21 Burst results for "Carnegie Institution"

"carnegie institution" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

05:21 min | Last month

"carnegie institution" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"IBM knowingly conducted the census to identify the Jews, religious or not made the railroads run on time and pinpointed Jewish bank accounts to seize. Every concentration camp had its own IBM customer site. The infamous ash with Auschwitz tattoo began as an IBM number before it morphed into other serial systems. They? First of all, they they were just doing business. And you know, you got to do business with everybody on DNO judgment at all. You know what? We're not responsible for anything. Then after they denied this for a long time and really tried to destroy you, but you had all of the evidence. On your book. IBM and the Holocaust is absolutely amazing work. But is there a difference between IBM and the potential? Of Google and Facebook. That potential of Google and Facebook has already been tested in China. What IBM did If you said was it, uh, systematized in organized all six phases of the Holocaust. I don't wish to compare the hall cost in any way, shape or form to what is happening today. But look at what IBM did well in Nazi Germany. One faith one identification where everyone is already identified here. Faith to exclusion. We have now seen what exclusion looks like. And the curtain is just raising on that confiscation. Well, that's just another word for popularization. You could also use the word the monetizing deep platform ng how many people have said we're out of money. So after that, um, the next step Is ghettoization. Now No one here is going to be shipped into a ghetto, but we have to ask ourselves. In this country. Have people been? Um uh, put into concentration camps Have people been selected? For domestic deportation. Well, we know it happened with the Japanese in, uh, in world in World War two and in my book war against the weak and the latest edition I reveal how in Connecticut The Carnegie Institution had conspired with the governor of Connecticut, Wilbur Cross into a door to door survey. And I know eugenics is one of your specialties to do a survey off every citizen in, um in Connecticut. They started in a town called Rocky Hill, and they would be ranked For their eugenic or racial worthiness. And those who did not measure up with was thought to be 99% would be deported to someplace in the Oth er, until that was just too much. And, uh, when they got overcrowded, they were working on methods of mass murder, which they called extermination. I actually wrote a, um, quoted the document the planning document. It was just Oh, my God. Circumstances have been election. That this was not carried out. But they did start it. And this was done by the Carnegie Institution by the state of Connecticut and by the governor of Connecticut, and it began in Rocky Hill, and their purpose was not all on Lee to deport domestically deport. Uh, hundreds of thousands of not millions of residents of Connecticut but then to deprive them of their money. Remember, the Japanese were deprived of their property. Deprive them of their assets in Connecticut, and when they were just too crowded for the camps to continue eventually to exterminate them. And the word they used was euthanasia, which is mercy killing under the theory that they Didn't have a good life, eh? We're doing them a failure. It was showing mercy by relieving them of the burden of being on planet Earth. So, Edwin, I'm going to take a one minute break. And then I want to come back and ask you What have you learned from history that can help us today? Violence is certainly not the answer. As we know from the Reichstag fire, it will on Lee accelerate things. So what have you learned? What should we be doing today to be able to not repeat the mistakes of the past in one minute back with Edwin Black? Glenn back by now You've heard me talk about my.

IBM Connecticut Carnegie Institution Rocky Hill Edwin Black Lee Google Facebook Glenn Germany China murder Wilbur Cross
Finally, a Room-Temperature Superconductor

Techmeme Ride Home

04:03 min | 4 months ago

Finally, a Room-Temperature Superconductor

"Not Exactly, the revolution that would result if we achieved cold fusion, but it is notable that room temperature superconductivity has been achieved for the first time quoting MIT technology review room temperature superconductors, materials that conduct electricity zero resistance without needing special cooling are the sort of technological miracle that could up end daily life. They could revolutionize the electric grid and enable levitating trains among many other potential applications but until now, superconductors have had to be cool to extremely. Low temperatures which has restricted them to use as a niche technology. I'll be an important one for decades. It seemed that room temperature superconductivity might be out of reach forever. But in the last five years, a few research groups around the world have been engaged in a race to attain it in the lab and one of them just one in a paper published today in nature researchers report achieving real temperature supercar activity in a compound containing hydrogen sulfur. And Carbon at temperatures as high as fifty eight degrees Fahrenheit thirteen point three Celsius or two, hundred, Eighty, seven, point seven Kelvin the previous highest temperature had been two hundred and Sixty Kelvin or degrees Fahrenheit that she'd by a rival group at George Washington University and the Carnegie Institution in Washington DC and twenty eighteen another group at the Planck Institute for Chemistry, in Germany, achieved two hundred and fifty degrees Kelvin or negative nine point seven degrees Fahrenheit at. Around the same time like the previous records, the new record was attained under extremely high pressures roughly two and a half million times greater than that of the air we breathe. It's a landmark says Jose Flora's leave us a computational physicist at the sappy Enza University of Rome who creates models that explain high temperature superconductivity and was not directly involved in the work. The ways in which electric is generated transmitted and distributed could be fundamentally transformed by cheap and. Effective temperature superconductors bigger than a few millions of a meter about five percent of the electricity generated in the United States is lost in transmission and distribution according to the Energy Information Administration, eliminating this loss would for starters, save billions of dollars and have a significant climate impact. But room temperature superconductors wouldn't just change the system we have. They enable a whole new system transformers which are crucial to the electric grid could be made smaller cheaper and more. Efficient. So to could electric motors and generators superconducting energy storage is currently used to smooth out short term fluctuations in the electric grid but it's still remains relatively niche because it takes a lot of energy to keep superconductors cold room temperature superconductors. Especially, if they could be engineered to stand strong magnetic fields might serve as very efficient ways to store large amounts of energy for longer periods of time making renewable but intermittent energy sources like wind turbines or. Solar cells more effective, and because flowing electricity crates, magnetic fields superconductors can also be used to create powerful magnets for applications as diverse as MRI machines and levitating trains. Superconductors are of great potential importance to the nascent field of quantum computing as well. Superconducting cubits are already the basis of some of the world's most powerful quantum computers being able to make such. Cubans without having to cool them down would not only make computers simpler smaller and cheaper but. Could lead to more rapid progress in creating systems of many cubits depending on the exact properties of the superconductors that are created it remains to be seen whether scientists can devise stable compounds that are superconducting not only at ambient temperature, but also at ambient pressure. But the researchers are optimistic. They conclude their paper with this tantalizing claim quote, a robust resume temperature superconducting material that will transform the energy economy quantum information processing, and sensing may be achievable and quote.

Energy Information Administrat Mit Technology Kelvin Enza University Of Rome George Washington University Washington Jose Flora United States Planck Institute For Chemistry Physicist Carnegie Institution Germany
Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy Turvy

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 6 months ago

Star Systems Can Be Born Topsy Turvy

"Our solar system is far from the only way to put together stars and their planets. They feel look at all the stars in our galaxy the Milky Way. More than a half of the stars are forming multiples meaning that there are more than once tar in system astrophysicist. Jay. Han. Bay of the Carnegie Institution for Science he has studied one of those systems with three stars. It's called GW Orion is and it's freshly formed on the a million years old. Yeah. It's really really young. Yeah. It's a baby bay says if you translate that million year lifespan. To that of a human, it's the equivalent of a week old baby and how many week old babies do bump into. If you just walk around your neighborhood, there's really little chance that you me the baby weighs one week old right. So first of all, it's hard to find these systems. They are pretty rare ban. His colleagues got lucky spotting this one using radio telescopes they were able to image the. Star system and they say, it differs from our own solar system in more than just star account in our solar system. For example, all eight planets orbit the sun more or less in a single plane. Think of the Sun as the center of a vinyl record with the planets strung out along the grooves in contrast as team discovered that the stars in this triple star system are ringed by clouds of. Dust in multiple warped and misaligned planes picture three-dimensional gyroscope rather than a two dimensional vinyl record. The observations in the journal Science those rings of dust will presumably go on to form planets as the star system matures and base as astronomers have indeed observed other more mature star systems with planets orbiting in these misaligned planes, and we want each under tenth if that happens at the time those planets worn or. Some evolutionary thing over you know billion years, the findings suggest that weirdly aligned planetary systems are born that way and that stars in their embryonic planets can be all topsy turvy even in their infancy.

Carnegie Institution For Scien JAY
Saturn is the solar system's 'moon king,' with 20 more spotted

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Saturn is the solar system's 'moon king,' with 20 more spotted

"Saturn is now the most moon rich planet in the solar system this week astronomers at the Carnegie institution for science announced the discovery of twenty new moons around Saturn the discovery comes roughly a year after scientists announced the presence of twelve noon around Jupiter that brought Jupiter's moon population to seventy nine but with the latest findings Saturn can now claim eighty two natural

Saturn Carnegie Institution For Scien
"carnegie institution" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

As It Happens from CBC Radio

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on As It Happens from CBC Radio

"Is the show office planet in the Solar System All Jupiter can do is stare balefully it's red eye from six hundred forty nine million kilometers away an envy it's fancy ring but at least Jupiter could comfort itself with the knowledge that it had most moons of any planet but no now Saturn has even stolen the moon king title from its hapless giant one eyed neighbor that's what the Carnegie Institution for Science yesterday as it announced that research had researchers had found twenty new moons around Saturn that means Saturn has most known moons of the planet in the Solar System Eighty two and Scott Shepherd says there could be dozens more to find around that already arrogant planet Mr Shepherd is an astronomer who's part of the team that made these discoveries we reached him in Washington. DC Scott how do you know that Saturn has so many moons so we've been surveying around Saturn in the last years to discover moons around Saturn and we've gone very deep deeper than anyone before and we're using the large telescopes in the world with the largest cameras in the world the camera it's about the size of a small car and so we've been uncovering every little thing cramming around Saturn trying to find the small moons are also moons. I I understand you have detected that are going counter to the the way that it is is that right yes the the moons that we've just discovered have fairly inclined orbits to Saturn some are going around the planet the opposite the direction of the planet rotates and some are going the same direction the planet rotates so in a sense yeah summer going backwards and forwards and we think this is because these objects didn't originally from west side and we think they originally comets or asteroids that formed in the southern region happened to be passing by Saturn and got captured by the planet in the distant past it's its gravitational orbit is that right yeah and the interesting thing about that is Saturn in the current source of Saturn cannot capture an object to the moon because you need somehow slow it down the capture but in the distant past when a plant's we're still flooring we think there's a lot of gas and dust around Saturn and so we think these objects are interacting in fact gas and dust and we think a lot of I think we think Saddam basically formula sway a lot of these objects fell into Saturn and basically make Saturdays we see today but these moons are Kinda like ass remnants of the objects that Forum Saturn they instead of falling instead planet they got captured into orbit around the planet and we can see him today and some of these moons are quite small all right yeah so the ones that we're finding are only a few kilometers in size to the five kilometers in size so they're they're fairly small and we believe Saturday and probably has even smaller moons we we think down to one climate and size is probably one hundred moons around Saturn or so but our current technology can only see two about to the five kilometers in size and and if we relate that to other planets you're innocent Neptune are even further than Saturn so it's even harder to find the moon's over there so we do believe there's many even ten the climate or size moons around your tune yet to be found so there's still a lot of work to do to find these moons we know what it's like to new moon gays on Earth and if you could be on Saturn what would be like from from the surface of Saturn to be watching these moons orbit yeah so if you're on the surface of Saturn I just looking up and there's eighty two known moons of Saturn so the sky it'd be full of basically these moving dots and these moons are pretty fairly far away really small so they would be small point to light but there are the larger moons as well like Titan which is bigger than the planet mercury itself so there's some very large moves around Saturn as well those would be a several of those as well just moving in the sky so it'd be unlike that the famous style working where you see to setting sons or two or three moons in the sky this would be a from eighty two moons in the sky or it'd be pretty cool that's amazing now they're Jupiter has been considered to be the moon king as they call it the or the has the clown of being the moon king which I think should I should be the Moon Queen but now does it look like Safran is the has the Moon Queen Crown how is crowned crowned King or Queen of moons because it now has the most moons just surpassed Jupiter which has seventy nine known moons and Saturn is further away than Chris what's actually harder to find moons around Saturn because it's further away and so the smaller objects or even fainter and so that we've actually found more moons around Jupiter strongly show is that really is the legitimate moon king or queen because we do believe it really does have more moons and Dan some of these moons have a kind of Canadian connection can you explain that yes so in the year two thousand some of these some outer moons Saturn were found by a group based in Canada in at the University of British Columbia in Victoria and they use what would they call the Canada France Hawaii it's it's telescope in Hawaii it's probably owned by by Canada to survey Saturn and they found a few of these moons as well and one of the moons actually coming groups we see okay groups of these outer moons so we actually think these orbital groups were each one was once a much bigger moon fifty two hundred connors and size that has been broken apart due to collisions with the other moons or passing comments and so we see fragments of moons that are clustered in groups and one of these groups is called the inuit group so they we we name moons that are found in that group after anyway mythology and so there's now up until this year there was four of them known in that Annua group and we just discovered a new one now so we actually discovered to two new ones now so there's two names anyway methology you need to be don and we are running a naming contest for these new moon so we want the whole world to try name these moons and so Inoue methology is one of the sources we are looking to name Moon from norse and Gaelic group right yeah so there's a north group so north mythology and Gaelic mythology are the two other groups that we've discovered moons in and so those three mythologies are what we're looking for the name of the moons after and it's if you use twitter all you have to do is on twitter and Hashtag name Saturn's moons and tell us why you WanNa make certain moon of certain after a certain God or goddess and videos and pictures of highly recommended to show your enthusiasm and while you want to get these things named pass that onto our listeners how did you come the immune chaser Yeah I mean I've always loved astronomy I remember when I was in fifth grade or so I got this astronomy magazine that my parents get amy and it was a diagram of all the known moons and the source for some reason it's always love moons I remember I put this diagram up on my wall and so I've here by that was the strongest Scott Shepherd in Washington DC he gave details there about how you consent in your name ideas but you can also let us know what you think the twenty new moons of Saturn should be called can reach out to us on twitter and facebook both at CDC as it happens our email is a h at CBC DOT CA and we always love to hear your voice so give us a call please at four one six zero five five six eight seven.

Solar System Eighty Scott Shepherd Carnegie Institution for Scien Mr Shepherd Washington five kilometers six hundred forty nine million
"carnegie institution" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"Stuff does oh okay don't stuff has to imagining so plants animals living in the desert needs special adaptation survive in their harsh environment seriously so plants tend to be tough and wiry with small or no leaves water resistant cubicles and often spines to deter <hes> people that are you know plants animals that are gonna eat them sure so some um annual plants Germany bloom and die in the course of a few weeks after rainfall while others <hes> survived for years and have deep root systems able to tap underground moisture many desert plants have reduced the size of their leaves or been in them altogether so CACTI our desert specialists and in most oh species the leaves have been dispersed with in the chlorophyll displaced into the trunks the cellular structure of which has been modified to allow them to store water so when the rainfall is water is rapidly absorbed by the shallow roots and retain to allow them to survive until the next down part which may be months or years away the Sawara CACTI can grow to be over forty feet tall and it is the largest cactus species in the U._S. on the C._R._O.. Is Native to the Sonoran desert in Arizona as well as the Mexican state of Sonora. The swallow blossom is also the state wildflower Arizona. Oh Oh it's scientific name. Carnegie A- Gigantea is given in honor of Andrew Carnegie. WHO's Carnegie Institution established the Desert Botanical Laboratory in Tucson Arizona in one thousand nine three? Oh in nineteen ninety-four swallow national park near Tucson Arizona was they've made it to help protect the species in its habitat so I was have relatively long life span often exceeding one hundred fifty years <hes> they so it starts out it's kind of like a trunk and they might grow their first sidearm..

Arizona Carnegie Institution Desert Botanical Laboratory Andrew Carnegie Tucson Sonoran Sonora Gigantea one hundred fifty years forty feet
"carnegie institution" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Can kill deer. A lot of people who live along the coast who are urban planners property owners wanna know, how high how fast think we need to talk to kind of zone here. One is what what's the expectation, and then what are the risks and the expectations are a couple of feet this century. But that if we continue with our greenhouse gas emissions, basically the rate of ice sheet loss will cost oceans to rise at a rate of about an inch year because it takes fouls years, basically what we're doing in the central. This is like the central conservative type estimate that the sea level will eventually rise two hundred feet, but it will take something like twenty thousand years for that to fully manifest itself. Now, there are more recent models that have things like. Sheet ice, cliff, instability, and other things that mean that could be lost much more rapid. But even if you take that central view that means that basically every coastal city is going to be drowned Venice, New York. Venice's given by me, but bring it closer to home for us. Put it in our lifetime by twenty thirty. I mean twenty years, I think the seven central estimates are really a couple of feet this. This is part of the issue of this whole climate problem is that it's a long time scale problem. And if you look at even how many you can say number, and they'll sound big for how many Californians will be flooded from sea-level rise this century. But if you put that in the context of how many new homes will be built in California the century. It's not a huge percent of GDP hit on the economy. And so that I think that we take these purely economic views you can say, oh, well, it's happening far long way. It's just a couple of feet this century. And if you think of a lot of California coast is pretty steep. There's places like in San Jose. And so on where it's very flat and flooding will be bad. But I think if you take a purely economic view, there are a lot of this will unfold slowly. And be far in the future. And a pure economic calculation will say, well, let's forget about future generations and just enjoy today's party and. And I think this is. I think this is what I said before. But we have to move to this idea that really that analog I think of it as as. I work for Carnegie institution, and there's an endowment institutions and the board of trustees to responsibilities one is to make sure that endowment survive. So that future generations of scientists can have the support. And then they're they're they're other responsibility is to take the proceeds from this endowment and use those resources wisely. And we need to start looking at the environment as an endowment that we're obligated the hand of future generations, and that we need to use the proceeds of that endowment wisely. And that the trustees of Cornyn can't just decide to liquidate the foundation the foundation just to consume everything today are your guardian of the coast your thoughts on how. I feel quite a bit of urgency around seal is because I think when we do hear the estimate around inches and timeframes and we talk about twenty thirty or twenty fifty it.

California Venice Carnegie institution Cornyn San Jose New York twenty thousand years two hundred feet twenty years
"carnegie institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Fastest worming state in the US. So they're really feeling the consequences of climate insurance chant. So you have the have the frozen tundra. That's frozen. Yeah. Methane escaping. When you didn't think it's going to be escaping all kinds of stuff like that. You have a new story just out today about the USDA and science journals. Yeah. So scientists at the USDA which has a bunch of research services that look agriculture and soil and all kinds of things where instructed last year that when their papers get published in a journal, that's not the end of the process, they need to append a note to the publication saying that the research is preliminary and have not been formally disseminated by the USDA and that is pretty surprising for scientists. Because traditionally getting your paper published appear review journal that's been vetted by your colleagues and experts in the field, that's considered. That's not preliminary. That's that's science the gold standard. Yeah. It's the gold standard for how researchers traditionally done. And so lots of folks, including. People who ran research services at the USDA under previous presidents have said that this raises questions about the scientific integrity policies that the USDA has. You know, scientists traditional I mean, traditionally don't have to get something reviewed by politician in order to have their results presented as valid? So here is you can publish it. But we'll call it preliminary. Because our political officer hasn't reviewed. Yeah. The ideas, this is a way of making the results get out before research has undergone internal review, but for scientists calling it preliminary. When the the research is objectively thorough raises some questions hope that doesn't spread to other divisions of the government. Yeah. Finally, a naming contest for some new moons of Jupiter. Yeah. So last year a bunch of new moons of Jupiter were discovered by researches, researchers at the Carnegie institution for science and this past few months, they've been holding a contest to come up with names for these new moons. But there are a lot of rules because international Esther nominal union, which oversees the naming of things in the solar system and beyond. It has these really strict guidelines in place. So if you want to name, a moon of Jupiter, it has to be a character for Greek or Roman mythology. It has to be a descendant or lover of the God newness Zeus or Jupiter v. Sixteen characters are fewer can't be offensive or commercial political and even has rules about like, what letters there can be. So if the moon circles, it's Jupiter in the same direction that Jupiter rotates the name has to end in a and if it's the opposite than the end an e, but the reason they have all these rules is because. Because prior to the forming which is actually celebrating its hundredth birthday this year. The solar system was just like a huge mass people would name things whatever they wanted. International fights actually between different countries. So this is a way of keeping everything in order Volkan doesn't make it again. Thank you very much for taking time to be with us today. Sarah Kaplan, science reporter with the Washington Post and happy holiday t to and now it's time to play good thing. That thing..

USDA US Carnegie institution for scien political officer Esther nominal union Volkan Washington Post Sarah Kaplan reporter
"carnegie institution" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

Curiosity Daily

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on Curiosity Daily

"Here's one great way to get involved in science name, one of Jupiter's moons. That's the thing you can actually do. Thanks to a contest being held right now by the Carnegie institution for science seriously. Remember last July when astronomers Scott Sheppard announced he discovered twelve new moons of Jupiter. Well, the naming process. For five of those moons is officially open to the public technically, the international astronaut Michael union gets the final say on the official name of any new celestial body that gets discovered, but the discoverer gets to suggest a permanent name and the union does give priority to those suggestions it's fair game to ask people to give you ideas, which is why Pluto got its name from an eleven year old girl. You can find our episode with that story on curiosity. Daily dot com, by the way, but there are still a lot of rules. You have to follow when you name a moon, you'll have to brush up on your Greek and Roman with all Aji for one thing since Jupiter is the king of the Roman gods and the analog to the Greek God Zeus, the moons have to be named after descendants or lovers of Jupiter or Zeus also the names of the moons that spin in the opposite direction as Jupiter have to end in an e and the names of the moons. It's been in the same direction as Jupiter have to end in a the name has to be sixteen characters or fewer, preferably one word. It can't be offensive in any language. It can't be too similar to. Any existing names of moons or asteroids, and it can't be the name of a person place or event that's mainly known for political military or religious activities got all that. All right. Once you have a name, you can tweet it to at Jupiter lunacy with a hashtag name, Jupiter's moons. And explain why you chose the name. They'll also accept suggestions in video format you have until April fifteenth to get your suggestions in good

Jupiter Carnegie institution Mooney MC Michael union Scott Sheppard Hayden fossey Michael kovic Ryan Westwood One Cody Goff Ashley Hamer Michaela official eleven year three m
Here's one great way to get involved in science name, one of Jupiter's moons.

Curiosity Daily

01:45 min | 2 years ago

Here's one great way to get involved in science name, one of Jupiter's moons.

"Here's one great way to get involved in science name, one of Jupiter's moons. That's the thing you can actually do. Thanks to a contest being held right now by the Carnegie institution for science seriously. Remember last July when astronomers Scott Sheppard announced he discovered twelve new moons of Jupiter. Well, the naming process. For five of those moons is officially open to the public technically, the international astronaut Michael union gets the final say on the official name of any new celestial body that gets discovered, but the discoverer gets to suggest a permanent name and the union does give priority to those suggestions it's fair game to ask people to give you ideas, which is why Pluto got its name from an eleven year old girl. You can find our episode with that story on curiosity. Daily dot com, by the way, but there are still a lot of rules. You have to follow when you name a moon, you'll have to brush up on your Greek and Roman with all Aji for one thing since Jupiter is the king of the Roman gods and the analog to the Greek God Zeus, the moons have to be named after descendants or lovers of Jupiter or Zeus also the names of the moons that spin in the opposite direction as Jupiter have to end in an e and the names of the moons. It's been in the same direction as Jupiter have to end in a the name has to be sixteen characters or fewer, preferably one word. It can't be offensive in any language. It can't be too similar to. Any existing names of moons or asteroids, and it can't be the name of a person place or event that's mainly known for political military or religious activities got all that. All right. Once you have a name, you can tweet it to at Jupiter lunacy with a hashtag name, Jupiter's moons. And explain why you chose the name. They'll also accept suggestions in video format you have until April fifteenth to get your suggestions in good

Scott Sheppard Michael Union Carnegie Institution Official Eleven Year
"carnegie institution" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

WBBM Newsradio

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on WBBM Newsradio

"Pam coulter. CBS news newly discovered planet far far away gets a far out named match dwarf planet. It's color is pink. It's about eleven billion miles away. The Carnegie institution says astronomers founded just last month using huge powerful telescope in Hawaii pink planet is only about three hundred ten miles across its distance from the earth makes it the farthest known object in the solar system. So scientists have decided to name it. Far out Peter King CBS news WBZ news time, six twenty four. What is a three d computer chip? I'm Brian Cooley from seeing that in search of the next big thing. Intel doesn't have the chip dominance at once did apple makes its own mobile chips and soon those for its laptops in videos, moved way, beyond graphics and Samsung is a huge chip competitor. So Intel looks to leapfrog them with three d the idea is to lay out those microscopic transistors that make up a chip in more than one layer sort of like building a two story apartment building instead of a single the promised performance benefits come from eliminating bottlenecks that exist in today's flat processors and Intel promises this won't just be gilding the CPU lily, but creating the kind of power will need soon for artificial intelligence processing VR in real time and autonomous car tasks. This new family of three D chips should arrive in late twenty nine ten and Intel hopes it gets a lot of people excited about buying computers. Again, the one I'm recording this on his seven. Years old and doing just fine. I'm Brian Cooley. Newsradio seven eighty and one zero five point nine FM. WBZ news time six twenty five. The key indexes eked out modest gains Tuesday trading. The Dow Jones industrials rose eighty two points or three tenths percent to twenty three thousand six seventy five the NASDAQ closed thirty points or four tenths percent higher. The S and P five hundred rose by less than a point fed ex posted a quarterly profit the top forecasts. But the company lowered its outlook saying global trade is slowing. Fedex also announced it will look to cut costs. One action will be a voluntary buyout program for some workers. Shares of Darden restaurants rose five percent. The company boosted it's outlook for the year after another strong quarterly performance by it's olive garden chain American and Chinese trade negotiators planning to meet in January. According to Treasury Secretary, Steven Mnuchin during a round table interview with Bloomberg Mnuchin said several telephone conversations have been held in recent weeks. But he does not think there will be face to face contact until.

Intel Brian Cooley Bloomberg Mnuchin CBS Pam coulter Carnegie institution Darden restaurants Samsung Fedex Peter King Newsradio apple five percent
"carnegie institution" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Time for money. News on KYW. Here's Bloomberg's Donna Wilson. You an stunts holding onto gains even though around in oil. Liz dragging down energy producers. The Dow Jones industrial average up three hundred and one points to twenty three thousand eight ninety five s and p five hundred up twenty three points. The NASDAQ climbing one point two percent, but west Texas intermediate crude is down five percent to forty seven thirty nine a barrel. The Federal Reserve began a two-day policy meeting in Washington today. Officials so widely expected to raise interest rates at the conclusion tomorrow in L G electron IX is said to be planning to sell big screen TVs next year that can be rolled up and put away like a pollster they Embiid the sixty five inch TV's will retract automatically at the touch of a button. Like, a garage door company is hoping this move will revive the consumer electronics business with money news from Bloomberg going KYW. I'm Donna Wilson out name for a newly discovered planet that's far far away. It's dwarf planet. It's color is pink. It's about eleven billion miles away. The Carnegie institution says astronomers founded just last month using huge powerful telescope in Hawaii pink planet is only about three hundred ten miles across its distance from the earth makes it the farthest known object in the solar system. So scientists have decided to name it far out Peter King CBS news is your budget feeling a bit tight after all that Christmas shopping. Well, Richard Branson and the Indian government want to give you three million dollars to help out. But what you have to do is invent a better air conditioner. It's called the global cooling prize. And it's meant to address a new report predicting the number of AC units around the world will triple over the next thirty years. Former national security adviser Michael Flynn is in court to be sentenced for lying to federal investigators. And that's ahead in three minutes. Your hair is important hair. Club knows this.

Donna Wilson Bloomberg Federal Reserve Carnegie institution Richard Branson Michael Flynn Liz Texas CBS Indian government Peter King Washington
"carnegie institution" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Kelly of Notre Dame is Associated Press college football coach of the year. The AP Shelley Adler has details. Kelly got sixteen to fifty eight first place votes from AP college football poll voters, Alabama's Nick Sabin was second with central Florida's first year. Coach Josh hypol- third Kelly joined Sabin and TCU's. Gary Patterson is two time winners. Kelly was also coach of the year in two thousand twelve the fighting Irish your twelve and this season, they will meet Clemson in the Cotton Bowl later this month in the college football semi-finals Kelly was born in Everett raised Chelsea a four year letter winner at assumption college in Worcester. Afar. Out name for a far away planet newly discovered here's CBS's Peter King. It's a dwarf planet. It's color is pink. It's about eleven billion miles away. The Carnegie institution says astronomers founded just last month using a huge powerful telescope in Hawaii. The pink planet is only about three hundred ten miles across its distance from the earth makes it the farthest known object in the solar system. So scientists have decided to name it far out Peter King CBS news. Knowledge makes you much more. Boston starts a ban on single use plastic bags for ban will help cut down on solid waste and reduce the amount of trash on the street. There'd be no trashing the trees anymore yet. Some people aren't emotionally prepared to say goodbye to those flimsy, plastic. Convenient interesting WBZ NewsRadio. Five fifty three now time for traffic.

Kelly Nick Sabin Peter King Gary Patterson Shelley Adler CBS AP Afar Carnegie institution football Josh hypol TCU Florida Clemson Everett Alabama Worcester Boston
"carnegie institution" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"You reach your employment contracting company policies by line. And not being honest about what happened as a result moon. Vez gives up a one hundred twenty million dollars severance. He'd lied and did not fully honestly cooperate with the investigation, and they repeat that and their reasons for denying him his separate Bill Rakoff CBS news in a statement released by his attorney moon Vesper pizzas, denials of any nonconsensual sexual relations. We'll be able to avoid. A partial government shutdown on Friday by passing a spending Bill isn't that a lot of lawmaker optimism right now. Democratic Senate leader Chuck Schumer says we're five days away from a lapse in appropriations and President Trump. Still doesn't have a plan to keep the government open. President Trump says he will not approve a funding measure enlisted includes five billion dollars for border wall. Construction emerging from another closed door session with the Republican run House Judiciary committee today. Former head of the FBI James call me telling reporters what they grilled him about questions about Hillary Clinton and the Steele dossier strike me as more of the same. I didn't learn anything new in there. Maybe they did another five hundred boy drop the Dow art Cashin on the floor of the new York Stock Exchange for weeks. If you bought the dip, all you did was lose money that changes people's habits greatly. And that's the reason that you're seeing a losses of over one percent on a daily basis the man who marketed Obama. Care to the country after the passage of the Affordable Care Act. He says a federal judge is ruling striking down the law poses a threat to millions of Americans. Josh will tech former chief marketing officer for healthcare dot gov. One hundred and thirty three million people with preexisting conditions who could face discrimination. If this decision has upheld. It's the newly discovered farthest known object in our solar system. What would be an appropriate name for a dwarf planet. It's color is pink. It's about eleven billion miles away. The Carnegie institution says astronomers founded just last month using a huge powerful telescope in Hawaii the planet is only about three hundred ten miles across its distance from the earth makes it the farthest known object in the solar system. So scientists have decided to name it far out. Peter.

President Trump Obama Vez Hillary Clinton Chuck Schumer House Judiciary committee Carnegie institution Senate FBI James Dow chief marketing officer Peter attorney Hawaii Josh Cashin York
"carnegie institution" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on NewsRadio 1080 KRLD

"Coulter, CBS news. It's been more than a year and Bruce Springsteen is finally seen enough of the lights and Broadway. Performed his final Broadway show Saturday night to show that more from just a two hour play into a fully immersive Springsteen concert every night. It's also one of the most successful shows. Broadway has seen recently Springsteen on Broadway open last October ran for two hundred thirty six performances and brought in almost a hundred seven million dollars. Overall tickets for the final show went for as much as. As forty thousand on the secondary market. You can see the show now on Netflix. It started streaming Springsteen yesterday. Astronomers choose an appropriate name for a newly discovered object at the edge of our solar system. It's a dwarf planet. It's color is pink. It's about eleven billion miles away. The Carnegie institution says astronomers founded just last month using a huge powerful telescope in Hawaii pink planet is only about three hundred ten miles across its distance from the earth makes it the farthest known object in the solar system. So scientists have decided to name it far out Peter King CBS news when it comes to the joy of Christmas, Texas, falls closer to the Scrooge side as opposed to the Santa Claus side. A new survey from get century took a look at different factors about what makes us state filled with the Christmas spirit on taxes came in thirty eighth out of the fifty states website looked at culture and online activity state of Washington finish. Number one, followed by South Dakota, Utah and Missouri at the bottom of the list, Alaska, Hawaii and Florida..

Bruce Springsteen CBS Carnegie institution Coulter Netflix Peter King Scrooge South Dakota Alaska Washington Texas Hawaii Missouri Florida Utah hundred seven million dollars
"carnegie institution" Discussed on I Need My Space

I Need My Space

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on I Need My Space

"That you're listening to you right now and i have a pretty exciting discovery to share with you all today i did not discover it full disclosure but there is some incredible raking space news today so today july seventeenth two thousand eighteen astronomers at the carnegie institution for science release that they have definitively identified a dozen new moons orbiting jupiter the coolest thing about it is that they weren't even looking for them they found them while they were trying to capture images of other objects far deeper into space now at one point scientists believed that there are actually sixty nine jovian moons and despite the fact that this new discovery puts a wrench in your eighth grade sense of humor the finding actually tells us a lot about the formation of our solar system like how our neighboring planets interacted with other objects billions of years ago it also tells us about the nature of the jovian moons like the fact that the newly discovered oddball moon is hurtling towards other moons jupiter's orbit like a like a car just just racing down the highway in the wrong direction it's all really amazing incredible exciting stuff so to learn more about this finding in verses own tech and space writer matthew falen sat down with lead scientists on the jovian moon findings dr scott shepherd that's right we have a interview with them right here the guy who discovered these moons shepherd who is an astronomer with the carnegie institution for science spoke with matthew about how the study came to be why it's important for our understanding of space science and shed some more light on these objects over to jupiter.

matthew falen carnegie institution for scien writer dr scott shepherd
"carnegie institution" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:53 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"Surgical sterilization and even euthanasia because the first gas chambers were the attempt to legislate them in in the united states came in ohio in nineteen oh six but the immigrant population that came here and of course or two ordinary americans didn't want their elected officials sterilizing and murdering them through this pseudoscience and so those things were not legislated in until of course buck versus bell the supreme court oliver wendell holmes in nineteen twenty seven said it is a better for all the world dead three generations of imbeciles be be sterilized and see them executed for their crimes what is the i didn't know about the gas chambers here in the united states will tell me that well year decades before hitler employed the gas chamber of course hit a hitler was eugenicist who studied american eugene panik works in german translation translated by the nazi party in prison and even wrote about american eugenics in mein kampf gas chambers were always considered to be the best solution for our our eugenic problem and i think i have a chapter in that you're looking at right now oh war against the week it's called the lethal chamber or you or you genocide and so there was always an effort to bring out a gas chamber in united states of course they finally did so in nineteen twenty eight in nevada with two fritz capital punishment crime but the original idea was that the doctor would write a prescription out for a guessing and there'd be public guessing some people would be marched in and brought out the dead and as i say the first legislation was entered into ohio in nineteen zero six and none of it ever came to the fore in fact when the carnegie institution rockefeller foundation i propelled eugenics movement to international in a pseudoscientific heights euthanasia was one of their twelve preferred methods of of eliminating we must understand that you jenex was an effort to eliminate ninety percent of the people in the united states ten percent of the time to first identify what they deemed to be the bottom tenth and eliminate those and then slice off a tenth attempt a tenth until there was no one left except those who resembled themselves and that was blonde blue eyed are airing there was nor nordic are you concerned at all that.

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"carnegie institution" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:54 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Gas chambers were the attempt to legislate them in the united states came in ohio in nineteen oh six but the immigrant population had came here and of course or ordinary americans didn't want their elected officials sterilizing and murdering them through this pseudoscience and so those things were not legislated in until of course buck versus bell the supreme court oliver wendell holmes in nineteen twenty seven said it is a better for all the world dead three generations of imbeciles be be sterilized and see them executed for their crimes what is the i i didn't know about the gas chambers here in the united states will tell me that well year decades before hitler employed the gas chamber of course hit a hitler was the genesis who studied american eugenic works in german translation translated by nazi party in prison and even wrote about american eugenics and mein kampf gas chambers were always considered to be the best solution for our our our eugenic problem and i think i have a chapter in that you're looking at right now a war against the week it's called the lethal chamber or you or you genocide and so there was always an effort to bring out a gas chamber in united states of course they finally did so in nineteen twenty eight in nevada with to frisk capital punishment of crime but the original idea was that the doctor would write a prescription out for a guessing and there'd be guessing some people would be marched in brought out the dead and as i say the first legislation was entered into in nineteen oh six and none of it ever came to the fore in fact when the carnegie institution rockefeller foundation i propelled eugenics movement to international in of pseudoscientific heights euthanasia was one of their twelve preferred methods of of eliminating we must understand that you jenex was an effort to eliminate ninety percent of the people in the united states ten percent of the time to first identify what they deemed to be the bottom tenth and eliminate those and then slice off a tenth attempt a tenth until there was no one left except those who resembled themselves and that was blonde blue eyed our area was nor nordic are you concerned at all that we're doing many of the same things just in.

united states ohio oliver wendell holmes hitler nazi party nevada carnegie institution rockefell ninety percent ten percent
"carnegie institution" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:41 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on WRVA

"Nineteen o six but the immigrant population that came here and of course or ordinary americans didn't want their elected officials sterilizing and murdering them through this pseudoscience and so those things were not legislated in until of course buck versus bell the supreme court oliver wendell holmes in nineteen twenty seven said it is a better for all the world at three generations of imbeciles be be sterilized and see them executed for their crimes what is the i didn't know about the gas chambers here in the united states what tell me that well year decades before hitler employed the gas chamber of course hit the hitler was eugenicist who studied american eugenic works in german translation translated by the nazi party in prison and even wrote about american eugenics mein kampf gas chambers were always considered to be the best solution for our our eugenic problem and i think i have a chapter in that you're looking at right now oh war against the week it's called the lethal chamber or you or you genocide and so there was always an effort to bring out a gas chamber in the united states of course if finally did so in one thousand nine hundred twenty eight in nevada with the first capital punishment crime but the original idea was that a doctor would write a prescription out for a guessing and there'd be guessing some people would be marched in brought out the dead and as i say the first legislation was entered into ohio in nineteen hundred six and none of it ever came to the fore in fact when the carnegie institution rockefeller foundation i propelled to your jenex movement to international in of pseudoscientific heights euthanasia was one of their twelve preferred methods of of limiting we must understand that you jenex was an effort to eliminate ninety percent of the people in the united states ten percent at a time to first identify what they deemed to be the bottom tenth and eliminate those and then slice off a tenth attempt attempt until there was no one left except those who resembled themselves and that was blonde blue eyed with nor nordic.

oliver wendell holmes united states hitler nazi party nevada ohio carnegie institution rockefell ninety percent ten percent
"carnegie institution" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

KTLK 1130 AM

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on KTLK 1130 AM

"The immigrant population that came here and of course or ordinary americans didn't want their elected officials sterilizing and murdering them through this pseudoscience and so those things were not legislated in until of course versus bell the supreme court oliver wendell holmes in nineteen twenty seven said it is a better for all the world dead three generations of imbeciles be be sterilized and see them executed for their crimes what is the i didn't know about the gas chambers here in the united states will tell me that well year decades before hitler employed the gas chamber of course hit the hitler was eugenicist who studied american eugenic works in german translation translated by the nazi party in prison and even wrote about american eugenics in mein kampf gas chambers were always considered to be the best solution for our our eugenic problem and i think i have a chapter in that you're looking at right now oh war against the week it's called the lethal chamber or you or you genocide and so there was always an effort to bring out a gas chamber in the united states of course they finally did so in nineteen twenty eight in nevada with the first capital punishment crime but the original idea was that the doctor would write a prescription out for a guessing and there'd be guessing some people would be marched in and brought out the dead and as i say the first legislation was entered into in nineteen oh six and none of it ever came to the fore in fact when the carnegie institution rockefeller foundation i propelled eugenics movement to international in a pseudoscientific heights euthanasia was one of their twelve preferred methods of out of limiting we must understand that you jenex was an effort to eliminate ninety percent of the people in the united states ten percent at a time to first identify what they deemed to be the bottom tenth and eliminate those and then slice off a tenth attempt a tenth until there was no one left except those who resembled themselves and that was blonde it was blue eyed are airing the with north nordic are you concerned at all that we're doing many of the.

oliver wendell holmes united states hitler nazi party nevada carnegie institution rockefell ninety percent ten percent
"carnegie institution" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

02:50 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie institution" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Rising and murdering them through this pseudoscience and so those things were not legislated in until of course but i was about the supreme court oliver wendell holmes in nineteen twenty seven said it is a better for all the world debt three generations of imbeciles the be sterilized and see them executed for their crimes what is the i i didn't know about the gas chambers here in the united states wouldn't tell me that well year decades before hitler employed the gas chamber of course hit the hitler was eugenicist who studied american eugenic works in german translation translated by the nazi party in prison and even wrote about american eugenics in mein kampf gas chambers were always considered to be the best solution for our our eugenic problem and i think have a chapter in that you look at right now oh war against the week it's called the lethal chamber or you or you genocide and so there was always an effort to bring out a gas chamber in the united states of course they finally did so in nineteen twenty eight in nevada with defers capital punishment crime but the original idea was deputy that the doctor would write a prescription out for a gassing and there'd be public guessing some people would be marched in and brought out the dead and as i say the first legislation was entered into ohio in nineteen oh six and none of it ever came to the fore in fact when the carnegie institution rockefeller foundation i propelled eugenics movement to international and a pseudoscientific heights euthanasia was one of their twelve preferred methods of oh of limiting we must understand that you jenex was an effort to eliminate ninety percent of the people in the united states ten percent at a time to first identify what they deemed to be the bottom tenth and eliminate those and then slice off a tenth attempt attempt until there was no one left except those who resembled themselves and that was blonde it was blue eyed are airing nor nordic are you concerned at all that we're doing many of the same things just in a more sterilized fashion now now you can pick e you know the hair color the eye color your now if you have twins you can pick if it's going.

oliver wendell holmes united states hitler nazi party nevada ohio carnegie institution rockefell ninety percent ten percent