39 Burst results for "Carnegie"

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Medical Frontiers

Medical Frontiers

03:03 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Medical Frontiers

"He's one of the most qualified journalist in the history of that that genre, and I know you know, he let it get out of hand and he should have done a better job. And you know Melinda Roeder actually teaches communications at Waynesburg. She's an incredible professor. And she's got great insight, and we were talking a little bit before she did a newscast last hour, and she was explaining how she would have approached her teacher students. I I just know this. Chris Wallace is a great journalist, and I think that was an uphill battle last night, But I'm going to say this again. I think the meaning were those words of shut up. Clown idiot. All that stuff. Liar. I just don't think there's any cause for that. And I did not like what the president did, you know, talking about the drug use of Joe Biden, son for a parent. That kind of ripped out my heart a little bit. There's no need for that. There's just no need for that. And if they have to, you know that next debate on the 15th and don't forget pre debate tailgates with Rick Dayton next Wednesday for the vice presidential debate in Salt Lake City. And then, of course, the 15th with the president, and, Ah A person who would like to become the president. The Democratic nominee, Joe Biden, will have a chance to go at it again. So Rick will be here with great guest leading up to the debate, so the rest of the way, But I just There's no need for that. There's no room for that, in my opinion. And I mean your business is your business. But your family's another matter. And I think a lot of us have seen families personally go through loss literally figuratively emotionally because of drug abuse in this country, and that's why I want to continue to talk about job growth and creating jobs. And that's why this cracker plant means so much to me. I'll tell you why. Because it's going to get people working. It's going to get people moving. It's gonna have money in the pockets of people who deserve it because they're out, earning it every day. And they're going to be working, so they're not going to be getting into us much trouble. They're going to be able to invest in their community invest in their home investing their automobile invest in their future, invest in their families. And when there's money coming in, it makes everything so much better and the on ly reason that I'm going to continue to support the president throughout all of the mud slinging that both of them did last night. Is because I believe that the president understands thie significance of this energy that we have been blessed with. It is called natural gas. You understand if the cards fall where they're going We could have this much growth economically in this region over the next 25 years as our country Sol from The early 19 of the late 19th century into the early 20th century. We're talking Carnegie Frick, Morgan Westinghouse. It could happen again. Our Children and grandchildren could read the benefits. We could do incredible things in this country, but we cannot lose focus on that because of mudslinging and deciding on who we're going to vote for on these personal attacks. It's got to be the issues of jobs. First jobs last. We're going to come back with more in just a moment. Right now. All of our lines are on hold. So if you.

President Trump Melinda Roeder Joe Biden Rick Dayton Chris Wallace Waynesburg Salt Lake City Carnegie Frick Morgan Westinghouse
Got Your Olive? Got Your Mani Pedi? - burst 09

EAST TO WEST WITH NICK AND ROB

01:40 min | 4 d ago

Got Your Olive? Got Your Mani Pedi? - burst 09

"Little bit of the mail. The mail discounted balance. Is it off to have it? I recently shifted to a half cran half no crayon because I want want the sweetness, but sometimes when I get a full Suite it's a little bit too much for me. Let me give you one local here though in Vegas cuz I know people come to visit us down still probably too much during the pandemic, but they good for them. Look at a little bit off the beaten path and you're going to have drive away from the strip for about ten minutes to get there seven sinful Subs small place. Not a tennis eating sandwiches are very reasonably priced unbelievable meatballs, especially when you consider it's on the west coast just a ton of fun things on their menu. I'm not going to spoil it for you it Google page when you're in Vegas take the time drive out there and credible sandwich place on the southwest side. So Seven Deadly Subs seven sinful Subs, that's amazing. I mean, I was hoping you were going to knock off. The Earl of Sandwich cuz I had one of those and I was out there and it wasn't all that bad. I think you gotta give it one more shot cuz it depends what you get on the menu. And the problem with Earl of Sandwich is not always consistently good. So yeah. Keep in mind. There's a Carnegie Deli here. That's not bad too. But I've had bad sausage like a roll there and it wasn't super great. I'm going to go the Carnegie Deli. It's going to have be in New York. I'm sorry, but you bring the stuff inside the food is all legit, but it's not the same consistency. Unfortunately, it's like you get in the lobster and if it doesn't come from cousins, it's not worth it. I don't like it when they fight the pot man. It's still heartbreaks. It's over expired wage. Put it in there show no mercy sleep if you name it. I'll never enjoy it and I love Lobster. I'm going to name one for you. And I'm going to name it dinner. That sounds about right. You should

Carnegie Deli Sandwich Vegas Google Tennis New York
Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Mandy Connell

Mandy Connell

05:19 min | 12 hrs ago

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Mandy Connell

"I don't think that and by the way, let me clarify why that matters to me so much, even if you assume they're zero cheating, even if you assume that everyone who works on these campaigns is on the straight narrow and nobody asked nobody's harvesting ballots or any of that stuff that apparently is going on. Let's just assume for the point of this conversation that's not happening. Election night. Donald Trump Looks like he's gonna win, but we have to wait until all these absentee ballots come in. Well, what if people are sitting on ballots? And they didn't send them at all. And all of a sudden they find out Oh, crap. I don't want that guy to be president again, and then they fill up. That's not right. That's not right. The ballots have to be postmarked the balance after the end by X date. That's the way it should be. Colorado's secretary of state will tell you when you need to mail your ballot if you want to make sure it gets there in time, and if not drop it off in a drop box. I talked about their drop boxes everywhere. They're already out. There's no reason to put your ballot in the mail. Take it to a drop box. Take it to your polling place. There's a drop box there. Take out the middle man. And make sure that your vote is counted, so it's kind of a big deal. An extremely big deal. I just I so feel like we're sliding into some kind of banana republic situation here. If we are not willing to ensure the integrity of our vote, does it really even matter? This is long been my argument about voter. I d. You guys, I don't want to keep anyone who has the legal right to vote from being able to vote. But every single person in this country has I. D. Every single black person in this country. Has I d. So act like somehow that's a disenfranchisement is really insulting to all of the black people who already have I d. It's insane. We have to protect the integrity of our elections. And this is going to be an absolute disaster yet. You know, it's really ironic People think of Richard Nixon is an evil person many do and in the 1960 presidential election. There's a lot of evidence that there was fraud in Illinois and Richard Daley and and that Nixon really could have won the election and had he protested and filed a grievance. It could have been turned around, and it could have been a mess for For months. And Richard Nixon, although he knew that there was probably cause for this decided the country didn't need that kind of controversy, and he stepped aside and accepted all the results. Who would think Richard Nixon of all people would do that kind of Self sacrificing thing for the good of the country and look at where we are today. I know. Imagine that happening in this election. Exactly. It's just not going to happen in this election. So, uh, tomorrow on the show. We continue our exploration into some of the ballot initiatives with my friend Greg Brophy. He is a former state senator. All round straight shooter. Guy love talking to Greg because he does not hold back. And he has no sacred cows. You know, sometimes when you talk to somebody works for, you know, one side or the other. There's certain things that they will not tell you the truth about not Greg. So we're going to do Ah, quick rundown of some ballot initiatives were also scheduling other interviews as well, plus I have an interview with James Whittaker, who is a writer who got who had the opportunity. Two. Take the original interview between a man named Napoleon Hill and and Andrew Carnegie. Back in 19, 8, 1908 or 1910. I can't remember exactly when that conversation was the beginning of 20 years of study about what makes successful people successful and ended up being the book Think and grow rich by Napoleon Hill, which has sold 130 million copies through the years. He published it 20 years after That first interview because Andrew Carnegie challenged him to write a book about the success stuff, But he had to study it for 20 years first, and Napoleon Hill did. And then published a book that's been read 130 Million Plus times. This book is fascinating. I have so enjoyed it, and I got to tell you, after all the negative stuff that's going on. It's nice to feel like you can kind of empower yourself a little bit, And this book does just that. What he did was he takes the original interview. And they had translates it for you a little bit because it's written in the English of the early 19 hundreds, which is far more verbose, then the language that we use now, so he kind of consolidates. The points gives you an example of the points. It's really, really, really good. It's called mental Dynamite, I think I have to look at and say All I know is it's very good were going to talk to him tomorrow. 12 30, then Greg Brophy at one and is be cave there. Mike TBK show up yet. We'll see if he pipes in here in a second. He's checking for him, right, all right. Because now it's time for the most exciting segment on the radio of its kind, and wow, that.

Greg Brophy Richard Nixon Napoleon Hill Andrew Carnegie Donald Trump Banana Republic Mike Tbk President Trump Colorado Fraud James Whittaker Illinois Richard Daley Writer
Interview with Lisa McFadden, PhD

Moving2Live

06:35 min | Last week

Interview with Lisa McFadden, PhD

"Welcome back to another edition of moving to live our ethos movement is a lifestyle notches activity. We tried to interview professionals across the movement spectrum because we understand at the end of the day, anybody who is involved in movement either wants their clients patients or athletes to either move more or move better whether it's to move with less pain or to move more efficiently. Some of our best guests come from recommendations from other guests and a big. Thank you to Andy Gillam who recommended today's guest Lisa McFadden they arresting thing with podcasting is i. now have lineage of three people in a row starting with Brian Gary To. To Doctrine McFadden today hopefully two or three more as far as I can trace it's not who you know is who you know who knows somebody. So Dr McFadden thank you for taking time to talk to moving to live this afternoon. Absolutely thank you for having me. My favorite question I always ask on moving deliver the first one I. Always ask is to get an elevator. You get to talking because the elevators really slow because somebody's pressing all the buttons and they say, so what do you do what your thirty second? Not In a negative way elevator spiel my name is Lisa McFadden and I. I'll man and this one's a Turkey one I wear lots of different hats But yeah so. The way I look at what I do is I really put science into practice whether it's with athletes or with patients and Meyer expertise is in bio mechanics. So I like to used by mechanics to help people move better and then I also liked to inspire whether that's inspiring communities around science or whether that's inspiring. Students through mentorship in education. Right. Now, if I'm correct your in South Dakota. Yes that's correct. I work at Stanford Health See Falls South Dakota. And I know we were chatting a little bit before we started recording and both of us grew up in upstate new. York and I have to be honest I never thought I would end up in Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania, I never thought I would go to Grad School in Alabama and I would imagine that there's an interesting story going all the way from New York state with multiple stops all the way to South Dakota and I would imagine if you're anybody else like anybody else in the movement field is probably a few more stops along the way before you retire. Well, it's funny. I almost ended up in Pittsburgh. Along my way and I've spent some time in Alabama on a couple of different business trip. So it sounds like we've got a similar. Set of journeys But yes I I grew up in upstate New York in a little town called the sweet go not quite as little as where I heard you up. But? Yes. So I grew up on Lake Ontario My Dad was a doctor in I. Always always wanted to be a doctor specifically pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon, and my dad always told me no, you do not He said you really WanNa be an engineer and I said, no, No, no dad engineers are big nerds. And he said you're really good at math and you you have passion for this and I. Really suggest you become an engineer. So I very boldly went to the University of Rochester Pre and applied math saying you're wrong dad. But you know had a had a moment of clarity probably after my first year I did realize and did some self reflection and thought you know the type of. Mother that I wanted to be in the type of you don't grown up that I wanted to be really do not not focus around having call and prioritizing patients, which is absolutely something that you have to do but really being able to have a little bit of flexibility in In my lifestyle and so I finally listen to my father after a long time of not and. decided that I would actually transfer into biomedical engineering where I ended up focusing on bio mechanics as my concentration with minors in mechanical engineering and applied math. throughout my Undergrad I really really enjoyed all of that and so as I started thinking about what was next I started getting really interested in robotics and in two that feel that was emerging back. Then decided that I really wanted to go and get a PhD in that. So I had been at ski resorts I grew up ski racing and I was in Montana with our family on vacation and watched a bunch of ski. Racers who had disabilities whether they were in a sit ski or whether they were missing leg skiing and I was just very inspired I looked at them versus like while they're amazing. They're they're better skiers than I am and then you could see that as soon as they were off the hill where they were excelling the rollout of daily life challenges. So I started getting really interested in prostates wanting to kind of help people that you needed additional help outside of. Being Super, rockstar athletes to help them in their daily lives and so robotics was sort of that pathway for me. My senior design project ended up being a surgical robot and then I ended up getting into Carnegie Mellon at the Robotics Institute which is where I almost went to Grad School and then the University of Utah in my husband and I. Boyfriend at the time looked at each other and said, we should go skiing. So, Kinda took that wildcard robotics institute was number one ended the US at the time but decided to go out to Utah where they had just one anger from the NSF in robotics, and so I was in the bio engineering department and kind of hybrid into mechanical engineering. So I really took courses and had faculty the Committee from both worlds and I was able to do there was. My my PhD was focused on spinal cord injuries and what we were working on with functional electrical stimulation, supporting an array of electrodes and putting them into the peripheral muscles, and then stimulating those and my job was to figure out what the mechanics looked like. So creating models of the limb and then creating control algorithms to figure out how we can control this limbs yet somebody to go from sitting to standing. And to do it in a way that they didn't get tired while they were standing because the way our muscles work. If you contract one all the way, you might get yourself to go into a specific movement but then that muscles eventually wanting to fatigue and you can't can't sustain it. So what does that look like as well?

Lisa Mcfadden South Dakota Pittsburgh New York Engineer Alabama Grad School Andy Gillam Brian Gary To Stanford Health See Falls Robotics Institute Lake Ontario Carnegie Mellon University Of Rochester Meyer York United States
Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on BBC Newshour

BBC Newshour

03:01 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on BBC Newshour

"A senior advisor to President Recep type add ones get some comment from Tom Devil, Senior fellow at the Carnegie Europe think tank and author of Blackguard in Armenia and Azerbaijan through peace and war and Time. Welcome to the program just on this issue of Syrians being sent to Azerbaijan. Have you been hearing Similar records. I have that there's a French journalist who's also spoken to. I had a very, very similar story to the one you had, which he's reported to three days ago, and there was also a report on Reuters. It seems to be pretty clear that there are Syrians sent but by Turkey with official turkey or was some unofficial turkey to Azerbaijan that that does seem to be See the case. It's it's a It's a strange story. It's a weird story. You Azerbaijan take them as about John's also a Shia country. We should remember mainly, but but but it does definitely did does does seem to be substantiated? Anna's illness have it was was saying Surely Azerbaijan has its own people to guard its border. I mean, that's a fair question, isn't it? That's right. I mean, obviously, people are speculating like mad about this. One speculation, People said, is that obviously, Azerbaijan doesn't want to send conscripts into action, and it would rather use a kind of third force. If possible. If it does want to use use manpower in the fighting. It's trying to obviously minimize its own losses. But that's just just one line of speculation. Unfortunately, we don't have Proper foreign journalists on the ground in Azerbaijan, so it's very hard to get some detail on this in broader terms. Why does Turkey support Azerbaijan? And why now? Well, I mean, historically, these air to Turkic nations, which are quite close. They've had their differences, but before the first Azerbaijani president used to talk about one nation Two countries so that there has been strong support all along the way through but took he has traditionally up until now being bean politically supporting a zoo by John on the diplomatic front politically economically, but also being a restraining force on on the on the use ofthe military Fourth. That's changed now took his act had one circuits actively. Encouraging Azerbaijan to use for so this is a very new factor in this conflict on part of what a more assertive foreign policy by by Turkey, that seems to be the case, Turkey is obviously in Syria in Libya squaring up against the Russians announced this seems to be a kind of third. Front. Now whether this is just the one playing to domestic opinion, playing to his traditional base as it were both both in Turkey and outside Turkey, or whether Turkey is actually going to get involved in the war in the Caucasus, which would be much more dangerous. I think it's a bit early to say You very much indeed. Tom Devil senior fellow at the Carnegie Europe Sink Tang much more on the story on our website in clearing plenty of analysis.

Azerbaijan Turkey Tom Devil Senior Fellow Senior Advisor Carnegie Europe John President Recep Reuters Armenia Blackguard Anna Caucasus President Trump Official Syria Libya
President Trump presides over a reshaping of Middle East power dynamic

All Things Considered

03:19 min | 2 weeks ago

President Trump presides over a reshaping of Middle East power dynamic

"The White House was trying to resolve the Israeli Palestinian conflict with the quote deal of the century, but the Palestinians were not among those signing the so called Abraham Accords today. It was the foreign ministers of the United Arab Emirates in Bahrain, agreeing to open diplomatic and economic ties with Israel. President Trump's staged an elaborate ceremony to mark the occasion were here this afternoon to change the course of history. After decades of division and conflict, we marked the dawn of a new Middle East. Neither Bahrain nor the United Arab Emirates were at war with Israel. They had been working quietly together to counter Iran. Israel's Prime Minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, thanked the the US US president, president, You You have have unequivocally unequivocally stood stood by by Israel Israel side. side. You You have have boldly boldly confronted confronted the the tyrants tyrants of of Tehran. Tehran. You've proposed a realistic vision for peace between Israel and the Palestinians, Palestinian see the deal's as a betrayal by their Arab allies and an effort by the Trump administration to undermine the Arab peace initiative. That plan calls for normalization with Israel after the Israeli Palestinian conflict is resolved. The Trump Administration took a different approach, says Aaron David Miller of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. They reserved all the honey for Israel in the key Arab states and all the vinegar for the Palestinians. The idea is that as Arab states normalize ties with Israel and get big arms deals with the U. S. They will put pressure on the Palestinians to make peace with Israel on terms more favourable to Netanyahu. Miller says It's known as the outside in approach, and he recalls numerous conversations about this with Trump's son in law and advisor Jared Kushner. It was just easier for them. It was more attractive for them. It was much more in keeping with the pro Israeli sensibilities both for political reasons, and in the case of Mr Questioner and others emotionally To align themselves with the eyes outside in approach. It's starting to pay off. But the Trump administration is still short of its ultimate prize, Miller says. Getting Saudi Arabia on board. My only concern is that they have hyped and Who plotted to the point where That may not yet be wanted. But if other Arab states join the party, particularly the Saudis, then I think you've got something that will be much more enduring. The Arab foreign minister say they're not turning their backs on Palestinians and Moradi Abdullah bin Zayed, speaking through an interpreter reminded Netanyahu that he agreed to suspend plans to annex parts of the Israeli occupied West Bank. You can look after dark cell. Um thank you for choosing peace and for halting the annexation off Palestinian territories at position that reinforces our shared will To achieve a better future for generations to come. In this time of a pandemic. The men didn't wear masks as they signed their deals with Israel. They did, however, avoid a public handshake. And while the ceremony was taking place at the White House, Palestinian militants in Gaza fired two rockets into southern Israel.

Israel Israel Israel United Arab Emirates Trump Administration President Trump Aaron David Miller Benjamin Netanyahu Tehran Carnegie Endowment For Interna Bahrain White House Middle East Iran Saudi Arabia Jared Kushner United States Gaza
Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Mixergy

Mixergy

06:33 min | 19 hrs ago

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Mixergy

"I don't know why but kind of independent view and. For me it was just always a drive of like I wanted to go into the financial sector I wanted to you know make a success of something and. That kind of played through into. Sort of every step of of my career Where like for example, where a lot of people would have maybe started working later on in life when you get like mid teens and whatnot? Yes. Soon as I turned thirteen got a job also got fired from that job but I did get a job after that and and you talking about the KFC job it's kind of interesting I get a job at the local fast food place by my house just to get some money understand how they're growing like what is it about this business? That makes it works so well in all these different states. I couldn't do it ten and I wanted to couldn't do it at eleven or twelve. I think I had to wait till thirteen and If I'm not mistaken, I think I might have even need to get some kind of paperwork to show them that I was eligible to work. That's what it was free. You're waiting for the day to be able to do exactly that yet. I mean realistically it was that I was the kid who's shoveling snow since like what eight years old so I don't know maybe it's like an entrepreneurial thing maybe it was it was in born was it for you to were you born with it? This lady Gaga was born this way. I don't know I'm not that kid who who was like You know you always see this distinct. Magical. Kid Makes I know ninety thousand dollars. Yeah. Seven years old and I'm like. That was in me. You know good for the kid but that that what was I was admiring that wanting to be that way bus route that was right. So it's not that we were doing it. We wanted to for me part of it was I was born this way. The other part was the influences I would go to the library and read biographies of people who'd made it big and think you know what they're always start. That's what it was for you. Who Was it? Who are some of the people that you read about? A hundred percent. Ben Franklin. Walter Isaacson Ben Franklin Favorite Ever Yeah Steve Jobs obviously same author Isaacson Steve Jobs Benjamin Franklin that made you want to be like him. Worldly guy diplomat was was widely widely respected but most importantly, you know practical thrifty I've really liked how cleverly a he would write him in him and mark. Twain. So that was really the major blake draw for me of like how somebody you know hundreds of years ago was basically doing the same thing that we're now doing today for example, He would put an article in his paper and just to drum up some sort of controversy he would penned the article that would be you know. A in the name of somebody and the following week, you'd pen another counterpoint article from somebody else you know opinion column and. Sort of get into a a on the NFL called King sock puppets these fake characters in a fight, each other and he was doing that and you like that what about this is the paper? Sorry and he owned any own the paper, right so the more you're reading about the controversy, the more he's getting paid. Okay. I get it. Why did you then get fired? Here's a guy I'm looking at a kid eager to get a job finally gets a job. How many hours were you working? You told our twenty to twenty thirty hours a week. Not, officially according to. Loud no, it was. Yeah. It was. It was a pretty substantial part time job. When I was when I was there But I don't know it was it was maybe attention of bike. I couldn't do the things that somebody else was telling me to do. and. Just continue to pay attention to what it is that they wanted me to do. I was never really great employee. Because so you would go in there. You had this job twenty to thirty hours. What would you do that would get you fired. I mean I would end up in the back like trying to to practice my Spanish with with with some of the guys that work there it was you know purely for. Entertainment and bettering myself and it's like, okay why are you not working the register? Whoops we had customers and you have people skills enough to feel comfortable as a teenager talking to adults in a foreign language. I was too too shy at that point to talk to them. Yeah. It never I don't know. Maybe this is like one of those things where you just you never see the difference in between adult and. Child I mean I never felt the difference between. Myself End and someone who's like fifty years my senior where peers it's just you've been around longer than me. There's probably a lot that I can learn from you and so why would we not speak? I had evan was I found the people weren't rational or I didn't understand the rationale behind what they did until I read del Carnegie's how to win friends and influence people, and then he says the operating it will do these irrational things that weren't even in their best interest on. How do I even talk to someone like this and then Dale? Carnegie starts off by explaining the EGO and he says people are generally guided by their sense of self and I realized Oh. So they want people making bad long-term decisions because in the short term, it makes them feel good about themselves. No wonder you have to remember somebody's name it literally doesn't matter right I just keep talking to you and say hi and talk you say the name Evan I noticed when I talked to my guests, their ears perk up or there is per cup or there's a thing that I feel. Because, we feel good hearing. Anyway. Del Carnegie gave me that get until eighteen act thirteen I couldn't do it. How did you thirteen be able to talk to these adults? I mean. I've noticed anything for you. Yeah. Just it. It was. It was never like some mental block for made it to. To to be able to speak to two other people. So I don't know just never had never had that problem just like an individual thing I mean. But that sort of ended up biting may because.

Del Carnegie Benjamin Franklin Evan KFC Steve Jobs Walter Isaacson Gaga NFL Twain Blake Dale
Yahoo's Ugly Death

Malicious Life

05:59 min | 2 weeks ago

Yahoo's Ugly Death

"The name is synonymous with a time when all of our lives were simpler when facebook was an actual books full of students faces computers made weird sounds when the connected to the Internet and downloading a one minute long video can take all night. Eddie tight yet who was one of the four or five most popular websites in the world with billions of views, every month and evaluation well, over one hundred, billion dollars. But as the two thousands turned into twenty tens, the web changed massively and your who was faced with the difficult task of changing with it. Their web portal service model was going out of fashion. We all moved to g mail and Google Search, McCain the front page of the Internet. Despite the fact that ask Jeeves was obviously way better. Many of Yahoo's services remained relatively popular, but they were no longer trendsetting no longer growing and the company's market capitalization dropped to a fraction of what it once was any remnant of the mindshare or what we might refer to as v Cultural. Capital they once held fell off. So to those of us on the outside yeah, who's fall seemed utterly quiet gradual and most of all inevitable but was it really Forget what you think. You know at least for a moment and consider this from the peak of the DOT COM bubble. Some say the beginning of the end for Yahoo to two thousand, eight, their revenue increased tenfold that success was no fluke either as print publishers struggled with the incoming revolution of online advertising, Yahu was very much on top of it. They were positioned Willie enough that when Microsoft attempted to buy the company for forty, five, billion dollars in. Two Thousand and eight CO founder and CEO Jerry Yang swiftly rejected the offer it was over the following few years that things would start to ten at the company transitioned through five different CEOS in just four years, and in the meantime Google took over the Internet. This would seem like the end of the story except in two thousand and twelve yen made arguably the most significant tire in its history and new CEO who could finally get things going again. Marissa Mayer. was distant for such a role from the beginning. Some college students have hard time in the job market, but after completing her degree at Stanford, Marissa was offered fourteen different jobs including teaching Gig at Carnegie Mellon One of America's leading engineering schools and consulting role at Mackenzie. Arguably, the world's premier consulting for the Young Maria turned down both those offers to become the twentieth employees at a fledgling startup called Google. At Google, she was star in fact, there's hundred percent chance you've run into her work. She oversaw the design of Google's homepage. You know the one you use probably ten times a day she was also one of the three people behind Google Edwards. It's difficult to overstate the importance of Edwards to the Internet as a whole and to the company itself to give you some sense of it. Though, at one point Edwards provided ninety six percent of Google's entire revenue. In fact, you could argue that Edwards and by proxy Melissa Samaya was at least partly responsible for the fall of. yahoos revenue multiplied tenfold between two thousand and two thousand and eight in no small part because of their online advertising. But he declined even faster when Google they're smaller competitor designed a better wage, you connect advertisers with users based on search results. Edwards. So, by the principle that if you can't beat him, you should join him Yahoo in two thousand and twelve hired Marissa Mayer. It was bald and popular choice. The company's stock rose two percent. The day of the announcement Meyer instantly became an icon for women in an industry dominated by men. Then, she got to work changing the company culture. She opened an online portal for employee complaints a system whereby any office problem given sufficient votes by employees would be automatically investigated by management. She oversaw a personnel shift which brought remote employees back into the company's offices Fortune magazine put her in their forty under forty list and ranked her as the sixteenth most powerful businesswoman on the planet. In short things were finally looking up for Ya. At least from the outside on the inside, however, the really really inside a very different story was about to be reading.

Google Edwards Marissa Mayer Yahoo Facebook Marissa Mayer. Eddie Marissa Jeeves CEO Fortune Magazine Jerry Yang Carnegie Mellon Microsoft Maria Mccain Willie Yahu Co Founder
Reading minds with an MRI machine

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:01 min | 3 weeks ago

Reading minds with an MRI machine

"Hasn't wished we could read someone else's mind know exactly what they're thinking. Well, that's impossible, of course. Since our thoughts are more than anything else, our own private, personal unreachable or at least that's what we've always well thought. As we reported last fall. Advances in neuroscience have shown that on a physical level, our thoughts are actually a vast network of neuron is firing all across our brains. So if that brain activity could be identified and analyzed, could our thoughts be decoded? Could our minds be red? Well. A team of scientists at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh has spent more than a decade trying to do just that. We started our reporting on their work 10 years ago. And what they've discovered since has drawn us back.

Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh
Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy Turvy

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 3 weeks ago

Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy Turvy

"Our solar system is far from the only way to put together stars and their planets. They feel look at all the stars in our galaxy the Milky Way. More than a half of the stars are forming multiples meaning that there are more than once tar in system astrophysicist. Jay. Han. Bay of the Carnegie Institution for Science he has studied one of those systems with three stars. It's called GW Orion is and it's freshly formed on the a million years old. Yeah. It's really really young. Yeah. It's a baby bay says if you translate that million year lifespan. To that of a human, it's the equivalent of a week old baby and how many week old babies do bump into. If you just walk around your neighborhood, there's really little chance that you me the baby weighs one week old right. So first of all, it's hard to find these systems. They are pretty rare ban. His colleagues got lucky spotting this one using radio telescopes they were able to image the. Star system and they say, it differs from our own solar system in more than just star account in our solar system. For example, all eight planets orbit the sun more or less in a single plane. Think of the Sun as the center of a vinyl record with the planets strung out along the grooves in contrast as team discovered that the stars in this triple star system are ringed by clouds of. Dust in multiple warped and misaligned planes picture three-dimensional gyroscope rather than a two dimensional vinyl record. The observations in the journal Science those rings of dust will presumably go on to form planets as the star system matures and base as astronomers have indeed observed other more mature star systems with planets orbiting in these misaligned planes, and we want each under tenth if that happens at the time those planets worn or. Some evolutionary thing over you know billion years, the findings suggest that weirdly aligned planetary systems are born that way and that stars in their embryonic planets can be all topsy turvy even in their infancy.

Carnegie Institution For Scien JAY
Kushner tries to smooth over F-35 dispute in visits to Israel and UAE

Morning Edition

02:38 min | Last month

Kushner tries to smooth over F-35 dispute in visits to Israel and UAE

"This week. The first Israeli commercial airliner landed in the United Arab Emirates and both countries are celebrating new diplomatic ties. But the USA is focused on a different airplane. It wants to override Israeli objections and by the F 35 from the U. S. NPR's Daniel Estrin reports. Good morning. A senior Emirati defense official welcome President Trump's son in law and White House advisor Jared Kushner at an Emirati airbase that hosts US troops. Mr. Jared Kushner. Distinguished delegation Major general Fella who Kahtani ticked off the U. S and M Iraqi military's joint efforts. Recently. We have sent our troops to Afghanistan to work with US force to fight Isis. Afterward, Kushner met the Emirates first female fighter pilot, They posed for photos in front of a sleek F 16 fighter jet marked with the Emirati flag. Nearby like unacknowledged elephants in a room stood to gray F 35 joint strike fighters. The US keeps those stealth aircraft at this base, the USA once some of its own Carnegie Middle East Center fellow but safe. Having a case of non belligerency between Israel and the U. S is a kind of argument that now that you Moratti's will push forth to ensure that they can get that deal with the F. 35. The Emirati military has fought in conflicts in Yemen and Libya and wants to enhance its standing as a regional power. But the F 35 issue is sensitive. Israel is the only country in the Middle East that has a 30 fives. And despite the new peace deal, it publicly opposes the U. S selling the Emirates those Jets. Former Israeli defense official AMA Ski Lad says Israel needs to protect its military superiority for whatever geopolitical changes come in the future. I want apology and is a precedent right? You'll get it and not Saudi Arabia, Egypt and so and we might be surrounded by coalitions. That is not inferiors in our air Force. That's him. Lots of them. The U. S. Is committed by law to protecting Israel's qualitative military edge, or Q. M. E. Kushner told reporters that the U. S can keep the Israelis and the Emirati is happy. The military relationship that America has with United Arab Emirates is very special, just as the relationship that America has with Israel is incredibly special. And so the cure me is something that can be respected while also advancing our military relations with the United Arab Emirates. Kushner says discussions on the F 35 will take time. His priority is to quickly finalize the treaty between Israel and the U. S. A. And try to get more Arab countries to establish ties with Israel.

Israel United Arab Emirates Jared Kushner M. E. Kushner Emirates USA Moratti Jets Official Daniel Estrin Middle East Carnegie Middle East Center M Iraqi Afghanistan U. S Advisor America Saudi Arabia Yemen President Trump
Detroit Lions cancel practice to speak out against Jacob Blake shooting

NFL Live

02:53 min | Last month

Detroit Lions cancel practice to speak out against Jacob Blake shooting

"The Lions canceled practice today to protest the shooting of Jacob Blake. Cell Phone video showed Blake was shot multiple times in the back by Wisconsin. Police his father says he's paralyzed from the waist down today. Instead of practicing the Lions chose to address reporters as a team in front of their building to deliver a message that they will be part of the change in the United States against police brutality. Here's quarterback Matthew Stafford on what the day meant to him. No football was talked about We were brought together and coach just open the floor. We knew they were going to be guys in there. That had heavy hearts and guys that had similar situations or close calls that have happened to them and needed to get it off their chest and and those conversations lasted for hours and it was incredible to part of just like it was all spring. but it was the first time that. You know we've we've really dedicated a chunk of time to talk about it when we're all in the building together you know we understand it about America and about. People in miracle is that. A narrative king, Carnegie shifty. We understand this sacrifice. You know. You might step on toes you might have some feathers but. In, order for change to happen or something to happen you know someone has to be uncomfortable in you. Know I think everyone inside these walls understand that understand what is going to come with the lasted make them with. A powerful statement from the Lions Today Marc Spears Dan Orlovsky Munich here on nfl live Marcus as you saw this unfolding just hours ago. What's your reaction? Is Important in looked the whole monographs stick to sports. Athletes in activism. The things that we talk about this is no longer a land that you draw and I know everybody likes to run and huddle away and say sports is supposed to be a refuge and let's just do sports and don't worry about these things going on what people have to understand is these situations affect the sportsman, the guys that are actually playing the Games. These are real life scenarios that they live through and I thought what Matt Staffer said was so important to listen to the stories of guys that have been through these types of situations before and have feared and the things that they express. So I think what the lines are are doing is admirable. It totally makes sense for the stick to sports crowd. Look you're no longer living in that generation. These guys have voices they want to use them to make us all better and I think everybody should attach themselves to that and applaud that as opposed to trying to find reasons why they should just play ball and not worry about the things that are happening in their communities.

Lions Jacob Blake Matthew Stafford Wisconsin United States Football Carnegie America Matt Staffer Dan Orlovsky Munich Marc Spears Marcus NFL
Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny in grave but stable condition after suspected poisoning

The World

03:33 min | Last month

Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny in grave but stable condition after suspected poisoning

"Alexei Navalny, the face of Russia's opposition, a lawyer, a politician and a harsh critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin. Today, Navalny isn't an intensive care unit in Siberia. Suspected of poisoning reporter Charles Mains joins us from Moscow Charles How did all this play out and hasn't been established? That someone did indeed. Try to poison navalny? Well, it's still a developing story. And as far as whether you indeed was poisoned or not, is still an open theory, depending on who you talk to. We do know that he was fine home from Tomsk in Siberia back to Moscow. Along the flight. He didn't feel well, which prompted an emergency landing in Omsk not to be confused with Tomsk. Navarone now is actually in a medically induced coma on a respirator at the hospital there. Doctors say he's in serious but stable condition, although their quote fighting for his life Also lets his wife Julia, and his personal doctor now there's well that there were reports have some delays in getting access to Navalny initially with lots of police on the scene, So how did this happen? Have you heard any theories? Will his spokesperson I care? Young. Bush made comments to media here. So she says he just drank some black tea at the airport before the flight, and it's obvious that he was poisoned at that moment. Idea here being that hot liquid was more likely to absorb quickly into his body. You know, In fact, a passenger named Pavel Lebedev took a photo of navalny sitting at the cafe in the airport before he got on the flight. He appeared to be drinking tea and later the two of them ended up on that same flight. Andi. It's interesting that some point heat this level have noticed Howl's coming from the laboratory realized that the cries were coming from Navalny, and he ended up detail ing all this in a post to social media once he touched down in arms. So that was at the airport. What else can you tell us about the suspected poisoning? Is there any talk of a possible suspect or suspects or or a motive? No suspects yet certainly know among Navalny supporters. They find this to be no accident. Not surprising. They think it's politically motivated. Navalny has made his fair share of enemies with Siri's reports on corruption in the highest rungs of the Russian government and off Russian business. He's certainly been attacked numerous times before, including in 2017, when provocateurs doused him with a green dye that partially blinded him for a period. Then again in 2019 when he was exposed to some toxic substance while serving a month prison term, which caused some skin lesions, But he made it. Okay on course, there's this troubling pattern of enemies or perceived enemies. Of the Russian state being poisoned, Attacked, sometimes killed, you know in this prompts this constant debate here over who's really behind them, and specifically whether Vladimir Putin really gains from these brazen attacks on his opponents, and that the Kremlin says they're designed to make Putin look bad, and I want to bring in another voice here. This is Andre Kalashnikov, an analyst with the Moscow Carnegie Center here. Even if Kremlin doesn't know anything involved Squad Strange because it means that this kind of events are uncontrollable. FSB local If his B Saman emus off, no one could do it. Without essentially from Kremlin Now. The other option, says Kalashnikovs that the's orders or indeed, coming from the top from Putin. The point is, we can suspect but never seem to really know and interesting enough. The reaction to today's news from the Kremlin spokesman Was to wish Navalny speedy recovery reporter Charles Mains in Moscow. Thank you very much for this.

Alexei Navalny Vladimir Putin Kremlin Moscow Tomsk Charles Mains Siberia Howl Pavel Lebedev Reporter Bush Navalny Omsk Russia Moscow Carnegie Center Russian Government President Trump Julia Andre Kalashnikov
History of the US Income Tax

Planet Money

10:01 min | Last month

History of the US Income Tax

"But our country has this really conflicted history with the income tax. It was not designed by our founding fathers for most of American history there was no income tax at all in the years are brand new government needed some way to raise money, but there was no need to mess around with an income tax. The government had a much simpler way just. Tax The stuff that comes into the ports for a long time really the only way that they raised money was using tariff duties duties on imported goods. This is tax historian Joe, thorndike and tariffs are simple. Right? You send out a tax collector told the major ports ship pulls import us go through the manifests, check the cargo and you add up whatever you WANNA tax sugar guns, books simple. But there's one big problem with tariffs they fail you the one time you really really really need revenue tariff duties are great way to raise money as long as you're not fighting a war yet because someone's blocking airport right or sinking your ships on the way. News Yeah. And that that does tend to depress a little bit. So when in the United States do people start to think and talk about an income tax will you know the earliest? In American history that I know of comes during the war of eighteen twelve when the treasury secretary throws it out there it's it's really kind of a throw away in a report that he sends to Congress. You know, hey, we could consider taxing incomes but this suggestion during the war of eighteen twelve, it goes nowhere an income tax is actually a very complicated thing to pull off successfully there are three big obstacles to getting it. Right. The first obstacle is logistics like how do you make sure people pay a percentage of their income? Oh, it's enormously complicated because it really does come down to. The individual, who's filing this return, and that person we're going to expect them to begin with just to keep track of how much they're earning. Then expect a lot of honesty from them about reporting those records to the government and to make sure that they're actually doing the job you didn't have to create this huge administrative apparatus to go in and enforce it, and you have to give these people the power to dig through the personal financial records of every taxpayer, and that's usually pretty unappealing to tax payers and the government is not going to radically reform the tax code unless it has to. Unless, there's something incredibly expensive it needs to fund. This is how a lot of taxes come out. There's a war, and in fact, fifty years after the idea of the income taxes I floated such a war comes to pass the civil war. This is a very, very, very expensive warm Congress needs money to feed its soldiers by guns, cannon ships. So this time, it's not just one guy. Bringing up the income taxes a suggestion this time. Congress makes it law and even more importantly they come up with a way to enforce it Congress provides for the creation of the Bureau of internal. Revenue this is the first real income tax in the United States, but it doesn't look quite like the one we have today during the civil war only the wealthy had to pay income tax. And the government does this really very clever thing to get rich people to pay it. It makes tax returns public during the civil war anyone could go in and look up your income tax return or at least your report of how much you earn and the idea was that this would help improve compliance because your neighbor would see you driving around on your brand new plow and he'd. Say Wait a minute I that guy get all that money I'm going to see how much he reported on his income tax and they'd go in and they check it out and they could report to the agency and say, Hey, you know I. Don't think that this is the right number. This guy looks like he's living too large for this sort of an income they sort of conscripted. And made the tax collector. So who is living large in? Let's say Washington DC in eighteen, sixty four. Well, we pulled up a copy of the tax assessor sheets for DC, during the civil war and there happens to be a guy here Abraham. Lincoln. Address White House at the White House. Everyone knows where it is it's senator and and the taxes he paid I'm sure people were very interested in this one, thousand, two, hundred, ninety dollars. They're also entries here for restaurant owners for liquor dealers some guy lived on longboat may be in the Potomac River. It's clear from this list that people were paying taxes, the plan worked. Well, some people are paying taxes the north part of the country. Remember this is the civil war, the south. Also attempted an income tax attempted they had a much less effective, a tax system and their income tax was much less effective than the North's version. Is there a case to be made? The civil war was sort of an economic battle in the in the north was better at at that and raising money and and that's one reason at one. Oh, absolutely I mean taxes do have a lot to do with the. North. Winning the war. Not just taxes, but the North's ability to borrow money it. It just had a better economic foundation for fighting a big warlike that you know the income tax worked. So well during the war, you would think that the US government would want to keep it around I. Mean it's Nice to have extra money when you're actually rebuilding from the carnage and such but once the conflict ended, there was this big argument about whether to keep the. Income tax round or not, and now the income tax hits its second obstacle a legal obstacle. Remember how he said the income tax only hits the rich. Well, the rich did not like it and the rich have lawyers in eighteen ninety, five legal challenge to the income tax reaches the US Supreme Court here's economic historian John Steele Gordon. My great great uncle was one of the lead lawyers in that case and guess which side he was on. The trying to shoot down the income then you've got. Cable. He was a Morgan partner at five years later. The argument John Steele Gordon great great uncle made in court was that the income tax violated little document that we'd like to call the US Constitution here Ariba line to you. It says quote direct taxes shall be apportioned among the states according to their respective numbers. I will translate that for you if the federal government wants to raise money directly from people or property, then it has to divide the tax burden up equally Among the states according to their population. So if a state had ten percent of America's population, it should only have to pay about ten percent of the tax and the income tax wasn't taxing according to population it was taxing according to income. So the question before the Supreme Court is and as is often the case it's something kind of knowingly subtle and hard to follow. The question is, is the income tax eight direct tax. I stayed up late last night reading court documents. This is a huge rabbit hole of complicated things, but it comes down to this if any part of this income tax law passed by Congress, if any of the many taxes embedded inside considered a direct tax, then Congress did it wrong? The law is unconstitutional. That is the question that justices had to decide a very interesting thing happened in the Supreme Court. One justice was ill evacuate dying Justice Jackson from Tennessee who was argued before eight justices and they split four four as to whether or not the income tax was a direct tax and therefore unconstitutional. That's why we have an odd number of justices. He can't have a tire. Exactly. was. A four four time. The court decided that the case was simply too important to be tied, and so they haul justice Jackson out of his deathbed. Now odd number of justices and everybody knew that he was in favor of the income tax because he'd said. So publicly, Z. Really Dying Jesse really died two months later. So the lawyers re argue the case Justice Robert Jackson is. In the final days of his life is a pro income tax guy. So he's going to break the tie in favor of the income tax and the tie was broken case was decided five four. But the crazy thing is it was five four the other way it was a five four decision against the income tax. One of the other justices we don't know who switched his vote. and. So the tax was unconstitutional. No income tax. How do people reacted the time to this little intrigue Oh they've there would be a there was a lot of. In the papers about it, but the Supreme Court was silent as it so often is to what the internal workings we really don't know who who, really don't know who it but somebody's which their vote we just don't know. So there's this weird stretch in the middle of American history where the income tax has been ruled unconstitutional but this didn't in anyway settled the argument I mean, if anything the debate over income tax in America grew more heated. This is the time when a lot of big industrialists are getting filthy rich JP Morgan, Rockefeller Carnegie, and at this exact time, the nation has no income tax, the people who are not JP Morgan or Rockefeller Carnegie in the country. A lot of them feel those guys the rich need to bear more of the burden. So nearly twenty years after the income tax is ruled unconstitutional, we get an amendment to the Constitution the sixteen, th amendment ratified in nineteen thirteen a single sentence which begins the Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes just in time for another war World War One. So the income tax has cleared to hurdles so far logistics check legality check. The income tax needs one more thing to bring it into the modern age. One More L. Word Love the income tax of to this point has been a tax on the rich right everyone else was exempt in fact when they bring the income tax back after the constitutional amendment, less than two percent of the population has to pay. All this changes though with World War Two, the government needs more money and now ordinary folks are asked to pay again Joe Thorndike this is a is a real revolution because for most Americans, they've never had this kind of direct tax paying relationship with the federal government. You know they're paying excise taxes on alcohol tobacco or consumer goods but those things are are usually levied somewhere other than like on the consumer you know they're levied at the manufacturer level for the first time. Americans are sort of confronting the federal government as a tax collector and the middle. Class has never paid this tax before they not sure what to do a whole in nineteen forty-three show that one third to one half of people were unclear what

Us Supreme Court Congress United States Federal Government Joe Thorndike John Steele Gordon Potomac River Washington Jp Morgan Justice Robert Jackson White House Senator Lincoln Tennessee Justice Jackson
Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:14 sec | 2 months ago

Gold just hit $2,000 an ounce — but that could be a scary sign for the economy

"The price of an ounce of gold is now up to $2000 but analysts say this could be in people are losing confidence in the stock market. Carnegie Mellon Finance professor says people are buying gold during the pandemic has a safe asset, but the price is not

Carnegie Mellon Finance Professor
Using Your Brain Without Thinking

Developer Tea

07:38 min | 2 months ago

Using Your Brain Without Thinking

"What does it mean to use your brain? And how is that different than just thinking? As developers engage in thinking all the time but here's a entirely separate part of our brains that we might be missing out on using. That could be better at solving some of the problems that we face on a day-to-day basis. My Name is Jonathan trailer listening to develop for T and my goal on the show helped driven developers like you find clarity perspective and purpose in their careers. One of the amazing things about the. Human. Brain. Is Its ability to process complex topics. This is why we can write code that is abstracted so many levels. Away, from a physical reality that we have to tangibly think about. We can imagine entire. Kind of universes where we can create stories and. keep track of those stories while we read a book. A book that was written with a bunch of characters that are enough themselves abstractions. These are characters that we may not have ever even seen that specific character that specific size before. But somehow we are able to process all of this information and create meaning out of it. This is an incredible feat and part of our kind of intellectual superiority that we are aware of the domination that we have over the world around us. Has Given us. A somewhat distorted picture of what the brain is actually capable of more importantly where the limits are. And it's very simple to see the limits of your brain and specifically limits that we're gonNA talk about today. If you want to test these limits you can. Try to brute force memorize the first twenty digits of Pi. This isn't a lot of information. It's just twenty digits in after all we can process a lot more. Information than just twenty digits, we can read entire books with thousands of pages and understand them. So what is it about remembering twenty digits? Makes it difficult? Here's another exercising might want to try. that. You've probably faced already in your career, go and look at the features of what say three or four different libraries, popular libraries or three or four different languages and try to decide which one is best. This kind of information that you have to process. It's really difficult to do because the number of variables and that's the critical factor for today's episode, the number of variables that you have to weigh against each other. Can Be really large temper variables. You can imagine for example. That you're trying to deduce which which language should you learn next let's say you're a beginner programmer and maybe you're trying to decide which language to learn. You can use variables like the market size. You can try to quantify how much you enjoy that language or. Even how much you expect to enjoy it in the future, you can imagine you would use measures like the number of available repositories on get hub or get hubs own report of the trends for a given language. How do you decide what trend to use or how far back to look? These are all different questions they you would have to try to answer and then compare between the different languages. And so now you have this very large list of pros and cons and. You sit down and try to look over that information, but this is. Where we hit our limit. Our ability to cognitively process or think about something on purpose. We only have so much capacity to think in parallel. This is critical factor remember again, the number of variables were very good about thinking about one thing. At a time. In fact, most of the advice that you receive on this podcast is an attempt to get you to think about fewer things at any given point in time and reduce the things that you are working on to the simplest form. So you don't have to keep a lot of information in your head. But if you are trying to make a decision complex decision with a lot of variables. There is another part of our brains we can tap into what's interesting is that as knowledge workers, we are paid for using this one specific part of our brain, this prefrontal CORTEX. The part that's responsible for thinking very deeply and thinking very focused manner. But. There's another part of our brains that can help us think more abstractly. And without the same limits of the cognitive processing limits, the would find in the prefrontal CORTEX. Lots of studies. For example, one from Carnegie Mellon support the idea that the rest of our brain is working on the problem. In parallel to us focusing on other things. For example. If you expose yourself to all of the information about the various programming languages that you're considering let's say you have four of them. Then you can go and do something totally unrelated to that. Your going to keep on working on that decision problem. Now, we're not really consciously aware of this and there's no way to become aware of it but once we return to that problem at a later point in time we may have a different sense of clarity and we might even have. We might feel is a gut intuition, but actually it's an intuition that was given to us by that unconscious processing that's happening in the rest of our brain. So. Here's the critical thing to to take away I. We said the the most critical thing is to remember that this has to do with the number of variable. So if you can reduce the number of variables that you're thinking about, then you can actually process those entirely in that prefrontal. CORTEX. For example, if you're working on a math problem, this is a perfect example of processing in the prefrontal. CORTEX. But if you're working on something that requires much more evaluation much further a can of discussion about multiple variables or a comparison between multiple things, and that's not something that you're going to be able to hold in your prefrontal Cortex, the working memory for of a better explanations too small. So the prescription to fix this problem is to expose yourself to the information all the relevant information for making a given decision and then go and do something else. Maybe take a walk give yourself something that's totally unrelated that won't allow your mind drift backing and try to process that information again, on purpose in that intentional and conscious way.

Cortex Carnegie Mellon Programmer
Leon Fleisher: Pianist who battled hand condition dies at 92

BBC World Service

00:57 sec | 2 months ago

Leon Fleisher: Pianist who battled hand condition dies at 92

"Most celebrated pianist Leon Fleisher, has died. He was 92. NPR's Tom Hi Zinger reports that Fleischer's resource will come career spanned more than seven decades. And for much of it, the Penis played on Lee with his left hand land. Fleischer was a child prodigy. He gave his first recital at age eight, debuted at Carnegie Hall with the New York Philharmonic at 16 and released a string of acclaimed albums beginning when he was in his twenties. But it was all over at age 36 when he suddenly lost control over his right hand, Fleischer considered suicide. The only way out of that funk was to realise that music was certainly more than two handed piano playing Leon Fleisher reinvented himself as as a a a left left left handed handed handed player, player, player, a a a teacher teacher teacher and and and a a a conductor. conductor. conductor. Eventually, Eventually, Eventually, after after after treatment, treatment, treatment, he he he resumed resumed resumed playing playing playing with with with both both both hands. hands. hands. He He He was was was awarded awarded awarded a a a Kennedy Kennedy Kennedy Center Center Center honor honor honor in in in 2007. 2007. 2007. Tom Tom Tom Hi Zinka. NPR news.

Fleischer Kennedy Kennedy Kennedy Center Leon Fleisher Tom Tom Tom NPR Carnegie Hall LEE New York Philharmonic
The Story Behind Every Song on Taylor Swift’s folklore

Jared and Katie

03:53 min | 2 months ago

The Story Behind Every Song on Taylor Swift’s folklore

"Right. Another Hollywood news. You know, Taylor Swift surprised us all when she released her album, folklore, and we didn't make it or break it for you. Not so long ago with her brand new single cardigan. And a lot of fans talking about. There's couple rumors around folklore, the album from Taylor Swift fans saying they think that Taylor Swift and her boyfriend, Joe Done Zo reel of the lyrics, and they think that even though Joe Alwyn believe that I say it always was credited with writing under Ah, a pen name, they think that he wrote some of the lyrics, but I guess some of the lyrics are also saying that they have broken up and fans are really upset about it. Same old, same overtime now. Also something else. And this is where you really have to be a major Taylor Swift fan to even know this. But Taylor Swift might have given away the name of Ryan Reynolds and Blake, Lively's third daughter. They welcome their three okay, but the name of their third daughter has not been publicized. In one of Taylor Swift songs. She goes on to talk about it. There are three names Betty I Nez and James. Well, Inez and James are the confirmed names of Blake Lively and Ryan Reynolds daughters. And so now fans are speculating that Betty is the name of the third. Wow, Interesting, Taylor Swift and they are all friends, and they all hang out. And then as She just cement the room or even further. Blake Lively, offered a lot of praise, talking about like you. Folklore is full of heart and soul, humor, passion, intelligence, what she goes on and on and on with every positive and you could say about the album. And so fans quickly noted that the lyrics to the song featured the three names Betty, Inez and James the ladder to being the names of Ryan Reynolds and Blake Lively's Daughters. It's interesting. My wife, Kelly is a huge Taylor Swift fan. When I first met her like, she said, When she goes to bed, she would have a Taylor Swift playlist and she'd go to sleep and were first married. You know, to go to sleep. She'd just hit it and They're so if we go to sleep, listening, Taylor Swift every night she got the new album. She was mad at me. First of all that, you know, we didn't make it or break it for one of the cardigan issue, And I was she was like, Did you notice we have new album like Yeah. Came out two days ago. And she was. Why don't you tell me? I forgot This was so upset. I think she would know that some sort of fan club mailing. Yeah, but she's been working like nonstop. I'm pregnant. All stuff. Everything's been going like seven. She's seriously like under Iraq. She knows nothing going on, even says that And she start listen to us. Listen to the whole thing. It's right. Don't like it. It's a very sound one of the lifeguards over the weekend, said a What's up with your girl? Taylor Swift. You guys think of friends, Sailors just like you know, I just know that you played Taylor's with but she said, Yeah, it's just sad girl music. ISS felt like that. I like sad girl like Adele like where she's you know. Tom Amaro, Where's powerhouses like Wow, It's kind of like Oppressing, which is the type of music with the artist that she worked with her. She collaborated with on this album. People like bony there, I think there's a couple other and that's Their style. That's so you could hear it when you see who she's worked with, you kind of think. Oh, this's what I'm getting. Okay. It's different from any album she's ever done, though, and I didn't listen to all that. We played the card. We played Carnegie Hall Cardigan didn't like it. I mean, this is too slow for me, but I'm biased. I typically don't like most super slow, low energy songs. I know lots people that do, But so I am elicit the rest of it. But Me and Kelly Taylor. Swift could scream and be in agony and in killing that's great. Well, she won't because she's the top singer. You could make the most horrific sound my wife like. That's great now did not like it at all. Listen to the rest of it, and I did not like cardigan. We'll see though We'll

Taylor Swift Kelly Taylor Blake Lively Ryan Reynolds Carnegie Hall Cardigan Betty Inez Joe Alwyn Hollywood James Tom Amaro Iraq Adele
Regis Philbin Was an Entertainer In the Truest Sense

Black and Gold Sunday with Rob Pratte

03:49 min | 2 months ago

Regis Philbin Was an Entertainer In the Truest Sense

"Was talk. Regis Philbin. You know the connection. Our friend Frank Dawson. The loophole Sapporo have Valley Hall of Fame. The coach Lou hold too many others. This was a guy who was larger than life. And as I've been saying all day, and I said it before David Letterman, but I totally agree, he said he is a significance to television as Johnny Carson and this death is as big as the death. Of the Great late night. King of talk shows Johnny Carson as it is to the king of daytime television talk. The man that wrote the book. Regis Philbin, Teddy. Well, you know, we had the honor of having him come to mountaineer and perform at the harbor with Don Rickles and Regis was a heck of a singer and musician. A lot of people didn't really get to see that side of him that often. They saw the talk show entertainer, but he was an incredible entertainer musician. And then when you you matched him with Don Rickles that we had it who we had at Mountaineer three or four times, actually. But, uh, it was just an incredible show, and I got to have dinner with both of them after the show, sitting in LabOne be a great restaurant at Mountaineer. And it was just a thrill. I mean, it was. They brought me back through the Johnny Carson through Frank Sinatra and all of the relations that they had going back throughout the history of really Entertainment in America as we know it today, Post World War two and it was just fascinating. The 88 years old but was probably in great shape. I haven't really seen much of them in the last year, but He loved to work out. He was really just as nice. A man and a person sitting and having dinner just as he was, as you saw on TV, so I have nothing but great things to say about him. And and when you match him with Don Rickles It was just out of control. I mean, they were so funny and great together, you know, and how loyal he was to his friends. Digger has so much meaning our friend Frank Dawson. To promote this region and I alluded to on social media yesterday, did it again today and on the radio First thing this morning, Frank Dawson did amazing things he would actually get introduced in the audience tonight during that television show when it was live being seen locally on Channel four across the country through the Great brand, that is Disney. They formed a partnership of bond there, he would actually come to speak in East Liverpool. He was on the steps of the Carnegie Library downtown across from the alumni building in East Liverpool. And he loved Dean Martin. Obviously, he worked with Joey Bishop for a while, he took. Who wants to be a millionaire into the biggest thing? Maybe since gaming has been permitted in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. I mean, people loved it. It was like a wagering on your favorite team. People gravitated to it. Millions of viewers. It ran them more than one night in prime time and anything that it went up against it beat. This guy was a communicator. But as I mentioned today, Teddy, he could talk just about any subject, and he was also when he had to be a great serious interviewer to so Regis Philbin may have seemed like the kid next door, but he really was a heavyweight in this business. Absolutely. Buddy was like the kid next door. He was like your next door neighbor and you sat down with him and just like people got the CM on Regis and Kathie Lee, how he was able to just talk with anybody about anything sports. He knew everything about sports. Entertainment. He knew everything about entertainment. You get into a Wall Street, you know about Wall Street in things that were going he was, and actually an aficionado of of the market. So It was just it was just fun to be with him. Hey, how

Regis Philbin Don Rickles Johnny Carson Frank Dawson Frank Sinatra Mountaineer David Letterman Teddy Sapporo Have Valley Hall Of Fa East Liverpool Dean Martin Joey Bishop Kathie Lee LOU Carnegie Library Digger Disney Pennsylvania America
Saudi King Is Said to Have Successful Gallbladder Surgery

PRI's The World

05:08 min | 2 months ago

Saudi King Is Said to Have Successful Gallbladder Surgery

"Moving onto Saudi Arabia. King Salman is spending some time in the hospital there this week Saudi state media report he had surgery to remove his gallbladder, and it was successful nothing life threatening, but whenever an eighty four year old national leader is hospitalized for whatever reason it raises questions for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Those questions about what a possible succession might look like the World Sharon Jafari reports the modern day kingdom of Saudi. Arabia was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, two, and since. Since, then it's been ruled by the same royal family succession has mostly gone from father to son or brother to brother eighty four year old King Solomon took over from his brother into fifteen. Joseph Russell was the US ambassador to Saudi Arabia back then. Oh, yes, I got to know him very while this describes Kim Samoan as educated Matt. It says the king loves to read to his grandchildren so whenever he went back to New York while says he would buy books as gifts for some on. In the old culture of Saudi culture books never had pictures. That's because the ultra conservatives in the kingdom considered images to be un-islamic, so made sure I brought books a lot pictures. One time was false, as he brought by another bound copy of one thousand and One Nights, a collection of middle. Eastern folktales, and the king loved it. At the opportunity to work with online, I grew very fond of him, but while Kingston Mon- might be the most powerful official in Saudi Arabia. It's his son. Crown Prince Mohammad Bin, Salman who runs the kingdom on a day to day basis. NBS known is next in line to the throne. Nowadays, the process of succession is overseen by a special group of authorities yes-men. Faruk is with Carnegie in. For International, peace in Washington, the previous king had established what they call the allegiance council, which is basically a counseled from the surviving sons of the funder for NPS to become kings. She says this council would initiate a process for members of the royal family to pledge allegiance to the new king, but right now there's a problem. The Allegiance Council doesn't have had the last one died, and I think the position has been vacant for over two years now and one member at least of the allegiance council is under arrest Prince Amit faulk says NBA has been controversial figure since they want his made it his mission to consolidate power and supply line any potential competitor. Nabil Nura an expert on Gulf affairs says MP's has arrested an intimidate viable members of the royal family also rounded up hundreds of businessmen and activists. He was to show that he is the guy for the position, and he wants to make sure that there are no challenges in his way to the throne occupied. Was it all after. that. The king went to the hospital state TV showed him holding a cabinet meeting from there. That's to show that the king is alive and well, and still in charge, but nobody says it's an open secret that MBA's is actively pushing to become king while his father is still around. Why well a number of things one of them is related to the US actually Hamad bin. Salman wants to make sure that he ascends the throne while president. Trump is personally that states trump has been supportive of the crown. Prince says it's not clear if joe. Biden would do the same besides the American election does also the G. Twenty summit in November. It could be a critical moment for MBA's to show that he is in charge. And some people from the Royal Family might not be happy with Hamad bin Salman, being king, so hammered. This might ascend the throne while his father is still alive to make sure that everything goes smoothly. So where does all this leave the US? Saudi relations Yes menfolk says NBA is a controversial figure in Washington DC. She says it's not internal policies that have raised eyebrows NBA has has been the war in Yemen and according to the CIA or did. Did the kidding of Washington Post columnist Jamal and unfortunately like many things inside Washington there is polarization and the debate is very much politicized, but let me tell you that the concern, the uncertainty about the rule of Mohammad Bin, Salman is certainly bipartisan. People differ on what to do about it, folks. Some things have not changed Saudi Arabia remains a key player in the global oil market and president. Trump has boasted about selling weapons to the king. Now with the possibility of political transition in both countries on the horizon, there are big questions about the future of the relationship between the two longtime allies.

Saudi Arabia King Salman Crown Prince Mohammad Bin NBA King Solomon Royal Family Allegiance Council Donald Trump United States Nabil Nura Washington Dc Joseph Russell President Trump Sharon Jafari Prince Amit Faulk Washington Post Hamad Bin Mohammad Bin NBS Washington
Brooklyn residents march against violence after shootings in New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 2 months ago

Brooklyn residents march against violence after shootings in New York

"Involvement in Brooklyn this weekend in an effort to head off gun violence, Mayor De Blasio says extra police patrols will be on hand when community groups hold peace marches this weekend. And Crown Heights in bed Stuy. His honor says This is a new way to fight crime. Some of the efforts of the anti crime unit unfortunately mirrored some of the reality we saw would stop and frisk. Brooklyn Council member Robert Carnegie says anti violence programs are also set to include alternatives and a commitment to communicate that making sure that we're consistent. And have sustainable messages around employment around affordable housing. Seven hot spots throughout the city will have organized rallies to take back their blocks. Juliet Papa 10 10

Mayor De Blasio Brooklyn Brooklyn Council Juliet Papa Crown Heights Stuy Robert Carnegie
New York City Mayor de Blasio announces Central Brooklyn Violence Prevention plan

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:09 min | 2 months ago

New York City Mayor de Blasio announces Central Brooklyn Violence Prevention plan

"NYPD chief of department expressed concerns about the rise in gun crimes in our fair city, playing it at the feet of recent moves to defund the police. And the removal of a unit whose job it was to remove illegal weapons while the mayor signed into law that so called so called bill today, part of the police reform, so that continues, But earlier, the mayor announced steps designed to combat gun violence, deploying more officers and mobilizing people in the communities where they tread is Juliet Papa, There will be peace marches where civilians and clergy will own the neighborhoods. Seven areas have been identified. Brooklyn Council member Robert Carnegie says Crown Heights in Bed Stuy will benefit from additional resources so we intend to wear those hospitals are located to provide long term sustainable services. Like jobs. Plus Mayor de Blasio was discussing with police Commissioner Dermot Shea, a strategy that replaces the efforts of the disbanded anti crime unit. It's taking the same officers and their abilities. And applying them in a way that really pinpoints the focus on where the crime is, He says. This is now a combination effort and community based focus to fighting crime.

Commissioner Dermot Shea Mayor De Blasio Juliet Papa Nypd Bed Stuy Robert Carnegie Brooklyn Council
"carnegie" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:37 min | 7 months ago

"carnegie" Discussed on KGO 810

"Globe I want to Carnegie Foundation grant in my junior year of college that entitled me to go to any place in the country they gave out twenty of them in disciplines that were ninety five percent male covering the NFL for the globe the credential it said no women or children in press box professor was there now working forty five years in the business thirty at CBS with even a first here at Westwood One the first woman and an NFL booth as an analyst by the time I went to CVS and covered the Olympics are covered ten levels and ten final fours on NBA finals Super Bowl being a first presented it challenges players or coach or somebody would hit on me I would always say now your mother didn't teach you to talk like that still working in sports Fisher looks forward to mentoring saying the three elements for anyone to succeed passion knowledge and stamina whatever it is you want to do I am the example that you can do it because it did not exist when I started so I say dream big pharma sept eleven till now concerns surrounding the spread of coronavirus of left many employees at entertainment venues temporarily without work correspondent Clayton Neville says members of the NBA community are stepping in to help out Dallas Mavericks owner mark Cuban said shortly after NBA games were suspended that he would take care of a redeploy eats I reached out to the folks at the arena and our folks at the maps to find out you know what it would cost to support financially support people who are going to be able to come to work you've been living up to its promise pledging to pay the arena workers for the games Mr over the next thirty days they get paid by the hour and and this is the source of income and so we'll do some things there we may ask them to go do some volunteer work in exchange the shark tank mogul says he understands the gravity of what the country is dealing with this is people's lives at stake this isn't about basketball this isn't about the Mavericks this isn't about when do we start or do we start or how do we start for the team practice continued we told them to be very vigilant that this is not a situation where the seasons ended go do what you're going to do others following Cubans lead the Golden State Warriors announced they would donate a million dollars in disaster relief to assist chase center employees the Brooklyn nets putting a plan in place to help out Barclay center staff and Cleveland Cavaliers star Kevin love taking it upon himself to donate one hundred thousand dollars to an hourly staff quite nimble Dallas nine till Robert workman has sports still no stores or sporting events but football stepped into the spotlight over the weekend six months before the season starts to think of it as a really long pregame show like you get for the Superbowl the players voted to approve the new collective bargaining agreement which means labor peace for the NFL for a decade the vote was close just a three percent separation but a simple majority was all that was necessary there read it means expanding the playoffs from twelve to fourteen teams as early as next season and adding a seventeen game to the regular season schedule as soon as twenty twenty one that extra game that may wind up being played at a neutral site either domestically or overseas the CBA also means a larger salary cap one hundred ninety eight point two million dollars for the upcoming season and that's timely since today is the deadline for teams to use either the franchise or transition tag on their potential free agents teams have exclusive negotiating rights with their players through noon eastern today after which players can talk to any team with signings beginning on Wednesday if they had the power of the new CBA teams could have used both the transition tag and the franchise tag which will come in handy in say Dallas for they have dak Prescott and Amari Cooper both ready to test the free agent waters a couple of players took advantage of the new numbers over the weekend Ryan Tannehill re up with the Titans getting a big four year deal as a reward for getting them to the AFC title game over the winter and the raven sent a fifth round draft pick to the Jaguars board of incidentally is Campbell he not only made the Pro Bowl this past year he won the Walter Payton award as the most of the though as as one of a fine upstanding human being he's expected to sign a contract extension NASCAR had planned a reason front of empty seats over the weekend but they change their mind on Friday cancelling the races in Atlanta yesterday and next week in Miami the new plan has racing resuming on March twenty ninth in Texas another change came in on Friday the PGA postponing the masters they canceled everything up to the masters which is scheduled to start on April ninth now it'll be rescheduled but sometime we just don't know when they're going to be playing the tradition like no other that's Monday sports all right it is seven till.

Carnegie Foundation
"carnegie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Noblesse oblige been lots of pledges notably from the fashion multinational LVMH, the family two hundred million euros, the Pino family, very rich family in Frantz false while only Pino a hundred million euros. He says he wants to revive the jewel of our heritage a billion dollars pledged within days private wealth for public good, a pure expression of the downstream benefits of capitalism. But also as it turns out, a pretty good window into its costs within hours of his bosses pledged to give John jock Lagaan director of the Pinault collection tweeted, a call to the French government the money, given by French. Residences two-thirds tax deductible. Some people are saying the deduction should be increased in ninety percent. Ninety percent tax break, of course, essentially transfers the cost of philanthropy to the government, which is to say to the taxpayer yet, the credit and acclaim general burnish -ment of reputation all accrue to the givers. The history of philanthropy is the history of rich people basking in perpetual glory for their generosity often in gilded institutions bearing their names. But obscuring how they got rich in the first place. We recall Carnegie Hall Carnegie Mellon University. Carnegie libraries, Andrew Carnegie robber, baron. Not so much kind of foolproof, or at least it was consider. Now, the Sackler lers the family that controls Purdue pharmaceuticals white scraps of paper swirled through the Guggenheim museum last night as part of the stage protest against the drug.

Carnegie Hall Carnegie Mellon Andrew Carnegie Frantz Carnegie French government LVMH John jock Lagaan Pino Guggenheim museum Sackler Purdue pharmaceuticals director Pinault billion dollars Ninety percent ninety percent
"carnegie" Discussed on Overdue

Overdue

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Overdue

"I guess that except that the way you pitched it out awful, the your pitch which opened with the word PowerPoint was bad. And so I'm already feeling like maybe you didn't take the point away from this possible. So he'd Carnegie didn't end up actually becoming a Gitai lecture. But I think that he wanted to this was like his great dream speaks speaks to his personality and his desire and approach a little bit. So what he actually did after he quit his sales job was he tried to become an actor. Didn't couldn't do that failed at that. And desperate a little desperate for money. He started teaching a course at the Y about public speaking. And he did not have enough material for verse course, and so-. Improvising. During one of his I think is I lectured, though, this this this has the feeling of like an apocryphal bit of myth making going on. Yeah. But apparently. He improvise any asks he started asking people who were there to talk to describe something that made them angry found that this method made people a little less nervous and a little more open to speaking in public and then things took off from there. I have run that exercise. I have run. Hey, talk about yourself or two minutes and people like clam up, and then I have run. Now talk about some that makes you mad for two minutes and people can't shut up 'cause stuffed makes people mad and stuff makes me nobody. I'm mad right now people are like uncomfortable going on about themselves for that long. So they like, and they don't think about themselves that way, but very eas- easier. Anyway to think about a thing outside of yourself that just you off well, and then sometimes sometimes people in like people will it'll be like a Seinfeld like a standup you like, oh, do you know the deal with p? Who drive bad and everyone would be like, yeah. I know the deal with people like that. And it breaks the group open civilized builds community through collective anger through. So it sounds like he was very successful. Dale Carnegie was he was a pretty successful guy. So there are a few collections of his of his writings avenue before this. There was one called a public speaking a practical course for business men do to or in nineteen twenty six. Hello. I am a businessman breaking into two words whole areas to me..

Dale Carnegie two minutes
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Those who may suffer from accidents and provide small pensions for those needing help in old age. This was actually the first of its kind the influence of his father and all those that encouraged him during his lifetime pushed Andrew to create as many libraries as possible after creating a public library back in his hometown of done firm Lynn and one in allegany. He went on to create an entire public library system in Pittsburgh. Eventually, he helped to build nearly three thousand public libraries throughout the country. In addition to the Carnegie relief fund, he also created the Carnegie done firm Lynn trust. The Carnegie trust for the universities of Scotland and Manhattan's music hall, which we know today as Carnegie Hall, you may know of his most famous school now known as Carnegie Mellon University. It originally started as a trade school in nineteen hundred after Andrew donated a huge sum for the schools engineering program, it became Carnegie tech in nineteen to he founded the Carnegie institution to fund scientific research and established a pension fund for teachers with a ten million dollar donation. He'd made the transition from industrialised tycoon to a philanthropic madman, but his philanthropic efforts, though they were huge, might not have been his biggest achievement. Andrew was the first to call for a league of nations and later established the Carnegie Endowment for international peace in nineteen ten to hasten the abolition of war. He funded the building of the Hague palace of peace in the Netherlands, which now houses the world court. The court was created to end World War One award that deeply disturbed Andrew along time, pacifist during the last year of his life. Andrew was bedridden and plagued with influenza. He lived comfortably in a six storey block long mansion, but his health was fading fast. It was time to close an old wound before it was too late. Andrew summoned his longtime secretary, James bridge to give a message to Andrews former partner in crime. Henry Frick the two hadn't spoken in over twenty years in his message to Frick Andrew requested that the two of them in their old age air their grievances and make up for everything they done to each other freak wasn't buying it in fricks infamous words. He told bridge quote, yes, you can tell Carnegie, I'll meet him, tell him. I'll see him in hell where we both are going even if he couldn't make amends. On a personal level, he was able to see his country Megan. Men's on an international one, even though his efforts against the war were in vain. Andrew lived long enough to witness the treaty of or Cy and the end of World War One on June twenty eighth nineteen nineteen. Just two months later on August eleventh, Andrew died from pneumonia complications. He was eighty one years old. He'd given away over three hundred fifty million dollars the equivalent of over seventy six billion dollars. Now, despite his best efforts, he wasn't able to give away all of his money. But his wife Louise went on to live another twenty seven years in kept making donations. He left his wife, small cash gift, their Manhattan townhouse and Skibo castle in Scotland. He left his daughter of small trust and walled. This probably allowed them to live comfortably. The eventually had to sell their town home. Andrew Carnegie left the world with a mixed legacy. He rebuilt America and helped usher in the industrial revolution, but he did so on the backs of underpaid labourers. He gave most of his money away to found institutions that would help give people the tools they needed to succeed. But only after his factories had left countless men dead through careless accidents and by gunfire. What he did leave behind is noise inspiring. But the idea of the innovative philanthropic billionaire continues to resonate today with both the good and the ill that come with it and Andrew Carnegie was for better or for worse. The blueprint for that archetype. There are many buildings. Many institutions, many companies, and even a city that continued to bear his name today that is money. He could have decided to hoard within his family passing down that wealth through the generations. If nothing else we are lucky then that Andrew truly believed a man who dies rich, dies, disgraced. Thank

Frick Andrew Andrew Carnegie Carnegie relief fund Carnegie Endowment Carnegie Hall Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie institution Carnegie Lynn Lynn trust Henry Frick world court Manhattan Pittsburgh Scotland allegany Hague palace of peace Skibo castle pneumonia
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"He renamed his business Carnegie steel. Their profits had risen to upwards of forty million dollars per year over one billion dollars today, and they were still growing his partner. Henry clay fricks shady business practices continued to make them both very rich intercity wanted to retire and spend all of his earnings charitably, but it didn't look like he was going to start that anytime soon. And then one of the deadliest strikes in American history happened at his homestead factory in eighteen ninety two while Andrew was away in Scotland with Louise Frick faced more labor negotiations this time from the amalgamated association of. Iron and steel workers. One of the most powerful unions at the time. If Andrew was at least diplomatic in his treatment of factory workers. Frick was the opposite. He was only concerned with stepping up his production demands, which made matters worse for laborers letter correspondence between Frick and Andrew in the months leading up to the strike. And even through the strike showed that Andrew supported Frick though he would later deny this on may. Fourth eighteen ninety two about two months before the homestead strike Andrew wrote to Frick quote. One thing we're all sure of no contest will be entered in that will fail. It will be harder this time at homestead. On the other hand, your reputation will shorten it so that I really do not believe it will be much of a struggle. We all approve of anything. You do not stopping short of approval of a contest. We are with you to the end and quote. So the laborers refused to. Except the conditions and refuse to work until their demands were met, namely higher wages, Andrew suggested shutting down the plant guaranteeing his labors that they would still have their positions. If they could come to an agreement. Frick had a different idea when the laborers refused to comply Frick shut down the homestead plant and went the extra step in firing, all the union laborers on July. Second eighteen ninety two. He opted to hire new nonunion workers instead in retaliation on July sixth, the fired union Labor's decided to hold a strike, but Frick got wind of the plan and hired three hundred Pinkerton guards to help protect the plants. Pinkerton guards were the first private investigation firm an America. The Pinkerton agency made its name by going after outlaws such as Jesse James and providing private security for railroads. On July.

Louise Frick Andrew Pinkerton Henry clay partner union Labor Jesse James nonunion Scotland America forty million dollars one billion dollars two months
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"And now back to historical figures. It said that at the start of the American civil war in eighteen sixty one twenty six year old, Andrew Carnegie was actually drafted to fight for the union, but he never went. Rumor has it that Andrew payday poor Irish immigrant, eight hundred fifty dollars to take his place. Although Andrew wasn't exactly on the front lines. He had a pretty dangerous job army engineers and saboteurs would attack telegraph lines to stop communication between enemy soldiers and their bases like an old school version of cyber warfare if align went down, Andrew would have to go out to the site and fix the problem so that communication could get back up and running. They also had to run trains to evacuate wounded or seriously endangered union soldiers injure. Notice the wood rail and bridge infrastructure in America was quickly deteriorating. Having seen bridges built with iron on his trips to Altuna. Andrew proposed replace bridges and rail lines with iron. Before the old wooden infrastructure became too dangerous for travel. So in eighteen sixty five the same year, the civil war ended thirty year old Andrew decided to retire from the railroad business and go into the iron business with the help and blessings from Mr.. Scott to start the company, Andrew secured investments from a few as well to do friends, the five of them all contributed around twelve hundred and fifty dollars so that Andrew could start the keystone bridge company in eighteen sixty five. His initial focus was on replacing old wooden bridge in train rails with iron. However, keystone also built its own bridges and its reputation grew quickly by year three. Keystone was the go-to bridge building company in America and would later be known for building the EADS bridge in Saint Louis..

Andrew Carnegie keystone bridge company EADS bridge keystone America Altuna Saint Louis Scott eighteen sixty one twenty six eight hundred fifty dollars fifty dollars thirty year
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Ship was miserable and cramped. The little privacy afforded to passengers as many were forced to share cots in eighteen forty eight. The railroad system in America was still a work in progress. So the journey from New York to Pittsburgh was another arduous, one from New York. The Carnegie's took a boat to buffalo and another boat to Cleveland. Finally, they took a steamboat from own. Ohio to Pittsburgh by a canal on the way to Pittsburgh the Carnegie's experienced their first encounter with mosquitoes. Andrew noted that his mother was bitten so badly that by the morning, she wasn't able to open her eyes. However, in the end, it was all worth it. The Carnegie family had finally made it to the promised land, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Except Pittsburgh didn't look too much like a promised land on eighteen forties. Pittsburgh was a manufacturing town filled with dangerous factories with terrible working conditions. These factories constantly spewed ash and soot into the air which left a film of dust on everything, including residents, lungs homes, and water supply. And this was a far cry from the twelve year. Old Andrews picturesque home in Scotland, after weeks of uncomfortable travel and mosquitoes. The Carnegie's anxiously settled into their new lives in Pittsburgh. They lived in two rooms above the small Weaver shop that Andrew's uncle HOGAN had built. His family came to America with nothing so Andrews immediate focus was to figure out a way to help his family survive. This father tried to revive uncle, Hogan's, weaving business. But as Andrew said, quote, the results were meager. His. Mother ran a small enterprise repairing shoes, but it didn't earn enough Andrew's father realized he wouldn't be able to make a sustainable living and began working at a cotton factory. Thirteen year old. Andrew, joined his father in the cotton factory as a bobbin..

Pittsburgh Andrew Carnegie uncle HOGAN America New York Old Andrews Cleveland Pennsylvania Ohio Scotland Thirteen year twelve year
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Embroidery in the hague for the permanent court of arbitration and that was one point five million dollars in funding that was given by carnegie to build what was called the peace palace and the foundation continues that buildings maintenance to this day there are many more such institutions funded by andrew carnegie and as we mentioned in the catholic chadwick episode you've probably seen a building or a school or a library that he funded after he retired from business to pursue philanthropy as the second career carnegie began writing his recollections of his youth and his rise to wealth from poverty in the forward to his autobiography which was published in nineteen twenty his wife louise wrote of their time in scotland when world war two broke out quote he delighted in going back to those early times as he wrote he lived them all over again he was thus engaged in july nineteen fourteen when the war clouds began together and when the fateful news of the fourth of august reached us we immediately left our retreat in the hills and return to skibo to be more in touch with the situation these memoirs ended at that time world where would was hugely upsetting to andrew carnegie he had been so focused on the idea of world peace that it was a jarring shock to see this conflict unfold carnegie was willing to put his remaining fortune to work to try to end the war he would have offered kaiser ville.

andrew carnegie louise scotland kaiser ville chadwick skibo five million dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"He had written a popular book titled the gospel of wealth in which he wrote about the duty that wealthy men have to better the lives of people with less and he was intent on living up to that writing he focused on giving money away in ways that we're enriching and would have lasting impact yeah he was he did not just want to hand people money he wanted to figure out how he could build something into the world that would keep people enrich longterm and as part of his philanthropic efforts he built a library in a concert hall in homestead pennsylvania and he said up retirement funding for the workmen under the andrew carnegie relief fund writing that it was quote as an acknowledgement of the deep debt which i o the workman who have contributed so greatly to my success he funded nearly three thousand libraries than united states and abroad the library where i get most of my materials for this podcast is in fact a carnegie library gary he felt that with access to knowledge and a desire to learn anyone could become educated even outside of the formal education structures yes since that was really how he had become educated and become a successful person he thought like i want to give that avenue to everyone who might want it but he also funded many actual formal institutes of higher learning so carnegie mellon university is the modern day outgrowth of a two million dollar endowment that andrew carnegie established in one thousand nine hundred to set up technical schools in the pittsburgh area in one thousand nine hundred two he founded the carnegie institution of washington with twenty two million dollars all allocated towards scientific discovery and in two thousand seven this organization became the carnegie institution for science the carnegie corporation of new york was formed in one thousand nine eleven to give away the remainder of the carnegie fortune and that entity remains and continues to fund trusts in educational institutions the carnegie council for ethics and international affairs was initially named the church peace union and it was established in nineteen fourteen with a two million dollar endowment with the goal of finding alternatives to war the carnegie foundation was established to build a courthouse and the line.

pennsylvania united states carnegie corporation new york church peace union carnegie foundation andrew carnegie carnegie library carnegie mellon university pittsburgh carnegie institution of washin two million dollar twenty two million dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"J p morgan offered to buy carnegie out that year and after thinking the matter over andrew carnegie decided that it wasn't he'd time to leave business and begin philanthropy and ernest he had been doing philanthropic works prior to that but he decided that was kind of going to be a second career and so he wrote down his asking price just on a little slip of paper and he had an employee of his hand deliver it morgan made no counter offer but immediately accepted the deal and bart and bought carnegie steel for four hundred and eighty million dollars of that sum carnegie walked away with two hundred and fifty million dollars the portion that went to carnegie has been estimated and a modern values somewhere between four and five billion dollars yeah and that's one of those things sometimes you'll see it reported a little bit in a confusing way because since there are two figures involved there that four hundred eighty million purchase price versus the two hundred and fifty million that was carnegie's out of that deal you'll sometimes see one or the other just reported on its own so i wanted to make sure we included both of those for clarity and right in the midst of this allowed by the way was the time that cassie chadwick was fading to be carnegie's daughter any massive fraud scheme and since andrew carnegie never really knew anything about that until it came too late during chadwick's arrest and her trial which he did attend it didn't really impact his life it was not something he really thought a whole lot about other than being a lump kind of amused about it but i wanted to contextual is it on the timeline since that previous episode about cassi does mention carnegie andrew carnegie's spent the rest of his life trying to give away all his money in eighteen ninety two years before the homestead strike.

p morgan cassie chadwick andrew carnegie bart carnegie fraud eighteen ninety two years eighty million dollars fifty million dollars five billion dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Mrs and they risked being attacked on the street if they actually left the mill an armed organized attack on the fifty black families who had moved in to find work during the strike resulted in multiple injuries some of them very serious the violence that started with the pinkerton arrival in july eighteen ninety two finally came to an end in november after the union gave up strike leaders were charged with murder and additional charges were leveled at one hundred sixty of the strikers but none of the men were convicted of their crimes in initially carnegie who had experienced the worst of this stuff going on while he was across the atlantic ocean kind of saw the union giving in as a victory he was at that point able to increase the length of the work day and co wages as the mill reorganized poststrike to become more profitable but he soon felt regret over what had happened and particularly over how he had handled things and a letter to william glad tone carnegie wrote quote such a foolish step contrary to my ideals repugnance every feeling of my nature our firm offered all it could offer even generous terms are other men had gratefully accepted them they went as far as i could have wished but the false step was made and trying to run the homestead works with new men that is a test to which working men should not be subjected does expecting too much of poor men to stand by and see their work taken by others the pain i suffer increases daily the works are not worth one drop of human blood i wish they had sunk yeah he really really pretty much for the rest of his life regretted that whole thing and his part in it well and he's also like simultaneously.

murder carnegie poststrike william mill
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In eighteen ninety to another conflict between mill workers at the carnegie owned homestead steel mill and the management resulted in a deadly conflict that contradicted the image of carnegie as a worker's rights advocate the steelworkers employed by carnegie and frick faced incredibly dangerous working conditions for very poor pay two years earlier in eighteen ninety steel revenues had started to the klein and then in eighteen ninety two henry frick slashed workers pay and set out to break the steelworkers union and andrew carnegie was not blameless in this conflict for one thing in anticipation of the union contract expiring kerr negi had told frick to increase production so that they would have the leverage to shut down the plant if the workers didn't accept the new terms without losing any ground in their production schedule carnegie was in great britain is all this was playing out and he sent we're defray that he supported frick in whatever he chose to do due frick emboldened by the statement severely reduced the workers wages and the workers who went invested so much time and labour in increasing the mills revenue even some of them experiencing terrible accidents in the process we're not willing to back down frick declared that he would not negotiate with the union and he would only talk to individual workers the dissolution of the union was the point in the negotiations that just could not be resolved even after all the others were and then frick closed down the mill and locked all the workers out yet this plane it was kind of like one of those situations where you know there's a company that people have been part of for a long time and they feel like.

carnegie klein henry frick steelworkers union kerr negi britain andrew carnegie mill eighteen ninety two henry two years
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Yeah it was very it kind of suggested that the the united states had become the the next step kind of in evolution of of great britain society like in going out in colonizing they had kind of gotten to that next level in his opinion carnegie lost both his brother and his mother in a very short period of time thomas died in october eighteen eighty six from pneumonia that he had initially thought was just a cold and the following month margaret carnegie died also from pneumonia she had already been quite ill when thomas who was living in georgia at the time died and nobody actually told her of her younger sons passing for fear of upsetting her while she was so ill similarly when margaret died andrew was sick with typhoid and his mother's death was not immediately related to him they actually lowered her coffin out of a bedroom window so he would not see it passing in the hallway after margaret carnegie died it removed that obstacle that had kept andrew in louise from beginning a life together but the couple waited to announce their plans to marry out of respect for margaret and because andrew was still quite sick for a while but as he later wrote quote i recovered slowly in the future began to occupy my thoughts there was only one ray of hope and comfort in it that comfort of course was the weeds and while andrew had spent time with women it was more apparent to him than ever that she was the one he wanted to spend his life with and their engagement had been on again off again it wasn't like they were two people so passionately in love that they were like anything we'll get through anything for example when he wrote her that letter it was like it's pretty much all about our moms that was kind of like a doesn't rica down period.

united states thomas margaret carnegie pneumonia georgia typhoid britain andrew
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And by the time the war ended andrew carnegie had come to the realization that the iron industry had great potential and in a surprising move he left the pennsylvania railroad and he started a new company in eighteen sixty five called the keystone bridge company keystones entire business was upgrading existing wooden bridges to start sturdier iron structures and this proved to be extremely lucrative just a few years into it he had made himself wealthy in eighteen sixty seven he started the keystone telegraph company which cuts such a lucrative deal with the pennsylvania railroad to run telegraph wire on the railroads polls that carnegie and his partners were able to flip the business and triple their money in a very short period of time has estimated worth in eighteen sixty eight was four hundred thousand dollars so caveat it is always really tricky to convert historical worth into modern value but a rough estimate is that this was about five million dollars he was only thirty three yeah and i did want to point out that you know he was making these deals still with the pennsylvania railroad so even though he had left he really left on good terms and maintained business dealings with them for a long time that were always quite positive and riding high on his string of successes andrew carnegie decided that he was only going to give business two more years before turning to a life of philanthropy he wrote this plan out in a letter to himself in eighteen sixty eight and he had calculated out that he could live comfortably off the money he had made by allocating himself fifty thousand dollars each year and then using the rest of the money to benefit causes that he believed in but in eighteen seventy he wasn't quite ready to say goodbye it's all these various industries that same year he also met a young woman named louise whitfield through a mutual friend andrew became social with the whitfield family.

andrew carnegie louise whitfield whitfield family pennsylvania keystone bridge company four hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars five million dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"He was making five thousand dollars a year from his investment which is so much more than he had been earning from his railroad income he was also promoted to railroad superintendent in eighteen fifty nine and he used his increased income to move himself and his mother ensue nicer home yeah there's an interesting thing that plays out over and over where he starts making more and more and more money on investments but for quite a while he actually still kept his much lower paying job which is kind of interesting to me when the civil war began thomas scott his boss was hired by the union to manage transportation of its troops was pretty natural sincere in a railroad that they were like hey why don't why don't you run a similar set set up for us carnegie was also hired he was working alongside his boss is part of the war effort in meanwhile his earnings from that sleeping car company investment went toward a new business venture he invested eleven thousand dollars in oil in eighteen sixty one and he almost doubled his money in the first year i think he he took in something like eighteen thousand dollars from there he began diversifying his investments further and soon he was earning more than forty thousand dollars a year from them that was a massive sum in the eighteen sixties andrew carnegie was drafted in eighteen sixty four but he didn't wind up serving as part of the draft terms he had the option to pay a sum of three hundred dollars or find a replacement to serve in his stead so he opted to pay another man eight hundred fifty dollars to feel to fill his slot.

superintendent thomas scott andrew carnegie eight hundred fifty dollars eighteen thousand dollars eleven thousand dollars forty thousand dollars five thousand dollars three hundred dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"As a messenger andrew would sweep the office in the morning before the telegraph operators arrived and one morning he actually took a message that came through when no operators had yet begun their shift and he did a good enough job that the operators started asking him to keep an eye on the telegraph when they needed to step away he eventually learned to take messages by ear so without the help of a running slip of paper to print the message out he would just write it down as he heard it a significant promotion followed when he subbed in for another operator on a two week trial because people realize he was actually quite good at this and he was soon given the title of assistant operator and he was making twenty five dollars a month while working for the telegraph office andrew meta man named thomas a scott at the time scott was superintendent of the pennsylvania railroad scott noticed how diligent and driven the young carnegie was made him an offer to leave the telegraph office and become scott's private secretary and also run his personal telegraph machine carnegie was offered thirty five dollars a month into him that seemed like a fortune so he took this job and started learning about the railroad industry kernigan he was once again doing really well because he carried that same work ethic into every position he had and he was making a name for himself at the pennsylvania railroad but his father in the meantime had not met with success in the united states after struggling to make enough money through weaving jobs william carnegie made a stab at entrepreneurship and he tried manufacturing his own cloth and then selling it as a traveling salesman but that really never took off william died in eighteen fifty five when andrew was twenty in that left the eldest son as the primary breadwinner in the family a year after william's death andrew started to expand out his business efforts he invested in the woodruff sleeping car company with a loan and it paid off sooner.

scott superintendent carnegie secretary pennsylvania railroad united states salesman andrew woodruff thomas william carnegie thirty five dollars twenty five dollars two week
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"But then famously and what he's probably most known for today is the fact that he decided that the most important thing that he could do with his millions and millions and millions of dollars was to give it all away down one of the things that's really interesting to me about him today you will hear a lot of people talk about wealth disparity as a problem and he had he had no issues whatsoever with wealth disparity he was like just sort of thought that was how it's life's going to be is no problem with that but the people that had all the wealth should be doing useful things with it which to me is an interesting point of view yeah andrew carnegie was born on november twenty fifth eighteen thirty five in dunfermline scotland as father william was a weaver and unfair lynn had been known for quite some time for beautiful linen and particularly for its damask linen william struggled in his trade as industrialization became more and more common and hand loomed goods couldn't keep up as steam powered looms became more and more popular the family really struggled to make ends meet but william was obstinate that he wanted to remain a weaver even though he couldn't really support his family doing that and as a charter i william carnegie believed that the way to make change was to get working men elected into parliament so that they could make change at the legislative level that would help working men like him if you're not familiar with the term chart as that sort of sums up the whole thing it was a national working class effort at parliamentary reform so william and his brotherinlaw tom morrison both were committed to the chartered 'cause they were organizing strikes they were writing for charter publications and meanwhile andrew's mother margaret morrison carnegie stepped up by taking work mending shoes and renting a small grocery to try to keep the family afloat seeing as parents struggle and also living in poverty as a child deeply impacted the young andrew.

scotland william tom morrison margaret morrison carnegie andrew carnegie dunfermline william carnegie twenty fifth