4 Burst results for "Carnegie Fund"

"carnegie fund" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

03:34 min | 3 weeks ago

"carnegie fund" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"They have all <Speech_Male> told us that they <Speech_Male> sprang into <Speech_Male> action, as you say, <Speech_Male> without thinking. <Speech_Male> You <Speech_Male> don't think <SpeakerChange> you just, you're <Speech_Male> strictly acting. <Speech_Female> I didn't think <Speech_Female> about it. I <Speech_Female> didn't even think about it. <Speech_Female> It really <Speech_Female> makes sense <Speech_Female> when you think <Speech_Female> about how ancient <Speech_Female> and deep in our brains, <Speech_Female> structures like <Speech_Female> the amygdala are. And <Speech_Female> I wouldn't want to <Speech_Female> say that the amygdala <Speech_Female> is where altruism <Speech_Female> is in the brain. It's <Speech_Female> one link in a very <Speech_Female> long chain of events <Speech_Female> that's happening that takes <Speech_Female> us from seeing <Speech_Female> that somebody is in danger <Speech_Female> to <Speech_Female> actually acting to help <Speech_Female> them. But <Speech_Female> we know that <Speech_Female> it's definitely an essential <Speech_Female> link in that chain, <Speech_Female> whether you're a mouse or <Speech_Female> a rat or <Speech_Female> a dog or a human. <Speech_Female> It's performing <Speech_Female> the same functions <Speech_Female> at a <Speech_Female> really deep, <Speech_Male> fast <SpeakerChange> subconscious <Speech_Male> level. <Speech_Male> If the act of <Speech_Male> heroism is a <Speech_Male> sprint, the <Speech_Male> consequences <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> are a marathon. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> For <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> David McCartney, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> it was for the better. <Speech_Male> He's the <Speech_Male> first to admit he <Speech_Male> wasn't a good man. <Speech_Male> In the <Speech_Male> past he'd pleaded <Silence> guilty to battery, <Speech_Male> but <Speech_Male> he promised the <Speech_Male> woman he pulled <Speech_Male> from the burning car <Silence> that he would do <Speech_Male> good. And <Speech_Male> in 2019, <Speech_Male> he donated <Speech_Male> a kidney. <Speech_Male> Who did the kidney <Silence> go to? <SpeakerChange> I have no clue. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> On the other hand, <Speech_Male> for Terry Ann <Speech_Male> Thomas, heroism <Speech_Male> has been <Speech_Male> troubling. <Speech_Male> She wasn't able to go <Speech_Male> back to work in <Silence> the police property <Speech_Female> room. <Silence> I had a hard time. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Silence> <Advertisement> I still have a hard time. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> And it's been <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> a hard time for <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Pete Ponce, <Speech_Male> who was left <Speech_Male> with regret <Speech_Male> that second <Speech_Male> boy he could <Speech_Male> not reach was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> flown to a hospital, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> but did <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> not survive. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> A hero <Speech_Male> would have gotten the second <Silence> one as well. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> And that's <Speech_Male> a challenge that I always <Silence> live with. <Silence> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> I <Silence> just couldn't get the second <Speech_Male> kid. <Speech_Male> His <Speech_Male> regret was <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> coupled with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> curiosity <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> about the boy he <Silence> <Advertisement> saved 6 years <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> ago. <Speech_Male> The boy whose <Speech_Male> name he <Speech_Male> never knew. <Speech_Male> The young man that you <Speech_Male> saved is named <Speech_Male> Sebastian pro <Speech_Music_Male> cop. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> we found <Speech_Male> him. Okay. <Speech_Male> And he <Silence> had something that he wanted <Speech_Male> to say to you. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> So <Speech_Male> let me introduce you. <Speech_Male> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Sebastian pro <Speech_Male> cup. I'm 18. <Speech_Male> I recently <Speech_Male> graduated <Speech_Male> from high school <Speech_Male> and I'm working towards <Speech_Male> going to college, getting <Silence> a car, all that good <Speech_Male> stuff. <Speech_Male> Thank you to the one <Speech_Male> who pulled me out <Silence> and let me <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> be able to achieve all <Speech_Male> the milestones that <Speech_Male> I've got <SpeakerChange> in that <Speech_Male> I plan to get. <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Thank you, Scott. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> What is <Speech_Male> it like to see him today? <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> It <Speech_Male> kind of takes my breath away, <Speech_Male> Scott. Does that <Speech_Male> helps to bring some <Speech_Male> closure and <SpeakerChange> some help? <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Help for <Speech_Male> heroes has been <Speech_Male> the mission of the <Speech_Male> Carnegie fund for <Speech_Male> 118 <Speech_Male> years. <Speech_Male> It has <Speech_Male> bestowed 10,000 <Speech_Male> medals <Speech_Male> and awarded <Speech_Male> $40 million. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> And here they <Speech_Male> are back in 1904, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Andrew Carnegie <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> sent what <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> science has now <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> confirmed. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Heroes, <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> he said, <Silence> <Advertisement> can not be created. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> act on an <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> impulse. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> A mysterious <Speech_Male> gift <Silence> <Advertisement> to <SpeakerChange> the few. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Scott pelley. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> We'll be back <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> next week with <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> another edition <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of <SpeakerChange> 60 minutes. <Music> <Advertisement> <Silence> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Explore <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the rainforest. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> While you water <Speech_Music_Female> your house plants, <Speech_Female> take a science <Speech_Female> trip with shortwave, <Speech_Female> one of NPR's <Speech_Music_Female> daily podcasts. <Speech_Music_Female> More voices, all ears, NPR podcasts.

David McCartney Terry Ann Pete Ponce Scott Andrew Carnegie Scott pelley NPR
"carnegie fund" Discussed on 60 Minutes

60 Minutes

01:59 min | 8 months ago

"carnegie fund" Discussed on 60 Minutes

"Thank you, Scott. What is it like to see him today? It kind of takes my breath away Scott. Does that helps to bring some closure and some help? Help, for heroes, has been the mission of the Carnegie fund for 117 years. It has bestowed 10,000 medals and awarded $40 million. And back in 1904, Andrew Carnegie sensed what science has now confirmed. Heroes, he said, can not be created. They act on an impulse. A mysterious gift to the few. Now, an update on a story we first reported in 2018. Sharon alphonse looked at how a plastic plague was turning oceans into vast garbage dumps. A young Dutch inventor buoyant slat created a device meant to clean up the notorious great Pacific garbage patch. The eventual goal of this cleanup is to get to a 90% reduction by the year 2040. The combination of pipe and nylon netting collected more publicity than plastic. But slots organization the ocean cleanup has developed a new design. In tests, this summer and fall, its successfully collected some 63,000 pounds of ocean plastic. I'm John wertheim. We'll be back next week with another edition of 60 minutes. If anything has got a chance of solving the world's problems, it's science and technology. And every breakthrough was the result of somebody doing the breaking through. I'm David pogue. This is unsung science. The untold creation stories behind the most mind-blowing advances in science and tech. Presented by CBS News and Simon and Schuster. You can listen to unsung science wherever you get your podcasts..

Carnegie fund Sharon alphonse Scott Andrew Carnegie John wertheim plague David pogue CBS News Schuster Simon
"carnegie fund" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

07:27 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie fund" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"Rather we should direct ourselves as citizens to trying to rejuvenate and reenergize the very democratic institutions of the government. That is the only possible realistic source of a solution to these problems. If bill gates or jeff bezos decided to direct all of their philanthropy solving hunger. They wouldn't have enough money to eradicate hunger across the globe. Only the scale of a government or a state can possibly do that and looking to billionaire. Owners distract our attention from our core obligations as citizens to solve these problems collectively through the state which is the ultimate backstop for ensuring that basic needs are met. Thank you rob your opportunity. Now beth For your own rebuttal of rob's opening statement or what you've just heard now. Thank you very much. Why i'm hearing in the case that's being made. Here is an awful lot of modding of waters of pitting things as opposites when of coast and also possess the more crucial meeting of waters. Here is this idea that we either solve problems by tax. Always off by philanthropy the counterpose. Defuse either one or the other. And that you if you're in favor of lump therefore you're against a generous welfare state in your tire progressive taxation and is simply not true. I'm in favor of closing tax loopholes. Having talks many billionaire philanthropy through record of saying the same thing but the critics into rob selective in not hearing that they've they've created a fantasy of a billionaire. Philanthropist who somehow wants to run public services. I've been interviewing and meeting slumped pace for about fifteen years now. I have never met one yet. It wishes to take over or replaced government in quite the opposite rather what big donors looking for is to do something new something extra. Something transformational something. They can be proud of something that relates to their own life. Experiences of Causes that they have some personal connection to and what tends to happen. Unlike an rope made the point that The the wealthy donors it's bam and all about them. They get to choose exactly what happens. And there's this huge issue of power that to me speaks of somebody who's not been around. Slumpy fundraisers in the nonprofit sector because in reality. What happens is a nonprofit group. That's working on the cause and a donor who has an interest in 'cause get together and they say hey you've got the resources in the money we've got the expertise and the feet on the ground and staff volunteer. How 'bout we get together because money on its own can't achieve anything. Everyone knows that andrew carnegie funded but two and a half thousand libraries around the world. What many people don't realize is a two hundred and twenty-five communities authored a carnegie library and they said no thank. You no thank you. It's not a priority for the moment. No thank you. We know we'd have to pay the running costs after and we don't want to do that or no thank you. We don't like the man and his money so donations have to be accepted as well as given gray my opportunity now to join the debate and think of some questions that are on the minds of our audience to come to you first robin give you an opportunity. One to respond to beth there possibly with some examples of billionaire flats you think is distorting our polluting of the public. Good but also just push you a little bit on best point that what we're really discussing here is civil society. We're discussing free autonomous individuals and agents coming together matching ideas with capital to improve the public. Good why shouldn't we celebrate that. Why shouldn't we celebrate the kind of spontaneity of billionaire philanthropy or the floppy of the of the ultra wealthy because precisely because it is so connected with the immediate diverse and complex needs of society. Yes there's a role for government. But let's do this. Also we can walk and chew gum at the same time. There's a sense in which billionaire to be is indeed meant to replace or displace the activity of government. I see that from problem after problem after problem. This idea that government is inefficient. It's dysfunctional let the smarter sector that people with the business success. Now take over some of the solution. And so i don't see that as an activity in which citizens voices are lifted up in civil society but rather as an exaltation of billionaires preferences and their distinctive expertise alleged expertise in problem solving last thing. I i wanna ask you or your about what you said about civil society and a kind of. There's always a a dance. That goes on the person with the money and the nonprofit with the The ability to say yes or to no in taking the money there are very few billionaire. Philanthropist i'm aware of who as it were take grant applications over the transom. They they look for worthy nonprofits who send in an application that they then decide to fund. That's how smaller scale. Philanthropist often work but the billionaire philanthropists very often don't even have websites if you wanted to try to get money from mckenzie. Scott jeff visas ex wife. You might be receiving a phone. Call that announces. You're about to get a multimillion dollar infusion of cash but you have no idea the source of comes from you wouldn't be able to apply for the grant euro had asked for newell the idea that there's a two way dance with one person having all of the money and a whole bunch of other people trying to get it makes a mockery of the idea of contract. Contract is when two people exist on a level playing field of power the genuine ability to consent or distant from the terms of the contract when one person has all the money. The billionaire and the nonprofit so desperate to get some of it there is not a level playing field and the nonprofits very happily bend themselves. To the preferences of the wealthy so that billionaire philanthropy becomes subcontracting the vision of the philanthropist to the nonprofit to execute what the philanthropist wants to do. That's not civil society that makes for a flourishing democratic society. That's a shaping of our collective civil society to the preferences and whims of billionaires high. Read your griffis here your host and moderator. I have a favor to ask you. Please consider coming among member. Membership is free and you get access to a series of great benefits including a ten plus year library of some of our best debates dialogues and podcasts. You also get a free monthly newsletter featuring the debates that we're watching around the world and you get a specially curated friday weekly monk members only podcast focuses on the big international events and trends shaping our world all of that again free at. Www dot munk debates dot com. I hope you'll consider joining and becoming part of our community now back to our program. So.

rob beth jeff bezos bill gates andrew carnegie Scott jeff robin mckenzie newell griffis
"carnegie fund" Discussed on The Munk Debates

The Munk Debates

08:08 min | 9 months ago

"carnegie fund" Discussed on The Munk Debates

"Of billionaire philanthropy. We find that it goes far more often to endow the wing of the museum and the art that sits in it rather than hunger pestilence were water access so billionaires choose on balance not direct themselves at these problems now second even if they were to do so breath. Let's imagine a world fantastical world. I would claim in which billionaires collectively organized themselves to direct their philanthropy to these evidence social ills. We still have to ask ourselves. Do we want our most urgent. Social problems solved by the whims of rich people. Among our midst rather we should direct ourselves as citizens to trying to rejuvenate and reenergize the very democratic institutions of the government. That is the only possible realistic source of a solution to these problems. If bill gates or jeff bezos decided to direct all of their philanthropy solving hunger. They wouldn't have enough money to eradicate hunger across the globe. Only the scale of a government or a state can possibly do that and looking to billionaire. Owners distract our attention from our core obligations as citizens to solve these problems collectively through the state which is the ultimate backstop for ensuring that basic needs are met. Thank you rob your opportunity. Now beth For your own rebuttal of rob's opening statement or what you've just heard now. Thank you very much. Why i'm hearing in the case that's being made. Here is an awful lot of modding of waters of pitting things as opposites when of coast and also possess the more crucial meeting of waters. Here is this idea that we either solve problems by tax. Always off by philanthropy the counterpose. Defuse either one or the other. And that you if you're in favor of lump therefore you're against a generous welfare state in your tire progressive taxation and is simply not true. I'm in favor of closing tax loopholes. Having talks many billionaire philanthropy through record of saying the same thing but the critics into rob selective in not hearing that they've they've created a fantasy of a billionaire. Philanthropist who somehow wants to run public services. I've been interviewing and meeting slumped pace for about fifteen years now. I have never met one yet. It wishes to take over or replaced government in quite the opposite rather what big donors looking for is to do something new something extra. Something transformational something. They can be proud of something that relates to their own life. Experiences of Causes that they have some personal connection to and what tends to happen. Unlike an rope made the point that The the wealthy donors it's bam and all about them. They get to choose exactly what happens. And there's this huge issue of power that to me speaks of somebody who's not been around. Slumpy fundraisers in the nonprofit sector because in reality. What happens is a nonprofit group. That's working on the cause and a donor who has an interest in 'cause get together and they say hey you've got the resources in the money we've got the expertise and the feet on the ground and staff volunteer. How 'bout we get together because money on its own can't achieve anything. Everyone knows that andrew carnegie funded but two and a half thousand libraries around the world. What many people don't realize is a two hundred and twenty-five communities authored a carnegie library and they said no thank. You no thank you. It's not a priority for the moment. No thank you. We know we'd have to pay the running costs after and we don't want to do that or no thank you. We don't like the man and his money so donations have to be accepted as well as given gray my opportunity now to join the debate and think of some questions that are on the minds of our audience to come to you first robin give you an opportunity. One to respond to beth there possibly with some examples of billionaire flats you think is distorting our polluting of the public. Good but also just push you a little bit on best point that what we're really discussing here is civil society. We're discussing free autonomous individuals and agents coming together matching ideas with capital to improve the public. Good why shouldn't we celebrate that. Why shouldn't we celebrate the kind of spontaneity of billionaire philanthropy or the floppy of the of the ultra wealthy because precisely because it is so connected with the immediate diverse and complex needs of society. Yes there's a role for government. But let's do this. Also we can walk and chew gum at the same time. There's a sense in which billionaire to be is indeed meant to replace or displace the activity of government. I see that from problem after problem after problem. This idea that government is inefficient. It's dysfunctional let the smarter sector that people with the business success. Now take over some of the solution. And so i don't see that as an activity in which citizens voices are lifted up in civil society but rather as an exaltation of billionaires preferences and their distinctive expertise alleged expertise in problem solving last thing. I i wanna ask you or your about what you said about civil society and a kind of. There's always a a dance. That goes on the person with the money and the nonprofit with the The ability to say yes or to no in taking the money there are very few billionaire. Philanthropist i'm aware of who as it were take grant applications over the transom. They they look for worthy nonprofits who send in an application that they then decide to fund. That's how smaller scale. Philanthropist often work but the billionaire philanthropists very often don't even have websites if you wanted to try to get money from mckenzie. Scott jeff visas ex wife. You might be receiving a phone. Call that announces. You're about to get a multimillion dollar infusion of cash but you have no idea the source of comes from you wouldn't be able to apply for the grant euro had asked for newell the idea that there's a two way dance with one person having all of the money and a whole bunch of other people trying to get it makes a mockery of the idea of contract. Contract is when two people exist on a level playing field of power the genuine ability to consent or distant from the terms of the contract when one person has all the money. The billionaire and the nonprofit so desperate to get some of it there is not a level playing field and the nonprofits very happily bend themselves. To the preferences of the wealthy so that billionaire philanthropy becomes subcontracting the vision of the philanthropist to the nonprofit to execute what the philanthropist wants to do. That's not civil society that makes for a flourishing democratic society. That's a shaping of our collective civil society to the preferences and whims of billionaires high. Read your griffis here your host and moderator. I have a favor to ask you. Please consider coming among member. Membership is free and you get access to a series of great benefits including a ten plus year library of some of our best debates dialogues and podcasts. You also get a free monthly newsletter featuring the debates that we're watching around the world and you get a specially curated friday weekly monk members only podcast focuses on the big international events and trends shaping our world all of that again free at. Www dot munk debates dot com. I hope you'll consider joining and becoming part of our community now back to our program. So.

rob beth jeff bezos bill gates andrew carnegie Scott jeff robin mckenzie newell griffis