20 Burst results for "Carmela Coyle"

"carmela coyle" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:14 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"The proposal includes direct payments of $1400 to most Americans on top of the 600. It also asked to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour as the Corona virus pandemic continues to stretch healthcare provision to the limit. There's a possibility some California hospitals maybe soon. Have to force to invoke what's known as crisis care. Keep case, John Michaels is live with an explanation. Kitty hospitals typically run on one of three operational modes, conventional care, contingency care or crisis care. Last category is a last resort environment in which re sources are scarce and not every patient will receive the maximum level of care, California Hospital Association president Carmela Coyle says in spite of all best efforts, some hospitals in the state Maine To resort to crisis care. We continue to have some 40,000 Californians who become covert positive every single day. Remember that 12% Of everyone who tests Covad positive is ultimately in need of hospital care. That means some 4 to 5000 additional hospitalizations each day with a surge now 45 times greater than what California saw last summer dignity. Health starter Carol Bailey says guidelines are being established for the possibility of crisis care so that if we ever have to get to crisis cared, we make decisions across the board whether You're in weed California or San Bernadino. We make decisions, at least similarly, and consistently accounting for the proportion of good that can be done with a limited resource is Dr Christopher Myers of the Keg Lee Institute of Ethics that CSU Bakersfield says health care decisions will be based on two key elements. The development of the triage team. And the scoring models that they rely on to help make their decisions. In these cases. What we're doing is taking decision making away from the physicians and the families and placing them in the hands of a team of expert Dr Myers says the high level physicians offer immediate benefit to the treating providers. They're not the ones who are having to make the very hard call. Telling a patient or family. We simply don't have the ventilator or the oxygen or the bed space. To be able to meet your healthcare needs. That burden is is being shifted to the triage team. That team is also looking at objective criteria only to make the decision about who is most likely to benefit in particular, who is most likely to survive to discharge and those folks will be the ones receiving the treatment, Coyle says. It's also designed to avoid bias and discrimination in the heat of the moment. What you do in life does not factor in To the scores or the ways in which those decisions are ultimately made. Liability protections. Continue to be a conversation, Kitty. All right, John Michaels, thank you. And at 6 50 will head over to O K ke Traffic.

California Dr Christopher Myers John Michaels Carmela Coyle Covad California Hospital Associatio Keg Lee Institute of Ethics Kitty San Bernadino Carol Bailey president Maine Bakersfield
California hospitals struggle to keep up with surging COVID cases

Leo Laporte

00:25 sec | 1 year ago

California hospitals struggle to keep up with surging COVID cases

"Hospital associations Carmela Coyle says the surge in California hospitals is expected to get much worse in the days ahead. We've got 23,000 in California's hospitals today with co vid and we are anticipating another 15,000 individuals between now and the 18th of January, says 40,000. People are testing positive for covert every day.

Carmela Coyle California
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Live from NPR news. I'm Jack Spear. Twitter has permanently suspended the account of President Trump. As NPR's Bobby Allyn explains. It is the latest punishment from a social media company in the wake of the violent riots. Whoever took the U. S Capitol earlier this week. Twitter says the account at Real Donald Trump has been blocked forever, officials at Twitter said after closely reviewing the president's post since the attempted insurrection on the Capitol, it concluded that Trump's account has to be suspended for good quote due to the risk of further incitement of violence. For years, Trump has used his account to belittle his enemies, spread false claims and amplify conspiracy theories. But after sharing a message sympathetic to the rioters who swarm the capital platforms crackdown Trump, who had 88 million followers on Twitter has now been stripped of the ability to say anything at all on the platform. Facebook, meanwhile, has temporarily ban Trump but said it could last indefinitely. Bobby Allen NPR NEWS SAN Francisco President elect Joe Biden says he has believed for a long time The president Trump was not fit for office, but it was up to Congress to decide on a second impeachment of the GOP president. After Wednesday's storming of the U. S. Capitol. Speaking with reporters today, Biden said he is focused on containing the covert 19 pandemic and ensuring rapid vaccination and bolstering the economy. I'm going on to say what the Congress decides to do is for them to decide what we're going to have to be ready to hit. The ground. Running by and remarks came in response to questions asked about legislation being readied by House Democrats to impeach President Trump for his role in fomenting the violence that occurred in Washington. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is raising concerns with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs. That President is unhinged. NPR's Claudio Gonzalez reports blows He met with Mark Milley today discuss available precautions were running a quote unstable president from accessing U S nuclear codes. Speaker Pelosi and chairman Millie spoke about her concerns that Trump could initiate military hostilities in order a nuclear strike. Pelosi shared the news of the conversation in a letter to her House Democratic colleagues. Concerns calm in the wake of Wednesday's deadly attack on the Capitol, led by pro Trump extremists seemingly egged on by the president. Pelosi says trump poses a dangerous threat. And quote. We must do everything we can to protect the American people from his unbalanced assault on our country and our democracy. She also told her colleagues that if Trump doesn't leave his office imminently and willingly, Congress will proceed with its action on impeachment. Quite agree. Service. NPR NEWS Washington U. S economy showed renewed job losses for the first time in eight months. Latest numbers showing payrolls fell by 140,000 last month. Employment of bars and restaurants tumbled amid the Corona virus pandemic on Wall Street. The Dow was up 56 points. You're listening to NPR. Live from KQED news and terrorists. Tyler Governor Gavin Newsom's budget proposal includes more than $4 billion of environmental spending to fight climate change. Kevin Starke from KQED Science Test details the plan State environmental officials say some of California's budget surplus will rebuild a battered economy, reduce emissions and invest in environmental justice. The biggest ticket item on climate is a billion and a half dollars for electric vehicles and charging stations. Officials say the new spending will build jobs and prevent smog. The proposal includes hundreds of millions of dollars to pay for toxic waste cleanups and farm programs that sequester carbon The administration also carved out a billion dollars to pay for wildfire protections, including manage burns, firebreaks, thinning forests and hiring firefighters. I'm Kevin Starke KQED news. Hospitals across the region continue to be overwhelmed amid the state's largest and worst covered 19 surge. State officials announced earlier this week that I see you capacity in the Bay Area has dropped to 3.5% its lowest level yet. Carmela Coyle is the president and CEO of the California Hospital Association in California. Some counties have placed the ban on skilled nursing facilities accepting or admitting patients from the hospital. Well, says patients who are no longer in need of acute care and cannot be moved to a post acute care setting. Stay in the hospital. Coyle also says hospitals want more relief from certain state regulations like disaster plan rehearsals. But, she says, takes time away from treating patients, State officials say quote the state is.

President Trump president NPR Twitter Congress Speaker Pelosi U. S Capitol Joe Biden president and CEO Kevin Starke Carmela Coyle California Bobby Allyn Jack Spear Bobby Allen Facebook KQED Tyler Governor Gavin Newsom
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KCRW

"Years and a supporter of President Trump and far right conspiracy media will have a look back on Ashley Babbitt and Out some of her history coming up on the program state local news at 3 32. How the violence in DC yesterday during the insurrection on Capitol Hill has fueled violence right here in California after these stories from NPR stay with us. Live from NPR news. I'm to Wayne Brown today after a violent siege of the U. S. Capitol, President Trump remained silent. White House press secretary called the actions reprehensible and Administration's deputy national security advisor resigned, NPR's Franco Ordonez tells us Matt Pottenger is among a list of high profile trump officials leaving their posts amid the fall out. Conjure was one of two top officials at the White House National Security Council to quit in protest. Ryan Tolly, who was the NSC senior director for European and Russian affairs, also resigned. Trump had also nominated totally to be an assistant secretary of state. Both were actively involved in Trump's China policy in response to the pandemic, An increasing number of officials associated with Trump and his inner circle have said they're quitting. Including former chief of staff make Mulvaney and members of Melania Trump's team after the deadly violence that surrounded the congressional vote to certify Joe Biden's presidential election victory in November. Franco or Dona as NPR news. Top two Democrats in Congress are calling on the president's Cabinet to remove Trump from office using the 25th amendment, which allows the vice president and a majority of the Cabinet to declare president unfit for office. Speaker Nancy Pelosi cites Trump's role in sparking violence at the U. S. Capitol and his refusal to acknowledge his election defeat. I joined the Senate Democratic leader and calling on the vice president. To remove this president. I immediately invoking the 25th amendment. If the vice president of cabinet do not act. Congress may be prepared to move forward with impeachment. Congress confirmed Joe Biden's victory before dawn today, after an angry mob loyal to President Trump stormed the U. S Capitol building. Four people died in the May have Stocks finished higher on Wall Street today, as investors about a new Democratic administration will deliver more stimulus help to boost the economy. The Dow was up more than half a percent. This is NPR. And this is KCRW. I'm Larry Parole. Here's what's happening in state and local news at 3 32. The jolting on rest on Capitol Hill on Capitol Hill has also played out in parts of California, although in a more muted way than in D. C. Trump. Supporters yesterday clashed with anti Trump demonstrators outside the state Capitol in Sacramento, and about a dozen people were arrested. In downtown L. A. A pro Trump rally broke out into brief fistfights and a handful of arrests. Assembly members, Shirley Weber will soon be California secretary of state, she told KCRW. The violence in D. C has emboldened the president's supporters here. We knew there were things taking place. We had no idea that it would be obvious escalated to the level. The weather that would happen in Washington or that there was also which I think promoted or encourage folks in California to do more than they have been doing, which is a peaceful protest that has existed as California's future elections. Chief. Webber said she was disappointed to see members of Congress promoting baseless claims of voting fraud and of what she says was political opportunism. There are consequences for our behavior. And while we may think that this is just a benign act of voting against something, there's another narrative that is occurring that can create tremendous harm, and it appears as if we haven't learned that whoever needs to be confirmed as secretary of state by the Legislature, which is expected Happen soon. California's health care system strains under unprecedented covert caseloads. Hospitals are asking the state to eliminate red tape so they can better respond to the worsening crisis. More on that now from Kcrw's Gerald Saxman. A state issued new directives this week that require hospitals in hard hit areas to cancel elective surgeries and that order medical centers to accept patients from facilities that have exhausted their ICU beds. But Carmela Coyle, president of the California Hospital Association, says that's not enough because hospitals are being flooded with more patients than they can discharge. Coyle says state officials should override decisions at the county level. That prevent recovering coronavirus patients from being released two skilled nursing facilities, local officials fear they could spread the virus. But Coyle says that concern is superseded by the overwhelming number of patients in need of treatment and his KCRW's Jeryl Sasser been reporting And if you were thinking about doing some winter camping this month, you may be out of luck. That is because of stay at home orders. The U. S. Forest Service has extended a campground closure for a dozen national forests in California. The list includes the Angeles Cleveland Los Padres in San Bernadino National forced the closure will be in effect through January. 29th you killed can still enjoy.

President Trump president California vice president Trump NPR KCRW Congress Joe Biden Cabinet Carmela Coyle Franco Ordonez U. S Capitol building press secretary assistant secretary
California Hospitals, Nurses Union Battle Over Patient Ratio Law

Morning Edition

03:54 min | 1 year ago

California Hospitals, Nurses Union Battle Over Patient Ratio Law

"Is a battle going on between hospitals and the state's powerful nurses union because of a surgeon hospitalizations. The state is asking nurses to take care of Morven since than they normally would. It waters down a nurse to patient ratio law that so far exists only in California from member station KQED. April Damn, Bosque reports normally telemetry nurses take care of four patients at once. But since the governor relax the state's ratio law in mid December Norris a black has to keep track of six were given 50% more patients, and we're expected to do 50% more things. With the same amount of time Her patients are sick. Many of them are in the hospital for a stroke or heart attack, and they have cove it Black is terrified of missing something or making a mistake. You know, I go home and I feel like I could have done more. Oh, I could have done this for them. I could have done that for them. But there just wasn't enough time. In recent weeks, the state has excused 170 hospitals from the normal ratio, rules and nurses have taken to the streets in socially descent. Protests like this one in San Bernadino. Thank you's hospitals of putting profits over preparing for a search of laying nurses off over the summer than not hiring enough for winter. It seems that the hospitals have been more reactive. Than proactive in their staffing In California's current search four times as many people are testing positive for the virus compared to the summer up to 7000 new patients could be coming to California hospitals every day. That's according to Carmela Coyle, the head of the state's Hospital association, she says there's no way around the math. We are simply out of nurses out of doctors out of respiratory therapists. Coyle says hospitals have tried the higher contract nurses but because California's surged early during the summer and other parts of the United States then surged afterwards. Those travel nurses are taken. Coyle says hospitals next step is to try team nursing pulling nurses from the operating room, for example, to help with covert patients. Economist Joints. Pets studies the healthcare workforce at UC San Francisco. She says hospitals should have started training for this over the summer. But they didn't either because of costs or excessive optimism. California was doing so well and that we kind of got it under control, and I think there was a lot of belief that we would be able to maintain that. Spent, says the nurses union has reason to be defensive of the law that limits the number of patients nurses have to care for. At one time, it took 10 years before it passed the Legislature in 1999. And several more to clear the court challenges, including one from then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as some rally where they were protesting. He made some offhand comment about kicking the nurses butts because I'm always kicking up, Bud. That's why they don't like me, which really hardened the opposition to him. Nurses prevailed in the court of public opinion and law, but the battle has made them fiercely protective of patient ratios. Even accused hospitals of using the pandemic to try to roll them back for good. Hospitals deny this and spent says it's unlikely to go in and say, Oh, you clearly did so well without ratios when we let you wave them, So let's just eliminate them entirely, I think would be just adding insult to moral injury to nurses. The public can see that nurses are overworked and burned out by the pandemic spent says hospitals probably wouldn't want to pick a fight with them over job protections once it's over for NPR News, April dumbass Key in Oakland. April story is part of a partnership with NPR, Kaiser Health News and KQED

Morven California Carmela Coyle State's Hospital Association Coyle Bosque San Bernadino Norris Heart Attack Nurses Union Stroke Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger San Francisco United States Legislature BUD Npr News Oakland Kaiser Health News
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"This one in San Bernadino, the accused hospitals of putting profits over preparing for a search. Of laying nurses off over the summer and not hiring enough for winter. It seems that the hospitals have been more reactive than proactive in their staffing in California's current search four times as many people are testing positive for the virus compared to the summer. Up to 7000 new patients could be coming to California hospitals every day. That's according to Carmela Coyle, the head of the state's Hospital association, she says there's no way around the math. We are simply out of nurses out of doctors out of respiratory therapists. Coyle says hospitals have tried the higher contract nurses Because California's surged early during the summer and other parts of the United States then surged afterwards. Those travel nurses are taken. Coyle says. Hospitals next step is to try team nursing Only nurses from the operating room, for example, to help with covert patients. Economist Join Spence Studies the healthcare workforce at UC San Francisco. She says hospitals should have started training for this over the summer, but they didn't Either because of costs or excessive optimism. California was doing so well and that we kind of got it under control. And I think there was a lot of belief that we would be able to maintain that that says the nurses union has reason to be defensive of the law that limits the number of patients nurses have to care for at one time. It took 10 years before it passed the Legislature in 1999, then several more to clear the court challenges, including one from then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as some rally where they were protesting. He made some offhand comment about kicking the nurses butts because I'm always kicking good,.

Carmela Coyle California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger San Bernadino San Francisco Legislature United States Hospital association
California Nurses Demonstrate Outside Hospitals As COVID Crisis Worsens

Marketplace

04:02 min | 1 year ago

California Nurses Demonstrate Outside Hospitals As COVID Crisis Worsens

"In California. The Corona virus crisis is triggering a battle between hospitals and the state's powerful nurses union. Hospitals run out of staff. The state is asking nurses to take care of more patients at once than they normally would watering down the union's most sacrosanct job protection. A nurse to patient ratio law that so far exists on Lee in California. KQED s health correspondent April de Bosque reports. Normally telemetry. Nurses take care of four patients at once. But now that the governor has relaxed the state's ratio law Norris a black has to keep track of six were given 50% more patients, and we're expected to do 50% more things. With the same amount of time Her patients are sick. Many of them are in the hospital for a stroke or heart attack, and they have coveted black is terrified of missing something or making a mistake. You know, I go home, and I feel like I could have done more. Oh, I could have done this for them. I could have done that for them. But there just wasn't enough time. In recent weeks, the state has excused 170 hospitals from the normal ratio, rules and nurses have taken to the streets in socially distant protests like this one in San Bernadino. Carrying signs that say ratios save lives. They accused hospitals of putting profits over preparing for a surge of lying nurses off over this summer than not hiring or training enough for winter. It seems that the hospitals have been more reactive. Than proactive in their staffing in California's current surge four times as many people are testing positive for the virus compared to the summer peak up to 7000 new patients could be coming to California hospitals every day. That's according to Carmela Coyle, the head of the state's Hospital association. She says. There's no way around the math. We are simply out of nurses out of doctors out of respiratory therapists. Coyle says hospitals have tried to hire contract nurses, but because California's surged early during the summer and other parts of the United States then surged afterwards. Those travel nurses are taken, she says. The change to the ratios is saving lives, and we cannot in the crisis of this proportion, buying nurses and doctors hands with red tape. Coyle says hospitals next step is to try team nursing pulling nurses from the operating room, for example, to help with covert patients. UC San Francisco economics professor joins Spitz says hospitals should have started training for this over the summer, but they didn't either because of costs or excessive optimism. California was doing so well and that we kind of got it under control, and I think there was a lot of belief that we would be able to maintain that spent says the nurses union has reason to be defensive of the ratio law. It took 10 years before it passed the Legislature in 1999, then several more to clear the court challenges, including one from then Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger as some rally where they were protesting. He made some offhand comment about kicking the nurses but because I'm always kicking death, but that's why they don't like me, which really hardened the opposition to him. Nurses prevailed in the court of public opinion and law, but the battle has made them fiercely protective of ratios. They've even accused hospitals of using the pandemic to try to roll them back for good. Hospitals denied this, and Spence says it's unlikely to go in and say Oh, you clearly did so well without ratios when we let you wave them, So let's just eliminate them entirely, I think would be just adding insult to moral injury to nurses. The public can see that nurses are overworked and burned out by the pandemic spent says there will be little appetite to cut back their job protections once it's over.

California De Bosque Carmela Coyle Kqed State's Hospital Association Coyle San Bernadino Norris Joins Spitz Heart Attack LEE Stroke Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger United States San Francisco Legislature Spence
"carmela coyle" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on WTOP

"Says are scheduled to go out by the end of this year. Wendy Gillette CBS News Hospitals in Southern California are full due to Covad 19. There is talk that some could be forced to ration carrot things get much worse. KNX is John Baird in Los Angeles and I see you director believes another surge would be AH, hospitals worst nightmare, especially with hospitals stretched to the limit already. Carmela Coyle is the president of the California Hospital Association. She says 0% Passage. He means exactly that the early very real. We are full up in the Los Angeles area, she says. It's not just about beds. It's about staffing. We don't have enough critical care nurses, Coyle says during the crisis ICU nurses were being asked to handle more patients. John Baird for CBS News, LOS Angeles The U. S death toll from covert 19 is more than 300,000. Congress passes and the president signs a short term spending bill to keep the government open. CBS is Michael George says that gives lawmakers more time to work on a pandemic relief bill. She ations continue on the final details of a $900 billion covert relief package. Democratic leaders Pelosi later McCarthy and I've been working around the clock for several days now. Talks remain productive. In fact, I'm even more optimistic now that I was last night. Majority leader Mitch McConnell is also working behind the scenes, urging his Republican colleagues not to challenge the presidential election results when Congress certifies President elect Joe Biden's win next month. Incoming GOP Senator Tommy Tuberville, of Alabama's hinting he may challenge the results as covert 19 stresses health care systems around the country. It is also stressing holiday shipping infrastructures for delivery companies. K y W TV reporter Alicia Roberts in Philadelphia was a woman in front of me. That was.

Carmela Coyle Los Angeles president John Baird Senator Tommy Tuberville Congress Wendy Gillette CBS Covad CBS News Alicia Roberts Southern California GOP Mitch McConnell Joe Biden California Hospital Associatio KNX reporter Alabama
"carmela coyle" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on WTOP

"It's different from the visor vaccine in that it can be stored in a regular freezer, and it can go for a significant number of days at refrigerated temperature. This makes the supply chain dramatically easier across the country, especially in rural areas that do not have the ability of storing the visor vaccine. The decision comes exactly a week after the agency approved the Fizer vaccine shipping for the modern aversion. Good start as soon as tomorrow. Approval comes as cases and deaths continue to jam hospitals and morgues, especially in California. CBS is Wendy Gillette Intensive care units in Southern California, including Los Angeles are completely full Dr Cristina Galley, They're having to really go to extreme measures to care for the volume of patients that require that critical level of care. The president of the California Hospital Association, Carmela Coyle, says staffing is the critical Whole issue, So it's one thing to have a bed. But what we really needed that critical care nurse the doctor, the respiratory therapist at that bedside and able to take care of a patient, there are only about 1200 intensive care beds left in the entire state of California. Wendy Gillette. CBS News First It was the House days are 320. The nays are 60 and then the Senate passing a stopgap measure tonight to keep the government in business through Sunday. Senate reconvenes at 11 A.m. Eastern time tomorrow to continue negotiating a covert relief package. This is Illinois Democrat Dick Durbin, praying that the negotiators will be able to Spent good time today and report to assume that they have reached an agreement. President Trump has long said that he's been tougher on Russia than any other president. But he appears to be missing in action after suspected Russian hacking attacks on government agencies you CBS is scamming McCormick. Several lawmakers attended to classified briefing this morning but came away disappointed. One said it appears U. S cyber security experts don't have a real sense of the breath of the intrusion. Others complained they were given few specifics. One issued a statement saying this may be the largest cyber attack in the nation's history. And he asked, where is the commander in chief. The Washington Monument is temporarily closed due to a staff shortage. Several workers a quarantine because Interior Secretary David Bernhardt tested positive just after a recent visit. No word on when the monument reopens to tourists. The Wall Street the Dow closed down 124. This is CBS News. Never miss a moment. Top news from W T O p 24 73 65 Listen on air on Alexa and on the W T. O P s..

CBS President Trump Wendy Gillette Russia California president Senate Washington Monument Dick Durbin Carmela Coyle Alexa Dr Cristina Galley Southern California California Hospital Associatio Los Angeles Illinois
"carmela coyle" Discussed on WTOP

WTOP

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on WTOP

"By Egg lands best on that Piper in New York. Covert 19 vaccinations are out in full force today, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi just got hers, as did Senate leader Mitch McConnell. Vice President Mike Pence got his this morning and President elect Joe Biden and his wife are slated to get theirs in Delaware on Monday. In California can, ex radio's John Baird says. For many, the vaccines arrival is already too late. When I see you director believes another surge would be AH, hospitals worst nightmare, especially with hospitals stretched to the limit already. Carmela Coyle is the president of the California Hospital Association. She says 0% capacity means exactly that the early very real. We are holed up in the Los Angeles area, she says. It's not just about beds. It's about staffing. We don't have enough credit. Will care nurses, oil says during the crisis, ICU nurses are being asked to handle more patients. John Baird for CBS News, LOS Angeles More than 10 states, including Michigan, Oregon in Minnesota, have been told that the number of doses of the Fizer vaccine they were expecting to get next week has now been cut. CBS is Max Bayer. A senior administration official said original estimations were for planning purposes only, and that states were notified of next week's allocation. On Tuesday, Fizer says it is having no production issues and that it's awaiting shipping instructions for millions of doses without directly addressing that claim, and HHS spokesperson outlined the instructions for the roughly seven million doses Fizer has on hand, which is how many doses the department is aware of. The country awaits the go ahead from the FDA for but dirt is covert 19 vaccine, which could happen this afternoon Studies. Sylmar generous is Easier than five hours to handle since it does not need to be kept in ultra frozen temperatures. The pandemic is bringing some big cuts to a big soda maker correspondent Jim Carcela, with sales losing some of their fizz because of the pandemic, Coca Cola will cut 2200 jobs worldwide. 1200 of the cuts will be in the U. S. 500 of them in Atlanta, where Coca is headquartered. Coquette earlier announced it was offering Voluntary separation packages to 4000 workers in the U. S. And Canada. The Supreme Court's declining to immediately weigh in on the legality of President Trump's plans to exclude immigrants living in the country without legal permission from the 2020 census figures, oil law schools Lauri Levinson, even the collected and segregated the information. Those who are not lawfully in the United States. They haven't decided yet how to use it. And if it is used in a way that does violate the law. The Supreme Court may revisit this issue..

Vice President Carmela Coyle John Baird Fizer Los Angeles Supreme Court Nancy Pelosi Mitch McConnell Mike Pence Joe Biden Coca Cola Sylmar United States New York Senate CBS Delaware California CBS News
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:47 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Scott Simon. This hour. Corona virus vaccine is a hand. We'll talk to her leading neurologist about the implications also. Live. Officials in one California county decided enough to issue a stay at home orders. Black farmers in North Carolina deliver something precious boxes of fresh food. Listen, the first box exactly had collars. Super side of her a bouquet of herbs. There was like men, you know, onions, things like that. Also the week in politics still no coronavirus relief Bill and Baron Iron packs a massive modern classic of Indian life into his Syriza, a suitable boy. First we have our newscast It's Saturday, December 12 2020. Yeah. Live from NPR news on Barbara Klein. The move to get a Corona virus vaccine from labs into people is advancing. Late yesterday, the FDA granted emergency use authorization for the vaccine developed by Fizer and buy on Tech. As NPR's Amy held reports with the vaccine authorization. 2.9 million doses are expected to get into arms within days. A start for a two dose vaccine prioritized for some 20 million. U. S health care worker. Yes, and three million nursing home residents, but also a turning point in a worsening pandemic that has sickened million's and killed hundreds of thousands of Americans. President Trump hailed the development vaccine will vanquish the virus. And return life back to normal. But first the country must take on the biggest immunization campaign and its history. States are asking Congress for billions in aid, and it will be months before enough doses are available for the general population. Several vaccines are in the pipeline. The FDA considers Madonna's next week Amy held NPR news. CDC Advisory committee is due to meet today to decide which demographic groups should be at the head of the line to receive the injection. As Blake farmer of member station W. PLN reports, hospitals will be up first. Each state is receiving shipments based on population size. But these first doses will largely go straight to hospitals, and those hospitals are starting with everyone who is working with covert 19 patients. This should help their frontline staff stay healthy enough to keep working. Since staffing has been such a concern with nurses out sick or quarantining the number of doses heading to states this week won't be enough to inoculate everyone working in hospitals. But the next priorities are the staff and residents of nursing homes where Cove in 19 has been most deadly. First responders are also in line for the earliest doses. Some states are also planning to rush vaccines to homeless shelters and even prisons where the corona virus has spread so quickly. NPR news. I'm Blake Farmer in Nashville. President Trump posted a Syriza tweets this morning. Lem basking the Supreme Court for rejecting a Texas lawsuit aimed it invalidating election results in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin and Georgia. As NPR's Nina Totenberg reports, the high Court said it wasn't Texas's place to bring the case. The court said that Texas has no legal grounds to complain about how another state conducts its elections. And the justices therefore said essentially, you can't even come here with this suit. In this country. Election laws are governed by state and local laws unless there's some federal exception. And so the court said that Texas had not suffered any injury. After all Texas and all the states that we're supporting it, they got to cast their votes the way they wanted, and they couldn't complain about How another state conducted its election. This is NPR. Live from KQED News. I'm Queen Achim. California is waiting for its first batch of the krone virus vaccine it expects to receive 327,000 doses by next week. The plan is to distribute it to hospitals to vaccinate healthcare workers. Counties will receive allotments of the Fizer vaccine, which will be distributed to hospitals that the California Department of Health has determined have adequate storage capacity. Serve a high risk healthcare population and have the ability to vaccinate people quickly. And as a surgeon, covert 19 cases continues. California's hospitals are rapidly reaching capacity with beds while beds is the metric that's being used to describe how many patients can be treated. Carmela Coyle, CEO of the California Hospital Association, says that term can be misleading. This really isn't an issue of mattresses and pillows are limiting factor is staff. And so we can take a typical bed in a medical or surgical ward and convert it to an ICU bed. But at the end of the day, what we need is the correctly appropriately trained nurse doctor therapist. Whatever that need is at the bedside. Coyle spoke to KQED newsroom Levi Strauss is listing a third of its San Francisco headquarters for sub lease the jeans maker listed up to 100,000 square feet of space at its Battery Street complex. It's another hit for the commercial real estate market in the city, San Francisco Chronicle Business reporter Rowland Lee reported this story. According Cushman Wakefield, which is the real estate brokerage. It's the highest vacancy rate 2005 not going back to almost like the dot com crash hangover. I mean, last year you saw so many police is so weak companies expanding, but this year we've basically seen nothing. Twitter and up brought box have also moved to rent out space in their San.

NPR Texas President Trump Blake farmer California FDA Scott Simon Amy North Carolina California county Carmela Coyle Fizer San San Francisco Chronicle Twitter Supreme Court high Court CDC Advisory committee KQED News
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The single day peak during the state's summer coronavirus surge. Meanwhile, the number of available intensive care unit beds continues to drop. Hospitals across most of the state have less than 15% available. ICU capacity. U S. Supreme Court last night shot down President Trump's effort to block Joe Biden's election as president. In a three sentence order, the justices said they could not. They would not consider a lawsuit filed by the state of Texas and supported by the president that sought to invalidate the election results in four key states Here's NPR's Nina Totenberg. For the last couple of days, Trump has been promoting the Texas lawsuit as the Big one. But just hours after the last briefs were filed in the case, it fizzled, with the justices, saying that Texas has no legal standing to complain about the way other states have conducted, counted, recounted and certified their elections. So, barring any last minute maneuvers on Monday, the electoral college delegates will cast their votes and Biden will be formally the president elect Nina Totenberg. NPR NEWS Washington This is NPR news. Live from KQED news. Good morning. I'm Queen A Kim. As a surgeon. Covert 19 cases continues. California's hospitals are rapidly reaching capacity while beds is the metric that's being used to describe how many patients could be treated. Carmela Coyle, CEO of the California Hospital Association, says that term can be misleading. This really isn't an issue of mattresses and pillows are limiting factor is staff. And so we can take a typical bed in a medical or surgical ward and convert it to an ICU bed. But at the end of the day, what we need is the correctly appropriately trained nurse doctor therapist. Whatever that need is at the bedside. Oil spoke to KQED needs room. Volunteer Hewlett Packard Enterprise and now Oracle, one of the older marquee names in Silicon Valley, has said it's moving its headquarters at a state Rachel Myrow, senior editor of Our Silicon Valley desk has more Of Oracle's 135,000 employees worldwide, a mere fraction of them work out of the 60 acre campus in Redwood Shores, or did before the pandemic force, most of them to work from home. In a statement, the company said the move to Austin means many of our employees can choose their office location. And the Oracle will continue to support its offices in Redwood Shores, Santa Monica, Seattle and elsewhere in the U. S. Oracle began in the bay in 1977. Why moved the headquarters toe Austin Cheaper real estate for one for another. There's no personal income tax in Texas, particularly tempting draw for California's wealthiest residents. I'm Rachel Myrow. KQED.

Texas president President Trump Oracle Nina Totenberg NPR Joe Biden Rachel Myrow KQED California Redwood Shores ICU Our Silicon Valley Supreme Court Carmela Coyle
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cities on minorities, places that historically have voted Democratic. Don't let anybody for you that this is about irregularities. Wisconsin election officials have said there has been no evidence brought forward of fraud or irregularities in the state for NPR news. I'm Laurel White in Madison, a federal judge had some harsh words about the Trump administration's handling of Dhaka or deferred action for childhood arrivals, which protects young immigrants brought to the country illegally as Children. NPR's Joel Rose reports. The judge criticized the administration and hearing today in New York. Judge Nicholas Care if it's ripped the Trump Administration for what he called a quote, sad and inappropriate use of executive authority. The judge ruled over the weekend that the acting secretary of Homeland Security was not lawfully serving in that position, and he issued a memo suspending new doctor applications. The Trump Administration has tried for years to end the program, which would have left more than 640,000 young immigrants vulnerable to deportation. The Supreme Court blocked the administration from ending DACA in June. Judge Garr office said he's deeply concerned that the administration is trying to run out the clock instead of complying with the high court's ruling. Joel Rose. NPR News U. S. Stock market indices turned lower in afternoon trading The Dow down 344 points the NASDAQ fell 97 points the S and P was down 41 points. This is NPR. Live from KQED news. I'm terrorists. Tyler. As we head into another coded 19 surge, which has the potential to overwhelm hospitals, nurses, unions have once again accused management of understaffing and not providing enough personal protective equipment. The Carmela Coyle, president and CEO of the California Hospital Association, says When it comes to PPE, their hands are tied. Hospitals have been working to replenish Their resource is as we prepare for another surge. The problem that we have is a worldwide shortage of personal protective equipment. Coyle says. International manufacturers have not been able to keep up with demand. As surgeons take place globally. U. C. Berkeley is removing the names on two of its buildings, citing racist legacies. Take you. These Chloe Veltman reports campus officials of planning to rename the consul, which houses the physics department and the social sciences oriented Barrows, whole 19th century science professor Joseph Leconte came from a slave owning Confederate family and used to scientific language to promote racist ideas. David Prescott Barrows was UC president from 1919 to 1923 and a white supremacist student. Union President Victoria Vera says she's thrilled the university's doing away with these names. E.

Trump Administration NPR Joel Rose Judge Nicholas Care Judge Garr David Prescott Barrows Carmela Coyle Wisconsin president Supreme Court fraud Laurel White Joseph Leconte president and CEO Chloe Veltman Dhaka KQED Victoria Vera
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:49 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"And we get again into this whole question of partisan politics and how that's played in the distribution of P P and it is a big question. Other big question. I have for you. Carmela Coyle is center management has been charged with eliminating sick days and requiring nurses to pay for their own health care. That's come from essentially the nurses union. Can you address that? I don't have specific information on that circumstance. What I do know is that hospitals have been working to do everything we can to ensure that when isolation quarantine is needed, that we're doing everything we can to ensure that our workers Khun do that, Um, there were pieces of legislation early on around. Worker's compensation and understanding that individuals who had covert 19 It was important for us to make certain that they were taken care of from that perspective as well. So I don't have specifics on the other. If I may, however, comment on the manufacturing system on DH process that is the crux of this issue. We used to have personal protective equipment that was manufactured in the United States. But it was the case that it could be done far less expensively. Out of the United States and so much of the supply chain of masks and gowns, and all of the rest moved internationally. Many people don't know that a lot of that was actually manufactured in China, and in fact in Wuhan, China, and so when we saw China so affected by this pandemic itself, it really shut down some of the manufacturer. One of the most important lessons coming out of this pandemic will be the need for us to diversify. The manufacturer of.

China Carmela Coyle United States Khun Wuhan P P
"carmela coyle" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"News, 93.1 Kfbk. California's Covert 19 positivity raid is remaining stable. It's 7.5% Governor Gavin Newsom announcing today that more than 10,000 positive cases of Corona virus were reported Wednesday. The statewide total is now more than 490,000. You are also 194 deaths reported bringing the state's death toll toe over 8900. California hospitals are struggling to keep up with an increasing need for personal protective equipment as they respond to the growing spread of covered 19. Carmela Coyle of the California Hospital Association says that has medical providers trying to extend the life of their peepee reuse of and 95 masks as an example as authorised by the Centers for Disease Control. And of course, the most important thing we can do is to try to reduce the infection and disease spread in the first place. Doyle says. Hospitals are also working to increase product supply by contracting through new manufacturers. There's also been an increase in inventory sharing. The California Supreme Court is ruling that local governments can stop pension spiking among public workers. The ruling came down today forbidding public employees from cashing out there sick time and unused vacation just before retiring California's highest court sided with a 2013 state law that was created for closing loopholes and preventing abuse of the pension system. I'm Joe Michael's news. 93.1 Kfbk, not traffic and weather together. Good evening. Looks like we have a grass fire. New at this hour, 50 eastbound right? A fulsome boulevard. It's visible from the freeway, man. Look out for some flashing lights on the scene there is he, speaking of Eastbound, 50 from downtown Sacramento out of Folsom, a 16 minute journey call it a seven minute trip eastbound Cap City from downtown out to 80. Right now it's going to cost you about 18 minutes downtown up to woodland past the airport. And then 16 minutes. What's pound from the heart of downtown Sacramento to Davis? I'm Jack Ferris for news at any 160.1 kfbk. Clear tonight. Load 57 to 61 study tomorrow afternoon high of 94 to 98. Staying clear Tomorrow. I'll over 57 to 61 Plenty of sunshine Saturday I of the 96 to 100. Banky Weathers, Barson. He was 93.1 kfbk. Sacramento's number one for breaking news, traffic and weather. Who's 93.1 Kfbk? Hi. There it is. Power walls for Roseville numismatics and Coin Shop 8 98 Douglass Boulevard in.

Kfbk California California Supreme Court Sacramento Governor Gavin Newsom Banky Weathers Carmela Coyle Centers for Disease Control California Hospital Associatio Doyle Jack Ferris Joe Michael Coin Shop Roseville Cap City Folsom Davis Barson
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KGO 810

"Go to the staff. Is that Harris is restaurant, 2100 Venice Avenue in San Francisco, lawyer for a Chinese scientist charged with visa fraud after authorities said she concealed her military ties. Says she was arrested after she left the Chinese consulate in San Francisco to seek medical care Theatre knee, says Zhuang Tang had been living in the consulate since June, when the FBI seized her passport and visa. Tang, who has asthma, was informed last week There was a warrant for her arrest. She had a medical emergency, and federal agents arrested her after she visited a doctor. Our attorney is arguing that she should be released on bail. Senate Democrats have killed Republican efforts to vote whether to end Governor Gavin Newsom state of emergency that was declared in March because of the pandemic. The effort was defeated today in the Senate Rules Committee. California hospitals continue tohave supply personal have to supply rather personal protective equipment issues related to the Corona virus pandemic, and they expect those shortages to continue for at least two more years because manufacturers can't make them fast enough. Carmela Coyle, with the California Hospital Association, says government must give suppliers incentives to make more faster, She says it'll take a collaborative effort to solve this one. There is no single magic pill here. Got to make all of the pieces that are essential to providing care to a covert. 19 patients come together at this time of pandemic. It's the very definition of a pandemic. First it was the statue of Sir Francis Drake and Mark Spur that was taken down this week. Then we saw school officials take down the Sir Francis Drake High School Sign in San Anselmo yesterday, where a new, more unifying named decision is in the works. Now the name of the Explorer with connections to say slavery is having his name taken off of one of San Francisco's swankiest hotels. The Sir Francis Drake Hotel in Union Square is run by Kimpton Properties, and they've been working with property ownership to evaluate a name change and a potential rebranding of the property. Kim, If you recall last night, I suggested this was next in line, and I don't know if all of time tonight but at some point, we'll talk about it. I have so many happy memories, including my senior prom at the Sir Francis Drake. And being with Richard Nixon of Sir Francis Drake Hotel, So there's a lot to discuss their. Yeah, You called it And still, we don't know what the name of the rebranding might look like. So we'll wait to find out. I can't wait. The latest iPhone will be delayed a few weeks from the typical September release that, of course due to the pandemic. Take a look at the Pacific Coast Highway, a highway ride..

Sir Francis Drake Hotel Sir Francis Drake Sir Francis Drake High School San Francisco Chinese consulate Zhuang Tang Carmela Coyle Governor Gavin Newsom visa fraud Senate Rules Committee San Anselmo Harris FBI California Richard Nixon scientist
"carmela coyle" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Now Trending on News, 93.1 KFBK, California might create its own $600 weekly unemployment supplement if Congress doesn't restore the federal benefit before it expires. California hospital struggling to keep up with increasing need for personal protective equipment as they respond to the growing spread of covered, 19 KPK show. Michaels is live in studio with details. Kitty, Almost 7000 Californians are now hospitalized with a novel Corona virus, More than 2000 of them in the I C U and the numbers are continuing to rise. Carmela Coyle of the California Hospital Association says that's leading to a shortage of personal protective equipment When people think about or talk about pee pee They tend to focus on the N 95 respirators, the masks, and there's been a lot of attention on that particular piece of equipment, but the equipment that is needed to care in particular for covered 19 patients. It's far more. It includes surgical and procedural masks, medical gloves, surgical gowns and apron face shields, gloves of different sizes. Hair covers known as bouffant caps. Goggles and others. Oil says that as medical providers working to extend to reduce the use of their PP, and hospitals working to increase the supply of the products, hospitals are working to contract with new manufacturers. Many have gone directly to manufacturers instead of through distribution chains so that they can be more certain of that supply. And we've seen more sharing of inventory not only within hospital systems, but even across states within those systems, and we certainly know of circumstances where our hospital is in an emergency there short And have been ableto borrow if you will from a neighbor, doctor, Bernie Klein of Providence Holy Cross Medical Center says even while his hospital's pp supply is fairly constant challenges or continually springing up a few weeks ago, white The wife's that used to disinfect surfaces became in very short supply. And so we had to develop a new process to actually create our own wife using CDC approved guidelines. The latest thing is yesterday, I had a call from one of my managers, they could not secure enough gowns. Dr Klein says. A lack of testing is also affecting the PP shortage. You admit a patient If you aren't able to rapidly test them, then the question becomes. Where do you place them if they need hospitalization, So we end up placing him on a covert unit. If we suspect they have Covas. While we're awaiting the test results. If the test becomes positive, then they're in the right place. If it's negative, we have to move them. But while they were on the covert unit, it takes additional PP Downing and 95 master fate facials something called papper captors. That you and abusing unnecessarily. Doctor Coyle says hospitals must continue to be flexible, less Corona virus cases continue to increase, saying they need to work collaboratively to meet the PP demands that continue to rise as covered. 19 continues to spread. Okay. John Michaels there. Thank you. 5 50 traffic and weather together. Let's hear from Dana has you and brought to you by the California Department of Public Health and split. Is going to be about nine minutes away. He's found cap cities go over.

Carmela Coyle John Michaels Bernie Klein California hospital California California Hospital Associatio Dana Providence Holy Cross Medical Kitty California Department of Publi KPK Congress CDC
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:48 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KGO 810

"The Path Thurston program with Chris Meryl filling in today. San Jose Mayor Sam Ricardo would like to speed up the implementation of some of his police reform measures. They include reforms that would provide more oversight of the police and strengthen the investigative authority of the independent police auditor. Police misconduct allegations would be investigated by the auditor instead of police internal affairs. Another proposal would re imagine public safety response by having civilian employees respond to non criminal matters. The City Council is scheduled to consider the proposals in August. California hospitals continue tohave supply personal have to supply. I should say personal protective equipment issues related to the Corona virus, and they expect those shortages to continue for at least two more years because manufacturers just can't make P P E fast enough. Carmela Coyle, with the California Hospital Association tells KGO government must give suppliers incentives to make more faster, she says. It'll take a collaborative effort to solve this problem. There is no single magic pill here to make all of the pieces that are essential to providing care to a covert 19 patients. Come together at this time of pandemic. It's the very definition of a pandemic. Oil, says shortages air driven by surges in coded cases and testing capacity right now hospitals or suffering the most in hot spots in the Central Valley. We'll take a look at traffic on Highway 101 in the South Bay, where there has been an incident that is next on KGO. Too much just way too much jewelry was left at the end of things. Jewelers going out of business sale inside Della's Town Centre before remaining inventory is sent to industry wholesalers. We will be accepting all reasonable offers on jewelry until Saturday, August.

auditor Carmela Coyle Chris Meryl Sam Ricardo San Jose KGO California Town Centre City Council Central Valley California Hospital Associatio South Bay
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"NPR News and Kiwi Day news next Live from NPR news. I'm Laxmi, saying the White House and Senate Republicans have a tentative agreement on what should be in the next Corona virus relief package. NPR's Kelsey Snell says the GOP's next challenge is getting enough Democrats on board There are differences over those big ticket items like unemployment insurance, like the payroll tax deduction that the White House is pressing for that Republicans on Capitol Hill largely don't like And there's also worry about the overall cost of a bill. Republicans had said they wanted to keep this all to about a trillion dollars. Democrats are talking about $3 trillion. That's NPR's Kelsey Snow. The White House is now saying it will drop its bid to cut Social Security payroll taxes. California is a state with the highest number of Corona virus infections now, with more than 414,000 reported it now, tops New York, NPR's Eric Westervelt says yesterday California reported its largest single day total of infection since The outbreak began. California was the first in the nation to impose statewide stay at home orders and made progress slowing the spread of Corona virus in the spring Governor Gavin Newsom. Told citizens you have bent the curve. But then in May, much of the state started to re open, and by early June, not long after Memorial Day, the number of positive Corona cases started to creep back up. And then the seven day positive average really surged after 1/4 of July and public health experts say the state simply re opened too soon. Too fast. This is NPR news live from cakey. Weedy news. I'm Brian Want with Mohr on the Corona virus situation in California. The recent surge is forcing healthcare facilities to prepare for the worst. Science reporter less Lima clerk explains. California flattened the curve last spring. But soon after the economy reopened cases spiked again after June 15th we saw things skyrocket precipitously. Where we're now looking at 13,000 new covert positive cases a day. That's Carmela Coyle, head of the California Hospital Association cases arising in the Bay Area, but the hardest hit areas are in southern California in the Central Valley. Oil says new treatments are shortening hospital stays and the state currently has enough beds for all cove in patients with search capacity. But she stresses staff testing and masks are still in short supply and model suggests the situation will decline. I'm Leslie MCCLURG News. Eight people on California's death row at San Quentin State Prison have now died of apparent complications from the Corona virus. That's according to state prison officials. The most recent death was 67 year old John in beams who died at an outside hospital. San Quentin is still experiencing the largest prison outbreak in the state. About half the population has contracted the virus, and there are still over 850 active cases, with 15 total dead So far. Yesterday, a U. S District judge ordered state officials to free up at least 100 beds for isolating in quarantining inmate. It's in all 35 prisons across the state. It's in order to prevent an outbreak like the one at San Quentin. I'm Brian. What? VD news and more about California, surpassing New York with the most covert 19 cases from NPR will be hearing from David Greene and Nathan Rot in just a few moments..

California NPR San Quentin State Prison White House San Quentin Kelsey Snell New York Laxmi California Hospital Associatio Gavin Newsom Kelsey Snow Carmela Coyle GOP Leslie MCCLURG reporter
"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

11:41 min | 2 years ago

"carmela coyle" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Welcome back to political breakdown I'm Marie Salada goes here with Scott Schaefer and today we are thrilled to be joined by come by Carmela Coyle she is president and CEO of the association representing four hundred hospitals around the state welcome to the breakdown pramana thank you so much for having me we are very pleased to have you you know we're just talking at the top about the state budget and I thought we might start there you as we mentioned are representing these hundreds of hospitals and I think it may surprise some people to learn that as you guys all geared up for the the potential covert surgeon you know cancel the surgeries and appointments that hospitals are now facing an estimated ten to fifteen billion dollars in losses some of the revenue estimates are up to sixty percent of revenue losses and rural hospitals we're looking at layoffs the talks would explain why this is happening at a time when we're all looking towards our medical system more than ever yeah thank you so much and you know I think most of us we probably take the health care system for granted right now we know our hospitals are there twenty four seven other open when we need them it's the first place we had when there's an emergency but I think most people don't really think behind the scenes about how old the financial system works as it relates to hospitals and so what's happened is that in order to address this code crisis California hospitals really answered the call the governor asked California's hospitals to be able to surge forty percent basically take on forty percent more patience and care for them if needed and then he came back and he asked us to be ready to search fifty percent so in order to do that we had to empty hospitals and that means we had to close down services and procedures and try to empty beds to make way for the potential for co the patients and what all that means is that there was no revenue flowing into hospitals as a result no patience and that's how hospitals get paid by treating patients no patience the great news is that we didn't need those beds and we were able to flatten the curve of infection in California but the bad news is this has been devastating for California hospitals and has really put us on the financial brink hindsight of course is always twenty twenty and as you said with it which turned out really well you know we didn't need the capacity that you are all prepared for but you know if you were to be able to do it again what would you do differently and what do you think this situation that we're in right now in terms of your financials what does it tell us about our hospital system in the economics of it we are actually preparing right now and drafting up plans for how we would do this again and that is because I think for many of us in the middle of this now we know this is not over well there's talk about counties coming back online we all need to prepare not only for an increase in coal that infection and we all begin to mix and mingle and and move around again but we have to prepare for the real possibility of a second surge and a surge that could be even worse than what we experienced the first time so one of the things I think maybe the most important lesson we can't address this by simply closing down the health care system not only is that horribly financially challenging for hospitals but it meant that many people who are in need of care not coded related care but heart attacks strokes in patients with cancer well we're not able to get some of the care that they needed and we know in retrospect that simply dead turning the lights off on the healthcare system is not good for Californians it's not good for their health and so we've got to find a different way to be able to surge more in real time rather than closing down capacity in advance and making way I'm I'm glad you mentioned that because I have two little kids and I've definitely told them repeatedly don't break a leg right now right I'm okay now now that yeah things are better now but I'm things up I mean I want to get into some of how hospitals have been dealing with this because it seems like that's a hard that's probably a hard balance to strike and I'm just curious like what I mean what does that look like what is your modeling showing we're just talking about this re opening and it does feel a little tenuous you know that we we don't have a vaccine we don't have therapies and we're testing more but we don't have all of those tools that folks have been telling us we need so how are your member hospitals kind of trying to make that balance of you know bringing back some revenue in and all that but also knowing that this is it this pandemic is not over California's hospitals really do remain concerned and it's because the decision to re open and our preparedness to be ready to face what may be another storage actually is the confluence of a number of things people tend to think first of all about the space you know is there a better available but it's more than that it is about the testing we need to be able to understand who has the coded by race and who does not that's going to be critical as we move into the fall so hospital surge anyway in the fall because of the flu season it will be critical that we not only press for vaccination but that we're able to separate us somebody who's got the flu from somebody who may have the code nineteen disease it's dependent on personal protective equipment these are the year that respirators and the face masks and the face shields and isolation gowns on the gloves all of that which still to this day remains in short supply and that supply chain is spotty so hospitals are still concerned about their ability to access that equipment and that's essential to keeping our health care workers safe and the third is staffing itself we've got to be able to staff those beds if there are more of them and that is probably the greatest challenge it is why we are so worried right now what's happening to hospitals because of this huge loss by the way like nothing we've ever seen before but this huge financial loss hospitals have only one option and that is to begin to furlough and lay off workers and that's because for a typical hospital sixty percent of their costs our labor rate hospitals are about people taking care of people it's very people intensive and so when they're hit and the other fifteen percent of their costs are related to the things needed to care for an individual so three quarters of our hospitals costs are are related to care delivery the only choice they have in financial circumstance like this is to begin to cut back on labor and that's the exact opposite of what all of us believe we need in this system right now well are pressing for help yeah the ending in in in terms of that help I know you asked the governor for a billion dollar lifeline in the state budget in this current fiscal year another three billion in next year's budget and it looks like the governor put me on that none of that into the budget I wonder what are you hearing from his office from his administration about why that is and might there be you know money coming that the legislature puts yeah we are disappointed that the governor did not include that funding in his release of the budget we have until June fifteenth to work with the governor and the legislature and while clearly we understand as does every Californian that this budget is tough that the shortfall is enormous in my view a budget is a set of the state values and priorities expressed in numbers and so we are still a state that is spending over two hundred billion dollars what we're suggesting is we need to prioritize hospitals now so we don't look at this as a lack of funding we look at it as a need to reprioritize to put hospitals first because in the governor's own re opening plan hospitals ability to search is one of the six metrics right that every county has to have to be able to meet and as a result of hospitals are not open available and staffed and ready to deal with the surge we will not be able to reopen California's economy if you're just joining us you're listening to put a breakdown on KQED public radio I'm Marie Salada goes here with Scott Schaefer and we're talking to the California hospital associate association CEO Carmela Coyle you know health care you're right we're all paying more attention but it has been a very contentious political sort of football for decades and I know you've been involved I'm at the the national level with the health association there the hospital association there you ran the Maryland hospital association before coming to California a little bit about the structure I mean it would seem to me that if you know if there's less patience than our insurance companies paying out less money does that mean they're hurting or flush with cash a lot of your hospitals are for profit I I can see there might be people out there who would be sort of grimace at the idea of of tax payers putting money into hospitals considering how much a lot of people pay out of pocket for healthcare can you talk about that dynamic and sort of what what's the case for that given where you guys sit in this very complicated ecosystem of healthcare sure and and maybe let's start with how money flows through the system for those of us who are insured in California is a state that enjoys some of the highest rates of insurance in the United States some ninety six percent of Californians have insurance those of us who are insured we pay a premium amount of money or in our employer may do that on our behalf to an insurance company the insurance company then hold on to that money and then they pay hospitals and doctors and nursing homes and others when an individual receives care and what is the cash flow for hospitals that come through so that we can keep the lights on and the doors open and staffed and all the rest what happened is we're all continuing to pay our insurance premiums those dollars are sitting with the insurance companies but they're not being paid out because of here that was not provided what's different for hospitals and by the way we've got lots of sectors of the economy who are dealing with revenue losses you know restaurants and movie theaters and retail stores what's different about hospital is that while everybody else close those businesses and did not encourage Spence's hospitals were actually open and incurring even greater expenses as we were preparing for Colby patients buying ventilators buying personal protective equipment at prices that started to skyrocket and being there and ready hiring extra staff.

Marie Salada Scott Schaefer Carmela Coyle president and CEO