37 Burst results for "Carnegie"

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Green Connections Radio -  Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

01:47 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on Green Connections Radio - Insights on Innovation, Sustainability, Clean Energy, Leadership, Entrepreneurship, and Careers w Top Leaders, Women

"Guys are like. Oh this is. A hydrogen feels and And it's it's garnered so much interest report everywhere now super excited about this technology Were involved in european standardization effort to create a protocol feeling protocol phillies. Heavy duty trucks. Because we're moving. A lot of hydrogen really quickly goal is to fill these vehicles in ten minutes not is an international effort. So there's people all over the world. Now that are really moving quickly to build hydrogen trucks and to figure out how to feel them and it's just it's really exciting from it moved much quicker than we ever anticipated. Well that's cool. I love that story. And i love the evolved from somebody trying to make the reduce the healthcare problems in communities around those areas. Because that's a big. That's a big environmental justice issue. Is that so many of these. Coal plants and electric power plants and ports and stuff are surrounded by low income communities because the properties are less expensive and so they tend to attract people who have less money to spend on where they live and so it ends up becoming a ripple effect reminds me of a story just real quickly one of my other guests. Who's in pittsburgh leads. The smart cities initiative carnegie mellon told me about a community that was seeing rates like this of of asthma especially in their community near a coal plant and they were trying. They went to the city council to get the coal plant taken down and the call. The city council said we don't see a direct correlation so the community members took it upon themselves to set up a system to collect the data and they went back eight months nine months later with all this data and the city council was so freaked out. They shut down the plot the coal plant within like a week. I think because the correlation was was just frightening. That's that's a great story and it's a sad story you know it's it's so sad but it shows it's still frustrating what it shows bringing it It is but it shows the power of community mobilization and of data and science. One again you know and we really we also love college students and bringing them into our space introducing them this technology and we had this this group of insurance. Come in and they're doing their exit panel the other day and i was wizard. Was your biggest take. It was your moment. did you have the wrong moment. And one of the one of the female engineer students she was like i cannot sit behind normal diesel truck anymore. She like i get so frustrated there so slow and there you see them admitting all this pollutants into the air right before you you know and it doesn't. That's not the way it has to be. That's interesting the other thing. I was thinking as you were telling them story was that i bet a lot of the truck stops. Have less business now because the trucks won't need to stop his own..

Carnegie Mellon Ten Minutes ONE Pittsburgh Nine Months Later Eight Months European
Double Date With Ted Danson & Mary Steenburgen

Double Date with Marlo Thomas & Phil Donahue

01:55 min | 4 d ago

Double Date With Ted Danson & Mary Steenburgen

"We flew out to santa monica to visit. Ted danson and mary steenburgen. Their house is carved into the side of a hill. It's a craftsman style. Bungalow built in nineteen twenty two and it has what is called a living roof which is covered with greenery to fight off climate change. Ten mary decorated themselves is very relax and homey mostly. It was their warm connection to each other. That grabbed her attention from the start. This is fun. Yeah we've been so excited. We're really that you asked us. Well you came to mind immediately. Really people are always asking us. How did you. How are you married too long. And what i like in likes me. He's cute boys smells and that's a big deal so smell good. Ted likes to play the rascal but once we settled at their farm style kitchen table and began to talk. He was so honest and vulnerable rule of four of us here. I'm the only one who's only married once. Yes i'm the third. i'm being married. Well that maybe that's an interesting way to start because you're a wild optimist or you're total. Denial i mean. I got married and college carnegie Halfway through and i think it's fair to say the real communication would have been I'm afraid to go to new york by myself. Are you oh well. Let's go Sharon apartment and buddies that would have been kind of the emotional truth but somehow we ended up getting married and twenty two and Married for five years good friends but certainly not you know a a marriage

Mary Steenburgen Ted Danson Santa Monica TED Sharon New York
Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

02:17 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "carnegie" discussed on With Friends Like These

"Not a comedian. That is i mean. I sold out carnegie hall and i've traveled the world but i'm not thinking now. I have to sell out a baseball stadium or now. I need to have An oscar for. I really don't feel like that. I feel genuinely like i want to. As i was saying participate in a way that will create new material and be able to express it. I do like to have the success that i have and i want to maintain that and i wanna maintain the success that i've had in my personal life. That's really a number one for me. And i want to maintain my health. I wanna maintain my career. My my friends family all of that. If my life continued the way it's going and didn't even raise a hair in in successor income I am perfectly happy. I wanna i wanna maintain a like so many good places where we can wrap this like a couple of places happened as a comedian. You end things really neatly. I appreciate that. But i actually just couldn't let this interview end without asking you. If you have any advice for me dr advice for you. I mean i obviously don't know you very well except for right now. But this is my favorite Advice to give to anyone in every one and st- something that i read once that i tweaked slightly so that it kinda applies to everyone always in its to Now in fact. Google one. We're going to edit this so like it's not it's yeah it is. Oh my gosh. Kim believe i tell people this all the time because people ask all the time about advice ended his two. I stumped you know it's way basically the idea is to living your freest life and doing exactly what you want to do. Then you're freeing everybody around you. Nobody will worry about you. Nobody will be concerned and trapped in their life worried about your mental or physical state or your financial stay or any your heart your soul if you are taking care of yourself and living the best life you can live Everybody around you is free. Take thank you so much coming on my show. Thank you so much for having. And i really don't think i can put it any better. This show is production of crooked media. It is produced by alyssa. Harare with assistance from mugabe's this episode was engineered by louie lino. I own whitney patrick somali. Box take care of yourselves this day. And i'm the host. A part of the people come join me say younger kaya henderson and are bound as we explore the most overlooked headlines topics that impact people call our issues of race and justice in generally issues of equity whether we're talking to national leaders and academics or activists and influences. We go deep on the issues. You probably won't hear anywhere else. New episodes a policy. The people every tuesday on apple podcasts. Spotify or wherever you get your podcast join us..

Kaya Henderson KIM Alyssa Louie Lino Apple TWO Patrick Somali Spotify Harare Google Tuesday An Oscar Mugabe ONE Hall Carnegie
Fairness Aware Outlier Detection

Data Skeptic

01:48 min | Last week

Fairness Aware Outlier Detection

"I might mention prime. And i'm a student in much lending in public policy at carnegie mellon university. I might've said basically focuses on baton minding on this action and this isn't support systems. I think a lot of people have a vague conception of what anomaly detection is. You're welcome to give a formal definition or an informal one but to you. What is anomaly detection. A nominee addiction is typically. I'll give you a former left. Nation or infamous sense of what an effective is an omni is defined as anything which dates from the normal. So as against the definition of normal is again dependent on the application or the domain better. You are applying tim. Bontemps insolence example. If you're meeting at a classroom right. So it's you're looking under classroom. And if you're dusted regarding ages of the people present in the classroom on the students typically would have age range between say eighteen and twenty one and maybe professor has in asia injured in party fight. Bless or something. I'm just making this up right. So in that sense. The normal is defined because we are under guarding h defined by maybe the ages Drain so in that sense. The deter would be an anomaly in that sense because teachers age his on her age is like different from the nominal. It's in that sense. That would be anomaly in this case. Essentially a number is a field with strives to unusual activity or unusual observations in a given domain. And that's not a nominalization with and since it's about finding unusual things you typically find applications of anomaly detection intrusion detection save. Fraud detection are even in medical domains. Light say epileptic seizure detection on salon.

Bontemps Carnegie Mellon University TIM Asia
Myanmar Fails To Stop Action Even as It Cracks Down on Protesters, Journalists

Pacifica Evening News

03:55 min | Last month

Myanmar Fails To Stop Action Even as It Cracks Down on Protesters, Journalists

"1000 demonstrators against last month's military seizure of power in Myanmar emerged cautiously today under the streets of the country's second largest city. Those in the vanguard carrying homemade shields bearing images of the three thinkers salute the movement symbol of defiance. The protest at Mandalay took place even though security forces have shown little reluctance to use lethal force to break up crowds. Those who marched gathered for just a few minutes before dispersing to avoid a possible confrontation. With riot police. Another group made him mobile protests. Driving through the streets on motorbikes. The protesters have adapted their tactics and response to the escalating violence from security forces, including the firing of live ammunition at crowds. The government's crackdown has left more than 50 protesters dead. But his failed to slow the widespread protests against the February 1st coup that ousted the elected government of Aung San Suu Cheap. According to the Myanmar based Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, more than 1800 people have been arrested in connection with the coup. Dozens of journalists have been arrested, including CNN's awe of The Associated Press has been charged under a public order law that carries a penalty of after three years in prison. According to local news reports and social media and what has become a daily occurrence in Myanmar Protests. Marches were held today in cities and towns across the country. Their actions came after a dramatic night and Yang gone when thousands of residents broke the eight p.m. curfew to show support for a group of protesters who had been trapped by police in an enclave of streets. They came out of their homes, saying songs against the coup and banged pots, pans and other implements together partly in the hope of diverting police from the hunted. Protesters estimated two numbers 200 Witnesses said Several dozens of those who had such shelter in the city's song strong neighborhood were arrested, but others made their way home at dawn several hours after police withdrew from the area. More from reporters. Simon marks what does the military in me and ma want to happen there now that they've seized power and a brutally suppressing protests demanding the freedom of the leaders of the National League for Democracy, the party led by unsung sushi that decisively won last autumns elections in the country. In the short term. Of course, it's apparent that they wanted to stop the new NLD government from taking power, but how much ongoing control do they want to play over affairs in the strife torn country? I think they've been just generally really surprised by how many seats energy has one solid. Jeffrey is non resident scholar in the Asia program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. And we mean question all of us are asking is whether the military intense to revert to a direct and complete control of the country. As it did in the bust, or or tweak the current system off indirect dominance in a way that addresses their insecurities. About holding on to power and the promise of fresh elections and appalling the 2000 and eight constitution that they've been making since the cool suggest that they are really leaning towards maintaining indirect control by designing new rules that would cut down in these Dominance in the parliament and give a boost to the to the military lined BST party, she says One piece of evidence pointing to that conclusion is the appointment of a new election commission that the military directly controls replacing the independent commission that preceded it. Simon Marks reporting

Myanmar Government Of Aung San Suu Assistance Association For Pol Mandalay Nld Government The Associated Press CNN Yang National League For Democracy Government Simon Carnegie Endowment For Interna MA Jeffrey Asia Parliament Simon Marks
Oldest Texas Electricity Co-Op Goes Bust After $2 Billion Bill

All Things Considered

01:46 min | Last month

Oldest Texas Electricity Co-Op Goes Bust After $2 Billion Bill

"11 bankruptcy protection today. Citing they said a nearly $2 billion bill from the state's electricity grid operator following the storm. Marketplaces and you'll reports. Those things can happen when you let the market dictate prices on a grid that's not connected to the rest of the country. Raza's Electric is a cooperative that pays the grid operator to get electricity to hundreds of thousands of Texans. The grid operator is called ERCOT there like a toll road for the electricity system. Costas America teaches environmental engineering at Carnegie Mellon, he says in the February deep freeze, brasses Electric ran up bills many times higher than they normally be. The prices are allowed through the Texas Electricity system to rise when demand is really high, and supply is low. That's kind of the theory of all this the theory behind the largely deregulated market, a system that many are now questioning. David Spence teaches energy law of the University of Texas, he says. In fairness, I don't know that anyone ever anticipated an event like this when they were designing that system. Now, this seems like a black swan event in that sense, But a similar event did hit Texas 10 years ago, and lawmakers decided not to winterize Emily Groubert and George Attack says there's an opportunity again to rethink infrastructure more generally. I think we need to be really, really thoughtful about when it is actually logical to spend a little bit more money here to make sure that these systems actually do what we want them to do for the next several decades. Brasses Electric said before the freeze, it was financially robust. Its bankruptcy family could be an ominous sign. As other Texas power providers success the storm's damage in Austin, I made a Euler for marketplace.

Raza's Electric Costas America Carnegie Mellon David Spence Emily Groubert Texas George Attack University Of Texas Brasses Electric Austin
Lee Daniels and Andra Day on the hidden activist life of Billie Holiday

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:07 min | Last month

Lee Daniels and Andra Day on the hidden activist life of Billie Holiday

"Good afternoon. I'm jonathan kaye. Part opinion writer for the washington post. Welcome to washington post. Live the united states versus. Billie holiday is the incredible story of the fbi's effort efforts to keep jazz great billie holiday from singing strange fruit. Her signature song about lynching director lee daniels presents a gripping drama that shows holiday in all her glory and tragedy. Andrew o.'day gives a stellar performance. So convincing you'd think you were watching lady day herself. That's why i am thrilled and honored to welcome lee daniels and andhra dade to washington post. Live thank you both very much for being here to see you again. I know it's been a very long time. Greats isn't a you again both of you. Congratulations on this film. The moment i saw it. I immediately sent a letter to y'all saying okay here. All your options. I need to talk to you about this film. Le- let me start. Start with you. Thanks so as we saw in the in the opening clip. The film tackles pretty much everything. Racism sexism addiction art abuse. And i'm wondering. How did you come to this project. And what influenced your approach to billie. Holiday's life susan lori parks the pulitzer winning a prize winning playwright Sent me this beautiful script that really depicts the government breaking her down coming for her coming for billie holiday and and really trying to cripple her. As an artist or singing strange fruit which was about lynching black people and that wasn't the understanding of billie holiday that i had. I thought that she was a troubled jazz singer. Got in trouble with the law. And you know the drugs and was fashionable. I did know that she was a political activist. And so and i you know i pride myself in being smart about our history and i thought to myself that i i don't do this. I don't know i had. I had to do it. And i thought also like how many other stories about our people have have. They have been hidden so yeah that was more threes in selena. And so right and i am going to latch onto what you just said before. Which was you thought of billie holiday as a jazz singer But you didn't really know that she was an activist. What what more did she do. Other than being defiant about trying to seeing strange fruit despite government opposition and government targeting. What other things that she do that made you realize that she's she's more than just lady day. What other than she did. Besides stand up to the government. I guess a lot to say i couldn't. I don't know that i could today. I don't think that i could. They told me lead. You can never make a movie again or coming for your mother. I'm going to come for your kids and you will. I'm like take it. But the thing about her strength and her being born in the into the world that she was being born in tipton board she didn't she didn't get to fly in you know what because she. She had nothing to lose by living in her constantly. And let me bring you in here. I saw your interview go ahead. Go ahead now. I just wanted to back off that too. I mean. I think what shows so brilliantly in the movies that apart what she did in standing up to the government was being human. She's black queer woman in the nineteen thirties. Forties and fifties and that living in an owning their in itself is is is defiance than accident that she's integrating audiences music one of the first artists a black woman to integrate carnegie hall. She wasn't the first but she is one of the first shoes audiences in athlete. People understand. This is sort of pre. They're real reinvigorated civil rights mellon so we wouldn't have our heroes would not have been as bold in as they were no thurgood. Marshall end the light on downs. You know rosa parks on down if it were not for her singing. Strange fruit in defiance of the government for not for setting off this alarm in the nation. In letting people know that it's that this was a really really understand. How much for june that emboldened the civil rights news we know today you know as as arrested in the so and him showing her in all her. Human element is is access. Defiance all in itself nelson young. I'm proud from did work.

Billie Holiday Washington Post Lee Daniels Billie Jonathan Kaye Andrew O Andhra Dade Susan Lori Parks FBI Pulitzer United States Selena Tipton Carnegie Hall Rosa Parks Marshall Nelson Young
Lee Daniels and Andra Day take on Billie Holiday’s legacy

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

05:07 min | Last month

Lee Daniels and Andra Day take on Billie Holiday’s legacy

"Afternoon. I'm jonathan kaye. Part opinion writer for the washington post. Welcome to washington post. Live the united states versus. Billie holiday is the incredible story of the fbi's effort efforts to keep jazz great billie holiday from singing strange fruit. Her signature song about lynching director lee daniels presents a gripping drama that shows holiday in all her glory and tragedy. Andrew o.'day gives a stellar performance. So convincing you'd think you were watching lady day herself. That's why i am thrilled and honored to welcome lee daniels and andhra dade to washington post. Live thank you both very much for being here to see you again. I know it's been a very long time. Greats isn't a you again both of you. Congratulations on this film. The moment i saw it. I immediately sent a letter to y'all saying okay here. All your options. I need to talk to you about this film. Le- let me start. Start with you. Thanks so as we saw in the in the opening clip. The film tackles pretty much everything. Racism sexism addiction art abuse. And i'm wondering. How did you come to this project. And what influenced your approach to billie. Holiday's life susan lori parks the pulitzer winning a prize winning playwright Sent me this beautiful script that really depicts the government breaking her down coming for her coming for billie holiday and and really trying to cripple her. As an artist or singing strange fruit which was about lynching black people and that wasn't the understanding of billie holiday that i had. I thought that she was a troubled jazz singer. Got in trouble with the law. And you know the drugs and was fashionable. I did know that she was a political activist. And so and i you know i pride myself in being smart about our history and i thought to myself that i i don't do this. I don't know i had. I had to do it. And i thought also like how many other stories about our people have have. They have been hidden so yeah that was more threes in selena. And so right and i am going to latch onto what you just said before. Which was you thought of billie holiday as a jazz singer But you didn't really know that she was an activist. What what more did she do. Other than being defiant about trying to seeing strange fruit despite government opposition and government targeting. What other things that she do that made you realize that she's she's more than just lady day. What other than she did. Besides stand up to the government. I guess a lot to say i couldn't. I don't know that i could today. I don't think that i could. They told me lead. You can never make a movie again or coming for your mother. I'm going to come for your kids and you will. I'm like take it. But the thing about her strength and her being born in the into the world that she was being born in tipton board she didn't she didn't get to fly in you know what because she. She had nothing to lose by living in her constantly. And let me bring you in here. I saw your interview go ahead. Go ahead now. I just wanted to back off that too. I mean. I think what shows so brilliantly in the movies that apart what she did in standing up to the government was being human. She's black queer woman in the nineteen thirties. Forties and fifties and that living in an owning their in itself is is is defiance than accident that she's integrating audiences music one of the first artists a black woman to integrate carnegie hall. She wasn't the first but she is one of the first shoes audiences in athlete. People understand. This is sort of pre. They're real reinvigorated civil rights mellon so we wouldn't have our heroes would not have been as bold in as they were no thurgood. Marshall end the light on downs. You know rosa parks on down if it were not for her singing. Strange fruit in defiance of the government for not for setting off this alarm in the nation. In letting people know that it's that this was a really really understand. How much for june that emboldened the civil rights news we know today you know as as arrested in the so and him showing her in all her. Human element is is access. Defiance all in itself nelson young. I'm proud from did work.

Billie Holiday Washington Post Lee Daniels Billie Jonathan Kaye Andrew O Andhra Dade Susan Lori Parks FBI Pulitzer United States Selena Tipton Carnegie Hall Rosa Parks Marshall Nelson Young
Biden treads carefully around Trump's combative trade policy

Here & Now

06:11 min | 2 months ago

Biden treads carefully around Trump's combative trade policy

"Negotiations over. A corona virus relief package have been central to president biden's first weeks in office but he's also confronting a long list of foreign policy challenges global vaccine distribution trade and the task of repairing alliances that were frayed by former president. Donald trump in his first major foreign policy speech as president last week biden laid out his vision. America is back. Diplomacy is back at the center of our foreign policy. As i said to my inaugural address we will repair our alliances engaged with the world once again not to meet yesterday's challenges but today's and tomorrow's we want to get some reaction now to how biden's foreign policy is shaping up in europe and for that we're joined on skype by rosa balfour director of the europe center at the carnegie endowment for international peace. Welcome rosa hello. And so the president outlined a few immediate changes in his announcement last week including a nuclear arms treaty with russia and the decision to keep. Us troops in germany that former president trump had said would be coming back to the us. So how was his address. And this statement that america is back received in europe. Everything that has happened since by was elected has been well received in europe. There is a nerve well. Ming delight that things have changed in the white house and all of the decisions that were actually taken infest. Few days of the biden administration also welcome in europe however the still awesome europeans are worried about and i think one of them is that while the biden administration really wants to invest on allies and on diplomacy which is music to is of europeans. At the same time there is a bit of a concern that the priorities of the new administration will be very much domestically focused and that that will have implications for trade for climate change prioritize of technology so does raise some potentially troubling issues in the relationship between the us and europe together. We'll let me ask about one of those then rosa because One of the early executive actions that president biden took was signing his So-called american executive order so you mentioned trade as a potential issue. Does europe look at that as a form of protectionism. Well they're all suspicions that bassey's the deep meaning this. This decision actually is and europe would probably be more ambitious than the us in seeking broader trade deal. So i would be cautiously optimistic. That europeans and americans can go through the differences about they all suspicions in europe about the. Us's ultimate goal in terms of trade policy could any concerns about protectionism. Also extend to access to a corona iris vaccine. Because so far the supply has been kind of limited Could there be some tension between the us and europe about who is able to get their hands on these limited supplies. Yes to there's been a bit of a spat with the uk over procurement of crow virus. Vaccines and these could well continue. Having said this there is a general commitments that this coronavirus pandemic really needs to be addressed through global cooperation and european leaders. Have been underlining this and so i think ultimately this line will prevail pasta is modeled because of the pandemic and the desperation attached to wanting to this pandemic and get back onto a normal footing in our lives in the economy. Globally on that idea of getting back to sort of a normal footing. We heard germany's foreign minister. Say that he hopes for a reset of us european relations under the biden administration. I'm wondering rose how easily you think the president can do that. I mean is there any lingering concern in europe to the. Us is just not as reliable as it once was based on the last four years. Yes i'm afraid. The legacy of four years of trump is a pretty dramatic. He's caused a long shadow and they're all doubts. We've seen this before. George w bush was not loved at all in europe and then america bounced back with the bomber with biden. It might take a little longer. But i think all the ingredients all that at the end of the day even if europe and the us do not align on everything they don't align necessarily on their view off the chinese threat or the russian threats but are far closer to each other van out to anyone else. And i'm glad you brought up russia because that was one of the things that the president brought up in his speech last week's asked what he calls the quote determination of russia to damage and disrupt our democracy. He also sort of reaffirmed the united states commitment to nato calling it one of the country's closest friends how is biden's russia policy taking shape it. And what does that mean for. Nato in your view so let's just tremendous because europe has just had a bit of a diplomatic blunder of with russia on the high representative for foreign affairs visits moscow and the outcome visit was very negative but the high representative has also said. There's only so much i can do. If the member states continued to be divided and this is the big issue in europe with respect to russia in particular but also with respect to china's that the member states have quite simply not on the same page. I think biden if he works with his allies in europe and is in listening mode in doing so can help bring europeans closer together. And this affects you. Us corporation russia. But also a nato. On russia we know that nato has still considers russia as the greatest threat. And of course the us decision to wait before. Moving troops of germany is only welcome in germany. Trump's earlier decision to move. The mouse was viewed very negatively in germany. Rosa balfour directs the europe center at the carnegie endowment for international peace rosa. Thanks so much for your time. Thank

Europe Biden Administration President Biden United States Biden Europe Center Rosa Balfour Rosa Hello Russia Carnegie Endowment For Interna Donald Trump Germany Ming Bassey Skype White House Rosa Nato George W Bush
Biden taps longtime diplomat William Burns for CIA director

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

00:15 sec | 3 months ago

Biden taps longtime diplomat William Burns for CIA director

"Washington diplomat who rose through the ranks of the State Department. For retiring retiring term term on on the the Carnegie Carnegie Endowment Endowment of of International International Peace. Peace. Sherry Sherry Preston Preston ABC ABC News News Co. Co. Moh Moh news news 1000 1000 FM FM 97 97 7631 7631 Right Right now now Monday morning,

Carnegie Carnegie Endowment En Sherry Sherry Preston Preston State Department Washington Abc News News Co. Co. ABC
Tech companies role in the attempted coup

This Week in Tech

05:17 min | 3 months ago

Tech companies role in the attempted coup

"As i see it we have three core problems related to what happened last week. They're all tech tech related so the first core problem dan mentioned we've got a relatively small group of people who are making decisions for all of us and that is true that that group of people is based on the valley. We also have a small group of people in washington. Dc making decisions that impact us and and that's the supreme court there's a tension inherent between the decisions that are being made in response to involving the evolving nature of our technology speech and society by technology companies and the static laws of the united states. Laws that are not intended to change. There's this tension between the two and resolving that tension. i think is is not just critical to get through. We are right now. But it's it's going to have to be the cornerstone of of how how law evolves over the next couple of years because if that doesn't happen the mechanisms by which we make a lot of decisions no longer makes sense. So part of what's happening right now is an indiscriminate use of terms of service The the the big long post that zuckerberg relayed the letter from twitter with. They are doing is trying to make legalistic arguments. Having to do with the terms of service and the problem is that there was a study from carnegie mellon a couple years ago showing that if we stopped to read all of the terms of service that that are presented to us it would take seventy workdays to eight hours a day. Fifteen at work weeks because the median lanes of privacy policies around twenty five hundred words. Now if you start you know and that's just so if you if you assume that you are reading the t. o. s. and you're thinking about what you were agreeing to write. You can even go further and show that you know in terms of work lost in exchange for us reading all of these terms of service. It's like hundreds of billions of dollars and my point is that tech companies are making up the interpretations of these terms of service as they go along which is in conflict with the laws that they are intended to respond to so indiscriminate application of terms of service to some extent is how we got to now and ultimately. That's what took some of these key figures off of the networks but in some way they don't matter because it's not just trump. Who is the problem here. It's algorithm determinism. It's the systems that are designed to pull content. Not just from him but now from all of these other places so trump may be gone in. Aws may have taken parlor off line but the problem is the infrastructure. Supporting all of this. And i will say one last thing and that has to do with world building because all of this reached a fever pitch and a past couple of days And again. I say this as somebody who's politically independent this the people surrounding donald trump has done a masterful job of world building They created something called antifa they created something called cunanan which may have been bubbling up here and there may have had little fits and spurts but certainly if created. They certainly fostered it. These this aunt have anti first of all. It makes me crazy that way that it's being pronounced as anti there is no long found in the word. Anti fa whatever. The point is short for anti fascist antifa aunt. Whatever it doesn't matter it's made up anyway. So here's here's why. It does matter. Because i was at the state department in twenty twelve through twenty sixteen as we're others talking about intentional misinformation and how this has significant next order outcomes and it would be good to read team some of this in advance to think these things through and it just didn't happen so we really have to think hard because it just taking some of these people offline and taking parlor and gabby you know out of the play store their amira sites already like somebody created a mirror site of a sub. Reddit that it gotten take down this. This doesn't it's virtually impossible to eliminate this stuff. That's right that's right so now we've three core problems that are unfortunately from my vantage point not going away and the compounding effect here is that we've got a transition of power It's cold in a lot of places where americans live and we have no holidays to look forward to Jewelries always sucks. So i mean but this tells us and we've got kobe. That's so so we have to really think through not just what happened last week in a vacuum but also how does the mechanisms that we have to deal with. Some of this no longer makes sense is the

Carnegie Mellon Zuckerberg Cunanan Supreme Court DAN Washington United States Twitter Donald Trump Reddit
US Help Gulf States Agree to Ease Relations With Qatar

All Things Considered

02:32 min | 3 months ago

US Help Gulf States Agree to Ease Relations With Qatar

"Deal between two important but feuding allies Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Jared Kushner, president Trump's son in law and adviser, was on hand for a signing ceremony in the Saudi kingdom. It marks the end to a three year rift that threatened to undermine U. S strategy in the Gulf region. NPR's Jackie Northam reports. They were warm hugs and handshakes, all while wearing masks as Saudi Arabia is Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman created Cutter shake Tommen bin Hamad al family ahead of today's signing. Seen belied the deep animosity between the two countries since mid 2017 when Saudi Arabia announced the diplomatic trade and travel blockade against his tiny rich neighbor. Frederick Wary is with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. The Saudis wanted to bring contact to its knees. The Saudis made at least a dozen demands of cutter and none of them to my knowledge were, you know fulfilled for asthma. Assad with George Washington University's Elliott School for International Affairs, says the Saudi Crown prince realized it was time to move on, especially with an incoming Biden administration that is promised to get tough with Saudi Arabia, Arabia. Clearly this is Part in parcel of turning the page. They are setting the table, so to speak for better relations with the incoming Bud Administration, But it was the Trump Administration that's been pushing to resolve the spat. Saudi Arabia and Qatar. Our allies in the U. S has a large military base in Qatar. The administration also wants to create a bulwark against Iran. Carnegie's wary doesn't buy it to say that the Gulf is going to be united against Iran that there's going to be this Impenetrable Gulf Sunni bloc now against Iran, because suddenly Qatar has been brought into the fold is just pure fantasy. I mean, the gulf has always been this united in terms of its outreach and policies toward Iran, and many of the issues that started the feud are still there. Hotter still has relations with Iran. Look sad with the Elliott School says it's not a sure thing. Today's deal will stick. The reporting is that the deal almost fell apart on Sunday in the U. S. Had to Jared Kushner personally had to intervene and work the phone lines. I think it's a testimony to have fragile it is even if tenuous, MCs odds, says the deal is a step in the right direction and will be welcomed in D. C. Jackie Northam. NPR news

Saudi Arabia Jared Kushner Qatar Saudi Kingdom Jackie Northam Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salm Tommen Bin Hamad Al Frederick Wary Elliott School For Internation U. Biden Administration Gulf Region Iran Bud Administration Carnegie Endowment For Interna Trump Administration Donald Trump NPR Assad George Washington University
A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

My Seven Chakras

05:45 min | 4 months ago

A Detailed Discussion With Kim Chestne ON How To Use Your Intuition y

"It's time to bring on our special guest today. Kim jesse so. Kim is the author of radical infusion of globally recognized in innovation leader and founder of intuition lab. Her work has been featured are supported by leading edge organizations such as out by southwest carnegie mellon university comcast and hewlett packard while working as a leader in the tech sector. Kim recognize that tremendous role that intuition plays in business and cultural progress and set out on a quest to learn everything there is to know about it and as of nearly two decades worth of research and practice she has developed a powerful system that anyone can tap into to access the inner wisdom in ordinary with so really really exciting and kim. Thanks for joining us. Thanks for having me excited to talk to you tonight. Yeah me too. It's supposed to be in our species night especially in india because it is valley the festival of lights and there's actually a transformation going on in india as well. This started many decades back because as you know india and the valleys associated with firecrackers people becoming more and more conscious as they let go off that external firecrackers and realized the light that is within them the lamp within the essence within. I think that's got me to do our own in to it absolutely. Is that inner light that intellect growing so strong. It's such a beautiful metaphor and it's a beautiful day for us to be having this conversation because it really all does tie together absolutely so. Let's start from the beginning. Where were you born and warm. Was your childhood lane. Well i was born in a little town called carlisle pennsylvania small town girl and You know i think i had. I had sort of your colonial white picket fence upbringing in one thousand nine hundred eighty s america which was really fun and if you remember the eighties and so it was really fun. Time to grow up. And i think that's it's those times it really started to develop my interest in intuition and i had a lot of intuitive experiences growing up so It all kind of stemmed from those childhood years amazing and work sort of influence. Did your family have on your intuitive or spiritual development. Yeah you know. That's a really good question because a lot of people we have this talk about intuition and when it happens to you intuition can be something that people can either accept or not accept right so when you're talking about kids and it's so important with kids because kids have such great in and they haven't really had it beaten out of the yet. It's one of these things still alive and still so connected with intuitive. Things starts to happen with children. Appearance can either encourage that or they can create fear. Be like oh my gosh. This is something to be afraid of or this is crazy. You know so it's You know working with intuition in my childhood it was challenging for me. Because i think coming from a really sort of traditional christian background. There's not a lot of room for intuition. Especially it was more of the protestant. I think in the catholic traditions. There's more of a place for the holy spirit in a lot of mistakes but in my experiences growing up in my little world there was not a place for intuition and so it was something i really had to come to terms with on my own and really facing a lot of fears and a lot of sort of judgment from the people around me and now they get it like my mom's very intuitive she inherited from her. I think it is something that we have a genetic propensity to. But i think there's just not that level of acceptance which in the east which i think is so wonderful about you know eastern cultures. Intuition is so much more integrated in daily life and acceptance right. Yeah that's that's very true. And i think like we were discussing before the india was india also is going to its own journey of realizing how abundant and whilst our own heritage is and going back to our roots realizing that wisdom about intuition and the mind and the soul and yes we're going through our journey as a country has But you know what what comes to. My mind is As i learned more about how children behave like a child always looking at his mom or her mom or her danna his dad for approval right. They're always looking at the so. It's not so much of words but it's also about how the bench reacts to. A certain situation are something that is happening on the word. Maybe that micro reaction that can make a huge difference right in terms of how the child approaches word even as an adult absolutely absolutely in those little foundational moments. They and this is talk a lot about conditioning. If you read my booker you hear me talk today. I'm probably going to use that word. A lot Because intuition is something that is really a counterbalance to this conditioning. That we all get and we get it from those very first moments with our family and with the people that we grow with you know. We're conditioned to think things. Like oh intuitions not real. Or we're conditioned thank like our imagination in our creativity isn't as important as our intellectual side so so part of really balancing these sides of our brains and really coming into our true being is stepping away from that conditioning in releasing it

Kim Jesse Southwest Carnegie Mellon Univ India KIM Hewlett Packard Comcast Carlisle Pennsylvania America Danna
The Great Commission with Tyler St. Clair

The Bible Says What!?

05:27 min | 4 months ago

The Great Commission with Tyler St. Clair

"Special guest is the lead pastor at the cornerstone church in detroit. Scho- tyler sinclair. Hey how you guys doing. Glad to have yawn man. Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule in having the conversation appreciate it. My pleasure. Mock leisure well today. We decided to discuss the great commission. But i like to get to know a little bit more about you. Tell us a little bit about your scherf. I'm gonna give you the long and short of my journey. Yeah i'm born born and raised in detroit michigan. I grew up Grew up at a situation that we It's pretty common Single parents and the In the city and struggled and ran the streets and the very similar story a lot of people That are ministry six to reach In the city of detroit but I born and raised in church. But i decided at the age of eighteen and my infinite wisdom that i was done with god. Donald church didn't want when have anything to do with this Beings that i thought was irrelevant in my life and Yeah whitten On my birthday when got got got a tattoo and decided that I'm done One one year later one year later. I'm asking jesus To say before for my fans and surrender my life to the lord. Jesus so what. A difference. A year year makes so they age of nineteen. I surrendered to christ and What what struck me was My church experience was Church with the destination church. Which is the place that people came. I thought it was just a social thing. I thought it was just something that people came and did and got their religious goods and services and when i began to read scripture sure I saw that there was. There should be an urgency behind the church that there should be a zeal and the desire to see people come to know and follow jesus and to see people From the wrath. Adjustment of god. So i think i for this is this is different. What i'm when i'm reading a scripture is different from what i'm seeing and what i'm experiencing and So i i got saved In september of two thousand and one in december just a few months. Later i was telling my pastor that i feel called to ministry they nineteen years old and everyone thought i was insane And i felt insane. But i knew that This burden at the lower had put on my heart with something. I couldn't took away until i got older Like i experienced Life transformation through the gospel. Jesus and i wanted that for everyone that i came in contact with since since nineteen. I have been Like old thanks for say running for jesus and it's been a wild ride and i've just seen so much of the lord's grace In the last twenty something years of kind of know about this tattoo was it. Like i'm done with you. Got a tattoo like it was it was it was. It was just my my my Rebellion me sticking my flag in the ground. I i gotta i gotta t and then. After i became a christian. I change the ten talk cross. Of course so how convenience. It was just This was hey I'm outwardly a rebellion. I'm choosing a life without you And that was a sign of that but Thank god his grace. He's gracious in carnegie and he caught me to himself and save me from myself so college. The tuesday curious the great commission. Let's let's start that matthew twenty eight we've got the great commission eighteen through twenty Mark fifteen sixteen says the same thing. the message basically is go out and preach my work Why do you think it is that you're the one that's supposed to do this. So i love the great commission. And it's been a passes that i've referred to when and and and and basically human oriented my life around this great commission and the part that i think we often overlook is The beginning part. Before right before get right. Before jesus gives the great commission inverse eighteen Verse eighteen matthew twenty aching and jesus Came and said to them. All authority in heaven and earth has been given to me so jesus is making. That's a very big weighty statement. All of the all authority in the entire universe has been given to me

Detroit Tyler Sinclair Donald Church Cornerstone Church Whitten Michigan Carnegie Matthew
Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

Daily Tech News Show

00:58 sec | 4 months ago

Uber sells self-driving cars unit to Aurora Innovation

"And it's thomas car plans in deeds so this story broke right at the end of detainees s. Yesterday uber announced on monday that it so sell selling and self-driving unit advanced technologies group also known as eighty jim to aurora innovation. A competitor uber. The deal is expected to close in q. One well zuber given up on autonomous vehicles. Be nuts uber ceo dara khosrowshahi will join. Aurora's board an uber. At investors and employees will in forty percent of aurora following. The deal uber will also invest four hundred million dollars into aurora directly and errors. Autonomous cars will eventually operate on uber's ride hailing platform. Aurora was founded by google's former lead engineer for thomas cars. Chris urban along with sterling anderson. Who helped lead tesla model x. project and drew back now who ran carnegie mellon's research lab and worked on a thomas vehicles at uber.

Thomas Car Advanced Technologies Group Aurora Zuber Dara Khosrowshahi Uber Thomas Cars Chris Urban Carnegie Mellon Google Tesla Anderson Drew
David Lander, 'Squiggy' on 'Laverne & Shirley,' dies at 73

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 4 months ago

David Lander, 'Squiggy' on 'Laverne & Shirley,' dies at 73

"Actor David lander famous for playing squeaky on laverne and Shirley has died after dealing with multiple sclerosis for decades he was seventy three I marquees are a letter with a look at his career David lander signature line was one word long comedy partnership with Michael McKean as students at Carnegie Mellon University they played Lenny and squeaky on laverne and Shirley from nineteen seventy six to nineteen eighty three lander hid his multiple sclerosis at first but said in a two thousand AP interview he went public with it to show it was not a death sentence not all crippling it doesn't mean it's the end of the world it doesn't mean that you can't lead a normal life now there are drugs to help you live that life and people should be aware of that

David Lander Laverne Shirley Multiple Sclerosis Michael Mckean Carnegie Mellon University Lenny Lander AP
After Trump, Europe's Populist Leaders Will Have 'Lost One Of Their Cheerleaders'

Morning Edition

04:00 min | 4 months ago

After Trump, Europe's Populist Leaders Will Have 'Lost One Of Their Cheerleaders'

"Trump on his way out of office. Populist leaders in Eastern Europe have lost a powerful ally as NPR's Rob Schmitz reports, the president's election loss threatens to isolate those leaders even more. On the day after the U. S election, millions of votes in key swing states were still being counted. And there wasn't a clear winner yet. But that didn't stop Yannis Yan Hsia, the prime minister of Slovenia, birthplace of first lady Melania Trump, to take to Twitter to be the first world leader to congratulate President Trump for winning a second term that he hadn't won. After the election was called for Biden. Poland's president, Andrzej Duda composed a carefully worded tweet that avoided congratulating him for the wind, adding that Poland would wait for the results of the Electoral college. Eastern Europe's populist strongman leaders are having a hard time accepting Trump has lost. I'm not so sure it's a big loss for the populations. I think it's a big loss for the individual leaders. Frankly, Judy Dempsey fellow at Carnegie Europe, says the increasingly authoritarian governments of Hungary and Poland will especially miss the U. S president, who seemed to share their world view. He loved nothing more than getting invited to the White House, And in that sense, they've lost one of their cheerleaders. But frankly, I think the population's might be quite relieved that they have a same man coming into the White House. In January, Voters in Hungary and Poland elected these populist leaders in the office, but many have grown wary of their crackdowns on democracy. So has the European Union. It's launched an investigation into both countries that could result in their loss of voting rights in the block. The post government bet on the wrong horse. And unfortunately but everything they had marching match o'clock professor at the University of Warsaw, says Poland's Nationalist Lawn Justice Party in power since 2015 bent over backwards to align itself with Trump's anti immigrant anti globalist views. Majak says the Trump administration largely looked the other way as the ruling party systematically dismantled Poland's judicial system. And crack down on its free press. Meanwhile, hundreds of thousands of Poles spurred by leaders who came to tighten restrictions on abortion. Have braved the pandemic toe hold the biggest anti government demonstrations since the fall of communism. Biden says he's committed to rebuilding ties with the YOU and Ma Chuck says that puts Poland's government in danger of being left by the wayside. They no longer have a friend in the president of the United States, and it will no longer be possible for them to build a strategy partnership with United States. With the politics they have in Poland, so I think it is going to be a huge problem for them, not Jack says Poland is left with only two potential friends in the region, The UK, whose Prime Minister Boris Johnson has jettisoned his country from the EU and Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, who has consolidated power in himself and his Nationalist Party. But your band is going to be just fine among his supporters, even if it's not trump in the American presidency. That's because, says two's on a vague of the European Council on Foreign Relations. Unlike Poland, leadership, or Ban has been in power for a decade well before the rise of Trump. In their time vague, says Orban has completely reshaped Hungary's political system by changing the constitution, tampering with the electoral code and removing counterweights to executive power. Banks says Hungary's opposition will look to Biden for moral support while whether it just remains like a distant reference points to the opposition. That okay, we can Look at the Westin See that change is possible. Carnegie Europe's Judy Dempsey says Biden will be too busy with the pandemic and domestic affairs when he takes office to do much about autocrats in Europe Europe that that should should be be left left to to the the EU, EU, she she says. says. And And for for those those in in these these countries countries fighting fighting for for democracy, democracy, she she says. says. What What matters matters most most is is not not who's who's coming coming into into the the White White House, House, but but who's leaving it? Rob Schmitz. NPR NEWS Berlin

Poland Donald Trump Rob Schmitz Yannis Yan Hsia Judy Dempsey Melania Trump President Trump Andrzej Duda Eastern Europe Hungary Carnegie Europe Biden U. Lawn Justice Party Majak White House Trump Administration Electoral College NPR Slovenia
James D. Wolfensohn, Who Led the World Bank for 10 Years, Dies at 86

AP 24 Hour News

00:14 sec | 5 months ago

James D. Wolfensohn, Who Led the World Bank for 10 Years, Dies at 86

"Who served as the president of the World Bank for 10 years has died. Wolfensohn worked on Wall Street for many years and was also chairman of Carnegie Hall. He was 86 years old. I'm Jackie Quinn. AP News CORONAVIRUS

Wolfensohn World Bank Carnegie Hall Jackie Quinn AP
Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

Data Skeptic

05:22 min | 5 months ago

Sybil Attacks on Federated Learning

"Hi. My name is clement. phone. I'm a phd student at carnegie mellon university. Welcome to the show thanks. I'm here so tell me a little bit about your specific areas of study. Yeah so at carnegie mellon. I'm a phd student in the school of computer science. And more specifically. I do research in. Let's say the broad category of computer security and if you wanna drill down even further i mostly work in security when applied to machine learning systems and the security of machine learning systems. I would guess the audience has at least some familiarity with security is being like denial of service attacks and very like rule based kind of system looking at traffic. Maybe not as much machine learning. How does security play into machine learning operations. Yeah absolutely there are many different levels. I think that you can approach the problem. There's the initial idea of just taking traditional security problems. Such as denial service intrusion detection and applying machine learning to those domains just gathering insights from data and learning about them. and then there's the more meta area of making the actual process of machine. Learning more secure has so there's been a wide array of work in the community that has shown how at test time you can perform different tastes of attacks during training time you can perform a tax on the model and pretty much anything in between. I'm sure you're familiar with this phrase that if you're not paying for the product you are the product and i guess. There's some wisdom in that i don't know if it's universally true but people are certainly becoming more aware of that and maybe the off the cuff reaction is. I don't want people having my data because its privacy. But in some sense i would like people to have some of my data. I don't mind having good recommendations on amazon for example. Because i can just ignore them. Where do you yourself. Draw the lines about data sharing yet. So i agree with you that this is a pretty personal choice when it comes to just the type of experience you wanna have with the products. I think i would be similar to you in that respect where nothing comes for free. As you've said you've got to give some data to system to use it and to use it effectively. I think it's a really big area of research in general about ways in which maybe you could provide assistance but do things in a more privacy preserving way so that's a very big area research these days i guess i am a user of most day things. So that's where i would slide. Hundred spectrum makes sense. yeah. I think that's most of us. Perhaps we'll the specific paper. I invade you on to discuss. Today is titled delimitations of federated learning in civil settings so some definitions questions to kick us off. What is federated learning. This is great because it kind of plays into the idea of privacy. A little more federated learning is this new idea in distributing machine. Learning came out in around twenty seventeen developed by google. And it's the idea that you can train machine. Learning models across distributed data sets over the network without actually transferring data into google domain. So previously you'd have the idea that i'm using a service and some server. Let's say that's owned by. Google would be collecting all the information in storing it somewhere on a database and then writing machine learning on that collected data federated. Learning is a different idea. Where instead of storing data on a database owned by google. They actually just do the model training kind of live as it's occurring and there's no transfer of data is just machine learning occurs over the network and that might sound like it's kind of the same thing but when it comes to the problem of data ownership and privacy there's a bit of nuance there in terms of both the privacy and security implications federated learning which is one of the big topics of our paper and when the models being trained. Where does that training actually take place in the situation of federated learning. I guess you could think of the machine. Learning process is kind of just an iterative summation of values. So the training still takes place at work in the sense that you're taking updates to a model like you're learning it by adding values but the values are passed over the network directly so it's still lives in the service domain. Just the data used to supply those updates does not it still stays on the client devices. Gotcha so maybe we take a simple case of something like the logistic regression which can be nicely summarized as just it's beta values just the parameters that were calculated machine learning. Would it be corrected to saying like my phone or my local or whatever looks at my private data calculates that model and instead of sending my data just sends those parameters off to google. Yeah that's exactly right. That's like a really good way. Just gotcha okay. So we're seeing that then. Don't i still have some sort of privacy risks though because someone could kind of invert that and say well. If you're sending us these parameters what's the data that would have arrived at this answer exactly. So there's a whole field of research on privacy attacks on federated learning. We discussed this a little bit in our paper. But it's not really. The focus of our paper ends the idea behind. All these attacks is very much what you just said which is maybe. I can't observe the data used to train the model directly and that provides some sort of privacy but if i can observe the model updates or the beta values as you're saying and observed multiple instances of them i get a pretty good idea of what your data looks like there's some you know mathematical theoretical bounds on how much you can do but in practice. That might already be too much for certain context.

Federated Carnegie Mellon University Google Clement Amazon
Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

Daily Tech News Show

01:24 min | 5 months ago

Algorithm spots 'Covid cough' inaudible to humans

"Mit scientists have published a paper. In the i tripoli journal of engineering and medicine and biology describing an algorithm they developed the can identify whether you have covid nineteen by the sound of your cough. That's true if you're asymmetric. In other words if i mean a coffee is a symptom. But you don't have the classic symptoms of covid nineteen because a cough could be a symptom of anything. Covid changes the sound you produce. Even when you're a symptomatic intesting. The algorithm was ninety eight point five percent accuracy on patients with a positive covid nineteen tests. So they were able to use coughing to detect ninety eight point five percent of people who were definitely positive with covid nineteen and a one hundred percent accurate for those with no other symptoms. The algorithm was trained on a data set of seventy thousand audio samples with multiple coughs. Twenty five hundred of which were from confirmed covid nineteen cases. So that's how the algorithm was able to go. Okay that's somebody who doesn't have it that somebody who does and figure out the patterns that it would listen for the site just hope to get regulatory approval to use it as a way to take quick noninvasive daily screenings and for pool testing to quickly detect outbreaks in groups pulled. Meaning like a group of people a test. A bunch of people once cambridge university carnegie mellon university. Uk health startup called novo. Eric are all working on similar projects. So it's not just mit. But they're the most recent to publish a paper on it.

Tripoli Journal Of Engineering Cough MIT Cambridge University Carnegie Mellon University Eric UK
"carnegie" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

04:37 min | 1 year ago

"carnegie" Discussed on KGO 810

"Globe I want to Carnegie Foundation grant in my junior year of college that entitled me to go to any place in the country they gave out twenty of them in disciplines that were ninety five percent male covering the NFL for the globe the credential it said no women or children in press box professor was there now working forty five years in the business thirty at CBS with even a first here at Westwood One the first woman and an NFL booth as an analyst by the time I went to CVS and covered the Olympics are covered ten levels and ten final fours on NBA finals Super Bowl being a first presented it challenges players or coach or somebody would hit on me I would always say now your mother didn't teach you to talk like that still working in sports Fisher looks forward to mentoring saying the three elements for anyone to succeed passion knowledge and stamina whatever it is you want to do I am the example that you can do it because it did not exist when I started so I say dream big pharma sept eleven till now concerns surrounding the spread of coronavirus of left many employees at entertainment venues temporarily without work correspondent Clayton Neville says members of the NBA community are stepping in to help out Dallas Mavericks owner mark Cuban said shortly after NBA games were suspended that he would take care of a redeploy eats I reached out to the folks at the arena and our folks at the maps to find out you know what it would cost to support financially support people who are going to be able to come to work you've been living up to its promise pledging to pay the arena workers for the games Mr over the next thirty days they get paid by the hour and and this is the source of income and so we'll do some things there we may ask them to go do some volunteer work in exchange the shark tank mogul says he understands the gravity of what the country is dealing with this is people's lives at stake this isn't about basketball this isn't about the Mavericks this isn't about when do we start or do we start or how do we start for the team practice continued we told them to be very vigilant that this is not a situation where the seasons ended go do what you're going to do others following Cubans lead the Golden State Warriors announced they would donate a million dollars in disaster relief to assist chase center employees the Brooklyn nets putting a plan in place to help out Barclay center staff and Cleveland Cavaliers star Kevin love taking it upon himself to donate one hundred thousand dollars to an hourly staff quite nimble Dallas nine till Robert workman has sports still no stores or sporting events but football stepped into the spotlight over the weekend six months before the season starts to think of it as a really long pregame show like you get for the Superbowl the players voted to approve the new collective bargaining agreement which means labor peace for the NFL for a decade the vote was close just a three percent separation but a simple majority was all that was necessary there read it means expanding the playoffs from twelve to fourteen teams as early as next season and adding a seventeen game to the regular season schedule as soon as twenty twenty one that extra game that may wind up being played at a neutral site either domestically or overseas the CBA also means a larger salary cap one hundred ninety eight point two million dollars for the upcoming season and that's timely since today is the deadline for teams to use either the franchise or transition tag on their potential free agents teams have exclusive negotiating rights with their players through noon eastern today after which players can talk to any team with signings beginning on Wednesday if they had the power of the new CBA teams could have used both the transition tag and the franchise tag which will come in handy in say Dallas for they have dak Prescott and Amari Cooper both ready to test the free agent waters a couple of players took advantage of the new numbers over the weekend Ryan Tannehill re up with the Titans getting a big four year deal as a reward for getting them to the AFC title game over the winter and the raven sent a fifth round draft pick to the Jaguars board of incidentally is Campbell he not only made the Pro Bowl this past year he won the Walter Payton award as the most of the though as as one of a fine upstanding human being he's expected to sign a contract extension NASCAR had planned a reason front of empty seats over the weekend but they change their mind on Friday cancelling the races in Atlanta yesterday and next week in Miami the new plan has racing resuming on March twenty ninth in Texas another change came in on Friday the PGA postponing the masters they canceled everything up to the masters which is scheduled to start on April ninth now it'll be rescheduled but sometime we just don't know when they're going to be playing the tradition like no other that's Monday sports all right it is seven till.

Carnegie Foundation
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Those who may suffer from accidents and provide small pensions for those needing help in old age. This was actually the first of its kind the influence of his father and all those that encouraged him during his lifetime pushed Andrew to create as many libraries as possible after creating a public library back in his hometown of done firm Lynn and one in allegany. He went on to create an entire public library system in Pittsburgh. Eventually, he helped to build nearly three thousand public libraries throughout the country. In addition to the Carnegie relief fund, he also created the Carnegie done firm Lynn trust. The Carnegie trust for the universities of Scotland and Manhattan's music hall, which we know today as Carnegie Hall, you may know of his most famous school now known as Carnegie Mellon University. It originally started as a trade school in nineteen hundred after Andrew donated a huge sum for the schools engineering program, it became Carnegie tech in nineteen to he founded the Carnegie institution to fund scientific research and established a pension fund for teachers with a ten million dollar donation. He'd made the transition from industrialised tycoon to a philanthropic madman, but his philanthropic efforts, though they were huge, might not have been his biggest achievement. Andrew was the first to call for a league of nations and later established the Carnegie Endowment for international peace in nineteen ten to hasten the abolition of war. He funded the building of the Hague palace of peace in the Netherlands, which now houses the world court. The court was created to end World War One award that deeply disturbed Andrew along time, pacifist during the last year of his life. Andrew was bedridden and plagued with influenza. He lived comfortably in a six storey block long mansion, but his health was fading fast. It was time to close an old wound before it was too late. Andrew summoned his longtime secretary, James bridge to give a message to Andrews former partner in crime. Henry Frick the two hadn't spoken in over twenty years in his message to Frick Andrew requested that the two of them in their old age air their grievances and make up for everything they done to each other freak wasn't buying it in fricks infamous words. He told bridge quote, yes, you can tell Carnegie, I'll meet him, tell him. I'll see him in hell where we both are going even if he couldn't make amends. On a personal level, he was able to see his country Megan. Men's on an international one, even though his efforts against the war were in vain. Andrew lived long enough to witness the treaty of or Cy and the end of World War One on June twenty eighth nineteen nineteen. Just two months later on August eleventh, Andrew died from pneumonia complications. He was eighty one years old. He'd given away over three hundred fifty million dollars the equivalent of over seventy six billion dollars. Now, despite his best efforts, he wasn't able to give away all of his money. But his wife Louise went on to live another twenty seven years in kept making donations. He left his wife, small cash gift, their Manhattan townhouse and Skibo castle in Scotland. He left his daughter of small trust and walled. This probably allowed them to live comfortably. The eventually had to sell their town home. Andrew Carnegie left the world with a mixed legacy. He rebuilt America and helped usher in the industrial revolution, but he did so on the backs of underpaid labourers. He gave most of his money away to found institutions that would help give people the tools they needed to succeed. But only after his factories had left countless men dead through careless accidents and by gunfire. What he did leave behind is noise inspiring. But the idea of the innovative philanthropic billionaire continues to resonate today with both the good and the ill that come with it and Andrew Carnegie was for better or for worse. The blueprint for that archetype. There are many buildings. Many institutions, many companies, and even a city that continued to bear his name today that is money. He could have decided to hoard within his family passing down that wealth through the generations. If nothing else we are lucky then that Andrew truly believed a man who dies rich, dies, disgraced. Thank

Frick Andrew Andrew Carnegie Carnegie relief fund Carnegie Endowment Carnegie Hall Carnegie Mellon University Carnegie institution Carnegie Lynn Lynn trust Henry Frick world court Manhattan Pittsburgh Scotland allegany Hague palace of peace Skibo castle pneumonia
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"He renamed his business Carnegie steel. Their profits had risen to upwards of forty million dollars per year over one billion dollars today, and they were still growing his partner. Henry clay fricks shady business practices continued to make them both very rich intercity wanted to retire and spend all of his earnings charitably, but it didn't look like he was going to start that anytime soon. And then one of the deadliest strikes in American history happened at his homestead factory in eighteen ninety two while Andrew was away in Scotland with Louise Frick faced more labor negotiations this time from the amalgamated association of. Iron and steel workers. One of the most powerful unions at the time. If Andrew was at least diplomatic in his treatment of factory workers. Frick was the opposite. He was only concerned with stepping up his production demands, which made matters worse for laborers letter correspondence between Frick and Andrew in the months leading up to the strike. And even through the strike showed that Andrew supported Frick though he would later deny this on may. Fourth eighteen ninety two about two months before the homestead strike Andrew wrote to Frick quote. One thing we're all sure of no contest will be entered in that will fail. It will be harder this time at homestead. On the other hand, your reputation will shorten it so that I really do not believe it will be much of a struggle. We all approve of anything. You do not stopping short of approval of a contest. We are with you to the end and quote. So the laborers refused to. Except the conditions and refuse to work until their demands were met, namely higher wages, Andrew suggested shutting down the plant guaranteeing his labors that they would still have their positions. If they could come to an agreement. Frick had a different idea when the laborers refused to comply Frick shut down the homestead plant and went the extra step in firing, all the union laborers on July. Second eighteen ninety two. He opted to hire new nonunion workers instead in retaliation on July sixth, the fired union Labor's decided to hold a strike, but Frick got wind of the plan and hired three hundred Pinkerton guards to help protect the plants. Pinkerton guards were the first private investigation firm an America. The Pinkerton agency made its name by going after outlaws such as Jesse James and providing private security for railroads. On July.

Louise Frick Andrew Pinkerton Henry clay partner union Labor Jesse James nonunion Scotland America forty million dollars one billion dollars two months
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"And now back to historical figures. It said that at the start of the American civil war in eighteen sixty one twenty six year old, Andrew Carnegie was actually drafted to fight for the union, but he never went. Rumor has it that Andrew payday poor Irish immigrant, eight hundred fifty dollars to take his place. Although Andrew wasn't exactly on the front lines. He had a pretty dangerous job army engineers and saboteurs would attack telegraph lines to stop communication between enemy soldiers and their bases like an old school version of cyber warfare if align went down, Andrew would have to go out to the site and fix the problem so that communication could get back up and running. They also had to run trains to evacuate wounded or seriously endangered union soldiers injure. Notice the wood rail and bridge infrastructure in America was quickly deteriorating. Having seen bridges built with iron on his trips to Altuna. Andrew proposed replace bridges and rail lines with iron. Before the old wooden infrastructure became too dangerous for travel. So in eighteen sixty five the same year, the civil war ended thirty year old Andrew decided to retire from the railroad business and go into the iron business with the help and blessings from Mr.. Scott to start the company, Andrew secured investments from a few as well to do friends, the five of them all contributed around twelve hundred and fifty dollars so that Andrew could start the keystone bridge company in eighteen sixty five. His initial focus was on replacing old wooden bridge in train rails with iron. However, keystone also built its own bridges and its reputation grew quickly by year three. Keystone was the go-to bridge building company in America and would later be known for building the EADS bridge in Saint Louis..

Andrew Carnegie keystone bridge company EADS bridge keystone America Altuna Saint Louis Scott eighteen sixty one twenty six eight hundred fifty dollars fifty dollars thirty year
"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

Historical Figures

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Historical Figures

"Ship was miserable and cramped. The little privacy afforded to passengers as many were forced to share cots in eighteen forty eight. The railroad system in America was still a work in progress. So the journey from New York to Pittsburgh was another arduous, one from New York. The Carnegie's took a boat to buffalo and another boat to Cleveland. Finally, they took a steamboat from own. Ohio to Pittsburgh by a canal on the way to Pittsburgh the Carnegie's experienced their first encounter with mosquitoes. Andrew noted that his mother was bitten so badly that by the morning, she wasn't able to open her eyes. However, in the end, it was all worth it. The Carnegie family had finally made it to the promised land, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Except Pittsburgh didn't look too much like a promised land on eighteen forties. Pittsburgh was a manufacturing town filled with dangerous factories with terrible working conditions. These factories constantly spewed ash and soot into the air which left a film of dust on everything, including residents, lungs homes, and water supply. And this was a far cry from the twelve year. Old Andrews picturesque home in Scotland, after weeks of uncomfortable travel and mosquitoes. The Carnegie's anxiously settled into their new lives in Pittsburgh. They lived in two rooms above the small Weaver shop that Andrew's uncle HOGAN had built. His family came to America with nothing so Andrews immediate focus was to figure out a way to help his family survive. This father tried to revive uncle, Hogan's, weaving business. But as Andrew said, quote, the results were meager. His. Mother ran a small enterprise repairing shoes, but it didn't earn enough Andrew's father realized he wouldn't be able to make a sustainable living and began working at a cotton factory. Thirteen year old. Andrew, joined his father in the cotton factory as a bobbin..

Pittsburgh Andrew Carnegie uncle HOGAN America New York Old Andrews Cleveland Pennsylvania Ohio Scotland Thirteen year twelve year
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Embroidery in the hague for the permanent court of arbitration and that was one point five million dollars in funding that was given by carnegie to build what was called the peace palace and the foundation continues that buildings maintenance to this day there are many more such institutions funded by andrew carnegie and as we mentioned in the catholic chadwick episode you've probably seen a building or a school or a library that he funded after he retired from business to pursue philanthropy as the second career carnegie began writing his recollections of his youth and his rise to wealth from poverty in the forward to his autobiography which was published in nineteen twenty his wife louise wrote of their time in scotland when world war two broke out quote he delighted in going back to those early times as he wrote he lived them all over again he was thus engaged in july nineteen fourteen when the war clouds began together and when the fateful news of the fourth of august reached us we immediately left our retreat in the hills and return to skibo to be more in touch with the situation these memoirs ended at that time world where would was hugely upsetting to andrew carnegie he had been so focused on the idea of world peace that it was a jarring shock to see this conflict unfold carnegie was willing to put his remaining fortune to work to try to end the war he would have offered kaiser ville.

andrew carnegie louise scotland kaiser ville chadwick skibo five million dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"He had written a popular book titled the gospel of wealth in which he wrote about the duty that wealthy men have to better the lives of people with less and he was intent on living up to that writing he focused on giving money away in ways that we're enriching and would have lasting impact yeah he was he did not just want to hand people money he wanted to figure out how he could build something into the world that would keep people enrich longterm and as part of his philanthropic efforts he built a library in a concert hall in homestead pennsylvania and he said up retirement funding for the workmen under the andrew carnegie relief fund writing that it was quote as an acknowledgement of the deep debt which i o the workman who have contributed so greatly to my success he funded nearly three thousand libraries than united states and abroad the library where i get most of my materials for this podcast is in fact a carnegie library gary he felt that with access to knowledge and a desire to learn anyone could become educated even outside of the formal education structures yes since that was really how he had become educated and become a successful person he thought like i want to give that avenue to everyone who might want it but he also funded many actual formal institutes of higher learning so carnegie mellon university is the modern day outgrowth of a two million dollar endowment that andrew carnegie established in one thousand nine hundred to set up technical schools in the pittsburgh area in one thousand nine hundred two he founded the carnegie institution of washington with twenty two million dollars all allocated towards scientific discovery and in two thousand seven this organization became the carnegie institution for science the carnegie corporation of new york was formed in one thousand nine eleven to give away the remainder of the carnegie fortune and that entity remains and continues to fund trusts in educational institutions the carnegie council for ethics and international affairs was initially named the church peace union and it was established in nineteen fourteen with a two million dollar endowment with the goal of finding alternatives to war the carnegie foundation was established to build a courthouse and the line.

pennsylvania united states carnegie corporation new york church peace union carnegie foundation andrew carnegie carnegie library carnegie mellon university pittsburgh carnegie institution of washin two million dollar twenty two million dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"J p morgan offered to buy carnegie out that year and after thinking the matter over andrew carnegie decided that it wasn't he'd time to leave business and begin philanthropy and ernest he had been doing philanthropic works prior to that but he decided that was kind of going to be a second career and so he wrote down his asking price just on a little slip of paper and he had an employee of his hand deliver it morgan made no counter offer but immediately accepted the deal and bart and bought carnegie steel for four hundred and eighty million dollars of that sum carnegie walked away with two hundred and fifty million dollars the portion that went to carnegie has been estimated and a modern values somewhere between four and five billion dollars yeah and that's one of those things sometimes you'll see it reported a little bit in a confusing way because since there are two figures involved there that four hundred eighty million purchase price versus the two hundred and fifty million that was carnegie's out of that deal you'll sometimes see one or the other just reported on its own so i wanted to make sure we included both of those for clarity and right in the midst of this allowed by the way was the time that cassie chadwick was fading to be carnegie's daughter any massive fraud scheme and since andrew carnegie never really knew anything about that until it came too late during chadwick's arrest and her trial which he did attend it didn't really impact his life it was not something he really thought a whole lot about other than being a lump kind of amused about it but i wanted to contextual is it on the timeline since that previous episode about cassi does mention carnegie andrew carnegie's spent the rest of his life trying to give away all his money in eighteen ninety two years before the homestead strike.

p morgan cassie chadwick andrew carnegie bart carnegie fraud eighteen ninety two years eighty million dollars fifty million dollars five billion dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Mrs and they risked being attacked on the street if they actually left the mill an armed organized attack on the fifty black families who had moved in to find work during the strike resulted in multiple injuries some of them very serious the violence that started with the pinkerton arrival in july eighteen ninety two finally came to an end in november after the union gave up strike leaders were charged with murder and additional charges were leveled at one hundred sixty of the strikers but none of the men were convicted of their crimes in initially carnegie who had experienced the worst of this stuff going on while he was across the atlantic ocean kind of saw the union giving in as a victory he was at that point able to increase the length of the work day and co wages as the mill reorganized poststrike to become more profitable but he soon felt regret over what had happened and particularly over how he had handled things and a letter to william glad tone carnegie wrote quote such a foolish step contrary to my ideals repugnance every feeling of my nature our firm offered all it could offer even generous terms are other men had gratefully accepted them they went as far as i could have wished but the false step was made and trying to run the homestead works with new men that is a test to which working men should not be subjected does expecting too much of poor men to stand by and see their work taken by others the pain i suffer increases daily the works are not worth one drop of human blood i wish they had sunk yeah he really really pretty much for the rest of his life regretted that whole thing and his part in it well and he's also like simultaneously.

murder carnegie poststrike william mill
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"In eighteen ninety to another conflict between mill workers at the carnegie owned homestead steel mill and the management resulted in a deadly conflict that contradicted the image of carnegie as a worker's rights advocate the steelworkers employed by carnegie and frick faced incredibly dangerous working conditions for very poor pay two years earlier in eighteen ninety steel revenues had started to the klein and then in eighteen ninety two henry frick slashed workers pay and set out to break the steelworkers union and andrew carnegie was not blameless in this conflict for one thing in anticipation of the union contract expiring kerr negi had told frick to increase production so that they would have the leverage to shut down the plant if the workers didn't accept the new terms without losing any ground in their production schedule carnegie was in great britain is all this was playing out and he sent we're defray that he supported frick in whatever he chose to do due frick emboldened by the statement severely reduced the workers wages and the workers who went invested so much time and labour in increasing the mills revenue even some of them experiencing terrible accidents in the process we're not willing to back down frick declared that he would not negotiate with the union and he would only talk to individual workers the dissolution of the union was the point in the negotiations that just could not be resolved even after all the others were and then frick closed down the mill and locked all the workers out yet this plane it was kind of like one of those situations where you know there's a company that people have been part of for a long time and they feel like.

carnegie klein henry frick steelworkers union kerr negi britain andrew carnegie mill eighteen ninety two henry two years
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Yeah it was very it kind of suggested that the the united states had become the the next step kind of in evolution of of great britain society like in going out in colonizing they had kind of gotten to that next level in his opinion carnegie lost both his brother and his mother in a very short period of time thomas died in october eighteen eighty six from pneumonia that he had initially thought was just a cold and the following month margaret carnegie died also from pneumonia she had already been quite ill when thomas who was living in georgia at the time died and nobody actually told her of her younger sons passing for fear of upsetting her while she was so ill similarly when margaret died andrew was sick with typhoid and his mother's death was not immediately related to him they actually lowered her coffin out of a bedroom window so he would not see it passing in the hallway after margaret carnegie died it removed that obstacle that had kept andrew in louise from beginning a life together but the couple waited to announce their plans to marry out of respect for margaret and because andrew was still quite sick for a while but as he later wrote quote i recovered slowly in the future began to occupy my thoughts there was only one ray of hope and comfort in it that comfort of course was the weeds and while andrew had spent time with women it was more apparent to him than ever that she was the one he wanted to spend his life with and their engagement had been on again off again it wasn't like they were two people so passionately in love that they were like anything we'll get through anything for example when he wrote her that letter it was like it's pretty much all about our moms that was kind of like a doesn't rica down period.

united states thomas margaret carnegie pneumonia georgia typhoid britain andrew
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And by the time the war ended andrew carnegie had come to the realization that the iron industry had great potential and in a surprising move he left the pennsylvania railroad and he started a new company in eighteen sixty five called the keystone bridge company keystones entire business was upgrading existing wooden bridges to start sturdier iron structures and this proved to be extremely lucrative just a few years into it he had made himself wealthy in eighteen sixty seven he started the keystone telegraph company which cuts such a lucrative deal with the pennsylvania railroad to run telegraph wire on the railroads polls that carnegie and his partners were able to flip the business and triple their money in a very short period of time has estimated worth in eighteen sixty eight was four hundred thousand dollars so caveat it is always really tricky to convert historical worth into modern value but a rough estimate is that this was about five million dollars he was only thirty three yeah and i did want to point out that you know he was making these deals still with the pennsylvania railroad so even though he had left he really left on good terms and maintained business dealings with them for a long time that were always quite positive and riding high on his string of successes andrew carnegie decided that he was only going to give business two more years before turning to a life of philanthropy he wrote this plan out in a letter to himself in eighteen sixty eight and he had calculated out that he could live comfortably off the money he had made by allocating himself fifty thousand dollars each year and then using the rest of the money to benefit causes that he believed in but in eighteen seventy he wasn't quite ready to say goodbye it's all these various industries that same year he also met a young woman named louise whitfield through a mutual friend andrew became social with the whitfield family.

andrew carnegie louise whitfield whitfield family pennsylvania keystone bridge company four hundred thousand dollars fifty thousand dollars five million dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"He was making five thousand dollars a year from his investment which is so much more than he had been earning from his railroad income he was also promoted to railroad superintendent in eighteen fifty nine and he used his increased income to move himself and his mother ensue nicer home yeah there's an interesting thing that plays out over and over where he starts making more and more and more money on investments but for quite a while he actually still kept his much lower paying job which is kind of interesting to me when the civil war began thomas scott his boss was hired by the union to manage transportation of its troops was pretty natural sincere in a railroad that they were like hey why don't why don't you run a similar set set up for us carnegie was also hired he was working alongside his boss is part of the war effort in meanwhile his earnings from that sleeping car company investment went toward a new business venture he invested eleven thousand dollars in oil in eighteen sixty one and he almost doubled his money in the first year i think he he took in something like eighteen thousand dollars from there he began diversifying his investments further and soon he was earning more than forty thousand dollars a year from them that was a massive sum in the eighteen sixties andrew carnegie was drafted in eighteen sixty four but he didn't wind up serving as part of the draft terms he had the option to pay a sum of three hundred dollars or find a replacement to serve in his stead so he opted to pay another man eight hundred fifty dollars to feel to fill his slot.

superintendent thomas scott andrew carnegie eight hundred fifty dollars eighteen thousand dollars eleven thousand dollars forty thousand dollars five thousand dollars three hundred dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"As a messenger andrew would sweep the office in the morning before the telegraph operators arrived and one morning he actually took a message that came through when no operators had yet begun their shift and he did a good enough job that the operators started asking him to keep an eye on the telegraph when they needed to step away he eventually learned to take messages by ear so without the help of a running slip of paper to print the message out he would just write it down as he heard it a significant promotion followed when he subbed in for another operator on a two week trial because people realize he was actually quite good at this and he was soon given the title of assistant operator and he was making twenty five dollars a month while working for the telegraph office andrew meta man named thomas a scott at the time scott was superintendent of the pennsylvania railroad scott noticed how diligent and driven the young carnegie was made him an offer to leave the telegraph office and become scott's private secretary and also run his personal telegraph machine carnegie was offered thirty five dollars a month into him that seemed like a fortune so he took this job and started learning about the railroad industry kernigan he was once again doing really well because he carried that same work ethic into every position he had and he was making a name for himself at the pennsylvania railroad but his father in the meantime had not met with success in the united states after struggling to make enough money through weaving jobs william carnegie made a stab at entrepreneurship and he tried manufacturing his own cloth and then selling it as a traveling salesman but that really never took off william died in eighteen fifty five when andrew was twenty in that left the eldest son as the primary breadwinner in the family a year after william's death andrew started to expand out his business efforts he invested in the woodruff sleeping car company with a loan and it paid off sooner.

scott superintendent carnegie secretary pennsylvania railroad united states salesman andrew woodruff thomas william carnegie thirty five dollars twenty five dollars two week
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"On the machines later in his life carnegie wrote of this time quote it was a hard life in the winter father and i had to rise and breakfasts in the darkness reach the factory before it was daylight and with a short interval for lunch work till after dark the hours hung heavily upon me in the work itself i took no pleasure but the cloud had a silver lining as it gave me the feeling that i was doing something for the world my family i've made million since but none of those millions gave me such happiness as my first weeks earnings soon the young andrew moved into a different factory job working with a boiler in a steam engine this was hard work but it offered a substantial raise over being a bobbin boy now he was making two dollars a week through a connection of his uncles andrew transition to another job as a messenger for the city telegraph office in eighteen fifty when he was fourteen he was a really hard worker and he took these duties very seriously he made a point to memorize all the streets of pittsburgh as well as the names and addresses of messenger recipients that were frequent so that he could be as efficient as possible in his job part of this was so he could recognize any of the gentlemen that might be receiving a telegram message or any of their servants on the street and be able to hand something off without maybe always having to go full distance to deliver it so he could be way faster and get more done initially he was not sure if he could handle this job and in his interview he told the hiring manager is much but he also said that he would do his best and that he would like a trial and his worries were unfounded he did really well and he had moved up to earning two dollars and fifty cents a week and he found the position he wrote quote in every respect a happy one he owns.

carnegie pittsburgh andrew two dollars
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Allegheny pennsylvania yeah that that allegany township eventually got absorbed into the larger pittsburgh metro area but if you look at a map and you chart out this route that they took it becomes immediately obvious that it was really a long way to do it and these were as mentioned a moment ago about as distant from luxury cruises as you could get the family was of course very poor and they were travelling at the cheapest rates that they could get and it took three weeks to get from the battery in manhattan to the pittsburgh area a trip that today takes about six hours by car or ninety minutes by direct flavor margaret might have had remanded ideas about the new life that she and her family we're going to start in pennsylvania but once they got there they had some harsh realities waiting for them for one the city was already dealing with pollution from industrialization a fire that had ravaged the downtown area three years before they got there from scotland left the city with a code of soot that was still there carnegie would later write that if you washed the off your face in your hands they would be coded again an hour later and it wasn't a place where newcomer family with no money could live in any kind of comfort he described this as a more or less miserable situation william carnegie did find work he got a job working in a cotton factory and for a while andrew worked in the same factory as a bob envoy he was paid a dollar twenty per week to run bobbins to the weavers as needed and on occasion to perform maintenance tasks.

Allegheny pennsylvania pittsburgh manhattan margaret pennsylvania scotland allegany william carnegie andrew ninety minutes three weeks three years six hours
"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"carnegie" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"But then famously and what he's probably most known for today is the fact that he decided that the most important thing that he could do with his millions and millions and millions of dollars was to give it all away down one of the things that's really interesting to me about him today you will hear a lot of people talk about wealth disparity as a problem and he had he had no issues whatsoever with wealth disparity he was like just sort of thought that was how it's life's going to be is no problem with that but the people that had all the wealth should be doing useful things with it which to me is an interesting point of view yeah andrew carnegie was born on november twenty fifth eighteen thirty five in dunfermline scotland as father william was a weaver and unfair lynn had been known for quite some time for beautiful linen and particularly for its damask linen william struggled in his trade as industrialization became more and more common and hand loomed goods couldn't keep up as steam powered looms became more and more popular the family really struggled to make ends meet but william was obstinate that he wanted to remain a weaver even though he couldn't really support his family doing that and as a charter i william carnegie believed that the way to make change was to get working men elected into parliament so that they could make change at the legislative level that would help working men like him if you're not familiar with the term chart as that sort of sums up the whole thing it was a national working class effort at parliamentary reform so william and his brotherinlaw tom morrison both were committed to the chartered 'cause they were organizing strikes they were writing for charter publications and meanwhile andrew's mother margaret morrison carnegie stepped up by taking work mending shoes and renting a small grocery to try to keep the family afloat seeing as parents struggle and also living in poverty as a child deeply impacted the young andrew.

scotland william tom morrison margaret morrison carnegie andrew carnegie dunfermline william carnegie twenty fifth