35 Burst results for "Carnegie Mellon University"

Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

Environment: NPR

02:03 min | 8 months ago

Pittsburgh Wants You to See Constellations

"When astronomer diane turn shack move to pittsburgh in nineteen eighty-one she noticed. Something big was missing from the night sky. When i grew up in new england you could just walk outside and look up and see the milky way. But when i arrived in pittsburgh the sky had started to decline in quality. Still she says at the time her students at carnegie mellon university were very familiar with the milky way they knew about stars and constellations. That is not the case anymore forty years later. I have to explain what the milky way is and describe what it looks like in a show pictures and they think those pictures are fake. Because of light pollution major constellations can be totally invisible in cities. The pittsburgh city council is now trying to do something about it with the help of scientists like turn check. It passed a dark sky. Ordinance last week to reduce light pollution. This city is going to replace streetlights with warm tone. Led lights and they're also going to install shields so that late doesn't travel up what we're trying to do is cut out the light at the blue end of the spectrum because blue light scatters more easily than red light in the atmosphere rate. That's why the sky is blue. So blue light scatters everywhere. It doesn't stay where your lighting and to measure progress. She has some help in the higher ups in august. The astronauts on the international space station took some pictures of pittsburgh for on a clear night. And that's the before shot. The astronauts are gonna continue to take pictures of pittsburgh so we will have during pictures and after pictures. Terzic believes that as the sky's get darker more people will look up. In wonder that means more people more children will be able to see it and the benefits of being connected to half of our universe. I can't overstate that. It's a spiritual thing to feeling of connection with the universe she's hopeful it will peak young people's interest in the stars above and encourage them to pursue subjects such as

Diane Turn Pittsburgh Pittsburgh City Council Carnegie Mellon University New England Terzic International Space Station
Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

Environment: NPR

02:15 min | 9 months ago

Power Grids Feel the Pressure of Intense Storms

"Hurricane ida crumpled a major transmission tower. That survived katrina sixteen years ago building infrastructure. That strong enough is hard when the target keeps moving because storms are getting stronger energy consultant alison silverstein says utilities and their regulators can take planning cues from murphy's law. We need to assume that everything possible that could go wrong is going to go wrong. Simultaneously and murphy is always gonna win. President biden's climate plan includes a much bigger role for electricity electric cars. For example cutting carbon footprint says easier with electricity from emission free sources like wind solar and nuclear. But even those have to stand up to extreme weather putting wires underground may seem obvious but engineering professor destiny. Knock at carnegie mellon university says that won't always work in hurricane country where you might have under grounded. The lines to protect them from wind putting them underground makes them more susceptible to flooding knock. Says it's never just one thing that's going to keep the lights. On energy experts. We interviewed agree on a few basic ideas though. They say the grid should be more decentralized so the whole thing doesn't shut down at once. More generation out in communities such as solar power would accomplish that but new orleans utility energy has resisted calls for just that to the frustration of local activists at mit engineering professors. Or up. a mean says not all the fixes are technical. He says power companies also need to become more agile and do more when responding to storms the fact that some utilities are not able to sort of respond immediately is also another kind of failure which is perhaps as drastic as the infrastructure. Failures is assuming outages will happen. Amin says utilities should focus more on dispatching generators even before a storm to make sure important facilities and vulnerable populations get electricity restored as soon as possible. All this cost money that usually ends up in utility bills. Congress is working on major funding through infrastructure bills. That could address some of these issues. There also focused on president. Biden's climate goals including zeroing out greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector by twenty thirty five.

Hurricane Ida Alison Silverstein President Biden Murphy Katrina Carnegie Mellon University Hurricane MIT New Orleans Amin Congress Biden
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"My research group investigates how energy poverty will be affected by energy transitions an creates methods for identifying who is experiencing energy poverty when people hear the word poverty they usually think of people who have trouble affording their basic needs and the energy space most people assume in individuals energy port if they spend more than six percent of their income meeting their energy needs. The problem is that this assumes everyone is spending all the money. They need to keep their house at a comfortable temperature cook and use all of the other electricity appliances. We have become dependent on this misses. The people who use space heaters and their ovens to heat their homes due to high natural gas and oil prices and what about the people who keep their houses really hot in the summer because they cannot afford electricity in my research group we have created an energy poverty metric called the energy equity gap which identifies the households that are cutting their electricity consumption to reduce their financial burden. The energy equity gap is based on the difference in outdoor temperatures which members of different income groups are likely to start using their a c. We find that. The energy equity gap between low in high income groups ranges from four point seven degrees fahrenheit to seven point five degrees fahrenheit meaning on average low income households. Wait seven degrees longer to turn. On their ac units. Some households will even wait until it is above eighty degrees. This puts them at risk of heat. Stroke and heat. Exhaustion foregoing air-conditioning also increases the humidity in the house meaning the occupants will be at greater risk from mold asthma and allergens. We hope this new dimension of energy poverty will be used in addition to traditional income based energy poverty metrics to reduce the number of people suffering from energy poverty.

Stroke mold asthma
Destenie Nock of Carnegie Mellon University on Fixing Energy Poverty

The Academic Minute

01:52 min | 9 months ago

Destenie Nock of Carnegie Mellon University on Fixing Energy Poverty

"My research group investigates how energy poverty will be affected by energy transitions an creates methods for identifying who is experiencing energy poverty when people hear the word poverty they usually think of people who have trouble affording their basic needs and the energy space most people assume in individuals energy port if they spend more than six percent of their income meeting their energy needs. The problem is that this assumes everyone is spending all the money. They need to keep their house at a comfortable temperature cook and use all of the other electricity appliances. We have become dependent on this misses. The people who use space heaters and their ovens to heat their homes due to high natural gas and oil prices and what about the people who keep their houses really hot in the summer because they cannot afford electricity in my research group we have created an energy poverty metric called the energy equity gap which identifies the households that are cutting their electricity consumption to reduce their financial burden. The energy equity gap is based on the difference in outdoor temperatures which members of different income groups are likely to start using their a c. We find that. The energy equity gap between low in high income groups ranges from four point seven degrees fahrenheit to seven point five degrees fahrenheit meaning on average low income households. Wait seven degrees longer to turn. On their ac units. Some households will even wait until it is above eighty degrees. This puts them at risk of heat. Stroke and heat. Exhaustion foregoing air-conditioning also increases the humidity in the house meaning the occupants will be at greater risk from mold asthma and allergens. We hope this new dimension of energy poverty will be used in addition to traditional income based energy poverty metrics to reduce the number of people suffering from energy poverty.

Mold Asthma Stroke
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:41 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Research group investigates how energy poverty will be affected by energy transitions an creates methods for identifying who is experiencing energy poverty when people hear the word poverty they usually think of people who have trouble affording their basic needs and the energy space most people assume in individuals energy port if they spend more than six percent of their income meeting their energy needs. The problem is that this assumes everyone is spending all the money. They need to keep their house at a comfortable temperature cook and use all of the other electricity appliances. We have become dependent on this misses. The people who use space heaters and their ovens to heat their homes due to high natural gas and oil prices and what about the people who keep their houses really hot in the summer because they cannot afford electricity in my research group we have created an energy poverty metric called the energy equity gap which identifies the households that are cutting their electricity consumption to reduce their financial burden. The energy equity gap is based on the difference in outdoor temperatures which members of different income groups are likely to start using their a c. We find that. The energy equity gap between low in high income groups ranges from four point seven degrees fahrenheit to seven point five degrees fahrenheit meaning on average low income households. Wait seven degrees longer to turn. On their ac units. Some households will even wait until it is above eighty degrees. This puts them at risk of heat. Stroke and heat. Exhaustion foregoing air-conditioning also increases the humidity in the house meaning the occupants will be at greater risk from mold asthma and allergens. We hope.

Stroke mold asthma
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:25 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh carnegie mellon university week. Getting ahead of a virus is critical. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute amir barati firmani assistant professor of mechanical engineering. Finds a way to do so. Why is zora. Sneaky lethal pathogens. That can rick. How work on the human body before the immune system knows how to destroy them. Machine learning is a tool to outer smart witesses by speeding up the process of developing antibodies. My lap develops gore was for machine. Learning that can unfair learn and predict mechanical systems. based on data. ba can use these algorithms. To learn the complex antigen antibody attractions of wireless faster than the human immune system can with ebola and source of two which causes co with nineteen these potentially saving thousands of lives. Scientists currently used expensive and time consuming computational and physics based models to screen antibody sequences. These methods required information. You might not have yet about new virus. This is where machine learning can do the heavy lifting when kobe nineteen eighty mares. Our research team combined available biological data on other infectious viruses into a data set. We use these to train. Machine learning models selecting the best performing model to thousands of antibodies. Their model identified eight stable. Antibodies highly efficient in neutralizing source cove to these machine. Learning model can help. Scientists zero in quickly on the base. Antibodies to further investigate. It can also be used when mutation emerge. We are now working to make predictions about the interplay of kobe. Nineteen and fact has like the number of cases in each state based on how many people were vaccinated and that was a mere barati ceremony of carnegie mellon university. You can find this other segments and more information about the professors at academic minute dot. Org production support for the academic. Minute comes from a a c and you advancing liberal learning at research for the public good..

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg amir barati firmani carnegie mellon university zora ebola rick gore
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

02:29 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh carnegie mellon university weak infrastructure can keep people locked in the past. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute daniel armani ios assistant professor in the department of engineering and public policy explores how to understand the complex social legacy of our infrastructure. We must recognize that embedded within its physical embodiments are a wide array of people and organizations both past and present. Our research conceptualize is bridges as institutional relics institutional in that engineers designed bridges according to standards of the time relics in that. These standards are explicitly built into the bridges physical attributes which persist even when these standards changes societies evolve. These bridges do not just carry outdated standards but also social buys. He's from the time as physical infrastructure is difficult to move. New infrastructures often built along. These outdated footprints further locking in these biopsies using data up to twenty ten we find communities with greater percentages of african. Americans and hispanics are still associated with fewer bridges and associated with more restrictive bridges clearance constrict the free flow of buses or trucks. When they even get one in another study we find that even one new bridge in a city increases high growth startup rates by sixteen percents outdated infrastructure therefore continues to systematically shut out black and brown communities from accessing economic opportunities are infrastructure does not just transport people goods and services. They transport new ideas and with them. Hope and opportunity. They also perpetuate outdated ideas that give bias in exclusion continued life so the next time you cross a bridge think about all the benefits of access connection and innovation. The you take for granted from this silent engineering marvel however also think about the community intersected and displaced to make that possible. Their connection to infrastructures often unwanted one. That's still shunts. Their prospects that duality typifies the complicated social legacy of our infrastructure systems that permeates persist through its brick mortar steel and that was daniel armani dose of carnegie mellon university. You can find this other segments and more information about the professors at academic minute dot. Org production support for the academic. Minute comes from a ac and you advancing liberal learning and research for the public good..

daniel armani dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg department of engineering and carnegie mellon university
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

The Academic Minute

01:52 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on The Academic Minute

"Oh on carnegie mellon university week. What if you could control something by just thinking. I'm dr lynn. Pascarella president of the association of american colleges and universities and today on the academic minute bin he professor of biomedical engineering explains mind. Control is no longer science fiction. They bring computer interface facial. Bci is a device that allows individuals control emerging or computer just by thinking about knowing invasive eeg base to use a bring way. What eeg to recording dakota bring intention. That is safe and convenient compared to more risky in they. She'll message that. Use a brain implant generally take longer to learn and users ultimately very im- performance. We have luke into mind controlled by examining bring side story and the hypothesize that meditation or yoga is able to enhance and improve a individuals ability to control a bci will recently completed a large scale human study involving a week course in simple widely practiced meditation techniques to test the effect as a potential training tool for bci control however results showed that humans with just a weeks of lessons in mindful. Meditation training demonstrate significant advantage compared to those with no prior. meditation training. The meditation group performed a much better than the control group and learn the mind control skills much faster than the control group. Meditation has been widely practice for well being an improving house. I will work demonstrate that it can also enhance a person's mental powerful mental control and ultimately.

dr lynn Pascarella association of american colleg carnegie mellon university Bci bin dakota
Fairness Aware Outlier Detection

Data Skeptic

01:48 min | 1 year ago

Fairness Aware Outlier Detection

"I might mention prime. And i'm a student in much lending in public policy at carnegie mellon university. I might've said basically focuses on baton minding on this action and this isn't support systems. I think a lot of people have a vague conception of what anomaly detection is. You're welcome to give a formal definition or an informal one but to you. What is anomaly detection. A nominee addiction is typically. I'll give you a former left. Nation or infamous sense of what an effective is an omni is defined as anything which dates from the normal. So as against the definition of normal is again dependent on the application or the domain better. You are applying tim. Bontemps insolence example. If you're meeting at a classroom right. So it's you're looking under classroom. And if you're dusted regarding ages of the people present in the classroom on the students typically would have age range between say eighteen and twenty one and maybe professor has in asia injured in party fight. Bless or something. I'm just making this up right. So in that sense. The normal is defined because we are under guarding h defined by maybe the ages Drain so in that sense. The deter would be an anomaly in that sense because teachers age his on her age is like different from the nominal. It's in that sense. That would be anomaly in this case. Essentially a number is a field with strives to unusual activity or unusual observations in a given domain. And that's not a nominalization with and since it's about finding unusual things you typically find applications of anomaly detection intrusion detection save. Fraud detection are even in medical domains. Light say epileptic seizure detection on salon.

Bontemps Carnegie Mellon University TIM Asia
A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

My Seven Chakras

05:45 min | 1 year ago

A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

"It's time to bring on our special guest today. Kim jesse so. Kim is the author of radical infusion of globally recognized in innovation leader and founder of intuition lab. Her work has been featured are supported by leading edge organizations such as out by southwest carnegie mellon university comcast and hewlett packard while working as a leader in the tech sector. Kim recognize that tremendous role that intuition plays in business and cultural progress and set out on a quest to learn everything there is to know about it and as of nearly two decades worth of research and practice she has developed a powerful system that anyone can tap into to access the inner wisdom in ordinary with so really really exciting and kim. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me excited to talk to you tonight. Yeah me too. It's supposed to be in our species night especially in india because it is valley the festival of lights and there's actually a transformation going on in india as well. This started many decades back because as you know india and the valleys associated with firecrackers people becoming more and more conscious as they let go off that external firecrackers and realized the light that is within them the lamp within the essence within. I think that's got me to do our own in to it absolutely. Is that inner light that intellect growing so strong. It's such a beautiful metaphor and it's a beautiful day for us to be having this conversation because it really all does tie together absolutely so. Let's start from the beginning. Where were you born and warm. Was your childhood lane. Well i was born in a little town called carlisle pennsylvania small town girl and You know i think i had. I had sort of your colonial white picket fence upbringing in one thousand nine hundred eighty s america which was really fun and if you remember the eighties and so it was really fun. Time to grow up. And i think that's it's those times it really started to develop my interest in intuition and i had a lot of intuitive experiences growing up so It all kind of stemmed from those childhood years amazing and work sort of influence. Did your family have on your intuitive or spiritual development. Yeah you know. That's a really good question because a lot of people we have this talk about intuition and when it happens to you intuition can be something that people can either accept or not accept right so when you're talking about kids and it's so important with kids because kids have such great in and they haven't really had it beaten out of the yet. It's one of these things still alive and still so connected with intuitive. Things starts to happen with children. Appearance can either encourage that or they can create fear. Be like oh my gosh. This is something to be afraid of or this is crazy. You know so it's You know working with intuition in my childhood it was challenging for me. Because i think coming from a really sort of traditional christian background. There's not a lot of room for intuition. Especially it was more of the protestant. I think in the catholic traditions. There's more of a place for the holy spirit in a lot of mistakes but in my experiences growing up in my little world there was not a place for intuition and so it was something i really had to come to terms with on my own and really facing a lot of fears and a lot of sort of judgment from the people around me and now they get it like my mom's very intuitive she inherited from her. I think it is something that we have a genetic propensity to. But i think there's just not that level of acceptance which in the east which i think is so wonderful about you know eastern cultures. Intuition is so much more integrated in daily life and acceptance right. Yeah that's that's very true. And i think like we were discussing before the india was india also is going to its own journey of realizing how abundant and whilst our own heritage is and going back to our roots realizing that wisdom about intuition and the mind and the soul and yes we're going through our journey as a country has But you know what what comes to. My mind is As i learned more about how children behave like a child always looking at his mom or her mom or her danna his dad for approval right. They're always looking at the so. It's not so much of words but it's also about how the bench reacts to. A certain situation are something that is happening on the word. Maybe that micro reaction that can make a huge difference right in terms of how the child approaches word even as an adult absolutely absolutely in those little foundational moments. They and this is talk a lot about conditioning. If you read my booker you hear me talk today. I'm probably going to use that word. A lot Because intuition is something that is really a counterbalance to this conditioning. That we all get and we get it from those very first moments with our family and with the people that we grow with you know. We're conditioned to think things. Like oh intuitions not real. Or we're conditioned thank like our imagination in our creativity isn't as important as our intellectual side so so part of really balancing these sides of our brains and really coming into our true being is stepping away from that conditioning in releasing it

Kim Jesse Southwest Carnegie Mellon Univ India KIM Hewlett Packard Comcast Carlisle Pennsylvania America Danna
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Soviet-backed. Man's if you were talking about Super symmetrically as an extension of standard model beach. Dan requires Not require but then hypothesize Particles would be having seen a and one of the jitters of the large hadron collider in geneva is to cease to see if they can actually detect some particles in may two collisions major major experiments and so far be cabinet found them But more recently you applying this Emerging ideas in declining and machine learning in particle physics paper out entitled to and physics eveland classification it. Cms open data applying image as deep learning through detector data for direct classification of coalition Let's see this eight great application because you have tongue tons of data and And i wonder this would be more in Unsupervised learning right Because you don't really have label tita you In any way do we re too. I mean does this can be know. Supervised learning unsupervised learning So maybe sort of just to to connect to what we talked about before you know we talked about. You know upgrading our a detector making it you know giving it sort of better but a heart were up at her. You know instruments So this is sort of one way to sort of improve your experiment and the other is to sort of become more You know creative with respect to how you analyze the data how you try to tease out certain effects or how you try to understand the data and machine learning is very very You know wade sort of to To do this and i have to admit. I ignored machine learning for quite a long time. Which you know. I always sort of you know I always sort of said you know look you know. What is this machine. learning all about. We hear party physics. You know we have been using neural networks for like thirty. Years de classify our data. What are you guys sort of talking about his machine learning and i truly sort of ignored it and Like three or four years ago One my graduate students sort of became a little bit interested in machine learning and this is a great thing in the beauty of being a professor. You know you know you learn with your students and you learn from your students and be sort of you know started to talk. And i sort of realized yeah. There's quite a few things that i had ignored that i had not paid attention that happened..

geneva Dan cabinet
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"But if you don't find it you cannot reject it. That's right yes that's right. I thought this is. This is sort of the interesting thing about doing. Research in your. You don't really know what you're looking for in always you know a back and forth if you know what theoretical models and you know people who come up with a great series And then there are extra mental lists like me who sort of search for them. And if you don't find them then you know this is sort of feedback for people who build other theoretical models and that really exciting thing is you know you don't know what nature really hasn't story. You know stupid symmetry you no mathematical very you know elegant fury but it is very possible that you know nature hasn't really realized this and has may be realized something completely different that we don't think about yet and so this is sort of this back and forth between you know carrying out an experiment and verifying a theory Like you know we have verified are standard model for many years worth looking for fury. That's not the improvement. You know as i said nature might not have realized of this kind of sierra evansville in to as it appears mathematically very elegant. You mentioned the cms detector that That that you are making at cmu will what exactly is cms. A cms stands for the compact megan solely annoyed So it sort of describes a little bit Sort of some of the elements of the of the of the detector. So the detector itself is you know a large It's it's it's sort of. Latch like how it's really big I sometimes like to tell the story that Some years ago Maybe five years ago or something like this. I spent the summer with my family Own and it wasn't a time like now where the accelerate didn't We were actually able to go down in the cavern and you look at the cms detector. And i had told you know my my wife and my daughters saber. I dunno search and fourteen at that time You know it's really large. You know and so we come down there and you know the first thing they say. Wow it's really large like like who. Who listens saturday at here. It says you know people say. Nfc's the some of the largest machine that be ever built right. Yeah i think this is really correct you know. I don't want to sort of get into inaugural arch than others or into the bigger is better aspect it is you know a Through the collider it is in a tunnel that is about one hundred meter underground in the geneva area in In switzerland and the tunnel itself circumference of almost seventeen a mile so it is really a you know quite a bigger instrument and then you know the detectors themselves may do a few numbers so the cms detector. is about fifteen meters high fifty meters wide about twenty meters sort of long sort of like a house and it's made out of different components and it's called compact because it has a lot of likes steel in its outer apart More than what. It's in the eiffel taller And sometimes tried to point out. It's also called compact because another experiment assists expert which is called. The atlas experiment ended this Twice as large twice as long twice a high house..

sierra evansville cmu megan Nfc geneva switzerland
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:13 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Mike yesterday is professor Who is a professor of physics at carnegie mellon university Member of the cms experiment operating at the large cap on collider the alleged. See at sun. He's looking for the production of dark matter political in collision See he has also set up. A lab at the university to build. Electric devices without creative component of the detector called the end cap. Cannoli her in recent years he has talked to explore nova machine learning these approaches for even classification particle physics bakkies interested. You send mail to go. Beyond the classic data analysis approaches that have been used in particle physics. For many years though manfred could afternoon Thank you for having me gil absolutely i. So i want to start with superstars and villanova general discussion with you. On what the super symmetry and the ways important my understanding manson i have video limited understanding of this is that be have. We have a reasonably established Idea 'cause standard moral of patients that the can't quite explain a the standard model and so super cemeteries principle that might allow us to go beyond that. And i understand that there are multiple super simply tvs around so if you do sort of set the context for standard models list and why super sooner streets symmetric game about yang I think you have a pretty good understanding. But maybe to sort of set the context let sort of define what we call it. The standard model of particle physics. And maybe. we'll start with the with the adam where we know you know. An atom made out of a nucleus that is surrounded by electrons and then inside the nucleus the protons and neutrons. And now we know you know. The protons neutrons have us substructure and the are quirks inside a proton neutron. And so this. Are you know elementary particles that we consider nowadays as elementary inside to proton and a neutron are two different types of quirks because upwards into down quirks and it turns out the are They sort of come in pairs and become a family so they are sort of three types of families for a total of six quirks savino nowadays to there's a just do so so became a long payment for so became from earth. Water fire as fundamentally do to adams and And then you've got into quads so we know that now The protons and neutrons inside Of quads and right. You've quotes right Comedy company different quotes exist..

carnegie mellon university manfred villanova gil Mike manson sun savino adams
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:34 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

David Lander, 'Squiggy' on 'Laverne & Shirley,' dies at 73

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

David Lander, 'Squiggy' on 'Laverne & Shirley,' dies at 73

"Actor David lander famous for playing squeaky on laverne and Shirley has died after dealing with multiple sclerosis for decades he was seventy three I marquees are a letter with a look at his career David lander signature line was one word long comedy partnership with Michael McKean as students at Carnegie Mellon University they played Lenny and squeaky on laverne and Shirley from nineteen seventy six to nineteen eighty three lander hid his multiple sclerosis at first but said in a two thousand AP interview he went public with it to show it was not a death sentence not all crippling it doesn't mean it's the end of the world it doesn't mean that you can't lead a normal life now there are drugs to help you live that life and people should be aware of that

David Lander Laverne Shirley Multiple Sclerosis Michael Mckean Carnegie Mellon University Lenny Lander AP
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Really unbelievable again. It automatically getting the measurement taken. Their of david millers is like the the radius at most precise measurement. Yeah so arm. So what happens is a laser. That's being fired between earth which are a mile apart and win the when the gravitational wave comes through it moves the mirrors less than than the than the radio of a nucleus of adelaide. And yet it's able to be detected right so that's one part the you're measuring one part in ten to the twenty four. That's unbelievable it. Mind boggling that this is this is been accomplished. yes oh so. In new framework effective seal a avenue reduce it to a particle you could actually predict the existence of Or even the properties of gravity waves when two black holes merge right right so we use the effective field theory. It's a lot easier to understand so let electric. I say we should i say so. How how did the gravity waves show up. So what happens is to black holes. If they're near enough to each other they start to they start to go the orbit each other and as they do so they emit gravity waves lose energy and they start to inspire and as they inspire all the it more and more gravity waves and in those signals are what we measured earth and it to actually saw for the motion of to rhea black holes has to be done on a computer but walter i did was. He said well if we treat them as point particles using effective field theory. Then we could solve the problem in a much easier fashion so as long as they are far enough apart from each other that they don't merge than they are treated as individual particles than we could make predictions four the gravity waves without having to resort to to writing computer code. Yes s. s. that dance with each other He is so. I would imagine that are different. Gravity waves being generated right. It's not only at the at the point of merger. Is that right correct. Yeah yeah and so did lie go have sort of a history of gravity base coming from this one even know so mean the first event that they saw. Yes so you know they were taking. They take data continuously and the remember this. This machine is so sensitive that when they were in the louisiana if there was a large wave crashing on the coast right or or if there was a truck driving anywhere near this underground detector so it's an incredibly sensitive machine and They saw the signal and so had they know what was it was black holes colliding and the answer is that they have basically If you think about A from the point of view of of a police department they have that catalogs fingerprints right. It's called a. They have not templates. And then they the computer compares the signal to all these possible collisions until they find one that fits Fits the signal and It if you go online. I recommend your listeners can go to the like a website and you can see the signal of versus the prediction For for the for for certain masses black holes and they like sit on top of each other. It's unbelievable I had the recommend people go to the lego website and check it out east. Is this The blackhawks merger. I would imagine fairly common even. Yes absolutely it's happening. So so since two thousand sixteen and they've increase the sensitivity of the detector There's now hundreds of of events and as sensitivity grows.

david millers blackhawks adelaide lego walter i louisiana
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"That's right right so so like you say if newton vent about his his work and he assumed that he has to take that ball and cut cut into pieces into smaller and smaller pieces before he can understand if could make he would never have gotten there yet so in some sense like saying that if your objective is to understand things in large scale maybe the you know maybe maybe your ideas and i'm going to make a statement. It could correct me if your ideas get bit clouded. If you really get into the details offer is that the right. So what you you know you can. You can confuse yourself by forcing yourself to try to understand what happens. It really short distances. Instead of sort of trying to say okay well. I don't know what happens at short distances. I don't know what the mass of the electron is. Let's think about that terms the ball but maybe the mass electra doesn't matter all that matters is the total mass of all the electrons in the ball right and if i thought that i needed to know the mass of the electron to understand how the ball rolls when i'm never going to figure it out right. Yeah einstein is a good example of this right. I mean the histories have also not is conceptually so elegant and describing what's happening without quantum mechanics ray. Without getting into the details it would certainly He certainly When it came to his discovery relativity. Yeah he he. There was no need for him to go into microscopic physics in order to figure out the laws of relativity great. That's absolutely true. And so so Talk about black holes in this context. So what does Swat styled radius again. So the schwartz. Shield radius is the radius which At which nothing can escape. So if you think about a ball then schwarzer radius would be like the race of the ball the inside anything inside the ball would be inside the torch field radius. That'd be inside. The black hole were nothing can escape sitting even correspondent for the black hole at the same thing..

einstein newton schwartz
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we.

Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

Data Skeptic

05:22 min | 1 year ago

Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

"Hi. My name is clement. phone. I'm a phd student at carnegie mellon university. Welcome to the show thanks. I'm here so tell me a little bit about your specific areas of study. Yeah so at carnegie mellon. I'm a phd student in the school of computer science. And more specifically. I do research in. Let's say the broad category of computer security and if you wanna drill down even further i mostly work in security when applied to machine learning systems and the security of machine learning systems. I would guess the audience has at least some familiarity with security is being like denial of service attacks and very like rule based kind of system looking at traffic. Maybe not as much machine learning. How does security play into machine learning operations. Yeah absolutely there are many different levels. I think that you can approach the problem. There's the initial idea of just taking traditional security problems. Such as denial service intrusion detection and applying machine learning to those domains just gathering insights from data and learning about them. and then there's the more meta area of making the actual process of machine. Learning more secure has so there's been a wide array of work in the community that has shown how at test time you can perform different tastes of attacks during training time you can perform a tax on the model and pretty much anything in between. I'm sure you're familiar with this phrase that if you're not paying for the product you are the product and i guess. There's some wisdom in that i don't know if it's universally true but people are certainly becoming more aware of that and maybe the off the cuff reaction is. I don't want people having my data because its privacy. But in some sense i would like people to have some of my data. I don't mind having good recommendations on amazon for example. Because i can just ignore them. Where do you yourself. Draw the lines about data sharing yet. So i agree with you that this is a pretty personal choice when it comes to just the type of experience you wanna have with the products. I think i would be similar to you in that respect where nothing comes for free. As you've said you've got to give some data to system to use it and to use it effectively. I think it's a really big area of research in general about ways in which maybe you could provide assistance but do things in a more privacy preserving way so that's a very big area research these days i guess i am a user of most day things. So that's where i would slide. Hundred spectrum makes sense. yeah. I think that's most of us. Perhaps we'll the specific paper. I invade you on to discuss. Today is titled delimitations of federated learning in civil settings so some definitions questions to kick us off. What is federated learning. This is great because it kind of plays into the idea of privacy. A little more federated learning is this new idea in distributing machine. Learning came out in around twenty seventeen developed by google. And it's the idea that you can train machine. Learning models across distributed data sets over the network without actually transferring data into google domain. So previously you'd have the idea that i'm using a service and some server. Let's say that's owned by. Google would be collecting all the information in storing it somewhere on a database and then writing machine learning on that collected data federated. Learning is a different idea. Where instead of storing data on a database owned by google. They actually just do the model training kind of live as it's occurring and there's no transfer of data is just machine learning occurs over the network and that might sound like it's kind of the same thing but when it comes to the problem of data ownership and privacy there's a bit of nuance there in terms of both the privacy and security implications federated learning which is one of the big topics of our paper and when the models being trained. Where does that training actually take place in the situation of federated learning. I guess you could think of the machine. Learning process is kind of just an iterative summation of values. So the training still takes place at work in the sense that you're taking updates to a model like you're learning it by adding values but the values are passed over the network directly so it's still lives in the service domain. Just the data used to supply those updates does not it still stays on the client devices. Gotcha so maybe we take a simple case of something like the logistic regression which can be nicely summarized as just it's beta values just the parameters that were calculated machine learning. Would it be corrected to saying like my phone or my local or whatever looks at my private data calculates that model and instead of sending my data just sends those parameters off to google. Yeah that's exactly right. That's like a really good way. Just gotcha okay. So we're seeing that then. Don't i still have some sort of privacy risks though because someone could kind of invert that and say well. If you're sending us these parameters what's the data that would have arrived at this answer exactly. So there's a whole field of research on privacy attacks on federated learning. We discussed this a little bit in our paper. But it's not really. The focus of our paper ends the idea behind. All these attacks is very much what you just said which is maybe. I can't observe the data used to train the model directly and that provides some sort of privacy but if i can observe the model updates or the beta values as you're saying and observed multiple instances of them i get a pretty good idea of what your data looks like there's some you know mathematical theoretical bounds on how much you can do but in practice. That might already be too much for certain context.

Federated Carnegie Mellon University Google Clement Amazon
Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

Daily Tech News Show

01:24 min | 1 year ago

Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

"Mit scientists have published a paper. In the i tripoli journal of engineering and medicine and biology describing an algorithm they developed the can identify whether you have covid nineteen by the sound of your cough. That's true if you're asymmetric. In other words if i mean a coffee is a symptom. But you don't have the classic symptoms of covid nineteen because a cough could be a symptom of anything. Covid changes the sound you produce. Even when you're a symptomatic intesting. The algorithm was ninety eight point five percent accuracy on patients with a positive covid nineteen tests. So they were able to use coughing to detect ninety eight point five percent of people who were definitely positive with covid nineteen and a one hundred percent accurate for those with no other symptoms. The algorithm was trained on a data set of seventy thousand audio samples with multiple coughs. Twenty five hundred of which were from confirmed covid nineteen cases. So that's how the algorithm was able to go. Okay that's somebody who doesn't have it that somebody who does and figure out the patterns that it would listen for the site just hope to get regulatory approval to use it as a way to take quick noninvasive daily screenings and for pool testing to quickly detect outbreaks in groups pulled. Meaning like a group of people a test. A bunch of people once cambridge university carnegie mellon university. Uk health startup called novo. Eric are all working on similar projects. So it's not just mit. But they're the most recent to publish a paper on it.

Tripoli Journal Of Engineering Cough MIT Cambridge University Carnegie Mellon University Eric UK
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

03:05 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

05:33 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"My guest today is Professor Aubert Mufi who is a professor of computational biology biological sciences by medical engineering at machine learning at Carnegie Mellon University. He's also honorary professor of biology at the University of Free Book. Germany. Fed off the actively and American Institute for and Biological Engineering. And the senior member of the International Society for Computational Biology. He formed the Computational Biology Department at Carnegie Mellon and served as its head from two thousand nine to two thousand twenty. Two. Swiss interest include machine learning all. Derived models of Cell Organization and analysis and modeling of protein location changes across types in diseases. locum Bob. THAN SKILL So you're passionate. CMU is what he called. Automated signs. Betas the practice of scientific research. Because the need for significant human intervention. And the goal is to develop subsiding instruments. You say along similar lines to self driving cars, could you? Could you explain bit about like you mean by Automated Science? Sure! The to do that the starting point. For me! is going all the way back to win I I. Decided to become a scientist was thirteen years old, and I read a book by Asimov on the genetic. Code. And That It was fascinating book end. What appealed to me. What sort of a premise of that book is? That, we're that we were starting to learn the rules the codes. The laws. Such that we would have the kind of understanding of biological systems that we had of mathematical and physical systems yes, and. That really was extremely attractive to me and that's that's what led me to to to go in the direction that have gone. But in the while, I was still in graduate school in the Seventies. The whole paradigm of Learning laws learning the rules started to really crumble. And what I remember really while from that period was the discovery of reverse transcriptase, which is an enzyme that turns. INTO DNA yet and the central dogma is DNA makes makes protein. And this was turning that on Ted and that was followed by many many many other examples. Of. Biological laws that we thought we had learned especially starting in the.

American Institute for and Bio Carnegie Mellon University honorary professor International Society for Comp Asimov Computational Biology Departme Carnegie Mellon University of Free Book professor Germany Cell Organization Ted scientist
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

Scientific Sense

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Scientific Sense

"Welcome to the site of accents podcast. Where we.

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

Outcomes Rocket

04:55 min | 2 years ago

How to Become a Change Agent in Your Health System with Tony Manuel

"Welcome back to the outcomes, rockets, Sal Marquez is here today I have the privilege of hosting Dr Tony Manual Dr Tony. Manual is a practicing anesthesiologist and Austin Texas. He's a partner with the United States anesthesia partners central Texas and has been in practice since two thousand two. He's an assistant professor. In the Department of surgery and Peri, operative care at Bell Medical School Dr Manual received his undergraduate degree from Vanderbilt attended the University of Texas Health Science Center for medical. School, completed his residency in anesthesia at the University of North Carolina or Or. He was recognized as the outstanding resident and fellow cardiovascular anesthesia at Duke, university in two thousand seventeen. He received his masters in medical management degree from Carnegie Mellon University and today he's playing. Multiple Roles as as he has in in his career and today we're going to be talking about physician innovation, and in particular how physicians can evolve their career to be greater contributors beyond the point of care and so. I WanNa thank you Tony for joining me today to have this very interesting discussion with you saw thanks so much great. Great to be owner podcasts, and I WANNA. Thank you for actually doing this podcast. Because for a lot of people like myself, it's been a great conduit to learn about what other people are doing, and what best practices that are out there, and it's an alternative to sort of the Journal Review articles that we have historically read and I've actually looked up several companies that you've had on and engaged with them. Really appreciate what you're doing I. Love that man now. That's great. I'm glad to hear that you've done that. That's the intention. Intention and so I appreciate you for doing that, so you know we are having a discussion. Folks Tony and I connected and said you know what the role of the physician is changing, and and so what I wanNA. Do today is just highlight how that's changing through the life of Dr Manual here and so you know I love for you Tony at to just kind of walk us through some of the work that you're doing and how it's changed from just practicing to actually doing more You know as we engage this. You know three five trillion dollar industry that call healthcare. Yeah, it's it's been an interesting journey for me and you know have to credit one of my anesthesia attending when I was in residency, his name's Dave mayor said Gimme, grapevine goes Tony You have to continually strives to maximize your career and Let's see well. What does that mean well? You definitely want to start trying to be the best clinician you can be once. You achieve that you should really look at you. Know becoming really strong in other areas, and I always took that to heart in so I think back to when I first started here in Austin I became the division chief of cardiovascular. Cardiovascular Anesthesia Rochester, saying I helped create division of cardiovascular. Because at that time we were Basically, everybody was doing it, and I fell coming out of myself. This'll be really better if we limited number of people at work in that space and you know put together some protocols and got the team together, and we saw some really good outcomes from that work and I fast forward to what I'm doing today, and that work has changed so much partly because I think every clinician you have to get educated, and I use a rudimentary tools back then, but in after getting that masters degree from Carnegie Mellon I really developed at toolkit that allows me to take on. On much more complex problems that we face and healthcare today. Yeah, that's so interesting, and so you have that entrepreneurial bug from the beginning right so you kind of re retooled the way that you guys approached cardiovascular anesthesia and I'm sure with with much improvements and outcomes, but then you've taken other steps to. You've been involved in startups, and now you're doing different roles. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah I worked my way of the medical staff leadership and ultimately became the president of medical staffing while that was a great experience after I graduated with my master's degree. The entrepreneur apart really was intriguing to me. In more important is the. The interface between the clinicians in technology and so The startup is called Dynamic Lights based here in Austin, and it's actually technology out of the University of Texas and They had great idea concept. Basically, it's how to noninvasive map blood flow during Sri will hand you an aneurysm surgery and uses what's called speckled laser technology and I was like honestly Craig. It's continuous. It's noninvasive, but they never really thought about the interaction. How you get it. It's dockers hands. How do you test it? And that was sort of my strength and so I, said well. Let's work together and figure this out and to date. You know we've incorporated. We're FDA approved, and we're. Ducking clinical trial and we're looking to partner with a couple of larger health tech firms,

Dr Tony Dr Tony Manual Peri Assistant Professor Carnegie Mellon University Austin Dr Manual Texas Austin Texas Sal Marquez Dynamic Lights Carnegie Mellon University Of North Carolina University Of Texas Health Sci Bell Medical School United States Department Of Surgery Vanderbilt Duke
reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

How I Built This

07:01 min | 2 years ago

reCAPTCHA and Duolingo: Luis von Ahn

"Think about the small moments or decisions in your life that actually had a huge impact on how your life turned out. Maybe it was a conversation. You struck up with the person next to you on an airplane. Maybe it was a party. You reluctantly went to only to meet the person you'd eventually marry or maybe it was a decision to stay on vacation an extra day that sparked a new idea for Kevin System. It was a random remark from his girlfriend that made him decide to use filters on instagram for Blake. Majkowski was a chance meeting with a group of young Argentinian who took him to the countryside where he saw kids with no shoes. That one day inspired him to create. Tom's and for Louis Fun on it was a free lecture at Carnegie Mellon University in two thousand. We'll get deeper into the story in a few minutes but that single lecture would lead him to invent to ingenious new tools the I was capture. Yes captures those annoying twisted and blurred letters. You have to type into a website to prove your human and the second one was duo lingo now. The biggest language learning APP in the world which is now getting even more popular because people are looking for new things to do now that they're stuck at home but was captured and duo. Lingo were designed to harness the power of crowdsourcing to solve problems. And I'M GONNA blow your mind here if you have ever typed in a capture or reused dueling go. There's a good chance you've taken part in a massive online collaboration that you probably weren't even aware of and it's amazing. How Louis came up with all this but let's start at the beginning. Lewis was born in Guatemala in late. Nineteen Seventy S. Both as parents were doctors and though he was surrounded by poverty violence in Guatemala City. Louis screw up in comparative privilege and as a kid. He spent a lot of time hanging out at the family business. My Mother's family actually had a candy. Factory everybody is always a Mesa. The fact that I grew up with a candy factory they think it was like Willy. Wonka or something. I was not all that much into the candidate. Self I was into the machines because basically the candies made by these gigantic machines. That bump out I don't know how many thousands of pieces of candy per hour and basically all my weekends. I spent playing at the Candy Factory and I would They the machines apart and put them back together they would be some extra pieces after. I put him back together on that. That would be a problem but what? What kind of student were you were? You were school pretty easy for you. Yeah I was pretty nerdy basically. That was really good at math. Math was just easy to me. I what I would do during the summers is basically get either next year or you know. Couple YEARS LATER. Math books on all the sizes. Wow it kind of came easy but the way I really got good ideas by doing hundreds and hundreds exercises. That's what you do in. The summertime was bored. I mean I was an only child I is. I didn't have that much to do. This is remember this is also pre Internet pre everything. So what was I going to do? Man That's what I did was putting playing cards in the spokes of my bicycle and by jolly ranchers seven. Eleven should math books. So you were. Did you just love math? I mean it sounds like kids. Don't think about their future. They're not like I'm going to study math so I can be in tech one day like unless I've really enjoyed it. I I enjoyed it was it was like a puzzle for me by the way this is not the only thing I did. I mean I I also played a lot of video games Pirated Video Games in my commodore sixty four like floppy disks. Floppy Disk loppy discs. That's right I wanted a Nintendo. When I was eight my mother would not get many intendo. She instead got me computer. Commodore Sixty Four. And I couldn't figure out how to use it but eventually I read like the manual stuff and I figured out how to use it more than I figured out. I could buy other people's video games. And so I became a little hub in my in my little neighbourhood but these were not other kids adults or kind of basically young adults who had a computer and they would come to my house and I would take their games and give them my games exchange so then. I collected a pretty large number of video games but sh- mentioned right that I mean because your childhood sounds pretty nice but but like as a kid I guess or even as a teenager there was a civil war in Guatemala right. I mean we know that today. There's a a lot of violence there. Obviously violence in the US and other countries to but Guatemala's has been particularly hard hit. I mean did it feel dangerous when you're a kid yes it did. There was a civil war pretty much since I was born in seventy nine to nineteen ninety-six. There was a civil war going on the whole time. It always felt dangerous when I was fifteen or so. My aunt was kidnapped for ransom. I mean she was gone for seven or eight days. Wow People's cars would be stolen. I don't every couple of months. Somebody's car would be stolen in my family. Going past seven thirty PM was rare games. You needed to go out in a large group. If you're going to go up at seven thirty PM and I did my house had walls and barbed wire yeah. It felt dangerous. I mean this is one of just one of the reasons I came to the US. Actually I mean I was. After my aunt was kidnapped I thought to myself. I don't WanNa live here. Yeah and I guess you did end up leaving Guatemala for college because you went to Duke in North Carolina and you describe yourself as a like a math nerd in school and and is that what you intended to do like to do something in math. That's what I wanted to become an economic math professor. I was pretty certain. I wanted to become a math professor at the time. I thought the best thing that I can do is really learn a lot of math and I really it and I thought it was futile to learn how to deal with other people. It is interesting because my job. These days is one hundred percent just dealing with other people's problems. I'm just trying to understand the so so by becoming math professor. You thought. Hey I wouldn't have to deal with people I would just deal with facts. Data and numbers. Yes yes and you know I. I'll do math research all day long. And every now and then after class of but whatever that's like a tax That's that's what I thought so all right so you are She gets your degree and you this path to go into academia and you go into a PhD program at Carnegie Mellon Correct and I guess you go into computer science right yes. I changed from math computer science because I visited a math Grad school and what people were saying the professor was saying. Oh I'm working on this open problem that nobody's been able to solve for the last three hundred years and I thought I don't think I'm smart enough if you haven't done it and nobody's done it in three hundred years that's Kinda not for me whereas when you visit in computer science I mean this is crazy thing before like. Oh Yeah I still have an open program yesterday. Well it's a much younger field yet so that I thought that was much more exciting for me. At

Guatemala Professor Louis Fun Math Grad School Candy Factory United States Guatemala City Carnegie Mellon University Instagram Majkowski Kevin System Carnegie Mellon Blake Nintendo TOM Wonka Mesa
Felicity Huffman's daughter Sophia accepted into prestigious university 1 year after college admissions scandal

John Williams

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

Felicity Huffman's daughter Sophia accepted into prestigious university 1 year after college admissions scandal

"Says and Felicity Huffman's daughter is being accepted into a top university Sofia Macy is heading to Carnegie Mellon university's theatre program after mom's rolled in last year's college admissions scandal her mom pleaded guilty to paying fifteen thousand dollars to alter Sylvia's SAT answers well Sophia took the test again on our own got accepted into the

Felicity Huffman Sofia Macy Carnegie Mellon University Sylvia Sophia
Facebook map shows you where people are reporting coronavirus symptoms

Daily Tech News Show

00:56 sec | 2 years ago

Facebook map shows you where people are reporting coronavirus symptoms

"Let's talk a little bit more about another couple of other efforts actually multiple efforts to track. Where infections might go next by having people self report systems symptoms rather facebook partnered with Carnegie Mellon University's Delfi Research Center on a survey asking users to report their symptoms both Carnegie Mellon and Facebook have now published websites with their initial. Findings can see a little heat map Go TO COVA CAST. Cmu DOT EDU. And you'll be able to see these heat maps later this week and eventually provide forecasts based on the data to help. Local health officials anticipate where hospital capacity needs might spike next facebook's own site provides a symptom map of the US at the county level showing what percentage of the population has reported systems county by county facebook's also partnering with the University of Maryland to take that survey global and Carnegie Mellon is building an API so let researchers access the data.

Carnegie Mellon University Facebook Carnegie Mellon Delfi Research Center University Of Maryland United States
Facebook launches map to help identify coronavirus hot spots early

Sean Hannity

00:52 sec | 2 years ago

Facebook launches map to help identify coronavirus hot spots early

"In the social media giant is opening up about how it's helping fight coronavirus founder and CEO mark Zuckerberg penned an opinion editorial for The Washington Post in which he offered up the vast resources of the social media giant to help fight the covert nineteen pandemic his reasoning is straightforward accurate county by county data is needed from across the U. S. and Facebook has a community of billions of users globally and as we have all learned over the past few years I spoke knows a lot about us Facebook has already rolled out and often a symptom survey run by health researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Facebook says answers to the survey were sent to the researchers not kept by the social media site so far Carnegie Mellon says they're getting one million responses a week in the United States Zuckerberg says the social media data is a new super power in fighting pandemics and urges people to use the data

The Washington Post Carnegie Mellon University Facebook Carnegie Mellon Founder And Ceo Mark Zuckerberg United States
Dating at a Distance

Coronavirus: Fact vs Fiction

08:44 min | 2 years ago

Dating at a Distance

"Should PEOPLE STILL DATE? Everything is aligned. Date no no no no blind date center definitely not but even before this tender. I'm kidding that was mean on the late show with Stephen Colbert. A month ago before most of the country was staying at home at the time. A conversation about dating during a pandemic may have felt like late night comedy fair. You know Stephen. Everything in life is is a risk reward. Proposition is riskier to do things versus before. Perhaps being in close contact with somebody especially somebody. You don't know Is Is. It's a different time right now. But as their new reality has evolved so as the act of finding love people are using dating apps more both tender and bumble have reported an increase in daily messages and user engagement. Other APPS had a video chat feature and some people are reaching out in ways I would have never imagined a look out my windows. Bill dancing traps to take and needed to say here down. She waved back. That's the start of the story you may have heard before. It's from a video on Tick Tock by Jeremy Cohen a photographer from Brooklyn New York. After Jeremy Waves to the dancing girl he flies his drone over with his cell phone number. She picked up my job and I guess it works. 'cause I our lady's Jeremy's video went viral if we're still allowed to say that it has over thirty million views on talk now. I'm not at all surprised. It's the meet cute of our time if our time is defined by isolation and physical distancing Jeremy and Tori Cigna Rela. She's the girl on the roof have gone on a few dates after that. Here's Jeremy and Tori. The first date was we had dinner. There was another restaurant she is on her roof and I was on my balcony. It was so funny because we'd be talking to other on facetime and then sometimes I like look over like I'd see him there and then we'd look at each other. It was like such a weird scenario lovely on another date. Jeremy win inside a huge plastic bubble so he could take a walk. I just couldn't stop laughing. I like hit the ground. Basically I was not expecting to see him in a bubble. It's a lot more effort to go through than your average date and it's hard to express the usual social and physical cues when you're six feet apart but there things about this new normal that for Jeremy Cohen. Surprisingly work well. It's really nice to get to know her. Just not have any of this pressure at the end of the day like okay. Am I going home or am I gonNA invite her back to my place? This awkward moment of okay. What what is the other person thinking? I don't WANNA be too forward but I also don't want to be a scaredy cat. Jeremy isn't immune to the loneliness of social distancing of not actually being physically around someone even though he's found this new connection I am in my apartment either remained but he's with his family in Minnesota. So I'm alone in this two bedroom apartment for about a month. Now it makes me realize how much the small things in life such as a hub. Like hug skill great. I've actually putting myself a couple of times. It doesn't feel the same because it isn't the same. There's a lot of research that shows. That physical touch is important for health and wellbeing. One behavior that we have focused on in some of our research is interpersonal touch or affectionate touch. We've shown that touch has powerful effects on our physical. Health are mental health. Our relationship health. That's Professor Brooke Fini. She's a social psychologist at Carnegie Mellon University. She studies how relationships impact our health throughout our entire lives. It increases feelings of security so it just makes people feel more secure. It increases people's willingness to embrace life opportunities affectionate touch has been associated with lower daily stress lower reactivity to stress A lower likelihood of even perceiving something as stressful in the first place for Professor Feeney affectionate touch has benefits even above and beyond sexual intimacy. Which is something else were missing in? A time of isolation can engage in sexual intimacy for a variety of reasons that have to do with reproduction and drives and less to do with communicating care and acceptance and love and value. And so on. They're both important forms of touch and Communicate very important information to significant others But we think they are very different types of processes hearing about all the benefits of touch at a time when a lot of people are deprived of. It isn't exactly comforting. So what happens when we do lose it in our everyday lives? Here's Professor Brittany Kubiak. Who Studies affectionate touch in romantic relationships? Children form attachments with their caregivers in a lot of ways through touch and in adulthood we think that some of the same processes happens you form an attachment to your romantic partner just like you form attachment to your parents. Although the relationship is obviously different long-term not having the ability to touch. I think there's the possibility that you may not be able to form as secure attachment to that person but Professor Jacoby Act doesn't want to overstate the benefits of touch. Either it is still possible to have meaningful connections with each other without it. We know that people maintain very satisfying long distance relationships. Even when there's not a pandemic going on people do things reminiscing about times that they did spend together or planning times that they will spend together and so I think we can find ways at least if this is going to be a somewhat short term separation to make sure that we're maintaining high quality relationships even through physical distance for Professor Feeney. There is a positive outcome at least in terms of human connection about the fact that this is all happening to us together our rates of loneliness and social isolation even before they pandemic had been increasing and people have just been feeling more relational disconnected across the board. One positive thing that I think has come out of this. Pandemic is that people first of all are all in this together. You know so. We're now all part of a big group of people who all this happening to them. When people are facing adversity together they usually reach out to each other more and try to connect stance. Oh I do see one positive side effective at this is that there are these more creative ways that people are trying to connect and help each other out and so on like Jeremy and Tori and whether or not they do end up together doesn't even matter to them anymore. We're absolutely going to meet up. Probably something a little bit more low key like drinks but definitely still could never forget it honestly no matter what happens between us like we're going to remain friends like there's nothing like this that doesn't bond to people and said it's just like look if he's not like in my wedding he'll be at my wedding like that's. I certain that's a powerful connection. Now there was a study from Harvard. That came out this week. Saying we might have to prolong intermittent social distancing measures. Up until two thousand twenty. Two professor. Feeney doesn't know what that means for physical and mental health. No one does she and a team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon are just about to begin a study on this if we don't find these other creative ways to connect It remains to be seen. How well We can continue to abuse remote connections as a proxy for the more physical connections but I think the the core issue that underlies it all is. What touched communicates and so I think what we have to do. During the pandemic is just find other ways to communicate to our loved ones that were available to them if they need us even though we can't be physically proximal to them right now and might be more difficult to communicate that remotely but I think we can do it. Human beings are social creatures by nature. We crave connection. We're not meant to be isolated. These days. Some people might not have the security that comes from physical touch. But that's not all our relationship is built on find those other connections and lean on them. I think you'll be surprised by how strongly though resonate in your life.

Jeremy Professor Feeney Jeremy Cohen Jeremy Waves Stephen Colbert Stephen Carnegie Mellon Carnegie Mellon University Tori Tori Cigna Rela Professor Brooke Fini Social Isolation Professor Brittany Kubiak Professor Jacoby Act Bill Professor Harvard Minnesota Partner
Coronavirus Detected By Voice? Carnegie Mellon Researchers Develop App To ‘Listen’ For Signs Of COVID-19

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:26 sec | 2 years ago

Coronavirus Detected By Voice? Carnegie Mellon Researchers Develop App To ‘Listen’ For Signs Of COVID-19

"News researchers at Carnegie Mellon University creating an app they see might be able to tell if you have covert nineteen the app hasn't been approved by the FDA or CDC and is still in its early stages it listens to you cough and then asked you to resign and number of letters and sounds before letting you know how likely it is that you may have the disease as of now researchers say the app is an experimental and

Carnegie Mellon University FDA CDC
Visualizing Fairness in Machine Learning with Yongsu Ahn and Alex Cabrera

Data Stories

08:36 min | 2 years ago

Visualizing Fairness in Machine Learning with Yongsu Ahn and Alex Cabrera

"So let's get started with the with the topic of today so today we talk about a really really relevant topic can needs It's particularly hot right now. We're GONNA talk about bias in fairness in machine learning. And if you know know what this is we're going to describe and explain what this is about in a moment and more specifically what is the role that can play in this specific domain to say mitigate problems that can arise in terms of bias and furnace in machine learning so to talk about this topic. We have not one but two guests. We have Alex Cabrera who is a PhD student from Carnegie Mellon University. I Alex is again. Thanks so much for having and then we have young. Soo on who is also Ph student at the University of Pittsburgh I- youngster. Welcome to the show. Hello Nice to talk to you so Alexander. Who can you briefly introduce yourself? Tell us a little bit about what is your background. What is your main research topic? And just give a brief introduction. Yeah so I'M ALEX. I'm a PhD. Student of the Human Computer interactions to at Carnegie Mellon so generally idea research into creating interactive systems and visualization. Systems that help people both develop better machine learning models so even more accurate more equitable and understanding these models so understanding potential issues. Or How? They work okay. Young Soo my name is sue on in I'm a dirtier peachy students at University of Pittsburgh. A my research interest lies at the intersection of visualization and fair. And explain away. I enter to machine learning so my primary research question is to build assistant to help users with making the machine learning results more fair and explainable in helped him to interact with machine so that their opinions and apex can be incorporated into the system. Okay thanks so much so I was thinking. Maybe we should start with defining a little bit this terminology to the extent that he's possible but maybe they're probably many of our listeners who've never heard of that and of fairness and bias and this is a very overloaded terminology here so I'm wondering if we can start by defining a little bit. What what we mean by fairness and maybe even bias in emission learning and also what? What kind of province exists there yet? So I'll probably I can start by talking about a little bit of background on why the problem This fairness problem has been actively discussed in especially missionaries research. So as a May have seen did. Data driven decision is kind of increasingly used in important decisions so especially Such as a job recording of colleagues dimension were predicted policy. Those kind of important decision which have kind of huge impact on Individuals muster learning as more and more used induced kind of important decisions then Some of cases have been reported that these machine turned out to be biased towards certain groups or certain individuals so here the what I mean by bias is certain. Decisions are kind of burrow favored to certain groups or individuals. Such as man over woman or a white people over african-american people. This is because on the machine. Learning model is trained from Historic Co. Data set and this historical data said could possibly include Inherited bias then. The model is kind trained by those data sets and then have kind of inherited vice. The problem of machine learning here is that whatever trained model can kind of systematically discriminate against certain individuals groups especially in Western Assistant Because many decision makers may use to system in their decision making then kind of making these mistresses. More Fair is kind of important problem so basically the type of fairness you talk about is mostly related to not being discriminatory or not using features. That have nothing to do with the essential decision. You're making more superficial like Maybe the race or gender or other features of a person right. So it's about combating discrimination. Yeah I think that's the main idea. It's actually you get to you a more complicated because even if you don't include some of these protected features so if you say you're trying to give someone alone you don't really want to decide that based off of their gender their race Those are actually. You can be almost perfectly predicted by the other features so you can actually reconstruct that so actually a lot of machine. Learning people suggest you actually add those features in because they're going to be used anyway and then you can apply some resolutions afterwards to try to address the problem. So it's very much embedded in the data that you're using to train the model this historical data that you've collected so it's not just as easy as leaving out that column with Race Agenda and not saying you talk to the research that's happening now. It's a little bit more complicated. Just the complex relationships between the variables ends up that you can actually recreate the biopsies. Even having no idea algorithm not being aware of these protected attributes. Okay but just on the Senate so the evaluation you do and fair. Evaluation is one that only takes the features into account that you're supposed to take into account so usually the way we did try to define fairness or quantify is an output. So if you're trying to give loans or a very popular example is trying to decide algorithms to decide how risk how likely someone is to recommit a crime if they're like. Oh so whether or not you should give someone bail we usually it doesn't we don't really look at what features are used that we look at. What the output is and so if for example the RECIDIVISM prediction case for African American males? You're more likely to be given a higher risk or even though you're just as likely to recommit a crime that is discrimination. That is the bias that we're trying to discover and trying to combat right So we really like black box models. It's really hard to know. What parts of the data are being used to make the decision? But we really care about whether these decisions were making. The outputs are making that really society impactful whether those are equitable and fair. Okay Yeah I'm wondering if we can can you? Maybe describe one or two specific examples. Where these kind of problems can arise. I think what is interesting? Is that right now? I mean we live in a society where where these these systems stems are already making decisions or some of some decisions for us right or providing indications for for experts that have to make decisions based on on what the AI system suggests recommends right. So I think I'm wondering if we in order to make a little bit more concrete if you can cite one one or two examples where where these these. This kind of problem can rice yes. Sadly there are quite quite a few examples. So one of the biggest one of the first investigations elected to it was in facial recognition systems so there are systems by like Had some face plus plus IBM and Microsoft that they audit and it tries to tell given a picture of someone's face whether they're male or female and when they started looking into it they found that when you start seeing how well they perform for say white men versus darker skinned women. There was almost ninety nine percent accuracy for the white males and close to seventy percent accuracy. For the darker skin females which is pretty big disparity. A lot of that is due. Hey if you look up. General data sets of faces a lot of the faces. That come up are white males that data that you're learning on is not

Alex Cabrera University Of Pittsburgh Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie Mellon SOO Alexander Historic Co IBM Senate Microsoft AI
Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

Behind The Tech with Kevin Scott

07:17 min | 2 years ago

Chris Urmson: Aurora CEO - Autonomous Driving

"Hello and welcome to our first episode of behind. Find The tech in twenty twenty. I'm Christina Warren. Senior cloud advocate at Microsoft. And I'm Kevin Scott all right so Kevin. It is twenty twenty which Shh is both the new year and I guess a new decade although people will get weird technicalities and it's always a great Chance to kind of look back at what's happened over the last ten years and reflect on new opportunities. Yeah I mean I it. Is I think in their industry and for human beings in general really easy to get completely used to new innovations that in our lives. But like when you think back ten years ago the world looked like a very different place than it looks right now so smartphones were just catching on. They were nowhere near as ubiquitous as they are all right now and the things that you could do on them were far far more constrained than they are right. Now I mean for. For God's sake people were renting movies from blockbuster In two thousand ten right very blockbuster was actually still a thing and instagram hadn't even been invented yet. Coley different world you know I do now that we've hit twenty twenty. Do you have any forecasts about what the next year intact might bring her even the next decade. Well well I think one of the themes that we spent a bunch of time chatting about last year on the podcast was artificial intelligence machine learning and I think we are are certainly going to see the trends that that had started in the prior year's continue to accelerate as one of the reason why I'm really interested in chatting with our guest today So autonomous vehicles. For instance. I believe are going to make AK- ton of progress over the next couple of years in particular and I'm really looking forward to seeing some of that stuff. Play out yes I couldn't agree more. It's funny I don't have a driver's license But I've actually been on a few self driving car panels over the years and I I think the technology she behind it is so fascinating. Which is why? I'm really really excited about your conversation with today's guest. Chris Armstrong and Chris is an engineer. Who's known for his work in pioneering self driving car technology? Yeah and you know one of the reasons that I'm especially interested in self driving cars and I'm looking forward to this conversation that we're about to have Chris is that There's so many ways that the world is going to change for the good once we we are able to put this technology into the hands of lots of different companies so One of the things that will hear about Aurora's. They are a company building the self off driving car technology as a platform for other companies to use to build autonomous applications. And so you know one of the things that I'm sorta hopeful for that will come into the world in the not-too-distant future is some technologies. That may help my grandmother. So I'm I'm lucky enough to have a grandma that's still still alive. She's eighty nine years old and lives in a very rural place in Virginia And she can still drive which is awesome but the day is coming where she's not going to be able to To drive her car car in the same way that she is right now and Like then it begs the question of how she has access to all of the things that she needs in order to help her live and independent life. So how does she get her prescription medicines. Like how does she get her groceries and You know just just sort of the staple things that she needs to exist. And one of the things that I think could be really incredibly beneficial with these self driving thing. Technologies is Like the possibility that you'll be able to have autonomous deliveries for people like my grandmother. I think you're absolutely right. I think the potential for the stuff is really fantastic. So let's hear more about some of the potential for this technology from Chris Aronson Guest today is Chris. Samson Christie's the CO founder and CEO Vera accompanied the bill self driving vehicle technology before founding Aurora he was CTO. Google self driving car program prior to that. Chris was a faculty member of the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University where he was the technical director of the Darpa urban and grand challenge teams. I'm really excited to hear what he's up to these days. Hey Chris the the show. Thanks for having me so I love to start by learning how you got interested in technology in the first place as a kid. Were you taking engineering classes or programming classes when you were in high school. So are you discover that in college back. When I was in high school there wasn't really computer science at high school And so I Bought Oughta some kind of Tandy x eighty six clone or whatever Back when I was in probably ninth or tenth grade from money for my paper route A- and you know tried to learn to program at first where you go you know you don't if you recall this but you go to the bookstore and you'd buy You know this paperback for Back Book. That was program whatever it was and it was just the source code listing and this before C. D. Roms even pete which people probably don't even remember that that's right we Before that actually bought a commodore sixty four and of course that was exciting. Because it didn't have tape drive right right or it didn't have a floppy drive floppy yeah and five and a quarter inch. Discs that's what had YEP YEP so anyway so we was doing that and then this language C. Plus plus which seemed to be the hot new thing And so started. Actually the first programs I really learned with C. Plus plus. Wow that's rough. Yeah yeah it was a little crazy. A I mean I guess on some some level like CPS was challenging lodging first language. But the good thing is after you've mastered as downhill it's all downhill And so did. Did you know from all of this experience in high school that you wanted to get a computer science and engineering. Gary you know up in Canada so apply to you you know variety of schools got into into a couple of them And then in my senior here I met a girl Turns out now. She's my wife. And decided I wanted to stay at the University of Manitoba which is right in central Canada and Manitoba and got into the computer engineering? School computer. Seem like you know they had a future.

Chris High School Aurora Twenty Twenty Kevin Scott Microsoft Christina Warren Chris Armstrong Instagram Chris Aronson Canada University Of Manitoba Virginia Google Gary C. Plus Samson Christie Manitoba
Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds

Paul W. Smith

00:17 sec | 2 years ago

Math Looks The Same In The Brains Of Boys And Girls, Study Finds

"Why do boys seem to do better at math than girls well it's not their brains according to researchers at Carnegie Mellon University they study the brain imaging of children and found that development of the part of the brain most active in doing math are exactly the same and boys and

Carnegie Mellon University
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"To the older person and have the woman sit in his lap that's. for awhile and we got a squeeze in our today now. back with Jack. this date September nineteenth historically eighteen eighty one US president James A. Garfield dies of wounds suffered in a July second shooting and vice president Chester A. Arthur became the president upon Garfield's death. nineteen eighty two Scott Fahlman posted the first ever documented emoticons and they are everywhere now emoticons is on the Carnegie Mellon University bulletin board system or some and local in nineteen seventy two this I don't know if this is right or not the record hottest temperature this late in the year ninety six degrees seven in nineteen seventy two according this almanac I have but I just saw in the paper this morning had the record high for this date night said ninety five in two thousand and five I don't know which one is right. but here one is about six or seven degrees above normal that it happened so it's still happening. anyway it's eight forty six on a M. Tampa Bay to the newsroom we got out real quickly got record bring him up Solano yeah yeah eight hundred nine six nine nine three five two for a chance to win but the tickets buffet tickets then Chris.

James A. Garfield vice president Chester A. Arthur M. Tampa Bay Chris US president Scott Fahlman Carnegie Mellon University Solano ninety six degrees seven degrees
"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie mellon university" Discussed on KTRH

"I met him at a UFO conference in Washington DC, just an amazing guy. He passed away recently at the age of eighty five years old his academic background included a bachelor science degree in industrial management from Carnegie Mellon University. A bachelor science from the US naval postgraduate school a doctor of science and area. Nodding astronautics from MIT. And he was a staunch believer that this planet was being visited by extra terrestrial head girl. Pleasure, my friend. How are you George? Nice to be with. It was morning. Likewise, likewise, you've been busy lately since we last talked stay. I stay pretty busy going on. Well, I had an opportunity to meet the Buzz Aldrin. I was king show several weeks ago. And what are the the light full guy? He's he's tough. Now is he probably was then at her. Well. All right. He does not believe in extraterrestrials. Did you ever talk to them about that? Briefed. I've talked all developed about what they thought face. But. No, not obscene pretend experience for the Apollo program. Nothing in space was subsequently validated. Are understood. Good,.

Carnegie Mellon University US Washington MIT George eighty five years