion. From. Neil being founder owner. To. Having to make unemotional decisions a CDL. Exactly I'm in, you'd think about companies having the pivot right. Now you're the founder and you had this idea and just been working on five years and it's released your baby. It's what you're attached to me. You have to bet and completely go in a different direction and you have to let go of what that idea may have been. Hopefully, it's just an iteration of it, but you have to let go at that what's best for the business maybe not exactly what you want to be doing or where your energy and passion exactly sets. Yeah boy. Okay so a lot of founders Go through burnout when they're actually trying to scale their business. What? guess ensures, but what leads to that and what they could be doing differently. I think out framework around this scaling and moving into a CEO. Yes when you're founder everything is within your domain and you're wearing many hats and you're working very hard and as you transition to see you know the role changes and the problems become more complex and the team is growing and you become and manager, and there are moderates how the role of changes which we can may Chad about in terms beds burn out I think that. Founders, get stuck in the weeds because they have a hard time letting go right as you grow your team, you have to be able to delegate. It's one of the most important things you can do give up some control and trust that you hire the right people and empower them, and so you gotta be able to delegate and I think for founders giving up that initial control or any amount of control is very hard. To do I also think we have this mentality that the media certainly sewell's that you know to be successful founder you have to work twenty four hours a day. That's that stressed the game everybody who's been successful does it and that's the only way to go about it and you know even if I got my own business I felt like well, any free time I had I should be working on the business why why wouldn't I? You know what else was I doing and there's always something more you can be doing, and so you know I got caught up in that mentality as well and I think it's easy to and the media certainly plays into that the great stories of sacrifice and. Dedication and all of these things when it's not true and So I think we have to change the story a little bit in the mindset of bit but I also think it's giving up control and delegating to people that you've hired. It's a big piece.

Founder Kate Carney CEO Strategic Advisor Kate Neil Sewell
Climbing Out Of The Weeds

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:41 min | Last month

Climbing Out Of The Weeds

"Over the years, the accelerate your business growth podcast has gained recognition as a great resource for. A small business owners, sales, professionals, business leaders. And that is because of the guests, these are folks who have expertise in a particular area of business and they join me to have a conversation where they share their expertise with all of you. Today is no different. My guest is Kate Carney. Kate is an experienced business consultant lawyer and Strategic Advisor. She, scales business she help scale businesses so companies can grow revenues and reach profitability. She takes a founders centric approach to performance focusing on leadership talent strategies and organizational design. Kate believes alignment of these critical areas results in a culture that supports sustainable growth. Over fifteen years of legal experience working with corporations, hedge funds and startups. Thanks so much for joining me today. Thank you for having delighted to be with you. I am thrilled to have you here. We're going to be talking today about. Founders transition excuse me transitioning to the role of CEO and the in sort of sounds obvious that founders would do that. But. They struggle with that kind of thing. Why is that? Initially it's this mindset that being able to go from. It's my baby to the business right you start off and founder mode and you know the market you know. The product or service your customer you had this idea it was your blood sweat and tears and all of a sudden you Kinda have to step back and say it's not about me the. Achievement and success of the business are not necessarily mine. It's business and it has its own reis and it has its own people and as you grow team etcetera and so it's just mindset shift that I think founders struggle to make, and maybe because many of them are execution type people and they're not best manager leader type of person that takes. A transition and skills as well. senior that's interesting. It is It's tough to remove that emotion. From. Neil being founder owner. To. Having to make unemotional decisions a CDL. Exactly I'm in, you'd think about companies having the pivot right. Now you're the founder and you had this idea and just been working on five years and it's released your baby. It's what you're attached to me. You have to bet and completely go in a different direction and you have to let go of what that idea may have been. Hopefully, it's just an iteration of it, but you have to let go at that what's best for the business maybe not exactly what you want to be doing or where your energy and passion exactly sets. Yeah boy. Okay so a lot of founders Go through burnout when they're actually trying to scale their business. What? guess ensures, but what leads to that and what they could be doing differently. I think out framework around this scaling and moving into a CEO. Yes when you're founder everything is within your domain and you're wearing many hats and you're working very hard and as you transition to see you know the role changes and the problems become more complex and the team is growing and you become and manager, and there are moderates how the role of changes which we can may Chad about in terms beds burn out I think that. Founders, get stuck in the weeds because they have a hard time letting go right as you grow your team, you have to be able to delegate. It's one of the most important things you can do give up some control and trust that you hire the right people and empower them, and so you gotta be able to delegate and I think for founders giving up that initial control or any amount of control is very hard. To do I also think we have this mentality that the media certainly sewell's that you know to be successful founder you have to work twenty four hours a day. That's that stressed the game everybody who's been successful does it and that's the only way to go about it and you know even if I got my own business I felt like well, any free time I had I should be working on the business why why wouldn't I? You know what else was I doing and there's always something more you can be doing, and so you know I got caught up in that mentality as well and I think it's easy to and the media certainly plays into that the great stories of sacrifice and. Dedication and all of these things when it's not true and So I think we have to change the story a little bit in the mindset of bit but I also think it's giving up control and delegating to people that you've hired. It's a big piece.

Founder Kate Carney CEO Strategic Advisor Kate Neil Sewell
Pottery Barn Starts Selling Used Goods

Business Wars Daily

03:15 min | Last month

Pottery Barn Starts Selling Used Goods

"Home goods retailer Pottery Barn has long been the mothership of quote Shabby Chic. It's Pricey. Items are often carefully designed to gently used even though their brand new that way you don't look like you're trying too hard right But now through a new partnership, the retailer is going to be offering up. It's returned bedding bath towels, table linens, and even bathrobes for sale to the masses. This stuff really has been. Gently used perhaps before you get a case of skin crawling anxiety over covid nineteen, hear me out the new initiative called Pottery Barn renewed is in collaboration with the renewal project. The company cleans and rehabs unsellable inventory including return items that would otherwise end up in landfills. Each item goes through the renewal workshops six step process to make it squeaky clean according to a pottery barn statement products are sorted, graded and thoroughly sanitized with water technology repairs are made if necessary then each item is inspected to ensure it meets quality standards only then does it get a renewal workshop tag certified items are listed for sale on the Renewal Workshop website. Pottery Barn is the first major retailer to partner with the renewal workshop. The company says, this is its first step toward becoming a quote circular business in other words is working to ensure that goods and materials are used for as long as possible. And the impact could be significant. The Renewal Projects Research found that more than eighty percent of what brands consider waste can be renewed and resold. Pottery Barn isn't the only posh retailer to try repurposing last month, modern home goods retailer West Elm got in the game it launched a sustainable line with Fashion Label Eileen Fisher using post. Consumer. Denim Waste Eileen Fisher is taken. Back more than a million garments to keep its label out of landfills the de Garments that were to damage to be worn were washed, repaired, and deconstructed. Then West Elm used them to create a line of pillow covers. Oh, and there's also a repurpose denim swivel chair that'll set you back about two grand west ELM has been working toward more sustainable products for a while. But it's not easy six years ago the company pledged that forty percent of all of its products would be fair trade certified by this year but it has only hit the twenty five percent mark according to Forbes the effort is complex. The company Says Finding, and certifying overseas factories is a difficult and stringent process especially when you're among the first to do so West Elm, does label its products is fair trade sustainably sourced organic or locally made among others. Roughly sixty percent of its product support. At least one of its sustainability initiatives dwell reports. These green business moves may be challenging, but they appear to be smart while the pandemic pummeled many brands early on New York University found that dollar volume sales of sustainable products increased by more than fifty percent and a recent report by research firm Carney found that more than half of consumers. We're more likely to purchase environmentally friendly products because of their covid nineteen experiences. So sure sells has been a Madison Avenue mantras since the Real Life Madman days but today the way to consumers hearts appears to be a little less saucy and little more sustained.

Pottery Barn West Elm Eileen Fisher Renewal Projects Research New York University Partner Carney Forbes
Transgender activist Sarah McBride wins Delaware state Senate primary

KYW 24 Hour News

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Transgender activist Sarah McBride wins Delaware state Senate primary

"Transgender activist Sarah McBride has won today's Democratic State Senate primary in Delaware and is poised to make history as the first transgender person elected to the States General Assembly. McBride is the favorite in November's general election as Democrats outnumber Republicans in the district by more than 3 to 1 Governor John Carney and U S Senator Chris Coons easily beat back challengers to win their Democratic primaries.

Sarah Mcbride Governor John Carney States General Assembly Chris Coons Senate Delaware Senator
Christopher Coons wins Democratic Senate primary in Delaware

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 2 months ago

Christopher Coons wins Democratic Senate primary in Delaware

"ON w T o P Christopher Kun's wins Democratic primary Senate. Let me Say it again. Christopher Coombs has won the Democratic Senate primary in Delaware tonight. He was first elected in a 2010 special election to fill Joe Biden's expired Senate term. After he became vice president. Koons was defending his seat against progressive activists. And political newcomer Jessica's. Corinne and John Carney has won the Democratic primary election for governor in Delaware. Carney was elected governor about four years ago. After serving three terms in the U. S House. He served two terms as lieutenant governor from a one toe nine but lost the 2008 Democratic Governors primary to Jack Markell. We'll keep you updated here

Democratic Governors Primary Democratic Senate John Carney Senate Christopher Kun Christopher Coombs Vice President Delaware Koons Jack Markell Corinne Jessica U. S House
CNN's Brooke Baldwin praises Biden during Kenosha visit: He's trying to fight for 'the soul of this nation'

The John Phillips Show

01:05 min | 2 months ago

CNN's Brooke Baldwin praises Biden during Kenosha visit: He's trying to fight for 'the soul of this nation'

"To Joe Biden's Kenosha visit was entirely predictable, and the drool cups were out, not just for them, but also for Joe Biden have to catch his rule. CNN's Brooke Baldwin listen to her reaction to Joe Biden doddering round in a church while apparently handing like scripted pieces of paper. Two people to ask him questions. This is Here's Brooke Baldwin going Full Jay Carney never go full. Jay Carney Point by point by point on his notes, You know, just just questions concerns from from folks there who have been able to speak up about you know the Children and education of mental helmets and health and then a prison system. But I want to go back just briefly. I mean, obviously he's there in the wake of the Jacob Blake shooting. He's not with the family today, and he was mentioning Charlottesville and again, You know, when Joe Biden announced he wanted to run for president, what did he say He wants to fight for the soul of this nation, And that is precisely what he is trying to do in making his case to become The next president of United States. That is precisely what he's doing. Well, I mean, wow, wow. She is so impressed. She was so impressed. I never would have printed that from a CNN anchor never would have predicted anything remotely like that. So Brooke Baldwin doing the heavy lifting their.

Joe Biden Brooke Baldwin Jay Carney CNN Kenosha President Trump Jacob Blake United States Charlottesville
Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

How I Built This

1:03:33 hr | 3 months ago

Starting Zocdoc with Oliver Kharraz

"Oliver Karaz was born and raised in Germany mostly in rural parts of the country his mother was German and his father was from Iran in came from a long line of doctors. For me, it really starts in some ways with my dad and. The timing rapidly had every reason to become a social activist and and so he came to Germany from the Middle East when he was very young around twenty with no money in his pocket no language skills. And you personally then worked on of odd jobs, but he eventually became a psychiatrist but what has really shaped me much more than being born in Berlin is. Social. Active. Isn't that I that I saw him live and that he really made our family mattress we always talked about talent responsibility and the need to use. Whatever telling behind to help those. Around us that we can make a difference. Given that your father was Iranian and your mother was was sort of. German. An Uber even though you were born in Germany, did you feel did you feel as Germany everybody else? So I didn't have a second identity. We only used spoke German at home and yet. As you say I was also a not always fully accepted. So if I give you an example, my school twelve hundred students and you could pick out to the didn't look like everyone else and I was one of them right and even an enlightened country like Germany. That is notable. So I had what I call a visual accent would people would see me on the street and they would ask me how to speak German. So well and But they also school the skipped my name when reading out scores because they weren't sure how to pronounce my last name and opportunities taken away and even at was physically threatened so i. I think that really shaping in many ways because I realized. Very early that in order to be as successful as everyone around me I would have to be dramatically better in really work much much harder than anyone else and so that used to be strong work ethic in me. For the record Oliver is somewhat down playing his work ethic. Because just out of high school, he actually started his first successful company. It was the early clunky days of the Internet, and he designed a way to help people send emails more easily and he wound up selling that business not for a ton of money, but enough to get him through medical school. But. After practicing medicine for a couple years Oliver realized he couldn't stop thinking about that first business he'd started and how he wanted to start another. So he quit his job in medicine and consulting job with Mackenzie and eventually moved to New York. That was my goal was actually to start another company that that's A. Healthcare, but I I'd also realized at the time that I sold my first company and far too cheaply in that I should learn more about business I and at McKinsey God exposure to balance sheets and panels and hit a lot of very practical experience and what it means to manage business. And I think they fondly of my time at McKinsey was one of my better decisions. McKinsey GonNa Mackenzie is a little bit like going to business school. A lot of people at McKinsey have come from business, schools. In that. Many people go to business school thinking they will find a co-founder. Did you were you actively looking around at your colleagues to think maybe I can do something with him or her you know maybe that person. Absolutely and were you just thinking about different business ideas all the time? Well, it is actually very hard to find good ideas and my definition of a good idea was that it needed to have a great mission I. wanted to make sure that we actually do something good in that. We stayed true to sort of talent breaks responsibility, but also wanted to be a large market and to have a great motor rounded and also I wanted to be based on contrarian inside. Because I thought that all of the best companies have that at its core. While she wanted mission, you wanted a company that could kind of dominate its field by building a motor around it, but was also contrary and that's that's that's those are some interesting. Criteria. And that's why I screen for several years rejected pretty much every idea that that I came across And meanwhile. While you're going through all that I guess you meet this guy Cyrus Masumi. WHO's another McKenzie consultant and and just you just. Become friends like he's like somebody like in and you guys start hanging out. While we got put on study together that required us to travel globally and you've ever done that it meant frost were sixteen eighteen hour days together for three four, five months on end and we really. Got To become great partners in that and and what we realized that we had some. Very complementary skills. Cyrus is one of the most charismatic and gregarious individuals. You'd ever meet his very passionate. He could be more forceful, which sometimes was needed to be effective with clients. And you've talked to me now for a little bit as you can probably tell. More dispassionate and logical and more measuring. German? More, German in many ways, right. also was effective with clients by by. and Cyrus is American right? He's American this but that That close listened and how we work together that really started friendship and we stayed close for the study and be caught up over lunch pretty regularly denounce different business ideas off one another and. I think we connected because we had similar interests because. On. Some levels We were equally passionate about what we're doing higher says, passion was more visible to others than mine but we. Were close enough together that we both accepted. The other as. individual that that we could learn a lot from. Was it was it clear pretty soon after you start hanging out, Sarah's that this was the guy because you were. You're on the lookout for a partner. They I think it was was absolutely an option I know reality is that. With. Both founded companies before Mckinsey and we both knew that we wanna do it again and as I. was always great about being. Very honest. Rather than just nice and and I value that a lot. Yeah. All, right. So So this guy, Cyrus Super Charismatic, really smart clearly, the two of you start to to work together. And what what kind of business ideas are are you coming up with? While we kind of fell in love with a new idea that came about a one of these launches were Cyrus. Told me about how he recently ruptured his eardrum by flying with a cold and then found it very difficult to actually find a doctor and he had asked for recommendations and called down his insurance directory listing started with the as. Doctors weren't accepting new patients some no longer accepted two centurions one provider Pasta Way and so he said, well, why does it take four days to the doctor when I'm in pain right? And why can't this much easier? And we. Both very quickly. realized the potential of this idea from. Working at project be new helps us the for actually spending millions of dollars for marketing to grow their patient base because they had wasted inventory, right they had something that I like to call hidden supply, which is these last minute cancellations no-shows reschedules. That the that go to waste, and then on the other, there are the patients who had a hard time accessing this. You thought it immediately clicked with these my God. Yes. Doctor's appointments connect patients to doctors. Yeah. Well, look if you go through the forfeiture that I had read, it's a great mission right? We're making one of the most personal needs more accessible for for patients we can help patients to get in fast we can help the doctors become more efficient. We can make the entire health care system more cost effective people out of the emergency room things like that, and it's a marketplace. So there is a strong mode and clearly anything in healthcare is a large market and I think the contrary and inside that we had. was. The fact that. Most people thought it's normal that people have to wait twenty four days to a doctor because there's a doctor shortage in read our inside was really no doctors have asthma debate ability because of these last minute cancellations, no-shows reschedules and so I felt very about this idea. So. So you member like how long between the time that the you had that first conversation To the time were both you said, let's start this business was like monster or weeks or days. was was weeks. We what we what we started doing is actually. Mocking up the side in how imagine back then in powerpoint pointing just the wire. Website. Yeah. Wire frame. Exactly. We would. We'd go into starbucks and we'll chat up strangers and say, Hey, here's a five dollar gift card. Give me your thoughts. Sorry I'm GonNa. Go back. You just go to people in starbucks Gift Card and say, can you give me your thoughts? Random Person? The absolutely that's that was sort of our market testing. They wouldn't. They would be like excuse me this is a little weird. You're my space. Might also happen from time to time but you know there's lots of people on starbucks is very in German of you. That's debris because usually he would be to report tentative about doing that. Well, you know I think there was a lot less rejection than you think people actually quite open I. Suggest you try this out but if you If you're unthreatening in Luke harmless as we probably dead and then they'll be pretty open. You went up to and starbucks and you'd say, Hey, we're thinking about a company here. Can you just look at his powerpoint give you five dollars Gift Card and what was in the powerpoint, the popcorn and was just what we thought. This website would look like and we would ask them is the set service that resonates with you would you use it and and we got an incredibly valuable feedback here and really set us in many ways on the on the right track right? So and what pointed to the two of you decide let's quit McKinsey. Let's. Let's pursue this. Probably a month or two after we initially discussed idea did anybody say you were crazy for quitting? Everyone. Everyone told us. Crazy and got a lot of negative feedback on the idea to write people would say this is Bloomberg out I would never pick my doctor on the internet or I already have a doctor or you know doctors wouldn't accept patients that that are looking on the Internet of all kinds of protections that people had when they were thinking about their own situation by. When when you talk to people and starbucks, they actually thought about it much more positively. So we were encouraged enough to say, well, this is going to work as long as we get out of our circle and don't ask McKinsey consultants doctors. The responsible be better. All right. So you are in your thirties at this point. And presumably were making pretty good cash at McKinsey because you were probably you'd know expenses you're on the road all the time so. When you quit, I'm assuming you had some money to launch the business and probably live off for a while. Yeah. So I very deliberately had never raised my living standard to the money that the paying McKinsey and I had saved every dime so that I could. No be in a position where can fund this embraced can afford not to take a salary for a couple of years. Wow. So so a couple of hundred thousand and you saved. You know. Maybe. I'm to Germany to discuss personal finances but. I had. Built this. Radio, you can tell the. Story Yeah I I had I had enough money to live off for for several years but I also Saturday night both finance the company early out of our own savings so that clearly diminish We had leftover after that. So now, you both decided to quit. and. You have some technical expertise because you had. You had done some coding but this is next level stuff. Were you able to be that technology founder and Cyrus was going to be the the sort of the business founder? Absolutely not as I add coated but at that point, I had not touched a computer for a long time We knew we need to have a technical co founder and so Sarah's knew a guy named Nick Guanzhou from the time together, trophy software, and this is another company that they would both worked at the that's the company that they're both previously worked together and Nick just brought a totally different perspective and really educated Addison me on a lot of things and and he was really the one who understood a building a seamless experience for the consumer and ends May. Zach Docs. Early Genius, did you did you have the name dock from the beginning? Not, not initially we we went to several phases on on what the right name could be for for while we wanted to have a descriptive name. So we looked at physicians, dot Com Doctors Dot Com, and we actually tracked down the owners of one of these domains and they wanted several million dollars for the domain name. And and we were finding the company ourselves. So that was out of the question. So then we just sat in a room and we brainstorm a list of fifty or one hundred names, and then started eliminating names until we arrived at Dr. What does it mean? or it doesn't mean anything which was the WTO bit we could. There were zero search results. Okay. There's no meaning behind his ACH. There's no meaning behind and and in hindsight it was precisely the right thing to do because it really was a blank slate for us to fill with with meaning and really build a brand around. Zero such as October we started. It address nate the right lake once you know that it takes more than three weeks from picking up the phone and dialing for doctors till you actually see someone you realize Oh, this really not much else that we have to wait so long for to get. And this is more important than most of these other things you already have. Fantastic access View Magin. If air travel way that healthcare workers that wouldn't be an expedia that wouldn't even be Delta Dot Com that would be individual phone numbers for every plane. Imagine. If that happened, you know a half the planes would fly empty it would be a massive pain and that was actually the state of health care before sock. Is Amazing that that the nothing like this was out there in two thousand seven. I look at I. Think. In many ways you couldn't build it a much earlier. In the early days. When we went out there, we were the ones installing Internet of the doctor's offices. We. They they were a many times just migrating from a paper books to scheduling systems. We were at the cusp of digitisation for healthcare. We were just lucky in our timing to get this right in and start offering the service when that also happened. All right. So you decide to pursue Zach dock and it's the three of you. I'm assuming really just at the beginning and were you working out of out of one of your apartments? Did you guys rent space? No, we worked out of respect for. Many. Times we came to make yet the nicest apartment and and we could bring breakfast Burrito and bake him up and you know the the reality is that we originally had a pretty ambitious launch plan right so we got together around July. We wanted to launch by December of two, thousand seven. Something interesting happened were nick send an email suggesting to look at what was then called techcrunch forty. Take is is now a household name but the draw for us back then was there was a fifty thousand dollar prize now it's called tech crunch disrupt think. So it's a major a startup competition. It's a startup competition and we were the first class of this was much less known be budgeted two hours to fill in the application in really which will send it off. He didn't think about it anymore that there was an early July and early August we've heard that we had been accepted, but there was a complication we'd have to be ready by September eighteenth or. That was three months sooner than we had originally planned to launch. So you'd have a live website by September that is right that is right with doctors with doctors, right So we actually debated for a few hours whether we should even tried to go for that but we ultimately said, yes, we can get the website working and we wanted to have enough doctors just a bars wouldn't look pathetic. Brayden. Coded Night Neither Day and nick really busted his but he did the patient facing side of the website and that was the programs. What was potentially even harder because we're tried to launch a marketplace was to actually get the initial supply on there and remember the website wasn't there yet so. Tires ended up going door to door for doctors offices. Excuse telling them a powerpoint page, and this is really a testament to cyrus sheer willing determination if you think about what it means to really start a company early on, there's nothing to show right you may be a powerpoint but there's no website there's no patience. There's no other doctors no social proof and it has to run on passion and very clear that that is Cyrus superpower. He just went to random doctors offices or he had like a list of doctors offices and he started kind of walking block by block. Well, there's a lot of walking involved a we launched in Manhattan so you can literally go down the street and you see. The signs and you walk in. And he was basically saying look, it's a way to connect you to patients. How was how many by the way? What was your objective? How many doctors do you need to sign up to have this website look okay by September Between six and ten was our goal. Okay. So just doable it is a was extremely hard really. Is telling doctors is one of the hardest things to do why were they saying? Well, first of all, it is baby very hard to even speak to a doctor they are being shielded. Their time is very valuable. Office managers are trained not to let anyone talk to them to protect the doctor from people walking in selling them stuff shirt them. Secondly, they many didn't want to give up control over their calendar which has to write. We ask them to post times that a patient could book into it and it was just a far fetched idea for many of them the patients would actually do this. So he got a lot of knows he got a lot of knows. He'd go there and he just simply not leave until he got a chance to speak to the doctor and a few times. It was even escorted out by security. I really think one in a million could have put this off. I mean was he going to particular kinds of doctors or was he generally focused on an Internet general? Practitioners Ob sobe began with dentists Okay. Because our thinking was that. People go to dentists most often, and we wanted to make sure that we have an offering that is relevant for patients as often as possible. I. Got you so so eventually unassuming, you do get what six to ten or how many did you get by September of two thousand seven Eight. In the meantime, you inequity doing the back end stuff you were doing the coding and building the website does right and as you were building it. How did it look? So. The bit that Nick Build looked awesome for the time I think. It was impressive. We were. Very. Satisfied that we had a scroll bar that we had a map that we had back then already the insurance selector and a lot of feature that. Weren't to be found really anywhere else. All right. So September two, thousand, seven, you are ready to reveal. This service at. Tech. Crunch. And Doth Review present or did did Cyrus kind of wishy the spokesperson? Cyrus. I presented Nick stayed behind in New York to make sure that the less the website was actually up and running This is in San Francisco that you went to the we flew out to San Francisco and So we lost sock talk in front of Eight, nine, hundred people. A lot of them were journalists when the judges opened up with feedback guy covers ocoee who we newnan in valued. As embezzles forever apple he came out to said he he didn't get it. He would never use this in front of everyone right and. His direct load something like honestly Oh, it just never occurred to me to go to any doctor that's really burned in in my brain and what was worse is that he seemed to be right we didn't get a single booking. We were hoping that this PR would get us out of our initial batch of users, right because your other. So many tech journalists there. So you know the publicity may be would would would lead to bookings and that was the hope but. It actually took three days before regard our first legitimate a patient, and and in the entire first month, we only got five bookings. You come back from San Francisco and. You know you had Guy Kawasaki. Say I don't I would never use this service? I'm sure he feels differently today but man maybe then Ezio said that but did did you come back feeling like like dejected like losers or or were you excited like how did you feel coming back? While you know I think we obviously hoping we would eventually get more bookings and In the beginning you probably refreshed. The Bookings Report Hundred Times a day by as we were thinking through what we realized. It was really a typical two sided marketplace challenge It's just a classic chicken and egg problem. You need the supply to get the demand and you need the demand to entice them supply and for dark was even trickier. Right when you think about it, healthcare is hyper local. Very complicated. So you have to match. Supply and demand on a Zip code specialty level, and then we have thousands of insurances take. Until we realized that our odds of actually finding a patient that wanted. An offer there. Quite low, and so the best path forward was to methodically build up supply, and so we just kept going put up a huge map of Manhattan on the wall, and then a sleep put little flags on of where the doctor's brother we're on the website in which insurance is accepted and we just we knew the perseverance. Is the name of the game. Back in just a moment how oliver and Cyrus Begin to drum up interest in stock and how they even start to raise some money at figure out how to dress differently, stay with us guy rows and you're listening to how I built this from NPR. Hey everyone. Just a quick thanks to our sponsors who helped make this podcast possible I to epic provision maker of epic bar beef was nature's idea the epic bar was. The new Vif Sea salt and pepper bars have three grams total carbs why it's in their nature after all, they're made with one hundred percent grass fed beef, and nature's Metro's three grams, total carbs, eleven, grams of protein find them in the bar borrow or at epic Bar Dot Com. Thanks also to stand for Small and American Express. If you're a small business owner head to stand for small dot com slash partner for resources, offers and tools from a growing group of companies that want to help your business get back to business visit stand for small dot com slash partner to get started. Thanks also to Microsoft, the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat, meet, call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Here, at life, we know that getting your financial house in order can feel painful. Now, there's this whole corona virus pandemic. The deal with our personal finance tuneup series will help you feel more confident and get you on the right track listen and subscribe to NPR's Life Kit. And just a reminder, you can preorder the how I built this book right now, and if you do I'll send you a free signed book plate to go inside the book. The book is a collection of insights and wisdom from some of the most incredible and inspiring makers, inventors, builders, and dreamers on earth to preorder and to get your free signed book plate while supplies. Last, please go to Guira DOT COM or how I built this dot. com. Hey welcome back to how I built this from NPR Cairo's. So it's two, thousand, seven and Oliver. Cyrus. Nick are basically powering through with Zach dock going door to door trying to convince doctors. It's a valuable service and the thing about doctors even though they're really smart and capable and we depend on them. A lot of their offices especially back in two, thousand, seven or sort of technologically in the Stone Age. There was incredibly complicated to sink the doctors calendars with ours. Because none of the software was actually made to sink. Were even in the places where we had syncs up and running, we would frequently get. Feedback while the punishment didn't happen because the doctor wasn't available and we really couldn't figure out why this was the case because when we did screen chairs with the office to their calendar and and our calendar, it was identical right and couldn't figure out why that's happening. So I decided to sit next to the office manager I went there and got to know him and his family photos of his dog. I fixed the printer taught a better strategies to play minesweeper still couldn't figure it out. Until one day, the doctor would come out and she'd say, Hey David I'm out next Friday. And then what does David do does he go into the calendar and block out next Friday or does he take a post? It note On a doctor out next Friday and sticks this too is monitor. In the real world. These post it notes, of course happen and but once you know that Matthew Friend, you can start filtering this out and that's one example they were literally a thousand point, one percent solutions that we had to figure out to make this work. Wow. That sounds I'm getting exhausted. Just hearing about that because this is like even like Google calendars, right? Yeah. Yeah. That was that was early days and what we were extremely focused around were making show the experience was fantastic. If something went wrong, we fix it. Right. So I was our customer service I personally would call the doctor and and confirmed the appointment was all said if it wasn't I, personally contact the patient to let them know and then I would offer them. Amazon Gift Card alongside with an apology those actually one case where it didn't catch a patient in time. and. The were in the subway to the doctor, and so I raised them to the doctor's office and picked up a bouquet of flowers on the way there and met them in person to apologize. And that was really a turning point burs. The service has to work and we need to be have this patients I attitude in in terms of how it works completely ingrained in the company. All right. So you clearly need to kind of grow this Were you offering this service doctors for free at the time? Initially. We for free by we eventually started charging fifty dollars per month. But Sam doctor you come into my office and you say, Hey, if you pay me I can bring you more customers. I would be skeptical I would've said to you you who whose, who even knows about you. You'RE GONNA you're asking me to pay you money for Phantom bookings for maybe no customers I mean did some of the doctors say Many. The US summarize our sales challenge. Right? It was very hard because even if you wanted to, we couldn't easily share how many patients their competitors are down the road God like that was something that was confidential. All right. So you are you got this chicken and egg problem. Not, enough people signing up and he gets skeptical doctors but you know that the service could really benefit the doctors, but you also need them to pay for because otherwise you know but business. Meantime at a certain point I'm assuming you guys start to think we'd better go out and look for money if we're going to really make this thing work. Yeah. Yeah. That that happened in the spring of two, thousand, eight we decided we raise series. And we we make the rounds we get in front of a number of the big name, BC New York the also go to Sandhill road in impel. Toho Santo Road we leads and road initially were very successful at all we got Polite knows. and. Ray No feedback control someone took us as I told us you know what the idea seems. Good. But you're consultants I'd and the perspective of its consultants can't get anything done and what realized is that even though we had both founded companies before our Mackenzie Pedigree in our keys and button down shirts, they were really hurting us, and so we wait rank Khakis and button down shirts. It sounds crazy. Were they pleaded pants or were they at least nine pleaded please. Yeah Yeah. Yeah we after hearing that feedback We very quickly just went to the next gap and bought jeans and t-shirts and from that on the combos with VC's when but a lot better. So you went from McKinsey consultant look to this are the tech casual uniform of jeans and t-shirts that that's exactly right and we introduced ourselves not as NBA's and McKinsey Consultants but we introduce ourselves previous entrepreneurs that are starting their next company. was was anyone biting? Were there people who were like? Yeah there's a great idea I'm in. So interesting enough we had raised some money from. Friends and colleagues, and many of those they invested in US business plan unseen just based on the fact that we. Were giving up our careers at McKinsey to pursue talks. So that felt really a great. and. As we started changing how we appeared in how we introduced ourselves to venture capitalists L., we started to get offers and so in August of two thousand eight, we ended up raising five million from KHOSLA ventures expeditions mark. Wow Mark Banya Jeff bezos, and Venus is. All their. Funds are in which sounds like a lot before you WanNa do it's actually. Kinda limited because you still it seems to me in two thousand eight even though you have five million dollars a lot of money you still have this problem which is you've gotta get. Customers, and then to get customers, you need lots of doctors had lots of options but to get doctors, you need lots of customers booking through the site to you do that precisely D- These five million dollars per lily earmarked for making New, York, work, right, Miguel, I market work but. immediately after raising the money the financial crisis hit. And You may remember there was rest in peace a memo that went around about startups, right? Yes. About start ups, never being able to raise money arrested in peace good times. So we got this job is to make the money stretch in. We probably learn not during this time This was really our first go round making hard choices and what I want to be frugal and not to do things we can't afford and We learned to not let money replace critical, thinking and creativity. But now we continued to grind away at New York and at some point felt while if you want to get. To the next level we have to prove. Dr Isn't just a New York City phenomenon. Right? We had to prove that it would work in a second city But at that point, we didn't have the money to do this anymore, and by the way you're still your approach was still the same. It was door to door. That's right door to door and how how you building awareness about the about the fact Zach existed with customers with potential customers. So we it was day very difficult to get someone. To the website. Yeah but when they did. They loved it because it was such a step change from how healthcare used to work for him. Right they used to have to pick up the phone and wait on hold and then plays scheduling. tetris. With the office manager, can you do Wednesday morning about Thursday noon? Friday afternoon, and now they could do the same thing in a minute and have complete overview about the ability patients loved it and they told their friends. So we we started to get word of mouth. Going, and so we saw New York really taking up and we felt like, okay, this does this go into work in New York. At a minimum rate, but we also realized that it took us a fair bit of time. And money to get it going. In New, York and do we couldn't with the money we had left from the five million easily expanded into a new city at the same time. Raising money was going to be difficult because the next generation of investors wanted to see that it works and other cities as Walter. So we were a little bit in this catch twenty, two we ended up. Applying to. Force boost Your Business Competition Four. Forbes has his competition as sell to where they give away money right to they were promising a hundred thousand dollar prize. And at this time. We won. And Yeah what did is they gave us one of these large publishers. Clearinghouse is sex and very useful actually used to cover a hole in one in our only conference room. There was a hole in the wall and we covered it with that. At, this point you are, you are working out of an office, not not an apartment at this point we were working out of A. Shared Office space we work. Yeah. So they had given us publisher clearing house is is check but they fail to give us the small check for three months and we were getting really nervous, but it would still get it but. But ultimately, we got that one hundred thousand dollars and that's what we used to launch and our second market in DC in Washington DC and would did it require you guys to move down there or were you did you hire because I'm assuming you had to? A lot of your early capital was going into sales. Business Development hiring sales reps, is that right? Right, we had a couple of sales reps at the time. A. Very first employee ever was a sales rep is still with the company today and He was great. He figured out how to. Really charm his way. To the doctor. So there were no more security guards escorting anyone out. When did you? I'm assuming that even in two, thousand, nine, two, thousand, ten, and beyond we're not yet profitable. Far From It? Yeah. Far from it right because it's a capital intensive business. Yes. We obviously invested heavily in customer service wanted patients to have a great experience. And we had a quite sizable engineering team because that was actually a major engineering effort. So what started to happen when did you start to kind of see? A real turning point. Yeah. So we we we had launched New, York successfully with. Years. Of hardwork, we've gotten it off the ground is transported that to DC at work well, in DC, and now he said, well, why are we not in more cities and so we actually we raised serious be with fouled respond and We used to expand off the East Coast Francisco then Chicago and we just got better better at it. So we then ended up raising serious and two thousand eleven from Goldman NTSC, and we primarily use this to grow our sales team and sign up more more doctors in from two thousand eleven till two thousand, thirteen, we launched roughly thirty new cities I read that by by two thousand, fourteen would covered. Like forty percent of markets in the US, which is huge I mean that's right I mean that's a huge number of cities. And in that year evaluation. Of tzakda. Past Billion Dollars I mean that's That's pretty remarkable i. mean you were kind of on this like really rapid trajectory and you a pretty straightforward model right and you were charging doctors a flat fee every year and then. They could take all the bookings they wanted and I think that by that point like by two thousand, fourteen knew it was not cheap. It was expensive viewed really raised the price it was like three thousand dollars a year, right? Something like that. Yes recharged Dr Three thousand dollars a year and and there was a flat fee. No matter. How many bookings Actually facilitated for them and and the reality was for some doctors that got a lot of bookings that was a great deal. Yeah. But but there were also doctors that God a lot fewer bookings and for them that fixed cost was actually too expensive and some of them were starting to leave the service, and so we got into a situation that required us to invest a lot to stay where we are and then invest even more to continually grow our overall provider base, which means we had to build out a massive sales team to always sign up more doctors right and. Some point during this time L. Nick actually ran an analysis showed that it would take several years if ever fries to make our money back on on many of the doctors we signed up because you would have to sign up. X number of hundreds of thousands of doctors paying that amount every year. To make your money back to to make sort of our the cost of the sales team back. Wow and L. it. This was pure that would make us dependent on external capital for our very long time, and now it's a clearly there are many companies that have taken. Grow fast at all costs approach. And They Held onto this forty extended period of time by L., it clearly puts talking to a dependency to. Investors in their mind says, yeah. So. Meantime. You know I I from what I understand. There's disagreements I mean there there are you know the leadership team including Cyrus he he's I. Think he's he's sort of his position as the flat fee model is actually the best way to go is that a fair assessment of of his position? Yeah. I think that's right. I. Mean there were two fundamentally divergent ways held the business could go forward right. One way was to continue to work on optimizing the unit economics of our subscription model and the other way was to think about how to make it more transformative leap and then find a new more profitable. And more sustainable model and. Their. Look I can certainly understand The reluctance and taking this leap if companies rechange their underlying business model once they have a certain scale and then live to tell about it, right. We know the names of the companies that have done this net flicks, but from DVD's to streaming adobe. From box software to the cloud, but there's not a lot of companies that do that. and. Needed to make a choice which which direction I wanted to go. And and I should say over that. Became intensely personal for you because hugh and Cyrus really disagreed on on on the direction of the company should take. Steps down he he left the company and you moved into the role of CEO. Those right and what ask you about this neo. Beauty's in the flies of this show is its simplicity and we talked to one person or sometimes too. It's a single narrative, and so we don't have cyrus with us to tell us what happened but I wanna ask you about this time because. This was your co founder. This was your partner This is your friend and he was leaving the company. How did you feel at that time? I all I can say was a very hard and very emotional period for everyone involved and It was certainly a departure But how was through that given these two divergent choices you you couldn't. note, both of us could be useful to talk and. I have to imagine that for for period. China. was sort of the friendship. Look been we were very close we. Were not only friends we had worked for eight years believe together fourteen hours a day, and we probably talked more to each other than to anyone else in our lives but you know. Still touch from time to time and. I think he's joining us on from sideline. He still at prison million owner of the company Yeah, he's still. Here's the thing I mean we've we've told stories about breakups we've had we've had episodes were there were married couples who split divorced but continued the business e O products. Susan Griffin Black and an her husband Brad They continued the business stacy's pita chips continue the business after the divorce sold it for a quarter billion dollars. You guys were worth value to one point eight billion dollars at this point. was was ever party that just thought you know, God look at what we're doing on the core we're going and. I mean did you in service it down and say you know this thing is just growing and? Let's just figure this out. I think the challenge is that it's not as if there was an article way to decide what the right path forward is. As long as investors wanted to give us money growing all costs was yeah. Fine Strategy. The question was just how dependent you wanted to be on the continued goodwill of investors. It sounds like you were tired of going out raising money. You didn't want to do that anymore. Oh, not at all but I think you want to raise money from a position where you know what your turn to is and and. It wasn't clear that the business model would work in in a way that that we could just flip a switch and be profitable. Yeah. So. That was a tough year for you. Two, thousand fifteen. There was an article in business I think business insider, and it was about the sales team. It's October that year and it was. It was some allegations that you know Pete member sales team using adderall even cocaine they were under immense pressure. They were working all the time when you saw that article. And I'm not saying you even aware of any of this. You may not even aware of it but I. have to think that that article really alarmed you and and maybe even embarrassed you. Look A. There were a number of articles in two thousand fourteen fifteen. Didn't absolutely get everything, right but Budweiser I can say is that At. The time doctor had their sales team and we're. Getting very quickly and Your maybe maybe. Too focused on. L. Hitting targets and. Not. Focus enough on creating a strong culture the I hear these stories from six years ago from from time to time and from from now from candidates and and really every time. This happens like a Gut Punch. Because, this we know we're completely different company now. On on so many levels, but clearly, you saw that in new that you had to change something. While yes, I look I l there's a there's a couple of things about this. Right? We are a technology company, but we had said ourselves up too much about. Instead of writing wins and really too little about being adaptable and darning and and building the trust required to try things that now pet the risk of failure. and. So one of the first things I did is to change core values. You know to emphasize those behaviors each one of our values adaptable, not comfortable and other one is progress before perfection learners before masters right and. We only kept really one DIA CONSTANT DEL patients I. Personally that. That was more of the culture that I thought was right for Doc to succeed on many dimensions. So, you take over the company it's got high valuation, but you're still not making money and you know that you've gotta change the underlying business model you're never gonNA make money. And from what I understand this is the beginning of what you have internally described as the second founding of the company. That is right. That is right and that basically happens in in two thousand, eighteen you you launch this new business model where instead of the the dollar membership fee. Basically, you would charge doctors a lot less like two hundred or three hundred bucks, but then every booking you, you would take a cut from that booking. So like a travel agency. A little bit charge for new patient booking. So the existing patients to practice we made free but yes, there was the fundamental idea and. It sounds like such an obvious thing to do but but here's the problem with it and why why are we thought it was incredibly risky to try this. Our best customers that had been on for a long time. They got lots of pockets right and if we start charging them per bookings, their prices go up very significantly in some cases ten times more and that seemed. Competing, insane to us. In. Particular because when we talked to other companies that were at gone through similar changes and even pricing experts, they're number one advisor was make sure whatever you do never charged your best customers more and frost would be precisely. The opposite. In the thing that was counter-balancing this in our mind was well, maybe we'd be able to bring on a lot more doctors because the barrier to entry is now much lower that was there was the back and forth in the team to figure out whether that's the path we want to want to go. So, this is still a risky strategy because you're depending really on new bookings because the two hundred dollar annual fees dramatically lower and I have to imagine in year one, you actually saw drop in your revenue in the year one of of this curve. Second founding. Right. Well, it's from a risk profile worth at that. Right the warriors that you lose all your best customers in with it, all the bookings day used to be getting. and. So we needed to be ready for a very significant drop in bookings and revenue and the second Challenge was here that. The beauty of this approach modest and we got all this money upfront right and Sharon. Now to bond, we're getting paid after the booking with with a thirty day payment periods, we had a huge working capital requirement to make that happen. So did you see a drop and revenue in two thousand eighteen when you rolled this out? No we didn't because we actually didn't see the doctors leave the way that we hit on -ticipant did in fact, you know while we had very much worried that they would be upset and some of them certainly were upset. We were providing so much value to them that. You know what? What took you. So long I knew as getting a great deal all along. So that worked really well, and we had piloted in Georgia initially in April. Two thousand eighteen and then that had worked. So we we then all allowed in Colorado a few weeks later that work to, and from there we went to Washington state and again, very positive results and after these three days. Okay Great. We know this works does it out in our largest most important market? Let's go to New York and that and terribly horribly wrong. They the doctors in New York. Not only were so pissed off they actually I read. mounted a change dot org. Petition I. Don't know what to to to end this practice or something. They were really mad. They were really really mad and I guess you guys responded you said, are we won't we won't roll this out in New York for a while. Yeah look in New York. We. Facilitate Roughly, one in five new patient doctor relationship in the entire city on dock and so. The economic impact for the providers in. was much greater than for the providers in Georgia Colorado Washington. So yes, to give you one example, there's a dermatologist and so and he paid under the ultimate model ten doctor say paid thirty thousand dollars and under the new pricing model, his cost was going to go up from thirty thousand dollars to roughly three hundred, forty, thousand dollars. Wow. So what was your response to that? I? Mean it seems like a pretty reasonable. Concern. Yeah. So look after the conversation with the Dermatologists I. Actually. Put down the phone and I thought you know what? He's right. And so I pause and we regrouped and. We did a couple. Of things during this time, like the first one is we just went on a listening tour. You know we talked to provide their feedback and we just adjusted our this plan to give providers a much longer grace period to decide whether the wants to addition to the new model or not, and then. So then we read on New York six months later and and when dramatically better. So the strategy works and you see results from the strategy pretty quickly like within a year. Within a year, we had we finally at some incredible momentum was really going better than we had expected in our wildest dreams. Our existing client went down to essentially zero. I mean people still retire and and move jobs by no one really left the service and we were adding more and more providers because the barrier to entry was low and So in two thousand, nineteen we began growing profitably. It sounds like two thousand and nineteen was really the banner year. Two thousand nine hundred was a was a fantastic year and honestly we had so much momentum coming into twenty twenty and feel like, Hey, we worked really hard for three years and profitable and now the sky was the limit until. Tells Sam until March of two thousand twenty. Two Marjo twenty twenty and that's. That's really maybe the third founding DOC right? Well, I want to ask you about March twenty twenty because. Your Business is based on people booking with doctors and going to the doctor I have to imagine your revenues must have plummeted like every other industry like I mean doctors offices are still in most of the country. Slow or are trickle of patients coming in. With the lockdown started happening we saw impersonal bookings declining anywhere between fifty to ninety percent by the end of March I'm not surprised and lot of that buys I was getting was to. Lay off people and make sure that we hunker down to weather the storm but I saw an opportunity to build windmills, right so I thought well, we need to be there for our patients. We should be expanding into telehealth and I need every team member to help me do that and so we. Really went all important and supporting video visits and I'll probably June eighteen began redesigning the tire marketplace support virtual care, and so we actually released. Doctor Video Service and we made this available to. Any. Physician whether they are on soccer. for free. And by the way head, you plan to do this. How long would would I mean I'm imagining if you said in in February district I really want to focus on telehealth Would you have expected that by May would have been ready to go. Absolutely. Not I think what has been really fantastic to see is how? We really finished two years of roadmap in two months. Wow, and it's great because it's just gives us a window on what the next phase of doctor will be and really looking forward to that in my mind were the point were Amazon started from going. Books to also adding CDs. We have just gone from doing only in person to also A. Doing telehealth and I can't wait to see how this unfolds. It sounds like you. Might be reading between the lines but. You. Really, admire and respect your co-founders particularly. Cyrus and the work that he did to to build this company but I wonder if do you think that you will a I dunno, rekindle your friendship i. Is it something that is in the cards because a break is? Is Emotionally, it's hard Mesa really hard. Yeah, look I Do I think we'll work fourteen hours together again maybe not but you know I I've gotten through tougher breakups and reconciled in my past, and so I think we are we're in good shape and honestly know we are meeting were talking from time to time Yeah. We both have things to do and places to be so we're. Not, hanging out all the time. But it's now also five years ago So We are we're merch focused on making our join the baby successful. When you think about your journey and All Its happen to you how much do you think this has to do with? with luck and how much do you think it has to do with with the hard work you put in your your skills. Well I'm going look I I believe that there's really three ingredients to success. In order importance there are lock the talent, then hard work and. The only one. That's comedian. You control his how hard you work right and Now working hard to gives you more shots on goal It helps his day on the top of what you your talent allows and absolutely restarted at the right time the right place. So What what I'm proud of an all that journey has only that yet when we were wrong and when be had to revise and. When we needed the grit to actually make it work. I L we lived up to that and and that's really The all that anyone can ask themselves to. Oliver Karaz co-founder of Zach Braff by the way, remember how they originally wanted to call it physicians dot com or doctors dot. com. COULDN'T AFFORD THE MILLION DOLLAR PRICE TAG to buy the domain name. DOC DOT COM wasn't only available the price they paid for that domain name. Six Bucks. and. Thanks so much for listening to this show this week, you can subscribe wherever you get your podcasts. You could also write to us at H. I. T. at NPR DOT Org. If you want to send a tweet, it's at how I felt this or at Cairo's can also follow me on instagram that's at Guy Dot Roz. Our show was produced this week by Jet Anderson with music composed by Tina. Bluey. Thanks also to Julia Carney Candice Limb Neva grant and Jeff Rodgers I'm guy. Roz even listening to how I built this. This is NPR. Black voters play a crucial role for any Democrat who seeks to win the White House but some big devise amongst that block and some serious influence

Cyrus Masumi Mckinsey New York L. Nick Germany Starbucks Oliver Karaz Partner Office Manager United States Dot Com Doctors Dot Com Co-Founder Amazon Zach Dock Manhattan Middle East Sarah SAM Co Founder Iran
Netflix's 'Tiger King' was watched by 34 million viewers in the US in 10 days, according to Nielsen

Brian Noonan

07:32 min | 3 months ago

Netflix's 'Tiger King' was watched by 34 million viewers in the US in 10 days, according to Nielsen

"Tiger King on Netflix was watched by 34 million people in the 1st 10 days after it was released, making it one of the most popular series of all times. It was about this little known Area in the world. Life of zookeeper Joe exotic on people who collect animals and have these little roadside zoos that we're going to talk about. Joe Exotic was accused and convicted of exploiting wild animals and also plotting to kill another conservationists who campaigned against him. He sentenced to 22 years in prison. And Ah, well, I I want to talk a little bit about. Why can you buy a tiger? Can you imagine you can buy a tiger cub for as little as $2000? Why was this guy allowed to run this roadside zoo with seem like no regulation by the government. And are there laws And why aren't there laws to protect these beautiful wonderful animals? Joining us is not really the foremost expert in the country. On this topic. Kearney and Nasserist serves as the director and assistant clinical professor of animal welfare at Michigan State College of Law. She runs Klaus Consulting on has a great podcast called Tiger Talk. Welcome to the show. Carney. How are you? I'm fine. Thank you for having me so excited to talk about this topic because it's just fascinating and let me at first ask you. How were you involved in the Joe exotic thing at all in any way, shape or form? I'm the attorney who pitched the wildlife trafficking case the federal prosecutors against him so suddenly, the murder for hire thing didn't happen until after the K five hits with already under investigation for a couple of years, you know, he was charged with multiple counts of illegal trafficking. He's charged with multiple counts of illegally killing Haider violate teenager thinking back and That's already been underway. So, yeah, I mean, I was pretty neck deep in it, actually. So you know, being involved in the animal law world as I assume you are you knew about Joe exotic. You knew about what he was doing there and people in the in that milieu knew what he was doing. Is that right? Sort of robotic has long been, you know, on the top at the top of the list of the most notorious abuser than a goiter of big cats in the country, So you know, he all of the things that made for a great reality show that a lot of people who wanted to watch it during quarantine or the things that we had already known about been accustomed to you for one time, But I told people I live in New Orleans, you know? After you've seen that person you have painted themselves head in gold body caves and thinking on top of the stair on Bourbon Street. It's not there. No wow. Factor left any more. And the same is true for Joan thought it We've been after him for a long, long time. So you know, Chicago here has two world class ooze. We have Brookfield Zoo. I grew up very close. I could almost hear I actually when the wind was blowing right, you could hear some of the noises from the animals. And then we have Lincoln Park Su another beautiful city zoo, and I had never heard of a roadside zoo. I mean, I never understood that someone could just open up. Zoo without having certain regulations. Now tell me are there now regulations that would prohibit a Joe exotic from acquiring big, beautiful animals and putting them in a zoo? Like a menagerie of animals, capped by unqualified people who just collected animals that they want to open their doors in charge. If anybody can get us life in, um like from the U. S Department of Agriculture, which is the threshold entry point in order to get animals to the public and the application of the $30 That is really what hate you open a road pie deal. If you pass a pre lightened infection know that you're probably only going to be some feel about One infection per year in the U. S. D a very understaffed. It's notorious even in his own internal auditing department for failing to enforce applicable regulations, which are very, very low standards of care. Like Do the animals have water? Do they have food? Do they get veterinary care? Then they stand up, turn around and lie down on DNA with Russell, you know, And so in a, for example, like in a state like Illinois The law states that you know you cannot own. There can't be any private ownership of of the danger of exotic animals. Not great. Sounds like a prohibition. It is not really in practice because all it requires to circumvent that prohibition is to get that USDA license tell the federal agency that you have some future plan couldn't get an animal to the public. Pay your $30 half your initial infection and rock and roll and keep those animals so a lot of loopholes in victim lives on nine Good point, Illinois. But in fact, there are four things that don't have any regulation whatsoever. Existing federal laws are fraught with the pole that are really easy to circumvent. And that's why we've seen the proliferation of roadside menagerie that can operate on DH. The proliferation the pirate in particular. Let's go back to that this issue of the laws and changing the laws and all of that, but You're telling me you pay your $30 you go through these preliminary steps, and you can get a baby Tiger. If I wanted to do that, Carney if I just said, OK, I really like these cute little tiger's My my house. Pets from the DuPage animal shelter are just not doing it for me and I and I going to qualify and I get where do I go? And how much do I have to pay to get a tiger coming in? And how hard would it be for me to do that? You may have paid more and your tax deductible donation to the shelter for your rescue dogs. You have to pay to get a tiger. You know, I know that like I paid a few $150 donation to the shelter where I rescued my grumpy old 14 years ago. Um, you can get a tiger for a couple 100 bucks. They're even free, really, and people working on the Internet. Or using the network of roads by do that are going to dump animals month. They've become too big that once they reach that passed that threshold age where they can no longer be used for the extremely lucrative cub handling called pay to play photo op bottle feeding. Twin like tigers experience. Is that the right I do love you so lucrative. Um, once we're done with that, because the animal Barda financial and safety liability and nothing when they get dumped and feed about a pet trade so often recently there was a classified publication. It was a monthly publication and very mom and pop type of day. Anybody could have tried to it and you would be Lifting every single month. Like one ad, it was involving animal option. It was road five You're looking for or looking to dump animal. Whether they're tigers, lions, bears, monkeys, other primate, zebras, giraffes. You need it. You could find it in the animal finding God.

Joe Exotic Tigers Tiger King Carney Brookfield Zoo Illinois Netflix New Orleans Chicago Klaus Consulting Haider Usda Lincoln Park Su U. S Department Of Agriculture Joan Murder Attorney Michigan State College Of Law Kearney
Delaware Gov. Carney Believes Hybrid Model Is Likely for Students as Decision on School Year to Come Next Week

KYW 24 Hour News

00:34 sec | 4 months ago

Delaware Gov. Carney Believes Hybrid Model Is Likely for Students as Decision on School Year to Come Next Week

"This state will likely reopened with a mix of remote and in person classes. But Kearney stresses each school district will make its own decision how to begin the academic year. Mother, where officials are offering guidance to local schools, through scenarios based on trends in the number of new covert 19 cases, the average daily hospitalizations and the percentage of people testing positive. One of the scenarios calls for in person instruction. A stricter one suggests a hybrid model of remote learning and in person class is the worst case scenario calls for instruction by remote learning on Lee It's 11 37. Talks

Kearney LEE
New Jersey places Delaware back on quarantine list, 31 states total

KYW 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 4 months ago

New Jersey places Delaware back on quarantine list, 31 states total

"More than half the states in the country are now on New Jersey's quarantine list for travelers and as we hear from K Y W's Andrew Kramer. That list once again includes Delaware. Delaware is one of 10 states added two New Jersey's travel advisory meeting. If you travel to the Garden state from another state that's on the list or being asked the quarantine for 14 days, there are now 31 states on the list. Delaware was added a few weeks ago taken off And now it's back. Governor John Carney isn't taking this news lately. I made his health frankly, and it doesn't make any sense, Carney says. The state is in better shape today as Faras. The numbers go, then that was when it was taken off the list last week. He thinks Delaware is back on it because it's just a couple of bad days recently, where test results showed over 100 new cases in the state. Each of those days we have a percent positive. That's 4.2% positive, which is below the World Health Organization better than the other states in our region, not New Jersey and New York and fairness to them, but certainly better than Pennsylvania who's not on the list. Maryland and Virginia a few of the other new additions to the New Jersey travel Advisory, which just a reminder does not include people traveling between states for work. Andrew Kramer came Whateveryou news

New Jersey Delaware Governor John Carney New Jersey Travel Advisory Andrew Kramer New York World Health Organization Maryland Faras Pennsylvania Whateveryou Virginia
"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

04:48 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"This button. You get the air. You supposed to that three times over thirty minutes, and that's what he he's just sitting across me, and we're just GONNA. See it how it works and he should be. Sort of a tape recording of a woman who took this had the damage to make lot, and like ran out of the room like full-on Mike. Really exaggerated response. So I take it. My I inhale. was like this transcendent experience that I have at the end of a long breath. Hold in the Wim Hof stuff where I'm feeling great like it's this joyous thing for me and I'm like Whoa. This is cool tastes like citrus. Disintegrate and so then I pressed the button eleven times in the course of fifteen minutes before he's like. Yeah, I think we got enough here. And it essentially if you're able one. He said he's never seen this before that. You can actually change the way your body responds innately to see how to train my chemo receptors on this, but the other thing he says now he's running an study on this. Very topic is that if we can train co two tolerance in person? Will that make them less? Less anxious general. Will you be able to change their anxiety profile because who cares about the dude, the bag right, but how can this change the way we're? We're we deal with any sort of stressful situation, so there's a lot of like breath work ideas that can come out of this in a lot of the critical medical research. It's out of this work. Will Scott. I'm running out of time. It's just a privilege to talk to you and obviously there's a lot to be learned. That's why everyone needs to go to the book. Everybody is by the the wedge. Come on if you WANNA WANNA go all the way with this. It's the wedge, evolution, consciousness, stress and the key to human resilience. We didn't Lucia really. We tell. which the social brain evolves and That flow you're with with the kettlebells, probably part of our evolutionary heritage. Any less the note on evolution before we wrap this up. Yes, so evolution the idea is this is that we evolved with stresses right? The reason we can sense the world is because those senses evolved, and we're evolutionary. Add adaptive. They let us survive and and and. By paying attention to our senses that we get information about the world that affects physiology and we were designed to do this. In fact, every creature in the world was designed to this, and we came from constantly varying constantly challenging environments, and the problem with the modern world is that we live in an unchallenging environment. Yes, yes, half things that scare US right codes out there. Twitter wars are out there. They're politicians. We like or don't like out there. There's all of that stuff in the world. World, but that is not actually a threat. The way we designed to deal with it what we need our physical outputs physical responses to that stress, and that's what the wedge is all about. It's trying to find ways that you will tell Adam that particular construct 'cause he's. He's servants. Saying things like that for awhile. Did you discuss that without I'm the reason why Adam takes ice bats. You'll I know that and I think you'd have the breathing thing with him to right. We have across. Down but he literally I think this He. has been saying gear. You know what I'm talking about. Where he says essentially that we create problems because we're. We really don't have any. I if it's okay, I would like to take credit for all of atoms most brilliant. I am your statements and anything dumb. He says that's all him. Enough the long. It's Okay I. don't care where he gets it from. It's good, you know he knows what's worth repeating. It takes them judgment to be able to see that. So Got Again the website is Scott Carney cra wine dot com, the Wedge Evolution Kostas Stress Key to human resilience and You've certainly give me to continue my clothes showers, which I had been off for a while the started up again about a month ago and and I think it's doing something I do. This we didn't even talk about the the idea of. Sort of wilfulness, a Willie yourself in comfortable situations part of that. Choosing to go towards the Wedge Right? Yeah, there's a lot packed into that. To the hardest thing. A human has ever done is sit in a warm shower and turn around and turn the KNOB. To Cole I am convinced that that is the hardest thing that we can. But. I've gotten to the point now. Where if I don't do it I start to feel. Guilty or weird or like missing something and it certainly is easier and easier. The more you do it that is for sure yeah, and I I'm convinced talking to you. I should do a little bit longer to maybe. We need to throw some kettlebells next time out.

Adam Scott Carney US Twitter KNOB Lucia Cole Willie
"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

08:02 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Your sensory changes when you can also do is my your emotional changes, because remember what I said. It was sensation and emotion bonded together, Yeah. So, let me go back to my experience of it. I will first of all I this interesting experience where? For a few seconds. I can't tell if it's hot or cold, which is kind of a fascinating experience? All I could feel is that it's. It's. Burning is like it's burning so-called burning. In then. I take a few breaths and and I. Would I try to tell myself as positive thoughts like Not I think Wim. Hof US got this from him or somebody's not just to do. Endure it, but to love it. Feel like like I with it I'm in it or something. And that that turns the corner on that clenching up response. Yes, in once you're in. You can tolerate a lot more though though I do hit kind of a threshold I'm like okay, that's enough. and. So what do you do when you get to that point? Well I. Mean You can stop a? There's no reason why you why you need to do. A thirty minute is. Sort of crazy and I do know people who do that, but I don't know why they do that. Because what you're trying to do is is is flip that talk all right between flight and rest and digest and do that. You know obviously the hunger you stay in the ice bath the more, but your body wants to flip that switch over to the other side right, and and what you're what you're explaining is like your I get out of the flight bath. Well, that was the flight response, right? It was a art were got out. Yeah and I. It's not but in in a we getting a we discussing here for Missus, does he? Yes, yes, so why? Of consciousness to go, but tell me about MRS so Hermes. This is the idea that if you put yourself under stressful conditions that stress makes you stronger until it doesn't right, you know so so the classic example is birds right with and bird eggs right? Where if you put just a little bit of arsenic on a bird egg? They produce more viable offspring crazy, but if you put too much, they all die. So so the idea is that just a little bit of poison will make you much stronger, and and the trick by using any sort of hormetic exercise is not to get too much, so you have to practice with them bound to be very careful with doing it, but it is the fact that you have stress than a than a response where your body's steps up and actually improves against that challenge, and that's people are toying with the idea that that could be helpful in reducing the risk for drama virus Riding that. Don't don't confuse it with things driving. IDEA. Then right. Right and you know honestly with You know we can't say what's going to help. Run Advice. Follow the public health. Risk of course percent, but. There's nothing to be. SA- certainly make your body more resilient right now right like generalize resilience. You know things like this ice water. Practice this breathing practice. And other things like heat practice going into sawn. These things stress your system and force you to get stronger now. Will it cure anything I? Don't know but I. Sit, my guess is. It's going to give you a better shot. Is there a reason you call it the wedge? Yeah? It's because of this idea of separating stimulus and response that ideas that my mind. My intention was sort of like forcing that stood between the ice water and my bodily reactions. Like something you felt like. This feels like a wedge between you know like you experienced. Did you sit and think about it and said what's the word that describes come on? It was instantaneous when I was in the water like was like looking at women I was like this is the wedge and A. Grad there's another time, so this is the. Separating stimulus response is what we're talking about with ice water, but I want to give you an example of the removing of it, which is which is also really cool. So one of the things I WANNA do in. This book was put myself in multiple situations that. I could control myself in a strong stimulus, I went to Stanford and hung out with Andrew Hoberman of the WHO live. He's a neuroscientist and he was trying to teach me about fear. And this is where I got the idea of neural symbols from and he was putting you into a VR simulator with virtual sharks with people who are trying sensitive, so people who are prone for anxiety, and the sharks would produce reliable stimulus, producing it sort of equating anxiety attack, but to make them anxious then he would measure their automatic arousal in that situation, so he uses to describe your, and so I was super excited to go swimming with his virtual sharks and learn about my fear sensations. But it turns out, I'm not scared of virtual sharks like like sort of. Like! These are sort of land so I when I left his lab. I was pretty sort of like a bummed out I was like I didn't find my wedge in this environment. Thanks for the description, but then I got this message on my phone from a guy named Tony who I know who who said. Scott. You got to go meet my friend Michael Castrogiovanni. He will throw kettlebells at you and put you into an instantaneous flow state, which believe is the gets the award for the. Dushi EST message ever sent via taxed. and. I was like all right well. What is this about for me? kettlebells sort of and throwing kettlebells. You know what comes in your mind wants Mrs. Throw a kettlebells. You're gonNA break my foot. Yeah, that's in your soul apart. So go meet him, and we hang out in San Francisco and he Michael Like just to paint the picture for you. Michael is basically a gorilla in human form. He has his his arms or like my legs. He's sort of hunched over, but sow his his his knuckles I mean for all intents and purposes they drag on the ground I. Mean He is dangerous looking dude when to people facing off against each other right and one of them holding essentially a cannonball, because kettlebells like it's a weapon. This is an aggressive, potentially dangerous scary situation. And, and so Michael, what he does is he says Scott GonNa throw this at you. And there's there's three I'm gonNA. Do Three things before I throw it the first time he swings it. It comes up between us, and we are looking in each other's eyes and I'm like this is great. On scared. The next time he he brings it up. You go from looking each other's is to the kettle bell. So now we're focused on the thing that's about to smash my foot, and on the third time he throws it and I'm still looking right at the kettle bell. Let's go. It flips through the air my, but puckers strong after like former diamond of coal. But I grab that that Kettle Bell. And all the sudden it goes between my legs I. Let it go, and it flies back to him, and we go from essentially what could be an aggressive dangerous place into essentially dancing community air? Because it's dangerous. Because all of a sudden, we were in the presence of danger, and our movements start coordinating automatically. It's like it's like we're not even thinking anymore. We're just moving because we're in the presence of that threat and this all of a sudden, this exercise goes from being like the dubious thing you've ever heard of just look on instagram to something about trust. Trust something about empathy something about connection and the practice is actually I think really really beautiful and really wonderful, because it's a way to communicate.

Kettle Bell Michael Scott sharks instagram Mrs. Throw Hof anxiety Michael Like San Francisco Michael Castrogiovanni WHO Tony Andrew Hoberman Stanford
"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:42 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"I met whim in Poland, so he they did this. They brought twelve college students from Reading University and they did the same training that I did which was a breathing protocol sitting in ice and relaxing in the ice. Then they brought all these people back to the lab. And they injected all of them with endotoxin, and they all had the same results as Wim Hof was. A seat lies bath. A No it was a week of ice bats. A week of is fast, and then they came back, and then they did. They injected them, so it's probably dance. Today's of how long are they or what's the? So the ice bath when I'm doing doing stuff. You sort of build up to like a ten minute. plunged into his leg and then you'd climb up a mountain in your bathing suit, and you're controlling your body temperature in this hostile environment It's really quite quick to learn and the other part of his has protocol. Is the breathing method where you essentially you super ventilate. Dizzy and kingery, and then you exhale. And you hold for as long as you can, and you do that three or four times until you're holding your breath for three minutes, and the way and this. Basically you're blowing off all your co two by blowing off your co two. Your gas reflects is delayed, and you're able to hold your breath ridiculous amounts of time, but these are the two basic components of the Wim Hof method, the people who did that for a week and it was a little bit more intense than just the fifteen minute thing. They all had no response to endotoxin, which showed that at least it was possible that he was basically turning off his immune. On over a reaction to this well. You know the immune system evolves with the neurological system and It's pretty clearly as there's lot of evidence that it's tied in with the on the nervous system as we don't understand. So right out as though this is. Completely unfounded science. Right no absolutely and. For me, it's been it's been you know. This is the problem with being investigative journalists and you'll. You'll recognize you. Get Lots of anecdotes from people right I need tons of people who've had these really remarkable experiences, but don't have yet is a data set of thousands of people who've had like. canker sores like mind that way right or part you know, but I've met people who had symptoms of Parkinson's come under control. I've met people who've had diabetes reverse. CROHN's disease reverse by doing this stuff the thing that worries me is is we could get too excited about this, and and maybe stop medical treatments, and that would be a really bad bad outcome but on the other side. What I'm never what I don't think is ever going to happen. Is You know we're never going to get one of these gold standard studies from a pharmaceutical company where you spend one hundred million dollars to get a perfectly randomized control group? And settings where we like. Oh Yeah, that definitely works right I. Just don't see that that funding paradigm coming in. So let's let's keep going down the rabbit hole because. One of the. Interests me your anthropologist by training. Yes, and. He's I found Jordan Peterson years ago because he in my estimation, he was trying to combine psychology and Anthropology and myth. Religious experiences and try to understand why humans do that. Why why humans have those things? And what does it tell us about humans? So so, I'm always interested in somebody with anthropological training you WANNA. Do you WANNA. Talk about that I because we're GONNA. Get into consciousness because that's where. My anthropology training so I went through graduate school got to. Dissertation for the anthropology and then I dropped out to become an investigative journalist so The The thing that links all of my books and my first book on organ trafficking around the world on one of the few experts on organ trafficking spent six years sort of looking at how people buy and sell kidneys and hearts and skeletons and hair, surrogate pregnancies and stuff like that, and it was mostly looking at the commercial aspects of this and it's a horror show. And that book is called the Red Market. I wrote a book on. called the enlightenment trap. Essentially how meditation can can really mess you up if you're doing it wrong like if you're going the wrong answer of teachers if you have these expectations of superpowers. You can get into a lot of trouble and I actually knew. Several, people who've died or ended up in insane asylums by Tantric teachings and like really sort of like indepth knowledge, so it's really odd that I've ended up in the place where I am now or I'm saying look, here's something. That sorta looks like a superpower right? Here's something that sorta of sort of crazy so I don't even know where my life is going to go next. Because you know I just sort of put myself I try to immerse myself into these situations, then try to understand what it means to be human. In all of this. Right, which is what fascinates me and so the back to the wedge before your consciousness. The Wedge! So it is a way to folk to separate stimulus from response. or in some cases, away to increase to decrease the space between stimulus and response. It's a way to have some control over how we react to the environment. Especially ones. They're stressful. Especially ones that have those really loud signals that come in through your nerves and you're you. Are we saying that if we can tolerate things like cold that it it. By itself translates into the ability to. Regulate other emotional experiences, or is there some procedure we have to go through? So it's not just cold and you know there's several types of cold. There's fast cold slow cold for instance slow colds, keeping your house at fifty degrees where you just sort of like feel cold fast cold as you jump into ice water, right for there's this really quick switch. The slow cold is. Is actually a lot harder to control. That creeps up on you, but that fast switch is something where you can see that change happen rapidly, and then you can exercise control because your body wants to do something right your body has this desire to make an immediate reaction, which is the clenching up rates, federal fighter flight, and when that it toggles in that direction, you have the ability to say no. Let's not toggle to resist in the same thing like right now. If you tickle, you drew. Did you have an assistant there because? Let's say someone would tickle you. You can say I don't want to be ticklish. Right you can. Will yourself not an ticklish or when a sneeze is coming on? You can think what what do you do? Think nonce newsworthy thoughts down. No, you focus on this and sessions, but you can at least delay sneeze. And that's really the wedges well. It's just not super applicable for sneezes. But when you learn to do these things in multiple environments right, not just ice water, but also things I deal with fear I deal with. Sleep with sound all of these. Different ways you can experience something if you can..

Wim Hof Reading University Poland Jordan Peterson CROHN diabetes colds Red Market Parkinson
"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

07:46 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"About the very first time. You feel anything like our brain, right? sits inside of our head, and it's basically you know you can think of it like an afloat tank writes in his spinal fluid and brain fluid, and the only way knows anything about the world is through your sensory pathways through your nervous system through your eyes, ears, your nose and whatnot and from birth I mean we have a few instincts. There's a few things that are sort of wall fired in their everything we learn about the environment is from experience. It's through those chemical and electrical signals that that that fly through our our body and one of the things that I I came to understand while writing, the wage was. That the actual process of formation is actually entirely subjective, a formation formation of impressions about what the environment formations of of impressions really about everything, but yet it sensation at first objective in the sense that it's a it's a one skull, experience, or or or subjective in the sense that it's choice 'cause. I think later I'm on with the choice assessment, but as a child. Well. It's interesting. Right because your brain is never not in your body, right? It's always getting that information. Your body's trying to figure out the world and I think the wedges sort of a fundamental power that we have sense birth, and it's something that we're trying to do to try to take control of her body where we were going for basically ought onomic right when you're born you're you look down and you can't control your arms like what the Hell is that? How do I figure that out and you'll only learn to use it by sort of. It's essentially stress it's. To sort of work against that physical structure, and somehow you form the neural connections to move that under conscious control, and as we get older, you know. Where to use the we use this sort of encounter against stress over and over to extend expand our abilities until we don't feel like we need to anymore what I'm finding is that we can actually keep on expanding them by keep on pushing ourselves against difficult things like the shower like the like the ten or fifteen different things. I'm talking bout in this book. But I think this concept of neuro symbols actually really useful to get neural neural neural symbols symbols. And if I if let me just describe it for a second, it's a little bit in the weeds, but it's really really fascinating and I think it's going to be. There's a payoff here. which is the very first time you feel something? Let's just use the example of a cold shower, right or like an ice bath. Let's say you've never felt the cold before. For some reason right I don't know, but this person is, but they've never felt the cold and you're gonNA plunge them into the ice bath. They drop into that that environment that stressful environment, and this signal from their nerves fires into their brain. Right goes up. The peripheral nervous system goes up. The spine goes into the very lowest areas of the brain. This is the LIMBIC system and and it's coming in as basically just data like it doesn't make any sense. All at the LIMBIC system knows is that it has a really high volume 'cause. It's a super loud stimulus. And so I like to use a metaphor here. The limbic system is something like a library and every library has a has a a librarian and says she gets the signal, and she looks in her library of books, and she tries to see if that signal matches anything her because she's ever felt the signal before, but she hasn't 'cause. She's never been in ice water. So what she does is she kicks this signal over to the Paralympic system, which is just another conglomeration of brain structures like a centimeter away from the limbic area and the limp, and this guy will come a bookbinder. Takes that signal, and he bonds it with your current emotional state right, and this is what gives them meaning to that, so this is the the loud signal of ice water in your current emotional state, which is probably abject terror and horror, and that probably actually comes from some instinctual stuff. It's there from before, but it comes back down abject terror and hard. That's what ice bath means she takes. That book files it away. Then you have your your ice bath experience now here's the really interesting thing about symbols. Is that the next time you have that same sensation? You jump into the ice? Ice Bath. The signal comes up. Librarian gets it. She looks over her books. She sees that it's already there. The ice bath is unmitigated terror and horror, and she pulls that signal off, and you do not experience in the present moment, which means that every time you experienced anything you're living in your emotional passed, and that's like an and this like neural symbols they have your forming billions of and I'm taking sort of an extreme example of them of course, but if you think about it, these are the bits and bites of the human software that makes it the hardware of our bodies. I completely agree with the assessment that the the metaphors interesting you're you're talking about. A region called the insular CORTEX. Yes. And I, there's a great book I'm trying to find it Gary maybe you can help me. Inger inroads interest conscious always reference it. Somebody else reference to I was interviewing. Is it how we feel or how? Let's see how. How do you feel looking up on Amazon? It's literally. How do we get into receptive experience from our body? Yet injure right. It's deeply embedded in the on onomic nervous system and and what? I think most people here. How do you feel it's going is by a guy named How do you feel an interest? After moment with your neurobiological self by guy named the Bud Craig. And he he goes through in great detail, elucidating this mechanism and I think a lot of people are aware that we have hunky lists on on our private courtesans, since rear for motorists information well, we have a monkey lists a whole series of layers of a monkey ally in our insular CORTEX, and it goes from anterior to post earier, and it gets more and more clearer in refined as you move forward. Here it is thank you. It's it's. It is not for the faint of heart reading. It's for really neurobiologist, but it's it changed my love it. That's great and he is really give. Trying to break down exactly what you're talking about the very very specific neurobiological mechanisms. so you are onto your onto it. Oh? Yeah, even as I hear you talking about it. You know our our pain patients. Their big problem is this region of the brain. Yes, the emotive or misery component of pain is what's going crazy. And they can't control it. They can't regulate it and You know you're this kind of stuff you're talking about. Behold the clue to one day. Developing therapies for people like that right out. One thing that I really have found in this and. I am so glad that you're of your medical background. Because this is going to make it, so we can freely geek out so that no. It's going to get out of that. but the the. Interest. Shit I.

insular CORTEX pain Amazon Inger Bud Craig Gary
"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:42 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"Scott Carney investigative journalist author anthropologist, his new book is the Wedge Dilution Consciousness stress and the key to human human resilience and Scott to tell you just the title that book got me I said it must be spending. So. Here we are. Nice. Thank you so much for having me This is It's quite time we live in right now. Yes indeed I I'm not sure how to even frame that. More specifics of skied at Scott Cardi CER ANYWAY DOT COM AT S G Carney on twitter. You may know Scott from some of his work with women Hof. which is. What Adam has been speaking out with you about, but I think I'm going to geek out with you about something else. I WanNa talk about the book I'm going to. Tell me about it. So, yeah, the wedge. It started off with me. first meeting. Wim Hof back in two thousand and eleven where I was the first investigative journalist, or I real journalists to ever write about it, and and just really briefly about the Wim Hof method basically, this guy is known for climbing up Mount Everest in his skivvies. sitting in ice water for crazy amounts of time, and and he made these claims that he could control his immune system at will, and basically give people superpowers, so I had just been writing lots of articles and was working on a book about how. Sort of that search for superpowers through meditation can be dangerous and even kill you so. When I heard about whim I was like this guy's a charlatan and he's GonNa get. People. You know.

Scott Carney Wim Hof Adam G Carney twitter Mount Everest
"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

Dr. Drew Podcast

01:56 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Dr. Drew Podcast

"A product you need to know about magnesium. Breakthrough is the ultimate magnesium supplement easily the best out there. All seven forms of the mineral is available through magnesium breakthrough. Finally back in stock everybody then he's in breakthrough has been selling faster than the company makes it by optimizes can keep up. It's sold out a few times and due to supply shortages with everything going on in the world. This could be sold out again very quickly. So our team here at Dr Drew Pod was able to arrange for some stock. Be set aside just for our audience. The best deal available in this product right here. Seriously volume discounts combined with our customers, ten percent coupon code at Dr, drew ten. You can save up to forty percent off select packages of magnesium breakthrough, amazing value with code. Dr, drew, ten. It's only available at this specific website MAG breakthrough dot com slash drew. You will not find that deal at Amazon region, the company's own website exclusively for our podcast listeners, and for a time while supplies last they have completely revamped the checkout process, so it is easier friendly magnesium breakthrough, the most effective museum supplement. Their say goodbye to having to buy multiple different kinds. Just one magnesium breakthrough though to MAG breakthrough image B. R., E. K. T. H.. H Meg breakthrough dot com slash d. r., E. W. Drew. Use a coupon code Dr Drew Ten and you can save up to forty percents off select packages to get the most full spectrum effective magnesium ever. Thank you all for supporting the folks that support us. We can keep this thing underway. Don't forget after dark. Dr Dot Com as well as adamant drew you guys. We appreciate toward of that as well and I'm doing a stream on a regular basis and the website where we try to make sense of the. Disaster Today welcoming.

Delaware added to New Jersey's list of quarantine states

KYW 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 5 months ago

Delaware added to New Jersey's list of quarantine states

"At 1 31 when Governor Murphy first announced a list of Corona virus hot spot states from which people arriving in New Jersey would have to quarantine there were not surprisingly questions about Just how the order would be enforced. Checkpoints on the turnpike at every bridge screenings at Newark Airport know, the governor's office said Self quarantine is voluntary, but compliance is expected. Now they can expect Mohr questions as everyone from neighboring Delaware travelling to New Jersey is supposed to comply with a 14 day quarantine. That's because of the spike in covert cases in Delaware Governor Carney there last month delayed Phase three of his reopening plan is and has ordered all beach bars close to try to dull that impact. Now you're exempt. If you're travelling for business If you're planning to spend a week at the shore, the Health Department says you may wish to cancel your reservation and visited a later date or you may self quarantine in the rental home. Hotels and Airbnb tze and like should contact guests, the Health Department says to tell them about the self quarantine advisory, with the addition of Delaware and a couple other states today, there are now 19 states on New

Delaware Governor Murphy New Jersey Health Department Newark Airport Mohr Airbnb
"carney" Discussed on Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban

Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban

02:54 min | 5 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Do The Thing, with Whole30's Melissa Urban

"When you find <Speech_Male> yourself in a <Speech_Male> in a anything, <Speech_Male> that's difficult. <Speech_Male> Always remember <Speech_Male> that you you have <Speech_Male> the breath. <Speech_Male> I mean. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> People have always <Speech_Male> said this right. This is <Speech_Male> nothing new, <Speech_Male> but you but you have <Speech_Male> control <Speech_Male> of your breath, <Speech_Male> and so that something, <Speech_Male> and so you always <Speech_Male> have something you you. <Speech_Female> You have <Speech_Female> I love that so <Speech_Female> much I love it <Speech_Female> Scott, where can people <Silence> find <SpeakerChange> out more about <Speech_Male> you? <Speech_Male> So. I have a website. <Speech_Male> It's very <Speech_Male> difficult to remember so <Speech_Male> jot this down Scott <Speech_Male> Carney <Speech_Male> dot <Speech_Male> com. <Speech_Male> <hes> yeah, so you <Speech_Male> cer <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> N Y <Speech_Male> and there's the instagram's <Speech_Male> and <SpeakerChange> there's the <Speech_Male> twitter, and there's you <Speech_Male> have google you <Speech_Male> just go. Find it I show <Speech_Male> up on that. <Speech_Male> There's an audio <Speech_Male> book for the Wedge Audio <Speech_Male> Book for what <Speech_Male> doesn't kill us. <Speech_Male> There's <Speech_Male> also all the other types of <Speech_Male> books so. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> please. <Speech_Male> Oh, you can get <Speech_Male> a sample chapter of it if <Speech_Male> you're not sold on <Speech_Male> my <Speech_Male> wonderful delivery. <Speech_Male> Of this, <Speech_Male> there's a free <Speech_Male> sample chapter on my <Speech_Male> on my website, <SpeakerChange> so you can <Speech_Female> go read it there. <Speech_Female> I love that one of my <Speech_Female> most favorite categories <Speech_Female> of books, and it's <Speech_Female> as category that I made <Speech_Female> myself is called <Speech_Female> nonfiction that <Speech_Female> reads like fiction. <Speech_Female> It is so <Speech_Female> engaging it is <Speech_Female> so enthralling it moves <Speech_Female> you along. You're <Speech_Female> invested. You <Speech_Female> forget that you're reading <Speech_Female> actual journalism <Speech_Female> and that is exactly <Speech_Female> the category <Speech_Female> that I would lump your <Speech_Female> work I have loved <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> reading your <Speech_Male> books. <Speech_Male> Well I love it. Thank <Speech_Male> you so much, and <Speech_Male> there's <SpeakerChange> more on <Speech_Male> the way Melissa their. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Way Well <Speech_Female> I was lucky enough to get an <Speech_Female> advanced copy of the <Speech_Female> wedge and <Speech_Female> couldn't figure out how to get it <Speech_Female> on my kindle, so I'm like <Speech_Female> reading it on my tiny <Speech_Female> iphone screen because <Speech_Female> I could not <Speech_Female> wait. <Speech_Female> And then of course they ordered <Speech_Female> a copy pre-ordered <Speech_Female> as soon as it came out so <Speech_Female> the wedges your newest <Speech_Female> offering. What <Speech_Female> doesn't kill us as the one I've <Speech_Female> been talking about others <Speech_Female> on Amazon will link <Speech_Female> to all of this in the show <Speech_Female> notes Scott <Speech_Female> Carney. Thank you <Speech_Female> so much <SpeakerChange> for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> joining me on. Do <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the thing I <Speech_Music_Male> appreciate? Thank you for having <Speech_Music_Female> me <SpeakerChange> great conversation. <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Thanks for joining <Speech_Music_Female> me today on. Do <Speech_Music_Female> the thing <Speech_Female> you can continue <Speech_Female> the conversation with me. <Speech_Female> Melissa you <Speech_Female> on Instagram. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> have a question for Dear <Speech_Female> Melissa or topic <Speech_Female> idea for the show, <Speech_Female> leave me <Speech_Female> a voicemail at three, <Speech_Female> two, one, two, zero, <Speech_Female> nine, one, <Speech_Female> four, eight, zero <Speech_Female> do. The <Speech_Female> thing is part of <Speech_Music_Female> the onward project. <Speech_Female> A family of <Speech_Female> podcast brought together <Speech_Female> by Gretchen Rubin <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> all about how <Speech_Female> to make your life <Speech_Female> better. Check <Speech_Female> out the other Onward <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Project PODCASTS. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Gretchen Rubin side-hustle <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> School <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Happier in Hollywood <Speech_Music_Female> and everything <Speech_Music_Female> happens. <Speech_Music_Female> If you <Speech_Female> liked this episode, <Speech_Music_Female> please subscribe <Speech_Music_Female> leave a five Star <Speech_Music_Female> Review and <Speech_Music_Female> tell your friends <Speech_Music_Female> to do <SpeakerChange> thing. <Speech_Music_Female> See you next <Music> week. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> From the <Speech_Music_Male> onward project.

Scott Gretchen Rubin instagram Melissa twitter google Hollywood Amazon Carney
Bitcoin Falls - Profits Made

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

09:26 min | 5 months ago

Bitcoin Falls - Profits Made

"I don't come. Download the APP and put in the code. Try to call feel bias. Walk into the tram to come crypto shy well. Wasn't yesterday, a bit of a wild one high. Gee, WHIZ! Absolutely nuts. Big foles in markets as I was pretty confident, we'd say we did say some very strong moves down and listen good training conditions as well. No huge amount of opportunities also fought around the same so the time if you will try to, the CRYPTO, cried Naci boost strategies, you would've been had the opportunity on Bonnets on ails on Tron and on Cod Donna, which moved the laced, and that's the one I took. But still, WANNA percent profit for the day. Yesterday pretty stoked about that. Yeah let me saw a beautiful boost to the just couldn't raise the ordering Thomas a volatile my sword the calculations. They'll just get it quick enough. Tron beautiful and yes gripe. Fifteen minute time from I love the fifteen minute timeframe on the top ten perc contracts. Why are you asked me well because you've got a big position? Entering you stop also pre taught. So when you've got your entry and you stop plus really tie, it means that will effectively you end up with a lot more contracts? Now that could have the you know you can be. A double edged sword. In the sense that you know not, there's not much liquidity they. You can't call some slippage that. but if it does if you do taunt properly then, yeah, you can absolutely kill the pigs. It doesn't take very much movement to make some very very lodge money on a multiple of risk. It's one percent. Oh, half percent whatever you like, so yesterday was released is You know that I did saw was going to go to those low timeframes. That was the plan. I put out there on my youtube, so if you not they guy follow it. It was with planet. Put out of everybody really stuck to that plan and it was successful. Now When the markets wrought fool your fifteen minute timeframe the law or even fifty nine out the half an hour one hour. Well, it's just by knowing what the market looks like what it's doing for me. It's when the comes back to the market. We had some serious momentum. Yesterday's lower timeframe souls comfortable to do it. The Quincy he was there for me to fill my bigger orders and I got what I needed. as a matter of knowing what to do and win a Seidel Tom. It's not just about having a trading strategy is a lot of things we need to do is try to make sure that we. Were the right place at the wrong time doing the right things, and that's what law I've tried fools about. That's what might try to coke communities about. It's about sharing this information with people to let them know what my plan is. H time for them to make their own planes It's really important to us that we help the community and we help people to become the best tried is I candidates the whole purpose of the business? Now couple of things the first thing I'll say to you right now. You're not. On my list I'm going to get a video out there today and we're gonna be doing some stuff with a Toro. Coming up, and you'll need an account for it so if you haven't got if your already got an HR archaic now dramas. It says you've already got one. If you haven't got one jump on the mailing list because I'm going to put the link in to get one because I'm going to take you through the crowd, of course, their guy and that's just the beginning is also going to be scans. There's also going to be a lot more. Down the track as we develop and get our licenses, that's right. We'll be looking at other markets eventually as well so That's where it's going to get really dame cool. In on looking forward to that day. Anyway let's go back to the markets and that's just try to call dot COM Gawain do the video newsletter. You can actually jump on rotten massages, and you'll save posted, so can fill your boots on that one. But. Just talking the market now mainly I. It is so difficult to the man. When, I look at it right now, yes, tonight, bearish definitely. The bergische broke down from that daily can looked like all buggy that we're GONNA. Go much much lower. We did move caught a lot lower me from from yesterday's close. To where we bat bottomed out, it was four point seven seven percent, which significant decent move. On I haven't quite quickly so. Know, we headed towards having one of those. You know I nine ten percent decline top dies, but did not even we. We bounced that. You know we bat SPEC, really hot and that's where for me it's. It's a little bit tricky. And the reason it's tricky is because once again. bitcoins just wrecked. itself is a trend. It's gone low. Hi Lola. Then, that's gone straight back up to a high. Low Aloha and if I look at the four outshot. The. We've been here before we will hear. With a hair! Back through April. Now, we get an up trend that would I down as soon as it set itself down. Investment opposite said itself. I wasn't till sort of You know the start of my. Sorry the back end of Ipil, the we started to really have a decent. That was when we sort of went through seventy eight hundred. We ended up around ten grandma. Cunanan suddenly around that sort of figure. At we're going continual choppy period of time. That is very. It's not the best training conditions, the matter of fact, trading, spot or trading margin against BTC's probably given a lot more opportunity than everything else. It's just a matter of being patient. Looking at one point five percent yesterday. I'm happy with that because I ain't got, add on a flat That was a really nice, really nice way to start the week to be feeling fresh to do anything else this week unless the conditions good now with bitcoin yesterday i. Believe it all. Dan, lightly percent at once I've actually closed up one percent on the nose. We had a low thousand, eight, hundred, ninety, and we close at nine, thousand, four, hundred, twenty, eight, so. We're told me five hundred dollar swing, but if you look at the the high of the Diet was ninety five sixteen, so a really wall What does it tell me? It doesn't tell me about the role really? You know there is a low hi, there is a low low, but is there a good daily downturn? Absolutely not it's certainly isn't clear. If it's not clear, it's not there and just go back and white Bitcoin Bitcoin in particular sitting. North thousand four hundred fifteen dollars right now theorem also kind rejected on the dingaling. Two hundred and seventeen dollars thirty two cents, which is exactly the resistance level interesting that one. It did close down only point three percent closing at two thirty one when now slightly down on the session, but not by very much I mean it's point two of a percent, the EXA pay look at how to a hell of smashed down as well, but it closed up one point one percent closing at nineteen point two cents a guy. He's a very strong run backup carney down nineteen point one, which is down point, six of a percent bitcoin cash close down yesterday as well the close to thirty spot seven zero. It had moved old why to a lawyer yesterday twenty four, so a pretty decent eleven move to get back up to closing down point item, percent base, they and also right now it's two thirty, five ninety five point one of the scent they. Look the book the daily downtrend they, it's broken, one seventy six it in a down trend. It looks very bearish to me on in fact, looking for opportunities to try this show at the moment I'm hopeful I. Haven't got anything yet, but I am keeping a close on on this as it does. definitely carry the hallmark of of Loa low coming in here finally, the four Alcan was a legal beat smaller than I certainly would have my My mock there. We currently only saw yesterday with death three point two percent closing at one, seventy, three, six down point to at one, seventy, two non full wrought now lot coin, rolling over as well rejecting those lows yesterday once again with a sitting around some support around one around forty one dollars and sixty four cents at BAFTA, quite strong, it's still pretty solid. Why slightly to the downside Slot Momentum Bearish Saad? A close yesterday Dan Point, six at forty three dollars, seventy five, or about the same rock now. A US against sitting random portal's forty turned was pulled the. Look a its its down point. Two of a percent now toodle fifty two yesterday. It closed down one point three six percents. It's not the clearest translate bonds at a river of a move yesterday. Jay's I really wish I had to take in that instead of Don on the fifth day at one stage. what was the actual low on the fool? Because the foreclose, sixteen fifty fog was down seven point five seven percent on the day. Pounced to close down one percent at sixteen dollars and thirty seven cents, the low was fifteen thirty so over a Duller of a move that very very volatile bonnets was yesterday and look tell you what It's a sort of sort of mock love to try. Just I'm just waiting for my opportunities wants guy. Starring role of now, Dan, point six of the sense sixteen dollars twenty eight

Dan Point Tron Thomas United States Ipil EXA Alcan Cod Donna Quincy Seidel Tom Cunanan BTC JAY Carney DON
Nonjury trial eyed in suit over virus worship restrictions

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 6 months ago

Nonjury trial eyed in suit over virus worship restrictions

"Delaware's governor has backed off restrictions on church services Delaware's governor Jim Carney is backing up restrictions he imposed on church worship to prevent the spread of the coronavirus state attorneys told a federal judge that regulations regarding worship services had been revoked by new guidance issued this week they say nothing in the new guidance imposes any mandatory restrictions or obligations on houses of worship beyond those that are generally applicable to secular businesses and entities in March Carney ordered a ten person limit on worship services he later loosen those restrictions but only of houses of worship complied with several conditions dictating how services could be held I'm Walter Ratliff

Delaware Jim Carney Walter Ratliff
"carney" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

Mysterious Universe

10:25 min | 8 months ago

"carney" Discussed on Mysterious Universe

"You'd have oxygen issues and and how quickly did you do it again? It was less than two days right eight hours. Yeah it was. It was really fast. I mean it wasn't the world record but it was probably a record for people who had no acclimatization Jesuit And yet several people told us. We're GONNA die like the Dutch mountaineering. Association said we were going to die. Army predicted a if not death. Like having a Medevac off the mountain End Yet we made it like it was really really cool and what I was trying to figure out. You know as I'm going down the mountain look all of this. The basic protocols in the Wim Hof Method for a hell of a long time and now I wanted to know where else I could go. How else do I expand the abilities out past? I'm cold exposure in his breath work protocols where can I find that fundamental unifying Bodily and mental experience that I can apply to absolutely everything? And that's where the wedge comes in. I it's my continuing exploration into other stimuli. Like what happens. What if I try the same things in heat? What if if I try to conquer fear when if I have crazy psychedelic experiences and try to bring something out of that always by by trying to find that space between stimulus and response now Scott? You just said that when you climbed Mount Kilimanjaro that even though you are able to endure it it wasn't comfortable and this is something that starts off in the beginning of your book suggesting that technology in itself has made human beings to comfortable. How does this relate to the wedge issue we have with technology making human beings to comfortable and unable to withstand hostile environments? Well if you think back to our ancestors and you go back three hundred thousand years ago and you have sapiens wandering through the African plains They have the same exact physiology as they are the same species a few teleported back to that time period you could breed with them and you produce viable offspring. They are us and yet. There are huge differences between our capabilities. Like you would never want to do a foot race against one of those guys. They would wrestle to the ground and tear you to pieces and the reason is they always had harsh physical experiences that they were up against. You know they were there. Were scavenging for food experiencing scarcity experiencing temperature variations fighting off wild animals like and they had every stress that they encountered there was like a physical response to it. You know you see that lion you go grab your spirit and your adrenaline and your cortisol or like pumping through your veins trying to give you energy fast forward to like the modern people like you and me and everyone to this podcast and we are coddled from birth by technology. Like oh it's is it a little chilly. Is it just a nice? I know you're Celsius. But I'm in Fahrenheit. So you know is it. Is it only sixty eight degrees? Oh sorry while you can just press a button. And then you have this perfectly attenuated response and we. We rely so much on technology That we are stunting. Our biological abilities and the journey of the wedge is to try to give ourselves the stresses that create the sensations in our bodies that allow us to do things that we didn't know we could do. But we're like a lost evolutionary powers. But it's affecting psychology as well as you pointed out because those stresses that we had in the past when cortisol levels will go through the roof that would be a body responding to a threatening situation today in modern times those cortisol levels still go through the roof responding to perceived threats but those threats no longer day. How does that affect people in tonight? Because I mean especially talking about what's happening with you know holding and people you know terrified during this code outbreak you see people lacking a resilience to this seems like society will actually crumble not from the virus but more from the way that people respond to think this has a lot to do with us now being unable to be comfortable in hostile environments absolutely. And it's not really about the hostile environment right. It's not that if we all just hung out in on. Glaciers will be fine. The fact is that we have these stimulus. Is that come in? So you're surfing on the Internet and some politicians something you don't like and and you get really angry. You try to solve the politician problem by posting more on the Internet right and unlike but what your body wants to do is fight off that politician with spear which technically isn't legal anymore. But you want to do that. Physical thing because in the olden days you stab the lion or the lion at you and the issue was overstressed. Complete like it's it's not a thing but now we release these chemicals these hormones tour body and they just sort of royal around there and we don't have like any sort of physical. I'm response that we really need so one of the really cool things about everything I did with hot. Method is that you know you're exposing yourself to cold stress repeatedly and and what that does actually just almost eliminates anxiety and that's a really amazing benefit that sort of as part of that. I really love the idea. I love the technique that you describing and for me it really does take a lot from traditional belief systems and some spiritual practices. It reminds me of stoicism. It reminds me of taking a lot of self responsibility for what you experience. What happens to you You know it's a really. I think it's a really fantastic Approach to live which has lost these days. Yes feels like part of? It's missing in a way and I want to go into some of the neurological sides of this as well. Because one of the first chapters you go out to Stanford and made up with Andrew Hooverman a neuroscientist and he's working on the studies of the neurology of FIA. And you know you ask him this kind of really BICYC- question of what is fear. And he launches into this incredible story feed share with us. I wasn't sure exactly how it related to your question of share with us. What what he told you really funny because he actually has a lot of trouble explaining what fear is on so when he described it to me all right so two weeks ago. I was swimming. I was in a shark cage off the in the Off The coast of Mexico and I was twenty feet below the water and my friends were all swimming around with cameras and I was sucking on a hookah line. Which is actually this airline. That comes down from the boat. And that's how you breathe. And all of a sudden blind stops working like he pulls on it and he's out of breath and and he surrounded by great white sharks and he's like this is a really bad scene and so he he's trying not to panic and he reaches for one of those air canisters at the bottom of the tank sprayer. And that's not working. He reaches for another spare and that's not working. He has to think to himself. How do I get out of this situation? And realize he's got like only a few seconds make a decision is he gonNa go and scoot out the top of the cage dart up to the top to the surface a possibly triggering the prey drive of these twenty foot long starving feeding great white masters or is he going to try to just hold his breath until he dies or get his attention of his friends and he's able to stay in the moment long enough that that he actually does right as he's like sort of opening the top of the cage A friend of him sees him and he starts they make the Inter water eye contact. He started running his finger over his throat in the international sign of. I'm out of here and I'm going to die and his friend actually saves them but this is the way he sort of indicates to me you know. Try to answer that question. That in this moment in that in that space where he is a under threat was Hoberman scared. What was he afraid? And the answer is no. He was not scared. He was if he if he had panicked. If he had let go and start spiraling out into all of the ways he could have died and there were many many ways he could have died he he would have lost his ability to act in that moment and then went kaput. I'm so pleased that you put this so early in the book as well because it made me realize when I was first reading in the introduction chapters about the wage at all this is cool I mean this is a way for us to reduce anxiety and live better lives but it really made me realize that the wedge is actually potentially the difference between life and death. I mean we obviously don't get ourselves into life situations all the time but if that ever happens if you've got control over the wedge it really could make a big difference. Oh yeah the reason why we have the ability to control our bodies with our minds like our whole somatic system the whole point of consciousness in a way is to keep you alive right in stressful situations to keep you alive in the face of stress. And that's what our whole somatic sensory system is about. It's giving US information about the world. That's relaying through our nerves that goes into our brain and for whatever reason the reason we or or the reason we have conscious control over that is because our brain is able to make decisions that keep us surviving. What is the cool thing about the wedge is? It's not just about planning for the future. I should have spears on me to go. Fight that Lyon but it's actually deeper. It's actually saying okay. I'm going to going to dig deep into myself and find the right emotions. That trigger these. These are responses either. Either fight or flight arrested digest depending what you need at that time. And then I'm gonNA deploy those and so. What was hooligans wedge? What did he use so for him and this was bizarre at the moment where he feels like. He's like a not sure if he's GonNa make it. For some random reason the face of his bulldog costello some floppy bulldog shows up in his mind and he thinks to himself. I am going to come back to you. What a good boy right and I don't know if he asked him several times is that was that like a conscious choice like did you is. Is he like your.

cortisol Mount Kilimanjaro Army US Scott Hoberman Mexico Stanford Lyon Andrew Hooverman FIA
"carney" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"carney" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"I covered to Whitehouse's before I went to work for one the Clinton White House and the and the George W Bush the White House and and virtually with no exception everyone I dealt with in those administrations whether I personally agreed or disagreed with what the country I don't feel that way now and I I worry great things that we thought were could never change in our country that we realize aren't governed by laws aren't controlled by laws are controlled by norms that have been built up like the way we behave in our in our governmental institutions and are governed largely by precedent Sir.

Whitehouse Clinton White House George W Bush
"carney" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

05:08 min | 1 year ago

"carney" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"It's like isn't it great because we get to we get to be part of these really really vital world changing discussions another of those world chain discussions is happening right now in terms of artificial intelligence and facial recognition and Jeff Bezos told reporters a couple of weeks ago that Amazon is working on facial recognition regulations that it would proposed new Congress. Yeah we plan is Jeff was right of course but on and we had said earlier we posted on our blog Si- colleague Michael former ambassador to the World Trade Organization who now works in our policy shop he wrote a blog was that laid out sort of the the guidelines that we are working under sort of the general principles and now we're going deeper into Russians about how this technology should be properly regularly regulated because we believe two things one is that like any new -nology it can be it can be used powerfully for good and potentially for ill and you WanNa make sure that you maximize the former and minimize the ladder and we were eager to work with lawmakers and regulators to find that balance you know I would note that with our service where the discussion is often around law enforcement use of it we have yet to have a report of abuse by law enforcement I didn't see if and when that happens that customer will be cut off from our service wherever we are in the process of regulations and legislation I mean ultimately the use by law enforcement agencies technology like like this just as was the case with DNA needs to have some guardrails around and those guardrails have to come ultimately from makers with the input of businesses I think so your specific input to them will deal at all with the issues or the questions of what whether or not facial recognition accurately identifies women and people of color well so we already we when we sell to law enforcement agencies we you are instruction to them is this technology should only be used in this use case with at the ninety nine percent certainty level and there have been taste I think somewhat disenchant it was tests of the of the technology that set the reliability level or the confidence level much lower but that's not how it's supposed to be used and that's not how law enforcement customers are very clearly told that the proper usage of this should be at the ninety nine percent confidence level and should always have human review again companies can't do that in the end because these government agencies governments have to policy-makers and legislators have legislate towards after were extremely concerned there was a lot of talk about how this would lead to big brother government over intrusion into our privacy. I think it's fair to say that Civil Libertarians feel elated by how DNA has been used in the additional system there are so many people who've been found innocent on death row because of its use and and that's an example of technology that has the potential for both Danil being properly using regulated for good and and I think you don't WanNa have you don't want to prevent the upside potential because in our case just with our service there have been hundreds if not thousands of cases of missing children found of victims of human trafficking saved because of the law enforcement use of this technology we want that we just are extremely aware of an understanding of the fact that there are there are concerns about how this could be abused so that's where we need to get regulation and law next up Jay Carney's personal comments on current events in Washington DC and the trump administration warmed purchase love my pulse dot com. Are you looking to learn how to code do you.

Jeff Bezos Amazon World Trade Organization Jay Carney Congress Washington Michael Danil ninety nine percent
"carney" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

20:57 min | 1 year ago

"carney" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"Before I went to work for one the Clinton White House in the George W Bush White House and virtually with no exception everyone I dealt with in those administrations whether I personally it was just phenomenal experience I would have stayed to the end but my wife reminded me that I had said two years and it was five and a half and the end to the current political environment and the environment in the room where you once held court but I I do WanNa ask who is the tougher person to work for these things and and he was willing to take some heat for it and and a President Obama was the same way probably because he was so he he was a female who had risen from nowhere to become a candidate for president really and so he he wasn't part of the Washington game he hadn't been running for president for most of his life and most of his adult life and he hadn't been on the national stage and it just meant that he didn't see things the way others did and he wouldn't do things that we would I some of his other advisers with tell them the time focused on either at the political or policy level so before me and certainly can you know as I've been there is to have some subject matter experts now we have we become a resource not just You know not just a team that reacts to things but we can of technology we use works effects customers coming up next Jay Carney addresses questions about Amazon antitrust and Competition Techno legal thriller in Walter Isaacson Calls It a useful guide for how to navigate the digital future they're talking about tools and weapons the promise and the peril of the digital age by Brad Smith President of Microsoft and Dan Brown published by Penguin Press this book explores the impact of the rise of cyber attacks and threats to digital privacy tools and weapons go now wherever books e books audio books are sold obviously one of the key issues this year it is questions about antitrust scrutiny what is your response to lawmakers other retailers competitors including some of the those who use your platform who say Amazon is too powerful needs to be regulated more strictly or even broken up well we'll say I say you say a couple things one is consistent with what Jeff said publicly which is of course we'll be scrutinized were big institution all big institution wins in this country merit scrutiny whether there nonprofits or government agencies or large companies we think and our aim is to that will come through that scrutiny well because we have a really good story to tell and what I've found in Washington and not just in Washington around the country and sometimes around the world is that the perception of Amazon is a little different from the reality we because of our business model and the fields that we enter our core business retail I mean this is this is maybe the most competitive space in the world of the economy and notwithstanding our size were less than four percent of retail in the United States and less than one percent globally and you'd be I am surprised and you'd be surprised by the number of members of Congress who don't know that I got into a spirited conversation with a member of Congress not that long ago somebody who'd been in office for a while and you just wouldn't believe me that Walmart was two and a half times our size so I had to like get out my phone show or the Google search and it's they are you know it's not we're not even the biggest Taylor in any market where we have a business which is not to say we're not big another thing that's the misconception is that were were monolithic and as you know because you know the Business you know the fast growing part of our retail operation is third party sellers growing twice as fast as our owned inventory retail and that's hollering millions of small and medium-sized businesses around the world you know and I think we have two hundred thousand of them move you know with revenue of over a million dollars and I think that's a great fact point to when there are conversations about what the impact of a of of business like Amazon is on small businesses a single digit percentage of retail sales writ large but if you look at total use e commerce sales you're right around forty percent and the next biggest competitor is Ebay at six percents so as you know a lot of these antitrust discussions come down to defining the relevant market and so it sounds like your argument would be that retail writ large should be the market whereas others might argue that ecommerce in particular you're right and I think I think the most recent survey said thirty seven percent just two and that's outside that's not us but the but but you're right at that is our argument and it's also logic because there's not a retailer in in the country and and soon in the world that the hopes to have success that isn't hybrid that isn't it may be a physical store principally but it's also online he opera some businesses that has started online and now established physical stores Amazon I'm getting into the physical retail business and that's you know so obviously we don't think e commerce is going to eliminate physical retail because we're investing heavily in physical retail look I mean going back to Walmart obviously long standing and very large and successful retailer their recent success has been driven largely by their success in online so how do you how do you how do you say we're just gonNA regulate e-commerce and who do you leave out the and what do set thresholds we think here's here's the test for me of a market right you wanNA lawnmower if you if we controlled ecommerce right or if any if any company controlled ecommerce or had like a dominant position we could raise prices for lawn mowers and you'd be stuck right but you'll just go down the street and get a lot more right you go to the local physical or another ecommerce citing and get that product and we compete all the time every day every minute with retailers that are offline and online for Mars and if we don't offer that value proposition and convenience and a low price then of course they're going to go somewhere else you don't have this huge built in advantage with Amazon web services providing revenue and ultimately profits into the company and its they're sort of these areas where Amazon's power can be perceived from the outside to be unfair and I happen to be wearing the the new Amazon six collectives that all birds has spoken out about and that are very similar shoes I we talk with retailers who feel like they're effectively competing against a company that and lower prices because they have this advantage Amazon what services I realize these things aren't necessarily illegal or unethical but they can be seen as unfair let's let's let's tease that apart Aws Amazon Web Services is obviously a very successful part of our business and its margins are are a little wider than the thin margins of retail but it is the simple fact that is established by our filings at our consumer business is profitable we do not the are other businesses do not fund the retail business and the margins are smaller we've been making point for a long time you know we're in it gets highly competitive and Retail is always a matter of very slim margins but but Amazon is successful on its own as a as a retailer and and compete accordingly on the issue of of private labeled products you know of the big companies retailers that you know in this country and around the world we're the worst data we have the smallest percentage of our revenue that comes from private label one percent of our revenue there there are competitors out there and you go to their stores or online and it's twenty fifth the twenty five thirty eight percent eighty percent of of what they sell is private label so the fact that we have you know we've made some investments tried to get some traction and private label is only because we're trying to we're listening to customers and hearing their feedback and trying to provide them products that they want but knocked the team that works on that but if we're at one percent where we're not exactly you know killing it in that area do you consider third party retailers customers yes So what do you say then when those customers are complaining that they feel like that you need that we work our butts off every day for them to make sure that the a succeed as much as possible on Amazon and the proof is in the numbers they're growing twice as fast as our inventory so the whole long before my time at Amazon on maybe before you were paying attention but when when the company introduced this marketplace idea so that it could vastly expand selection for customers because that's what they wanted and they invited other sellers into what had been wholly owned a store with Amazon products people thought I mean the market dodger was crazy it was like why would you let on a completely equal footing somebody else coming into your store and compete with your products and the answer was because ultimately it will pay off down the road because that's what the customer wants from the wants the breadth of selection the customer wants the customer reviews then help him her make a decision about what what product is best and and is reliable and has the best price so you know it's completely in our DNA but also in our interest to ensure that are small aw medium-size sellers succeed and we work every day to help them succeed so it's great to be able to talk to you because there's so many nuanced and interesting issues yesterday credited Amazon for signing onto the Christ church home after the tragedy there to try and block streaming of live incidents such as that and unfortunately there was another today in eastern Germany and it was live streamed on twitch where is this headed can technology be created such that we can preserve free speech yet also prevent these kinds of events incidents from being broadcast live to the world so I mean it's a backup just you know Brad deserves a lot of credit for for the leading role he played in in in in a rain doing that and we were delighted to participate the Prime Minister of New Zealand is an incredibly compelling world leader on this issue and and I think when you talk to her and you can't say no and And I admire her greatly for the for the lead she's taken on this and I think that That was not that we don't have we don't we're not a social media we don't you know which is an area and and and what happened today is horrendous and and I know that twitches has either taken it all down or is actively working on that now and that any any customers that has posted a reposted any of that stuff is off for good and we'll work with authorities to make sure that that we're doing the right thing in this regard and to answer your bigger question look I think the only answer Sir is effective cooperation between private sector technology companies and governments because You know we have the deep into how the technology works we have the expertise to to to help governments and policymakers around the world make balanced decision ends about about how to how to regulate in this space so that we don't that we can we can as much as possible prevent kind of use of the services without stifling innovation or you know overly limiting free speech and these are the unbeliever compelling and complicated issues it's the fact that reading a small part of this conversation and we're a bigger part of other incredibly compelling conversations is what I love working at Amazon I tell my teams all the time you know and they feel like we're you know we get a lot of incoming and and you know.

Clinton White House George W Bush White House one percent twenty five thirty eight perce thirty seven percent million dollars eighty percent forty percent four percent twenty fifth two years
"carney" Discussed on 1075 KZL

1075 KZL

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"carney" Discussed on 1075 KZL

"Carney. Maybe he's six forty five baby umbrella, maybe you take much for the last time. I'm john. Maybe maybe I'm thinking is better. If you. Mom. Okay. Hello. The bidding. I don't play when it comes to my heart. The cat. Right here. That.

Carney.
"carney" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"carney" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"My friend. Kristen Carney is a comedian writer radio host. She's co-hosted on love line with Dr drew who you know. And she's also been Adam Corollas sidekick on the Adam Corolla show. She's got a lot going for. She's smart. She's beautiful. She's funny. And she's also depressed, and this has been something that's followed her for awhile. And recently the specter of suicide hit much too close to home. What I really love about. Kristen is that she never tries to sugarcoat anything. She so open so candid, it's impossible. Not to do exactly the same. When you're with her, which is what makes this conversation with her so valuable whether or not you suffer from depression. You know, someone who does or you're only glancing at it from afar, this is one of those conversations that's worth being part of and I'm honored to do. So with you here today, of course, aside from an inside look at phenomenon that affects millions of people around the world, we also dive into some practical that all. All of us need to be doing to stay even keel and mentally chill after the show. You'll be better equipped to deal with your own emotional states as well as those of others. And for that reason this episode for me was particularly impactful. All right. Here's Kristen Carney. So you started doing mentally chill with your friends Stevie Ryan who a lot of us might know. She was a youtuber she had her own television show. She seemingly had a lot of stuff going on. And and we lost her somewhat recently. So this is sort of there's a is it a cruel? It's not irony. It's a cruel. Yes. It is a cruel irony that we're doing a show about depression about somebody who is depressed about two people who did a show about depression and actually suffered from quite deeply. Yeah. I mean the circumstance surrounding doing a podcast on depression. And then having your co host take her own life was I mean, it's horrific. But then also totally surreal. Yeah. I can imagine it. It seems so strange because of course, a lot of people are going. I don't understand she had everything going for her because she was successful. Right. But that's not really the cure to this. And and it highlights the idea that it really doesn't matter. How much you have going for you? I mean, we only need look as far as Anthony bourdain to see that you can be successful as you want and still be really unhappy. Absolutely. The thing with her that was so life changing for me was not that her and I were similar. She had a lot more going on. She was a lot more successful. She was much prettier. She was really really funny, but she was a little bit of a mere for me because I looked at her life as my end goal of no longer being depressed. And once she turned out to be, quote, unquote, the more depressed one we actually used to do a segment on the podcast called who sadder, and it started because we were jokingly going back and forth competing with who sadder her or I and then she committed sewage. Aside. And so clearly she won the depression contest. And I had to step back and look at myself as someone would look at her because I looked at her. And I thought there's no way in a million years. She would be that depressed hater self that much hate life that much based on all of the physical evidence. I'm looking at. And then I realized people would look at me the same way and not, of course, the extent because I didn't have the the same following and an spotlight on me by any means, but her and I have a similar physical, look, and we have a similar sense of humor and. I started to think. Wow. I see why people look at me and go why are you depressed? I started to have that mirror reflect back to me. Yeah. I can understand how cause logically. We're going to look at someone and go there's no way it. That's why these high profile suicides always take everybody. Somehow. They're still surprising. They shouldn't be I suppose, but somehow they still are because people say what a beautiful soul. Everyone liked him. He was so successful..

Kristen Carney depression Anthony bourdain Adam Corollas Stevie Ryan million years