35 Burst results for "Carnegie Mellon University"

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:20 min | 2 weeks ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | 3 weeks ago

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and They had great idea concept. Basically, it's how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Dr Tony Manual Peri Assistant Professor Carnegie Mellon University Austin Dr Manual Texas Austin Texas Sal Marquez Dynamic Lights Carnegie Mellon University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School United States Department Of Surgery Vanderbilt Duke
Ivy League suspends fall sports due to coronavirus pandemic

Total Information PM

00:26 sec | Last month

Ivy League suspends fall sports due to coronavirus pandemic

"League schools announced today they will not have any sports in the upcoming months. The eight prestigious Ivy League schools have cancelled all fall sports because of the covert 19 pandemic. A decision on winter sports is expected later this month. Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh is also canceled All fall SPORTS The 11 members of The Centennial conference that compete in the Division Three have also cancelled all fall SPORTS because of Corona virus.

Ivy League Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

07:01 min | 2 months ago

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:38 min | 2 months ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Studied by researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and almost half are likely bots that are spreading disinformation many of them talk about how the virus is actually a bio weapon or said things like drinking bleach can cure the virus Kathleen Carley is a professor of computer science at Carnegie Mellon and she says it's extremely difficult to tell who's behind the false information on the tweets out kind of disinformation or the kinds of stories the kind of pattern of tweets is like what is normally done it's like what it really is like a standard Russian information campaigns or is like a standard Chinese information campaign or we can tell if it's in the interest of rush hour in the interests of China but you know proving that it is one hundred percent from those is kind of you can't tell by just looking at Twitter Connelly says if you see these kinds of outrageous claims in a tweet don't pass it on even as a joke because the next person might actually believe it Nathan Roberts K. and extend seventy newsradio and LA city councilmember has introduced legislation aimed at cracking down on corruption at city hall one motion by councilman David rue seeks to create an office of accountability and transparency make an independent watchdog in the hall with the participation of the documents and compel testimony from various city officials another motion seeks to remove the power of city council members to override and rewrite land use decisions made by the city Planning Commission you don't create an environment that breeds corruption who says that would require an amendment to the city charter which means it would have to go before voters possibly in November his proposals come as a cloud of suspicion hangs over councilman Jose Huizar who has not been charged with a crime but his offices and home were raided by the FBI in twenty eighteen as part of an ongoing investigation into pay to play schemes involving real estate developers earlier this year former councilman Mitch Englander agreed to plead guilty in another case Margaret Carrero can extend seventy news radio promoter city councilman Rubio Gonzalez is free on bail but due in court on Tuesday after being arrested on suspicion of child related sex crimes the DA's offices Gonzalez who was elected to the council in twenty sixteen and also works for the Pomona school district is suspected of annoying or molesting a child and also possessing material that depicts child sexual abuse city officials say they were stunned by the allegations Pomona's mayor says he'll call for a special meeting of the city council to talk about the situation and look at legal options for possibly removing Gonzalez from the council as that case proceeds time for your money with Nathan Hager social distancing will continue.

Margaret Carrero Nathan Hager David rue LA city Twitter professor of computer science Pomona Pomona school district DA Rubio Gonzalez Carnegie Mellon University Mitch Englander FBI Jose Huizar city Planning Commission city hall Nathan Roberts K. Connelly China
Felicity Huffman's daughter Sophia accepted into prestigious university 1 year after college admissions scandal

John Williams

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

Felicity Huffman's daughter Sophia accepted into prestigious university 1 year after college admissions scandal

"Says and Felicity Huffman's daughter is being accepted into a top university Sofia Macy is heading to Carnegie Mellon university's theatre program after mom's rolled in last year's college admissions scandal her mom pleaded guilty to paying fifteen thousand dollars to alter Sylvia's SAT answers well Sophia took the test again on our own got accepted into the

Felicity Huffman Sofia Macy Carnegie Mellon University Sylvia Sophia
Facebook map shows you where people are reporting coronavirus symptoms

Daily Tech News Show

00:56 sec | 3 months ago

Facebook map shows you where people are reporting coronavirus symptoms

"Let's talk a little bit more about another couple of other efforts actually multiple efforts to track. Where infections might go next by having people self report systems symptoms rather facebook partnered with Carnegie Mellon University's Delfi Research Center on a survey asking users to report their symptoms both Carnegie Mellon and Facebook have now published websites with their initial. Findings can see a little heat map Go TO COVA CAST. Cmu DOT EDU. And you'll be able to see these heat maps later this week and eventually provide forecasts based on the data to help. Local health officials anticipate where hospital capacity needs might spike next facebook's own site provides a symptom map of the US at the county level showing what percentage of the population has reported systems county by county facebook's also partnering with the University of Maryland to take that survey global and Carnegie Mellon is building an API so let researchers access the data.

Carnegie Mellon University Facebook Carnegie Mellon Delfi Research Center University Of Maryland United States
Facebook launches map to help identify coronavirus hot spots early

Sean Hannity

00:52 sec | 3 months ago

Facebook launches map to help identify coronavirus hot spots early

"In the social media giant is opening up about how it's helping fight coronavirus founder and CEO mark Zuckerberg penned an opinion editorial for The Washington Post in which he offered up the vast resources of the social media giant to help fight the covert nineteen pandemic his reasoning is straightforward accurate county by county data is needed from across the U. S. and Facebook has a community of billions of users globally and as we have all learned over the past few years I spoke knows a lot about us Facebook has already rolled out and often a symptom survey run by health researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Facebook says answers to the survey were sent to the researchers not kept by the social media site so far Carnegie Mellon says they're getting one million responses a week in the United States Zuckerberg says the social media data is a new super power in fighting pandemics and urges people to use the data

The Washington Post Carnegie Mellon University Facebook Carnegie Mellon Founder And Ceo Mark Zuckerberg United States
Dating at a Distance

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:44 min | 4 months ago

Dating at a Distance

"Should PEOPLE STILL DATE? Everything is aligned. Date no no no no blind date center definitely not but even before this tender. I'm kidding that was mean on the late show with Stephen Colbert. A month ago before most of the country was staying at home at the time. A conversation about dating during a pandemic may have felt like late night comedy fair. You know Stephen. Everything in life is is a risk reward. Proposition is riskier to do things versus before. Perhaps being in close contact with somebody especially somebody. You don't know Is Is. It's a different time right now. But as their new reality has evolved so as the act of finding love people are using dating apps more both tender and bumble have reported an increase in daily messages and user engagement. Other APPS had a video chat feature and some people are reaching out in ways I would have never imagined a look out my windows. Bill dancing traps to take and needed to say here down. She waved back. That's the start of the story you may have heard before. It's from a video on Tick Tock by Jeremy Cohen a photographer from Brooklyn New York. After Jeremy Waves to the dancing girl he flies his drone over with his cell phone number. She picked up my job and I guess it works. 'cause I our lady's Jeremy's video went viral if we're still allowed to say that it has over thirty million views on talk now. I'm not at all surprised. It's the meet cute of our time if our time is defined by isolation and physical distancing Jeremy and Tori Cigna Rela. She's the girl on the roof have gone on a few dates after that. Here's Jeremy and Tori. The first date was we had dinner. There was another restaurant she is on her roof and I was on my balcony. It was so funny because we'd be talking to other on facetime and then sometimes I like look over like I'd see him there and then we'd look at each other. It was like such a weird scenario lovely on another date. Jeremy win inside a huge plastic bubble so he could take a walk. I just couldn't stop laughing. I like hit the ground. Basically I was not expecting to see him in a bubble. It's a lot more effort to go through than your average date and it's hard to express the usual social and physical cues when you're six feet apart but there things about this new normal that for Jeremy Cohen. Surprisingly work well. It's really nice to get to know her. Just not have any of this pressure at the end of the day like okay. Am I going home or am I gonNA invite her back to my place? This awkward moment of okay. What what is the other person thinking? I don't WANNA be too forward but I also don't want to be a scaredy cat. Jeremy isn't immune to the loneliness of social distancing of not actually being physically around someone even though he's found this new connection I am in my apartment either remained but he's with his family in Minnesota. So I'm alone in this two bedroom apartment for about a month. Now it makes me realize how much the small things in life such as a hub. Like hug skill great. I've actually putting myself a couple of times. It doesn't feel the same because it isn't the same. There's a lot of research that shows. That physical touch is important for health and wellbeing. One behavior that we have focused on in some of our research is interpersonal touch or affectionate touch. We've shown that touch has powerful effects on our physical. Health are mental health. Our relationship health. That's Professor Brooke Fini. She's a social psychologist at Carnegie Mellon University. She studies how relationships impact our health throughout our entire lives. It increases feelings of security so it just makes people feel more secure. It increases people's willingness to embrace life opportunities affectionate touch has been associated with lower daily stress lower reactivity to stress A lower likelihood of even perceiving something as stressful in the first place for Professor Feeney affectionate touch has benefits even above and beyond sexual intimacy. Which is something else were missing in? A time of isolation can engage in sexual intimacy for a variety of reasons that have to do with reproduction and drives and less to do with communicating care and acceptance and love and value. And so on. They're both important forms of touch and Communicate very important information to significant others But we think they are very different types of processes hearing about all the benefits of touch at a time when a lot of people are deprived of. It isn't exactly comforting. So what happens when we do lose it in our everyday lives? Here's Professor Brittany Kubiak. Who Studies affectionate touch in romantic relationships? Children form attachments with their caregivers in a lot of ways through touch and in adulthood we think that some of the same processes happens you form an attachment to your romantic partner just like you form attachment to your parents. Although the relationship is obviously different long-term not having the ability to touch. I think there's the possibility that you may not be able to form as secure attachment to that person but Professor Jacoby Act doesn't want to overstate the benefits of touch. Either it is still possible to have meaningful connections with each other without it. We know that people maintain very satisfying long distance relationships. Even when there's not a pandemic going on people do things reminiscing about times that they did spend together or planning times that they will spend together and so I think we can find ways at least if this is going to be a somewhat short term separation to make sure that we're maintaining high quality relationships even through physical distance for Professor Feeney. There is a positive outcome at least in terms of human connection about the fact that this is all happening to us together our rates of loneliness and social isolation even before they pandemic had been increasing and people have just been feeling more relational disconnected across the board. One positive thing that I think has come out of this. Pandemic is that people first of all are all in this together. You know so. We're now all part of a big group of people who all this happening to them. When people are facing adversity together they usually reach out to each other more and try to connect stance. Oh I do see one positive side effective at this is that there are these more creative ways that people are trying to connect and help each other out and so on like Jeremy and Tori and whether or not they do end up together doesn't even matter to them anymore. We're absolutely going to meet up. Probably something a little bit more low key like drinks but definitely still could never forget it honestly no matter what happens between us like we're going to remain friends like there's nothing like this that doesn't bond to people and said it's just like look if he's not like in my wedding he'll be at my wedding like that's. I certain that's a powerful connection. Now there was a study from Harvard. That came out this week. Saying we might have to prolong intermittent social distancing measures. Up until two thousand twenty. Two professor. Feeney doesn't know what that means for physical and mental health. No one does she and a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon are just about to begin a study on this if we don't find these other creative ways to connect It remains to be seen. How well We can continue to abuse remote connections as a proxy for the more physical connections but I think the the core issue that underlies it all is. What touched communicates and so I think what we have to do. During the pandemic is just find other ways to communicate to our loved ones that were available to them if they need us even though we can't be physically proximal to them right now and might be more difficult to communicate that remotely but I think we can do it. Human beings are social creatures by nature. We crave connection. We're not meant to be isolated. These days. Some people might not have the security that comes from physical touch. But that's not all our relationship is built on find those other connections and lean on them. I think you'll be surprised by how strongly though resonate in your life.

Jeremy Professor Feeney Jeremy Cohen Jeremy Waves Stephen Colbert Stephen Carnegie Mellon Carnegie Mellon University Tori Tori Cigna Rela Professor Brooke Fini Social Isolation Professor Brittany Kubiak Professor Jacoby Act Bill Professor Harvard Minnesota Partner
Coronavirus Detected By Voice? Carnegie Mellon Researchers Develop App To ‘Listen’ For Signs Of COVID-19

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:26 sec | 4 months ago

Coronavirus Detected By Voice? Carnegie Mellon Researchers Develop App To ‘Listen’ For Signs Of COVID-19

"News researchers at Carnegie Mellon University creating an app they see might be able to tell if you have covert nineteen the app hasn't been approved by the FDA or CDC and is still in its early stages it listens to you cough and then asked you to resign and number of letters and sounds before letting you know how likely it is that you may have the disease as of now researchers say the app is an experimental and

Carnegie Mellon University FDA CDC
So We’re Working From Home. Can the Internet Handle It?

KCBS Radio Midday News

03:11 min | 5 months ago

So We’re Working From Home. Can the Internet Handle It?

"And with millions of people now working now taking online classes and sheltering in place at home the next few weeks could put quite a strain on internet service the big question it can the infrastructure handle it for a closer look Stan Bunger and sizzling Taylor spoke with John piazza professor of Kerr at Carnegie Mellon University and former chief technologist with the Federal Communications Commission can our infrastructure handle it that's the big question well the simple answer is we don't really know nothing like this has happened before luckily I I think most of the usage will occur during the day when it's not peak hour there is excess capacity so if we're lucky we won't exceed that capacity but we might especially in places like the bay area will just have to wait and find out until now the assumption had been that you know drive time as it were for the internet was the evening when everybody was busy streaming Netflix and Amazon movies is that still the case well that was the case two weeks and that that's why we have excess capacity during the day because they build to meet the the peak our needs we just don't know how much the daytime usage is going to go up if there are problems what would the first signs be or will it just stop no I won't stop you'll just see poor performance yeah for those of us and now I have to teach my classes hotline for those of us who are home working or or doing other things we may find that video for example doesn't work and if you're on a cable system particularly in the upstream is a problem if you are video conferencing the video you're showing is more problematic than the video you're seeing and we might have to go to audio of that half yeah and to be perfectly Frank just to share a story here we may have run into that very problem here KCBS yesterday morning when I tried to set up with a high quality audio codec from my house and it may well have been a limited upstream capacity from my house that brought things to a halt it's very possible so the question of which in the walls of somebody's house we're all on the same wifi network in any family structure other issues there too there could be we particularly actually the your in say an apartment building with ten walls and and and are densely packed you may actually find that the neighboring apartments start interfering with each other in terms of wifi that's also possible do you know if providers are doing anything to ease the situation I I mean they're they're they're changing some some of their their offerings to customers I'm actually trying my research team tried to reach out to some of the I. S. P.'s to to in the hope that they will share data with us particularly in the places that are getting hit first like Seattle and and now the bay area so we can learn and help the rest of the country prepare but if any of them are listening I hope they'll call me the cooperation that was John P. hopp professor at Carnegie Mellon University and former chief technologist with the Federal Communications

Visualizing Fairness in Machine Learning with Yongsu Ahn and Alex Cabrera

Data Stories

08:36 min | 5 months ago

Visualizing Fairness in Machine Learning with Yongsu Ahn and Alex Cabrera

"So let's get started with the with the topic of today so today we talk about a really really relevant topic can needs It's particularly hot right now. We're GONNA talk about bias in fairness in machine learning. And if you know know what this is we're going to describe and explain what this is about in a moment and more specifically what is the role that can play in this specific domain to say mitigate problems that can arise in terms of bias and furnace in machine learning so to talk about this topic. We have not one but two guests. We have Alex Cabrera who is a PhD student from Carnegie Mellon University. I Alex is again. Thanks so much for having and then we have young. Soo on who is also Ph student at the University of Pittsburgh I- youngster. Welcome to the show. Hello Nice to talk to you so Alexander. Who can you briefly introduce yourself? Tell us a little bit about what is your background. What is your main research topic? And just give a brief introduction. Yeah so I'M ALEX. I'm a PhD. Student of the Human Computer interactions to at Carnegie Mellon so generally idea research into creating interactive systems and visualization. Systems that help people both develop better machine learning models so even more accurate more equitable and understanding these models so understanding potential issues. Or How? They work okay. Young Soo my name is sue on in I'm a dirtier peachy students at University of Pittsburgh. A my research interest lies at the intersection of visualization and fair. And explain away. I enter to machine learning so my primary research question is to build assistant to help users with making the machine learning results more fair and explainable in helped him to interact with machine so that their opinions and apex can be incorporated into the system. Okay thanks so much so I was thinking. Maybe we should start with defining a little bit this terminology to the extent that he's possible but maybe they're probably many of our listeners who've never heard of that and of fairness and bias and this is a very overloaded terminology here so I'm wondering if we can start by defining a little bit. What what we mean by fairness and maybe even bias in emission learning and also what? What kind of province exists there yet? So I'll probably I can start by talking about a little bit of background on why the problem This fairness problem has been actively discussed in especially missionaries research. So as a May have seen did. Data driven decision is kind of increasingly used in important decisions so especially Such as a job recording of colleagues dimension were predicted policy. Those kind of important decision which have kind of huge impact on Individuals muster learning as more and more used induced kind of important decisions then Some of cases have been reported that these machine turned out to be biased towards certain groups or certain individuals so here the what I mean by bias is certain. Decisions are kind of burrow favored to certain groups or individuals. Such as man over woman or a white people over african-american people. This is because on the machine. Learning model is trained from Historic Co. Data set and this historical data said could possibly include Inherited bias then. The model is kind trained by those data sets and then have kind of inherited vice. The problem of machine learning here is that whatever trained model can kind of systematically discriminate against certain individuals groups especially in Western Assistant Because many decision makers may use to system in their decision making then kind of making these mistresses. More Fair is kind of important problem so basically the type of fairness you talk about is mostly related to not being discriminatory or not using features. That have nothing to do with the essential decision. You're making more superficial like Maybe the race or gender or other features of a person right. So it's about combating discrimination. Yeah I think that's the main idea. It's actually you get to you a more complicated because even if you don't include some of these protected features so if you say you're trying to give someone alone you don't really want to decide that based off of their gender their race Those are actually. You can be almost perfectly predicted by the other features so you can actually reconstruct that so actually a lot of machine. Learning people suggest you actually add those features in because they're going to be used anyway and then you can apply some resolutions afterwards to try to address the problem. So it's very much embedded in the data that you're using to train the model this historical data that you've collected so it's not just as easy as leaving out that column with Race Agenda and not saying you talk to the research that's happening now. It's a little bit more complicated. Just the complex relationships between the variables ends up that you can actually recreate the biopsies. Even having no idea algorithm not being aware of these protected attributes. Okay but just on the Senate so the evaluation you do and fair. Evaluation is one that only takes the features into account that you're supposed to take into account so usually the way we did try to define fairness or quantify is an output. So if you're trying to give loans or a very popular example is trying to decide algorithms to decide how risk how likely someone is to recommit a crime if they're like. Oh so whether or not you should give someone bail we usually it doesn't we don't really look at what features are used that we look at. What the output is and so if for example the RECIDIVISM prediction case for African American males? You're more likely to be given a higher risk or even though you're just as likely to recommit a crime that is discrimination. That is the bias that we're trying to discover and trying to combat right So we really like black box models. It's really hard to know. What parts of the data are being used to make the decision? But we really care about whether these decisions were making. The outputs are making that really society impactful whether those are equitable and fair. Okay Yeah I'm wondering if we can can you? Maybe describe one or two specific examples. Where these kind of problems can arise. I think what is interesting? Is that right now? I mean we live in a society where where these these systems stems are already making decisions or some of some decisions for us right or providing indications for for experts that have to make decisions based on on what the AI system suggests recommends right. So I think I'm wondering if we in order to make a little bit more concrete if you can cite one one or two examples where where these these. This kind of problem can rice yes. Sadly there are quite quite a few examples. So one of the biggest one of the first investigations elected to it was in facial recognition systems so there are systems by like Had some face plus plus IBM and Microsoft that they audit and it tries to tell given a picture of someone's face whether they're male or female and when they started looking into it they found that when you start seeing how well they perform for say white men versus darker skinned women. There was almost ninety nine percent accuracy for the white males and close to seventy percent accuracy. For the darker skin females which is pretty big disparity. A lot of that is due. Hey if you look up. General data sets of faces a lot of the faces. That come up are white males that data that you're learning on is not

Alex Cabrera University Of Pittsburgh Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Mellon SOO Alexander Historic Co IBM Senate Microsoft AI
Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:17 min | 6 months ago

Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

"Hello and welcome to our first episode of behind. Find The tech in twenty twenty. I'm Christina Warren. Senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott all right so Kevin. It is twenty twenty which Shh is both the new year and I guess a new decade although people will get weird technicalities and it's always a great Chance to kind of look back at what's happened over the last ten years and reflect on new opportunities. Yeah I mean I it. Is I think in their industry and for human beings in general really easy to get completely used to new innovations that in our lives. But like when you think back ten years ago the world looked like a very different place than it looks right now so smartphones were just catching on. They were nowhere near as ubiquitous as they are all right now and the things that you could do on them were far far more constrained than they are right. Now I mean for. For God's sake people were renting movies from blockbuster In two thousand ten right very blockbuster was actually still a thing and instagram hadn't even been invented yet. Coley different world you know I do now that we've hit twenty twenty. Do you have any forecasts about what the next year intact might bring her even the next decade. Well well I think one of the themes that we spent a bunch of time chatting about last year on the podcast was artificial intelligence machine learning and I think we are are certainly going to see the trends that that had started in the prior year's continue to accelerate as one of the reason why I'm really interested in chatting with our guest today So autonomous vehicles. For instance. I believe are going to make AK- ton of progress over the next couple of years in particular and I'm really looking forward to seeing some of that stuff. Play out yes I couldn't agree more. It's funny I don't have a driver's license But I've actually been on a few self driving car panels over the years and I I think the technology she behind it is so fascinating. Which is why? I'm really really excited about your conversation with today's guest. Chris Armstrong and Chris is an engineer. Who's known for his work in pioneering self driving car technology? Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I'm especially interested in self driving cars and I'm looking forward to this conversation that we're about to have Chris is that There's so many ways that the world is going to change for the good once we we are able to put this technology into the hands of lots of different companies so One of the things that will hear about Aurora's. They are a company building the self off driving car technology as a platform for other companies to use to build autonomous applications. And so you know one of the things that I'm sorta hopeful for that will come into the world in the not-too-distant future is some technologies. That may help my grandmother. So I'm I'm lucky enough to have a grandma that's still still alive. She's eighty nine years old and lives in a very rural place in Virginia And she can still drive which is awesome but the day is coming where she's not going to be able to To drive her car car in the same way that she is right now and Like then it begs the question of how she has access to all of the things that she needs in order to help her live and independent life. So how does she get her prescription medicines. Like how does she get her groceries and You know just just sort of the staple things that she needs to exist. And one of the things that I think could be really incredibly beneficial with these self driving thing. Technologies is Like the possibility that you'll be able to have autonomous deliveries for people like my grandmother. I think you're absolutely right. I think the potential for the stuff is really fantastic. So let's hear more about some of the potential for this technology from Chris Aronson Guest today is Chris. Samson Christie's the CO founder and CEO Vera accompanied the bill self driving vehicle technology before founding Aurora he was CTO. Google self driving car program prior to that. Chris was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the technical director of the Darpa urban and grand challenge teams. I'm really excited to hear what he's up to these days. Hey Chris the the show. Thanks for having me so I love to start by learning how you got interested in technology in the first place as a kid. Were you taking engineering classes or programming classes when you were in high school. So are you discover that in college back. When I was in high school there wasn't really computer science at high school And so I Bought Oughta some kind of Tandy x eighty six clone or whatever Back when I was in probably ninth or tenth grade from money for my paper route A- and you know tried to learn to program at first where you go you know you don't if you recall this but you go to the bookstore and you'd buy You know this paperback for Back Book. That was program whatever it was and it was just the source code listing and this before C. D. Roms even pete which people probably don't even remember that that's right we Before that actually bought a commodore sixty four and of course that was exciting. Because it didn't have tape drive right right or it didn't have a floppy drive floppy yeah and five and a quarter inch. Discs that's what had YEP YEP so anyway so we was doing that and then this language C. Plus plus which seemed to be the hot new thing And so started. Actually the first programs I really learned with C. Plus plus. Wow that's rough. Yeah yeah it was a little crazy. A I mean I guess on some some level like CPS was challenging lodging first language. But the good thing is after you've mastered as downhill it's all downhill And so did. Did you know from all of this experience in high school that you wanted to get a computer science and engineering. Gary you know up in Canada so apply to you you know variety of schools got into into a couple of them And then in my senior here I met a girl Turns out now. She's my wife. And decided I wanted to stay at the University of Manitoba which is right in central Canada and Manitoba and got into the computer engineering? School computer. Seem like you know they had a future.

Chris High School Aurora Twenty Twenty Kevin Scott Microsoft Christina Warren Chris Armstrong Instagram Chris Aronson Canada University Of Manitoba Virginia Google Gary C. Plus Samson Christie Manitoba
Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds

Paul W. Smith

00:17 sec | 9 months ago

Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds

"Why do boys seem to do better at math than girls well it's not their brains according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University they study the brain imaging of children and found that development of the part of the brain most active in doing math are exactly the same and boys and

Carnegie Mellon University
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

04:41 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

"So if all do all teams have the same information do they all use it the same way like where's the edge in terms of analytics, and who does analytics really well versus like who's still learning you know, again, I, I would never apply about somebody else's organization. I think we're very fortunate in Pittsburgh. You know, we're sitting next to Carnegie Mellon University. Which is one of the top in the world for analytics machine learning AI. And so the person who runs our analytics division is from Carnegie Mellon, and, you know, we have tremendous resources there and is that the future of sports and are those algorithms or sort of insights proprietary now more than the east to be. Yeah. I think so. And I think that. It really is a blend of art and science, though, because. You know, you still have to be able to think about how again, human beings are gonna function and leverage situations. And you're gonna have to, you know, I think the highest and best outcomes are where you use the information and the technology. But you're able to interpret it in apply instead of just saying to inform your decision. That's exactly right. And I think certainly you look at baseball it has become an arms race. And for the teams number of years ago that rejected it and say, we're not doing that. Well, you know it's tough to be planning October. When, when you don't have the right amount of information, and certainly baseball is easier to apply. Analytics because you have a lot of one on one. Exactly. So it's it's easier to apply. But football's come a long way. Do you think we'll ever see like a? AI version of an offensive coordinator or defensive coordinator. Yeah. I mean just from calling plays not from coaching perspective, but it's like this play this. We know what's going on on the field. We have real time data, or that would not surprise me. I mean, or or at least, you know, like Jarvis in iron man, right? Like, here's what you should do that, that to me is not far fetched at all. How far away, do you think we would be from that? That's an interesting question, because I always find that technology you lose usually happen slower than you think. And then suddenly. Because if, if, if somebody used it, and it worked, it would be like nobody's wearing headsets and able to communicate upstairs, and then all of a sudden one person does, and that's an unfair advantage. So I would be completely guessing. But I think over the next five to ten years, you're gonna see remarkable advancements, you know, across the board, and in artificial intelligence. So are we had to play where we're using intellects to adjust players practice routines in the sense of like this player worked really hard? We need to give them more of arrests this player can work harder. They can go like more wraps, like, how are we using that to inform the individual players outside of games? I'm not sure we're quite there, yet there are tests where, you know, the guys you spit in a Cup, essentially, and it says, look, you're, you're low on x y and z should hydrate or you should so. I know there are clubs using some things like that. I'm not aware yet of using that level of granularity at practice by do you think that's what we're going to or will always just be this element of, I think, in the foreseeable future. It will be a tool in the toolbox, but not you know the tool. Yeah, I don't look like anything else. But sports sports is a great imitator. So if somebody, you know, employed those types of things in won the Super Bowl or won the World Series, I you can, you can bet that people are going to emulate it. What's the difference between without getting into specifics? But the teams that are perennially good in salary cap era, which is hard and teams that sort of, like build up. They have one or two years of success in the fall off the clip. Is that all salary cap management or is it? Man, I my own personal opinion is, it's a number of things again back to that word of culture, you know, do you have athletes that wanna play for you? Wanna play in that city?.

baseball Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Mellon Pittsburgh defensive coordinator Jarvis AI football ten years two years
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KTRH

"I met him at a UFO conference in Washington DC, just an amazing guy. He passed away recently at the age of eighty five years old his academic background included a bachelor science degree in industrial management from Carnegie Mellon University. A bachelor science from the US naval postgraduate school a doctor of science and area. Nodding astronautics from MIT. And he was a staunch believer that this planet was being visited by extra terrestrial head girl. Pleasure, my friend. How are you George? Nice to be with. It was morning. Likewise, likewise, you've been busy lately since we last talked stay. I stay pretty busy going on. Well, I had an opportunity to meet the Buzz Aldrin. I was king show several weeks ago. And what are the the light full guy? He's he's tough. Now is he probably was then at her. Well. All right. He does not believe in extraterrestrials. Did you ever talk to them about that? Briefed. I've talked all developed about what they thought face. But. No, not obscene pretend experience for the Apollo program. Nothing in space was subsequently validated. Are understood. Good,.

Carnegie Mellon University US Washington MIT George eighty five years
I Am Not A Robot: The Story of CAPTCHA

Planet Money

12:53 min | 1 year ago

I Am Not A Robot: The Story of CAPTCHA

"Year two thousand everybody was signing up for Yahoo Email addresses. This was back before g mail and Yahoo mail was great. It was free. You could check your Email anywhere. But there was this one problem and a computer science grad student at Carnegie Mellon University became fixated on this problem. His name is Louis von on the problem was that there were people who in order to send spam from Yahoo accounts. They would obtain millions of Email accounts, literally, millions not not hundreds or thousands. But millions of fake Email accounts. Literally millions of fakey mill council this spammers who were signing up for millions of spam. Accounts weren't going to the yahu male page and just signing up for these accounts. One at a time. It wasn't like they were like the real Jacob Goldstein at Yahoo dot com. Jacob Goldstein ninety nine at Yahoo dot com. Jacob the barefoot dancer at Yahoo dot com. No spammers were writing simple, computer programs little bots that just kept filling out the Yahoo Email sign up form again and again and again day. Day and night and that would generate an army of Email accounts that could be used to sell fake Viagra or steal your Bank account information. Whatever Dow didn't know what to do about this. But Louis finan had an idea. So the idea was can we make test that distinguish between humans and computers, but also a test that is graded by the computer, if you've basically ever signed up for anything on the internet. You probably know the idea that Luis von Ahn came up with a picture of distorted letters and numbers, and then a little field below that picture where you type in the characters that you see, and we actually showed it to the the guy who was the chief scientists at Yahoo. Are he loved it? And within a few weeks. It was actually, you know in the registration flow of Email accounts at Yahoo. It was it was being used there. And we were super happy that they were just using it Lewis gave his little tested name was a long ridiculous name that made a short genius acronym. The long name was completely automated public turing test to tell computers and humans. Apart a train test is a famous old idea in computer science. It's a test where you try to tell if you're chatting with a computer or with a human being if a computer can consistently make you think it's a human being that is artificial intelligence, and this sort of turing test that Louis came up with it became huge. You may even know the acronym for this test capture capture capture has very compelling have show is a good name. Yeah. Because it's like capture them or Gotcha. Or something like that. Yeah. It was it was a good name, you know capture. Maybe you do not like capture and yet the twenty year history of capture is this window into a lot into artificial intelligence into digitizing millions of books also into a little cyber. Hello and welcome to planet money. I'm Jacob Goldstein. And I'm no L king. And I am not a robot. I'm not not not a robot. But if you were that's exactly what. Today on the show, a global decades-long work an internet that people actually use versus a spammy wasteland. It is computer versus computer. And in the end the computers are only gonna need us the humans to do. A little light data entry. Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from quip quip was designed to make brushing your teeth. Simple affordable and even enjoyable one of the first electric toothbrushes accepted by the American dental association. Quip has a built in two minute timer that pulses every thirty seconds to remind you to switch sides sensitive sonic, vibrations for healthier gums and a multi use cover for brushing on the go. Get your first refill pack for free at G E T Q U IP dot com slash planet. Money. If you're in debt, don't beat yourself up life happens. Forgive yourself. Life kit is ready with a shovel to help. You dig out of crushing debt when you know better you do better check out life kid and apple podcasts or NPR dot org slash life kit. I should say that Luis von Ahn was one of several people working on capture of like tests around the same time. So he's not the only person who came up with the idea that people develop their own captures. But Lewis and his colleagues are the ones who came up with the name and their version was the one that really took off when you bought tickets online when you signed up for your mice basic count pretty soon people were taking Louise's little test two hundred million times a day. It was protecting the world from scalpers and spammers and bots and the world, of course, responded with gratitude every time that I talked to somebody about about capture, you know, the first thing they would tell me is how annoying they are. So I started feeling fair fair. I started feeling partly responsible for these, you know, two hundred million times a day. And each time you type one of these you wasted about ten seconds of your time. So, you know, I started just thinking is there any way in which we can make good use of this these ten seconds. This was in the mid two thousand and at this moment, there is this push. Bush going on to digitize old books and all documents. And at the time it was easy enough to scan old pages old pieces of paper and put them online. But computers were still bad at turning those scanned pages into useful online documents if not searchable you cannot change the font size. You cannot. I mean, it's just a bunch of kind of somewhat crappy pictures. Yeah. So it occurred to me that you could take all of the words that the computer could not recognize and we get people to read them for us while they were typing captures on the internet up to this point Lewis has been giving capture away for free. But now he thinks people might pay to have their print archives digitized one capture at a time, and he is sitting on over half a million hours of free human Labor Day. So he starts a company called recapture, and he goes out looking for customers. And what happened was I was actually giving a talk somewhere. And I was fortunate that the at the time the guy who was the chief information officer for the New York Times was sitting in the audience. Okay. And he said, oh, you know, what we have this huge one hundred and thirty year old archive of old additions of the New York Times. So maybe we can maybe you can help us the New York Times ended up being recaptured first client now when you solve the caption next to a few random letters and numbers there. Was also a picture of a word from an old issue of the times the computers couldn't read when you typed in that word, you weren't just protecting the internet from spam? You're also helping to turn a hundred years of old newspapers into a searchable digital archive, and I have to say, I just love this sort of while you're doing one thing. You're also doing something else like deficiency of this. Like, it just it delights me, you know, it's like the old dream of writing your exercise bike to power the lights in your house or something which by the way Lewis told me when he was like eleven he had that dream, and then he like looked into it and realize oh, actually like a person, right? An exercise bike as a terrible way to generate power. As Lewis was getting recaptured going Google came out and announced they were starting to digitize every book like every single book in the world or something they sold. Lewis was doing for the times and in two thousand and nine Google bought recap show and started using it to help digitize books and then a few. Later. Google started using captured tests that showed pictures of addresses on the sides of buildings when we saw those captures we were making Google maps work better doing a little more work for Google, unpaid. So that is the end of Louise's capture story, but a little digression. He started a language company where people did online translation while they were learning the length which same like doing one thing actually doing other thing idea. This company became super popular it's called dual lingo, in fact, it got so popular that they got rid of the translation part. Now, it's just this app that millions of people use to learn languages. Okay. End of Louis end of digression. So now, it is the 'oughts and for a while capture is working the spammers are held at bay. And then someone figures out a work around. Shady businesses started showing up online and offering to break capture for anybody willing to pay. Chris Canaan is a computer scientist who started looking into these businesses around two thousand eight and it's one of. Those things like until you actually think oh, actually let's go seek this up. See how hard it is to find. You might think. Oh, this is some shady cybercriminals underground thing. But Nope, you can just Google for it, you could find a dozen of these services. Very competitively priced with all that stuff. Chris wanted to know like what's going on here? Like is it for real do these services work? So he and his colleagues decided to act like spammers. I mean, they didn't do the spam part. But they did more or less everything else. They built a bought. And this bought went around the web bumping into captures. And automatically every time the bought hit a capture test. It would send it off to one of these services that offers to solve captures for money, and what do those services do exactly they pay human beings to sit in front of computers all day long and solve one capture after another. So some person sitting in front of a computer gets a capture from Chris's bought solves the test in a couple of seconds sends it back to Chris's Bhatt, which enters the solution into a web page and boo. Yes, that is the plain vanilla version just to see like. Does this work? How long does it take? But Chris and his colleagues also had some other questions they wanted to answer. So they did something else they made up their own captured tests to send out to the solvers. Some of those tests are said what time is it and the answer to those tests told them what time zone the people salting the test lived in. They'll wanted to know what languages the solver spoke. So they made captures with weird instructions in lots of different languages Chinese Spanish Italian Tagalog Portuguese Russian, Tamil Dutch, Hindi German Malay Vietnamese Korean Greek Arabic Bengali Canada Klingon in Farsi. I'm sorry. What was the one before? I see Klingon Klingon the made up language from Star Trek maiden. Of course, not. But they did it because they wanted to just like sort of push these services like how far will these capture solvers go. There's no way they're going to be able to answer this. But the answers we saw showed us. I think we got something like a one percent accuracy rate. But it. Was on something that was so incredibly long of a question that it couldn't have been right by chance. So presumably one of these capture solvers recognized that this was Klingon either new Klingon just because at the no or looked it up online. When was actually able to successfully solve this capture. That was written in Klingon you found the greatest capture solver on earth. Yes. Based on this part of the study, not the Klingon part put the languages and the time zones. They figure out that a lot of people seem to be doing this work in Russia, China and India, and they realize this is a huge industry. People have started calling it capture farming, and it is basically human beings opening the capture gates for an army of bots and capture farms work, usually they were right, usually they were very fast. So that so the services were legit. I mean, they were potentially illegal. But they did the thing that they said they were doing correct. Yeah. One of the most interesting things about cybercrime as a marketplace. Is that it works like any other like business to business type marketplace, your reputation is really important there. You're not gonna keep your capture solving business in business, unless you're actually solving those captures and how much did it cost one US dollar per thousand captures solved so incredibly incredibly inexpensive. But this is a task that takes a typical human, you know, about fifteen twenty seconds. Yes. But God, I mean, you really. Feel for the people doing the work. Yes. So if you are spam or these workers will solve captures for you around the clock for a tenth of a penny per thousand that price is obviously like mind breaking low, but it is still not zero. And it is still enough to weed out a lot of people it weeds out people who are just trolls making spam. Accounts for fun and people who are just posting garbage comments on million garbage websites hoping to sell a few extra dollars worth of garbage products. So even with the capture farms catches still are working to block a lot of people. But what would happen if you could teach a computer to solve the captures then you wouldn't need the farms and the farmers anymore. The price would go to zero and the spammers could go wild.

Lewis Yahoo Jacob Goldstein Louis Finan Google Chris Canaan New York Times Luis Von Ahn Louise Fakey Mill Carnegie Mellon University Viagra American Dental Association United States DOW
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of Noblesse oblige been lots of pledges notably from the fashion multinational LVMH, the family two hundred million euros, the Pino family, very rich family in Frantz false while only Pino a hundred million euros. He says he wants to revive the jewel of our heritage a billion dollars pledged within days private wealth for public good, a pure expression of the downstream benefits of capitalism. But also as it turns out, a pretty good window into its costs within hours of his bosses pledged to give John jock Lagaan director of the Pinault collection tweeted, a call to the French government the money, given by French. Residences two-thirds tax deductible. Some people are saying the deduction should be increased in ninety percent. Ninety percent tax break, of course, essentially transfers the cost of philanthropy to the government, which is to say to the taxpayer yet, the credit and acclaim general burnish -ment of reputation all accrue to the givers. The history of philanthropy is the history of rich people basking in perpetual glory for their generosity often in gilded institutions bearing their names. But obscuring how they got rich in the first place. We recall Carnegie Hall Carnegie Mellon University. Carnegie libraries, Andrew Carnegie robber, baron. Not so much kind of foolproof, or at least it was consider. Now, the Sackler lers the family that controls Purdue pharmaceuticals white scraps of paper swirled through the Guggenheim museum last night as part of the stage protest against the drug.

Carnegie Hall Carnegie Mellon Andrew Carnegie Frantz Carnegie French government LVMH John jock Lagaan Pino Guggenheim museum Sackler Purdue pharmaceuticals director Pinault billion dollars Ninety percent ninety percent
Despite drama, Tesla is still very popular with young workers

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

03:23 min | 1 year ago

Despite drama, Tesla is still very popular with young workers

"We did not intend for cars to be the theme of the program today. But the news is what the news is GM. We did right Laos restructuring getting ready for electric and self driving cars, but over a certain electric first car company, the resumes are piling up faster than the company can handle them. Tesla was one of the most popular companies with younger workers last year. Calcio wrote about it. She covers the workplace for Wall Street Journal. Welcome in the program are having me tesla. It turns out is an amazingly popular workplace with young technically minded people. Go figure that out. It was surprising to me as well. Because the impression that I've gotten that. It's a really frantic place to work. I've talked to people who haven't taken a single vacation in two years by people love it not to buy farther into the Elon Musk cult of personality, but how much of that is because of what he represents which is at some level changing the planet. That's a really great point for all of the drama that has follow. Yuan mosk. It doesn't seem to have dimmed his star much. With engineer minded, you know, big problem solving idealistic you wanting to fight climate change type students and new graduates. He seems kind of like a rebel rockstar figure. Chuckle. No. I mean, it's a little it kind of is. So this is it's a company with Ted quarters in Palo Alto, right in California. The plant is down in Fremont sort in the south bay there in San Francisco Bay, but it's not your typical fund tech startup, right? I mean, this is an assembly line factory plays. Now, not a job where you have beanbags and ping pong tables. This Silicon Valley dream looks very very different than being kind of like a cog in the machine at Google or Facebook where you would come to expect beanbags or, you know, free food at the very least. And there's nothing resembling that at tesla, it's really a car manufacturer and a battery maker at the end of the day. Does it look good on the resume though? Is that part of what's going on here? Not for the job funding next job. Ryan. Yeah. Folks have told me it's really kind of like money in the Bank. You work your butt off give up any semblance of free time, or you know, like work life balance solve these really, really. Complicated problems that no one is attempting. And I think that's really exciting to folks you want to make a difference in the world. There's a great anecdote about this woman who found this tweak in the assembly line. And and yes, so tell us that store. So this is a a woman named a new show who's doing her MBA right now at Carnegie Mellon University. So she's an MBA intern a bunch of business school students who are on the manufacturing assembly line, and she comes up with this idea for a way to tweak the workflow process. She's like, oh my gosh. I'm gonna make a presentation I'm going to put together a PowerPoint and bring everyone together and people seemed into it. They're like, yeah. That's smart. We should definitely do that. She's like great. Let's do a follow up meeting next week, and we can touch base with the management and see if they have a plan for rollout. And she was told by her manager. No, let's just do this now and implemented tomorrow, and that was super exciting for her. I mean, I think that was really the highlight of her summer, and you can kind of see the way in which that idea is really beautiful that promise of. Being able to just step into the job and do your best, you know, fix whatever you think needs fixing it's probably a little bit different. If you're like forty five, and you have lots and lots of years putting together automobiles and you're being told what to do by the intern

Intern Tesla Calcio Laos Wall Street Journal GM San Francisco Bay Fremont Palo Alto Ted Quarters Carnegie Mellon University California Engineer Google Ryan Bank Facebook
Consensual Hugs Seem To Reduce Stress

60-Second Science

02:13 min | 1 year ago

Consensual Hugs Seem To Reduce Stress

"Scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm lucy. Walk wonder friend comes to you. After a stressful day. How do you come for them? Do you? Let them rant. Do you? Pour them glass of wine, those could work. But a new study finds that a very effective technique is also simple and easy. Michael Murphy as a psychology post doc at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. He wanted to know if people who received hugs regularly could handle stress and conflict, better individuals who report perceiving ability of network of support. Individuals tend to show better at Titian when faced with stress, but just because you have a support network doesn't mean that you definitely feel that support. Researchers have argued that many behaviors we use to support others who are stressed might actually be counterproductive because he unintentionally communicate others that they're not competent to manage strap Murphy and his team interviewed four hundred and four men and women every evening for two weeks during these interviews the participants were asked simple, yes or no question. Whether somebody had been that day and a simple, yes. Or no question, whether they experienced conflict pretension with somebody that day, they also were asked questions about their social interactions. How many social? Actions. They had that day and responded to questions about negative positive mood states. And the researchers found that individuals who experience a conflict where not as negatively affected if they received a hug that day as participants experience conflict and didn't get a hug Murphy and his team also. So that people who received a hug didn't carry the negative effect to the next day while those who did not receive a hug would the findings are in the journal plaza. One Murphy doesn't include this caveat. But our findings should not be taken evidence that people should just start hugging. Anyone in that one who seems distress the hug from one Boston were or a stranger on the street that could be neither consensual or positive the ideas to relieve stress not add to it. Thanks relisting for scientific American sixty seconds science. I'm Lucy Wong?

Michael Murphy Lucy Wong Carnegie Mellon University Titian Pittsburgh Boston Sixty Seconds Two Weeks
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Welcome the main engine cutoff. I'm Anthony clans low and we've got some special guests here. We've got Andy and Mike from cube Rover, I ever Andy. Thanks for Anthony. Thanks so much for having us here today. We're really excited to be on your podcast for the first time and hopefully give it a little bit more information about what moon companies are doing. This is we've vaguely touched about moon stuff, mostly policy related on the podcast in the past, but not a lot about actual payloads going to the moon and things like that. So I'm pretty excited to dig into it. So before we get into the technology stuff, that design of cube Rover itself, all that fun stuff. I would really like to hear the roles that you have on the team, and you know what you're working on day to day. So Mike, you want to start. Yeah, sure. So I'm the president of the cube Rover division here at Astra botic, and we're soon spinning out as its own company cube Rover, and I'm the principal investigator on NASA contract under which the key. Rover is being developed in collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University, and that's the small business innovation. What is it was the are. They are. Yeah, I forget what the are is the type of contract used to develop technology focused Pacific toward small like Astra body, and that was a twenty seventeen award. But that came pretty recently. Is that right? Yeah, there is these these phases. So we had a phase one, and then we re proposed for phase two for more dollars and much more. Exciting and bigger development on the project. Leading to that point is kind of interesting because you mentioned that cube Rovers soon to roll off on its own, and you've got these cube Rover, small awards coming from NASA now. So it's seems like an interesting history there. I'm curious to find out how did the project itself start and maybe now the full company, like what is the origin story there. Yeah, I can. I can take that Asser botic and Carnegie Mellon have been working together for ten years since the astronautics inception. And we've developed a lot of Rovers over those years. CMU students and professors have developed their own plant a Rovers over the years all mostly targeting the moon, and it's only been recently that our government has switched its focus, much more towards the moon and started investing in development of technologies, including Rovers to go towards the moon. So what we do is heavy Klabin with with seamew students to develop this Rover is very challenging because of the small size that we're developing. But we have a lot of heritage and learning over the years to lean upon. So what phase would you say cube Rover, both the actual technology, but the company is in at this point in time? Yes. So we're, we're pretty far along with technical progress. We're at what you'd call tier all four going into KIRO five technical technology readiness level. So we have a prototype working driving around in the lab. What we're doing right now is we're trying to build that up to be a flight qualified Rover. So by the end of two thousand or by the middle of two thousand and twenty, we're aiming to have this Rover be ready for flight tested for all space, environmental testing, and ready to send off to NASA if they decide to file it on the company. And we're incorporating right now, we're looking at our location which I can't say where we'll be incorporating, but it will be very soon and we're hoping to have more information on that by the end of the summer. But yeah, we're actually on that note. We're going to be hiring four qb Rover. In probably November or December timeframe. So check out our website for updates on that. Could you talk at all about the decision to roll out as its own standalone enterprise of sorts? Because it seems from from someone like me who's a little bit outside looking in, it seems like a good fit with what Astra botic is offering that you could extend these services to not just Lander, but then have some ability on the surface. So it seems like a good fit there. It is a good fit. It really does align well with us.

cube Rovers NASA Astra botic Carnegie Mellon University Mike Anthony Carnegie Mellon Astra Andy Asser botic KIRO principal investigator president qb Lander ten years
Amazon Alexa mod turns sign language into voice commands

Daily Tech News Show

04:01 min | 2 years ago

Amazon Alexa mod turns sign language into voice commands

"Then listened to entrance late it into text. Sing believes Amazon could incorporate the algorithm into the Amazon echo show, which of course has a camera to allow sign language control of smart speakers. Now, Jeffrey Bigham an expert in human computer. Interaction from Carnegie Mellon University told the BBC. That sings project is an excellent proof of concept, but computer vision and language understanding is not yet capable of fully recognising sign language. It wasn't pooh-poohing what sing did, but he's like, it's not going to be a perfect replacement. At the same time, Amazon today introduced tap to l. exa for the echo show which adds shortcuts to the home screen as a replacement for voice interaction. This is part of their accessibility pushed for the echo show and they rolled out. Captioning to more markets. That's something they'd rolled out in the US, but it's now available in the UK and a few other markets as well. Were you able to try out to Alexa? Is it rolling out slowly or didn't? I didn't dry it out now that you say that I feel like an idiot absolutely should have gone through the Donncha night. Well, maybe it has pushed out to be yet, but I will try it. Well, I don't know. I mean, I don't know anything about sign language, but I know that this is a real. It's a really cool research project, right? Even though there's rewards Zuid. But the thing is, I mean, I would love if he would work with Amazon. I don't know what his angle is here, but I would love Amazon to incorporate this so that you could look at the echo show have a setting flipped on do sign language and have it display text back and the tap program that Amazon launched seems like it would work right into that. This could be an extra option. You could add to it and obviously pursuing accessibility for these devices. Absolutely. Well, I mean, think about voice to taxed. You know, sometimes voice just easier. So sign language. That makes perfect sense. It's really cool. I like it. Hope we see more of it. I like it too. You know what else? I like earning of course, you know, good, bad, ugly alphabet reported cutesy earnings per share of eleven dollars and seventy five cents versus excuse me an expected nine dollars fifty nine cents and revenue of thirty two point. Seven billion dollars which beat expectations of thirty two point. One, seven billion Google's advertising business accounted for. Most of its revenue had in twenty eight billion dollars of their revenues, which includes cloud business and hardware sales for point four billion other bets like healthcare company barely fiber and Waymo post acute to revenue of one hundred forty five million dollars on operating losses of seven hundred thirty two million. So four point. Seven divided by thirty two point. Seven is fourteen percent. Fourteen percent of alphabet revenue comes from not Google advertising, like we're not even talking about Google cloud. It comes from ads sense. It comes from ads. If there is a criticism of alphabet, it's that it's still overly dependent on advertising for its revenue. But this is generally good news for alphabet. Yeah. Well, it's because it is advertising. It has eaten everything. Go ahead and live over over New York listeners, the new York, Daily News laid off fifty percent of its staff today that the part of the really, Yep. Part of the reason why is because ad sales are down everywhere, because Facebook and Google have eaten all of it, they drank, you'll our milkshake. Yeah, they and they are full of twenty eight billion dollars worth of milk Schick right now. I wish they would break out a few more. I'm looking forward to the day that they break out, let's say a Waymo as as a separate line item. I know it's early too early to do that, but maybe verily is pretty close to that because I'd like to see us some of these other alphabet businesses do because you're you're absolutely right. Justin. They are not hurting in the advertising business, but looking down the road looking longer term, the decade-long thing somebody's going to come out and start drinking their milkshake. If they're not careful and they need to have some diversity to survive that. Certainly. So..

Amazon Google Jeffrey Bigham Carnegie Mellon University United States BBC Alexa Donncha UK L. Exa New York Justin Facebook Schick Daily News Twenty Eight Billion Dollars One Hundred Forty Five Million Seven Billion Dollars Fourteen Percent
Powell, Carnegie Mellon and Facebook discussed on The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Powell, Carnegie Mellon and Facebook discussed on The KDKA Radio Afternoon News with Robert Mangino

"Of the economy, Powell told congress he believes the economy is doing well and he. Sees several years of strong jobs and low inflation ahead the. Dow rose fifty five points for. Its fourth straight gain the NASDAQ was up forty nine the SNP gained eleven US industrial production increased. In June led by. A manufacturing rebound and mining gains Facebook's new artificial intelligence research, lab in Pittsburgh will take over space on Carnegie Mellon. University campus tech giant is emphasizing robotics at that facility Boeing has, unveiled a higher twenty year demand forecast four passenger jets the world's, biggest plane.

Powell Carnegie Mellon Facebook SNP Boeing Congress Pittsburgh Twenty Year
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"The players over the owners will also talk about the new ejection rule for hits that are deemed to be unnecessary they do this in college so under that new rule if an official calls a hit unnecessary they can go review it an object the player on the spot as opposed to you know finding the player later on in the week and suspending him then they could do it right there during the game the owners will decide the location of the next couple of nfl drafts nashville denver vegas cleveland kansas city have all been mentioned and of course they will decide a new owner for the carolina panthers david taffer who has already been vetted by the league is minority owner for the pittsburgh steelers should get the official vote sometime tomorrow making him absolutely the new owner of the carolina panthers he spoke yesterday to the graduates at carnegie mellon university and in his own words said it's been a hell of a week he has just bought the carolina panthers for two point two seven five billion dollars his speech the paper said was emotional at times he shared stories from his past and life lessons that helped pave his success he talked a little bit about his dad said that his dad had work sixty hours a week to make ends meet in highschool tapper was a short order cook at a deli sold knives door to door and worked at a bakery he told the grads mellon yesterday a kid from the streets of san francisco had to work his way through college at pitt and graduate school at cmu just got an honorary degree and is giving a commencement speech at this university he said a kid who couldn't afford to go to an nfl game well into his twenties is now on the verge of getting nfl approval to buy the carolina panthers not too shabby he said he said his greatest accomplishment hasn't been heading appaloosas management his miami based hedge fund it hasn't been his philanthropy or his nfl ownership it's being a better father to his three kids than his physically abusive father was to him and that's when he got motion all he said in.

vegas carolina panthers david taffer pittsburgh steelers carnegie mellon university san francisco pitt official nfl cleveland kansas miami two seven five billion dollars sixty hours
Supreme Court will hear privacy case involving Google

News, Traffic and Weather

01:40 min | 2 years ago

Supreme Court will hear privacy case involving Google

"The sight it's unusual it's not something you're gonna get a chance to win this every day but take a look and then keep going because we don't need traffic tie ups or these inspections the work should be wrapped up by the end of the week meghan gold speak kcbs this court will review the settlement of a class action lawsuit involving google which saw most of the settlement money going to organisations rather than users google users had sued the search engine claim that google violated their privacy rights by disclosing to websites with search terms used the users typed in to get their google agreed to pay eight point five million dollars to settle the case the lawyers got about two dollars and most of the remaining money was allocated to six groups who promised to use it to promote privacy on the internet among them the aarp carnegie mellon university and stanford the settlements been upheld by the ninth circuit court of appeals damaged sailboat that ran aground pacifica's linda mar beach over the weekend is set to be towed away today to sausalito for repairs captain tony clark says the thirty three foot boat ran out of gas late saturday night there was no wind to catch sales and the boat began drifting toward the jagged rocks before taking on water and eventually crashing on the beach heiko gareth's the teacher with san francisco school district tells kpi x five he saw one of the passengers struggling in the water and pulled her to shore a lady jumped off and she landed on her face and she wasn't moving and she was yelling so i thought if the boat comes rocking back she's gonna get hurt all four crew members suffered minor injuries the captain says the boat has thousands of dollars worth of damage the crew were on a round the world sale a brazilian surfers being recognized as having ridden the.

Google Aarp Carnegie Mellon Universit Pacifica Linda Mar Beach Tony Clark Heiko Gareth San Francisco School District Meghan Gold Sausalito Five Million Dollars Thirty Three Foot Two Dollars
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"For luke stark a fellow at harvard says there is a way of carrying on with the ad revenue model but limiting advertisers ability to link up taking their data with specific users so it means you don't get this granular data collection but you still you know you can still presumably sell at which would still generate revenue but probably a bit less than facebook is making right now i made euler for marketplace facebook ceo mark zuckerberg is getting all the attention at the moment it's not at all stretch to say that his making the rounds today on capitol hill ahead of his testimony tomorrow was a media free for all but it is also true that zuckerberg is something of a proxy at the moment for the rest of big tech facebook's not the only silicon valley company that collects and uses and makes money from our data on the one hand while having privacy issues on the other so what about those companies to marketplace's eric barris has that one while apple ceo tim cook has said his company is open to regulation google's ben mostly quiet that's because it's easier for apple to speak up its products are closed platforms tim durden ger is a professor at carnegie mellon university google he says is different google doesn't really have a revenue generating actual physical product what they have is information and monetize that information through advertising google has had it scrapes with the ftc that cost the company twenty two million in two thousand twelve part of the settlement included privacy limits which goule has voluntarily kept in place so for now google is enjoying the show they're saying out of the way the train wreck that is that scott galloway who wrote the big form a book about apple amazon facebook and google he calls facebook and google duopoly and the concerns around the company's data security very similar if not the same facebook is under government scrutiny but the whole industry stands to be remolded by regulation already google and other big tech companies doing business in the eu or scrambling to meet new regulations going into effect may twenty fifth jeff pollard an analyst at forrester.

amazon carnegie mellon university ceo luke stark forrester analyst jeff pollard eu scott galloway harvard professor apple google tim cook eric barris facebook mark zuckerberg twenty fifth
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"To apartment investor mastery dot com got questions from me want to pick up a copy of the think realty magazine that you can find that the 84 lumber stores or barnes and noble you know how to do it just gone over there pick it up and you know what it's called conveniently titled think realty magazine so make sure you do that got questions from me abdelhakam hit me up and instagram because i am always answering your questions and it's on instagram all the time avi call har so let's go and get brad online bragging with me by an area i can let's get started man i have one question that i generally asked to all my guests before we get the show on the road and that is you can be as dramatic as you want by the way are you in a real estate of might am i in the real estate of mine that'd be question that's the question that's the million dollar question for your breath absolutely i mean i got into real estate sixteen years ago and it's been my faster and you know both as an investor and as an educator and i mean it's done so many things for my life that that's uh you know an mba then engineering degree and never never did for may so absolutely that's awesome degree degrees you have have a lot more in common than i thought 'i'm into juniors yeah i graduated from carnegie mellon university back in 1989 uh is in chemical engineering nice that's a generally i think i would that's the hardest engineering degree next two electrical engineering which was my degree from the university of michigan and i think that is so you understand logic you understand flow and i'm really started to have this conversation with you because it's the numbers it's the emotion behind the deal than of course it's getting the deal done so let's start off by introducing a little bit about who you are and what you too yeah oh you.

carnegie mellon university brad university of michigan million dollar sixteen years
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Apartment investor mastery dot com got questions from me want to pick up a copy of the think realty magazine that you can find that the 84 lumber stores orban's noble you know how to do it just gone over there pick it up and you know what it's called conveniently titled think realty magazine so make sure you do that got questions from me abdelhakam hit me up an instagram because i am always answering your questions in its two on instagram all the time an avi call har so let's go and get brad online brad you with me by an area i can let's go get started man i have one question that i generally asked to all my guests before we get the show on the road and that is you can be as dramatic as he walked by the way are you in a real estate of might am i in real estate of mine is that be question bats the question that's the million dollar question for you brand absolutely i mean i got into real estate sixteen years ago and that's been my pashtoon you know both as an investor and as an educator and i mean it's done so many things for my life that that um you know an mba and eventually tear into your aid never never do for may so absolutely that's awesome degree do have you and i have a lot more in common than i thought i'm in the juniors will yeah i graduated from carnegie mellon university back in 1989 uh is in chemical engineering nice that's generally i think i would say that's the hardest engineering degree next two electrical engineering which was my degree from the university of michigan and i think that is so you understand logic you understand flow and i'm really started to have this conversation with you because it's the numbers it's the emotion behind the deal and of course it's getting the deal done so let's start off by introducing a little bit about who you are and what you do yeah.

brad carnegie mellon university university of michigan million dollar sixteen years
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"I am always answering your questions and instant on instagram all the time and avi call har so let's go and give brad online brad you with me by an area i can let's get start a man i have one question that i generally asked the all my guests before we get the show on the road and that is you could these dramatic as he walked by the way are you in a real estate of might am i in the real estate of mine is that'd be question that's the question that's the million dollar question for you brad absolutely i mean i got into real estate sixteen years ago and it's been my faster than you know both is an investor and is an educator and i mean this on so many thanks for my life that that um you know an mba an engineering degree never never did for may so absolutely that's awesome degree do you have you and i have a lot more in common than i thought i'm an engineer as well yeah i graduated from carnegie mellon university back in 1989 uh is in chemical engineering nice that's a generally i think i would say that's the hardest engineering degree next two electrical engineering which was my degree from the university of michigan and i think that is so you understand logic you understand flow and i'm really excited to have this conversation with you because it's the numbers it's the emotion behind the deal than of course it's getting the deal done so let's start off by introducing a little bit about who you are and what you do yeah so you know yeah i was late and because and i spent seventeen yearly corporate america uh uh often so i was thirty five years old before i ever thought about in real estate you know i got an engineering degree and mba my dad his three years of college so you know i'd dass boss finished his college degree or engineering as a matter of fact that my parents incurs me go to school study harkless graves graduate from college and and have a good job so that i can have a better life than what they had so that's pretty much what i did you.

brad engineer carnegie mellon university university of michigan thirty five years million dollar sixteen years three years
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Got an men and women but she says the president's tax overhaul and repeated calls to gut the affordable care act have been betrayals of the working men and women who put their faith in him that said again villeroux says now is the best moment they've had in decades to push for a better nafta for the world jason margolis new haven connecticut jason's reporting is part of our fifty states project to find more of our coverage of how globalization is affecting america's economy had over the pri dot org slash fifty states at five zero states a lot of economists are sounding alarm bells about donald trump's apparent push toward protectionism and an all out retaliatory trade war they say history is clear that is a bad idea lee branstetter is professor of economics at carnegie mellon university so am i right in thinking the last big push toward protectionism was in the thirties right after the famous it 1929 crash uh stock market crash well that is the historic precedent over all afraid of so you're absolutely light bright and the late 20s and early thirties there was a massive movement to protectionism at that time the great crash it already happened lots of people worried about jobs and so in this case to republican members of congress mr smooth and mr hawley introduced a massive hike in tariffs that president herbert hoover thought about rejecting but in the end he signed and that triggered a global trade war which brought huge declines in global trade and made the great depression far worse so protectionism ultimately made the depression the great depression well it it didn't make the great depression there were lots of things going wrong but the trade war that was begun then definitely made the great depression worse it made the pain greater made the employment losses more significant and that's a lesson that both republicans and democrats took away.

president villeroux donald trump lee branstetter carnegie mellon university congress mr hawley herbert hoover jason margolis connecticut america professor of economics
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Zero kfi am 640 let's talk about the art of smart thinking dr james heart serves as the president and founder of the bio cyber not institute inc he holds a bachelor's and science in physics from carnegie institute of technology anna masters of science had phd in psychology from carnegie mellon university and has done postdoctoral training in its saco physiology at the langley porter psychiatric institute at the university of california san francisco dr heart is author or co authored more than sixty papers and professional presentations he has dedicated his life in the research and development surrounding brain wave training is developed the technology based on the e gene measurement and feedback which has demonstrated significant effectiveness in healing in transforming core dimensions of personality dysfunction reducing stress and anxiety reversing key aspects of the brain's aging process increasing creativity and boosting iq dr heart thank you for joining us this evening it's a pleasure to be with you thank you for the invitation what an exciting time to be alive and this is something i was interested in talking about were kicking off a brand new year there are people out there that are always looking like myself to try to find ways to improve ourselves to find healthier versions of of fixing the issues that we see in our personalities and our memories and are in our mind that are you know not reliant upon drugs or or constant medical treatment that's what really kind of drew me to your work in attention talks meal but if you would about how you started to uh developed this this feedback system and and and hung into this would be so helpful well i didn't know that it would be so helpful when i started uh you know there's a really cool founder story here because i was a physics major at carnegie institute of technology and i came out of the student union after lunch when day and there was a big campaign it's fine where every letter was a different color and it said dr joe camille we'll talk on brain waves and consciousness and gave the time that oh my god that's just ten minutes and it was at the building just right over here and.

president and founder carnegie mellon university langley porter psychiatric ins dr joe camille dr james heart carnegie institute of technolo postdoctoral university of california founder ten minutes
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KELO

"Let's talk about the art of smart thinking dr james heart serves as the president and founder of the bio cyber not institute inkie holzer a bachelor's and science in physics from carnegie institute of technology anna masters of science of phd in psychology from carnegie mellon university and debt has done postdoctoral training in its saco physiology at the langley porter psychiatric institute at the university of california san francisco dr heart is authored or co authored more than sixty papers and professional presentations he has dedicated his life in the research and development surrounding brain wave training he developed the technology based on the e gene measurement and feedback which is demonstrated significant effectiveness in healing in transforming core dimensions of personality dysfunction reducing stress and anxiety reversing key aspects of the brain's aging process increasing creativity and boosting iq that your heart thank you for joining us this evening it's a pleasure to be with you thank you for the invitation what an exciting time to be alive in this is something i was interested in talking about were kicking off a brand new year there are people out there that are always looking like myself to try to find ways to improve ourselves to find healthier versions of of fixing the issues that we see in our personalities and our memories and are in our mind that are not reliant upon drugs or or constant medical treatment that's what really kinda drew me to your work in attention talk meal but if you would about how you started to uh developed this this feedback system and and in hungary this would be so helpful well i didn't know that it would be so helpful when i started uh you know there's a really cool founder story here because i was a physics major it carnegie institute of technology and i came out of the student union after lunch one day and there was a big handpainted sign where every let it was a different color and it said dr jill camille we'll talk on brain waves and consciousness and gave a time that oh my god that's just ten minutes and it was at the building just right over here and.

president and founder carnegie mellon university langley porter psychiatric ins dr heart dr jill camille dr james heart carnegie institute of technolo science of phd postdoctoral university of california hungary founder ten minutes one day
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

GeekWire - Geared Up

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on GeekWire - Geared Up

"We're doing this driving or you know being in a car going somewhere would be a lot safer and you know i see a point where they say cartridge is going to do the driving for you you know i'm headed the pittsburgh in february i don't know if you know about the sender and that is really a center of selfdriving cars based on a lot of the robotics were coming out of carnegie mellon university rivers doing their selfdriving car testing there a lot of this stuff is actually getting out into the wild and it's not going to be fifteen years of obviously fifteen years is when it could be mandatory us what you're saying but this is something that people are experiencing in everyday life now not only through features of things like tesla's flynn also just in in real real the real world in terms of uber and in pittsburgh absolutely okay so that is trend number two autonomous driving and this is one that i'm really excited about over the air wireless charging of devices this has been a promise that seems like magic of several companies for a number of years i think you're finally going to see this start to come into the mainstream at cvs this year there are a few companies a year that this is this is the year before your name the call for yet what you're saying is you have your smartphone yes look like marvel the average smartphone you walk into a room or you just you're just near something come within range anger of all eyes of a of a charging wireless charger eta ufologist start charging yeah went today when we say wireless charger what we're saying is you place your phone on a charging base without playing it in a charges this type of wireless charging is more of an environmental thing where you get near something and your phone just start charging that is crazy it's over the air it works much like wifi in in concept yes the issue is that all of these companies which we can talk about here they need to get small chips embedded in the devices themselves to be able to receive that wireless energy beam and essentially and so there's a little bit of an.

pittsburgh tesla flynn wifi energy beam carnegie mellon university fifteen years
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Chips with Everything

Chips with Everything

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Chips with Everything

"The guardian when we talk about online society and community issues of power dynamics come up a lot who wields power in social media discourse who feel safe online and who doesn't who feels represented in who doesn't you've probably heard something about manolis fair before you know internet communities where guys go to vent their anger or their fear about women and particularly about feminism of course misogyny itself is nothing new but some of these communities can be pretty toxic even hateful and they've raised a lot of questions for online society i'm meal exander and welcome to chips with everything from the guardian our guest today is angela wash co a game developer writer a teacher at carnegiemellon university angela has been doing both art and research about the self in virtual space for some time now up particularly when it comes to issues of gender and she's even done some deep dives into the manas fear so i'm antle wash co and i'm an artist of video game developer and a writer um i also teacher carnegie mellon university and pittsburgh a shorter transition from during a lot of performances inside massively multiplayer online role playing games most frequently inside world of warcraft i was operating as the council on gender sensitivity m behavioral awareness in world of warcraft for four years um and more recently i've been interested in actually making some of my own games recently i've been working on a a longterm research project.

writer developer carnegie mellon university social media carnegiemellon university pittsburgh world of warcraft four years
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on TechStuff

"This actually dates to the 1980s in a computer lab at carnegie mellon university it's amazing that we can actually tracked down the birth of the moada khan as it is used today often these sort of things end up being buried in legend in lower and we never really understand where something came from it just we can can of point when it became popular but anything before that tends to be a mystery not so in this case because things that existed online have a habit of sticking around even if that online was just online in the case of a of a local network and not the internet at large because we're talking about 1982 most universities didn't have access to the internet carnegie mellon probably in exception to that but this was not a internet mean this was very local on a bulletin board system so we can pinpoint the date of a motaqawi creation to september nineteenth nineteen eighty two so here's what was happening computer science students and other students who had become interested in computers uh were using a school electron bullet electronic bulletin board system or be be asked to post messages to one another so this was a predecessor to the news groups and forums that you would find over the internet but this would be a decade before the world wide web ever existed to access abebe s typically you would use a dial up modem and you would call a phone number that would be connected to a specific computer that hosted the bulletin boards system uh some of these bulletin board systems could only have one connection at a time so you might try and calling get a busy signal and you'd have to wait and try and call later you also had la bolton board systems that tried to regulate traffic by charging per minute of use and that way you could cut down on someone just hogging the bulletin boards system just for him or herself.

carnegie mellon university carnegie mellon bulletin board system world wide web computer science bolton