20 Episode results for "Carmel Valley"

Qualy #9 - The importance of exercise for brain health

The Peter Attia Drive

09:28 min | 1 year ago

Qualy #9 - The importance of exercise for brain health

"<music> procam to the qualities a subscriber exclusive podcast qualities just shorthand slang playing for a qualification round which is something you do prior to the race just a little bit quicker qualities podcast features episodes that are short and we're hoping for less than ten minutes each which highlight the best questions topics tactics etcetera disgust on previous episodes of the drive. We recognize many of you as new listeners to the podcast may not have have a time to go back and listen to every episode. Those of you have already listened may have forgotten so the new episodes of the qualities are going to be released tuesday through friday and they're going to be published exclusively in our private subscriber. Only podcast feed now occasionally. We're going to release quality episodes in the main fee. Which is what you're about to hear now if you enjoy these episodes and if you're are interested in hearing more as well as receiving all the other subscriber exclusive content which is growing by the month you can visit us at p._t._a. Dot com forward slash subscribe without further delay. I hope you enjoy today's quality. That's another change in my belief system. I think today versus. I don't know five or six years ago. I think five or six years ago. I didn't think exercise was that important to longevity which actually sounds ridiculous for anyone who knows me because i was probably exercising four hours. There's a day but not because i believed it would make me live longer. It was just sort of soothing my addictions but i think today i feel i am much more convinced. I buy a lot of the data. You've described certainly the central stuff when we publish this paper earlier this year with richard isaacs unite. We're talking about her before we started recording. We wanted wanted to get a sense of like if you took completely unbiased approach and look at the literature what was the single most compelling thing you could do to generate or preserve brain health and we came away thinking that it was actually exercise and i remember when the analysts were kind of going through this and showing me all the data. I was like come on guys. There's no way exercise is could be the most important thing for brain health and again. I'm saying this is a guy who loves exercise more than anybody but it just struck me as there's no way and again i think part part of it was i was just thinking about it through the vascular lens and obviously you know i think better than i do that when you start to think about brain health you have to think about it through a vascular lends a metabolic lens growth factor lens. I mean there are overlapping but distinct pathways that are going to influence brain health and so i was kind of humbled by that and now i guess in many ways. I'm a little more adamant about it with my patience. <hes> not that i wasn't you know adamant before but this is like boy if you're if you're every day we got to change that. I actually the the main reason i exercise for. My brain is certainly just not only for br printing nerve genetic disease and atrophy and all that but just because it affects my executive function and effects may already levels. It affects my ability make decisions. I absolutely if i have have something that's bothering me. You're giving me anxiety or have to make a really important decision. Going for a long run really helps me and there's been studies showing that it helps with executive function how long term planning like aerobic exercise specifically you know and the and high intensity interval training all that stuff they all they all do different things you couldn't didn't we couldn't tease this out of the literature which again probably is just a limitation of shitty human clinical trials but that's the second order question right which is if you're gonna take the tim tim ferriss approach which is what's the minimum effective dose because there are some people like maybe you were. I who i think just generally like exercise and also get these other benefits. These endorphin benefits fits but there are some people who are like look. What do i need to do like. I'm gonna treat exercise like madison and i think in that setting. I'm still not clear so if you were that person. Would i say rhonda and as long as you are lifting weights one hour three times a week like if you can only give me three hours with that be how i'd want you to spend it or would. I rather you be doing being anaerobic. Aerobic type thing. I mean that's to me. Those are where these biomarkers start to become very important because we're not gonna generate hard outcome studies with that level of control once you try to control that many variables and be that strict about it. You're going to very much lose a heart outcome prospectively but if we knew what to measure right right and that's you know would we be measuring in integral of i._g._f. For example so how much arises how much it falls and then what that looks like over time but i guess that's the funny anything right like the more we learn the lesson. We know yeah absolutely. I think that we definitely don't know the answer to that question but i think there's a lot of data out there showing the for example strength training and you know there's benefits on the brain that's been shown published this benefits on preventing muscle atrophy. There's benefits on preventing cancer incident like that's all been shown for strength training aerobic and you know this high intensity interval training is also also seems to be making its way as well like like there was a study that i that i found via to max's you know the ability of your your body to transport oxygen during exercise which also indicator of when you're not exercising and obviously transporting oxygen to the brain for examples extremely truly important the o._t._c. max declines with age like one percent per year. I forgot starting at what age but you know so ten percent per decade almost parallels the muscle almost clone does it does parallel exactly and there was a study showing that twenty four sessions of high intensity interval training where it was like a forty five minute session five minute warm up five minute cool down and then you know in between the max intervals which were like pretty long like a minute there. Was you know the seven percent max water anyway so twenty four of those increased video max by twelve percents. You're literally taking an entire decade of decline and like reversing it with the twenty four th that's that's actually a good point i when i was was more active as it sort of competitive cycling you we would get to max tested about twice a year ryan flaherty who we were talking about before the podcast one of my close friends and you've got to in to know him as well i learned from ryan that actually to max is not the most important indicator as a runner a cyclist. It's viva to max or p vio to max it. Matters in other words for for a runner veto to max is much more predictive of performance. Which is the velocity you carry at via to maximum for a cyclist. It's p. v. o. Two max which has the power output. Would it be okay max that said every time you go to test. You want the test well so you know over time. I learned how to game the system. You know i wanna make via two max's in the seventies which again to put that in perspective like that's not at the level of professional athlete or something like the guys that are winning the tour de france in the high eighties or low nineties in terms of milligrams per per mil per kilogram but nevertheless just altering my training for three weeks before lovie two max test and dropping my weight so if if i shed tequila grams did those types of intervals i i actually had it down to a science where there was a workout i would do you know in carmel valley. You've got the fifty six that goes out and and it's got a bike path next to it. There's a section of that bike path that is one point six miles long and it goes up at about four percent and just doing repeat intervals of that which takes about four minutes all out to go one direction and then about six minutes to cruise back four of those that was it twice a week for like three weeks and your video to max exploded now of course the question is is that like you know cramming for the test getting the results but not necessarily like you have to keep doing that to get the decade-long benefit i i don't know the answer but i agree that like if you can maintain muscle mass and you can contain peak aerobic performance it's not it doesn't even matter at that point. If you're living longer your clearly living better right like if you if you don't budge edge anything on maximum life span you've dramatically improved median lifespan right and that's <hes> you know i think for most people that's what matters it is yeah for me it is i mean what's the what's the maximum among life span the like a human's lib one hundred twenty hundred twenty four or something like that hundred twenty four one thousand one hundred twenty four million like that yeah living beyond that i mean that's i think the goal is really to at least for me. I think that's a lot more achievable is increasing my mind median health span right my health span you know so so basically preventing staving off cardiovascular disease cancer alzheimer's disease those sorts of things that i'm so that i'm living healthier and also you know a little bit longer but obviously not one hundred twenty five or six. If you enjoyed today's quality now sit tight for that legal disclaimer. This podcast is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute the practice of medicine nursing or other professional healthcare services including giving of medical advice and note no doctor your patient relationship is for the use of this information and the materials linked to the podcast at the user's own risk. The content of this podcast is not intended to be a substitute for professional national medical advice diagnoses or treat users should not disregard delay in obtaining medical advice for any medical condition they have and should seek the assistance of their healthcare professionals for any such conditions lastly and perhaps most importantly i take conflicts of interest very seriously for all of my disclosures the companies i invest in and or thighs please visit peter attiyah m._d. Dot com forward slash about.

Dot executive ryan flaherty muscle atrophy endorphin richard isaacs peter attiyah rhonda tim tim madison carmel valley lovie five minute three weeks six years forty five minute seven percent
Episode 299: Risotto, French Toast, and Good Enough

Local Mouthful

28:34 min | 1 year ago

Episode 299: Risotto, French Toast, and Good Enough

"Hi I'm Marie maclellan Author Food Jars and I'm joy manning up who'd writer and editor welcome to local mouthful. We're here to talk shop with Obsessive Home Cooks everywhere this week. We're talking about RISOTTO Vegan. French toast and meals. That are good enough but first. Let's compare notes notes on something we read this week. Okay so By the time this episode airs. This'll be a little bit of Old News. But it's an interesting topic because it's come up so much and that is is the recent romain lettuce recall another recall. This is I feel like the third or fourth in as many years. GROUNDHOG's day we have Romaine and it's too bad because Romain lettuce is certainly one of the most popular lettuces you know used to be that was iceberg and now everybody in it's like it's the basic acceptable lettuce and it keeps getting you know E. coli infestations. I haven't bought it in a year. At least really yes. I mean I told you when we were prepping to record that they don't need it anymore and I guess what I meant. I don't buy it anymore. It's often included in like a restaurant. Salad yeah so I guess I eat it then but I don't buy it. You know I never really I stopped buying it and maybe and I feel like maybe at this point I probably should Because you know there's just more than Scott and you you know me and household so I don't want to expose the babies to anything like that not not that. They're eating right now and maybe they won't be for years but you don't WanNa bring something contaminated the coli into your home right But the problem is I really love. remained like it's crunchy. It's you know easy. A Romain heart chopped up is one of the easiest basis for for a salad that I know But it's just been so many it has been so many this article you know poses the question of why does it keep happening. But it doesn't really answer it. Yeah it doesn't seem like it's you know we anybody is really figured it out. Well I mean I think one of the things that keeps half. The reason that keeps happening is because of sanitation situations in the agricultural sector I know that like the farm workers aren't always given Sanitary sanitary bathroom facilities or the time to use them if they are available and so they will end up. You know relieving themselves in the field if it rains or water comes through through washes You know that fecal material into the the farmland and so that can be part of it. The article said that contaminated agricultural troll. Water is a prime suspect in these outbreaks is out with that man. Yeah that's gross. It is terrible. Yeah I mean so there's these human rights and You you know respect issues tied up in it that no one's really talking about It's funny My my brother-in-law Andrew refuses to eat lettuce because he grew up around and so he grew up in Carmel Valley. which is right near Salinas? Which is where you know a huge chunk of the nation's Romain lettuce grown and he doesn't eat lettuce because he it remembers the smell of lettuce rotting in the field. Who will and it makes him so nauseated that he cannot eat lettuce to this day? Well what have I been eating instead. You might be wondering under. I am still having lots of Salads. you know. I go hard on a Kale Salad. I love celts. There's this mix in that they sell at sprouts I think all the supermarkets have their own version of this called a super greens and it's like baby Kale and baby Charred and other all kinds of things And what I love about that you can get it in the big box and it's good salad but you can also cook it. You can sort of use it in place of herbs if you I need something instead of parsley or what have you. So it doesn't go to waste even though I buy it in a big box or maybe a ruge which I think is a preference. I got from you. Oh baby regular baby spinach. I'll go back to or big spinach. Cabbage always the cabbage joining us. All out there. It's true and I feel like I almost always have cab in my fridge and to me that can release substitute for Romaine in a good way. If you shred it finally MHM Because it offers that same sort of neutral flavored crunch that is a large part of. What's the appeal Romaine lettuce and cabbage last even longer in the Phraya Korea? So do you think you're there you're gonNA stop buying it probably think it'll be a while before I buy like a bag of Romaine Hart's because I just it makes cleaner you know. The article said that starting in January twenty twenty two which is still a ways off. Farmers will have to test the groundwater four times during the growing growing season but it also said that they're already testing once a month so I can't see how that's GonNa make a difference. Yeah it's just it's an issue that has I think needs a larger solution and we. The agriculture in this country is not a place where it's ready to deal with those larger solutions Because it's I feel like it's this issue and we're just not dealing might. It might be a while before I by Romain Lettuce again yeah Anyway I'll have a link to that story we referenced in the show notes and If you are shopping in the produce section for salad for dinner tonight fiery where her yeah seriously speaking of dinner tonight. Yeah what are you making. RISOTTO I left out. It's another wintry dish. That doesn't We don't talk. We even talked about as much coaches some other. wintery things How do you make your is that oh I am a stove? Top risotto person. I don't necessarily think that you have to stir like constantly for half an hour or anything like that but I do like the process of kind of watching it evolve that you get when you make it on time how about you. I was a longtime stove. Top user but then I switched to the instant pot a couple years ago interesting I think that instant PUTT coaxes more starch out of of the grains of rice to make a creamier and result also hands off. Yeah always nice. I was thinking about doing it on the stove top today because I'm just is GonNa like freestyle risotto so it helps to be able to look at it and and sort of test as you go But I'll probably just do it in the insult. Mm for that reason. I like especially. If you'RE NOT GONNA use cream it's really you really want the starches to get to get out of the rice and into the liquid and and I also have some beautiful mushrooms. I got from fully food works then on different kinds like waster and I think there's a trumpet and Head of the woods in there air and some other ones that I'm not even sure where they are so I'll tell you those up and stir them in at the end And of course my frank brothel use mushroom unofficial. NFL look better than billion mushroom flavor. Excellent so yeah I am. I haven't made resulted in a in a long time. Part of it is that It's not wanna Scott's favorite things but I love it It also I the things I like to put in. RISOTTO are things that aren't his favorite Britt like butternut squash like you're talking about mushroom-lover mushroom risotto. And so you know. It's one of those things I often save to make when he's not eating dinner together other And you know in the last year or so. It's either that life life has been so intense that there's just no time to cook something where it's the everybody in the household can eat it right. You know what I mean. That's a good point so but There is this butternut squash risotto recipe. That's on epicurious. that as someone who doesn't follow a lot of recipes was just kind of making things up as I go along. This is a recipe. I go back to over and over again. There's just something about it leaks. It's but roasted butternut squash It does call for some cream although I never add it because I feel like it's rich enough just on its own but there's something about the kind of intensity of the onion flavor that you get from those leaks I- lovely. Yeah and then the real sweetness that the butternut squash brings And I've made it with other squash squashes to like you could also do Co. Boccia or one of those Fancy Farmers Markets Mazda's. But Oh my God. It's so good and so like wintery and satisfying thing and visit heavy makeup broth from the squash skin and strengthen scenes. It doesn't My favorite. Yeah that's a very cooks little stroll yet approach I. Why do it a lot though when I when I made a squash thanksgiving I made my squash? Bra didn't really like it happens fast in it is really full of flavor. No it's an it's so smart because then you're not wasting any part of that squad. Throw those things away but after you'd like to infuse I mean certainly they. They've given they've given their all by the time you have made us squash liquid but Yeah resort oh I just. It's one of those things I need to kind of pull back into my regular Focused you know I. I had originally planned have pasta tonight. But I've been eating so much pasta lately. Yeah than I thought. What Guy Habits Different Than Pasta now do you ever do risotto? With like Pharaoh or stuff like yeah yeah for rotel for wroto. Yes yes I like that. That's not a starchy. Though yeah I do I have some like aging are boil rice in there that I wanNA use. Yeah but I do love a for Pharaoh I also have some are Borio rice at home that I keep looking at thinking that this yeah. I've done it with Freika as well which I I love. I love It's like a green roasted. We it's very common in Mediterranean and Middle Eastern food. That's wonderful on a risotto style dish. What are we missing? Is there anything else barley. Oh it's really starchy. Sally would be great. Yeah Love Barley. My favorite risotto. Trick that I can't use anymore because not eating cheese. You know how it's often finish with butter at the end. Yeah if you like peel off the rind of a nice hunk hunk of like three. Oh my God and you melt the brain to at the end. Yeah that's like my best result of that I have. Oh my God that sounds so incredibly dense so good I mean you can use a lot to make it very decorative and are you can use a little. Oh what is that incredible delicious Flavor Dasher. I do love making risotto. That you've crammed a bunch of vegetables into so like a mixed roasted vegetable risotto. was that you don't do the vegetables on other salad on the side or roasted vegetables got Salad always looking at Cram as much vegetable matter into whatever. I like to eat vegetables too but I I wanna like even the mushrooms. I don't want to cook the mushrooms in the Rosetta. Want them on top. That makes sense so I get it. Sounds good. I looked to my instagram for photos. I'm a little jealous of the dinner. You'RE GONNA have terribly bad photos if I I was this. We're GONNA talk about this next actually the today. I was experimenting with them. Begin French toast. A friend of ours is like a Krige food photographer was like I thought that was steak. That's a uh-huh that's how bad my who'd photos are but I will probably take a few of the result. I am looking forward to seeing it so speaking of Vegan French toast. I WanNa hear more about this. Okay so I love French French toast and I have not been eating it for reasons of eggs. Milk and butter. Yeah and so. I've been researching recipes. Like how you do it. How how do you make a beacon French toast and there's a lot on a different things out there? People use Aqua fabriga people use coconut milk and cream which is out for me because coconut is loaded with saturated fat. Not that I'm never gonNA coconut but like yeah People use cornstarch People use chickpea flour and people use egg replacers which I bought a bag of Bob's red mill's egg replacer which is really just a blend of like finally mill Chia Flax and like stuff that you would usually use into. Yeah Bacon Egg and something something so I actually wrote it down. It was just for me because I didn't want to run some kind of crazy Vegan experiment on Dan so for two slices of bread. This is what what I did. One tablespoon of chickpea flour One Third Cup non dairy milk of your choice. I used Soy One and a half teaspoons egg replacers. Oh come and then to season it up I did an ATC and cinnamon cardamom one quarter order Teaspoon Vanilla and listed up he went and this is just for me. If I was going to have to it for me I would double it And then I got my earth balance buttery stick out. I filmed my nonstick skill with butter. And then I sprinkled once I you know I spoke the bread and smuggled the side I was Gonna put down with a little bit of sugar bigger. which gives it like? This is what I do on my normal French toast. That gives it like a little bit of a crunch in. Yeah criminalization. Yeah so then I just Then proceeded as usual with your French toast making and I was surprised at how good it was. Yeah it sounds like I mean basically. You're just looking for something to kind of create a little bit of Creston coach. You know custody. Ns Yeah and the you want to thicken it up somewhat. Yeah and there is something about chickpea flour that is like egg Jason. If you know what yeah I can see that so oh I would not hesitate to it for Dan now You know I didn't want to do a failed being experiment. I tried Vegan cookies earlier in the week. They were good but this French toast is more like regular French toast than the cookies. Were like regular cookies. You know what I do So I know you've probably never gone down that road. No although I it was when it's making me think of I've been having sort of a dalliance with non dairy eggnog ex You get one a trader when I got the Almond NOG from trader. That and I had it on the grocery list and then I told Dan not to buy it because I was feeling like conscientious about sugar or whatever you know. It's so good I had been getting a couple of different Non Dairy dogs recently. And I I try to coconut one and it was too sweet But the almond NOG from from trader. Joe's is not super sweet. It's really heavy on the NUTMEG. which kind of conveys Eggnog even without that edginess and it's just very it's the right thickness? It's very satisfying. And so it makes me think that you should. You should make Vegan French toast with Ominami. That's so smart because then you're going to get more of that flavor. It's already ready trying to replicate a sense of s and so that will give you a more satisfying finished product. Plus I think I definitely need to have it because when I go to like my mom's house and my mother-in-law's house like these are there's not going to be like Vegan sweets. Yeah on offer so that might give me a little feeling of yes. Yes celebratory necessary. You know I had my eye on that you think that's the best I mean I've only tried like three different ones so far this season but the I find I like it enough that I don't feel like I have to look elsewhere for different dogs. Yeah and it's not so sweet it makes me feel like I'm drinking some melted piece of candy. Andy when right coconut one really did And Yeah I like it. That's good Intel. Yeah I'M GONNA I'm definitely going to get. We're we're still recording writing this first week. Would you call this. Like beginning of the middle of December. I Dunno beginning of. Do you put a tree up in your apartment. We do. We have a little victory. I I can't recall seeing it but I must have. You know I mean I come from a family. The never really put up a tree until like December fifteenth the week because we always had real trees and my mom. My mother the Jew had grew up putting up Christmas. She would never put lights. They never put lights on the House and in my childhood we weren't allowed to put lights on the outside because she was Jewish but we were allowed to have a Christmas tree. It doesn't make a lot of sense but that's how it worked. And so but my mom prefers a real Christmas Christmas tree to a fake one and so and she liked leaving it up until New Year's Day go later in the month and so. That's kind of my expectation like the my built-in calendars like. Oh you don't put your tree up until so you have not put it up yet. We haven't and I do prefer real trees. But there's an ordinance in Philadelphia that if you live in a multi unit dwelling swelling. You and I think that's totally reasonable. Yeah the reason I was thinking about. It was my sister. I don't get involved with the Christmas tree stuff I don't know why could be migraine. She could be the fact that I don't have kids not sure but Jill wanted me to come help her Trim her little Gold Lemay type. Trade Yahoo also. I thought that I would bring Eggnog. Like the non dairy eggnog is like a tree trimming snack but it was the day after Thanksgiving so I didn't feel I needed to add. eggnog to leftover Thanksgiving Trieste. You know but that would have been a nice accent. I'll be curious to see here what you think of the the Onondaga I you know. I haven't had really Noggin so long. Now that I'm not sure I've ever had. I've had it out of the carton but homemade up never no I've never had homemade it either but like like the thick dairy is it. I think it's milky. It's supposed to have eggs in it. I don't know what I don't know but it you know it's basically like Turkey heavy cream. Yeah I know that when you make it at home there's exiled but the dominant one. It's satisfying yeah. I appreciate it. Albacore back on it after. I have dry sample. Let's talk about your good enough meal. Okay so unless you brand new to the show. Oh you know that I have five month. Old Twins. Life has been intense and I've been making a lot of dinners. That are a good enough. They're not great they aren't you know something necessarily to write home about but I'm feeling very satisfied with. It's just good good enough. It's not perfect and you can go an example yes. So for instance last night I was making roasted potatoes and roasted cauliflower. The Flower and chicken I had some chicken breasts and a previous version of me would have put the potatoes on one baking sheet and put the cauliflower another baking sheet and unlike done some really Nice pan-fried treatments to the chicken breasts to make it all kind of make each element as good as it could be before combining them instead out of simply cooked. Yes and so the good enough version of me that exists in this current day and age. Cut It all up. Put It on a giant. Baking sheet added. added all the leftover herbs from Thanksgiving so like I had some sprigs of time in some Rosemary and sage poor a healthy glove olive oil on it. Salt and pepper tossed it together and roasted everything together. Now what does this yield. You may ask. It yields own array of components. None of which are perfect. But couldn't we ran this as a sheet Japan dinner though you could. But they're still like it's you know. No element is achieving. Its highest aspiration. You know the potatoes. Don't really get any crust. The cauliflower was fine. The chicken gets a little dried out. What regret I was using breasts? Because that's what's got likes but here's the thing. It was good enough because I could use more of that. You know because the the options were either throw everything on a sheet pan and bake it or call for Chinese food and I had the ingredients. I didn't want to eat some. You know greasy chicken and you know string beans thing doesn't make you feel good uh-huh and and also it made enough that they're leftovers that I think with the addition of like I do is reheat some and put it on a pile of baby rubella and call it sort of a warm dinner salad and be very satisfied with it you ever feel. This is when I make something is maybe just kind of good enough satisfactory. Like I think that when I eat leftover almost like it more because and that I go round I'm comparing it to the effort involved in making it and it doesn't compare that favorably reheat it. It's just food that you have there. Yeah and somehow I appreciate it more. Yeah I'll I never not appreciate leftovers. people disagree agreed with US really a lot of people hate leftovers since Jila Mike moved back from Farmville. I have learned that Mike hates leftovers. Really so strange to me. So much etched food is better the second day on instagram and the other social. Media's I see people crying about leftovers and stuff and with the meal kits. That's usually a selling point no leftovers. I'm like leftover. Yeah I don't I never want to invest the time to cook something and not have at least lunch the next day. I'm with you but yeah I I'm just I'm just pointing out something. That seems very obvious to us. Like selling point is other people are not. I mean I can understand that and it's funny I have a a friend in Chicago Who May or may not be listening to this? PODCAST but She she is a relative that she's told me about once before who they yeah. They don't like leftovers. They have to have a fresh meal every night. And like what do you do with leftovers. And she said they just throw them away and like how do you like leftovers are like gold gold their gold money especially when you. That's responsible for cooking all the time. I can almost but not quite understand how you might have that point of view if you are not the person cooking. Yeah but as the person cooking like I hate it when I don't have leftovers and almost cheated because then you have to do it again right away but I mean in this. I'm just saying in this case you might find yourself feeling better about the good enough meal because yeah now it's prepared food. Hey I I am just grateful that you know I'll have to do tonight. Right is add some vegetables as you're adding element with yeah sometimes use it up exactly. I'M GONNA literally. This is what I'm going to do with these leftovers. I'm going to heat them up in my a crazy. Fancy microwave that we haven't talked about yet but It's coming soon. Yeah coming soon and then I'm going to put a handful of baby rubella in a a flat bowl I'm GonNa pour my microwave leftovers on top. I might add a little vinaigrette. Just to Kinda add some moisture and that is going to be dinner and Arab Unlike something you'd get it sweet green green exactly and it's going to be good enough totally good enough. I had a thing over the summer where I had all these extra eggplants and red peppers laying around So I- roasted hosted them and then I added some tomatoes and like I toured chopped chopped it very roughly and it became like this tomato sauce. Slash Ragu yeah situation than I was not a super crazy about but it was like good enough. Yeah too good to throw away so I put it in all these little one cup containers and stuck it in the freezer and A couple of days ago. Oh I need it lunch kind of in a hurry so I- defrosted it. I made some pasta and I mixed it with some leftover cashew cream from Thanksgiving and I was so happy I was like this is actually really great. Well and I think that what the the topic that we're kind of skirting around here is not every meal needs to be. You know five star. Yeah Culinary adventure that we we put so much pressure on ourselves that everything has to be great all the time. Sometimes it's good enough just to have cooked something to have warmed. Usually yeah and that we need to take a lot of the pressure off of ourselves and make it okay to you know. Have a meal or three that are just fine. Sometimes I feel guilty about something coming like salad and potatoes which you know is like almost every week thing because it's so like repetitive. And so good though ring we always love it always love. There's really nothing better than like roasted potatoes. I in my opinion now I love her as to potato and they are very simple so yeah it does helped cut yourself a a break. It can be hard to do in the world of Blake Dazzling instagram. Dinners and like all the food magazines and especially you and I I feel certain connection to our identity is like home cooking like well and I mean. Don't even get me started. This is a topic could open a whole nother can of words worms about all the Christmas cookie packages that are coming out right now in the various news papers wherever cookie has to be extraordinary. Let's do a cookie segment on a WH- whoa yeah anyway. I was just mentally calculator episodes till Christmas. Time very here but I just want to say it's okay to have good enough Christmas cookies like a sugar cookie with some sprinkles sprinkles on it. It's still fine right right. Well you know you have to have something for the photographs. Yeah if your food publication. I must feel like when you do like food. E Book a little cookbook. That's like good enough food. Yeah like food that you will really cook. Yeah and really eat exactly and I'm very sexy. It's not but did you specialize in unmarketable but useful. Yes and photographing photograph food that is satisfying satisfying and easy to make. Oh we could go on and on but we won't let me tell you about an extremely unqoute will tell me. I'm Popular Opinion Union than I have here in our loving segment. Are you ready him right. Up everybody out there sit down. Don't throw stuff at your phones or your computer or whatever but I am in two truffle oil right now. Nothing wrong with that super reviled ingredient. And I'll tell you how this happened. I was interviewing Rachel Klein who was like a genius Vegan. Shafiul the Greater Philadelphia Area for Thanksgiving Story. I was writing about how to throw a Vegan thanksgiving and she uses just touch truffle oil in her mushroom gravy. Yeah and I said I was like trefoil. Don't people hate that. She's like no people love it. You just just use a little bit like started hated because it was being abused you know like a time the tiniest drop of trail in something like gives it a real depth the flavor of wonderful complex aroma. You know you don't WanNa be like it's something that you use like an eyedropper and not by like a teaspoon you know. Yeah it does when you're not eating meat it really does give a sense of like Urfi News and Mommy and to me. There's almost like a cheesiness about about it so I have been using it in things like in my gravy I I will probably put a couple drops in my mushroom risotto tonight And it's just we have talked in the past on this. PODCAST truffle. Salt yeah which seems more socially early acceptable. Somehow I think I don't think that there's anything wrong with trefoil. It's just that over the years. It was so abused in. I remember going to It's gotta be like eight or nine years ago go into a restaurant and ordering something and it was so overwhelmingly doused and triple oil to the point where it's like you couldn't it. It blew out your pal. Couldn't taste anything about the truffle oil. You can smell anything and it became really unpleasant but I think in that situation it was it was kind. You've portioned by the tablespoon. What you want is like more of a like not like what is that? Yeah action not like a trefoil royal reaction. Yeah if you can tell the Oil Too much has been used right eyedropper not teaspoon so you're feeling subversive go buy yourself a bottle and see what I mean. I think I think the problem started when people started making truffle popcorn. Did you ever get served triple popcorn over. Probably like it became one of these things like a free starter at certain restaurants or like Little Moose Bouche and people expect popcorn to kind of be buttery and so the trefoil would stand in for the butter and then it was too to much right right. Well nothing will ever take the place of our what we're loving from a couple of episodes ago nutritionally popcorns. BFF Right. That's right for other things. I will have a drop or two of truffle oil now. I think it's you know. I think it's great. Come at me in the comments for the show notes and tell me how wrong I am and how much you hate it but if you take if you take this piece of advice give yourself opportunity like it. I want to hear about that too. All right. I think that's it for this episode of local mouthful. Our thanks go out to Dan. Call for editing. The show to Saul Rosenbaum for designing our logo and terrain arose for providing the music. And thank you for listening if you like what you hear. Make sure to subscribe describe the itunes or your favorite podcast APP. Follow us on facebook twitter and Instagram at local mouthful sign up for our newsletter catch up on past episodes and check out our show notes at local mouthful dot com until next time happy eating.

Dan Instagram Romain lettuce Romaine Hart Scott writer and editor Old News Obsessive Home Cooks Marie maclellan GROUNDHOG Intel Mediterranean Phraya Korea Fancy Farmers Markets Mazda Salinas Carmel Valley.
071 We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service

Lochhead on Marketing

18:32 min | 6 months ago

071 We Reserve The Right To Refuse Service

"Thanks for pressing play. Hi, this is Christopher and on today's episode I. Answer a Listener Question. When is it okay to turn customers away, and if by chance you have a marketing or category, designed question or life, question or anything else? You can send it to black hole all one word at LOCKHEAD DOT com. We're sponsored by our good friends at Oracle net, sweet checkout, net sweet dot com slash different today, and our friends at spunk are the leaders in data to everything visit, spunk dot com slash D to e now as Joey Ramone said Hey Ho. Let's go. This is lockhead on marketing the podcast that helps you develop a lens for what makes legendary marketing legendary posted by Christopher lockhead. Three Times CMO Godfather category design and a High School Dropout with a marketing journal calls one of the best minds in marketing, and the economist calls off putting to some. All Right? This email came in from a gal named. And she says dear Christopher. This is such a confusing time. People are on edge. There's a lot of arguing and mistrust in the US. It seems like we see more people acting out. And in our case, we've had some customers behaviorally badly. When is it okay to turn a customer away? All right well first of all. Let's talk about the law and Super Caveat Caveat Caveat. If you're a longtime listener, you know exactly how much time I spent in law school, which is zero so I am in no way a lawyer, however I am three-time public. Company C Ammo. And have served on a number of public boards, and at least know a little bit about this so I'm not giving legal advice. That's not what I'm doing. However, my understanding of the law is that you're allowed to refuse anybody service, but you can't do it. On the basis of things like color race gender, sexual orientation things along those lines, and the sort of conditions under which you refuse service need to be consistent. That is to say you can't refuse service to people for doing action than change your mind in for doing why and so forth and so on so. First thing you really need to do check with your lawyer to make sure you are one hundred percent in compliance That's why big companies have general counsels, and that's why little companies have employment and other kinds of lower so check with them, but my understanding of the law. Is that You can refuse service to anybody is long as you're not discriminating on something along the lines I just described, and again I am no lawyer and I don't even play one on the Internet. Now, here's what I'll tell you from personal point of view, and from been doing this for thirty four years point of view. I think it's Ok to refuse service to anybody who's being a shithead. And we had a situation happen here in the Santa Cruz. Monterey Bay area not long ago. There's a super ding-dong place in Carmel by the way if you haven't been to Carmel it's It's a stunningly beautiful place. And this super, and also, if you're new Ding Dong is a term of endearment for something that something or someone, that's very high end thing anyway. This place called the Bernardus. Bernard's lodge in Carmel and I've actually been there and it's a wonderful place. Well, it turns out on Fourth of July there was an Asian American family. They're celebrating a birthday. and. There was a tech CEO named Markle lofthouse sitting near them. And he decided to pop off on them with a bunch of horrible racist slurs If you Google it, you can see it and we'll have a link in the show notes to an article. About what happened, but the bottom line is this guy lost his mind and said a bunch of horrible things. And then something legendary eappen, an employee stepped in. A A server named Janika Cochran. said to him, he was saying these horrible things. It confronted him. And said quote, get out. You're not allowed here. You do not talk to our guests like that. They're valued. Guests get out and quote. And through this misbehaving tech, CEO out on his ass for being the racist should head that he was being. That to is a legendary story. In the reason that's a legendary story is it shows several things number one. That the folks at the WHO run Bernardus Lodge have some core values. And that in one way or another, whether it was formal or informal, they had communicated to their team. including of course Janika Cochran that there were certain behaviors they would tolerate and others that they wouldn't and racism and out and being an Asshole, clearly with something they were not going to allow and so. Jessica felt empowered to do that. I don't know if she asked for permission. I don't know what she did, but she took action, and to so that to me is indicative of a Janika being a good person and being the bernardus lodging. Carmel Creating an environment for their people centered on a set of core values so that in a moment of truth there people would feel empowered to do what they thought was right, and that's exactly what happened. Now in my life I've had a couple of situations like this pop up of late. My father in law is a farmer. and He. has a a small farm with fruit trees on it. And he's He's well into his eighties and and he sells his fruit a farm stan on the side of the orchard. And as you might expect the whole family chips in so taking care of the orchard, taking care of the FA farm stand is a family affair, an Italian family and the family chips in, and we are there on a regular basis helping papa out. And we have put up signs. We put up hand sanitizer. The signs say you know one person at a time in the stand and please wear a mask, and there's a pure l. squeezer thing right there so that everybody can be safe and everybody can be clean and cleanline- De, sanitized and the like. And interestingly enough as a side note. It seems like people love businesses like this, even more than ever Papa sales going through the roof right now in a way that is very very unusual, and yes, we're having a good fruit. Year it was a cold winter in California, and so that leads to good fruit, but that doesn't explain all of it I. Think part of what explains it is people are looking for. For things that are real and buying fresh fruit out of fruit, stand and not having go inside a restaurant. I, think is really appealing to people right now. Anyway, so that's one thing that's going on in our family and my wife and I were there recently, and this couple showed up, and they both started sort of entering the area of the Farm Stan. And that neither one of them had masks on. And so my wife said. Would you please put on a mask? Know the signs right fucking there right anyway. They start getting Lippi about really. Do we have to do that? And she says yeah, we have to do that. And they say why. And she says well. There's a global pandemic on, and we need you to wear a mask. And by the way my parents are in their eighties and we're not. They're not getting sick and so where a mask. And then the woman says well I. Don't see your parents around. What why does it matter? And I step in. Say listen where a mask they said. We don't want to wear a mask. And my wife says well then you can't shop here. And then the guy says well. We're never coming back and then I say thanks don't come back. And, so look I know this is playing out all around the country right now and. I know this for some reason. Masks have become a political issue I'm not exactly sure why I'm going to tell you a little nother story about that in a second. But on this one, our families decided to take a stand. Our families decided to listen to the Stanford. Doctors and other medical professionals who say wearing a mask makes a difference in addition to that. We're doing everything possible to make sure that the old people in our lives that we love don't get sick, and so in this case we refused service and we told them to stay away forever. Now. I had a somewhat similar situation. As it relates to me, personally I have been posting some stuff recently about masks, and in particular we had heard recently from a Stanford doctor that if the United States, if people in the United States wore a mask for about six weeks, we would get this thing contained. And when I was told that. I thought Oh. Why isn't anybody talking about that? It's doesn't seem to be out there very much, and so I posted on social media about this and the Post. I put up on linked in was viewed over thirty thousand times I couldn't believe it. Anyway. On, one of the social platforms I won't get into one of the specifics. Of people who were being? And saying you know masks for idiots and for she poll and you know this that and the other. One guy started to criticize me, and and this that and the other and and he just kind of came right happening and. I told him in no uncertain terms. If you don't like my posts. Defend me. Go F yourself. And so here's what's clear. By me, trying to help, spread the word that masks are good and viruses are bad. I have upset a bunch of people because for some reason in the United States of America, wearing a mask has become a political statement as opposed to as opposed to anything else. And if you don't want to listen to my podcast or you don't want, follow me on social media because I am trying to promote what Stanford doctors and now subsequent to post the CDC and others have come out, and said masks are GonNa make very big difference, and echoed the point that I had heard from this legendary Stanford Doc. Anyway, the bottom line is this if you don't like me or you don't WanNA listen to podcasts because I'm trying to promote wearing masks in the United States. That's okay. And so I think whatever the issue is. There comes a time in our lives as people and as business leaders where we have to A. be clear about our core values and be stand up for them. Now in addition I think this also goes for employees to. And got to two quick ones for you. On this one attacks Gio that I know was asked recently a all hands meeting, because if you're good tech CEO or frankly, if you're good CEO all, you're having regular communications with your people now for sure and this text. He was asked by some folks in the company whether or not the company was going to stop selling its technology to the US. Government and specifically to the military into law enforcement, because these folks thought that selling technology law enforcement in the military was a bad thing. And you could just tell this was a potential tinderbox. And this? CEO In my opinion, did something legendary, which is make it very clear. That, he believed that selling to the government legally. Is exactly what technology companies should do, and that's what his company is going to continue to do. And you ever noticed that sometimes the unspoken is louder than the spoken. And in this case after making this statement, the CEO the unspoken was very clear is, and if you don't like the fact that are going to sell our technology to our government and our law enforcement and our military, you can go work somewhere else. Now Look you may disagree with me about that. And that's okay I happen to agree with the CEO. I think it is unconscionable that American technology companies who, in a very real way get to exploit for their own profit technologies that were originally pioneered by the American government like the Internet, itself and many other information technology components. That then are created by the government and then commercialized by the private sector to then turn around and say we are not going to sell to our government. That makes me furious. That's just my opinion, so I happen to agree with the CEO, but whether you agree with me or not, the point is critical, which is even when it comes to your people. Sticking to your core values matters recently. We just saw Ford do this. Ford CEO Jim Hackett, in response to employees some employees starting to demand that Ford stop selling its police interceptor, which is the SUV they sell to police forces. He said they're not going to do that. He went further and said it's not controversial that the Ford police interceptor helps officers do their job and again. Did something very similar which is saying? We believe that selling cars to cops is a good thing and we're going to do it, and that is not connected. In any way shape or form cops, having great vehicles is not connected in any way shape or form to any reform that needs to happen in the United States in law enforcement. So where does that? Where does all this leave us? I think whether it's customers or employees or anyone. Now more than ever as individuals and as companies and brands, it's critical that we are clear about our core values, and most importantly that we lived them, you know the last company I was Cmo was called Mercury Interactive. We did not have our core values written down. They were there was no mission statement up on the wall. There were no six words are three words, four words, or whatever stating our core values up. OP painted on the wall. But Mercury more importantly than painting on the wall. Live them. Everybody could tell you what matter at that company. And everybody in the company knew they were empowered to live the core values and execute on those core values as employees of the company, and so I think we wanna be people and we WANNA build companies that are clearly tethered to a set of core values that are understood and ideally are clearly communicated to people. The only thing I would say is. You know there are some companies that will throw the customer under the bus when there's any kind of a dispute between customers and employees, this is one. I would caution you about. Remember that our people are the ones that serve our customers, and if we throw them under the bus, we are going to so bad seeds in our company, and so when there's a conflict when there's a disturbance dispute between an employee and a customer. this may be a controversial thing, but I would tilt towards the employees. First of all get the facts. And then be clear headed, get clear about your core values and check out what did the employees do? And what did the customer do and be very thoughtful about who stand with and who you stand against because if we're creating an environment where core values are clear, and we're trying to empower people to live our core values, and we tell our people that we trust them. We trust their judgment. And ask them to themselves in any situation whether it's with a colleague or a customer or anyone else. What would a legendary person do here? And sometimes the legendary per the legendary thing to do is to tell a customer to take their business elsewhere. The other thing I would share with you is remember the words of American author and philosopher Aldo Leopold who said ethical behavior is doing the right thing when no one else is watching. And of course, we increasingly live in a world where somebody's always watching what we're doing. And in the case of the Bernardus Lodge story I told you about with the racist. Really CEO That video was seen by over a million people, and so wherever we are in the world today there's probably somebody with a phone who can plus press record and capture us being a great person or racist asshole. All right I hope that's helpful. We would like to thank our friends at net sweet. The number one cloud business system to receive your free guide seven actions. Businesses need to take now to schedule your free product tour visit nets. We dot com slash different. That's next week. Dot Com slash different and learn how you turn data into doing at spunk, S., p., L. U. N. K. dot com slash Di the number to the letter e and my friends at go cheetah dot com are providing spectacular high-quality wholesale groceries direct to your house in the bay area so you if you live in the San Francisco Bay area. Cheetah Dot com I need to remind you that today's cats is so property, the Lockhead, odd cast network, and if you like it enough to listen, why not share with your whole team I want you to know we've gotten. We continue to get emails from heads of marketing that you're sharing this odd cast with your team. Making it quote. Unquote required listening of God. That's good management, but I think it's great anyway. today's information is provided you solely for information serve as purposes remember to consult your lawyer, Chaman doctor and mother before acting on anything discussed in today's episode. We're produced an edited by living podcast legend Jason Filipo checkout his podcast, grumpy old Geeks, Seren, arts and Jamie J., D. Legendary technical execution and build lockhead dot com show notes by Diane Jovencio Remember Tom. Waits is right. Listen to Ashley McBride and the words. I'll leave you with. Today's come from Maya Angelou. WHO said without courage? We cannot practice any other virtue. Please stay healthy stay legendary, and until were together again. Follow your different.

CEO United States Carmel government Christopher lockhead Bernardus Lodge Stanford Joey Ramone Janika Cochran. High School Monterey Bay Ford Oracle Santa Cruz Google
NPR News: 05-14-2019 12AM ET

NPR News Now

04:57 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 05-14-2019 12AM ET

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from American pest as the leading provider of safe sustainable pest control solutions across the DMV. Let American past help you to take back your home or business. From menacing pests. Visit them today at American pest dot net. Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens. President Trump says he'll help farmers hurt by the US trade war with China by offering a program to cover some of their losses from higher taxes on exports. The announcement coming days after the US slapped new terrace on two hundred billion dollars worth of Chinese goods as NPR's. Rob Schmitz reports. Officials in Beijing responded Monday with higher import taxes on American products fidgeting announce it was increasing existing tariffs on sixty billion dollars worth of US imports from ten to his highest twenty-five percent. These will cover more than four thousand products that include vegetables fruits, lamb beef as well as chemicals and liquor the higher tariffs will go into effect June. First the move is the latest esscalation in a trade war between the world's two largest economies. The Trump administration is now preparing a new round of US tariff hikes on all Chinese goods, not currently subject to import taxes. Meanwhile, the two nations remain open to further trade talks, President Trump and China's president Xi Jinping. Are set to discuss the matter on the sidelines of next month's g twenty summit in Japan. The police department disciplinary trial of an officer accused of choking and killing an armed black, man. Nearly five years ago is now underway in New York City. WNYC's Yasmeen Khan has details officer Daniel Pantaleo is accused of using a chokehold aband- maneuver while arresting Eric garner for allegedly selling loose cigarettes. The altercation was caught on video with garner, repeating the now famous words, I can't breathe during a break in the trial Garner's mother. Gwen Carr pushed back against the argument that her son was resisting arrest, you see how cruel they was even if he accepted they went to slow the kill tune the administrative trial is expected to last ten days and will determine whether Pantaleo should keep his job at the NYPD. He's been on desk duty since the incident for NPR news. I'm Yasmeen Khan, New York. Actress Felicity Huffman is facing four months in prison. For her role in the college admissions cheating scandal Darren Campbell of member station. W B, you are reports that Huffman admits paying a bribe to help her daughter get into college. Prosecutors say Huffman paid fifteen thousand dollars. So her daughter could take the SAT in a private location with extra time and a Proctor who corrected. The answers afterwards Huffman crabbing as she entered her plea and said that her daughter did not know about the scheme. Federal prosecutors are recommending that Huffman be sentenced to four months in a federal prison, plus a twenty thousand dollar fine. And a year of supervise release Huffman is one of about a dozen parents who have pleaded or greed to plead guilty to charges stemming from the admissions cheating scandal for NPR news. I'm drone Campbell in Boston train where reserve unsettling financial markets. Asian shares are lower that the sour down over one and a half percent. In Hong Kong. After Wall Street stocks fell over two percent on Monday in after hours. Trading. US? Stocks are up nearly one percent. You're listening to NPR news. Five minutes, alleging they were sexually abused by Roman Catholic priests say they will file suit against the Vatican. The plaintiffs are demanding names of thousands of alleged predator pres. They say have been kept secret by the Holy See, including the names of top church officials accused of abuse. Minnesota attorney Jeff Anderson says he'll file a case Tuesday. Former vice president Joe Biden made the first appearance of his twenty twenty presidential campaign in the early primary state of New Hampshire on Monday as WBRC. Anthony. Brooks reports the former vice president is competing in a crowded democratic field Biden address several hundred supporters in a restaurant in Hampton, New Hampshire. He cited his time working for former President Barack Obama and says he wants to return the country to what he argues were better times before the election of President Donald Trump. I want to restore the soul this country. And secondly. I really want to quite frankly rebuild the backbone this country. This time bringing everybody along the middle class. And Thirdly what I wanna do is. I wanted to unite the country among other things Biden wants to repeal the Republican tax cut and shut down hundreds of tax loopholes, which he says would free up trillions for domestic spending for NPR news. I'm Anthony Brooks in Hampton, New Hampshire, family, friends, and fans are mourning the death of actress Doris day, she was one of Hollywood's biggest stars of the nineteen fifties and nineteen sixties following a singing career often showcased her comedy film. Roles door day died Monday at her home in Carmel valley, California. She was ninety seven years old. I'm Shay Stevens. NPR news in Washington.

NPR Felicity Huffman President Trump US NPR president Joe Biden New Hampshire Shay Stevens Yasmeen Khan Anthony Brooks New York City Washington Darren Campbell Eric garner China Daniel Pantaleo vice president DMV Hampton
The Future of The Camaro + Shelby GT500 Carbon Fiber Package

CarCast

44:15 min | 1 year ago

The Future of The Camaro + Shelby GT500 Carbon Fiber Package

"This season when it feels like everyone around you is getting sick I used Samba call it's also or my kids favorite the great tasting Gumy's so this cold and flu season support guys today we really get into the new Ford Mustang yeah the one on the road course multiple runs in the quarter mile so he's all over that car available for versus what's available now and day first off good I'll talk about bet online dot g man. Nfl College football plus World Take Advantage of the best bonuses in the business use the Promo Code podcast one for fifty percent awards to give out each week the five listeners and five thousand go nine and our against Arizona I say thirty four fourteen locking in use doc oh come to pass across matt the motivator the Andrea Sherr the GT five hundred new twenty twenty five hundred and yeah shelby had a they one of the options maybe Russo coming up is it a sixty eight or whatever it is but it's the newer one I glanced at shelby these days with with the forty Ferrari movie coming out and your around the movie and stuff like that because they probably didn't even know about the movie when they started planning this I'm as we speak I'm going to beat the Peterson Museum Interviewing Matt Damon Christian I saw the GT five hundred unveiled on and finally the Interior in the stance in the exterior that's Oh the Kona blue 'cause they had you know what I recall it's a mean looking car and it's fantastic and it has like all the cool things wheels in sixteen and a half inch diameter breaks dusting and a half inch thing ever made it's one of the best sports cars ever made and and San Francisco and drive it through the canyons to Carmel Valley Ranch and have a nice dinner go out to Las Vegas Motor speedway and there's twenty or twenty five blue and I know it's a it's a great fantastic lineup you do like a canyon run them up lap you do three high speed runs and then a cool down lap seven sixty horsepower I drove both the normal version and the carbon pack the Emanuel's anyway and it's good it's really that long ago if you want them to perform well and to handle they have all you know normal mode sport mode track mode they have launched it's a comfortable as anything else out there is what what's the base on that car five hundred with a handling pack and in the eighties and if you want the carbon pack and arts on it and has the carbon fiber wheels right what were you doing point three seconds and runs ten seventies in the quarter mile we went out to las them off but getting out there used the line lock which is fantastic to asked Mustang drag racer guy out there I think he managed a ten eighty yeah so that's a good question because the demon is is a drag race vehicle career seed to lead I don't actually know what it runs in bring him down to twenty five pounds or anything we just ran it right off the showroom stock Yam a look but again that's what the drag the point is this if so good around the road course I did a few laps and then I rode they they they did point out that the carbon pack the carbon fiber wheels they said that the Magna ride is tuned rotors and in carbons rose what does it mean they said all things being the standard wheel just that alone once you dial it in with that lightweight a few pounds but that's in the middle of a car yeah but you do the rams and the rotors the weight savings between the carbon rams just rims three and a half pounds or something I it's probably not that great oh I think is probably about thirty five forty pounds in the carbon fibers are probably twenty Dan is you can take four pounds off with like a two piece of good to peace rotor if you're just talking about the rims will try to figure out the rams anyway air to that but you know people are going to be slapping on superchargers and stuff and arguably it's in the normal car and two point nine with the Z.. fifty-one handling package had that Edmund purchased they have on order I way because they wanted both cars to be roughly around the same price range when you could be the Mustang just the noise I like you know it's it's yeah I a young and going through the gas embargo and fuel line they'd have nineteen ninety will have no more fuel and stuff like that and and also who was horrible for the car it's horrible for Mustang horrible for outright let's say my kids my son hang the Z car that will be available to him yeah we'll be world am shits right so I remember being a car enthusiasts Camaro with the tee tops and all that new like it was it was a but it was on the Ford lightning from ninety four and ninety five and you're flipping through the pages enters the quotes Keller I drive my lightning all the time it's a hunk of shit like it's the roughest muscle car world that's all this cafe fuel mileage Russian on everything and and everything was a slug corvette had horsepower but and it's the tuned so I'm sitting around going Har era is in our rear view over ten years now and all we're going to do ah nothing we'll have no funeral and the things that we even slower because cars slower and all I could see what's the graph was going just going at times man they didn't eighty seven eighty eight just kept getting Satanic nineteen ninety they just and the notion that they're hell cats and SUV's Lincoln navigators got four hundred ninety four horsepower. Whatever twenty-one vehicles that have five hundred horsepower plus yeah that are readily you always like to say once you start to threaten to take away at the popularity of those vehicles to enthusiasts is is still extremely high you want these cars they sell a hundred and something thousand of these year so they just need to sell a we can all have our mustangs and Camaros in sports cars and well I'm GonNa Tease Camaro because Sorta high shoulder trend something that we seem it'll be yeah feel like Mustang Obviously Mustang and and corvette of up their game considerably feel like no matter what no matter what you've done to that two thousand I'll tease it but tell me what you think Camaros next I mean Camaro has got to be sitting around Tommy John Max Pat I need the weight of a forged aluminum Ram in contrast Tommy John Lots underwear brands they claim big impair sold ninety six percent of the customer ratings or four stars plus fumbling time feather light air dry I mean I'll wear mine awareness I run and I don't get the chafing so where the next day the man the stuff is yeah hurry to Tommy John Dot com slash car cast now to get twenty percent off your first order that's yeah from the forged rams to the carbon fibers that true just the rams no not talking about rotor brake package yeah it's so kind of disappointing news is the Camaro is coming to at the Camaro is Camaro sales are down right now and and all these brands have endured for years argosy corvette and I don't know if you there was one year at one drive me nuts but I wanna say eighty three Mustang uninterrupted should've stopped in regathered at some took some time off supra took some

Mustang Ford Nfl Tommy John Max Pat Tommy John Gumy Tommy John Dot Arizona football regathered four hundred ninety four horse thirty five forty pounds five hundred horsepower seven sixty horsepower ninety six percent twenty five pounds twenty percent fifty percent three seconds four pounds
Scotty Gange on winning the Jim Nantz Broadcasting Award

The Darren Smith Show

10:21 min | 7 months ago

Scotty Gange on winning the Jim Nantz Broadcasting Award

"Here in the Denver Area Scott against joins US next to thirteen sixty Scotty this is Darren Smith thank you very much in your hometown. How are you? I'm good man. Thanks for having me on. Realizing Pedro Gomez just on public. Wow, I'm GONNA, have to follow Pedro Gomez on here. I appreciate you chatting say. Well congratulations. It's a good story here at Torrey Pines High School via the academic in athletics powerhouse. That is Arizona. State University now gainfully employed at nine news in Denver. Let me just start with this? Whose job are you going for? Like? Whose job will you be stealing in a couple of years? I hope it's not mine, but the winner of the Jim nance award I don't want to put anything past you hear, what are you? What are you going for in your career? Nothing specific by land like how you say the at the academic, and let powerhouse of Asu. That's fun for me to hear nothing specific I'm still really to be honest with you figuring out what exactly I WANNA do and world of sports and entertainment broadcasting I kind of my style. I'd say mold the two together and I'm try a little bit of everything in my what three years of school I did. Radio videography did some new stuff sports so nothing set in stone right now. Just kind of figuring out what I enjoy doing. All Right? We'll tell us a little bit about the Jim. Nance award I you know I, compared it, and I don't know that I did this accurately or not. Scotty so correct me if I'm wrong, but I said it sounds like for me. I'm not one hundred percent familiar with it. Sound sort of like the heisman trophy for college sports broadcasters, so tell us a little bit about the Jim Nance Award and how it came to be part of of your resume. Yes, so that's a pretty fun way to describe it. But my brother always likes to call it that way so basically. Yeah, and and like you said it hasn't been around for all that long and the digital age and being able to post broadcast real and highlights on Youtube I've just done throughout my entire use, school and kids at Cronkite AF. Around the country when allowed to broadcast rail of some of their work throughout the school year ended, and it's super easy. You just posted a link on the web page. And at the end of the year they recognize thirty to forty collegiate broadcasters, and it's kind of a way for FDA, the company that sponsors it to connect people and get a closer look at Hey, you're a sophomore junior broadcast with this war. Here's somebody that you might WanNa work with might WANNA connect within the next couple of weeks or years, or whatever so yeah, that's what it is I sent it in I. Did my work over my my last year at. I was lucky enough to be honored with. It represents like you said Torrey Pines, the academics athletic powerhouse, Asu and my family to. And this is like an actual physical award. Right because I saw video of Jim Nance announcing the winner of the Jim Nance Award, which was kind of Jim. I'm sure that must've been a thrill. But this is an actual physical award that you actually have somewhere in your possession correct. Oh, my mom didn't let me take it to Denver. She wanted to keep it at home in San Diego. It's an actual awarded laugh. Like eight pounds but if that home in San Diego Right now. Okay, and how do you get? Do they just pop it in the mail? And then it shows up one day at the Games, household or what? Yeah normally. There's a national sports and media nation. There's a special events every single year in Raleigh North Carolina, but of course as all events are not happening, not happening this year, so the CEO of the company actually lives in Carmel Valley and so I met him at Roberto's for a California Burrito and you give me there. Wow. What am I mean so true to your roots? Back in the workout any better for you right got a lot of it to. This has gotta gain. She is the winner of the Jim Nance award. He is working in Denver at nine news via Arizona State via Torrey Pines High School. You grew up here in San Diego I just wonder and there's no pressure on a question like this. I don't know where it's GonNa. Lead us, but is there any sort of local sports broadcasting influence that you had growing up here in San Diego County that maybe help steer you in the direction that you're heading. I mean I always. I always liked watching different stuff I really really love I. Think my favorite sports segment to watch in San Diego as Foxworth San Diego Post game show of my comrades, and he hosts that I really really enjoy watching it. I think he's great on air and Scott Caplan you know the. Guy To I was trend football team mates with his son Justin. I was just one year above him so I got to be close with him. I sat in the in the mighty to ninety studio a couple years ago and watch him up close so. Those together just kind of made me realize how much fun sports broadcasting and and producing, and all that stuff looks like and so I think that was that was that helped me out a little bit and deciding what I really wanted to go to college for. See, I thought that experience. Because you know the mighty tonight, he experience almost drove a lot of out of this business. Now it's fun to watch I. Remember. He brought in. Guy? was playing some Guitar Piano Harp Mixed, and it was the most ridiculous thing I've ever seen and I thought to myself. Wow, this guy's getting paid to to watch this guy play music studio It was ridiculous, but it was supersonic rare painting. What I can't answer this question. I'm asking to paint with some pretty broad brushes here, but having just recently graduated. Arizona state in three years. CONGRATS on that most of us. It's like five seven years getting through our curriculum. But. It was different twenty five years ago when I was in college, people primarily wanted to be play-by-play people or wanted to be sportscenter anchors anchors on their local news channels. Now we've got a completely different landscape. There's the sports radio. There's podcasting. There's a different different types of websites. There's debate shows. Just, if you wouldn't mind, just give us a glimpse inside of the world either at Arizona State just across the board. Like what what? What are the kinds of things that the college broadcasters want to become in two thousand twenty? That's a good question. I think there's kind of decide you. WanNa go along the same path of the traditional quality, broadcasting and journalism right being prepared being as well spoken, and you can having good questions ready knowing whoever it is, you're talking about trying to be witty and not say something that other people have said before, but also especially at cronkite it's so digital now, and how can you make? Make a story that's going to go on the you know cronkite news on Arizona's PBS Five PM newscast, and then how can you alter that and put that into a two minute twenty second twitter video a one minute, thank you engage with other people or finding a way to put it on Instagram TV, or getting your podcast on spotify, and do you WanNa make it really long for people doing long. Long Car WanNa make a five or six minutes thing so there's so many different areas that the cronkite school was kind of pushed us into Oh, experiments and inside I'd be lying. If I said everything I tried and school works out perfectly, and everybody loves everything I would try different things and a lot of times. It didn't work out, but realize okay I did this podcast nobody really listened to it? It but the first two minutes were pretty exciting. What have I just made that into a video? Put myself in front of the green screen bragging and put it on twitter. People people would watch that so yeah kind of what is being taught as a young broadcasting. Going up is just getting many tools and sharpening as many edges that can spine so many different ways and directions to take content. And that right there. That's why Scott won the Jim Nance award because I'm telling you I remember the cover letter that I wrote to ESPN and said I'm gunning for John Miller I want John Miller's job. I WANNA be the play by play Guy Sunday night baseball. That's my dream job. Obviously, that didn't happen, but it doesn't mean that it hasn't been an incredibly successful. Run here in my career I'm really really thrilled with the way. This turned out as much as I- bellyache from time to time. Flexibility is the key in sports broadcasting as as you know. What are you doing with nine news in Denver? Starting production I heard. You say earlier in the show that what I think. This is show sixty eight out side of studio for you guys outside of the IHEART. Radio Studio and so I'M GONNA start in production for a couple of months. I just learned a couple of days ago I've got three to eleven. AM shift so a lot of it kind of up in the. The air because we don't know when sports are really gonNA. Come back and when it's going to be a fulltime reporter. Deal if I'm going to be able to do feature stories on the side, run a podcast specialty show on Sunday night. Stuff like that, so we're it's I can't really answer that question right now. which is both terrifying and exhilarating at the same time? Three Am until eleven am. That is those year your shift hours. Yeah, it's pretty good. That's not bad I. Mean I'm telling you Scott it could be a lot worse. Could be too. Yeah! Did. You know that that actually was my shift when I started at ESPN Two am until ten am. Wow. Yeah. It's. It's what you do what you gotta do. You gotta pay for going to be in this business we'll do. We're going to check in with you from from time to time and find out how life is going in Denver, and it was a pleasure to meet you and thank you for joining us. Thank you for the time there and I. Really appreciate it. You got it. She is the winner of the Jim Nance award again. If you didn't know what that was and truth be told, I really wasn't too clear on what it was. A couple months back, but a company that Jordan caruth networks four called S. T. A.. This is what they present to the best young college sports broadcaster in the country and the winner this year from Torrey Pines High School via the academic, and what was it from Giancana? Against? Since I'm reading this Vadim and athletic powerhouse that is Arizona State University is a Scottish. So good for him I will say this. Glad that there's no draft because otherwise he would ended up in Tupelo Mississippi. Since that radio station or television stations out there probably needed all the help. They can get good for him. I have a feeling. We'll hear more from that guy headed on down the road. Be Back after this with the tax contests.

Jim Nance Denver Arizona Torrey Pines High School Scott Caplan San Diego Pedro Gomez Asu Scotty ESPN cronkite school US San Diego County Torrey Pines State University cronkite Arizona State University twitter Raleigh North Carolina
EP. #15: The Arvin Nelson Interview

Locations Unknown

43:45 min | 1 year ago

EP. #15: The Arvin Nelson Interview

"And thousands of people have been studiously benched banished in America's wilderness. Join us as we dive into the deep end of the unexplainable room and try to piece together. What happened? You are listening into locations. What's up everybody and welcome back to another episode of locations known I am Joe Erazo and with me as always is the guy who's more fun than a ballpit big enough for adults Mike Bogart? Thanks for the Inter Joe This isn't one of our normal episodes codes. we've been teasing this for several weeks. Now that we've finally got the Arvin Nelson interview with his two close friends Jay Jason and so it's about forty minutes long and it really. It really gives us some exciting details about Arvin that we didn't know from the information that's available double online and Jay and Jason had a lot of great insights on the location where he went missing what they think happened to them. And just some overall details on what Arvin was like as person before he went missing. So I'm I'm glad we. I'm glad we got this interview. Set that up because I know we If in I'll say right now if you haven't listened to the RV Nelson episode. I would say go back. Listen to it as episode would five sorts. Obviously a while ago took a little bit to get this interview together but Mike You all the credit on coordinating and actually do the interview. I was not pleasant for it but go listen Arvin Nelson episode and then tune into the interview. Because you're going to hear from two very very close. Friends of Arbenz was what one of them was in college with with the room mates and one of them. Yeah one of the guys Arvin in college in his no new for decades and the other guy New Arvin during his time living in California. They both hiked with him a lot so they've been hiking with them. They've been in this area with him before he went missing They weren't neither of them. Were hiking with them on the hype that he went missing but they they had a lotta great insight in Arvin into urban in the case. So yeah it's a it was a great interview is a little hard to coordinate. One of the guys lives in New York and the other guy lives on the west coast so In obviously we live in the Midwest so it was a it was a little tough coordination but we finally finally got everyone together and Got The interview awesome. Then I'll say out without further ADO. Let's send it over to the interview with Jay. Jason I'd like to first of all thank Jason and J. for for agreeing to speak with us on Arvin and before before we get into Arvin and the location. I'd like both of them kind of just to introduce themselves and you know tell us tell us how how you got to know Arvin so when we start with Jason All right. I'm Jason Cellist and I've known Arvin for thirty two years IM- originally met in in College at San Jose State and Yeah we've kind of become closer and closer friends after we left school and it started camping pretty often together and then hiking okay. So you've known him for a long time so yes You'd consider yourself probably a really really close friend of Arvin really close friend. Yeah okay would come to Thanksgiving's dinners at our house and so I'll in J. introduce yourself I'm jail rear and I know Arben through Jason. I met Arben much later In Fishing Arben Friendship Jason. I am also been camping hiking together. Would you say Jason last twenty years or so maybe probably yeah and I'd say that I was with Jason and Arvin on camping trips. I WANNA say like six to eight times over that period. You know wiest the most Made upwards of ten but it was almost always in the geography that we're going to be discussing where disappeared but I know Arben much less closely but I do have that context of having hiked and camped with him with Jason. Okay yes so kind of diving right into the hiking aspects so as both you mentioned. You've you've known Arvin for while hiked with with them lot before we get into you know when he went missing would you say that. He was a pretty experienced hiker. He kind of knew his way around out on the trill Israel. Yes yeah I'd say so. And he knew he knew at least sort of the front side of that trail from big Sur station to Sykes Hot Springs Quite well yeah okay. So the the location that you went missing Was the ventanas wilderness. I know In some of our previous conversations you had mentioned some things about the area that we hadn't thought about before Why don't you go into kind of the terrain what the trail was like in kind of you know some of the things you guys have come across out there in your past hikes? Do WanNA WANNA speak to that Jay. Act Star of a little bit So the the area that He went missing is is. It's it's definitely back country but it's also like fairly well developed and and hiked on. The trails are clear here Except for maybe a has a different opinion on this except for maybe like a few areas. It's not particularly difficult. Michael it's it's got a lot of exposure it's On the inland which is to say like the eastern part of that coastline so the coastline has highway. Run one running right alongside of it. And they're sort of the western side which are the beaches is and you know kind of more popular Large Parks and trails. Edith died is is more more like quote unquote wilderness. But we're we're not talking like you know it's not like super remote. There's your often you know on a day hike. You will ask a lot of people especially on this on this leg were talking. He went A little further out opt in most people do like most people on a day hike or a couple of days. Hike will stay a little more close to the town of Big Sur and he was on a a trail that went a a little further into Basically ends up in Carmel Valley at a at a monastery in there are people that will do And that that hike that are maybe a little more of a serious hiker than your average day. hiker yeah I guess my only other thing before turning over to Jason is that area that in tunnel wilderness over the last decade or so has had multiple Wildfires tires okay. There's been like a lot of you know burned down and then re growth and then burned down end so you get out there and you know there's places that are you know sort of like basically halfway regrows and I mean we can talk about this later but there are some like weird spots like really crazy overgrowth and in sort of like hidden crevasses and stuff that may have played into okay so so if if you were to go off trail it all there could be areas where you might not see a big drop off or if something happened to you and your trail. It might be hard for people on the trail to see you. Potentially yes. There are places where there's like you know. Madryn or whatever in Fairly thick undergrowth despite the fires that he could have slipped down on. Turn not been seen by helicopter or or rescue search and rescue okay. is I can't remember the specific date. He was hiking when you went missing. But how is the weather usually early in that area. Pretty hot and dry it was I think August Sixth Agai- and it if undrivable ears there are large urge swabs they are between Sort of Toss Sahara hot springs. In China. Camp where he departed from where there you might not run into a river stream for quite a while and it does during the day it can be you know. Depending on the summer can be a hundred degrees crowd. So you got to come in with Enough water under. Yes or no that. They're streams that are active and he would he would have known that okay One of the other things we always try to look at these locations nations kind of wildlife Would there have been any type of wildlife that you were Arvin or either of you would have been. You know worried about hiking out there. Is it pretty. You're you're normal wildlife that you'd see anywhere in California I'd say mostly I think maybe the thing thing that just in that area in general or that I think about when I'm out there are snakes more more than like big cats or yeah I think think actually If I I don't know if you remember this Jason by feeling maybe one of the times we were out there navy even with Arben. There was like sign. Lena bore like wild boar. There sure but people don't go out there necessarily expecting to encounter hats bats snakes and okay in bad insects more good. Yeah okay so I mean it sounds like it's a pretty popular the area to hike. I'm assuming the trails are pretty. Well maintained as well. Yeah I think so where he was though. It's when you get east of Sykes hot springs it's it it becomes pretty remote. I think you know it's not for the faint of heart or thin skinned hikers but yeah okay yeah yes it is there. It is pretty vertical in spots to their areas of the trail that are pretty rocky. Okay and and sort of somewhat steep grades there's fairly big like cones and peaks back there. Okay so it definitely definitely. It sounds like the first half of the hike is more you know any your typical day hiker could do but the spot that Arvin kind of pushed into more remote and and probably more for experienced hikers. I think so yes. Okay you know. Giving given all that kind of vocation profile. I'm I'm sure you guys have hiked with Arvin enough to know. Do you think he was prepared to to go out there. The day he went missing or would there been in some reason. You would have been packing light or you know bring water. You know something like that. I don't think so he was pretty. Well prepared Oh yeah in general okay so I think My next question so Jason. You're the one you've known him for decades Jack Aids. Yes one of the things John. I had a really tough time. Researching was kind of past life so and obviously original episode. We had some kind of wild speculation on different theories of why he went missing. Sure and largely driven by We didn't have a very clear. Grasp of you know who Arvin was really as a person kind of much before not I think we know kind of how you is like when he You know months before he went missing. Sure but we don't have a picture of Arvin the person you know decades before you went missing so I don't know if you could fill the listeners. In on in kind of the Arvin that you knew over the decades yeah certainly was happy. Go lucky kind of guy as you described At least the past ask ten years using big Sur ever. Since I've known him a light I met him at San Jose State where he moved from Colorado he originally we attended Colorado State. And just funny aside. My cousin from Chicago met him on the orientation bus. Nineteen eighty-two at Colorado State. His friend drew moved to San Jose to go to San Jose State. He sort of followed and I was friends with One of his roommates where he was living in a large house with a lot of guys as which is how we got to know each other up while we were in college he was a business major and then Shortly shortly after we graduated I was working in adobe where I'm Jay and Arvin was working in printing sales and a sort of a he. He did a little bit of banking and then went into printing sales and decided he didn't like the suit and went to go back to a waiting. Tables also doing fine dining and nice restaurants and then finally decided to kind of Parse down all a lot of his belongings allowing some he had spent several summers working at big Sur various campgrounds and restaurants and decided he liked that lifestyle better being being closer to the woods and the water so he moved everything down there at several apartments. Different places either at the campgrounds sounds where he was working with. Have kind of an international destination. So they're like you know. Kids would come on their gap year and work for a year there so he would live in the apartments at the campgrounds or renting a cottage from someone. Okay what about His Teaching Simpson's take all yes. Excuse me thanks for being that up. Yeah he was. He was also a substitute teacher. He added a credential for so he some weeks he would actually commute During the winter months back to Las Gatos where I was living. Stay with me and then do some substitute teaching during the day. And you like the little kids the most of all but And then go back to big Sur on the weekends during the slow slow part of the air but eventually ended up transitioning all the way down there are and he was taking also classes at Monterey Peninsula College. He was interested in marine biology. And he he went to like a expedition a around around Alaska in measuring the reduced amount of ice. That is up there okay. So it sounds like he's actually he's had a pretty interesting life and It sounds like he's got a lot of different interests. And you know what we were able to read about him. was that kind of like one of those larger than life figures. Catelli for the part of everyone likes them and we didn't read anything. You know anybody saying a bad thing about him. Yeah now how is this. You know the the couple of months leading up to his disappearance. How is his mood or attitude? Around Big Sur. I know everyone's everyone liked him from what we read. Yeah Yeah as far as I know quite well I mean we spoke. I left for a trip to Europe when he in the period when he left for his his his week week long trip. Yeah And we spoke just before that and Yeah I seemed Pretty Normal Arvin even think I saw him a few months before that. Yeah my wife and I took a trip down there and ran into him so is so. There's nothing in a for you to think that he you know anything was going on in his life where he he would you know. Try to go out and no lose himself. I know some of these stories of people going missing and find out down the road that they had you know some kind of hardship in their life and they kind of go out into the wilderness to to not come back Jack. I know that sometimes happens to people but they don't have any reason to think that that's what happened urban. I don't what are you going to say something J.. Oh just yeah and then media comment on on that last question I was going to mention that It had actually been a while since I had seen are in but my girlfriend actually ran into him a few months before he was missing. Okay he he was a like he definitely. Oakland was larger than life. Figure down there and he was a common visitor to Retreats Center down there Essel in there for fifty or sixty years now and yeah they have They open up the hot springs there to the general public every neither really late at night. It's like midnight to one or something when the general public can go you. He was to be found. There are a lot he hung out at Esselin and Last time I'm My girlfriend psalm was a few months before he went missing. He was just there he is hanging out in the tubs. Totally convivial and friendly A. G. said like as happy as she'd ever seen him so that was sort of the last. I don't know Jason may have been over every year that I had personally seizure that he had YOU ASK BE I. I don't have any reason to believe he would have been depressed or had anything going on. That's one thing I've thought a lot about two. And Yeah. He left his wallet in all his belongings with his friend. Jesse and said you. No if if I'm not back by the fourteenth right don't show up to work calling the cavalry I don't I don't think he would have You know he wouldn't have thrown. I wouldn't have been like him to throw that kind of mask over. Yeah disappearing himself. Yeah no yeah. I mean everything that we could find on a kind of echoed. What you guys? Both just said that he seemed like a real happy guy you know. Everyone liked him. No signs of that at least Komo externally and as far as arvin purse himself From either he was a pretty pretty big guy he was over six feet tall. I mean he's not the Kinda guy that's going to get assaulted on a trail. You go down without a fight is kind of what I'm getting at sure. He he was eleven on a fighter for sure but yeah he could but he did have the he had kind of an imposing physical presence for she s. That kind of leads me into my next question. I I can't remember which one of you brought this up. This was something Joan I totally. We didn't even think of at the time but but you said that in the area where Arvin went missing there was there could have been some type of racial element to it. I don't if either of you want to kind of expand on that I probably brought that up I mean I think just It just one thing to be said is like there. Aren't that many black people in in big Sur and there were like you're just like anecdotally a lot of people that if you were to say. Hey you know urbanistic Oh accused the black guy like it was just sort of and they didn't Enron they were saying that in a in a racial way I'm just saying like it was very. It was very obvious it was sort of an obvious fact. Yeah and I think what one of the angled. There's actually a couple of different things I think. As far as this angle goes in one is the area that he went missing missing in It's not exactly deliverance. But it's it's it's pretty wild like there's survivalists lists out there the pot growers there's a actually in that valley between the highway. One in one one JAS media can help me remember this. I think like long nauseam mental road which which connects the two highways. There's actually really Wargames that are conducted. Back there in. It's it's just. It's a real rough and rowdy sort of back country. Yeah Yeah I've got a friend in LA. He was down the street neighbor for me who lived in Monterey for almost twenty years in when I was telling him this story. You just this just Kinda like Hawk Deny Brown he he was just like yeah. You know there's there's just some rough the people back and it just it kind of leads you to wonder like if there could have been some Racially inspired violence is or whatever but the other part that I think a lot about is Sort of the length and depth the investigation. which is which always seemed sort of like weirdly short and shallow? Yeah I mean there was a there was a pretty intense sort of search and rescue effort during the first couple of weeks but it just Kinda fell out of you and then there wasn't there wasn't a lot of coverage about like a criminal investigation or I'm not trying to read too much into. It is just just one of these things really like. Oh you know some black man gets lost in a forest in. It doesn't seem like there's much attention given to it as it was like it was like a a white woman or whatever again. This is just me speculating. But I think it's we're thinking about WanNa take it from there. Sure renew say something like oh go ahead I yeah that yeah. Think about that as well and You know yeah might be some cartel growers back there or something he might have stumbled upon the that might have played into that also You know this the the search and rescue effort did go on for I think. Do you know well over a month after that but Especially on weekends. You know as you mentioned there were helicopters and planes and I think at one point. They had several hundred did search and rescue people one weekend. They made them. Yeah like a big push. I'm kind of figuring that you know he might have had food for a couple of weeks have been able to survived Just on water. which is the most important thing? Yeah but then I think after about a month they sorta through the town may have moved onto other issues. But yeah you know it's it's Kinda sad you know we see this in case after case where there's a real hard push in the beginning and then it kind of case just Kinda you know people forget about it and move on and we did a case and a guy a Paul Miller. You're a Canadian guy. That went missing in Joshua Tree and his family still flies down there and hike the trail that he went missing on trying to find clues. There's something missing and even the Park Service tells us that they'll do trade their training sessions in areas where people have gone missing just out of the you know outside outside chance they may find something but interesting. Yeah it's sad that You know these these cases kind of just you know float off into the ether after a time So I I think that's a really interesting angle that we didn't look at in the original episode of not necessarily fairly may be a racial element. But just it's it's kind of wild back there with some interesting characters and something. Yeah maybe maybe came across A drug dealer a growing something out there as it's really strange they didn't find anything from him. That's one thing I was going to say that you you registered stirred with Rei. I know His friend that he left his stuff with an and the sheriff in Monterey looked up all his gear like what Color Paki had one confined everything not a trace. And that's the really strangest thing. Yeah it's a we see this all the time it's just it's almost like the these people just vanish off off the face of the planet. It just like they're gone. 'cause how how can a search of hundreds of people helicopters canines. You know all all these resources and not find a shoe or a backpacker anything. It's it's puzzling. Did either of you Get contacted did by any of the law enforcement. They're investigating at the time. I did a couple of times I think at the initial Someone from the sheriff's Office has called me just because I was his emergency contact unlike some of his work forms okay And you know just some some basic questions like do. Do you know where he's been. Have you seen them in kind of. Yeah Yeah Pretty Koci so they really at that. Point probably didn't have any any clue what happened to them or yeah still go yeah One thing I we don't know about is At the time of his disappearance did Arvin have any family family in the United States. Yes his sister Zony Lives in Colorado and I actually met her Several months after his disappearance she came out to kind of put his affairs in order. Your take you know his belongings back for his nephew. Her her son so whom he had a good relationship with. I think he wasn't. It was kind of a strange from his sister but he liked. He got along with his nephew. Okay did did Arvin have any any partners. In Big Sur at the time of his disappearance or was he kind of you know kind of Living the bachelor lifestyle. Mostly the bachelor lifestyle. I I know you got a couple of women. Friends that he was Fairly close was too but I don't. I don't think he was in a committed relationship at the time I have heard so I think yeah. Okay Yeah it's just it's interesting to kind of fill in these pieces about arvind and we didn't know before I guess getting into kind of what I think. Everyone probably struggles goes with his. What happened to them? In our episode we covered a lot of different theories including exposure animal attack One of our wild series was foul play involved in the cabin and I know I know you guys kind of you mentioned to me that that probably was a isn't a plausible theory. But you guys know the area and New Arvin what. What do you think happened to him? It is I just want to jump in with one thing and that is in. I think I mean even in recent conversations that Jason in a by had together. I don't know that we've really ruled out the foul play idea It's because it is one. It's one of the theories that explains there being nothing to be found. Yep there there's also we can talk about this too there. There's the unlikely chance that he might have crossed over to the coast side of the highway. And you could you could fall down a cliff and be taken out with all of your stuff never be For for none of that to ever be found again I that feels really unlikely to me that it's a it's a real. Oh big detour. It's possible but you really have to make an effort to get out to the cliffs but I don't know I I think the last time Jesus talking about this week we got a little. We just ended up talking about this idea like what happened at the cab allot enver. And I'm I'm I'm a person who is very curious about like how that was investigated like if the last place that he was seeing was a remote cabin alone like yeah they did they bring out dogs they dig stuff up It just I don't know it feels like a location where you could Do something to somebody and hide them in the I think to speak to what you and Mike and Joe discussed it you know. I think it's Jack in his son. taking off in the helicopter asking him if he wanted to go with. You know they sort of Validation that everything was okay at that time when they took off but use the possibility that someone came along to the cabinet because there aren't many houses out there and perhaps it was trying to break in the guy there that they didn't expect and you know who knows what happened. I think. Yeah Yeah No. That was one of the I think thinking back. That was one of our theories that maybe he was at the cabin when other people were coming out there to maybe burglarize it. I Know Jack was I know. Didn't they make some really expensive violin bows violin bows out there. Yeah so one of the more or plausible theories we had was that you know Arvin was staying there for the neider stopping there for some reason and he just was in the wrong place at the wrong time but you think evidence of that would would have been found in the if if they did an investigation there which I don't no no I try. We tried to get the current sheriff of Monterey County to do an interview. And we're about to get him on and he didn't but it would be really interesting to no if they had you know law enforcement out there to investigate that area But yeah so I think I think knowing that that area is pretty wild back there. I think foul play for me now is becoming the the most likely theory. Sorry Sir I mean it. It's not impossible that he could lose his including Some of the locals that I talked to at his sort of memorial. Yeah party that we had said. Oh yeah he could. You know there's places where he could lose his footing slide under some shopper. I'll not be seeing and then you know as Jane mentioned and just a year or two later there was a very devastating fire that started Kind of wiped out a lot of the area so if there was any evidence it may have gone up. That's a good point. Yeah I If any anything you know clothing or backpacks shoes probably would have gone up in smoke. Can Forest Fire Right. I guess not so. I don't know yeah I don't know yeah. It's a in one question I have for you guys that know the area so if if if something would have happened to him out at the cabin is they're easy access via like could you get four wheelers back there. Even a trucker is it. You GotTa hike in in and out of their use a helicopter. I think he got a hike in. I'm not okay very familiar. I I read a story about Jacqueline's That you know like He. He would walk in when he was younger. You know how many miles from yeah from big Sur but yeah that's you know. He needed medical attention or something outlive. Not and there's no cell phone reception back there at all. Yeah and especially. We're talking two thousand six so And I was just getting at the point to foul play. You would have happened in Arvin being an imposing presence. You know it's not GonNa be easy to You'd think if someone was trying to hide the body that investigators would find that sure So it's just another aspect of it. That's kind of puzzling. Two thousand fourteen. Just two thousand fourteen. I apologize so so you guys. Obviously at the memorial you were talking with the locals what what's kind of the theory around town or do people people kind of think foul play as well. That's I think the two theories are either file a Or you know again. Lost his footing. Yeah slipped under some shopper. Brolin I'm Jay has mentioned to. He might have taken a wrong turn. I think as you pointed out in your prior episode there a lot of I am sure he had maps and compass because he was the kind of person but yeah he didn't have GPS and he may have taken a wrong turn or something did he. Did he have any formal kind of survival training or anything that you're aware of not that I'm aware of other than he. was you know an avid hiker current. Pretty well prepared. General Eighty would always you know bring food and have always had plenty of extra supplies like Foil blankets and hand warmers. Whatever sort of? Yeah I mean he was he was more or less living in in that back country. Most of the time anyway like a lot as much of the time. He was more or less living out of his Dan. He was as a you know. A A site hosted a lot of the campgrounds mean he was he was basically announced door guy acting. That's the was the other thing I was gonNA mentioned earlier as far as like you know whether he had a disposition to sort of like disappear or war. Whatever like my my thought has always been like him? Moving to big Sur. was that very. That's how he was getting away from modern life like He. He did it like he did this. Like I think Jason I it some level I admire the way that he sort of just lived this very kind of counter cultural using a camping. Camping wasn't a hobby like that was his life. He lived outdoors ores. And we're doesn't really like it was already an escape is what I'm saying like. Why Scape from your escape? Yeah No. That's a good point. Yeah you you know I. I didn't think of that initially when we're researching Arvin. But he kind of already was kind of living that minimalist lifestyle and now that you guys have said you know kind of what we thought through the research that there is no outward sign that he was depressed or anything so I yeah I think the theory that he was trying to you know get lost is not a plausible theory. well Is there any any anything else about Arben or the disappearance or are there any. Are there any people still that you know. Have family or friends you know. I was still kind of want a year visiting area looking for stuff for film up until this year which was the fifth year some of the people that relived with They were part of a fraternity at San Jose State we would meet in Carmel Valley and have a memorial hike sort of annually at school. Yeah this this year. It didn't happen not really looking for them. It just yeah to share stories and Speculate Yeah No. That's cool. Yeah we see that. With a lot of these people like to come back and Sometimes the family will go through the area looking looking for stuff but a lot of times. It's just remember the the Fun Times Hiking and Well Yeah so is there any anything else about Arvin that you guys would like tell any any funny stories out on the trails with him any any time that you're not surprised you or I just remember For whatever reason there was like a couple of years where it seem like every time we went out we got rained out it definitely would not like want to leave like you definitely like stuck it out but it was kind of. I don't no you just. He was very good humored person out there. I didn't spend nearly as much time as I as Jason did with him. I I really can't think of. I'm not even like four depression. I really can't even think of him being in a bad mood. You just like a super positive optimistic guy. He befriended everybody You know he could mm sit up for hours and hours around fire. Talking he played the harmonica was just like. I don't know just like a person you wanted to be around. Yeah Yeah and yeah. If there wasn't a mean bone in his body my wife said I think he was. You know if he was ever a little sad about something you would pick himself up and move on the morning time In a lot at many many funny stories to share but he was very good natured. Well humored guy just positive super positive and I mean he he would spend a the other thing it was funny is very social show but sometimes he would go on and Dave Pasta retreat. Where you don't speak to another human for ten days so it's not unlike? Yeah I I mean I could see him be out on the trail by himself and you know being happy being alone for a little bit too Yeah that's That's interesting and I and I I think we all know people. I have a couple friends that no matter what you do. They always have a positive attitude So That's interesting about about his. His nature Well guys I really appreciate you coming on to talk about Arvin and his disappearance Yeah I think I really I really like the theory. You guys kind of drilled home about the foul play. I think something unfortunately happens. improbably human related out on the trail and Yeah I I think there's probably some gaps. I I wish we could have talked to the the sheriff from Monterrey county to kind of. I don't even know if they can discuss the case. Because it's I think it's still open shorter But yeah once again thanks for coming on and and really appreciate it. Thanks for doing the story but welcome back everybody and again. Thank you to Jay A.. And Jason for taking the time of your day to do the interview with Mike and give us some of that great feedback in inside INFO onto Arvin. His abilities as a hiker occur and just in-depth explanation your friendships with them. I think it was very insightful and really helped us personally. I can't speak for you Mike. But it helped me personally really rethink about Arvin as a person. I know one of our crazier theories was that he went into wit sack or and he just disgusting uh-huh towns and stuff so this really Kinda obviously changed that perspective because we have more info absolutely as you as you know from the interview I the Ajay and Jason really leaning towards of foul. Play being you know the theory behind what happened Arvin and I. I think I'm really sold sold on that. Based on the fact that you the area that he went back into you know hike is a pretty pretty rowdy area of California based on you know what we were what I was told in the interview. And you know there could have been some type of racial elements or You know he came across a crime or something strange happened up at that cabin but I definitely think it was is foul play because Arvin definitely you know. I can't remember it was. Jason said you know. His escape was moving to big Sur. That was kind of his. You know getting away from society so they didn't think he was going to also want to you know that then afterwards you know. Try to be lost out in the woods so oh sure yeah. It's it's that whole idea of who is a person that we just learned more information on. In addition to all the great things the community in big Sur said about him so I I think I agree with you. I think it solidifies the theory that we weren't pushing so hard the initial episode. But I think yeah I'm with you you and I'm with them. It's it's unfortunately probably foul play and there just hasn't been that full closure of recovery yet. Yeah so Well thank you again for everyone. The tuned in. I know we've been teasing this one for a while. We are going to have a couple of new episodes coming out hopefully before the end of the. You're coming up so stay tuned and like Joe said in the beginning. If you haven't listened to the original Arben Nelson episode check. Check down in the description of this this interview. And you'll see a link to it absolutely and as always if you're hiking camping fishing. Whatever Motrin

New Arvin Jay Jason Big Sur Arvin Arvin Nelson Arvin Jay California Mike Bogart Arben Joe Erazo New Arvin San Jose State Monterey Sykes Hot Springs Jason Cellist Jack Aids Colorado Jason All Midwest
Invulnerable to Danger Part II - Aviation Podcast

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

21:09 min | 11 months ago

Invulnerable to Danger Part II - Aviation Podcast

"Sure I I think the the biggest issue is getting pilots to realize their their own weaknesses or overconfidence. And the the only way to really do that is to put them in a position where they become overconfident or overlook some other weaknesses and actually make a fake Louis eaters and welcome back to the finer points on this episode of the finer points. We're going to continue our discussion about how to influence the safety mindset of pilots. That feel invulnerable. We're GONNA discuss the Kobe Bryant crash and check in with three people that actually reached out to me after the last podcast. We're GONNA see if we can wrap this one up. I'm Jason Miller in. You're listening to the finer points. The finer points is brought to you in part by four flight the essential APP for aviation online at four flight dot com and by those acres of the Eight Twenty headset the twentieth. The choice of military pilots and professional pilots all over the world and by the generous support of listeners. Like you through patriotic. If you WANNA support the finer points and receive bonus content please visit patriots dot com slash. Learn T.F AVIATOR'S WELCOME BACK. It's been a bit You know the last podcast published on February third. And you know I was doing so good there with my weekly publications in January but the reason. Is You know if you heard the last one you know I was talking about affecting the safety mindset of pilots that appear to feel invulnerable and we were using the Kobe. Bryant crashed the pilot from that crash is a kind of example now. We don't have the final report on that accident yet. But we do have a lot of data and I've had a lot of great conversations and I think I'm finally getting my head around some strategies that we can use to avoid making the same mistakes I mean first of all. Let's just review. There's been a lot of data coming back about the Kobe. Bryant crashed but we're using that pilot as an example because at the end of the day he was flying at about one hundred and sixty knots three hundred feet off the ground in very very marginal conditions and died doing something that kills more pilots than other weather events combined rights lightning icing thunderstorms microbursts wind. Share I mean you name it right all of that in one bucket via far into IMC kills more pilots right. So how did this eight thousand two hundred pilot? Eight thousand two hundred hour pilot not know that right. He must have known that. There's there's no way he didn't know that yet he's still going at that. Speed three hundred feet off the ground in conditions that were extremely marginal and at some point. He realized I can't do this anymore. I'm not I don't have visibility. I'm getting too close to the ground. And he executed an abrupt pull up into the clouds. We don't know why it was so abrupt. We don't know if he was thinking. I'm just GONNA pop up through this layer or or what but you can go to the pilot's. Handbook of Air Nautical Knowledge. Look up the section on spatial disorientation. This is textbook. There's something called elevator allusion when you introduce that upward force. Your tendency is to pitch down and just before the top of the clouds just before the helicopter broke out. That's exactly what happened. It started diving left. Turn and hit a mountain going. Four thousand feet permanent down right so the pilot unless he became incapacitated or had instrument failures. Let's just you know. Let's go with the obvious. Right comes razor. The most obvious answer tends to be the correct one he. He was spatially disoriented which would make a ton of sense because he's doing something that kills more pilots than all other weather events combined and he exposed himself to this elevator illusion. The real question is how did he feel as though this was not a problem for him how did he. Why was he going that fast? And some people say well hey look. There were pressures to fly Kobe Bryant. And Yeah Okay. But it doesn't mean you have to be on one hundred sixty three hundred feet off the ground. I think the behavior of if you watch the flight path and think about the mindset of this pilot. This is somebody who wasn't feeling vulnerable. Maybe right up until the very end. So how do we affect that? A lot of you know my work and I I in my book setting the standard a large part of. What's really become my thesis and Flight? Training is that we need to emulate the commercial operators standardize our behavior around accidents. That have occurred so that. We're modifying behaviors based on accidents. That have occurred whenever possible. We make those procedures redundant and then we force our own compliance But still even even knowing that there's still the right amount of pressure under the rate circumstances at the right time or the right combination of events that will get even the most experienced pilots. You know that to say well just this once. I'm going to. Maybe they even get away with it and it becomes normal right and they normalized this deviant behavior that they didn't even know was deviant because they keep getting away with it. I got some really interesting feedback about how in some other industries like law enforcement for example or construction others unknown concept that with a certain amount of hours or a certain amount of experience you become complacent that experience equals that and then flying we kind of do the opposite. We think more hours is more experienced. The is the safer pilot. And maybe that's true in the in the professional world where you're going back in for recurrent training every six months But maybe not so much in generally vacation one of the people I talked to a gentleman named David Dow. Who's a safety expert for confined spaces particularly in construction? I believe in any case. Consider what he had to say about safety. Classes that were required in the workplace couple hundred fatalities each year and trenches and excavations and confined spaces and was my specialty so to speak a lot of safety classes I met a lot of times with skepticism from participants and they basically had the attitude. If I've been doing this work for years and I've never had a problem So safety really isn't a concern. Just have not had a problem in the past. So why am I here for the safety class? I sometimes joke and think of it like you know. There's an expression that if a company is not growing it's dying. I always say if a pilot's not trying to get better. They're getting worse. And the concept of normalization of deviance is. Maybe you're getting away with things. Maybe the Kobe Brian Pilot had done this fifteen twenty times when the conditions were slightly better and it worked. You know you can kind of falsely. Prove to yourself that what you're doing is safe. So that's when I started thinking about the scared straight program and you know that's the one where they take the problem youth and they put him in jail for the night and they get scared straight in quotes and that led to a very interesting conversation with Greg Patch. All My name is Greg Paddle. I'm the Chief Flight Instructor Gateway Technical College and Kenosha Wisconsin. I think the biggest issue is getting pilots to realize their their own weaknesses or overconfidence. And the the only way to really do that is to put them in a position where they become overconfident or overlook some of their weaknesses and actually make a mistake. And it's trying to find a safe way to do that and there in lies one of the issues. You know the reason. We don't do spins in training anymore because two thirds the accidents. The fatal accidents were happening in training. So how can you safely do this? How can you safely make pilots aware of their vulnerability? Greg uses simulators and actual NTSB accident reports to recreate events that have proven fatal in the real world One of the scenarios we use as a a maintenance flight for an aircraft where it had some work done. Everything's supposed to be good and you know you're flying this airplane back to your home base. what we usually do is We we give the students the scenario. We don't tell them you know what the accident is. What happened we say? Plan the flight you know you might have. Passengers might not how much fuel you bring in. So the first thing they do is they ready. One page Risk Assessment papers and Kinda lay out what they see as possible risk for the flight and what their negation strategies or reduction strategies are for those perceived risks and they may or may not hit the nail on the head with the flight. Sometimes it's something that's completely outside the realm of something they could check on a simulator flight like a maintenance issue Then they will Submit a flight plan and plan for him so we know what their route is. We know what fuel they WANNA take and they may or may not get that out just like an eye for flight plan you might get throughout you file or not. The scenario happens in the simulator. The instructor kind of drive that Whether it'd be an engine failure or Seafood type of scenario where there's controlled flight into terrain and the actual excellent report And depending on how. The students either plan the flight or respond to that. That stressor in this scenario is Is the learning experience so sometimes the flight was off without a hitch minutes because they saw that risk upfront and they were able to apply you know appropriate negation strategies and move through that. And say I'll come and they they get to the end of the scenario and they're like well you know nothing really happened. Well Great. That means you. You had good skills going into that flight. For that scenario that doesn't happen with every scenario One of the scenarios I use is a A flight within Inner Fire and I actually bought a small smoke generator from party city and use that in the simulator to to add that realism. And it's about an hour and a half into the flight so I mean you're in the simulator in an enclosed simulator for an hour and a half after a while. It feels like you're fine an airplane and all of a sudden starts pouring. I had students panic a little bit in the simulator. You know and it. Kinda sounds funny but you know after you're in there for a while you really think that's happening so as realistic as you can. So that it applies to something they'd see in real life to trying to teach them to be more diligent about looking at the day to day flying and and what south or that could be a danger. There is so much good stuff in there and Greg is definitely a man after my own heart. You know I am the guy in the simulator with all the lights off and forcing my student to hold a Red Light. You know and Turning the volume the hominy engine up as loud as I can. And putting on headsets and making fake air traffic control calls mean anything we can do to make it more like the real world and Greg's right after a while that the illusion really does start to get some depth and you start to feel like you're in an airplane even though it's not moving and there's no you know perception emotion. Another amazing thing that they are doing there is having a risk assessment For the flight that they're about to taken. I'm not sure if it was greg with. Somebody got me on instagram and said that that was something their school did as well just to build it in from day. One on any given flight even if I'm going out to the practice area with a student there's a certain amount of risk associated with it and I have certain risk mitigation strategies for me assuming. No one makes any obvious mistakes. I consider the three big risks fire failure and collision on and you know for fire and failure. Outside of structural failure. You practice you know you. Practice communication failure you practice engine failure you practice fire procedures emergency to sense all sorts of stuff like that and for collision. I feel a lot better now. In today's world that were inside of what used to be the mode c ring but now requires a DSP out transponders. So I definitely take advantage of that. I've got the century Receiver always up. I've got four flat on my phone buzzing traffic in my pocket. I've got four fight on my IPAD showing traffic and now we really do have good visibility. So you have a risk mitigation strategy. Even if it's just I'm GONNA look out the window and I think the process of walking through it is what's important and what we want to pass on. I still see Delta here. There's still a gap in the fact that the airlines can mandate this that if your professional operator it's built into the equation and as awesome as Greg's examples are and definitely I'm gonNA use some of those still apart. One forty one environment. The training program can be carefully tailored. How do we affect the pilot when they get to eight thousand two hundred hours when they've entered well beyond really the killing zone in quotes? And unfortunately where? I'M GONNA come on this and this is truly what I believe and I think you know what. I'm going to advocate for pending a comment and review process. But I believe this is going to need to be regulated and I'm not talking about extreme regulation. I'm thinking you know. Let's identify like the police. Did some statistically sensitive point where confidence becomes complacency and. Send people back for an endorsement and the endorsement is to be some amount of simulator sessions. Doing the kind of stuff that Greg described and some amount of flying the airplane. I'm not sure if everybody listening has seen the I think it's the most recent fight shops video. Actually maybe two maybe even three ago but Dan Greider and Steve Thorne for flight chops were reviewing what they called an ATP program in Advanced Qualification Program. And Dan was coming up with real world training exercises that more emulated. What we're seeing. You know that are that are accidents. That are likely to occur preparing for things that might kill. You actually declaring emergencies this kind of thing and maybe at eight hundred hours or at some benchmark you have to go in somewhere like flight safety or whatever and you have to get an endorsement and the endorsement has to include this type of training but maybe we can fix the problem for it comes to that. So let's look at some more specific suggestions. On how can we force ourselves to comply with the strategies that we all know? We should comply with One thing is you know we do this. I'm safe acronym. Illness medication stress Alcohol Drugs Fatigue and e external pressures. I think the whole thing in reality for just GonNa look at statistically what's causing people to do. This external pressure is a huge one. I recently had a conversation with Chris. Clearfield who is the author of a book called Meltdown on Christmas? Also and we got into a conversation on this topic. There's a great story and Fighting magazine that we then Kind of dug into and interviewed. Brian SCHIFF ABOUT FLYING. Refusing to fly Steve Jobs and a bunch of equipment An a an another guy from a an airport in the Carmel Valley. Sorta like hot South Florida's The San Francisco. There used to be an airstrip. They're out they He he looked at the and this was in the. I think the late eighties early nineties. So that kind of you know. The sort of first heyday of jobs as a powerhouse and Brian Shift. Who'S BERRY SHIFTS? Sunbury is the guy who who I wrote about this story you know. He looked at this equipment. He said No. I'm not I'm not taking it. And they the other guy was the owner of the charter An Brian came up with a very clever solution. You know he was like twenty one year old eighteen year old. Whatever he was commercial pilot doing doing this I guess probably ninety one and he said look. We'll go to all the Monterey. It's got a long runway cooler. It's got the coastal breeze. It's a twenty minute drive for you guys. I'll do that will be fine. And so he lands I don't remember going somewhere somewhere else in the bay area Year he he lands at Palo Alto or wherever and Gets the linemen comes out as he's tying on the plane and says hey the you know. The boss who was on the flight wants to see you in his office into because like all right. I'M GONNA get canned here here here. It is And so he goes into the guy's office in he goes you know. How much do we pay you a day? It's whatever is is right all right. I'm GONNA double that. We need people that can you know? Put safety ahead of pressure from from our customers. Not many people took GUTS TO STAND UP TO STEVE. Jobs who was fuming. As as he did this. I you know I like the way you talk about personal minimums which is like you make the decision. The cold rationality of you know a a rainy day weekend. You're not flying and then you stick to it and you can't change it and so you know people who if the weather is forecast to be bad day out though they'll go for the go with the airlines or they'll always have kind of a backup ticket that they can cancel I was flying to visit some friends from Seattle to To to boulder to call in Colorado and so I was in a teacher ten so it's a long flight but fuel stop. I stop in Montana. I look at the chart and you know it was one of those situations where I'm looking at the weather on four flay and there are these symbols that I don't even recognize you know what I mean like like there's like an angry cloud symbol or something and I'm like I don't even have to go to Beijing late and so I am but I just again just internally driven. I'm here I am excited to show off to my friends that I'm a pilot flying myself to visit them right and you know it's like these are people. I've known for a long time like I didn't have any real production pressures but you know we all have ego that gets involved so I'm looking at this thing and I did this. I was in the midst of writing meltdown at the time so I was sort of deep into the research of the book and I was like. Okay what am I going to do here and the first thing I did was I was like all right. I need to get an external perspective and I think that can be hugely valuable and so all I did was. I took a screen shot of my IPAD and I texted my flight instructor and I was like. Hey I just need you to tell me I shouldn't go fly into this. You know skull-and-crossbone and she texted back and was like you definitely should not and and maybe she called and we chatted for like two minutes. I like literally knew the right answer. I just needed permission from somebody to to sort of Do the right thing awesome. That's really great and so anybody that's looking to get a copy of meltdown would go to where you can get it on Amazon. Or wherever fine books are sold It's called meltdown. What plane crashes oil spills and dumb business? Decisions can teach us about how to succeed at work and at home all right. Well there you have it. That's Chris clearfield author of meltdown. A huge thanks to Chris and Greg Patch and to David Tao for taking the time to talk with me and be a part of the evolution of this thought process also a huge thanks to the sponsors to pilot protection services. Make sure that when you renew your membership in. Aspca you add pilot protection services. They make it really easy for you. Just go to the website. Aarp DOT org slash membership dash PPC. That's Papa Papa. Charlie also J. P. I the best engine monitor online at GP instruments dot com and to the patrons for bonus content and podcasts without advertisements. Please visit Patriot dot com slash learn. T.f P also please come by learn the finer points dot com. I've got a free GIFT VIDEO. I would love to give you and I hope to see you on one of the airplane Camp Twenty twenty trips. We've got three trips this year and they are filling fast. So if that's on your bucket list definitely come by and place a deposit also a huge thanks to you the best fans on the Internet. For downloading this podcast. I'm Jason Miller and until next time. Be Safe Fire. Best Been The Sky Angel on the airwaves Fawn Arabian afternoon sky

Greg Kobe Bryant Kobe Brian Pilot Chris clearfield Jason Miller Greg Patch instructor Chief Flight Instructor Gatewa Louis IMC Greg Paddle Sky Angel Air Nautical Knowledge Dan Greider Delta Steve Jobs NTSB Papa Papa David Dow
Full Episode: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

World News Tonight with David Muir

20:37 min | 7 months ago

Full Episode: Wednesday, July 8, 2020

"Tonight, the new and alarming images from inside US hospitals, reminiscent of scenes from New York City as the US now tops three million cases of corona virus, chilling new images from hospitals in the South Houston's United Medical Center doctors nurses desperately trying to save a sixty six year old woman, and then to heartbreaking phone call telling the family she did not make it forced to quickly move onto the next patient in Arizona cases more than doubling in just the past week. One in three people out testing positive dozens of hospitals in Florida now running out of available, ICU beds. Dr Deborah Brooks today asking four states to roll back the real openings and what she's now asking American families to do. Also tonight how to reopen the nation's schools inside the school board meetings, the students teachers asking. Is it safe and the father in Er Doctor? Saying even he doesn't know whether to send his child back to school and tonight. The decision here in New York City. The interview tonight. Pierre Thomas One on one with Attorney General William Bar we ask about. The protesters forcibly cleared from Lafayette Park. Was it for the presidential photo on what bar now says also tonight, the black lives matter, and on allegations of racial profiling by police at amid this pandemic should Americans concerned about their health be allowed to vote in the presidential election by mail. What the Attorney General says after that confrontation new! York, Central, park ignited outrage. The woman charged. Charged, calling police on a black man of bird watcher, falsely claiming he was threatening her the surprising turn tonight. What he's now saying to prosecutors, the racist rant against asian-americans inside this restaurant, a tech CEO on video, lashing out the waitress, defending the families of what's happened now. The teacher who made international headlines has died Mary Kay. Letourneau convicted of raping a twelve year old student later marrying him. He was by her side as she died Deborah Robert. Sombat tonight. And the tropical threat were watching along the east coast this evening as it closes in on the Carolinas and then the northeast. We have the possible track. This is ABC news tonight with David Muir. Good evening and it's great to have you with us here at A. Wednesday night. We do have a lot to get to, and we begin tonight with those new images hospitals under siege. I see US overflowing tonight, and they are the kind of images that reminded us today. What we saw here in New York City. When the pandemic was raging here tonight, the US now surpassing three million cases that sobering milestone comes up to a record sixty thousand cases reported in just twenty four hours in this country. More than one hundred thirty two thousand lives have been lost with an eight hundred more Americans dying and just the last twenty four hours. Tonight from Texas. The images from inside Houston's United Memorial Medical Center the urgent effort to save patients the moment they try to save that sixty six year old woman, they were unable to calling her family right after and then moving quickly to the next patient in need ABC's backup, and leads us off tonight with the urgent need inside those Icu's and the plea from Dr Deborah burks tonight to American families to help. Try to slow this down. Medicine and machine failed staff inside hospitals. United Memorial. Medical Center work to jump. Start this covert patient's heart. With their own hands. got. Pounded her chest and pumped air into this sixty six year old woman's. Active, lungs video shot by the AP this week in the race for life, every moment counts, but like more than one hundred and thirty thousand American covert victims. She flatlined for solemn second. They stood there. Then raced equipment to the next cove. Impatient the US topping three million Cova cases, today and tonight. This is the grim reality across much of the South and west with Kobe is exploding in coronavirus, one miniature looking great on the next. Done. This ICU unit started with forty six beds. They doubled those and now need more. We're playing musical chairs in the middle of the night movie one bishop from one side to another experts calling the Sunbelt, a covert capital of the world in Arizona cases more than doubling in just the past week. The Mayor of Phoenix tells us that testing here is woefully inadequate. Especially given the thirty percents positivity rate here in Arizona that means that one of every three cars that drives to a testing site like this has a Kobe patient inside. Today's white. House Corona Virus Taskforce Dr Deborah Brooks asking those four states to rollback the reopenings, even further Israeli asking the American people in those counties in those days in those states to not only. Use the face coverings, not going to bar is not going to endure dining, but really not gathering in homes either nearly ten thousand new infections in Florida overnight. I see us at forty-one hospitals at capacity now a new hotspot in South Carolina at this coastal hospital dozens of staff infected. They've asked for the National Guard to help. We're pretty well maxed out on ICU capacity ninety six percent that that could happen quickly and the president tonight undercutting America's leading voice on the virus Dr Anthony. FAUCI advised Americans not to take comfort in a lower death rate, but disagree with them. You know Dr Out, said don't wear masks. And now he says where am and. Numerous things don't close off. China, don't Ban China but tonight. The scope of the crisis encapsulated back in that Houston. Hospital is horrifying. Because you just can't get your breath. Thinking your head is. GonNa end up on a ventilator. Cooper has been trafficking in fear and in-depth for Dr Verona that agonizing call. Thinking about those teams and those patients fighting this all describing similar symptoms, as this moves across the country Matt with from testing site in Phoenix, and met. You've been reporting here over the last couple of nights at people have been waiting in line for seven eight hours in the searing heat, and then they have to wait for results some waiting several days even weeks. Up to ten days, maybe more David. That's if they can't get tested now. Epidemiologist, tell us that means there is a lot of covert in the community and not nearly enough testing. The Mayor of Phoenix says she is asking the federal government for help, but the governor of the State Doug Ducey. A state in crisis hasn't been seen or hasn't spoken about the corona virus in over a week. His team tells us that they're planning A. A briefing for tomorrow. David more than a week. All right, you'll stay on it. Thank you, of course the heated debate over whether to open schools across this country in the fall some early as August tonight we take you inside the school board meeting students and teachers concerned Er doctor, a father who says even he doesn't know whether to send his child back and the new decision tonight here in New York City. Here's Stephanie Rommel's. Tonight with the virus, raging and hospitals on the brink, the president, putting pressure on schools today, threatening to cut off funding for districts that don't reopen in person. We're very much going to put pressure on. Governors, and everybody else to the school's president, trump tweeting, he disagrees with the CDC very tough and expensive guidelines for opening schools. The president said today. We just don't want the guidance to be too tough. Though CDC guidelines call for safety measures like masks, six feet of spacing between desks, open windows, avoiding the cafeteria and playground equipment, if possible, but tonight mixed messages from the White House Coronavirus Task Force I. WanNa make it very clear that what is not the intent of CDC's guidelines. is to be used as a rationale to keep. Schools closed the director of the CDC appearing to back off those guidelines. New Guidelines now expected to roll out next week, but it comes amid those new warnings about the risk of indoor gatherings in states where cases are surging like Florida where there's heated debate after the state ordered schools to reopen in August I. Don't think it's responsible to go. Go back to school at a Tampa School board meeting, students, teachers, and parents like this er doctor are worried. I think it'd be really hard to make a decision so I can't make that decision as a physician. Treating covert patients who come from that space I'm not sure how their parents can New Jersey teacher Adam Roth wants back in the classroom. If it's safe, you can have A. Much greater impacts on our student population if we are with him, but just in a safe environment today, the country's largest public school system New York City unveiling its plan to reopen with a mix of online learning with two to three days in the classroom, leaving it up to parents, the governor blasting the president, arguing he has no authority over the decision to reopen schools. He then says. Don't listen to the CDC. I disagree with them. Or really. The you know Mr President. Better than your health health experts how to protect the health of students as an ANTACID hasn't spelled out how he would cut off funding. He would need Congress to cut off the little he controls. Most schools are funded by the state and local levels, but the vice president has suggested the White House could tie the reopening of schools to corona responding down the Line David. All Right Stephanie Ramos live in New York Steph. Thank you tonight, we. We are one with Attorney General William Barr. With this pandemic, of course to growing concern over the presidential election, should Americans concerned about their health be allowed to mail in their ballot what Barr says about that tonight? And we ask them about the police about black lives matter and that scene at Lafayette Park forcibly clearing out those peaceful protesters was it for a presidential photo op, what he now says here's our chief justice correspondent Pierre Thomas with the Attorney General, tonight. We pressed the attorney general about that moment in June when mostly peaceful protesters. Were cleared out of Lafayette Park by force earlier. William bar standing right there moments later. The president stood for that photo op with the by. A was it done because the president was going to go over and walk and have a photo op. The plan was to move. The demonstrators up toward is street. Was, not done to set up a photo. Op Bar recently said there's no systemic racism in policing, but during our interview today he acknowledged a racial profiling problem i. do think that it is a. A, widespread phenomenon that that. African American. Males particularly are treated with extra suspicion, and maybe not given the benefit of the Dow with the presidential election, nearing and the pandemic raging, we asked about concerns about voting safely and voter suppression in recent primaries line stretching for hours, many states now pushing vote by mail. The president repeatedly, claiming millions of ballots could be stolen. We actually called Secretary of state. In the country virtually everyone and none of them said that it was issued that they were concerned about now. He's very concerned about the integrity of elections because I feel. We're very divided country. I think there's a lot of opportunity from Mess Jeff and that makes me concern, but it shouldn't. We be making it easier for people to vote in a pandemic. Well I think the states have a lot of latitude as to what form of voting they're going to have. I'm expressing concern over voter fraud and I do think it increases the opportunity for fraud. Be voted absentee voting. Yourself will actually one of those. I I actually did go to to vote. Precedent be attorney general and whether Americans should be allowed to mail in their ballots. This election in the meantime peer. You also ask. The Attorney General about President Trump and the possibility that he might pardon Roger Stone. David Bar maintains stones. Prosecution was righteous and that he deserved that three years in prison that the judge sentenced him to, but he admits it's going to be the president's call as to whether to commute stones, prison, term or to pardon him David Pierre Thomas Tonight with the interview. Thank you the major ruling from the Supreme Court today the court siding with President trump allowing employers to opt out of the obamacare mandate of providing contraceptive coverage, if those employers have religious or moral objections, let's get right to Terry, Moran. who was covered the court for Years Force Attari. This was a big win for religious conservatives and the president. Are Huge Win David the court, upholding the trump administration's changes to those obamacare regulations, which required employers to provide insurance that would cover contraception services for women. The new trump regulations allow employers who have religious or as you say just moral. Objections to providing that kind of coverage to opt out. The impact is immediate. The government estimates between seventy, thousand, one, hundred, twenty six thousand women will lose their contraception coverage under this rule interior I know you're watching tomorrow. The court is to rule in another big case this time involving the president's tax returns. Oh, it's huge. His Tax Returns Bank statements, three committees of the House of Representatives and the Manhattan District Attorney They WanNa look at years of the trump financial records. The president is declaring that as president. He has immunity from these kinds of investigations. The court looked at the claim The House on his side, but in the oral arguments they seem very skeptical that the trump that president trump could stop a local district attorney from subpoena. To help grand jury investigate potential crimes. It's a big question of presidential power. Tomorrow all right. We'll see you tomorrow night on that frontier. Thank you, and of course that other headline from the Supreme Court overnight word that Chief Justice John Roberts was hospitalized for a night last month after falling and injuring his head, walking at a country club Roberts, has suffered seizures before, but doctors say this was likely to light headedness from dehydration. Out of the new video tonight of a CEO of Tech Company, lashing out at Asian, American families well at a restaurant in California, and what's now happened? Here's ABC's Kaley Horta. The AROSA and Chan. Families were celebrating a birthday in Carmel Valley California on the Fourth of July, when they say a man at the table next to them began berating them solely a hear this loud voice. effing Asians. They started recording. Oh, now you're. The man identified as Michel Lofthouse, unleashing a string of racist obscenities at the group. That we've you need to the Asian pieces. He was full of anger on said that there's still people. That are like sat in. A restaurant. Employee Confronts Lofthouse Nat! Yes. Lofthouse the CEO of a Tech Company, called solid eight later apologized writing. My behavior in the video is appalling. This was clearly a moment where I lost control and made incredibly hurtful and divisive comments. Raymond Rosa and his wife have been in this country for more than twenty five years. He says they've never felt anything remotely close to racism until that night. He hopes that never happens to them or anyone else again, but he forgives lofthouse David. Kelly, thank you tonight. The News that Mary Kay Letourneau has died. She, of course was the teacher who made headlines Two decades ago, convicted for having a sexual relationship with her sixth grade student. She later married him, and he was by her side in the end. Here's Deborah Roberts. Too many her life story was nothing short of bizarre something Mary Kay Laterna. Herself admitted to Barbara Walters. Did you know that this was something? That was wrong. That society would see is wrong. I definitely knew that it was bizarre. A married mom of four, the Washington state teacher made stunning headlines when she admitted to a sexual affair with her twelve year old student Villar. When did you first feel any kind of attraction? To villi well, there was any motion all attraction. We just had bonded we have. Similar interests she called it love. Others saw it as predatory. The state called it rate Laterna gave birth to the couple's child before going to prison and had a second while serving her seven year sentence, they were married soon after her release, but got divorced last year. The TURANO died battling cancer for several months. Fifty, eight year old new no was surrounded by family and friends, as she passed away, according to her longtime lawyer and friend, including the father of to her six children on both sides of her family. They say that somehow they drew strength coming together in the end to be there with her during her arduous struggle, David or deborah. Roberts could have you tonight. When we come back here, the tropical threat moving in on the east coast, the Carolinas than the northeast will to track and the surprising turn in that central park confrontation. Retracting the tropical thread off the Carolina tonight, the system with a seventy percent chance of growing into tropical storm Fay expected to move up the coast tomorrow and Friday, reaching New England Friday night into Saturday several states on alert for heavy rain and dangerous wins the new turn after that central park confrontation tonight Amy Cooper facing charges for calling police in a black man, a bird watcher accused of falsely reporting. He was threatening her. Chris Cooper now says he will not cooperate with the prosecution on the view saying he accepted her apology. No excusing that it was a racist act, but that defied her entire life I don't know. Amy Cooper's lawyer believes she will be found not guilty. He said the public's rush to judgment in what he calls. The canceled culture epidemic will be proven wrong. A key witness in president trump's impeachment trial lieutenant colonel Alexander Vin. Men has revealed. He's retiring ending his twenty one year military career, his lawyer, setting a quote campaign of bullying intimidation and retaliation. He says led by the president. Defense official telling. ABC News at Inman. Just this week had been approved for promotion. The final word would have been the president's finally tonight here. America strong we have promised to stay on the story of the essential workers showing up every day since this began. Many of you now helping them. The order the essential workers on the frontlines from the beginning who we have celebrated here from the start keeping America running by facing their own needs at home now, a group of college students have started give essential linking essential workers in need with donors across the country since launching an April they about connected more than fifteen thousand essential workers and donors, if forty nine states nearly five hundred thousand dollars in donations, including pat a Nursing Garden Grove, California who received groceries and masks at this sign. Thank you so much. A new book at a Superhero, robbing and bill does Georgia for the daughter of an essential worker and tonight David. Cindy Chen from Salt Lake, city I wanted to help a firefighter and his two year old son from across the country, because I wanted to give back to the social workers that are on the front lines at pandemic every single day, donors also helping deliveryman Gabriel Garcia Solace from California so this opened I've been working pretty much fulltime as door Trevor David and Alicia Henry from Dallas Pennsylvania. She's been working from day. One I am a tractor trailer loader and give us on Joel's has made a impact on. On my life, I was given baby clothes for my son I WANNA. Thank the donators so much tonight I David. David team telling US why they're doing it I've come from families. Essential workers and I heard firsthand from nurses, grocery, store, clerks, and others about how difficult it was for them, so give us sensual for me was a way to help people like my family, and they vow to keep going. These problems are not necessarily just coded issues so as long as we can fill, these needs will continue so. That group helping is called. Give essential. Let's help. Now streaming exclusively on Disney, plus share the journey, the courage and the legacy with the entire family, the original Broadway production, a revolutionary musical Hamilton rated pg thirteen streaming now exclusively on Disney plus.

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The world of tiny robots

Brains On!

24:41 min | 6 months ago

The world of tiny robots

"You're listening to brains on or serious about being curious brains on is supported in part by a grant from the national. Science, Foundation. Bali either I know you're about to go. Take the but I have to tell you about this dream. I just had sure listening to people recount. Their dreams is never boring Oh. Yeah, remember when I told you about that one. I was waiting in line for a smoothie, but then a dog came up to me and handed me a cup of tomato soup instead, and then the dog took me on a walk, and we made like twenty different stops at shops and parks and. And stuff and I told you about every single one. I remember vividly well. Wait until you hear about this in my dream. I invented this tiny little robot. Basically it lived in my shoes, and whenever I put them on, it would crawl out of a small hole and tie them no hands necessary. And then we just crawled back when it was done when I wasn't wearing the shoes, it would destroy all the odor causing bacteria inside. WHAT AN AMAZING ROBOT! It was called. The shoe crab, Horseshoe Crab No. The shoe crab that sounds so useful and adorable friends. This dream was a wakeup call I need to build the shoe crab. I already invented my brain. Now I just need to figure out how to make it real. Tinker table. Don't worry shoe crab. I shall free you from my mind good luck mark. Wow, that's amazing. We should have to the studio, but I I need to tell you about this other dream I had okay for some reason I was dressed like a baby from an old cartoon like a Onesie and a bonnet, and with a pacifier in my mouth, and all around me were tiny Caesar Salad I just hey. Now. You're listening to brains on for American public media is Molly. Bloom my co host. Today is Eva from fondling Wisconsin welcome thanks for having me so eva, what is your favorite robot real or fictional? My favorite robot is probably a real robot named spot and he was made, or it was made in Boston Dynamics and I find it really cool because. It can do things such as like deliver. Things has its own camera to see things that humans can't. It can help with research. It can open an hold doors for people, and it's all in general just fun to watch. That sounds like a very very cool robot. I've never seen it before succumbing to describe what it looks like. It's. Like kind of shaped like a dog, it's very yellow. And it walked dog to wow. What do you think of about robots in general? When I think of robots in general, I think of them as like. Mostly helpful, but some people they do think of them as like evil in trying to take world in Mike. Not. Budding humans do what they usually do mostly when I think of robots I think as. Helpful in they could change our world in the future. Robots are a lot of fun to think about, and there are so many lovable robots in pop culture like bb eight from star, wars or Betamax from big hero, six or wally. He saying hi to you, Eva Hi Wally now. These robots are all the size of animals or humans. But what about robots that are much much smaller, right? Today's episode was inspired by this question. My name is Greta from knife for Minnesota and my question is. What is the smallest robot in existence before we get into it either I just want to ask you how we're talking about tiny robots. How big do you imagine them to be? The smallest robot I've worked with is properly about two inches. So when I think of tiny robots, my imagination would probably be like so small that I can't see it way when you say you've worked with robots. Tell me more about that. You've worked with robots. Yes I'm encoding club, so I do a lot of coding and a lot of with robots. So when you code robots. What have you been able to make them do so what we've been doing? The called ABBOTS and we took the special colored markers, and we would draw them in some sort of like maize or pattern on a piece of paper, and then we'd put the. Down? What about like five inches? And the ISO according to the colors would move a certain way, and you could coordinate them with a specific color and. Like you can make spin, you could make it. Go really fast stuff like that. That is so cool, so you. You know your robots. Pretty well that's awesome. So before we get into the question that Greta ask which is what is the smallest robot we need to begin by defining what exactly a robot is now. Not everyone agrees on the definition one hundred percent, but here's what a lot of people think, and the definition that we're working with today. A robot can sense was going on around them. Decide what to do next and then actually do it, so this means a remote controlled car is not a robot, because you are controlling it with a remote, it's not driving itself around, but a real robot car would be programmed to make decisions and drive by itself. It would have what we call artificial. When a machine can make decisions and move on its own, we call that autonomous, or we say it has a ton of. Real robots are autonomous. So, what's the smallest robot right now? This is tricky to answer. There are a lot of machines out there. That are tiny that are being called the world's smallest robot. But they can't do much on their own. They can be controlled by magnetic field or infrared light, or even vibrations, and some of them are super duper tiny. You would need a microscope to see them. which is super cool, but it's closer to remote controlled cars in one that drives itself. Researchers are working on making them fully autonomous robots, but they're not there yet. One of the contenders for the title of smallest robot that can do all the things we talked about is the Kilo bought? It's about three centimeters or as big as a quarter. So why aren't tiny robust even Tinier and why aren't there more of them? Yes, small robots are hard. That's Illinois Bauch. He's a professor at Carnegie Mellon University in the Robotics Institute. He's also written the books. Books, robot futures and AI and humanity. He spends a lot of time thinking about robots in the way, humans relate to them, and he says there are many reasons why building tiny robots is tricky. One of them is physics changes. When you start making things released, small things become sticky. You know how a Gecko or a spider sticks to a wall. They have tiny hairs on the. The bottoms of their feet that are attracted to the wall through something called. Vander waals forces. Those forces can make tiny robots stick stuff, too, so you're stuck to surfaces that you weren't intending to stick to. Because you're accidentally kind of sectioning to them, and sometimes instead of being sticky, tiny Rwasa movie slippery, so if you're trying to get friction down to the ground, zero wheels turn properly. Properly just slip because the thing is so light doesn't really have viscous friction with the ground very well. Another problem is powering the robot with electricity. As you make a robot release Hymie. You have to make a really tiny battery, and that's both physically difficult, because the battery is actual chemical system, so it's hard to make it small, but it's still has a microprocessor is still thinking. Whatever the computer version of thinking is, and that takes a lot of power, and that's going to drain your battery pretty fast, so tiny robots are hard, because they can accidentally stick to things, or sometimes they slip and slide too much, and it's hard to make batteries teen enough to power them plus a lot of equipment and materials. You wouldn't need to make tiny robots don't necessarily exist yet, but there are indeed some pretty small robots that have some level of autonomy, and they have something in common. They were inspired by insects. We asked brains on producer Matoco Wilhelm to look into that and oh. America you did more than just look of course I, did Molly? I really wanted to understand moving like a bug? So I made these cockroach inspired shoe covers. Oh, wow, now can scuttle. Please hold still that sound is to is for me. Okay. I get it. Cockroaches are not everybody's thing, but they've managed to solve a lot of the problems. You mentioned they're small. They can move around without too much sticking or slipping, and they do it all without running out of power. So. Why not try to model tiny robots after cockroaches or other bugs makes perfect sense, if nature already figured out a good design for a tiny autonomous thing, why not try to learn from that? Precisely, a lot of scientists are doing just that and it turns out scuttling like a cockroach is actually a great way for a robot to get around couch. Jerem is an engineer who has worked on Cockroach, inspired mini bots. Carpet excellent. Running really fast, they can climb up walls just as easily as they can run on level ground. Along ceilings they can easily squish into really small gaps, and they are seemingly indestructible. The robot. The cow chicken is t made looks a little like a tiny matchbox with four legs. It can run in different directions just like an insect, and it's not quite as fast as a real cockroach, but it does have one robo talent that cockroaches don't. It can run backwards cool also little. Well. Here's another insect inspiration that might have a lower factor. The flea fleas are master hoppers. Jumping is kind of Nice. When you're small because you can handle all the kind of rough terrain and obstacles might be in your way. Sarrebourg writer has worked on a bunch of little bots that spring into the air to move around. One looks a little like a tiny upside down palm tree. It's about an inch and a half tall with four feet at its base, and it's little. Parts are programmed to press down a tiny spring. and. Then release it to jump into the air, and this is the way jumping insects for two so they they store energy in a spring, Anthony release that suddenly to get the very high acceleration and high power that they need to jump fleas don't use metal springs. They just have springy parts of their legs. That work like this, and that's what the Flea Bot is copying eventually, the idea is that the flea bought could jump around or hitch a ride on other beings, the way fleas hitch rides on cats and dogs, and besides being small and moving well, bugs are also great at working in groups, which brings us to another insect that's. That's inspired engineers. So you think about these. They're normally in high. How do they work together? And how do they work as individuals feral held? Link is a researcher at Harvard. She's working on a little robot called the Robo be it's got two wings and four little legs, and its tiny. These robots wait eighty milligrams, which is about as much as a postage stamp. They're very very late. Whenever hand one to people that are like? Oh my gosh, and because they're so small, it would be very hard for Robey, too. Do much on its own, but in a big group or a swarm small things can be very mighty. Here's Sara, again. So I think about the ants in your yard. They can carry off your bag of potato chips as they want to. Even though each one is very very tiny, but if you have enough of them, they can really wreck havoc on your lunch. If only we could program. Row will be stop those ads from stealing our lunches now. That would be useful. Yeah, leave our lunches out this. Tiny things can also use that teamwork to build big stuff. Some termite colonies have built nests that are thirty feet high, so other researchers have taken a page from that termite handbook and made little builder Bots, and here's what's really cool about these termite like robots. They don't have to talk to each other to work as a team. All the termites just have the same goal. Stack blocks to build a structure and then. Then! Each individual robot just figures out what it needs to do on its own to make it happen pretty amazing. Teamwork makes the dream work for people and tiny robots, but at this point real insects have robo insects beat Dave adopted to survive and move in incredible ways so before I go I have to that. Some scientists are trying to add devices to real live cockroaches, so they can move those bugs with remote. It doesn't work perfectly. One team did it by strapping little bug backpacks onto cockroaches. Oh, cool! Breath! Am I headed the school micro trend Nope your backpack is actually a tiny little computer. It's going to tell your legs where to go. WanNa. Well, that's time for me to scuttle. Catch you all later by MANTECA. About Lebron's on. Now before we move on, we have something for you to sense and then react to. It's the. Here it is. and. Okay Eva. What is your guess? Maybe it's like a robot that could be like vibrating like something. vibrating I feel like that gets more vibration every single second. Yes I heard vibrating noises to. We're going to listen to it again. have another chance to guess in just a bit. Do you have a question you want to hear answered on brings on maybe a mystery, sound or drying to share maybe a drying of Mark's shoe crab. US. Just go to brains on dot org slash contact. That's where we got this question. Day Miami ads. And I'm from LACROSSE IN MINNESOTA. My question is why does this? Can't will around the earth. We'll be back with an answer to that during our moment of 'em at the end of the show, plus we will read the most recent group of names to be added to the brains honor roll, so stick around. You're listening to brains on from American public media. I'm Eva. And I'm Ali. It's time to get back to that mystery sound and before listen to it again. I'm just going to tell you that it does not have much to do with robots at all, okay. It kind of sounds like a bunch of like. Maybe like golf balls. Like the dumping a bunch of. Some sort of balls into a cup or something, and it's making that vibrating noise. That is a really incredible. Here is the answer. Hi, my name is ruin. And I'm six years old from Toronto and thous down to be dropping a golf ball into a rain gutter pipe. Eva I am so impressed that is. All! We when we chosen like this sounds so cool, but it seems really hard to guess, but no, you had no trouble. A Golf Ball in a cup is so close to a golf ball a rain gutter. I lived next to a golf course and I. Don't also so you're you have some familiarity with the sound golf balls? Make in different circumstances, yeah. I love that excellent excellent guests. Spring on. There are lots of smart people working on making tiny robots that could help humans and our environment in lots of different ways. There's so many possibilities that's so fun to imagine. What the future looks like and a lot of you have ideas for what you want to see. My name is penny, and I am from Bozeman. Montana and my little robot would be flying stored fighting robot that would. Fly around new IM- sword. Fight the mosquitoes that tried to buy you and it would sound like this Sh-. Hybrid on this Anshu from Toronto Ontario Canada. My tiny robot would be able to brush my teeth for me and it could do it in ten seconds. High brains on my name is van in my robot would clean up over my toys in. Give me money in its sowed would be. My name is Cindy from Boulder Colorado and my little robot would clean up my room for me. Give me my favorite foods garden for me and spray bug spray. Any excuse tried to bite me. Mine is my life and I'm from Castle Rock Colorado. My tiny robot would be named Dan Tolbert and it would clean my teeth, so I've never have to go to the dentist and the noise. It would make would be Very creative thinking in some of those are not that far off from what scientists are working on now there are already tiny robotic sensors that are helping filter the air to make a cleaner and healthier us, debrief and robot expert normal. She sees other nooses for small robots on the horizon they could help clean up oil spills or help the environment and other ways. We use incredible amount of pesticides. In agriculture now because we're trying to in a very Broadway get rid of the wrong species, we can grow the right species to make food. If, we can create low cost robust. That can do things like literally weeding. So they can physically pull out the problem tests and leave the place that changes the game, because then we can have much less impact on the climate, much less watershed issues and still do things like farming. We have to get help from it so I'm optimistic in the sense that we need solutions to our world's problems, especially climate change. And the only half the solutions is going to be through really smart, Community Co, designed technologies and robotics during the played an important role in that. Other scientists are working on tiny robots that you can wear even tiny robots that can go inside your body, but those are still in the very early research stages I wonder what role robots will play in our lives in twenty years or thirty years. It's fun to imagine. Another beautiful day at brains on headquarters, and look our old friend, EVA is here. Hello, and this is my daughter Eva Junior High Eva Eva Junior I'm so glad you're here. You're just in time. It's been years of hard work, but I'm finally ready to unveil. The shoot grab! Oh Wow you finally did it amazing. What's shoot? Grab? It can tie your shoes for you and destroy odor causing bacteria. Shoot Graham. A true robot can take an information about the world around it side would do with that information and then do it. That's called autonomy. Scientists are working on making small robots many inspired by insects. There are some challenges in making small robust in how they behave, and the parts available to make them. But robotic technology could play a big role in solving problems especially in keeping our environment healthy. That's it for this episode of brains on. On this produced by Molly Bloom Mar Santa's then taught and. Monica Wilhelm we had production help from Christina Lopez and engineering help from Veronica Rodriguez special thanks Tim Lynn the Harvard Microbiology Lab Andy Doucet. Brains nonprofit public radio PODCASTS. Your support helps us keep making new episodes head to brains on dot. Org Slash fans to support the show. Now before we go, it's time for our moment of candidate will around the earth. This a really good question the thing is it's hard for us to sense how much the sun is actually moving. I'm Britney. Come I I'm a scientist who studies the universe, and I work on building detector to be able to see out in the universe. In our solar system, our son is in the center of it, and we're all going around it the same way in a race track all the cars go around the same center. It's similar with the sun is that the sun is going slowly around? The center of our galaxy brought it so. We. Don't notice it on earth. So we're on earth and earth is going around the sun. And we looked out and we realize these tiny little dots were moving around, and those tiny little dots were other planets, and then we were able to put together the picture that all these planets were connected in our solar system. When we continue to look up and look out then we made really really really precise measurements of other stars, and so their star similar to our sun. And then you start to see that they're all orbiting around something in the middle. And when you start to work out. The. Path the stars are taking you find out. There's a super massive black hole like there's a huge huge huge black hole, so the sun actually does move, and it moves around a supermassive black hole in the center of the Galaxy. My heart revolves around these listeners. It's the brains honor roll. These are the talented and brilliant listeners who send us their questions ideas. Mystery sounds drawings and hi. Five's grace from Leo Indiana Isabella from Highland Mills New York Oliver from Portland Oregon, even from Winnetka Illinois Isabel and Brighton from Lilburn Georgia Angelo from Rockville Maryland Quinn, shave from Boulder Colorado Ben from Brooklyn New York Irish from Springfield Missouri Justin and Amelia from Ontario Conan from Hawaii come from Ann Arbor Michigan Uniform from Winnipeg Blake from Rochester. Minnesota Jack from Wesley Chapel Florida Jesse. From London England, Felicity and Peter from. 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Crappy Environment, Crappy Results? Change It Now

Unshakeable Leaders

29:30 min | 7 months ago

Crappy Environment, Crappy Results? Change It Now

"Imagine a penguin and it's so sad. Why because it's in the Sahara desert? But? Take that same penguin and put it in the Antarctic will not flapping its little feet, and it's really happy. What's the difference with the same penguin? But, it's in a different environment. In a world where more and more business owners? And entrepreneurs a struggling to keep it together. Judah the pressures around them I wanted to create an experience that sets out to and so one question. How can I inspire you to be healthier? Wealthy A- happier and connect at a deeper level in relationships. I'm your host, Simon Level and welcome to unshakable leaders. Hey so we're on the July fourth weekend. Hopefully you're having fun or if you're listen to this in the future. Hopefully, you've had a good July fourth weekend this episode. She jumped to the front of the queue I'm not sure we've done this before like me. What you've bought a bunch of books and you have like a cue. And then you hear about this one book, it resonates with you more, and so you bring that to the front of the queue and start reading it straight away. This is what happened when I heard this question on the court on Wednesday, which was. Does your environment make you more successful now. Just a pre frame a little bit. This client already filled in their on boarding form, and so I knew the context of why he asked this question, and he needs to go and make a power move which he did, which is fantastic, but also I gave a general answer into the group, which I want to touch on and go into a little bit more depth today because I think it's such an important question, and it does massively impact our success, so let me wind back the clock to that story that I've told before, but I'll go into a little bit more detail as it. It pertains to environment and so I was living my life. I was on life autopilot I wasn't doing the things that I knew needed to make me successful, and so I reached his turning point when I being you know just at this really low point in my life, and then an opportunity came up for me, which was to actually move out of the area, that I was living in because one of my friends are broke up with his ex girlfriend of go front at the time, and there was an opportunity for me to move out the area that I was living in and. Some me I knew that I had to make a move. Right, I had to pick up and pack up my stuff and get out of the area. That I was living in again. Not because the people around me were wrong, they were bad people. It's the I wasn't strong enough. In my environment and I needed to break free I needed to have a clean break. And what I noticed instantly. Once I moved which was. Slice start easier. I I didn't have as many poles to the negative things I was doing at the time, which were drugs and alcohol, and over stricken smoking so. That start to reduce. Right because I created space, right, I created distance. And so I'm going to be touching on a few things today as it pertains to environment, because there are a multitude of different environments that we have in our life, and once we start to have a cleanup. Right what it does is it frees up energy. It's like letting go of something now a big Ri- reason why people struggle with that is because they feel like they're gonNA lose people right that. If I if I take this move I need to for myself, and maybe people aren't GonNa like me. Maybe people are going to start to say things about me, and we have to understand that if we stay out of alignment and we know this thing is wrong, or this environment is wrong. This relationship is wrong. This whatever is is a feels off and something doesn't feel right. There's a signal that as a sign to make a move, but we've got to address the fear. We got to address the story. What is that statement? And the were saying in our head the stopping us from taking the action. And so. For me, actually packing up my bags and moving and it was only like an hour and a half away. What it does what it did was it created the space for me to get myself back to me? To start to clear out some of the clutter, even if it was the start to reduce the amount of things I was doing that was destructive. That gave me the time and space to be able to collect myself and to start to. Look at different opportunities, and when you start to make those difficult but powerful decisions in your life, we start to realize how important they are. So, yes, one hundred percent environment is is absolutely critical, so you know when you are in a living environment where other people don't align with your values that can be very problematic. Why because those difference in values? Can often main that. We don't see eye-to-eye, and it's not the we should not be around with people with different values. I'm not saying that, but when there is a consistency of behavior because of those values, and then we find ourselves being shut down in our bodies, because of that at some point, right, we have to be out of control the environment. Might. It's just like putting yourself in. Alliance cage. It's kind of stupid right and what we do is we keep ourselves in situations which are basically alliance cage? We continue to be attacked. We continue to. Put ourselves in situations where we are. Leading to a negative behavior. And that happens. The more erodes confidence to more. We get disconnected from ourselves, and then as I mentioned in the previous episode, we start to not really understand who we are, and it's all because of the environment Iran. and. A big thing that starts to happen is is the we get used to that feeling. We get used of feeling. Oh. This is this doesn't feel right, but it's also like a norm for me, and as we start to go through a spiritual journey, and as we start to evolve, what starts to happen as you make big decisions as you start to break away from things that don't feel right, and you move towards things at. Do feel right, you start. Start to feel. How can actually feel like this? And of course sometimes especially you know if you go through a break-up or something, it's hard, and it's emotional, and it's stressful for a period of time, but then what happens is is that because you start to distance yourself? Because you start to create you know put yourself in a different environment. The energetic bond starts to. Reduce, and then eventually the emotional ties starts to dissolve, but you can't have that dissolving in less, you make the difficult decision and you have to understand that when you got this energy bond with something I. You are living in environment where you're always being dragged down by someone. You'll live in an environment where the other people are doing things, but you don't. Partake in that, but you don't really want to do that, but you do it because it's a social norm. Right because it's such an energetic bond there so tight, it takes a lot of courage to break through that and I want you to kind of picture that right. Berry, imagine like not on your back. Right, and it's this this, not that you want to have mastered out well in order for the massage to come out to actually make the decision go to the massage therapist. And then what they'll do is, they'll stop. Needing and working on your back. That's like big decisions. That's like okay I've got a book. The move of to get out of go. See A surpised, and then I'm GONNA, lie down surrender, and then it's going to be needed out of my back, and I'm going to come out and feel better right now. The move is is the courageous move to actually book the appointment of the time, but we procrastinate on that why? Why because we say oh, it's GonNa. Get better, and it doesn't right think about that when it comes to the analogy of the massage therapists. Oh going to go away, go away tomorrow and tomorrow still there, and is there for another day, and then it's there for another day, and then the pain, and the frustration in the back gets to a heightened point, and then you book the therapist. Right, and this is what happens, guys in life when you're in the wrong environment right when you're in the wrong living environment around the wrong people or you're in the wrong relationship, so you're in, you're in friendships, and so what I'm GonNa do now is going to the different areas of environment that we need to declutter. Right, so we got living environment. Okay, so the area that we live in for example, if you're in an area where you feel isolated and has not like minded people right, and you know that you want to be around other people. Sometimes you need to create that environment for yourself. I made a big move I moved out of the area I was living in I mean historically I've made big moves of I made the initial move which was. To move out of the area living, Exeter and I moved to this place called Bristol back in the UK. And then another big one that I made was from a monumental move that I made was from the UK to America, because I was I was living in a place, called bath, and actually talk about some some big jumps in living. Scenarios I made, which had a big huge impact on me. I was living in this place called Bath in England, and it's a beautiful city. Don't get me wrong, but something fell off like I felt like I needed to make a big leap and what happened was. I got connected to this guy called Aj Roberts good friend now. And I was doing a product for the cross fit market. Who paid you in a box and We basically got Chang decided to come over to the states to go to cross fit game. which was in California anyway? Pick pick me up at the airport. Very nice of him and he started drive me round. San Diego and he drove me around La Hoya and start to see these palm trees, and it was just warm, and there's just this energy as you drive through San Diego especially up around La Hoya. Now it's just so beautiful and so different from what I'd experienced back in, you came. Rainy, and it's just like this is different energy to it right so at that point I just I was gonna live here, and that's where I create my vision board in two thousand thirteen. I'm pretty much. All of it came true and so I felt the energy of a different environment and then I In something in me shifted, and I made this commitment. And then I moved I. Mean a move from the UK to the states and. And when I got to the state, so I start to live somewhere, and so historically because of understood and G and environment, and how important is my body's telling me it's time to move right like the places I've moved from and to, and especially the big one from the ranch, which was the one point five Acre property. The go and it was great was fantastic, but it just didn't feel me. My body was sigler signalling to me. The I needed to make a change. And so I've I've moved I've made big moves. I've I've done the move from the UK to the states and them being in the states now for five years coming to five years. I've lived in La. Hoya I've also lived in. Carmel Valley which is the big house or move. To. Florida for year, and then I moved back to to San. Diego and I'm upping dome, our and Inherent de la. I'm in a smaller place I've been to my typically the big place right, but the location the energy like it all just feels right now. There's a couple of things in in the in house. The Australian I need to deal with those, but once those a doubt with then I feel settled I feel happy. So. One of the things, which is like location, but then you've also got the living environment where you live, and so let's just say that I was living here, but I didn't like what I saw in the apartment, and it was just like bland wars, and there wasn't ought up or whatever and I wouldn't feel good and so I need to feel good to be able to work, and so, why does our environment impact success well, because if you don't feel good where you live, you don't feel good in your environment. What that does is it low as your energy lows or vibration, and in that low vibration, you'll thoughts on as. As good and so you're not going to be as productive. You're not going to be as focused going to take opportunities you're on your sales calls, or your marketing is not going to be on point because you just generally don't feel good where you're at so then we want to do is start to notice. Hey, do I feel better when I go to a starbucks I? Do I feel better? If I go, Co, work, right. Do I feel better when I work second time or do I? Just need to change some things now for me. I love it when my cleaner comes now once a week because when she comes. And actually it's a couple of them that come. Clean Myself, but it wouldn't be time efficient for me because I'm not that good at it and I don't enjoy it right, so it's not in my zone, a genius, but when they come, and they enjoy it, and they do it, and they'd leave i. feel good I feel like I wanna go and do some content I feel better about doing my podcast. Why because everything's tidy nothing's cluttered like and so when you've got things around and they don't feel good. We have to understand that everything has energy. There's a great book called power. Versus forces thick. Book and it's not an easy book to read a teaches you. You about everything as energy right now for example I'm looked at. I'm looking at the Bruce. Lee Pitcher, which is blue and it's yellow and I. See it right in front of me when I see that I feel good right when I see my singing Bo for example that makes me feel good when I see my red chef. It makes me feel good now if I'm being honest when I look at my Sofa right now, I'm thinking about New Sofa. That's what I feel when I see it. Ryan is a couple of things lying around. That are out of place and I don't feel good when I see that. It's the same thing about having clothing right? You've got lots of stuff in your closet and it's just clutter. You never wear it and it's always like when you look at it. Sometimes we start to clear things out and I always use this analogy around the balloon rising which is. A balloon camp rise if it's got weights holding down and the weights for a lot of people a lot of time, our environmental. Right got a start to notice the things that Nigo you right, so you've got the place that you live in the environment that you live and that's a great way by the way a great thing rather to focus on. If you want to make more money, which is like. Hey, this is what I'm going. Commit to achieving. Right, what do you WanNa live? What state? What's your dream location like I always dreamed about moving to America, but you have to turn that dream into a decision, because if it stays as a dream, it's always going to be a dream by default, right? It's my dream to well if we think it's my dream to. Then, it's always going to be a dream, but if we take that dream and say I'm going to that simple switch can change everything so what I did was I created a vision board, and I said I am moving to America. Right or if I if I don't like this place and I want to have something else. I'm going to be like okay. I'm going to, and that's what I'm going to do, and the thing about mazes at once I get super focused on something, because there's so much energy going into that I can manifest it really quickly, manifestation meaning, just bringing something into my focus, and then it coming to life because I'm taking action and I'm not allowing fear to hold me back so for example when I did my company fit preneurs one of the things I said was I wanted to do these masterminds and I. I said I want to travel I want my first masterminded the being Thailand because I love the look of Thailand, and I made it happen very quickly, and so you got a start to like look at bucket list and look at things, and then if you feel it within you and you get excited by the excitement is the signal to move and take action now. How how do we get that well? Maybe we don't know how to get that. Maybe we need structure where maybe we need some clarity. Maybe we need someone to hold us accountable. Well first of all, you got to decide what you want. Right, what do you want? What environment do you want to live in? If you don't live in a good environment now if you're room feels funky, and you don't like it right now. How do you want it to be? Go to Pinterest and look at some rooms that you like? If you can't afford the things that you see on this an intention to find a way to make it happen if your business model doesn't support you making the money to do that, then what business model would you gotta start to break these things down and then get hyper focused. and. Don't get into the pattern of getting frustrated. With not having with getting frustrated rather with what you don't have when you haven't actually sat down and made decisions on how to fix it because that's a trapped, a lot of people get into, which is they? Keep on saying what they want, but they don't move forward towards it. Okay so. An environment where you live, and the the things in in your environment, and then we've got friends right. The people that we spend our time with and I'm sure you've heard this million times. which is you know, the top five people you spend time with your start to become them, but just on a basic level. Like how do your friends make you feel when you're around certain people. Do you feel good with them? Right or is a constant drain right and so we've got as I've mentioned before. We've got random events. That happen got behavior over time, right? What someone's attitude? And so if around people and you don't feel good most likely the values a different right one of the things I talk about law in my CPI performance full formula especially in week four five is understanding our values, and how it plays into our attitude. Because once we start to get clear upon. Value System, our belief system, and then it shapes into our attitude. Everything starts to change because we start to know ourselves. We have a list of non-negotiables. Okay, these types of friends I want to be around. They think like this like for me I. Want to be around people who I can disagree with for example, one thing disagree with, but also have a healthy discussion because I wanted to learn right. I want to be friends with people who? Who feel good? And also challenge me in a loving way. Right. I want to be around and have friends that. Expand me and you know, see the best in me and also can can point out things that can also support me. My growth right I want friends that can listen, and and also can I can listen to, and I can sit down and also have like a deep discussions with and not be surface level right. If I WANNA go somewhere in a conversation, you know, we can actually go there in that conversation and. Not Be afraid of going there so. I think it's important for us to reevaluate. And when we when we start going on this personal development journey, the truth is the reality is the hard. Just. You know the hard truth so there. Is that as we start to grow as we start to go into alignment. There's going to be a situation where people get to raise this standards to meet your new standards. They will fall away. Right! And, it doesn't mean that they're gonNA fall away forever, but we won't happens. Is We become attached right, and it's very important to yes be opening communication. Yes, be loving behind, but also understand that what's really important. Is that as individuals? We are in alignment with where we on needing to go. Right, and if you want to raise your bar and raise your standard in my opinion. Right, we shouldn't keep that standard low because of other people. Right so also really address what fears you may have to leveling. The next one, which is Within the living environment actually want to tell you a funny story so I was actually living in this really small nine hundred square for place after I moved out of the one point. Five Acre property I wanted to do the opposite of what I was doing. So I was living in this you know, posted a basketball court and a swimming pool, and it was just like it was huge right, and so I made the conscious decision I want to do the opposite I want to go. Do something tiny to see how about fields and not be attached and kind of kill off my ego, anyway so moved to play to a place called Nita's go nine hundred square for small apartment. Two bedroom and we had this situation. We didn't check out properly, and it didn't anyway didn't have conditioning and it was so hot. and. For so many weeks, I think it might have even been like a couple of months like we were just grinning and bearing it. Right and then we had this. Air Conditioning Unit but it was like broken, and the and the the chew wasn't linked and stuff and I still let it go on, and then eventually one day something snapped in my head and I. Like bought the peace for it. Arrived from Amazon I put it on, and the problem was solved, and I suddenly realized like how long. Was I sat here. Sweating my face off right trying to work. Being very uncomfortable when I needed to do was. Make It. Easy decision in order this. This piece of Air Conditioning Cube. And it was dealt with I, just sat there once. I linked it up going like how stupid will you? Right like to go on that. Allow this to continue and I. think that's such a big life lesson, right? How long we allow things to continue without just making simple decision like you see this thing every day that you don't like an it's still stays there. Right where we can actually change it and move it. You know so. I make sure now that cleaners come once a week that if I just she the other day I just took every close clue tonight didn't like and. You give it away threw away, right. So we've go. Living Environment the place that we live got friends, and then we got also mental environment. Now IF YOU'RE IN A. If YOU'RE IN A. An environment like your home. That's GonNa Affect your mental environment, and if you've already got mental challenges or psychological challenges or thought. And you couple it with an environment your end. That doesn't support you. You're basically getting like double the amount of stress worry anxiety right because you're you're putting on top of each other and life becomes very difficul. Right when you've already got stuff nest, just say this right. You go unresolved issues with parents, so maybe if father figure right. And then you've got that weighing on new subconsciously then you add on. The place that you live in the people that you live with. Just that alone is gonNA massively. Hinder somebody success because so much mental grain happening. And once we start the free dot up right. Through whatever what we do, all the environment shifts that we make we start to feel lighter and in that lightness in ease in not map peace of mind. Things start to. Evolve and opportunity. Start to come away because we feel different about ourselves. Then also, we got intimate relationships to right and how much they play in, and how much they drain us. Lift US right the someone. Bring out the best in you or does some. Bring out the worst in you. You know. and. That's a discussion on future podcasts in more detail, but. The analogy once of the frog in the paw, you know. You put frog in boiling partner who jump how if it's there and you? You know it's code, and then you start to heat over time. The FROG will die. Why because it gets conditioned to its environment, so you also have to look out on my condition to my environment. Conditioned where I live my condition, the personnel with the naturally like. We sometimes have to have a reality check. And that she say. Like I'm better than this. No. I deserve more bright because we can lead. We can't be unshakable leaders if we're in a place jets, which is always like you're trying to compensate from the energy. That's being drained. And that's also about just taking responsibility in holding boundaries. Go check out the boundaries. Episode would be great for you if you struggle with that, so we got these areas you know, and the more that we start to. You know we start to make these decisions more. We start to order on Amazon. That should have been ordered a month ago. In the more we start to go, Rhino that idea of me to move to this place now continues to come up a few times. Probably start listening to myself. Right that's the key now. One of the things I want to share with you. Especially when it comes to making these decisions is Yo. Your Ego was going to try. And find a way out and what it will do, it will put it off. I experienced this law when I'm coaching. CEOS, entrepreneurs coaches consultants right, and it's this thing where it's like I asked the question when you do that. And then somebody comes up with this really long answer, and it's like a month away or like two weeks away and I'm like hey, why can't you do it now? And this is when it comes to success skies. This is so key because when the mind does that and it puts off versus actually doing it now. That's way your success. Speed radically shifts, and that's where actually accountability so key, because really what that's about is getting you to do things quicker than the normally would have taken new year's, and that's why historically I've been able to get really quick results with people. Why because I? See The story I I hit the excuse I call it out and I show and the gap on the timeframe that someone's able to take action. Because normally they wouldn't have done tool, or the timeframe would have just been so long the by the time they got to do that, right, they wouldn't have the money or they wouldn't have had the lead lost the opportunity the opportunities on, and so when it comes to business spying opportunities key as well and this place together. So. Does environment impact success. Yes, it does, and if you have a story of when you've changed your environment, I'd love to hear it. Send it to me on instagram. Actually, if you not flowing me on Instagram, then you can do that Simon Lovell official. Let Me Know, Sim O., l., O., V., E. Double official. Let me know to send me a message of when you've changed your environment, and how it's impacted your life and stay tuned on Mondays episode when we're going to be doing another meditation, so I will see then have an amazing day. Take Care, thank you. You, for listening to this episode, please hit the subscribe to make sure that you don't miss out on another show. And if you want to do a deep dive into becoming even more unshakable, so that you can reach super high performance, I just put together a brand new training. The you can get instant access to by heading to Simon level dot com slash unshakable. I will see that most mostly on another episode. Take it easy.

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Leon Panetta: Worthy Fights

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

1:19:03 hr | 8 months ago

Leon Panetta: Worthy Fights

"I do solemnly swear that I. will support and defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign investor. That I will bear to faith and allegiance to the scene that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion, and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the Office on which I am about to enter. So help me God. Help me God so God. Welcome to the oath, and for many of you welcome back, I'm Chuck Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another compelling conversation with fascinating guests from the world of Public Service This is our season three premiere. And I am very pleased to share a conversation with Leon Panetta, one of the most distinguished and most accomplished public servants in American history. Leon was raised in Monterey California. The place where his father Carmelo the youngest of thirteen children, all born in Italy ultimately settled. Carmelo, Panetta could not have dreamed. He could not have imagined that his son Leon would serve eight terms in the United States House of Representatives as the director of the Office of Management and Budget as the White House, Chief of staff as the director of the C. I. A., and as the Secretary of defense. It has been a remarkable career and a remarkable life for Leon, Panetta a humble, thoughtful, intelligent and kind man. I had the opportunity to interview Leon in his office at the Panetta Institute on the campus of Cal State University Monterey Bay. With his dog BUBBA and his dog in law copper. Side Leon Panetta welcome to the oath. Good to be with you and thank you for having me to your office and the campus of Calcutta. University Monterey, Bay it's a campus that is located on. What was the old Fort Ord military reservation when I was in Congress? We fought the process on closing four door for about two rounds and lost on the third round they closed for Ord, which was about twenty five percent of the local economy, so you can imagine it was a pretty good blow, and the community came together and. decided that a campus would be a good re use of the base and we were able to get California State University. The chancellor guy named. Berry, Munis was very helpful, and we located the campus here now it's a thriving campus and I guess I've always said it's the ultimate conversion of swords into Plowshares, but I wanted to go back even further than the creation of this wonderful campus. Because in your book you write about Your Father. Coming to the United States from his native Italy on a ship called the providence third. Class passenger with twenty five dollars in his pocket. What a remarkable story! It was something I've always been. Fascinated by to think that you know here's somebody who comes from a peasant background in Calabria, Italy and his village was one of those located up in the mountains. Call Geraci Super Yorkie, which means mountains. It's kind of a walled city up there. They were in the countryside and you know we're truly peasants. He served in. World, War One the Italian army and fought in the. The Battle of the Pov valley, which was pretty brutal battle. He did talk about his memories from that battle. He was wounded, ultimately he was able to get out, and it was soon after he got out of the military that he made the decision to come over to this country had several brothers who had come over ahead of him his oldest brother. Bruno settled in Sheridan Wyoming. and. He had another brother who was closer to him. Tony. My father was the youngest of thirteen, and he had close relationship with Tony, and I think because of that he really wanted to come over and to suddenly leave your home, country and travel thousands of miles. This is not like there was Google or the internet or any idea where the hell he was going, he just decided to get on a ship. The Providence, my young son was the one who looked up that ship, and actually gave me a photo of that ship that I got up on the wall. He also looked up the manifest. And manifest had Carmelo Panetta. Occupation peasant while. He had twenty five bucks in his pocket. Which you know twenty five bucks a at that time probably wasn't a paltry sum, but it's what he had came through Ellis, island. And I think ultimately actually made his way out to California where Tony was located and spent some time working. I think in some of the restaurants in California. And then sometime in the late twenties decided that he wanted to go back to Italy to find a wife, and went back and found my mother fortunately for you absolutely. But you were born in Monterey. I was born in Monterey when they came over together after my father and mother met and married in Italian families, it was more of an arrangement than something where you kind of fall in love, but my dad's spotted my mother in the back of a church in my mother's hometown to near Rachel. Sabra Saderno is what it's called. Saderno Medina which is near the ocean. And he was in a church there good size church, and he was in the back, and my mother and her sisters came to church, any spotted my mother, and then the next step was to go to the family. He went to my my no new, my grandfather and my Nana and asked permission. To be able to go with her, and then hopefully marry, and it was on the basis that he would be bringing her back to America and my grandmother didn't like the idea that she would be going to America but my grandfather. Who was? A merchant marine. Sailed around the world on the old sailing ships. And had been everywhere from Australia to. God knows where to America Mino. New Said No, no, no, no, it's America is a great country and We shouldn't worry it'll be. It'll be good for them. to be able to do that, so my parents got married and came over there first. Stop with with his older brother. Bruno in Sheridan Wyoming and I've often said this that that they spent one winter shared. Shared in Wyoming and my mother said it's time to visit your other brethren. California your parents had grown up in southern Europe. It had to be a bit cold. Yeah, it was sign of a shock to their system to go through a winner in Sheridan. They managed to make it out to California and my dad. I was working in some restaurants in southern California, and then they made it up here to Monterrey. I've often wondered why I was blessed with having been born in Monterey I think it was because he had a friend who is also Kala. Bracy who he knew from Wyoming who was located in Monterey Fella named Dominic loose cree. And I think he came here to hook up with Dominic. And he worked in a restaurant locally and then. Working with Dominic, they established a restaurant. And Bar together. In Downtown Monterrey. I was a corner property Carmelo's cafe. It was Carmelo's cafe on one side Dominique's bar on the other side and there was a swinging door between the bar and the restaurant. I think this was late thirties or early forties and Monterey. Time was just a jump in town here there was it was a fishing community subject of Steinbeck's cannery row. Exactly I was Steinbeck who then wrote about You know cannery row, which was a whole set of canneries that were canning the sardines that were being caught, and the wives of fishermen who are catching it usually were working in the canneries in addition to that with four roared now this military reservation it was a major training post for young men from across the country. Who are being trained for the battlefield, so? World War Two and so. You can imagine the Monterey was kind of their last stop was civilization before they go to war so downtown Monterey I remember as a kid. It was full of soldiers in uniform sailors. They were MP's who are watering Alvarado Street to make sure that you didn't get in trouble. my mother, who handled the cash register at the restaurant had a button under her cash register to call the MP's. In case they got online. The soldiers would come in. They love to get Spaghetti and meatballs from my father's restaurant, but then they immediately go into dominatrix for drinks. Order drinks there one swinging. Swinging doorway, and every once in a while, they got unruly and my mother had to push that button. My earliest recollections were. As a young boy! I was standing on a chair in the back of that restaurant washing glasses. It was all done with hot water. You've lower the glasses into the hot water and then rinse I was doing some of that. And I have often said it's because my parents believed that child labor was a requirement. But, it was a great experience i. When I became secretary of Defense I remembered back to those days because my parents would invite. The soldiers particularly if they were a lot of Italian, soldiers from New York. They were coming by, but they would invite them to our house. For the holidays Christmas. Easter I can remember them. You know enjoying you know my mother's food talking Italian. And thinking to myself these young men are going to go off to war. God knows what's going to happen to them. And I thought about that as secretary. Because the toughest job I had as secretary of defense was to sign those deployment orders that place these young. Men and women in uniform now place them in harm's way, and in fact you had to sign those orders as Secretary of defense. That was your obligation. That's right every week. died sit down. And we would go over all of the deployment orders for the various units, and a lot of that was to the war zones I want to go back to Monterey for just a moment, though because it sounds like a wonderful place to grow up in Monterey. The Monterey Bay but Monterey. Has You know it has a downtown area? But then rising up from downtown area is hill area. It was known as Spaghetti Hill, because a lot of the Italians lived up there. And My parents lived up there on Van Buren Street, in Monterey, my brother was five years old than I and we spent a lot of time playing with other kids up there. It was community where families took care of each other and took care of the children that were there. It was really kind of a community feeling to grow up there. I can remember. Going to Catholic Grammar School. And walking from Spaghetti Hill van Buren street I think I walked about ten blocks. To the grammar school and you think about that these days. The buses, all of that, you know, no, no, we was five is just A. Little Kid about seven seven eight years old, and we would walk all of that distance to go to the Catholic school and walk back. It was a great place to grow up because there were a lot of other Italian families, but it was also a great community in many ways. This community traces its history back to Spanish. To Father Sarah who came through this community, but a lot of the early explorers settled here actually a presidio was built up. Here Spanish military unit was placed here at the presidio. The Admiral sloat landed at Monterey and actually placed the flag of the United States here in Monterey, proclaiming California as part of the United States. And that took place in Monterey. The community was a real mix of a lot of different races and beliefs and creeds, and everybody really did get along a good community. You tell a wonderful story in a moving story in your book about your mother's father, your grandfather no-no. Yeah, joining you here as a tourist as a visitor, but getting swept up in some of the World War Two internment hysteria, it can imagine as a young boy. Who got very close to my grandfather, he had come over to visit my mother. In nineteen thirty eight shortly after I was born. What happened was. That, the war broke out, and of course, Italy was an ally of Germany and that war they would not allow my grandfather to go back to Italy and for the first few years he lived with us. In, Monterey And largely took care of my brother and I particularly me. Because I was the youngest and got to know him. Really well. He was a loving guy and a big guy over six feet tall. Love to talk with other Italians and they were engage in these long conversations about the war and Mussalini and what the hell was going to happen in the war and I can remember playing around while he was talking, and he'd have one of these Tuscan Ellie cigars in his mouth and his hat on, and he would be talking with them, they could. Could just hear that even today you know those voices of all these Italian talking, and he would bring me down to the wharf, and we'd fish off the war orphan. He was a fisherman at one point in the area. Then what happened was for some reason. I mean we know that Japanese obviously were all gathered up and put into internment camps. But for some reason, there was a decision made that if you were an Italian. That you could not live near the coastal areas. An order went out to move all of these Italians inland and so my grandfather had to be moved. To San Jose. which isn't that far away? It's kind of silly. What happened here, but we had to pack them up. We found a boarding house in San Jose. And we all drove up together and I can remember as a young boy. Really feeling shattered, that are no news, not going to be with us, and had to be placed in in San Jose, and I think that went on for well over a year year and a half, and eventually you know. He came back and live with us before he went back to Italy, but I never forgot. That experience because you know I had a little bit of the feeling of what the Japanese might felt. In terms of being in turn, our treatment of Japanese Americans in that period was a real dark stain on the country and the same court decision that affirmed their removal and relocation. Komatsu probably one of the two or three worst decisions in the history of the Supreme Court, but many people don't know that some German Americans and some Italian Americans and then some Italian aliens like your grandfather were also moved. Yeah, yeah, no, no, it's It's kind of a forgotten part of history. It brought home. To me, how truly fragile our democracy can be and what can happen in those kinds of crises, our democracy, our rule of law is really just a construct. It's made by people. It's preserved by people that can be undermined by people exactly exactly you had the remarkable opportunity to serve a Monterey in the United States, Congress, first elected in Nineteen, seventy six. I can only imagine how. How your father must have process that his son, becoming a member of the Congress of the United States I was really happy that my father was alive when I got elected to Congress, my mother had died of cancer, but my father actually went back to Italy, a remarried brought my stepmother back to the country. We were living in Carmel Valley that's where the family home was. And what my dad did was he built a little house? A guesthouse moved into that guest house and Sylvia and and the boys moved into the main house. Sylvia your wife Yeah, so we, my wife and or three sons? Moved into the main House A to. Make the decision to run for Congress was something I mean I I'd been in Washington I'd worked as a legislative assistant for a senator from California it was. He was a Republican senator from California Thomas, Kiko Time Kiko came out of The Hiram Justin. legacy in California Hiram Johnson. Was a Republican governor in California. Who is very progressive? supported civil rights supported labor laws in a whole series of reforms, actually the initiative process. was created by Hiram Johnson that Progressive Republican tradition carried on with Earl Warren became governor goody night Tom Kiko came out of that Legacy Dwight Eisenhower exactly Kiko and Eisenhower were very close because of that tradition, and when I got out of the army after two years service I was able to get the job with Tom Keikel. And went back. And Kiko was the minority whip. I often say I've seen Washington at its best in Washington at its worst I. Recall those days because Republicans light. Kiko like Jacob Javits like Clifford case from new. Jersey Hugh Scott from Pennsylvania. George Aitken from Vermont Mark Hatfield from Oregon. We're working with Democrats. Like Jackson and Magnuson, Dick, Russell Sam Ervin and Fulbright were giants, but they work together on legislation and that was true, and I actually was elected to Congress I work with Keikel. He was defeated by right winger. It was the beginning of the division in the Republican Party Max. Rafferty was his name. And he ran against Keikel in the primary and beat him, and so I was out of a job as a result of that. And then got picked by another kind of Republican liberal by the name of Bob Finch, who became secretary of hew, and eventually appointed me as director of the Office for Civil Rights. I was a believer in civil rights worked on civil rights laws with Kiko and ultimately ran into something, called the southern strategy that Nixon had developed where he wanted to back off of civil rights. Now I didn't eventually lost my job. As a result of that went to work for mayor. Lindsay in New York City and other liberal Republican, and then eventually made my way back to Monterey, but in the process decided that be better off becoming a Democrat because Republicans were beginning to have these divisions that were beginning to split the party I was asked whether I'd be interested. In running for Congress and I was in practice with my brother practicing law and you know and I had to kind of make a tough decision. We had our family. We have three boys. We were living in the house in Carmel Valley and really loving it and Congress Washington DC very long way from Washington's a long way to go you know for the first time we had moved a lot. We'd moved in the army. A number of times We moved You know when we came back to California. And we finally settled in our home and he was decision that you know. We really had to think long and hard about, but Sylvia was very supportive and she got very much involved in the campaign. As she had with almost every other thing I've done in my life, which has been extremely important to my career, but more importantly I think it was important for our relationship, so she helped run the campaign. We made the decision I run. She ran the campaign. I was running against A. Republican incumbent. Guy Named Burt Talcott. And TALCOTT had been in office for about twelve or thirteen years, but he had gotten to the point where he was starting to not come home. And started to anger some of his own constituents. and it was almost the right time to Take them on, but it was a Republican incumbent, and so it took a lot of work in those days I think about the amount of money we had to race when I ran. I think it was about one hundred eighty five thousand dollars to run that campaign, and we raise it all locally. Doing little fundraisers with people must have seemed like a fortune back then. When? Jimmy, my youngest son recently ran for Congress and was elected, but you know he had to raise almost over a million dollars to run and Reagan Congressional races these as obviously are an excess of a million dollars. We struggle. We raise the money, and eventually you know. I won by about three or four percentage. which was a great moment and that night, after I had been declared a winner I walked over to my father's little house and walked in, and he had been watching and He embraced me and I really felt very proud, because I knew how proud he felt. That here he was an immigrant, not much money in his pocket it come to this country worked hard, and now his son had just been elected to the congress. It was a great moment. It's an extraordinary story. You tell a very charming story about the legendary Speaker of the House Tip O'Neill coming out to campaign for you, and then he almost got your name right. That's right. tip as a wonderful guy and obviously Democrats Democrat from Boston. We asked him to do a fundraiser that we got a house for it. And he came up. He gave us kind of rip roaring speech about it and said I want all of you. To Support Leo Mineta. And the problem was there was a guy named Norman etta. who had been elected to the Congress two years before? THAT MINETA WAS ITALIAN I always kid them that the reason he got elected was because they thought he was Italian who is a Japanese Japanese American who would actually be been had gone to intern camp, but he became mayor of San Jose great success story tip used to always get US mixed up and everybody laughed at the fundraiser and tip realize what he had done. Tip was just one of these genuine old Paul's from Massachusetts. Who I think had a great heart. And he also had a good sense of what was right for the country, regardless of Party William Mineta is close enough to Leon Panetta seemed to work. Did. I remember after I got elected This was in the Carter Administration. And the white. House would call. They would ask. If I would come to the White House. To greet the Japanese Prime Minister and. I said I think you've got the wrong guy think you're trying to get norm. Annetta and norm used to get calls from the White House. When the Italian prime minister came, so we were always confused finally. Norman I decided to put a team together baseball team. We said we played under the sign of the rising pizza. We had a great time playing around with with each other's problem. Being identified as either Italian or Japanese, I know, you took the oath of office as an army officer, but what was it like to get sworn in as a new member of in January of Nineteen, seventy seven? You know I've got a great picture. Of that swearing in. The right behind me here signed by tip O'Neill signed by tip O'Neill. And it was that the great moment of going over to the floor. Of the House of Representatives with all the new members, you raise your right hand. And Tip administered the oath. It's one of those moments you never forget because you think of. The history of what? Gave me particularly as the son of immigrants. A chance to be elected to Congress. and to be able to serve. In really one of the. Great Democratic Institutions of our democracy as a member of Congress. One of the things I always used to recall was walking over from the cannon building. I have my office in the cannabis at night. And looking up at the Capitol, which was all in lights I always had that feeling of all. That here I was serving in the pinnacle of our democracy, which is the the House of Representatives? house of the people and I always. Recalled, that kind of special feeling that I had been blessed with a tremendous opportunity to be able to be able to get elected and serve our democracy used to get the same feeling by the way when I walked in the Oval Office having served the president. and I'd walk into the Oval Office, and they'd be there by myself and looking around and say I am at the center of power. Not just for this country, but the world. I always had that feeling when I would walk into the FBI or the Department of Justice I. I can't believe that I'm here and I. Hope that nobody. Figures out that I don't belong throws me out I. Always felt like an impostor. Always I always had that that sense that maybe at some point they're going to say you know you're in the wrong place, but you know it. It is a remarkable statement about kind of the heart and soul of what makes our democracy great while you were serving in Congress. You took a great interest in the preservation of the California coast I mean yeah, you have a strong record as an environmentalist, well I. You know I was representing the Central Coast to California and Monterey. And here we've got the big Sur coastline. We've got Cypress, point and Pebble Beach. You've got Santa Cruz the coast line, and and it's a remarkable coastline and I I've often said that John Kennedy used to say that the ocean is the salt in our veins and. I really felt that way as a as a young person. Born and raised along this coast so I go back to Congress representing this this beautiful coastline and the first thing I run into. Is secretary what? secretary of Interior in the Reagan administration who decides city's GonNa put up for sale, all of our coastline for offshore drilling, and that really concerns me. I asked a Republican congressman who represented the Mendocino coast, which is also attractive, those are the days when you work with Republicans I asked him to meet with Watt and I said to the Secretary I said you know I understand that there are areas. That could be developed for offshore drilling, but I said there are also national treasures, likely seventy or yellowstone on our coastline that ought to be protected for the future and I said you know my coastline. Is that way? The Mendocino coast lines that way and I'll never forget. He walked up to a picture in. The Congressman's Office of the Mendocino coast and he said that's a great location for an offshore drilling. Rick and I said Oh. My God I'm in trouble, so authored as a result of that meeting I authored legislation. To create a moratorium. It was put on the appropriations bill and what I said was no funds in this bill. It was the interior bill. will be allowed for proceeding with offshore drilling. And I got an act. IT IS A. Bipartisan and we had a lot of the coastal delegations were supported. But but then I thought, and we actually got that moratorium passed I. Think almost twenty years in a row. But I was worried that if we ever had a gas crisis. That I would I would lose that legislation, so I decided to go for more permanent protection particularly for for the Monterey. Coastline, so I actually developed legislation. To create a Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. And it established what at that time was the largest marine sanctuary and the United? States are marine sanctuary stretches from the Farallon islands all the way down to San. SIMEONE and I've always been proud of the fact that we have now protected that area from any kind of offshore drilling, also an extraordinary legacy. It's Chris what am I proud moments as a legislator. Hi, everyone, it's joy, Reid host of am joy on MSNBC. Did you know you can listen to am joy, and all your favorite MSNBC shows as podcasts? You can catch up on the beat with Ari Melber the Rachel Maddow show the eleventh hour with Brian Williams and more anytime on the go search for your favorite MSNBC shows wherever you're listening to this podcast and subscribe for free. Thanks for listening. You survey terms in Congress I served eight terms was actually elected to my ninth term. President Clinton asked me to come into the administration as the director of office of Management and Budget, director of the Office of Management and Budget, I had been in the Congress said worked up to Chairman of the House Budget Committee we had begun. Something that nobody talks about these days which was the concern about growing deficits, and at that time we had deficits that were approaching three, hundred billion and going up to what we thought might be six hundred billion, which we thought would really be devastating for the economy. It began in the Reagan administration actually President Reagan. called one of the first summits really where we came together to try to develop a deficit reduction package, and then in the Bush administration I George Bush. We actually went out to Andrews. Air Force Base Republicans and Democrats and representatives from the administration to work out a budget deal that involved five hundred billion dollars in deficit reduction. two hundred and fifty billion out of largely entitlement programs and two hundred fifty billion of revenue tax increases. Tough package, but we worked at out and got it passed. It was a tough vote, but you know to the credit of President Bush. who had to move his lips? you know from what he campaigned on which was read my lips, no new taxes, he made a tough decision I have often told him. He made the right decision, and it was tough and he may have cost him. His reelection might very well have been one of the reasons. You know it cost him his election, but you know it's it's I. Always say that true leaders have to take risks of leadership and do the right thing if they think it's the right thing for the country. They need to do it in my very well. Cost Him an election, but they can always. Always live with the satisfaction of knowing. They did the right thing. Anyway, I was it was proud of having worked on that package and I think it was. It was the reason that Bill Clinton, who had had also run against Ross. Perot in that race and Perot had identified the deficit as a big issue and bill. Clinton Credit knew that he would have to do additional steps to reduce the deficit and I think that was the reason. He asked me to become director alone. Andy now. You also worked for president. Clinton as his chief of staff, I'd been in the Office of the director of MB. We passed the Clinton budget, which was tough and other five hundred billion deficit reduction past reconciliation, which is the bill to implement that which means raising taxes and getting the savings from a number of programs, but we got it done. It was tough. I think we passed it by one vote in the house and the vice president's vote in the Senate, I was doing the appropriation spills. And I really felt very good about what I was able to accomplish For the president, but more importantly for the country. I think it was Al Gore. Who was a classmate of mine when I got elected to Congress? And he was vice president came up to me and said something like You Know Leon I think. The president is thinking about having you as chief of staff. I said look I, you know I I really enjoy the job of be director and I think I'm doing a good job for the administration on budget and on the appropriations, and besides that very frankly, the White House was in chaos. There was very little organization. A lot of people would be going to meetings. There was no discipline really within the White House and I thought the last thing. I need is to have to take control of that place, so somebody needed to. Sit I said you know I'm better off as director and beat well. The next thing I knew also that the president wanted to see me up at Camp David. So I went up to the vice president's House to pick up helicopter there, and we flew up to Camp David and I walked into the presidential cabin there. And there was President Clinton and Hillary Clinton Al Gore and Tipper Gore and myself. And I knew that I was being put into a corner. Outnumbered, I was totally outnumbered. The president asked me if I would become chief of staff and I I said the same thing I said. You know Mr President I really think I'm serving you in a very important role as director of Oh and be. We've just passed the budget. We've just past reconciliation. You know we're passing all the appropriations bills on time. something that never happened for a long time and I said I think I'm I'm really important. The budget is going to your legacy and I think it will be you know I! Think I can help protect that and I never forgot Clinton's words. He said Leon. Did you know? You can be. The most famous. Director of Owen be in the history of the country. But if the White House is falling apart, nobody will remember you. So I said. All right Mr President I went ahead and of course president. Ask you to do something you feel obligated to do it and I did tough job. Tough job I add conditions matter of fact. after I came down from camp. David I went to see mack McLarty. Who was my predecessor as Chief of staff? He knew what was going on I said Mac I I need to look. At an organization chart for the White House and he said you know Leon I don't believe I've ever seen one of those and I thought man. I really am screwed. There's the problem. And so I almost had to rely a great deal on my army experience, because it was about a publishing chain of command who would report to process? Yeah, a process of discipline and supervision on the various staff members in the Clinton administration. There were a lot of people who carried this title of console to the President which meant that they could go to all the meetings talk, but never had any responsibility for doing anything and so I get. Get rid of all. The consoles to the president and stabbed. You know a clear chain of command I had two deputy chiefs of Staff, one for personnel, one for scheduling and people under them that they would be responsible for decided to try to control access to the Oval Office did that work. It did because Bill Clinton recognized that it had to be done as a matter of fact John Kelly when he became chief of staff to President Trump. Called me and said what do I need to do and John Kelly had worked for you directly. He had worked for me as a military when I was secretary of Defense. I said John I said. You know you're a marine. You need to have a strong chain of command. You need have disciplined. You need to control access to the White House. You need to establish systems for policy development so that the president is well served by those that are experts and know the issues and percents those options to the president. The biggest problem you have is the President I was working for knew that he had to be disciplined. He was smart enough to know. That he was not going to get reelected. If the White House was in chaos on, so he was willing to go along with the discipline. I said. You're working for somebody who I'm not sure. Really understands what disciplined about. He said I know but I. I really think I can try to apply. That same kind of framework, so it was really interesting, because in many ways I think John was dealing with some of the same chaos I added to deal with this UH chief of staff I would imagine every white. House has some degree of chaos and some degree of discipline. It's just a question of the ratio. You're absolutely right. It's It is a a huge responsibility to suddenly walk into the Oval Office. And realize? The dimensions of what you're now responsible for, and even as somebody who's worked there I can't imagine. The sense of walking into the Oval Office and realizing. That now a lot of what's happening in this country and in the world is going to be on your shoulders, and it is and the responsibility now of pulling together a team. Of People. Who you can trust who are good advisers who understand the issues you're dealing with so that you're presented with the best advice possible because these are always complicated tough issues that you're dealing with and you always WanNa. Give the president options. That was my approach any president I think it's really important that the policy making process does a good job of analysing the particular issue or crisis. You're dealing with and then. Presents a set of options to the president. S to what steps ought to be taken. You know sometimes there's consensus sometimes there's not but I. Think the ability to give president in the United States. A set of options gives the president the room that is needed. In order to be able to evaluate. What do I have to do? That's in the interest of the country, so we really do need to develop that process. You need to have good people in the cabinet who are running the departments in? And then under them, good deputies and responsible people who also are dedicated to their jobs. The one thing you learn very fast as president. Is that you know you can want all kinds of things to happen. But. It's not going to happen unless you have good people. In those jobs who are willing to make it happen for you and being able to delegate. Authority being able to energize that team to feel like they're part of this broader team is really one of the great challenges of any President going into the Oval Office. I know when you left the Clinton White House at the end of president. Clinton's second term return to Monterrey. It was with the plan of staying here, establishing the Panetta Institute. Your beloved California had called you home, but President Obama and the nation had a different plan. I'm often asked by young people. How do I? Improve my career opportunities. when I go back to Washington, I have a very standard response which is. You know the most important thing. Is To do. The very best in the job that you're in. To Make Damn sure that you've dedicated yourself to getting that job accomplished. Because if you start focusing on the next step up the ladder. What happens. Is that almost automatically? You begin to cut corners. You get distracted. You get distracted. You're always trying to think about what could jeopardize your position your political position. And you just they're not committed to really getting the job done, and if you do the job and you do it right and I've I've always felt that you know I I always thought it was important to do well in the job you're in. Even if it's risky, even if it means, you could lose your job by virtue of doing the right thing but do that. If you do that. Other opportunities will come along. And in many ways that's been the story of my life. Is that you know I? I always decided that. Particularly in political chops that those ought not to be careers he ought to. They ought to be limited because if you'RE GONNA. Do it right, and you're going to make some tough decisions. You're going to get people angry at you. It's always better to leave those positions on a high where you've accomplished something and you've done well, but it's not like you're just trying to hang on for the sake of hanging on I. Think there's a shelf life to those jobs are hard to do their exhausting. If you do them right, and by the way, it's often good to have someone else. Come in and kick the tires exactly no one. is absolutely essential to any job. The fact is other people can come in and. It's good to have this breath of fresh air that comes in and looks at the job, but that's in part why President Obama wanted you to run the CIA. You didn't have an background and. I Guy Certainly I. Get this call from Rahm Emanuel. Who worked for me as a one of my aides when I was in the Clinton White House and he was now, the President Obama's chief. Been Designated Chief of staff and rum, called and said the president is thinking about the US director of the C. I.. A. I said Rom I said. Are you sure you got the right Guy because I'd been doing budget work and I'd been working on ocean issues. Were they looking for Norm Mineta? That's what I thought. I thought. Maybe you're looking for Norm Annetta. He said No. He says I think the president really wants to wants you to do it. And I remember Sylvia and I were visiting our son in Minneapolis. He's a cardiologists in Minneapolis we went to I. Think it was a playoff game for the Vikings? We at the game and I got a call. On My my cell phone that I think was from Sylvia. That said that the president elect Obama wanted to talk to me after the game went went back to Granola. And made the call to the president and the president. Said like you to become. Director of the Central Intelligence. Agency and I said I said Mr President I, said I'm honored that you would ask me, but as you know I spent my life doing a lot of budget work and doing other things. I mean I. I wasn't intelligence officer in the army. And I, obviously did intelligence when I was chief of staff. For, the president but I said I. I'm not quite sure whether it's a good fit. He said well. The reason I'm selecting Yuli on is because I think you can restore trust of CIA which had been badly damaged because of the politics of the time, and he said. I really think that you would be able to do that and besides that. I think it's a because we are in a war with terrorists I think. You would be strong leader in leading the effort to go after. Terrorists and particularly go after Ben Laden the CIA as you referenced, was struggling with a number of issues from policies on renditions, interrogation and miscalculations about weapons of mass destruction rock. Exactly what? What did you find at the when you got there? What was the morale I obviously headed up Headed up the White House Staff I kind of knew you know the challenges of taking on those kinds of responsibilities. You know the CIA. Had A mystique about it. Because you know here, it is located out in Virginia. You know off the Parkway beautiful campus too great campus. There's all kinds of talk about just exactly what the hell is the CIA. and. Where is this area Nevada? Where there are all these vehicles from outer space? Located it should be. We should point out that you're kidding right absolutely. Always asked the question I had a great. Person who became chief of Staff Jeremy Bash who we had as a guest on this podcast. Yeah! I'm I'm really glad that you did that because Germany has a great story as well, but Jeremy had been selected by the Obama Administration to head up the intelligence transitions. And he was helping me. At CIA and Jeremy Setup several meetings with the heads of the different areas at CIA, there's an analytical somebody in charge of analysis at the time, somebody in charge of operations, somebody in charge of technology somebody in charge of support systems I had the chance to sit down with all of them. And, these were not Republicans or Democrats. They were really. People who are dedicated to their job. I'm so glad you said that because that's precisely what I found that the FBI and the Justice Department that they don't take sides. They're Hartson's. They just try and do their job as best they can. You know and it was. It was so encouraging to have these people who knew their stuff at dedicated their lives to security of the country. You know just to to talk with them and walked through the various threats that the country was facing from terrorists and others around the world, and to have a sense of confidence that you know this is a team of people who really care about what's happening. I really felt. that. And Jeremy, and I made the decision early on that we were not gonNA walk into the CIA and kind of clean house and bring all kinds of new people that the most important thing we could do was to have him and I walk into the CIA headquarters. Just, the two of US and establish our relationship with the professionals who were there and learn, listen learn listen look at people how they doing on the job. Are they performing some people that you have to move on, but there are a lot of people who are doing their job right and that was encouraging I. think he wrote in your that at your first meeting you told those assembled in your conference room that you're going to work. Hard, have fun and become friends. That's right and that. One of the things I always believed. And it went back to my other jobs. I said I will be honest with you. But I expect you to be honest with me. And if I find that, you're not honest with me, then you're not gonna be around very long. You had an interesting issue early on. We had mentioned that one of the. Matters that landed on your desk was present Obama's resolve to release interrogation memos memoranda from part of justice that permitted the CIA to do. Enhanced interrogation, xxx overseas, and in many of the men and women in the CIA. You're now. Running were adamantly opposed to the president releasing that it's an interesting story about policy and process. Yeah, it is, and it was actually one of the first issues I had to deal with the challenge. Really becomes one of whether or not. You're going to be a leader. Of the people. That are responsible to you or whether you just going to kind of do what you think is necessary to kind of protect your own rear end. And as a leader of the C. I. A. These were people. Who as I said are really dedicated. To doing their job and nine eleven was a tragic event for this country to to be attacked in the way we were and to not know you know where the next attack might be. And I always thought you know if I was in that position at that time that you'd almost wanna do everything necessary to make sure that you're protecting the country that it never happened again. Yeah, and that it would never happen again I. think that those who worked at the CIA. who were dedicated to doing everything they could to trying to make sure they got good intelligence to try to protect the country from another devastating attack, and they were doing their job, and the reality was that the Justice Department had pretty much backed up Some of the steps that had been recommended and the and everybody there felt that you know what they were doing in accordance with the law. And I understand why the President President Obama change that approach I think he was right to do it. There were some of the tactics I think probably. Violated our basic values in terms of how we treat other individuals, but at the same time I also understood why people were doing that and to now suddenly put those people in jeopardy. So that what they did might be questioned and ultimately might cost them their job. Concern me. I made the decision. I was going to back them up in that effort. And you know went to the president and said you know Mr President. We need to move on. We've changed the way we do enhanced interrogation. There's no reason now why we should try to penalize. People who were doing what Justice Department said was right at the time. They were following orders and. And doing the right thing and really cared about the country I. Just think this really sends a bad signal to the president's credit. He allowed me to bring a group of other members of the C. I. A.. They're the senior members who had been involved present Obama heard them out, and he heard him out in the Oval Office and they spoke from their heart. And I really appreciate the president listening to them and I think it was for that reason that he was careful about You know the decisions. He ultimately made even though we didn't agree with a lot of those decisions to to go ahead and make some of this public in the end. I think the president. Really did make clear to the people who are working at the CIA that he really did care about them and the mission. They were performing I think. Though he ruled against the position, you were advocating and release those memoranda he did make it clear that any CIA personnel who relied on Department of Justice, legal advice in good faith would not be subject to prosecution -actly exactly and I think that was an important signal. To Send people when Jeremy Bash, your former chief of staff was on the show, he talked about a tragic event that took place during your tenure as C. I., A. Director in December of two thousand, nine and Co Steph, Ghanistan Yeah, yeah. It really became a very pivotal event. What had happened was one of our allied intelligence partners. Indicated that they had. A possible agent. Had located at individual. Who might be able to lead us? If not to Ben Laden. To the second in command our here I. Think was his name, right? It was one of these kind of unique opportunities. To kind of see if we could get a break, frankly on the location of bin, Laden so. We decided that we had to obviously talk to this agent to vet that individual to make sure that he was not a double agent. And so we set up a meeting. With him at place, call host Afghanistan. It's in the mountains near the Pakistani border. At first, the ancient didn't want to come out of Pakistan and it took a while when we finally convinced him. To come to this meeting at host. When we found, he was coming. the people there were obviously very excited couldn't wait to greet him. He was actually able to get through the checkpoints. Without being searched, which was a mistake, and as his vehicle pulled up. To where the intelligence officers were located, they kind of moved out and began to surround his car and the security. People were very nervous to their credit. And he got out on the other side of the vehicle. They had their weapons drawn, and they said take your hands out of your robe. He had his hands in his robe. And he then set off a suicide vest that was. It was devastating very powerful. And the explosion killed I think seven officers and wounded a number of others you know. He turned out obviously to be a double agent at the time, and it was a devastating blow. It was I was. Back in Monterey, actually at my home in Carmel, Valley was over the Christmas holidays when I got word that it had happened. And I spent the next few months going to funerals and you know really sharing with the families who you know we're. We're the loving partners of these officers and. I'll never forget everyone of those funerals. Families came up to me and said. You know we're glad you're here. But we want to make one thing clear. That You've got to continue. To do the work. That our loved one died for, and that was essentially to keep going after bin Laden. You described all the families as remarkably STOIC. They were very stoic and that there was a moment that I will never forget of going to a funeral. Of One of the members up in Massachusetts. We were driving. In the motorcade, going to the cemetery and people had lined up. Along the whole route. With American flags. I was thinking. You know here. Here's somebody who largely operates undercover whose work is not really no. To most of the people in this country, and cannot pay and cannot be. And yet here are the American families. WHO Know that this person had given his life. For the cause of this country. And you know it was. It was just such a reassuring moment to know that we are not alone. At the fact is this country? Is there you know supporting the CIA and supporting those who put their lives on the line for this country? And, as a result of those moments, I remember. Going back to the CIA and the people at the C. I, had the same feeling that because what happened at host. They were Gonna do everything they could to make sure that we would ultimately not only find whoever was involved and responsible for that suicide bombing. But that we would also do everything necessary to find Bin Laden, you listen to the names of the men and women who died that day in your book Harold Brown junior aged thirty seven Elizabeth Hanson, age thirty Darren Labonte H thirty five Jennifer Lynn Matthews H, forty five Dane Clark Parisi, age forty six. Scott Michael Rogerson Age thirty nine and Jeremy Wise aged thirty-five. Those individuals are now remembered by stars on the wall. At the CIA as you enter the lobby of the CIA. On the right hand side. is a wall of stars. That represent every one of those individuals who gave their life. In the line of duty at the CI, and even to this day there are some stars with no name, exactly a lot of them. we could never reveal their real name. They operated in a covert basis and it's A. It's a remarkable wall because not only does it reflect their sacrifice that they gave their life, but it's also the work they had to do. On behalf of this country in surrendering their own identity in order to make sure they could try to gather the kind of intelligence, we need surrender their own identity even in death exactly. President Obama's to take yet. Another job an extraordinary job as secretary of Defense of the United States. was that a surprise. Yeah. It was a little. It was a little bit of surprise. I. Mean I again. Going back to what I said about always knowing when to get the hell out of. His Washington. And always leaving on a high you know after we done the bin Laden raid and gotten bin Laden and it was such a successful mission kind of a great accomplishment for the intelligence community, and for the Special Forces community. In fact, one of the guests on the PODCAST, Admiral. Bill mcraven spoke about that raid. Yeah, no bill bill was the one who uh whose had a special forces and he was the one I had asked to actually prepare the operations to go after this compound where we thought bin Laden might be located you know to. Have that happen in happen successfully. was just a very proud moment and I really thought that it was a good time for me. A CIA director probably move on and go back to California. You keep trying to go back can't. Keep keep trying. And the President President You know asked me if I would, if I would become secretary of defense, and I said well I said this president, one way or another I want to get back to California. To get back to our institute and my home, and so I'm not sure that I'm GonNa. You know that I would serve beyond four years as secretary says. That's okay. how whatever time you can serve as secretary of defense. I'd like to have you do it. So again, president asked me to take on new responsibility, and you know I decided to do it and I've never regretted that decision either because As Secretary of Defense again you're working with people who are truly dedicated to protecting our country. It made me proud. Of. Those in uniform in particular, who are willing to fight and die. To protect our country, it's possible that our listeners heard a faint scratching at the door while we were in your office. I presume those dogs. They are we've got. Right outside the door right now, we've got our dog BUBBA. WHO's a golden retriever and we're babysitting for Jimmy stock my my youngest son's dog. His name is copper and he's elaborate doodle, but. Always been adopted family and I had a great dog before Bubba, bubba great dog, but I had a great dog named Bravo. Who was another golden retriever. I actually used to bring Bravo back with me to Washington to be with me. When I was director of the C. I., A. and also Secretary of Defense and You can't imagine bringing a golden into the CIA with all of these straight shooters. Who here in a conference and I? I Remember Bravo. Who would go up to some of these? These older. Officers and we'd be talking and he. He pushed their hand off the chair so that they would finally scratches. Is precisely what Bubba did to me today. That's right. And in finally, they you know. They finally petted him. and they. They all got used to him and. We went through all of these conferences on the Ben Laden raid in I've often said Bravo was there for all of those conferences in never leaked a word I you could trust Bravo and Bravo by the way is in my portrait at the CIA and he is also in my portrait. As Secretary of Defense, the only secretary, the only director to have a dog in the same picture it and it's because I really felt that he was very much a part of my team. in both jobs you know the size of the Department of Defense in two thousand and eleven, when you became secretary as you right the Department of Defense employed more than two million servicemen and women, another eight hundred thousand civilians, an additional one point, one million men and women in the national, guard and reserves yet another two million retirees that it owns more real estate than any organization on. Has Hundreds of bases around the globe, and at the Pentagon alone headquarters roughly twenty three thousand people who worked in that building on a daily basis. That's big. It's huge. It's huge. I've often said going from the CIA to To the Department of Defense was like going from the corner hardware store to one of these big You know hardware outlets. Box Big box stores. How do you get your arms? Around an enterprise that large I think in many ways you take the formula used at Oh, and be in the White House and it C., I a. and applied it to Department, of Defense, which is that? It is critical to establish a team sense of team. Among the leadership there because in the end they're going to be responsible. For getting the job done accomplishing the mission. so what I did! was as I did. At these other jobs established a staff meeting. At the highest levels every day, would that be among your joint chiefs? That's what I would do something by the way that had not only been done I did a staff meeting each morning with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, usually the vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs. My civilian heads of the various. Areas of responsibility. The policy heads the General Consul. The top leadership really at Dod and we would meet at nine o'clock. In the morning around a big. Conference table. And I would walk through you know. What are the the primary missions were looking at? At that moment. What are we working on in terms of legislation up on Capitol? Hill, what's happening with the budget What's happening in other areas I would ask each of them to a report from their different areas. And the purpose of that is to build this sense of team. so that everybody knows. What's happening particularly with the secretary and particularly with the White House? I would basically present what issues we're dealing with with regards to the White House as well so in being honest with the team and listening to them. I think he really do build a sense. Of Loyalty. So that you know, they know that you're telling them the truth. You're not pulling any punches. And you're asking for their help. your you know obviously. You have to be disciplined if there are things that have to be done you. Impress upon them the importance of getting the job done. And what what what what needs to be accomplished And I I really think. To develop a successful leadership model. It really requires three or four key things. One is establish a set of goals that you want to achieve. Never Walk into a job. Just to move stuff from the inbox to the outbox. What are the goals you want to achieve? And establish those schools. Secondly. Make. Sure that everybody shares those goals and understands why it's important to accomplish them develop a strategy for accomplishing those goals and what barriers we may run into. And then fourthly. Be Honest with yourself. As to what you can do and what you can't do, but also be honest with others. I think those are vital ingredients to being able to. Pull a huge department or agency together so that you are focused on what you have to accomplish, and as with the CIA, the Department of Defense is a here Article Organization of folks are used to getting and giving orders, and you're the boss, so they try very hard to comply imagine, but it's unwieldy. Yeah, no, it's. It is a big organization. There's a lot of bureaucracy involved There's a lot of people who operate in stovepipes. One kind or another, and each of your services have their own cultures and their organization, so we had what you know, what are now known as the joint commands which I think is real step in the right direction. Can you explain Yeah, Joint Command Combatant Commands? are really a use of bringing the various services together so that the air force the Marines the army. The navy are working together in. In a combatant command so that that command represents the best of all the services, but more importantly, they're all working together, so for instance stubborn command. It's a geographic responsibility exactly, but your services are there together working on common problems right? So have you have a southern command? We have a European Command. We have a combat combatant command. You have an African, so we have different areas of the world that have combatant commands. And they represent a combination of all of our services so that they can provide the air support. The navy support the ground support the troops on the ground special forces. All of them are operating, and interestingly enough you could have an admiral as head of one combatant command. You could have a marine general ahead of another combatant command. You can have an army general him another command it really does make the forces work together, and it's very important this stove. Stove Piping that I talked about can really be harmful. If services are not reaching out and really sharing information about the kinds of challenges that they have to face, I was really struck by something. You wrote in your book. worthy fights which I read and loved by the way, but you said that every week as the secretary of Defense, you spent quiet hours alone sort of reading and contemplating letters to send to families who lost loved ones. It was. Without question, the toughest job I had, which is You know I sit in the the office of the secretary. And pull out my stationary and I'd have a list of those who had been killed in combat. And I would write notes to their family. and to just take the time. To in your own handwriting address these families. and. HOW PROUD! They should be. With regards to their loved one who made the ultimate sacrifice? For for for the country and matter of fact, I'll never forget. One Moment Where I was writing one of those notes and it was to a Mrs Weiss. And I wish writing about the loss. Of Her son Sergeant First Benjamin Wise Right Benjamin Weiss. And I thought my God. I had written. A note to this mother. When I was director of the CIA, because her son was one of those who had been killed at host Jeremy Jeremy Wise Jeremy. That's right one of the seven names that I had read. And so now I was writing another note because she lost another son. Call been and I I often thought that here's a family. That had made the ultimate sacrifice. Two sons. who had given their life for the country? I mean I think we all. Remember you know the scene. Of. The brothers in in in the movie saving private. Ryan, where you know, the brothers had been killed and. They were trying to save one of the brothers. and here I was dealing with. The loss of two sons and I think what greater sacrifice can a family make? Then to. To give two of their sons. To this country in order to try to protect, I was wondering if you might read the handwritten note that you wrote. I am so very lost in my emotion. Of losing another son of yours to combat as the father of three sons. I cannot imagine the pain. You must be feeling. And yet I know. That like Jeremy. Ben was doing what he wanted. To fight for all of us. He is a true American hero and Patriot. God. Bless him and you. As beautiful words I also feel that I'm right now in the presence of a true American hero and Patriot it is. Such an honor to sit down with you Leon Panetta somebody who served as a congressman for sixteen years as the head of the Office of Management and Budget as President Clinton's chief of staff in the White House as the director of the CIA and as the Secretary of defense. It's. Quite a legacy, well I. I thank you and thank you for your service. I really believe deeply. In service to country because. I think our democracy. Is, strong, because there are people who are willing to give back to the country. And are willing to do things to. Try to make sure that we give our children a better life you know I talked about. My father is an immigrant, and I used to ask him why he came all of that distance to this country, and I never forgot his response which was. Because your mother and I believe we could give our children a better life in this country, and it did and I think they did and I've had. That's the American dream. It really is the American. Dream and I've had a chance. To live that kind of American dream and I'm really proud of having done that. We'll. Maybe you'll get called back to service one more time. I don't know California's a great place to live right now. It's a great place to be. Thank you so much for your time. Thank you very much. Thanks to Leon, Panetta, his wife Sylvia and the wonderful folks that the Panetta Institute on the campus of Cal State University. Monterey Bay for hosting our PODCAST. Thanks to to his dog. and his dog in law copper for being so patient and quiet for almost all of our interview. Leon is one of the most distinguished and accomplished public servants in American history with more important positions on his resume, and one could ever imagine. Congressman White House chief-of-staff CIA director and Secretary of Defense among others. He is also the author of the book worthy the fights. This is the oath with Chuck Rosenberg. Thank you so very much for listening. If you liked this episode, please let us know leaving us. A five star rating on whatever APP you used to listen. And ask your friends to subscribe. We are available on Apple podcasts, spotify tune-in and every major listening APP as well as MSNBC DOT com slash the. If, you're listening on a smartphone, tap or swipe over the cover art of podcast. You'll find our episode notes including some details, you might have missed. If you have any thoughtful criticism, feedback or questions about this episode or others. Please email us at podcast g mail DOT COM. That's all one word. The podcast. G MAIL DOT COM. And though I cannot personally respond to every email. Please know that I read each one of them and that I appreciate. The Oath is production of NBC News and MSNBC This podcast was produced by Co.. With Benny Cohen Nick, Batum and Robbie. They are a wonderful team. I am fortunate toward. Bolivia cruiser provided excellent production support as always. Our associate producer is Alison Valley and Steve Lick Tai is our executive producer. This is the author Chuck Rosenberg. Thank you so very much for listening. Hi Everyone, it's joy, Reid host of am joy on MSNBC. Did you know you can listen to am joy and all? Your favorite MSNBC shows as podcast, you can catch up on the beat with all. Remember the Rachel. Maddow show the eleventh hour with Brian Williams and more anytime on the go search for your favorite MSNBC shows wherever you're listening to this podcast and subscribe for free. Thanks for listening.

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The IAEA's questions for Iran

Arms Control Wonk

48:02 min | 9 months ago

The IAEA's questions for Iran

"They should he borough charity. You are listening arms control long podcast on arms control disarmament and non-proliferation Time Geoffrey Lewis the founding publisher of the Arms Control. Wonka walk and they professor at Middlebury Institute of International Studies Have Monterey Directly Program for Policy Research. I'm employees hungry now. Independent analysts in Monterey California this weekend ooh I think. A lot of things slightly Three loaves of sour dough I attempted sour dough. Donuts that were disgusting and tonight is Sour dough pizza dough. So we'll see how that turns out very tasty to ask me what I'm becky. No Banana bread of it. We have a lot of banana bread in our house. That's what we do with with old Nana's as Rodman has and we made the healthy issuers and so we do use coconut oil rather than butter. That's disgusting. We're not here to talk about errands. Repellent taste in banana bread. We we we are. We are back with our our lousy zoom recording technology to about Iran. Because some it's gone down with Iran and the Iran nuclear deal. I thought we talked about that. A little bit talk first about the background onto. Yeah I for listeners. Who CAN'T SEE I? I'm taking advantage of the zoom virtual background option. And I have a behind me cascade of Iranian centrifuges. What's the breakout time on this? Well I'm I'm I'm actually recording this from in my toilet to try to get away from the sounds of my children's so I'm I'm thinking realistically we could get six or eight Enzo about four or five years that the US we name it the USS Tension Tinny for both the he's Alad quality and the normal function of this particular space. So that's why you have the background so you don't have to look at my toilet. You actually sound pretty good you do. I had no idea if you tell okay. Well that's enough about that's enough about a wonderful sour dough pizza. You're disgusting Coconut Oil Banana Bread and my toilet. We are here to talk about Iran. 'cause some stuff happened three things. I think we're GonNA talk about today. We're GONNA talk about tax the first use of insects Which is kind of an interesting thing. We're GONNA talk about the efforts to access re sites in Iran Raelians Seem super excited about allowing access to an answering questions about a third and we're going to talk about the most recent I e report which has some information. That's been brewing for a while. It's not that all of its new so we can talk about three things stay. We're GONNA TALK ABOUT INSECTS. We're GONNA talk about covert sites and we're gonNA talk about Some under appreciated aspects of JCP away that are eroding so you you all WanNa talk about insects. I sure so I guess so. We tried to record this episode last week when this was first happening but Last week on the on March thirty first German Foreign Office tweeted out that France Germany and the United Kingdom Had successfully concluded its first transaction via insects to facilitate the export of medical goods from Europe to Iran Insects was set up back in twenty nineteen on January. The mechanisms were set up on January. Thirty first two thousand nineteen but this was the first time that they had been used so insects for those listeners. Who Don't know is kind of is. It's a European vehicle to get around Us financial sanctions and by allowing European exporters to receive payments for sales to Iran from funds. That are already within Europe And vice versa so that no money is actually changing hands which then prevents them from getting on the wrong side of the United States financial. It's kind of a big deal right. Because they set up this mechanism in January two thousand nineteen to coordinate trade and yet there had actually been any trade that was on purpose of a significant amount of pressure from the trump administration not to use his vehicle because of honestly is that they were going to deal with these transactions says sanctions violations. May and they tried to just limit it to sue. Currently they are limiting it to just medical supplies medicine. What have you but the Iranians really would like to expand this to other goods. They deem necessary right. I mean I actually think the real value I mean. I think they were quite politically clever to pick an export of medicine at this time. Right because it's very hard Politically to make the case that you shouldn't be Maybe you shouldn't be facilitating kind of trade and and I think for listeners. The European Council on Foreign Relations Has This beautiful explainer Lincoln. The show notes. I'm just going to read it because I think it really explains how insects which is the European counterpart right. It's the instrument in support of trade exchanges and Iran and the Iranian counterpart S. T. F. I the Special Trade Finance Institute how they coordinate trade without any money crossing borders. Because that's what would trigger the financial sanctions right. So the example they get and again. This is from this article So these these are not my words. These are the the the quake clever words two other people. A European export or with an order for medicine from Iranian importer provides insects with the relevant documentation on the transaction. This include evidence that the importer has practiced reasonable due diligence. In relation to the Iranian Byron and user crucially for European companies. Insects will not provide the requisite due diligence service right so the European export her with medicine. goes to tax with documentation. And then once it's approved. The Sale Index Will Register. It on a ledger of trade. Insects will examine. It's ledger to identify. An instance in which a European importer has registered a purchase of pistachios from an Iranian. Exxporter in stacks will approve. Payment FROM THE EUROPEAN IMPORTER OF STASH GOES TO THE EUROPEAN EXPORT OF MEDICINE. Meaning that the payment can be made from one. European Bank to another without using funds that originated in Iran Night so to complete the process of the trade intermediation the reigning counterpart to insects will coordinate a similar payment from the Iranian importer of medicine to the Iranian exporter of pistachios. These funds will remain within Iran. It's quite clever. Although one has to wonder how how much trade arrangement like this could ultimately support? Well I feel like it's I don't think it can handle all a large volume at this point in time. But I think that for these essentials especially when in a time when Iran is having a really rough time with the bad thing that we try not to mention on the pie the bad thing I did. I know but it's important. It is important to to make it known that this that the first the first transfer of goods is necessary because they're having a really rough time with the bad thing. We can't avoid it completely but it is. It is politically clever. Don't you think I think it's politically clever? But I think it's also politically revealing took so long for them to process the first payment processing in the first panel was built around the export of pulling that would be in command -tarian goods rather than something in facilitation or something that the US financial The US Treasury would be looking at far more closely in terms of monitoring secondary sanctions placed upon the potential position of sanctions placed upon European countries. If they were to do If they were to engage in trade with the Iranians in ways that the JCP lay was supposed to facilitate. Would you say that? That's the way? Yeah I mean I the way I look at. It is the purpose of this is to try to deliver to the Iranians some of the benefits of the agreement in order to keep the Iranians at least nominally in the deal. You know they're at the point now where they're not abiding by many of the provisions just as the US has an abiding by many of the provisions but things have not broken down completely. I I think it's a clever way to start things but given that it has been an entire year is just not clear to me that this instrument as clever as it is is going to really ultimately be a difference maker although I I I hope I am wrong. Yeah and I think it's worth noting BA first. Transaction being around medicines given what ends with a backdrop. What is was a clever way to do this? I will question the viability of this as a large scale mechanism to give Iran. Even some of what it wanted under the JCP la and even in the very very Clever and very clear to follow Explanation that you read from the easiest piece. That's still kind of complicated than just a bank. Transfer right yeah. Yeah and so. I think Iran is making the requisite sort of counter moves to register their displeasure. Yeah so for example. There's not enough trade to get us the answers and access we want to the three covert sites which is the second big fake we want to talk about. The other major development has been that their IRA has raised questions about three undeclared sites in Iran. And while the IRA has been super careful about not naming the sites We have a pretty good gas right now. It looks like this involves one site that the I a visited but that they have questions about and to sites that the I eight year would like to and would like to visit but that the Iranians are not eager to give access to. Yeah it's I I think it's worth just rece- just reading. What what what. What the director-general Grocery Grossi set in full because it kind of circumspect but nevertheless very clear if you know where the group to the lights I'm just GonNa read it quote. The agency has identified a number of questions related to possible undeclared nuclear material nuclear related activities at three locations that have not been declared by Iran. The agency sought access to two of the locations. Iran has not provided access to these locations as not engaged in substantive discussions to clarify the agencies of questions and then there was the big warning right. Which in with Reuters? He said. I sincerely hope that Iran will listen to us and listen to the voice of the international community and assess that it's in their interest to cooperate with us. We will be walking towards a crisis if not so we have some. There's some thoughts about what those three sites are likely to be and they stem from the Atomic Archive Which was the documents that Israel purloined from a warehouse in subur- suburban Tehran so the three covert sites that the I. E. A? Would like to visit or would like questions answered about Are are likely a site called Turku Zabad which is the location of the warehouse of Tehran. Where the Atomic Archive was discovered. The Shaheed Bergeres Project which is a site located near Parchin that is alleged to be quote a production scale facility for manufacturing uranium metal components for nuclear weapons and the third is an unnamed site near day where Israel has alleged that Iran has conducted experiments to develop nuclear weapons including Yields estimation experiments. And we'll talk about it. But Fob Aeon Has Jill located that site. Yeah I think we should talk about her cusack. The warehouse site I because it does look like that. That's the one that the I eight years has been to and it's a little unclear in the Iowa reports because they didn't use its name but one of the reports mentioned that they had done environmental sampling at a site that revealed natural uranium particles of an of anthropogenic origin. And the report. Didn't say that was to Kusabhadra Abbott. Your typical anonymous diplomats. That's right raiders. Diplomats always western clue slid shink sets country. It's shock it's hard to imagine which which which western diplomats was a kind of so the important thing there is that this is the site where the atomic archive was created. Which is railly's late. Which the Israelis rated Always got a little frustrated because you know some of the people who are constantly demanding the IRA Do this inspection or do that inspection demanded that the IRA go visit the site and then when the visited the site they said it was too little too late not getting enough super annoying but a big ups to friend of the POD Mark Fitzpatrick who in advance of the visit sad. If radioactive material had been stored at the warehousing question it would have less left traces that lasts for years and are very difficult to erase and Lo and behold it left traces and the Iranians couldn't erase them. This is my favorite part because Iran always gets caught with his hand in the cookie jar. And it's always the I e a sample swipes the IRA has never been good enough to to to be an enforcement agency returned to at least be able to inspect these Places get it always seems to catch the Iranians with their hands in the cookie jar. It's it's incredible. I mean this is the Iranian. You know we were treated to the just endless in torrent of about how the Iranians were self-inspecting. I wasn't gonNA find anything. Parching and Pink Tarps Gloat Lo and behold they both got natural uranium at the site but then more importantly and very cleverly they didn't just swipe for uranium. They swiped for the explosive that the Iranians claimed had been stored there and that wasn't present and it was like. Yeah you guys are so by omission. I you know I mean good for the Iowa forgetting in. They're not surprising. It was the archive for the nuclear weapons program that we all believe existed up until two thousand three. Not sure what we learned other than that like. The archive is really probably an archive. Which you know didn't out when we should we should also mention so the the to the next two sites are came. Those revelations came we think out of the archive but are sites. That are part of the former program not things that we are currently worried about. Yeah I mean it's part of this endless and utterly pointless argument we have where we say. Iran was building a nuclear weapon. That's why it is very important. Strike this nuclear deal and then people say you can't strike a deal with them. They were building a nuclear weapon. It's like yes Rumsfeld nuclear weapon. That's why you have to enhance inspections. You can't trust them because they were building a nuclear weapon like yes. I know. That's why I need a but you can't trust them that yes I know. That's why it's yeah. It's you know it will get to this. We'll come to this later. Between the problems. We have talking about Iran. Because they're the three of US doubt that Iran was was headed very active. It'd be a much better podcast. Gareth Porter on you. Don't pretend exactly for ten was building nuclear weapons. We all know this. So that's the hardest part about this about me For me is following. Along with this because the imploding of the JCP La makes it easier for around to build a nuclear weapon at a time when we know that they had previously built a nuclear weapon. Where where it would be better to verify in robust detail that they're not building weapons. Yeah I mean. It's IT'S INCREDIBLE. People are like you know the problem with this deal is at the provision sunset. So we have to pull out of the deal now in Suns at all the provisions. It's like you know it's like the person who goes to the restaurant like the food is terrible and the portions are so small. It doesn't make sense what we do think or at least we are inferring. That two of the other sites that Grossi was talking about were sites that were in the right. I think so if only because regardless of whatever we think about the political theatrics of what the Israeli government under Benyamin. Netanyahu is doing these. These appear to be sites that are identified in the archive and Raphael. Grassi is a sincere and competent. International official and he is going to ask to see these sites right. It is not possible for me to imagine that Rafael Grossi wouldn't be interested in seeing the sights and so they have to be on the list as we talk. Let's talk about the first one Shaheed. Borusia Day Zhizn Shahida Boroujerdi Luzerne this. We're establishing that. The Arabic speaker is less likely to mispronounce the Persian word the Turkish speaker. Which if you speak Persian and you speak Arabic you know that. That is still not good enough. They are just. They are still difference. It's better than my redneck pronunciation. Should he borough charity best? Actually good. We're GONNA go without. I mean you got a little Charlie Wilson going on there. I'll never forget. My childhood accident comes out. I'll never forget learning that young young island in South Korea which is young young doe which I can't I can't get that people just called it in the military why Pedo why Pedo so just sp. Right so SB is a site that and I'm quoting here. A senior Israeli analysts assessed that this site was involved in making uranium metal components for nuclear weapons. It was published by Isis. It was it was provided to them. I mean you know to their credit. They footnoted right. It was a briefing net that David Albright got in Tel Aviv from Israeli intelligence officials foot Are Important why he could have pretended. He founded himself which he didn't do that. We've been unethical so I can give them about not liking their politics and then also give them credit for footnoting things it turns out. It's harder for some people to footnote things and others heart for some harder for some people to footnote things on others. Okay it's there it's on it's on the Parchin site right or two military bases Arjuna's or it's huge We know this. It's very large and it's the site where they had the The Test Chamber where the famous self-inspection took place where the EA found uranium particles actually where the Iranians who self inspect and found the uranium particles. I E L. Right and I think from from what does it matter perspective. It is important to note that the documentation shows that construction occurred between April. Two thousand two and may two thousand three. So that's before. Iran halted a word. I know love but before moulting or paused or suspended its nuclear weapons program which is typically given as sometime in the fall of two thousand three although the bureaucratic mechanism by which Iran halted the program. It probably took a little longer for it to play out so this is a. This is a free two thousand three. This facility is probably I mean I think the is pretty good that it's part of the pre two thousand three weapons program so the the evidence. Let's talk about evidence because I think one of the biggest parts is that it documents indicate that it is associated with project three point one four which had been previously identified by as part of the covert nuclear weapons programme involved in Uranium metallurgy. Yeah you know one of the really interesting things that comes out is so they have the documents associated with this right so they've got a contract that says it's for this project one ten which is a nuclear weapons program and then there's what I think is one document with to slide saying that the beneficiary as this project three point one four there is one I e document mentions project three point one four and it makes it clear it's part of the covert nuclear weapons program and I have seen secondary sources say it was linked marina metallurgy. But I have never been able to find that in an I. E. Eight documentum. You know one of the CO author on the report is Ali Hainan. Who's the former Director for safeguards? So I suspect that this is confirmation that that that's what they thought it was for. Okay so we'll just put a little asterik about that just a note. Oh I think it's real. It's just I I actually I happen to find. I found one book about Iran's nuclear program that mentioned that's what the thought project three point one four is four and I kinda made a note to myself like. Oh this person must have done some good interviews right so it's not that I don't believe it. It's just that like we'd seen them referenced. Project three point one four his best. I can tell one document where they didn't say what it was for But nomenclature wise that makes sense and I should say also. There's also a table of purposes of the rooms while they don't say uranium it makes it clear it's for processing battles so I think that's good enough. I mean I see why. Israeli analysts concluded was to make uranium components nuclear weapons by. That's a pretty good too. Yeah so you know it. Actually if I was going to make a broader observation about this I guess I would say that it goes to the kind of the challenge of the I eight. Yay at a place like Parchin right. Which is you gotTa know where to look. I mean there's a famous story in far as I think as far as news or maybe mayor about Ali Hainan in another. Iea official trying to select a spot To inspect parching and then picking out this bunker and the Iranians laugh at them because they say it's a toilet right which I'm not actually sure. That story is true just because the Iranian said it even worse toilet. Yeah but like even if it were true like this is a really big sprawling site with lots and lots and lots of buildings and unless you have really good information about what's happening in a particular building You know it's it's it's actually not that easy right to know exactly where you should go and and so. I'm not surprised that they would put a facility like this at Parchin and Not Super surprised that they would would be able to hide its existence. Maybe not remembering this correctly and I don't care if you leave it in if I get it wrong. But it was after they went and looked at it was around two thousand five or two thousand six where there were more documents sort of made available today adults to say that it allowed the refine their search to go looking for that specific billion S. Chambre am I remembering that correctly? Well that's how I remember it but it's possible we're both Miss Remembering it. But yeah they did do a visit to Parchin which which was not conclusive because it doesn't seem like they went to the right building. Which again like not not meant as a criticism of of the War of Ali Hainan at the time. Like it just. It's hard right. It's frankly if you're doing your job you're you shouldn't limit yourself to just the places that you're sure of right. I mean eagled testing the dependent. Variable yeah you you gotTa You. GotTa you know. I'm sympathetic to that so I You know it's not surprising. Iranians were able to do this. I didn't mean that is a criticism. I meant to say that it was a reaffirmation that it is hard especially at a big place like Where you could get a whiff that says Parchin as the site of some nefarious activity up but not know exactly where that is. Yeah well I mean it's like getting a whiff that there's some nefarious activity University of Maryland. College Park went to school and I was like. Yeah well I know there is a buildings you want me to go in for. I mean people all the time who went to Maryland when I went right at. It's like there's like I don't know how many thousands of students and it's like I didn't know like I should we talk about the third side. Kaz Aaron. You you you have you feelings about this place. I just called the dump at a desk buildings. The desert right so this is day. This is one of the most interesting things to me. The Israelis shows what information from the atomic archive to distribute and so they gave sb to to Albright and company but they held back this place until one of the multiple Israeli elections. That's been held in the past year. Maybe the second one. I can't remember. Oh and they said and you know in their defense. They said they decided not to burn it until the Iranian started tearing down Once okay reunions knew that it was compromised and they could go ahead and release it now. I'll leave it up to you as to whether it needs to be released in a campaign style briefing but the prime minister but you know it's a really interesting. It's a really interesting location. Because the Israelis do not say were what the purpose of the site is and didn't really provide much documentation associated with it. But you you an fob went and found the site and try by by that by that I mean by that you mean fobbing went and spa on the site and was like. Hey Jeffrey I found the site out of this look and I went on a safari and found the site and from working with bobby and is he just find. I don't know how well the Israelis did they gave the town and they put up a picture so they showed us how that picture and they gave the town as low hanging fruit bulldoze through it like a boss. Yeah so what did you. What did you see? What did you see because I it's a get to sit with you and look at this stuff anymore? You have to dump. It's hard to know how dumpy it is though because there weren't a lot of great satellite images of it remember it. Looks like it was part of the pre two thousand three nuclear weapons program right and so you know if you look at Google Earth for example. The newest picture is like may two thousand thirteen and that you know by then looked like it was in pretty bad shape. We also used to have Tara server but you know poor out Tara Server. It's now dead so Keira survey it's got got got to buy that straight from our MAC SAR got which I guess. We'RE GONNA probably end up doing You you know it. It really didn't look very active until the archive was rated and and the bulldozers showed man love is unseen treatment. Y'All which is now what cows our park a lovely park these days. It's a lovely bark. That's the one place where the particles for listeners. The one spot the Iranians have ever seem to successfully Demolish raise and then seal up. So that there's no finding anything was Lavasani on Shan which was probably a site for testing centrifuges Which the Iranians not only bulldoze but they ground scraped. God knows what happened to the dirt and they turned into a park and they've redone the park multiple times since and it's had basketball courts and other other things put down their pictures up online. It looks like a very peaceful and beautiful place to contemplate universal bereavement. They ever let us say. Maybe we'll record life podcast from that that you'd be freaking awesome. You know one of the funny things about this site which I don't really get I mean first of all. The rains didn't scrape the warehouse which they could've Yeah. It was weird. And they didn't and they didn't scrape this thing knocked down the building but they they left like a bunch of trees and things and so it didn't look like it was the kind of ground scraping that. I would expect to have seen if they were going to do a proper a proper cleanse so I don't know what they're up to but but they didn't let me. Yeah I mean it's a suspicious site for sure I mean I like whatever you think about. The motives of the people leaking this information. I think the archive is real and much of the information appears to be verifiable. This is a weird looking facility. It's a location that looks like a security facility. You know it's it's not. A far am a fact that after the archive was stolen. The you know suddenly got bulldozed. You wouldn't bulldoze a site like this site like this. It's in the middle of nowhere. If you abandoned it you would just let it fall down right. So that's the one that I the most enigmatic because like the SBA we know we've because we have the briefings a pretty good idea what it was four in. It's not surprising that a facility like that existed. This one is still kind of interesting to me. We Are we done with the three sites we. It's not really for US okay. We're it's sort of confirmation of things. We already assumed happen right. But it's right. It's the circular argument of Omega. Iran had a nuclear weapons program before two thousand and three. Yes we know. That's exactly why you need to agree to enhance the inspections. But you can't do that because Iran nuclear weapons program before two thousand three yes. I know that's why you have to. Yeah but the Iranians hadn't been sitting around and saying. Oh just just just keep smashing me over the head with sanctions. They've been gradually increasing pressure particularly on the Europeans but also the United States by undoing early violating provisions within the JCP La Serbs sequentially in response to American actions. And I think those I think we all agree. Are they more worrying part than these? These old buildings presumably older buildings. And the much-vaunted breakout count Calculate Yeah we've talked in numerous podcasts recently about the steps that Iran is taking away from the JCP in attempts to pressure the United States to come back to the table. But I think beyond those steps there were a couple other things in some recent statements that got you nervous Jeffrey. Yeah because you know a lot of the things. Iranians have done are ultimately reversible. You know they can't they said like oh well we're GONNA accumulate. Lsu Now at a faster pace rather than ship it out like well okay but if we come back to the deal and you patch things back then you just pack up and ship it out again right so so. A lot of that stuff is reversible. There have been two things happening. That are not getting any attention that are causing a more anxiety because they go to the question of. How effective are we going to be at detecting a covert program? Because as I've said a million times I do not believe that the Iranians are going to say. Hi We're done. We're building a bomb. We're using Natanz you have X. number of weeks to bomb this facility or we will have the material that just does not seem like their mo right whenever they get a point where they are done with the deal internally. They're not gonNA tell us they're just going to start sticking centrifuges under a mountain somewhere so it's so important to make sure that we can see all of the steps leading up to that and there are two things in recent reports that really bother me one is that Iran has started manufacturing. Centrifuge rotors bellows with carbon fiber. That is not subject to agency monitoring right so this is like really down in the weeds. But one of the cool things about the. Jcp is it placed monitoring on the workshops that actually make the centrifuges those the best part of Jesus Christ and one of the one of the things that made that ineffective mechanism was that generally speaking when when this whole thing started carbon-fiber was being imported by Iran. And they were supposed to import it through a procurement channel. The I could look at it and then it would go sit under surveillance and there was a provision. That's it you know. They could make their own material to if they wanted but if they did that then the I would have to be able to inspect them material and they would have to go. Sit under surveillance and you know like that was not a perfect deal but now Iran has basically started. They've left the manufacturing process under safeguards or containment and surveillance. I guess is the phrase I should use. They've left it under containment and surveillance but they've begun bringing in material that is outside of this process and some people say well that's because they're importing it from the black market. Which would be worrisome. Right because it means they have an access to a supply that we don't know about But equally worries because I I you know me with my experience with North Korea. I think we might be underestimating countries domestic abilities. We know they have talked about. They have shown us. Plants for producing carbon. Fiber is a big question about whether it's strong enough for Roeder's regardless whether it's one or the other they now have a source of carbon fibre. That's outside of monitoring that they are turning into centrifuge centrifuges in front of the I eight Yay. It has to really cause you to worry whether there's another facility someplace That could be turning carbon-fiber into centrifuges that are never going to be seen by the I eight years so that that's causing me a lot of anxiety and then the second thing is under the JCP the only place that Iran could you mechanical testing of centrifuges. They could either do it at Natanz or they do it at the Tehran Nuclear Center. And that's the only place to do mechanical testing. And I am if it was involved in Richmond at all needed to be at Natanz. There is now this one reference to a new location for mechanical testing of centrifuges. Which just you know just as a practical matter. It raises the safeguards burden for the Guy. Right and and at least to me services. A warning like it's nice that they told the about this one. But it's a reminder that that if there are centrifuges that are potentially being manufactured outside of this structure God knows where they're getting tested so I I just you know this isn't like Oh my God. There's a hole in the deal because there is still a lot more surveillance on their central workshops than there was before the deal but now the Iranians are starting to chip away at the stuff. I really care about and just has me a little nervous. It was back to. I mean I think all of this you wrap it up by saying these. Things would be solvable in. A climate of political goodwill other as if Iran is either importing carbon fiber manufacturing or manufacturing robust enough carbon fiber itself. There's there are ways to Italy. Call loophole there are ways to basically make Jc Pielach if Iran was seeing benefits JCP Without any benefits the JC pillay For the sanctions talk to the sanctions that we lead the podcast managing these manageable differences. Become much harder you know and so these provisions that I know I see the thing I cared most about When I first read the Jay seculow whenever that whatever that was Time is lost. Meeting was the centrifuge monitoring and the and the more complete monitoring full-frontal the fuel site. And it's it's that stuff that I worry about. It's not the breakout time. It could care less up at and and in the absence of political will you know you're seeing manifest inability not to do inspections or not site visits and then now with the carbon fiber stuff you just talked about an added layer of complexity would be the inability right now to put boots on the ground to actually go check these things out given the bad thing. Yeah and I mean the way I always looked at it it was the JCP was ultimately political agreement. Right it it was going to. It was going to live or die based on the web at the benefits that Iran was receiving were sufficient for the people who wanted a less Isolated Iran to triumph over the people. Who wanted to bomb right and so we always knew that. That was what this was a bow and the real question was. Could we give ourselves confidence that the Iranians were keeping their end of the bargain and we also knew that over time Iranian capabilities? We're GONNA grow and grow and grow right and that's why there's a whole bunch of stuff in the agreement that sunsets wasn't like we were getting an agreement where the Iranians were like abandoning science and technology in order to receive a handout from the US government. It was. Can you put in place. A structure that get that delivers benefits to people in Iran were willing to forego a bomb and as you are giving them the benefits. Can you give yourself confidence that they're doing that? And you always knew over time that their capabilities. We're going to grow in the kind of confidence that you're going to have is going to have to change and it was going to have to of all from really intensive and intrusive inspection to You know this kind of much broader approach and so like we knew that Iran was going to get better centrifuges eventually and the JCP away just accepted that. That was going to happen but we tried to put day off as long as we could so that you could actually build this political compromise and make durable in the interim what this development suggests to me is that obviously we are not building that political compromise. If anything we're talking about this trump administration is talking about how corona virus might help with regime change. So there's none of that goodwill right and and in the interim we're watching aranesp progress right the Iranians progressing and so like if they now suddenly have this access to a big supply of carbon fibre. And they're building new sites that are you know at least initially under monitoring but you know just maybe there could be some. That are right. Our confidence is dropping before we have put in place that the real durable political consensus which to me feels exactly like how things went wrong with North Korea and we know how that story ended. Which by the way as I said from the beginning if you like a nuclear arm North Korea you're GonNa love walking away from the Iran deal. That doesn't sound like a happy note. Jeffrey. I even mentioned the bad thing everyday. Read it really talk about the bad thing. It was the bad thing in the context of perhaps potential. Other bet so a lot of bad things around you but you're sitting on your toilet. No I'm sitting in a room. Filled with Iranian centrifuges. Tinkling noise. You hear is the B- Yeah that's that's right S. K. Doing its thing it. It's a happy to take us away before we go off the rails as usual. I don't have one that dead yet. We're all good everybody's healthy actually. I will tell you what I will tell you something. I don't know if this counts is uplifting but it was. It was important. Centering I ran into. I ran into an important friend of James Martin Center Nonproliferation Studies and enormous booster of the Middlebury Institute. I was taking my kids for a walk. Garlanded Park which is a big kind of nature area here in in Carmel Valley and he was exercising and we we exercised appropriate social distancing when we ran into another but we stopped in from six feet away had a brief conversation. And I. You know I've expressed my anxiety about my all the things going on in the world at the moment and as an older person he said. You know you're you're young. You're healthy families healthy. You know you get up each day and you focus on on on that fact And you know yeah you don't worry about the rest of the stuff you know and I I yeah I think it was good advice from someone who's successful and and you know fairly old now so we pot away it'll be it'll be alright I hope everybody is enjoying the podcasts. But preferably from their home or from a from six feet away from many a human outside the family We benefit obviously from your help in helping these guests on so we encourage you to hand over the patron dot com slash. Hew podcast where you can get set help For three dollars a month of your student. Five dollars a month if you are not a student where you get. Access to wear. Slacks channel in our side channel does very cool things including contributing to the Washington Post finding for the first time that the Iranians of the subject of this podcast shot down a Ukrainian civilian airliner. And some other stuff. I'm forgetting different. You remember what else that we are at this moment. Developing and open source resource to detect missile launches trial because with very technical in nature. It's GonNa work but it's awesome. It's it's service. Is this what we are? Seeing a collaborative spirit of a lot of cool people engage in the trading of cool information of because we all joy doing what we do at patron dot com slash podcast without an but Sanyo Jeff senior secretaries I've got about.

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Datsun Roadster Stories + Audrain Newport Concours

CarCast

44:06 min | 1 year ago

Datsun Roadster Stories + Audrain Newport Concours

"You're listening to castle car cast on podcast one eh well. We've got a great show planned for you today. Hot Dots Talk. Oh Yeah roadster Talk Road Sir Talk Not five ten not Z. Talk surprising roadster talk with a very harrowing story where almost got killed in the roads there I bet online dot. Ag Nfl College now MLB playoff action visit bet online dot h. e. to take advantage of the best bonuses and the business use Promo Code podcast one for fifty percent sign up bonus matchups in week five. We've got Baltimore Pittsburgh and Green Bay Dallas Indeed Casey lots of good games to choose from. We've got a five hundred dollars in rewards to give out each week to five listeners and five thousand season-long charity contest onto join the conversation on twitter at Hashtag sports net challenge and Let's see my lock will be New England at Washington. I predict forty two fourteen so take that one to the bank use the Promo Code podcast one receive a fifty percent sign up bonus today bet online dot. Ag Your online align sportsbook experts in the AC it on got to get it on the church baby mandate get on welcome to carcass macro motivator. He Andrea sorry turn. My voice is a little wanka traveling and talking and talking and traveling yeah. That's my job talking travel travel and talk so thanks for joining us a have car thoughts yeah sure you do as well current projects working on a couple of cars the roadster and the five ten the roadster is I guess a team team car. You're in the Five ten is a privateer car right the roadster. We've been talking about a long time the one you guys have seen there's another roadster right now. This is the second roadster in your collection the beer e. p. brock still send me emails law some stuff they did a sort of blue and white scheme and a red and white scheme and they did the same with their five tans as they did with a roadsters yeah and they had the five ten with the Red Hood. I think forty six forty six yeah that's the one that's in the museum than they had blue hooded want and that's the one I have and they did the same with the roads. Are I have the blue hooded roadster and the red hooded roadster the blue hooded one. It's the one you seen me dry before in the red. Hood one is in a million pieces but I think those are the only two roadsters I think so and the cool 'cause they're cool pieces in a weird way ev everyone loves the five ends but the roadster in in in a in a weird ways are more interesting piece the two thousand not not the sixteen hundred yeah yeah yeah they they came with a five speed which is talking about nineteen sixty eight nine hundred sixty seven sixty nine the car Harvard five-speed Yeah Ali full frame cars yeah Z's disease came with a four speed two years later or some years later. I'm guessing the five tens all had four speeds but the the roadster had a five speed had a two liter four cylinder versus one six or one eight and and like a big racy had and it was not an L. Motor Disease L. to twenty four hundred eighteen and l sixteen or this is a you which is a little a little different configuration so but those cars pull hard and and yes they have a full frame so like a truck frame yeah and they have a straight live rear axle yeah and have drum brakes in the rear which they all had but they haul ass in. They're they're fun to drive and I learned this lesson years ago. The first car I ever bought like the first fun car everbod Abbad was a very used to forty and I just wrenched on it and experimented just had all these memory. You'd have all these goofy plans for your car. Yeah about what you're GONNA do stupid rams stupid pain like super. You're GonNa just kept all I would do is sort of like I I sort of had the same relationship with the Z. Is I had with playboys. which is I would go babysit and I would? I knew the two kids I babysit their dad's had playboys and my dad didn't have playboys my dad's a weird dude like my dad doesn't. I don't think you could find a never had play. Nobody even gave him well. I know he didn't buy one right might you. If you walked walked into my dad's house it any point in his adult life yeah you could not look around his house now. It wouldn't take long to look around his house because this house was always six hundred square feeders shitty low apartment. You could not find a bottle of scotch a bottle of vodka. A bottle of wine can a beer a playboy a tool a cigar the no drugs like yeah you know some refer literally. If you went into my dad's house you search allows and you'd be like desert nine year old just live here alone. There's no isis at all. There's nothing there's nothing I swear to God. He didn't have one vice like a pipe. He spoke of pipe he for eight small for little period of time. I think he smoked a cigar for a small period the time but other than that there was nothing in the house. You couldn't find a steak. You couldn't find a bottle. Ah Scotch you. You can find playboy you can find anything there was nothing but just dancers lived in a house. Maybe other things turn them on. I yeah now maybe a four teenage black. TV Did it for them but I would. I think it was thirteen. I used to go and I would babysit for my these to guys named Rayvey and Ronnie and then my neighbor to Babysit and the dad's had like the playboy like somewhere in the bathroom under the sink or something or Dads can play and I would just be thirteen. I've just stare at this. Playboy Darren's God one the job you're on the jobs on the job while the kids went to bed I have no love boat and fantasy island just be sitting there on the Sofa for watching TV and just staring but I had the same with my Z. Car later it's like just look at it like I want to do something. I don't have any money I don't have any tools yeah and I just like I. I WANNA get turbocharger and I want to build an engine and I had nothing. I like. No no money no tools garage. Your car porn was there. Was There a magazine or a book or a Cadillac or a catalog it. There's like a hot rod magazine or summit racing catalog or jags catalog that you'd flip through probably not much of that. I got the how the hot rod your to forty five ten and whatever the sort of on what is that Book Max Pat How hot ride no it's soft cover but it's thick and it's like how to hot Rod Datsun two forty three. I think it said hot rod wherever in the picture of it is five ten like on the cover and I just sit there and look like triple Weber setups for the triple Weber burs setups for the hot race. You're in your Dotson right August it was maybe a little bit of instructional driving thing to go along with the mods you do the picture is the forty six John Morton car it. What I would assume is attract that is I know they tell me you can tell it's road Atlanta because you can see the clay okay so you see orange clay around around the side of the track or the berm that like Paul Newman hit his five ten and Blah Blah Blah then you'll know it's Rhode Island so I'm assuming it's road Atlanta because of uh-huh orange clay but I don't know and there's John Morton and I was like Oh man I could hot rod my Z? I would just stare at the pictures and maybe showing the the Weber set up and they'll be showing the they'd be showing the parts parts triple Weber set up that was like nine hundred hundred bucks or something so I would just stare at stare at it but I those are racing parts then the that's it. It's all racing parts. There was no like aftermarket. No it wasn't like you're going to buy in coil over programs you the racing you put on racing parts on your street car but it's so at some point my buddy snake bought a roadster Pale yellow they dotson and made a weird Pale yellow two thousand roadster this thing bone stock hubcaps on it like a luggage rack back in the trunk just flat out bone stock two thousand roadster yeah and and I drove my Z. Over to his house in North Hollywood and I was like yeah it's a cute little pea shooter and he's like this car hauls ass and I just like but it's not it's nosy economy. You know Kinda. Look at my car. Get Z. Car and you know it's all racy and everything you've got this little fun little chick car yeah. It's like a little roadsters. It's it just looks kind of my car has like mags on it. In years has five inch steel rims with hubcaps and now we proceeded drag races up and down his street okay and he beat me every time now looking back on it was probably because he had the five speed and I had a four speed possibly possibly but he just beat me every time now the car hauls ass another time he was driving up Laurel and our thanks coming down Laurel and some Gyn at kind of like i Chen Arek seven like pulled up next to him on Arek seven at that point like nineteen eighty four was like a modern supercar versus Zeke Zeke versus the two two thousand roads for the rice or yeah. They raced down downs Laurel SORTA side advice side. How do you do that yeah? I was in the car behind him following him but I caught up he beat him. In two thousand roadster bone stock dark seven ended up over the curb through a rod iron fans and on the apartment a lawn an apartment yeah so I don't know what happened but that guy lost. I lost that one over the curb another. I'm I like the picture on the book is Rhode Atlanta's so says Max package you look at this other shot of these dolphins at road Atlanta. That's the same turn right right. Oh good sneaky good. It's the slough things looping gonNA say thing yeah so so I so I had immense respect for that car like early on yeah. That's no peashooter. That's a cool car and then in the cars I have or B. R. E. Cars that you know Frank Mon East won the West Coast Championship and I can't remember what the other one is. I don't maybe Max Paddock and luck and I think Morton drove him to the scariest time ever had in a car was in a two thousand roads there which was not racing the two thousand roadster at Laguna Seca the scariest scariest time ever had was snake had his roadster once again he had some clutch problem with it and and he took it to the mechanic panic and they replaced the clutch and it was gone for like three weeks remembered you'd get you remember. Do you have to dump your car somewhere and he's gone. Nobody had uber right or a rental car or cell phone or cellphone or like eight dad barley. Your second car like there wasn't any sediment email going. What's the status you dump your car off at the mechanic and the guy be like we don't we don't stock? There's parts like throw out bearing got come from Japan's. Take Awhile whatever and and you just be walking for like two weeks. You'd have to have a car. You dump your car off somewhere. There was no uber we I never took a taxi cab. Taxi cabs are too expensive. Yeah Uber didn't exist. I didn't have credit cards or AAA. You couldn't rent a car for for week and like heavier insurance. There's no insurance. There's no nothing so it's just like for for like two weeks. If you had a buddy who had a motorcycle or something he'd lend it to here for two weeks or someone down and you can like commandeer their car or you'd have somebody like Ross at work the drywall or he'll pick you up on the way way into the giant like a lot of get pick up sued the COENZYME. You picked up some dude. There's a whole life around picking up dudes. It didn't have cars whose cars were broken so he dropped Scott. anyways car was in there for like three weeks and it's sad for two weeks day. I'm sure at some point got it back. You got the new watch he was happy about it and we're going the one that night to party and we're going up Wrightwood which is a street you gotta look up. right would in studio city right would is a street that goes up like makes its way up to Mulholland and it's like aww kind of laurel and Cohen gun whatever yeah we're winding hilly street super wind e in narrow that just goes up the backside on the valley side side of the San Fernando Valley up over it'll get you to you. Can it's like it's like taking a secret back trail to get up to Mulholland like going over the hill MMM we're driving up that we're looking at the picture on it and you know good squiggly line ray. It's like sitting in the front seat so I'm in the boot there. There's no back seat roadster. You have to sit sideways on a package shelf right now. Their seats are all the way back to my likes can't even go you have to literally sit sideways. You'd have to suicide. You're sitting behind the passenger your squish back there and snake is going up the hill and it's there's one part of it gets really bendy and really steep it just gets really steep and he's going in the clutch. Start slipping. You're like as he's getting up. The pills like slipping. It's got me and writes four hundred pounds extra dude it is in the car and it's slipping and snakes past ask. He's like God damn it. I just got this back from the shop and it's basically doing what it was doing more and it's slipping and it's slipping in a certain point where like coming to stop because it's just slipping and he goes get dammit and he throws it in reverse and drops drops the clutch of course immediately. We start going backwards because we're just coast and hard so he didn't mean to get oh he did he did he was pissed. He throws in reverse. I he punches. It drops the clutch now that we're not going up the hill with all the weight and the car now we're all the weight going down hill and now that he's we're moving the clutches kind of engaging now and he's punching it and he's going backwards down right it down. This wind at night like looking over shoulders got damages cussing the whole time like he's just driving angry. I'm sitting in the BOOT in China to block vision. He we go about two hundred feet is just whining like cussing yelling at the transmission enchanted God damn it and it simply just grabs the break in whips around in the cargo on a narrow street like not on a wide partner and he could see when he whipped it around. There's probably a foot and a half of play on each side of the bumper between the curb just whips around now and pops it in first gear and we just go down down. It says nothing else that's it. He's done nothing else later on I I owned a roadster Sir and got like a roll bar welded into it and then bought an old roadster off of my buddy. I'm Gada Abu Zamzam Cam was like hot riding at valley so I had a kind of history with with roadsters yeah and we stopped there. Were cool cool peas. I still think they're like little undervalued. I I don't care about the sixteen hundreds they have like a push rod iron head or something on. I'm like not that interested. Get the two thousand for sure but I don't know where they're at with the bring a trailer but if you look at the scatter adder grandma and bring a trailer a two thousand roadsters the must be creeping up they are little piece and compared to your four Spitfires in your 'em Jeez your triumphs and stuff like that. Those cars are all sort of four banger. Push Rod Kinda four-speed Kinda slugs yeah the roadsters kind a whole yeah yeah yeah and it's it's great on the track to like you're saying it's great in race trim and it's fun to see out there and and scoots well car when I was racing with with Martin and his Alpha Buddies guys you're super experience the drivers on that track. I don't think anyone could argue that. They're driving well prepared Alfa Romeo's no one can argue with a well prepped. GTA OR TV full full race prep car and that roadster hung them just fine yeah and eventually got passed a Maven so that's a good car and looks like the roadsters doubled in the last five years. Maybe ten to twelve grand maybe now in the twenty s and a few up there in the Godwit looks like the fifties or something yeah thirty five thirty five thousand. I was at thirty five hundred sixteen hundred to now. What's what's the dilly out then yeah the highest youth thousand is this candidates thirty four thousand thirty eighty four thousand for a FEU there the sixteen hundred thirty five thousand? There must be some story pretty Nice Pretty Nice but either way they're cool. They're cool pieces. they have kind of a nice kind of euro interior yeah again. They have a five speed which seems seems pretty cool. You can do things to on that got a nice big hood scoop that the hood scoop is not for the intake on the hood scoop. Just has a flap in it that pushes all the air to the radiator right okay. I got ya one of hood scoops. It's like a hood scoop but if you go in in an inch you'll see a flap a metal at all just directs it down to the yeah down to not much not much grill area on the front of that yeah yeah but a but a cool handling again kind of cool cool lines nice interior put some rims on it some mirrors on it and do stuff I do it. It's a good good piece all right. Let me hit Castrol over here. Let's see when a chance to win a trip to go to Vegas to see me and maybe maybe youtube right at your local autozone be entered on manically to win with the purchase of Castro pickup five courts castrol edge get. SDP St Peaks Than Life Oil Filter for just thirty three ninety nine use your artisans autozone rewards that is automatically entered a win three day two night Castro baby in Vegas. Come say hi November right Mex- Patter no purchase necessary to enter win open to residents of the fifty United States District of Columbia Puerto Rico must be eighteen eighteen years or older sweepstakes vaulted timber twenty four October twenty first void where prohibited see your local autozone store for more details all right so you went and drove the new Lincoln can Corsair Yeah. We talked a little bit about it on the show earlier. This week did a did a great drive in the Lincoln Corsair. The summary is is this like first of all they put on a nice event you drive from San Francisco to Monterey. We stayed at Carmel Valley Ranch and just overall just like Lincoln's up their game the luxury level they make a nice vehicle the Lincoln navigator that we've driven several times we'd love the gators the three row mid-size I I don't I know what sales are doing and maybe just me but I walk my dog around my neighborhood and four years ago I saw a lot more Mercedes eighties youths and a lot more Land Rover Range Rover stuff. I'm seeing a lot more Lincoln. Now I feel like I I don't know maybe matthew McConnell Hey and again. I don't know what sales sales are sort of like. I tell people all the time like you can talk about your show. Being popular you can talk about numbers you can talk about overnights demographics and all that if you're shows popular popular when you walk through an airport people stop you and say hi or say things. If you're not popular. No one will say that you can show me all the numbers you one one but I'll tell you if I can go with you and walk through an airport any airport in the country. No one says anything or looks at your does anything then you're shows not popular and you I can talk like car sales all you want but it's when you start seeing more of them on the road more and traffic more parked in the driveways of Nice houses houses and that kind of stuff well the design is good the luxury levels for good. I got to play around with a phone as a key so we drove around. We'd stop. I'd I'd grab out the phone. They gave us all like phone with the APP loaded up so we didn't have to load it on our phones and start the car locked. The doors unlocked the cars. Do whatever you can use. Here's the key you can use the key pad on the door and inside or the phone APP would that car would that have benefited me when Lynette went out of town and Gabe put the key are her tesla on the tire and then I called one and I said where there is the key and she said it's in the couple there yeah and then I smashed over yes although the car ran and then later on blocked my car in the garage right and then when I later on went to go look for the spare key I found the leather pouch but not the FOB bob cars at home and you couldn't drive either one of them and then when I called Yes lynette tasker where the key FOB is. She suggested that the valley may have stolen it at some point. Would this phone APP have benefited me province point problem solved you could've used the key default you could have used the phone APP and if you right over your phone and the key you can walk to the car type in your code. Get it in type in your other code starts right by the way if you left your key fob at home you could still give a code. It'll randomly doubly generate a valet code. The valley could use it and then when he gives you back the car codes gone forever and randomly generates another code now he's saying I can use my phone APP for the Tesla X. That's right yes okay. Why can't they have some version of of of phone as a key as well but I got to play around with it and it was great and it was it was a fun? It was a fun trip. Lincoln is is is nice and even though the smaller Lincoln because the small wheelbase is a bumpy ride they put all sorts of attention into making a comfortable N. and vh noise vibration harshest. They did everything they can to eliminate as much of that as possible. They made a really nice driving smooth thing and of of course it's guy you know because it's Lincoln even though it's the small Lincoln heated and cooled seats and massaging seats and the great sound system and noise cancellation the sound system. It's it's fantastic. They've upped their game. Yeah I was able to use my phone to call Gabe and ask him. They just send me a text. Tell me that the key was on the tire why why not just translate that transmit that little piece of information mation for me when you drop the car off seemed like something you'd want to convey to the person who's going to drive the car. Here's where the key. I've hidden the key somewhere in the car but I'll leave it up to you. Oh I'll leave it up to you to find it instead of send your taxing. It's on the driver's side tire when you use Lincoln course when I called Lynette. She was like it's in the cup. The Cup holder was like every day so Lincoln's Ki as a phone phone and if these two were imagine they were in the military should be bombing themselves. That's can you imagine that they'd be working in the kitchen and by the way this is this is this this this crime scene is what happens when you take two like minded folks and put them together to create a super super neutron bomb Super Tornado NATO because I did call the net and go where is the key and she's like. I I told gay couple okay. I didn't hear that part. You guys were sitting sixteen inches apart to be how how casuals everybody with everything you know what I'm saying okay yeah or get rid of Gate Aright Rick Shod. I hope I'm saying my saying shout my pronouncing his his name correctly Shad Rick Shad is executive director of the Newport Concourse I think I I just got something. Oh I got yeah. I just got an e mail on this Rick to be with you guys. This is exciting good to be with you. I just and and yet so Jay Leno just bought a place out there. Jay Leno is going to be the the smart choice. Jay Leno is going to be the event chair. this is a I so funny so I woke up this morning. I think I got something from gooding and company or suggested this was going on on and I was looking at it and then later on when I was talking to my guys and they said Newport concourse. We have a newport concourse out here ear yeah and I thought that's what we're talking about food. Yeah okay well. We part right a new Rhode Island. Yeah Yeah Right. I was like where did Jay bought a house over there. Why did you buy Newport beach? I did the exact same thing in Newport and Newport concours. Sorry I just ask somebody to if they were going to this event it was like hey you guys go to the Newport concourse like no where's that it's like Newport all right so so our West coasters over here this is this is this is going on now. I mean this weekend right yeah. I it starts on Thursday actually tomorrow tomorrow so we're in the throes of putting a motor week so it's not just it ends with the concord allegations on Sunday so it's a it's a full you know motoring event the first one of the size on the east coast or definitely in the northeast Amelia's a great event and there's some other events events but this is a massive new motor we hear in Newport Rhode Island and and it's very historic place it was the birthplace of auto racing in America Erica nineteen hundred so there's a reason to do it here and Donald Osborne is work is actually the head of the concord on Sunday and Jay Leno is our chairman for the week and I'm here with Justin Bell and with torque show who's doing the TV on this thing. We're doing a live simulcast and a a whole bunch of different. We have a lot of people coming from the West Coast a lot of great cars from coming from the west coast as well as amazing cars from around the world and here in the east so it's a it's a very very significant event with different things happening on each day and we even have John Legend is playing on Friday night. I've got Kenny loggins playing on Saturday at our at our big gala and it's it's a it's a whole big thing going on here. In gooding and company as you mentioned is our auction house and they'll be doing a full auction here next year this year they just have private treaty cars on display here but it's we have all the big the players are here all the big brands and we have the greatest class of judges group of judges for the different classes on Sunday and we'll be awarding the best in show trophy fi at around three o'clock on Sunday and it's the trophy itself is spectacular solid sterling silver twenty five inches tall about fifty pounds and It's something else. We wish you were out here. You're going on a on a cruise. I I am otherwise I would definitely be out there. I was talking to somebody recently about them. Possibly Franchising goodwood now here and bring it to the East Coast and dot I liked it stuffs popping up all over the place to be nice to just fill in the country with these great car vents. I know how many cars come now to your event. Well we in the classes thirteen classes. We have a hundred cars that'll be judged on Sunday but there's literally I mean thousand cars out here. There's riding right now. The new C. Eight corvette just got here with the huge. GM display we have thirteen cars from the Heritage Centre from General the motors we have cars from the Henry Ford Museum. We have what we think is going to be the largest collection of we got he's in US history here at Belcourt Mansion they're all arriving driving today. just watched the corvette Gulf one from the sixties pull in which was amazing They're going to be thousands dozens of cars here. of all types makes years we're even doing an event similar to the quayle which we call the gathering at rough point which is a huge mansion that was Doris Duke's estate the tobacco heiress and it's a very elegant garden party with a newer cars out there and we're doing several unveils with Aston Martin with his Gado twins were doing the Bugatti Sharon Sky Bucar Kona Sega's bringing gene the Jasko and also the car that the come not pronouncing that right but the one that just broke the speed record is here so I mean it's it's endless. There's just people are really excited about having something like this on the east coast they wanted it for a long long time and and we've been working on this project for his started about the idea start about five years ago and then the investment really started into it about two years ago and that's when we kind of lit the fuse on this thing and started planning it and you know anybody who's got the idea of doing a motor week think twice it's it's a lot of work yeah you were saying you just saw the corvette Gulf one Poland. That's the is that the experimental experimental one that looks sort of like an indy cars at the next Gen one. That looks like I think it's not a sixty three. It's the it's an off-white. It's the off white. Gulf wanted the huge race history. It's I mean it's a very very significant car but we have and we have Paul Paul. Newman's Daytona winning car is coming in a row. She's bringing that car. Rash is bringing the the the Mustang that nobody's Mustang so that row she's is bringing in the some newman won his class and Tetyana in a row Mustang that was sponsored by the movie. Nobody's fool by. I believe that's the story so that's one this is quite quite substantial it yeah it's we and we're gonNA enj- as doing a couple of seminars menards which is going to be really amazing. He's doing one with Jay Ward from Pixar who I I know you now and they're talking in with Michael Simcoe from goal from and GM and and I mean just a huge guys talking about the design and how movie cars relate to you know cars and car designers niners and they're going to do a great design symposium and Jay Leno is leading that with Donna Osborne and then Jay is doing another discussion about the journey of of Ford back to winning Lama and they're gonNA have the Gulf GT here I mean not the the the Ford. Gt here You you know that competed in one and Lama in there telling that whole story so which is going to be an amazing talk that we're doing there too and then we have things like America's Cup we you have Roger Penske's team American magic is feeling a discussion about bringing America's Cup back to Newport Rhode Island which is going to be fascinating wreck in search direct connect up for everybody which GT forty his that it's the mark to one you know the the heart mark mark to that was Was it McLaren's car or was it a year after yeah. No no no. I'm sorry it's the newer one to one that one recently in the top twenty twenty four. Gt Forty right no no no no not GT forty. I'm sorry I got I got too many car numbers and names balancing around my mind is is is is scrambled with with all the cars that are coming in here right now. Well I will tell IF PEOPLE WANNA go to the AUDRAIN CONCOURSE DOT COM I sang audran right yeah. AUDRAIN CONCOURSE DOT COM rain and you know they can still get some tickets to come in a lot of things are sold out but the great thing about this event is half of this event is for free so people WANNA come in and go to the different mansions and see the Ba- Gotti display see the McLaren display seaport in North America C. all these great cars and Lamborghini they can go and walk on the lawns of the mansions and see those displays for free and we're really encouraging young people to come in and and that leads me to on Sunday for the first time ever we have a class called the thirty under thirty which we developed for bringing young people into an actual concord competition competition so you you can't be older than thirty years old and you haven't you couldn't spend more than thirty thousand dollars on the restoration of your car and that was encouraged to encourage families to work on a car together and young people to get into the hobby and so we have you know we have like skylines have Honda's we have you know a great selection of young people's People's cars you know for that class and that class is going to be judged by Jay Leno and John Osborne and I think Sandra Button and a bunch of great people are we're going to judge that class and they can actually Levi for best in show trophy on the field which is pretty cool Rick Shad. Thanks for joining us. It sounds like a great event. I hope we'll be able to get out there next year and say heidiwear. Jane Donald who we love so much from Jay Leno's garage when you when you see him and again go to it's a you D. R. A. I N. CONCOURSE DOT COM and check it out and get tickets. Thanks Rik. Thanks we'll see you guys. You're next this year for sure. It's beautiful beautiful country so so weird so Christmas like the Newport concourse and I was like Oh we have a New York. Jay bought the house out. There and I just want to ask the Newport Nice. You've gotTa Weird because I'm pretty sure we talked about recently him buying a car house house like I thought it was Connecticut or something but yeah yeah sort of a castle over there. What is the Gulf? What is the in core VAT Gulf car nineteen sixty three or whatever so what I was when I went I saw the last Jay Leno's garage he was driving the new mid engined corvette and they were showing their experimental corvettes through the years and they had the first mid engine one but it was set up like a indycar or an f one car then they had this really cool piece which was a mid engined corvette which was basically? Gt Forty fighter like it was there to raise in those kinds of race and I I saw them all on display at the c eight unveiling and they hold hold that experiment one e x one but ever to the day. I don't remember what the what the naming was but yeah they had them there and they sort of had them in order and I didn't know a lot of the history behind him but yeah it was interesting to walk on them and kind of didn't choose your photos of what a Gulf nineteen sixty three Gulf corvette race car is is that we can look though some of those pictures from that see eight unveiling is probably up on my social media and I took a few photos or look at car. Look sound good all right. Let me tell you about GEICO. Everybody's got a to do you list. Maybe dropping off some dry clang or picking up some milk. Now you can add save hundreds of dollars on car insurance to that list and you don't have to drop off or pick up anything. Thank you just go to GEICO DOT COM fifteen minutes. You could be saving fifteen percent or more on car insurance so if you want some extra money in your pocket. This is the most rewarding to do you can do today. Just go to GEICO DOT com well now. We're looking at it. It's early sixties that that's Kinda Kinda Golfie but not Super Gulf the Gulf livery nine seventeen but there was early corvette prototypes that that you're also talking about that I saw them at that event and I forgot what they were called but you're right. They had sort of prototype he kind of names like the e x Juan or something along those yeah the first one was basically a indycar but the next one was kind of a sports car that was I kind of was a mid engine that they said Zare dont off drove like at the testing around two hundred and twenty miles an hour or something bring like that I could never figure out why so many of those cars even today or maybe not today but up until recently eh Gulf one that that was called Zia six out I could never figure out what so many cars were open cockpit cars ars for Lama yeah like it was like first off it rains all the time and then secondly for aerodynamic purposes and then thirdly just for protection or whatever like why why did they make show many open cockpit cars and that nearly a weight issue. Maybe yeah I know I know it is a piece of light grade sheet aluminum that goes over your head it. It's not a lot of weight all right you can go to AMC roller dot com for all the live shows that are coming up. There are a bunch of live shows and chick shifting steer available on I tunes and podcast one as well and support the show go to the

Jay Leno Lincoln playboy Newport concourse Jay Newport Rhode Island John Morton Paul Newman GEICO East Coast lynette tasker laurel twitter gooding
Happy: All about feelings, pt. 1

Brains On!

39:32 min | 1 year ago

Happy: All about feelings, pt. 1

"Today's episode is sponsored by old El Paso dinner, should never be boring. That's why old El Paso never stops bringing the fun of taco night to your home. They believe taco night is the one meal that gets everyone excited to come to the table, even the pickiest kid, they've even designed their shells and soft tortilla bowls to stand on their own leaving more time for talking and filling and less time. Worrying about mess, and spilling, old, El Paso, grab the yellow box. Today's episode is sponsored by good night stories for rebel girls. Goodnight stories for rebel girls. The podcast is back with eleven new inspiring stories read by influential women in season, two, you'll try a case with Ruth, Bader Ginsburg and save a country with them, Mira sisters look for good night stories for rebel girls, the podcast on your favorite podcast platforms, or go to rebel girl dot CO slash podcast. You're listening to brains on Lewer serious about being curious brain. John is supported him part by a grant from the National Science Foundation. Yes. Yes. Yes, I would love the part Varo think you so much. I will not let you down over. For sure. For sure. See you Thursday. I will be ready. Remember or by on man? This is so exciting. I gotta tell someone. Oh, I know I'll tell Harvey or ever-present disembodied robotic voice assistant. Hey, hey, Harvey. I got some news. You're not gonna believe I am programmed to believe facts. Are you familiar with the series of plays based on the superhero? Alpaca jack. Yes, and orphaned, alpaca named Jack is phone by world renowned physicist and karate enthusiast. Dr Kate Calhoun, while raising Jack Dr Calhoun discovers a new neural pathway and enhances Jack's brain, capacity far beyond any alpaca or human plays include disturbing the fleas keep the fleece and sweater weather. Yep. Well, now you're talking to you the newest Al package. Jack will. Yeah. I got the party in the next play fleece of mind who got the I got there, her who I got that pony. I got her. I am sensing an elevated heart rate sometimes when I am given a new part, my circuits overheat. Would you like me to call doctor? No, no, no Harvey. I'm just over the moon getting to play. I'll package Jack my GPS shows that we are on earth. Good one harvester, what I mean is that I'm jumping for joy? I do not detect a person named joy in this room only Sandon. Okay. Okay, harvey. I'm having strong feelings right now does not compute. Okay. The thing going on with me is called happiness. Check it out. I'm happy. See my smile. Smile acknowledged I'm smiling because I'm happy and I'm happy because I'm gonna play L Paca Jack get it. Smile. Equates feeling of happiness. Information downloaded. Yeah. Well reading people is not your strong suit, pow anyway. Oh man. I can't wait until we hersal start. I have to start practicing my two toed walking, and I'm going to have to go on an all grass diet. You gotta get into character, and I shine your trainer to teach me how to get a real authentic spit going. You're listening to brains on for American public media. I'm Molly bloom. You're going to hear more about dunes role as alpaca Jack at the beginning of the next few episodes, because they're all part of our long awaited series all about feelings, and here to help me with these episodes is co host a Cari from Baltimore heyday Cari. Hello. This episode is the first of a four part series on a subject near and dear to our hearts, and our brains and our bodies feeling where they come from while we have them and what we can do with them in this, because you have a lot of questions about emotions high. I am Nikita from the Bronx. My question is how do people feel certain emotions? My name is Aiden from tops healed Massachusetts in my question is what our feelings in? How do we get them ninety MS Katy seven Virginia? My. Question is, why do we feel emotions? So first things first, we took a both feeling from the heart would is not really a heart that make feelings is more of our brains in our body, when you see or hear touch things your brain sends signals telling you how you feel about that. But it's a two way street. Sometimes your body tells your brain information to it's like, if you're being against a chair, and your need tells your brain. Hey, the hurt you feel pain, and even though you can't always see feelings, like joy or anger the way, you can see scratch or bruise. Feelings still affect your brain and your body in a very real way. So let's get into how feelings work in our brains. Brain's do all the things they do feel feelings think thoughts move our bodies with chemicals called neuro transmitters. These little molecules are helped brain cells or neurons talk to each other. We as Rafael Williams to fill us in on some molecules that metaphor happiness. He studies all brains at how we make Twinsies at the university of Washington Raphael, says a few chemicals are particularly important for feeling happy, there, serotonin dopamine and oxytocin wherever you actually gave us a play by play of what's going on with the neuron in their neurotransmitters when something is making you happy. One of the things that makes me happy is that I of pension. This painting might be Raphael's best one yet, though, brushstrokes alone, speak volumes. It certainly the best piece this season. So when I finished the painting, and if my friend says, yeah, that's a really great piece of work, then my dopamine, neurons release dopamine, which is a messenger to other neurons to tell your brain. Hey, that felt good. Before that dopamine release, maybe he was feeling okay? But after that dopamine reward. Wow. He is feeling excited motivated. He Bravo wants to make another painting. That's just great. And oh wait, that's not the only thing coming in the also get a release of oxytocin because your friend is telling you that, that's okay. Good. Therefore, the oxytocin, which is a founding molecule is released in the brain. So that oxytocin is going to make him feel closer to his friend more trusting Lor connected. What Ed great molecule? But then you also get that serotonin early says. Well. Holy no chemicals that serotonin. It's interesting because our gut makes most of our bodies serotonin, but it has such an effect on the brain. It can be tough to pin down exactly what serotonin does it does so many things in the brain. But it seems to stabilize the way we feel it will likely keep Raphael feeling good. Even after this conversation and just amazing work out there. Niran truly incredible. So we know that a mix of different brain chemicals, help create feelings, like happiness and contentment in everyone's makes is a little different just like no two people. Look exactly the same our brains. Don't work exactly the same either. Some people feel happy pretty easily, but for others, it might take more to make them smile. The same goes for other emotions to it's kind of, like each of us has our own thermostat set for what it takes to feel certain feelings it no thermos that thing that control the heat air house. Exactly this metaphorical thermostat controls your moods, eight emotional thermostat. In this emotional. Thermostat is set by your genes. Not your paying, that's those are genes with a J. These are genes with a G there. The instructions that tell all the cells in your body, how to be, you inherit them from your parents in this emotional term was that is also set by experts, you have, we'll be talking more about regulating our feelings throughout this series. Okay, do Cari. I have something for you. That might release a little dopamine in your brain. It's them mystery sound. Here. This. It's so look a Bill, definitely sounds like something ringing. We're gonna give you another chance to guess, and we'll reveal the answer a little bit later in the show. Oh man. We are so thrilled to bring you new season of our debate podcast smash. Boom best, our roster of debaters is ready to. Wow. The judges with great stories and fascinating facts in each episode of Smith's, boom, bust. Get ready for an epic match up to the which is cooler like unicorns dragons decry? So in the unicorns dragons debate, which would you say is cooler dragging all the way? Why cooler fire yet pretty hard to compete with breathing fire? I might be on team unicorns because I've heard their skin and horns, have some pretty cool magical powers, but we're going to have to hear the whole debate. Whoa. We're in luck because at the end of this episode. There's a smash boom best sneak peek. Oh my gosh. I cannot wait full length episodes drop in June in, you have a debate send it over. We'd also love it. If you sent us quest. Question Bryant or mystery sound at brains on dot org slash contact. That's what this listener did. Hi. My name is question is when you first get snow. It's powdery, and then as you melt it, and freeze it again. Why is it is not snow won't answer that question in the moment of at the end of the show will also read the latest listeners to join the brains honor roll, and then we're roll this mass boomberg sneak preview, keep listening. Today's episode is sponsored by new cloud controlled cat, litter by arm and hammer. My cat is kind of a grumpy cat, but she is very sweet with my daughter. She lets my daughter hug her and play with her and sing her songs. It's a doorbell. I loved that my cat. Let's my daughter love her. But you know what? I don't love cleaning up my cats litterbox, which is why Armand hammer created new cloud control litter. There's no cloud of nasties when I scoop, plus one hundred percent dust free free of heavy perfumes and helps reduce airborne dander from scooping. So what happens in the litterbox stays in the litterbox, new cloud control cat, litter by arm and hammer. More power to you. This episode is sponsored by relay relay is the screen free. Smarter phone for kids really is as easy to use as a walkie talkie. But it works everywhere because it's powered by four G T just like a phone relate is safe. The device comes with built in GPS tracking. So parents can always know where their kids are you can talk directly with the relay from your smartphone using the free app. So parents don't need another relay to keep in touch with their kids relay is screened free. So it eliminates the distractions and unwanted side effects of screen time on kids, without, sacrificing the safety of easy communication, that allows parents to feel comfortable letting their kids go off on their own. They're also clip accessories so that you can wear relay and not lose it. Visit relay go dot com slash brains to get fifteen percent off your relay purchase on Amazon. That's our E. L A Y, GO dot com slash. Beat. R. A. I. N. S. Smash boom, best is a debate show for kids and families from the makers of the award winning podcast brains on each episode takes to cool things smashes them together. And let's you decide which is best it's a show that helps kids defend their opinions and teaches them some cool facts along the way, unicorns versus dragons chocolate versus cheese and snakes versus spiders, are just a few of the fierce smash boom battles, you can here in our new season of episodes, launching this summer. Subscribe, so don't miss any of them. You can listen to smash boom best wherever you listen to podcasts. You're listening to brains arm from America public media day Cari, and I-. Molly, we asked you are lovely listeners to tell us what your body feels like when you're happy. And here's what you had to say. Every time I'm happy, my stomach jumps as been down and really wants need a move at body feels really energetic. And when I'm happy I feel like I can bounce on balls. And when I feel happy, I feel like I can fly and I feel happier and Trump e in excited about things that feels that energy is like pumping up. I. Light is a feather. And I feel fine. Excited, and I feel a jump of energy and I feel like I wanna run. Thanks to beta Amaya bar, Amelia Sulaiman, Caleb, Kathy and Randall for sharing those answers with us. Doesn't it just make you feel good inside to hear all those happy feelings? Yeah. And also makes me wonder if the films we feel actually make changes and the rest of our bodies beyond brings you mean like whether feeling positive can make your body feel better, right. Like you get hurt. Sometimes something funny, can make you forget the pain. So how do I'll good feelings affect our bodies. Let's find out I have our trustees Zumra and I know just the person to zoom in on our pal. Chee is super positive. She's usually in the gym around now. Okay. Cheese about score, the winning point will she make it. There's a serve Chico's for it. And the ground goes wild. I g high tea. Hey, Molly hide Hikari? I'm just playing against this tennis machine practicing for Wimbledon, you know. Zumra. Yeah. We're trying to find a how good feelings affect our bodies. Well point zoom rate right this way because I am feeling pretty good. Whoa. Your heart is beating really fast from your practicing makes house arrest me. Well, let's look up at your brains. Whoa. You're endorphin levels are high to this day yet. Those are the body natural feel good chemicals. Right, endorphins get released from the to cherry Glen in the brain right behind the bridge of your nose. That little thing, I texted, cheese Brank with the blood vessel in yourself if this other pain. It's super small, but super powerful the between cherry Glen makes hormones like endorphins, and it also sends messages to other organs about what kinds of chemicals they should be producing. And endorphins affect your brain, like the strongest pain medicines, Dr campus scribe, they tickle parts of the brain that process pain, kind of distracting. It. So your brain stops, remembering, to tell you that you heard and because of a two-tier Glen. The piece of thing behind your nose pre safely, because of a two tiered gland also directs how your body releases other neuro chemicals. It's often sending out other neurotransmitters like serotonin and dopamine, along with hormones like oxytocin to mix up with the endorphins, right? We heard about those before they make you feel happy. Yeah. When the mix of these chemicals are higher. You feel good even help you boost your immune system to keep you from getting sick. They helping manage stress and they can improve your overall mental health. Yeah. Who looks like him out of balls. And I think at crushed it. You totally did she and now that you're smiling, I see even more endorphins dopamine and serotonin so smiling can make your body. Good neurochemical stew. That's right. Just smiling trigger feel-good neurotransmitters, and it can lower a person's blood pressure and heart rate. Cool. I can see cheese whole body coming more. Yeah. Spouse magic because they're contagious. We're all feeling some positives. That's why I like smiling. It helps me feel better, mentally, and physically. And it helps others feel good too. Awesome. That was some super smart tennis. Yeah. I'm always happy to serve up the science t. He with. Briancon. Okay, let's get back to that mystery sound here. It is again. Before you take another. Guess I'm gonna give you a clue you might hear this in a yoga class any new ideas that you're hitting something definitely here is the answer. Sound? In asian. Yoga tool. This is what it sounds like. That was Mr. Domon Coleman. He's a yoga teacher, who works kids in Baltimore, when you do yoga, you move your body through poses, like downward dog or happy, baby, while focusing on your breath, yoga originally comes from India and his thousands of years old. Mr. Coleman uses the sound of the bull to get his classes attention and get them to focus. My name is Mr. Coleman. I'm at Dallas nNcholas elementary school. I'm the yoga teacher for the school, the yoga and mindfulness practitioner. And this is my yoga glass. Everybody. Full body, exercise, so with that means is you work in every muscle, and you body that you use every day from your toes to the top. So everybody breathing. I've been doing yoga since middle school it really enforces the importance of self and in breathing. Every time you breathe in, I want you to see yourself pull in positive energy like happiness and joy, every time you breathe out. I want you to see yourself pushing out any negative energy like sadness anger. If anything made you angry at school today, just breathe it out realize that it's not happening right now. Focus on the present moment, what we're doing in this present moment is relaxing. Because I bring in energy. Happiness. And then sometimes when I've said I just read out tree pose. Pose. My favorite poses the mountain because when he put your arms up in looks like amount in which formed favorite pose the tree palm tree QE street. Pose creep. The less we're gonna take together breathing. And breathe. Oh. For some people like the students in that class. Yoga is a way to get in touch with their bodies and their feelings. So dicara, have you ever done a class like that? Yes. When I first started when I saw people doing his weird overs like. Really doing through. So where they wanna try the I thought it was really fun. So I wanted to stay in. So you started taking these classes through the holistic life foundation, which is an organization that teaches young people all about yoga and mindfulness. And now you're a mentor in the program. What kind of classes have you done as a mentor? We have done classes for little kids, which each like the basics then as you're older. We tell them more and more your teacher. Yes. So cool. So cute, tell me a little bit about what you tell the little kids, like how old are first of all, how old are the kids, you're working with three to five? What do you tell them? I told them when we first started the stretch our body, so you don't get hurt. There after we stretch out. We do the I pose the downward dog. You on your feet or your hands. A put your legs up. And you there for, like five seconds. Then when you actually go down. So you use your breath to move through these different yoga poses. Yep. So when you're teaching them, like, is the purpose of the class, sort of helping to control your emotions or is it have a different purpose overall? Was a motion and behavior. How do you think it helps that? A hopes them with common down more in not like more explosions happen. Do you meditate and do yoga? Or do you just do yoga Deepal? So do you find that when you do those that it helps you control your emotions it helped me by making me a calmer person? It helps you if you're anger problems or anything needs to be helped on how old were you when you started doing it? I was five year old when I started in, when I first started it was weird to me, but it grew on me that is so cool for people who have never meditated before meditation can help you quiet your mind in some meditations you focus on your breathing. In others. You notice your thoughts, some people call this mindfulness which means being aware of what you're doing and thinking, and feeling that can help you listen to the logical part of your mind instead of just the automatic emotional side. Researchers are starting to look at how mindfulness can help us it's hard to under. Exactly what it does to us because people and brains are really complicated. We'll talk a little more about how meditation might specifically help with feelings throughout the series. Just like everyone has their own emotional thermostat, different techniques, help different people. Some people connect with their feelings. When they're taking walks or petting their dog or praying or volunteering or singing or journaling in a way, these are all different kinds of meditation. That's something Melissa Chopra knows a lot about she's been meditating since she was a kit. Welcome. Thank you so much. When did you learn to meditate, so I learned how to meditate when I was numb ING, and I believe you may have learned even younger. Yep. So that's so inspiring to me, because I learned when I was nine and I will admit, sometimes I did it. And sometimes they didn't, but I know how valuable meditation was to meet growing up. So you're such a great role model for other kids. Congratulations. Thank you. Why should you use it where you're happy? That's such a great question because meditation helps us in all parts of our life when we're happy when we're sad when we're angry. And so when we are happy if we can focus on how we're feeling happy. Then we train our body to feel the more and more. So I like to recommend that when you're happy you focus on what you're grateful force, think about more things that you're happy about, and then also just feel your body's so that you can remember what that feels like is it. Good to always try to be happy. You know, I don't think anybody is always happy all the time. So people have lots of emotions, and that's totally normal to feel happy, sometimes sad. Sometimes angry at other times. So no, I don't think we're all always happy. But there are ways that we can deal with side. Angry feelings to make ourselves feel better. In each episode of the series. Molly will be sharing a meditation that you can try when you're experiencing different emotions today. She'll share a meditation for when you're feeling happy. So when we are happy, what we wanna do is feel that in our body and continue the feeling of gratitude. So this is a really simple meditation for win. You are happy to also focus on what you are grateful for, and I recommend doing this every night before you go to sleep or in the morning before you start the day and either you can do it by yourself. Or you can share these with your family, or friends or even write them in a journal. It's really simple. You just sit put your hand on your heart and say, what am I grateful for and maybe different things will come up. But I'd like you to choose just one thing. Take a deep breath in. In and out and feel that through your body. Take another breath in and out. And now that's it. You can continue with your day. Everyone has their own unique setting feelings some people feel things easily for others. It takes a lot of change their mood experience. Good thing in the world of race bodies to call. Neurotransmitters neuro transmitters like dopamine, oxytocin, serotonin, and endorphins. The help was so happy and thinking about our feelings can help us decide what to do with them. That's it for this episode of brains on, is produced Mark Sanchez, sentence Hutton, and Molly bloom. This series was also produced by mania Wilhelm and Sam chew support from call to mind APM's mental health initiative we had production help from style. Klein Hannah Harris green Christina Lopez. Illicit Dudley and Jackie Kim. And we had engineering, help from Johnny Vince Evans franca Rodriguez, and Bob white special, thanks to Jim Pete Andres. Gonzales, nonprofits, Gerald caz, Nelson Elena, Blanco Juarez and Nancy game now before we go is time for moment of a m-. When you first get snow in any Hugh melted and freeze it again. Why is not snow again? Really interesting question, because it gets to the heart of what we as fi intas try to do. We're trying to actually measure how much water is in. No, my name's third. Patterson. I am a scientist at the university of Wisconsin in Madison. And specifically I'm snow scientist, so I use instruments like radar, and videos and images of snowfall to study the properties of snow, and I do this all over the world, you have this great observation of snow. Right. You say have snow when it first of all, as a powder, what you're actually seeing is a collection of small crystals. And as you have I fallen atmospheric temperature, and moisture of the atmosphere, determines the shape of the result is you have this fluffy. How'd or like collection of ice crystals at the service. And then when all those ice crystals melt, they all flatten out into a bunch of water. That's all collected together. But that's a much more dense material. So it turns from a big fluffy pile into a flat sheet like a puddle. And then when that refuses that block is much denser than the snow crystals fell out of the air, the powder becomes liquid or the crystals become liquid and that liquid freezes as an ice lab. You can't actually reform. The triples one there on the surface. You have a snowstorm that produces ten inches of snow if you were to meltdown, those ten inches into water, you have one inch of water so we went from snow, which was penned the one, and then we went water, which is one to one and then that water froze is an icebox, which is approximately one to one. So it's all about the change in density. This list of names makes me so very happy. This is the brains honor roll. These are the lovely listeners who shared their brilliance with us in the form of questions ideas. Mystery sounds Android phones. We love you Judah from college park. Georgia torn from Phoenix advocates from Fairfax Virginia Lulu from Vancouver. Jackson Cooper Jules, Audrey from West Point. Utah, Rory from Charlotte North Carolina Beatrice from getting no Quebec Maxwell from Huntington Beach, California, Senna from Gainesville Florida Vero from Minneapolis, Hilda may from Galway Ireland Ethan from Spokane Washington Elsie from Austin, Texas Daphne from California Farren from Chicago, millions act for Mony Illinois Roshan from New Zealand, Dylan area, and from Berkeley, heights, New Jersey Shannon wrecks from Ventura California Lincoln enlarged from golden valley. Minnesota, Omar Annetta from Austin, Texas, Charlie from Nashville Louis from Seattle and Rian calling from Cambridge, Massachusetts Mathilde from reading England Mason from Sydney. Australia Alexander from West Ham's to New York. Why it from Falls Church, Virginia? Santa from Plymouth, mini. Ota sit from North Carolina, Avery and Eva from Carmel valley, California here from Canberra, Australia, Jesse from Hillsborough, Oregon Josie and Samantha, from battlefield, Missouri, Cora and Simon from Saint Paul ally from Bellingham, Washington. Theo from Brooklyn, New York oven Charlotte from San Antonio, Archer and indigo from Brooklyn, New York. Elliot and Louis from Houston Joshua from Fort Worth, Texas. Leeann in August from Portland, Oregon Daniel from Nashville Gavin for Markham Ontario Quinton Reese from Amherst, New Hampshire Josephina from Chico, California Gavin from Victoria, British Columbia. We Sean from Redmond, Washington, Oliver and Carolina from Savannah, Georgia Carris from new watt, Colorado KYW from Oregon grant from Tucson, Arizona Clayton and Marcus from Toronto Genevieve from San Francisco Luca from Seattle. Kathryn Jones from gastonia, North Carolina hookah, some framingham, Massachusetts. Samantha Jordan from the Winston neutrality aria from zero eight autumn, Schuyler sage in gambit from round rock, Texas, Olivia, aided in San Frisco, Texas, Charlotte Logan, Lila from Tasca, Daryl, California San from Raleigh North Carolina and. Ella from starkville Mississippi. We'll be back soon. With more answers to your questions, things listening. And now here's your sneak peek at the first episode in our brand new season of smash. Boom best the competition kicks off fierce in this unicorns versus dragons debate. Subscribe to smash boom bust in your favorite podcast app, and you'll get to hear the entire debate. Mash, smash. You're listening to smash boom best the show about showdowns. All right. Time to get back to the fantastic focus of this debate, unicorns versus dragons are judged. Kobe here is taking a lot of info. How are you feeling? Kobe. You're feeling swayed in either direction. I'm not gonna lie. I was pretty pro dragons in the beginning. But the unicorn side did come with some he. And everybody loves it under. The hero who have a better doors and under. So Santon K are you ready to sparse? A more, of course I was born. Excellent. Because it's time for. Micro round. Both teams prepared advance for this challenge called, I'd like to. Thank the academy. We asked team unicorn and team dragon to both right. And acceptance speech for an award received by their side all the details, including what the award is for our totally up to them. So get ready to hear some name, dropping some happy, tears and a whole lot of humble brags Katie went I in round one. So Sandon you're up. We'd like to invite team unicorn to the stage. Now the award for the thing, that's inspired the greatest words of art and culture. This year's Musy is the Yoda. Seriously? I'm just so honored, it seems like only yesterday I was a magical little podium with a horn horn, and a dream first off fix to all the agent manuscripts and paintings inspired by me. Shout out to the spectacular woven aren't known as the unicorn tapestries made in the middle ages, but still on display today in New York, because, hey, great are never dies. Right. And speaking of great art, thanks to all the TV shows books and movies, featuring me the last unicorn, sheera, Harry Potter, oh, and my little pony sub rone's. See you all the people behind food trends. Like colorful unicorn toast, and the unicorn Frappuccino, and I can't forget all the black white poster makers, sprayed, rush artists, and puffy sticker, people, thanks for using my likeness like all the time. I mean I get it. Who else would use dragon scare people to death and finally to my Queen my idol. My inspiration. Lisa frac-, your hyper colored rainbow pictures. So the real me, this is for you to be yourself everyone. Thank you. Oh, well mazal tov team unicorn, thank you. This is going to go on our trophy shelf with all our other. Right. Well, now it's team dragons, turn to hog the spotlight. Come on up to the podium, Katie. All right. This will be read as the dragon. So I need to prepare my drag woman. Woman. Applause, yet, it's me the dragon, although you probably already knew that with my dazzling wit and glittering, hold of treasure who know me know, whether you're terrified of my mighty role in fiery breath impressed with my immunity to Buea with good fortune. You've definitely heard of my work, wrapping, my serpentine Bobby around all the greatest treasures of the world and also the fate of mankind who else could do it. What I was told I won the award for most beautiful mythological creature, I wouldn't say I was surprised who is going to win the hydra that kind matter the Unical that little weird headed horse jokes, make me laugh because when I lack I shoot fire for my lips and you don't want the audience love you. A little dragon Huma. Full anyway, long story short, before they can't me off, and I am forced to the boot. Them to I am surprised. I'm a genius Adda hero. You're welcome for even Danny to being here. Goodbye for me the deroga-. Here. Thanks. Again, old L Passover sponsoring us today old, El Paso brings magic to taco night how they're the only ones with the stand and stuff, and tortilla bowl shells. That's right. The only taco shells that stand up on their own, so you can focus less on the spilling and more on the filling and eating bolt El Paso, grab the yellow box.

Brain dopamine oxytocin alpaca Jack Molly bloom El Paso tennis Raphael Harvey Virginia Cari Massachusetts Baltimore National Science Foundation Sandon Chico John Armand hammer
I Don't Remember

Armstrong & Getty

38:51 min | 4 months ago

I Don't Remember

"We can't make progress because too many of our countries rules and institutions were designed to exclude black people. We need real change. It's time to eliminate the Filibuster Makdissi Estate seriously fixed the Supreme Court and Abolish the Electoral College. We must vote in. November. But we need a pen of action. Now it's time to finally will a true equal and just democracy. Paid for by, JUST DEMOCRACY Armstrong and getty. Radio. These hideous foods and Jackass on radio introduction that was holy God Gosh nobody does it better us? We do want another it's Such a bizarre. Apologize for that. All right. Go Go. I don't recall. Okay. Thank you. My He. Armstrong and getty. From Studio sees senior. You know what it is that room here on little Friday deep within the bowels of the Armstrong and getty communications compound everybody wanted to the tutelage of our general manager. I need to point out it's the first of October that. Are. Are you ready to? Rock. Or general manager this morning James Comey. Awesome. Poor fellow never mind Joe. Biden. James Comey has the dementia. He has no memories. He can't remember anything happened poor fella but music, it's an information party. If you didn't come to party, don't knock on my door. District Standard Answer Mation Party Yesterday was all debate. So we got all the stuff stand today to talk about. Nothing else got talked about yesterday. Sanchez. That stuff keeps happening. And stuff keeps happening to today's fresh news fresh caught news major airlines announcing their let go. Thousands and thousands of people that was after Disney day before announced thousands and thousands of people. Who certain companies we may work with have made various announcements as well. Yeah. Is Not what's important? Is that Nancy Pelosi and the Democrats have the issue on Election Day Republicans did nothing to help you even though they're trying to negotiate something. Yeah. Well, the that you know the politics of the thing are definitely interesting but other just there seemed to be a lot of businesses industries that are This is lasted longer than we thought it was going to all you and We gotta do something. the the number out today every Thursday, the number comes out of how many Jobless claims there aren't it's low eight hundred thousands, which is down a little bit. It's still historically just insanely I. It's flattened for about five consecutive weeks. I guess in the US I will tell you this can't flattening in the eight to nine hundred thousand range. Oh no no. Since the previous record was six, hundred thousand and that was an out liar no, I was not expressing. That is good news interestingly troublingly enough Europe which really if we'd handle the covid like era, we'd it'd be much better off trump's in idiot blah blah. Blah. Europe has had rising unemployment now for five consecutive months. It's still rising. Wow. Yeah. Seen A resurgence of the head the rest of it. Yeah. I I. Hope I'm wrong about this too. But I don't feel like the the big powerful economic it hasn't happened yet. From this whole thing and depends it might be. Ameliorated made less bad by good policy don't hold your breath but yeah, they're they're absolutely are effects that are in their backstage right now giant economic effects putting on their makeup and getting ready to step on stage. And give us a good blasting. Somebody My iphone did what it does now and then were apparently updated my operating system. If you say no times eventually says, alright apple says screw you while you're sleep put the new operating system and it includes not answering your phone if you're driving. They didn't get the pre show phone call today, and then when I got here, I looked at my phone and said not receiving calls while your calls an audit implications it'll be silenced while you're driving and I'd never signed up for that I don't want him and that's I I figured out when I hate net technology the most I hate technology that's trying to anticipate and help me I hate that though I'll ask for to find needed. All right. The whole hey, we got an idea we're in fact we're going to do this for you. I hate that error all that drives me crazy. But what other wonders await I wonder when out my phone now I D. Say Hope. You can turn that off. Can you turn that Shirley? What is my? Why do all of my cars have the capacity for me to talk to you free if it's if your phone's going to do that I don't know that's very good question Anyway, let's introduce everybody in the squad to kick off the show. There's our board operator Michelangelo Pressing Buttons Flipping Toggles Pulling Levers Higher this morning Michael Pretty. Good, I did the final seating charts for my wedding upcoming and what I've done is I've said to my own table like I requested. To top that I got nice when I sit next to someone who doesn't talk now I've separated Somebody who doesn't speak? Separated the spouses so that those that are on unhappy marriages can find somebody else and so. This word. Nice really is generous. Love is in the air and you're thinking. Yeah. Now, I can't buy into. Separate couples. was just a wacky bit how many days to your wedding now at ten Oh boy, it's crunch time down. It's the fine. No count down double digits days away. It's never too late to change your mind, but it's getting close. Oh, wait a minute derby really uncomfortable talking about you don't say that to somebody on the eve of their nuptials. Have you ever known anybody who backed out toward the end? I don't think I am not personally no heard stories but don't ever have known a couple of should have I know. I've known several people who say they thought about it and wish they had yeah but I've never everybody. This is a really not a good conversation to be having with Michael in the room I'm sure. Sure he's got no worries ten days I think the vast majority of people go into it with with no concerns whatsoever. So I still have time. I'm kidding There is positive sean who's smile lights up? Are you shown doing very well indulged a little bit yesterday. I've existed largely off of things prepared for my rice cooker and and frozen pizzas for a while. But I went out and got some tacos from one of my favorite Taco joints did did the old curbside pickup? and. All Man I I missed a missed those good tacos. One of my old our favorite spots to hit were you get there at the right time and Tacos are it seems like they're free practically. So. They want they want you to spend money on booze I do yes Yeah I will I'm willing to oblige way to go along with the program. But Yeah it was just a nice little time to a small. It's not a chain places small little local business that I like and I'm glad that they're still finding a way to to maintain and I hope that continues we're doing that tonight my wife's birthday and she wants a this Mexican restaurants food and other gluten free your muster Mexican food gluten free is that right? Works had no idea I'll. That's fantastic. Don't tolerate the gluten and Mexico pernod away putting up with very traditional I'm Jack Armstrong. He's Joe. Getty on this it is Thursday October. October, the first, the twenty twenty rent is due the rent. It's too Damn Armstrong and getty, and we approve this program. Let's begin the show officially. Now according to FCC rules and regulations. Here we go and mark. Don't have to do a thing i. Don't. Know. What to? No one's talking to me within. Free don't have the. One. The unmistakable mistake Voice of Cartman of South Park there, their pandemic special debuted last night I only got a little bit into it because I ran long and I fell asleep because I'm an old man. Social distancing. Awesome. More of that later How's the bag of mail looking to? It's absolutely terrific. Some surprising thoughts on the debate Oklahoma days ago and Also you know a a great insight about a new statistic we need. We'll see if we can squeeze that in. Kids have said I'm bored. How many times a day since the pandemic again began the actually of coming up with statistics on that. I've heard that a few times for my kids. The whole world's board. You know we're all just doing nothing and same thing everyday. That's what drives me crazy the sameness. The Sameness I noticed that drives, people, nuts he's you wake him. We don't have anything going on today or this weekend it's going to be same as last weekend. We had before that. What are you trying to next week at? I'm trying to pretend that's not the case. Get Out. Of. My head when Our text line is four, one, five, two, nine, five, K FTC lots on the way. The Armstrong and getty show. S- pretty clear that TV ratings are thing of the past release until they come up with better technology, they have no idea how many people watch things now, they just don't have any idea. and no, and no way to figure it out currently. Because the ratings, the TV ratings, the debate were down thirteen percent from aw. Hillary, trump I didn't watch on TV. No No, I watched half of it not on television I would say that is a quaint number It's a quaint question designed only for TV executives who watched on TV? It's just it's it's unimportant right but the interesting thing is nobody has any idea what the number is anymore So that's just gone away. In terms of being able to know how many people were interested in something. Yeah. Boy Do you know if you're not in an advertising driven business? That's only mildly interesting for those of us? Who are it's It's it's rather a conundrum. It was probably among the most watched shows in the history of. Humankind video presentations because he can't say TV anymore because vinings. Television right. Right. Things you could watch on video it might have been you know in the top couple most watch things of all time probably was we'll never know nope mail that. Here's your freedom. Loving quote of the day from the Great Booker T. Washington. In his landmark book up from slavery. I've begun everything with the idea that I could succeed, and I never had much patience with the multitudes of people who are always ready to explain why one cannot succeed. Elizabeth. Homes there I wish I. Wish I have been writing in the car with Booker T. Washington today as we are listening to NPR. THOUGHT NPR is a channel that it's like it's like the Mommy Party and Daddy Party it's like your mom's saying it's okay. The world is hard and it's tough to really mean to units not your fault you. They were unfairly facts what. Fair no matter what to you it was your fault completely doesn't make any difference. Yeah and it showed up without your glove and your shoes they should've let you play anyway honey whose faulted as is irrelevant. It's your responsibility to go forward with where you are. It's exactly what I was thinking ahead doesn't really make any differences, waste your water, but this is where we are right now. I'm here in white supremacy I'm going to punish the world by having a miserable life. Mansi. Tell you what? into the correspondence proper. This first initial K I guess A couple of quick just a Bingo, Bango Bongo about the debate then we'll move on a promise but you have a guy who's known Roma his gaffes in his inability to speak and trump doesn't let him talk he's finding himself I became more aware of that as I watched more clips throughout the day yesterday. Trump really made a mistake by doing that that shut up man. and. He should've shut up. That's one Biden was gonNA explain why he's not going. Tell us about court packing. Let him hang himself let him go and if you let biking go for minutes, he sometimes says crazy things a little background first writes Jeff I'm libertarian with strong conservative views. My wife grew up in a really liberal house but doesn't follow politics at all. She stayed home mom raising two. Young kids. It's fabulous out of the blue. She said, she wanted to watch the debate after it was all over astor who she would choose to run our country and defend us against foreign attacks. She said trump I asked why? Because he comes off his strong and we need a strong president I on the other hand thought it was an s show but I'm still voting for trump anyway onto. This from al-anon humous. Voter I HATE DONALD TRUMP A lot. But after the debate I will hold my nose vote for him. Why? Because we own a small business and I listen to Joe. Biden talks nonchalantly about getting rid of tax breaks that mean business can grow the just a few breaths later talked about returning to Obama level taxation. Do you know how many jobs we created during the Obama Administration to the cost of Obamacare and the uncertainty around it as well as the constant threat of increased taxes stunted our growth for six years in the past four years. How many jobs have we created twelve wait a minute I thought government created jobs. Well, government policy can help in part because of the tax breaks that allowed. US Leeway to buy equipment that makes growth possible and write it off now Biden said he's going to do away with that stuff and raise our taxes to boot. I. Once voted for Obama because I didn't like his opponent and got a six hundred percent increase in our business healthcare costs never again. So I'll plug my nose by four years worth of earplugs vote for. Donald. Trump. Goodbye America. Hello from Utah fellows in an effort to really diversify my immediate take. I really do my best soak up different positions and talking points good for you. The one thing I keep getting hung up on his white supremacy. This is always such a hot topic and obviously their percentage of people that are racist but white supremacy is like this boogeyman of the left like the subject indicates maybe I am stupid is topic is maybe I'm stupid. Because MIT possible. But I don't see white supremacists tearing up streets and burning down businesses. How real are white supremacists like actually the very notion of Chris Wallace even telling trump to condemn white supremacy like the KKK ravaging parts of the country, and I'm just not seeing it what's the deal and water y'all's thought I've wondered that for years. The idea that. Donald Trump. would be required to denounce white. Supremacy. But Joe Biden not be required to denounce Marxism is obscene especially because it's Marxist and those soft handed emotional youths that have been corrupted by them that are burning down cities actually burning down cities, not some boogeyman toothless morons who managed to assemble themselves for a day Charlottesville with the resultant ugliness. But the people burning down cities all the time none of that Chris Wallace No of course not. Similar topic. Doug. This morning I was getting my three year olds very stern lesson explaining why my wife and I are teaching them about proper behavior and consequences. What happens when parents don't care enough to teach their kids their values I wanted to end my lesson by showing them the ANTIFA riots but was quite dismayed when I searched on youtube and the results came back coaches right wing protesters clashed with anti trump trump protesters or civil rights. Protesters also surprising was most of the various were from three years ago very little from these current rights. That's because youtube owned by Google is a way left corporation Sir. They won't allow honest labelling videos wherever you get shut down, and then we don't really have time to flesh this out but I want to get into it in a couple of minutes. Secret. Semi frequent correspondent Dave. Writes the field of Veroljub at times relies on mathematical models? How about a new one? The Kovic hysteria rate. Talking about the rise in. Domestic violence and drinking etc. What has the cove shutdown 'cause then I'll get into his reasoning it's pretty good. But the COVID Stereo Rate We surely should have. Statistical model once we should've talked about the cussing cussing parrots yesterday, the whole world did that story before us but got the cussing parents coming up too. And Getty. Support for this podcast comes from Goldman Sachs what Goldman Sachs expert, and leading thinkers have to say about trends, shaping markets, industries, and the global economy stay informed with the latest insights from Goldman Sachs on the economic and market implications of Covid nineteen available on our podcasts at gs dot com slash Cova nineteen or any of your favorite podcast platforms. Armstrong and getty show. Ladies and gentlemen under oath. We give you James Comey did Mr Page. Deny knowing people. That you accused him of having contact with I. Don't remember that battle. I recall I don't remember I don't remember learning anything additional about steals sources not that I recall. No, I don't remember or ever having me here I don't recall that. So do you recall I do not recall I do not I don't remember any discussion I don't remember using that word, but I don't remember using that word I don't remember ever being informed. They don't recall the informed of that. Did you ask any questions or do any due-diligence on this at all? I don't remember anything about the facts that have been revealed recently about the sub source I don't remember the exact words but something similar that that rendering. Okay well, that's pretty stunning thing. It didn't ring a bell which I'm sure you remember I don't remember the exact words remember whether I knew the Democratic Party but I don't know for sure I don't know I don't think I knew before remember reading a footnote I don't know whether I asked I don't know what that hers do as I said earlier that does not ring any bells with me when I read that I don't remember it I don't I don't remember receiving anything it's described in that letter. One thing everyone should learn from politicians is that he's not politician people in government. Not. Remembering seems to work. Well, also have been advised by a very high placed legal minds that if you're ever in trouble. Say don't say no, I didn't say I don't remember because if you say no, I didn't and it turns out you did now you've lied to a a an official of whatever level if you say I don't remember. Nobody can prove you actually remember. So that's an excellent Dodge Komi knows it. Plays an IRA member. Did. You know that Christopher Steele was getting crap from Russian misinformation agents. Remember. Can Say, and you can kinda fuzzy and you can get away with not remembering things that. Surely remember, this is a big deal. Now, I'm just done ring about Jack. Did we talk about the debate a great deal yesterday? Don't recall. Doesn't ring a bell. Oh boy I didn't realize my wife shares a birthday with James Earl. Carter former president turns ninety-six today. My wife turns over. There there are hills. He's older than, yeah. That's told oldest oldest ever president, right? Yeah. Nice. Fell Asleep. This is retirement building houses for people in Brian and criticizing sitting presidents and printing and and praying right sure I wanted to share with you a little bit of Dave's reasoning the covert. I think that term may be a little prejudicial to get people to sign on maybe we call it co vid shutdown. Kovic shutdown effect, right or something. But the rate would set out he writes to estimate the nasty effects of social and economic shutdowns and would be designed to accompany the death slash infection rates that the news media menacingly flash every day the new statistic would be designed to compare various death rates between the current ear and pass Cova years to arrive at a model an estimate. Samples of such how how such a goal might be accomplished. Past suicide rates are subtracted from an estimated number of suicides that now take place for projected hysteria suicide rate Oh that reminds me man we gotta. a note from a beloved listener who had to spend a couple of minutes in a mental hospital dealing with a family issue and was struck at the the place was teeming with young people and the nurse said, we've never seen anything like this. Oh. Yeah. Let's keep a keep ignoring that and pretending if Cova nineteen is the only risk to humanity. Sorry I get a little fired up about this stuff. This number it's added do other projected deaths including alcohol based on liquor wine beer sales spike in sales cetera same drug overdoses domestic violence can be projected this way as well. violence on the streets at least some of equates to a certain number of long term disabilities and deaths, which can certainly be added to the total death rates applying to heart disease and cancer from previous years could be subtracted CETERA. We've talked about that a great deal if car accidents have decreased that. Would tend to lower the projected hysteria rate, which may be the only positive effect of covert but wouldn't it be spectacular? If everyone could easily notice the utter nonsense that's been going on since last March we're being destroyed for no acceptable reason yet we seem not to notice well David. You know we notice around here. So my wife does this group she leads with a whole bunch university students about goats and stuff but anyway, they hadn't gotten together sense March. and. So what does that seven months and that's goat crap and they all got they all got together there their vet students at the toughest university in the entire world's they're all like super achievers. I mean like at the very top of super cheaper people but anyway they were their parents wrote big checks or could be I don't know. That happens by the hundreds in that particular university system. Can you do that if you? Have to be really good at math all. Get through your hands. Hanjin on a tangent. Turns out high likelihood. Gather. New CELLINI governor of California. I can't wait to hear. Those kids. Check reason the forum and I have. Evidence he so exciting hard evidence he so exciting aren't on on that just back to goats anonymous. Hadn't thought about this before on really difficult degrees. Do People do it for that? Why suppose if you're good enough to get into a university, you could do that. You'd get into the other one maybe but I I usually assume that people are doing that they're getting a degree in communications, our history or something where whatever Not. Something that's like the hardest science and math in the world I don't know I don't actually know that. These people are they doing kind of? Slide by degrees. Apparent, fake them into the college. That's an interesting question I. Don't know the I probably could have gotten into like a second tier law school definitely a third tier. And if my daddy had had money. And got me into a second tier I probably could've hung on I'm guessing Um what I would have been in the Joe Biden bottom. Core Tile Wood you. Anyway. So these college kids who get together and do this fun stuff and everything had they been together for seven months and my wife said they were so happy to be together. Of course, things seven months when you're young all. When you're twenty seven months is forever and then I mentioned my son they got together at the park him and his four best friends. They call themselves a gang they're the least threatening gang in the world. But the the five of them hadn't been together in seven months when your ten seven months is like your whole life is it is it's unheard of and they got together and they were so happy what we're doing to young people and seemed to a certain extent for no reason, there's no reason these people to get together and at least get together and where masks and be in the same room well, and even if it were necessary, you'd think it would be decided after great careful public consideration we all understand the damage were doing to our children are adolescents are teenagers are young adults right? We all understand that this will have. Devastating effects, but we need to do it anyway. No nobody is saying that why there is an answer that is not a rhetorical question. It's politically inconvenient for certain powerful lobby groups would because the data has emerged but for instance, the teachers unions dare not say that but having said that, yeah, human beings to they're very animal's brain to our spinal column for souls need human contact. Even a so-called loners need some human contact and children they did they depend on it like Air God were just ignoring that died that story by the Mental Hospital in so many young people being there I'd like to know more stats on that. That's really troubling. You know. I have to run in cars on a roof over my head. If I, could sign a contract maybe with the devil I don't know go down to the crossroads at midnight. See what happens if I could sign a contract with the devil. and. Say Look put us on five hundred radio stations for the next year just so we can deliver the message we've been trying to deliver in the last three minutes, and then just then I will retire from the business. I'll never say another word on the air again I don't want single dime for I would do it do it immediately. Cut This makes me insane. Can I have your dimes and I don't And I don't even have little kids who are suffering I just know of so many you are. It's son Afa then finally. You probably heard this story from other sources. I should've done it yesterday when Sean handed it to me, you do have responsibilities as his radio show hosts Jackson. You considered being good at your job. It's fair criticism I saw this done everywhere by Les mots but there were these parents that were teaching each other to swear laughing about it. That is not you guys were laughing. Funny Allergies when the Animal World Starts Using sproul language of your partner experience I will that is that is not good who knows what aiding and abetting each other. That would buy one of those parents right now. That is so every group of teenage boys in history except now because they're not allowed to get together because of the cove head because they were all quarantined together, one room was just full of swearing birds, right? On the zookeepers couldn't get him to stop life. Has Been forced to remove five newly adopted parents from public display after they started swearing at customers see that's an overreaction to me. They taught each other to swear I never knew that I've worked in retail I can relate with those parents. Will they heritage Jack? The expression goes it makes sense but I'd never heard of I guess I've never known anybody who had more than one. But obviously, if you have more than one, they're going to talk to you know they're gonNA teach each other whatever words they know. So two thoughts on this story number one, my one real parrot experience who is my sister and her her her late husband had a African gray parrot that did the mimicking thing and I. I stayed over there one night and and I heard her talking in the kitchen my sister. Now I grew up with this woman we still live in the same metro area I, see her frequently. I get up I get out of bed I go into say hello she'd been gone for an hour. This was the parrot the parrot was it was as good. As the most sophisticated recording known demand. So S-, towns it out and just say the words they have the tone always. Perfectly my sister has retained a bit more of a northern midwestern accent than I have it nailed that. It was just amazing second thought on this story. You got five swearing parrots putting off the patrons cut into your profit. You. Walk in there you say next to swears you're going to see what's coming. Parrot. says. Parrot. Pluck it. You put it out a spit g right adversaries. All right. Now, what do you got to say, right? says. Poor F- Lack Of clagget yet put it at a SPEC. Parents left you walk in there. You say who's next? Who else wanted a parrot says Chopper, traction no way you're snuff another one of us. Hey. You're back. Spit the only way to handle swear. Trust me on this. You let it get out of hand. Here's a fool the only way to handle. Schwerin. Perish. You've got a plan and it's good to have a plan. More on the way, our text line four, one, five, nine, five K FDIC for production segment. Wasn't it? Draw. The Armstrong and getty show. Star Carol Baskin was eliminated from dancing with the stars this week. If you haven't seen tiger king, it's a duckie's theories that premiered on Netflix three lifetimes ago you had no kidding. No kidding. Yeah. That was early in the pandemic. Longest six months of her. No. Kidding. It's interesting how events affect time. Your perception of time. Actually Change Yeah I'm but I. Always assumed that it's got something to do with why you like you know those those those years from sixteen to twenty two or twenty five or whatever you know just did they seem like half your life Even though there are a tiny portion of your life just because. So many things happened. So many different things, new friends, new places, new jobs into this, and then he'd get older and you know you can get into a situation where you're in the same house same job for decades and your perception of time changes, and that's why your soul dies. Maybe, not really I'm yeah. What's what's curious about the pandemic thing is not that much is happening but. The pandemic is happening all the time. So why does it seem like? It's a longer time shouldn't it seems short as it so extraordinarily, shockingly different all those other events was talking about when Ryan such different. This is all that. So new it's I don't know the I. Didn't watch the game but according to executive producer Hansen. Who is a big NBA Fan? The Lakers dismantled the heat. In Game One last night. Looking like. Little. Sweep Bill. Is that the league that Paints Marxist slogans on its yes it is Joe Lebron. James also maybe high off of his win just purchased Katherine Hepburn's old home for thirty seven million dollars and I assume Lebron James already has a number of. Fairly. Nice homes I don't think he's how many starlets of the fifties homes does he have Marilyn Monroe Drenica Garbo. Audrey Hepburn. Scott. To Jayne Mansfield home. It's cool though built in the thirty S. and. Then was taken over by Howard. Hughes imagine the people that have been through Katherine Hepburn's in Howard Hughes's own s other people that own it. That'd be very, very cool. I played golf not long ago in the Carmel Valley where a in plain view of a couple of fairways is Doris days old home. And apparently, she used to wander down and greet the golfers and sell wins the story Yup nothing more to the end of that. That is a collection of sticks and tar paper that used to shelter one doors Dan, who was a movie star thousand years correct. But Cutie when dinosaurs still roamed the. They are releasing the grand jury recordings. From the whole Brianna, Brianna Taylor killing tomorrow, and there are some people saying that this is going to be huge in some people against say you're just GonNa you know you'll. You'll hear. The dull explanation for the result that came out the other day is what you'll hear but I don't know what's going to happen. There is part of me the the the practical part of me thinks. It's good to do this because that will give people the information about how this decision and these decisions are east. But the experienced past forty part of me knows that won't do any good. People who who gain power from whipping people up have no interest in the truth. Yeah I'm thinking there's a decent those who are prone to be whipped up won't hear it anyway. I'm thinking there's a decent chance that of the twenty hours you're going to hear a couple of very short clips twice this jury was not convinced though and tell me I. Don't think this is right. You know we'll be the clip that comes out of twenty hours right even. If ten seconds later somebody said no, it's because blank Lange and she said Oh I get it. Okay. You'll never hear that I mean not in the news media not only I don't mean to come off his too cynical, but you can't cynical enough about this stuff i. wish it would do some good to release this trump's former campaign manager has resigned after getting tackled in the on the sidewalk in front of his home the other day by the cops. And being drunken waving around gun at his wife and stuff like that. Yeah. Side to resign probably a good idea. Now, I saw one story I hate to even say this out loud because I, don't know where I saw it. Have you seen anything about money anything about that. Anywhere I have not makes me think it's not true. Then that'd be everywhere for his true. Isn't it? You would think. Yeah. I don't know though I have no interest in protecting nor indicting Brad South I don't need to spread around things that are completely bunk. Yeah. I he strikes me is a guy who had. The wherewithal rise to a certain level and certain status, and then the as the Peter Principle makes clear he was promoted one level above that. And the pressure I can't even imagine the pressure and scrutiny what he was doing, but it appears a crack. Yeah you. Now you can. You can make this claim. It's not a claim. It's it's a true fact. Trump. Has One campaign manager that's in prison and one that's in a nut house. I mean. You can see your point. You can say that in it's a it's true. This. Brad Pascal Forty Four If you're if you're cracking up, have you this is a good one. Have you ever cracked up maybe not even to that extent where like the police have to tackle the on the sidewalk but like you you I don't know he ended up in the mental Ward or something like that. What it feel like is it's coming maybe the rest of US would like a little a few tips on what are some warning signs. when when that is coming, you think it's pretty clear or he is so diluted by life you don't know it's coming. Does it happen all the sudden? I? Don't even know. I don't know I and I don't know to what extent he cracked up I mean as far as we can tell drunked up and bruised his wife, which is horrible. And his wife saying completely lost it. But yeah text line four, one, five, two, nine, five K. FTC if you've ever lost it or a family member that completely lost, we worked with somebody who did yeah, indeed. Fine. Fella to completely froze up maybe the key is to walk around deter day kind of losing it ten percent that might lend out might be the best thing you can do. Armstrong and getty. This is Danny Shapiro host family secrets welcome to our fourth season families secrets. It seems just about every family has them. Some secrets are kind of small and insignificant, and some are shocking and massive. When they come out our new knowledge has the power to change our lives join me an hour millions of listeners as we dive deep into the stories of this new seasons. Amazing guests. Listen and subscribe on the iheartradio APP or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.

Jack Armstrong getty Joe Biden DONALD TRUMP US trump Joe James Comey president Disney sean Nancy Pelosi Mental Hospital Europe Dave general manager Booker T. Washington getty communications
NLU Podcast, Episode 369: Jim Urbina

No Laying Up

1:10:05 hr | 3 months ago

NLU Podcast, Episode 369: Jim Urbina

"Beater Right Club today? Yes. That's Better than. Most About. It is better than most. Than Most Latest German welcome back to another episode of the. PODCAST DJ. Paschi here filling in for our newly married host Sally. Who I believe was last spotted on instagram mowing his lawn for the first time just all kinds of life changes going on for Sally this week congratulations to him. He'll be back soon in the meantime, we have a very timely podcast today with Jim or Beena. Jim has been in the Gulf design business for a long long time and the reason I'm calling this a timely podcast is that not only was he the CO designer of Old Macdonald would you saw in episode four of the season of tour sauce? He was also instrumental in building Pacific dunes with Tom Doak and also built the punch bowl the putting course at bandon dunes that we all know and love, and all these are things you can see in this season of tourists presented by our good friends at precision pro range finders I gotta. Tell you guys up at Pinehurst this week caddying for our young hitter learn Coggan in the symmetric tour event. I did not realize maybe you guys didn't realize this range finders totally allowed. During competition on the symmetric tour as of this year, that was a great surprise to me and ignites anxiety release to me as I was freaking out for the last week trying to make sure I would be able to get the right numbers. I'm pretty helplessly reliant on my range finder at this point but all of my fears were put to bed when she told me that on the as on our way to the first teeth basically on on Tuesday morning. So I. Will tell you that my precision pro and x nine range finder is now officially competition tested. We used it all day today all day yesterday and I guess, Say I think it was working lauren had one of only six rounds under par today in brutal conditions. Conditions were tough out at Pinehurst number nine, the C. Suite, the strap boys, and even the narc they was coming the NARC in in these ad reads, you can call me Dj you can come in the narc either. One is fine. We all trust precision program to help us pick the right club and swing with confidence and right now, our listeners can get twenty dollars off the best selling next nine slope range finder by going to precision pro golf dot com and using coupon code. No. Laying up at checkout that twenty dollars off our favorite range finder the annex nine slope swing with confidence. Hit More Greens with precision pro golf now onto my conversation with Jim Urbina gym where I wanted to start. I saw somewhere I think it was Colorado Avid Golfer something like that called you a thirty year overnight sensation. First of all is that is that a fair characterization and second of all what does that mean? You know it's funny talk about the Avid Golfer magazine article a good friend of mine. Who I've grown to admire Tom Farrell the writer said. Jim You've been everywhere and nobody knows where you've been. And I kind of laughed and chuckled at that. So maybe thirty year sensation. Is. Aptly coined but. It's true. I've been a lot of places and when I tell P people, I've worked Pasta Tempo the Mid Ocean Club the valid club San Francisco Golf Club you never you would never know that I was there. So that's kind of a good thing I. Don't put my stamp on it. And places like Paxton's old Mac. The PUNCHBOWL. They were all great projects to be a part of, but again, hardly anybody knows that I was there. Yeah. So what's that? What's that like for you? What's that? What's that been like kind of a little bit behind the scenes I guess there was a lot of famous behind the scenes guys. If you don't mind I'll mention a few. If it wasn't for Robert. Hunter. A lot of people don't know this if it wasn't for Robert Hunter. Alister Mackenzie wouldn't be so famous in California. And if it wasn't for Seth Rainer Charles, Blair Macdonald would've never got off his creation. To Nausea Golf links of America so I don't mind and I cherish that. Behind the scenes addition to the project but Without. Sets Rainer. Without Robert Hunter without a lot of the guys who. were out there shaping when I did work. For Pete, dye shaping the golf course Pete would be the first year. That I need shapers I need guys to help me build these things. It's easy to lay down on paper, but somebody's gotTa Build. So I love it. I don't mind it I. Cherish. Well. So it's funny. I know we had bobby weed on the podcast a couple of weeks ago and he was talking. With Chris are host about. This massive tree of architects that Kinda stems stems back to to Pete Die I know you Have Your own branch on that tree. And I'm curious first of all, what was your path to to getting there to actually like hooking up with with Pete and starting to work with him and then second? What was that like? What was your experience with him like? Well, it's funny. I always joke with people that I was accidental participant. and. What I mean by that is I never intended to be a golf course builder, a golf course designer. Pete Dye never said that we were golf course architects. There's no such thing. You don't go to school to college to be a golf course architect you go to school to be a landscape architect a land planner. P.. Dye was an insurance salesman a very good player in his own right but an insurance salesman so we are all builders and so. I never intended to be in the business, but a lot of people don't know this I used to fight forest fires in the summertime in college what to earn money, and I was getting ready to go take a job with the Lolo national forest to be in their hotshot crew can possibly be smoke jumper but my soon to be wife father-in-law set. That's not a very good job. You ought to go get a job on a golf course so I apply I applied just to make him happy. I. Applied at a golf course in Colorado. which would be known as two. Plum Creek and the architect of record was die. I applied unfortunately or fortunately however you look at it. They hired me the next day and so I started as a ditched bigger a stick picker, a rock raker, and then I got to be a shaper and then as as a lot of people know now today the rest is history. What was your experience with golf before had? Did you play the game or were you just fighting forest fires? No just fought forest fires and I trained I trained. To be a teacher, I say high school drafting teacher. So I understood how to draw plans and I understood how to read topography maps show that little announced to me. That was really a foundation for when I got into the golf business I understand how to look at golf courses, how to look at maths and at three dimensional form. So little did I know possibly I was training for my future. Career. But at that time in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, two, when I applied to be in the construction part of the Gulf. ATISSI Plum Creek. I was hired again as I said to be working in the ditches and to learn how to be a shaper running a bulldozer never played golf and. To Peach Credit Pete never wanted to learn how to play golf because he said, it would taint my view on how to look and build and design the golf course isn't that interesting that is and I'm I'm curious what that meant I wanNA mention I was on the high school drafting team. So I feel like I've been training for this I've been training for this interview to pretend like I know what you're talking about throughout this whole thing. Birds of a feather, you'll be the next famous golf course architect takes time he pays just takes thirty thirty years. Yeah. Talk to me and thirty. We'll be dialed. So what do you think he meant by that I? Mean what was the? I don't want you to taint your taint, your IRA or anything. What does that imply there's biases would you say with architecture? What did he think? He met there absolutely, there's bias in an architecture because if you. As some people have said Jack, Nicklaus played a high fade and so some of his designs were in favor of that High Fade Pete wanted to be the editor Pete wanted to beat the designer but he appreciated my ability to run a bulldozer into shape his style of design, and then he would edit it. But he felt and I believe this to be true today that if I was a very good Golfer I possibly would never think about what a high handicapper player would play the how he played a golf course or I would only think about straight shots, high draws and what the best players in how they plant. So Pizza, let me be the editor. Let me be the designer you build them for me and and don't let that game that you play possibly taint your creativity. So at that point in your in your career I mean, did you have a philosophy on on? What made a good a good Gulf oil, and then now flashing forward obviously, you've you've done as much research on on architects on strategy on all these different things restoring these golf courses you've worked on. So I'm curious if that's how that strategy changed over the years. Well I never had a plan. I never had a concept. I never had a strategy was waiting to be taught. I was waiting to be mentored and Pete Dye and his son Perry die mentored me. They taught me what they wanted. They sent me to golf courses around the country to emulate some of their designs. I. Remember Pete Dye sent me on the plane to palm springs to look Redan hold that he was building while we were doing it at Arizona State University he said, Jim. Get on the plane. I. Want you to go look at this whole idea in palm springs or go get on the plane and go to Pinehurst number two, and as you as you we speak today. Pete die told me to go to Pinehurst number two. I have a lot to learn or he would tell me to go to old marsh and Florida and see how they did the drainage. So it was pete who set me on the plane she's gotTa Remember I was twenty, two, twenty, three years old getting on a plane go into these golf courses. I didn't get to play 'em just walked around took pitchers and then I come back and built it I mean that's a pretty cool job for any year old. It's a pretty cool job for anybody I agree and little did I know that I was beginning my education in golf course design and construction being an open book wanting to learn. Do. You know that he set me the family sent me to to Scotland to learn how the game was formed because I asked a simple question what is links golf being? Right they put me on a plane team eighty six I went to press Wick Scotland and I learned about what links golf is. Who Does that today who? Today that sounds like a high times of the of the golf course design business back then it was. And Again Pete and his son Perry they would send me everywhere. I went to the national golf links of America back in nineteen I believe eighty-six while still working for the die family I was so enamored with the look when I saw it in the book, this is this is how naive I was I was looking at a book A. Golf Architecture Book and I saw a picture of the national golf links. Of America. The seventeenth hole and I said to somebody I can't remember who was standing by me. I said look at this golf course just looks like what we're doing for Pete. And little. Did I know that Pete was emulating the National Golf links? Of America? That's how naive I was what do you remember about? You know all those trips around? Do you have a couple of specific holes that you saw that were real ha moments or kind of you know light switch moments for you for sure I remember going to California. Mr Diet sent me to believe it or not go see Carmel Valley ranch it was a golf course he did for landmark land in in Monterey Peninsula set me there And I thought well, wait a minute. There's some really cool golf courses. Right next door maybe I should go look to and so I went to see Pebble beach on my own I went to see Cyprus point on my own and I thought wow, these golf courses are so beautiful there so different. And yet I was. Building Golf. Courses for Pete and his son Perry and I'm thinking why didn't they send me the Cypress point or pebble beach so I was starting to gain an appreciation for why golf courses were different. Go to Carmel, Valley would go to Pebble Beach and Cyprus point to steady golf course architecture. He would send me to Pinehurst number two, but I'd go see all the other Donald Ross courses and all of the good golf courses in Pinehurst I went to the National Golfing of America but I went to Shinnecock and maidstone and I started to tour all those golf courses and I'm thinking why I'm getting this chance to learn about all this architecture and then he sends me to Scotland and it all starts to make sense to me all starts to make sense how the game was formed where its roots started and I was hooked I started reading. And I thought I, get it. Now I get it. The dies set me to work the game began and little. Did I know that that would pay high diffidence years to come when my kaiser hired us and I helped build Pacific Dunes on the coast of we're going to crescendo with with all the band and stuff I. Promise. We're GONNA we're, GONNA, get there for with plenty of that but I hate to ask a question that I'm afraid to hear the answer to but you weren't playing any golf during this stretch. You're you're just tooling around no, I started a plague. Okay. Okay. Good. That would have been tough to hear otherwise out you're gonNA. You're gonNA laugh this again, how naive I was they sent me to Scotland and I didn't have a golf bag. So I went down to the local I lived in southern. California. At the time I went to have you ever heard of vans. The grocery store th th there was A. Golf shop in southern California Okay and so I went and bought a big golf bag like on the tour. This bag was like about it was the size of Rodney Dangerfield. Golf bag in caddyshack and I bought some cheap clubs and I loaded up and I went to Scotland and when the caddy saw my bag, we were just like I'm not gonNA carry. It look extremely American with. Streaming. American, again remember I was so nice. And I was starting to learn how to play the game and I didn't realize it was just a simple as carrying a Shag bag with five clubs in it but back, then I was going to go play golf. So I figured I had the by this big golf bag I still have the photo you'll laugh if I ever showed it to you. How would you describe. Pete Diet like in the field I mean, what was it like? I know the everybody of talks about. The whole thing is built on flexibility and he can't be too rigid with plans and all that stuff I? mean. How much of that was was kind of him editing in the field and how much of that was was you and you guys kind of having freedom to do what you're I saw while it's interesting when I first started shaping. Plum Creek. I just did what they told me to do shape a flat TV spot, build a bunker created green site and I remember shaping on the sixteenth hole at. Plum Creek in Castle Rock Colorado I started to shape the green and pete kind of drug is float around in the dirt and he said, you know just put it right here. Jimmy just put it right here. So I started shaping it. And he watched me shape. He stood right bear by the Greenie watch shape it and he said Stop Stop. Stop. Stopping I got off the dozer. I said what's wrong he said, let me show you how to do that and he jumps on the tractor. He kinda puts the box played down on this tractor and starts to drag out the shape that he wanted. He said this is what I want. If you could do this. This is what I want. So that was my learning curve that was my my inspiration that you didn't look at a set of plans. You just built it in the dirt, and then if you didn't like it, you change that again and so years later at Arizona State University I'll never forget this. We got out and we were getting ready to go walk around the golf course an engineer got out a set of plans for behind the truck and he started a roll out with Pete died there a couple of the shapers and I was the design associated at that time I didn't shape Arizona on State University I was the onsite design associate. The engineer rolls out this plans and Pete Dye said. son, we won't be needing those today and so. That was that reinforcement that we're going to go what we're going to follow the routing and we're gonNA followed the stakes but we're going to build this in the field and I remember getting to the sixteen th hole and Pete would drop down to his knees in the dirt and he would shape disturbed land form and he would look at me and He'd say Jimmy I want you to just take this green and and just think of somebody Neilan and dirt. Okay. He's shaping this green and the dirt and he's taken the flow and the surface and he he digs a little hole with his hand and creates a bunker and he shakes Durkan mold set and he looks at me and says you get. Jammed the again it and I said Yeah I. got it. So do you see what I'm learning and how? To build these golf courses, you build them in the dirt, you take the plans and you said a routing, but then it's time to build them in the dirt and that's was my foundation for how I even golf do golf courses today. 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A war sitting in my cart right now, we've got a lot of northern Rhone stuff We've got a whole big refuge wine club meets every every week and really as far as wine goes may have some questions about buying it online and getting it shipped but they've got zip by ZIP temperature controlled shipping and satisfaction guarantee. So they will credit for any bottle that fails to impress. They've also got a new podcast, the one access podcast actually launched just a few days ago. Go check that out wherever you get your podcasts and check out one access dot com slash no you they've got A. Wine Club as well and Yeah. Some of the best prices out there and probably the best selection I've seen online. Now let's get back to the POD. So I know I'm skipping ahead a little bit, but you obviously worked with Tom Doak for I think seventeen eighteen years something like that, and and one of the the projects that just kinda springs to mind as you're talking about some of this stuff is is Sabanovic and trying to collaborate there with, with Jack, Nicholas and kind of a pretty famous famous collaboration there curious how a system like that works when you basically have to architects two teams. All of those those kinds of factors and you're trying to figure out how to be flexible that the right way to say, well, you have to be flexible. There was actually three architects. A lot of people don't know that there were three architects. It's the Bonk there was Mr Jack Nicklaus Tom, and Michael Past Gucci the owner so. When Jack and Tom Needed a tiebreaker Michael Pass coochie filled in. So the older always has a hand in the look and the style of the architecture because he spent some money, he's acquired the land he has some ideas. So we as builders we as designers listened to the owner, but it was really three people involved at subotic but yes, the architect of record was Tom Dokan and on Jack Nicklaus and I was assigned to. Blend that together and create a features as the onsite design associate. Shoulder shapers, what we were GonNa do float the Greens out a work with the Superintendent Gary Boddington took to manage all of that and create what you see today. Sabana Golf Club have you ever played it? I have it. Now I'll tell you that it is a thought process of to designers and an owner that you know the green. Somewhat say some pretty difficult. It's a true test of golf as as good players would say it hosted US women's open and it was it was a test for them. Michael wanted to golf course that that people would enjoy. But yet still be tested and Mr Nicholas and Tom a provided that and I was a fortunate very fortunate a participant in that and little did I know that someday? Twenty five years later I believe working with the iconic Jack Nicklaus, who would have thought a guy who never played golf who didn't understand the game would be working whether the one of the iconic wall time. How how did you notice his style different than? Mr Die or kind of what your own style, who at that time well, Jack had his his holes that he wanted to build a design and he had. Good success at some of his best golf. Courses Muirfield. In Ohio and some of his great golf courses in Arizona and Florida. So he knew what his style that he wanted and what Tom and I brought was the naturalism, the routing Thomas produced. So there was a bland of of good architecture in the routing. Good style of shaping and the bunkers Greens than the presentation and the strategy. Nicholas brought with his with his game and I'll never forget one day. We were a jack and I had a lot of fun lot lot of fun on that project and I remember one day we were talking about adjusting the bunker and I was standing in the bunker was on seven toll at subotic and I was saying well. You know if you stand right here, you could. You could get the all hate it out sideways and Jack said to me says, what hit it out sideways got to be able to hit it to the green and I said, well, you don't always have to the greedy and he said a good player would want to be able to do that. So you can see the difference between my again, my my. Thought process in shaping the Gulf oil and the process of a tour player eighteen time major champion saying I gotTa Get out of this bunker. If I get it and I gotta get to the Green, you can see the difference in the style of architecture. Yeah. You guys may have been coming at it from slightly different perspectives but in the end Michael Pass Gucci got the golf course that he wanted a very beautiful setting i. hope you get to play it someday and Jack. Got What he wanted a Renaissance Golf Tom got what he wanted and me at the participant got to enjoy all of it. Well I definitely want to get into some more. It's more stuff with you and Tom and and some band stuff before I. Do I know you worked on? A lot of Japanese golf courses as well. It was at late eighties early nineties timeframe is that right? That was actually that's how I evolved from the shaper, the shaper of the family to work on plans for Asian Golf courses on the agent REMM with Pete Son Perry I. Moved into the office and I started doing grading plans and trading drainage plans and Agrees detail plans and so I- volved in the starting to do that. But I only actually was involved with one in the field and that was not so country club I'll never forget it and that was that was my my foray into Japanese golf I'm telling you what that was an eye opener for me. I learned a lot and I can tell you that the Japanese at that time in the late eighties were fanatics about golf course, architecture, golf course design, and I built I shaped built an island green, zone country one of the best I was ever a part of Yeah I'm dying I'm dying to Japan ended it just every aspect of golf Japan fascinates me, and so when I saw that read that you'd worked on. So many of those. Kinda sent my mind into a bit of a craze. But yeah, what was the? What were the the big? Sticking points of design over there what we're kind of the obsessions or what were the what was the difference between what you're doing here and what was really being asked for over there well, I, can tell you that my evolution in golf course design and construction has come three hundred sixty degrees. Remember I started with Pete died the. Plum Creek a championship golf course, and then they sent me to Scotland to study links golf, and then I started to work for Renaissance Golf for with renaissance golf for seventeen years. But all through that process never did I think I. was going to be building a golf course to Japan. The Japanese loved water features. That was one of the most important things to them. The beauty of the golf course the garden concept I was involved with the golf course that had a twenty five foot waterfall. Dot I am not kidding you. The water. Think with me. Now think with me you're not gonNA believe this Suzanne. So Country Club had water that cascaded off the clubhouse. Into a pool on the eighteenth green surrounding two hundred seventy degrees of the green. Pool cascaded down into a waterfall almost twenty feet into the fairway below and. That stream then emptied into the big pond that had the island green. Tell me. They didn't love water feature. I was surprised Mr Kaiser didn't ask you to run that back at McDonald's. Well you know a lot of people give me a hard time about fountains and waterfalls. That's not my specialty. Got Burned out while I was in Japan. or changing gears a little bit I mean how did? How. Did you connect with Tom Doak for the first time and kind of how did that relationship start? I, I met Tom at. Plum, Creek, he just come from long cove. Golf Club. In. In South Carolina and he had come to the a Plum Creek. We were almost done with construction, but he was on the construction crews he was he was in charge of helping pick sticks and rake and I met him. I thought he was kind of an odd kind of guy. because. A friend of mine in the construction business, the project manager at the. Greek. We knew that Tom was a lover of baseball statistics. So Steve was his name bought a book on a statistical points of baseball and we used to quiz Tom all the time all day long about certain baseball things. We'd hide the book behind our back. We'd read something and then cuisine like we really knew and cared and. You know he'd come up with the answers and Steven I would just slap each other and thank God. This guy knows everything about baseball. So that was our running joke between us. So that's where I first met Tom He went on to go do other work on his own. He got his own his first client at high point and traverse city Michigan. And I continue to work with the dies, but you know after eight or nine years I just I just was ready for something different and. I kid people and I kid this with all due respect I remember being able to move a million cubic yards at my sleep almost 'cause that's kind of what Pete did and I was just time for a change and I call Tom up and I said Hey I'm ready to do something different and he knew that I had been traveling and seeing golf courses like the national golf links of America and he knew I'd been to Pinehurst and he knew I'd been to Cyprus point. So he knew that I was you know. A bit of an auditor that that I didn't play golf but I seem some of the best golf courses in the United States and had been to Saint Andrews. So he wanted talk to me. So we met and I said, you know I'm ready to do something different. So I signed on with Renaissance Golf design a lot of people don't know this it was Tom Doak Gill hands and myself for a small point in time we. All we all work together and I was in charge of Charlotte Golf links a golf course in Charlotte North Carolina while Tom and Gil were working at stonewall and so tom would come down and check on me. You know about every I dunno SGT eight weeks six to eight weeks. So I really built the golf course on my own. Well, Gayle and Tom were up at at stonewall and then Gill came down for the last couple. Of visits and help me with. The construction of the seventeenth and Eighteenth at Charlotte Golf links. So that's how I began. My career was Renaissance Golf Design at Charlotte Golf links, and then I went on to go on and build. And work with Tom on many projects. Some of my most beloved. Golf Course in Arizona called Apache struggled I wish it was still open today it was such a beautiful desert setting and maybe someday they'll bring it back. Well. I. Feel. Like you know obviously people listening to this podcast not calms name they know his golf courses, they know his work, but you know somebody who who has known him. So so closely for so long and worked with them. So closely for so long I don't WanNa save what is what is he best at but what what impresses you most about him as far as his his skillset goes or his his talent level goes you know it's funny. A couple of people have asked me that. And what I learned most about Tom Doak designed golf course constructed golf courses that seventy five percent of the battle is the land. It's not about the Greens although they're important and it's not about the bunkers although they're important the routing is very important but just think about this if you have this land that has just off the charts topography beauty. Character sand. Those were all the ingredients for some of the best golf courses I had seen and so it made sense that as in Tom's liking if you got the land to start with. Pacific Dunes on the coast of Oregon that you had already solved seventy five percent of the battle. So that's what I learned most about Tom and that's today what I still do when I'm looking at a design on my own, find the best piece of land work with the people that know that land's important and you're seventy five percent of the way their. Well. One thing I gotta ask I know. We had my kaiser on our first band in episode and he was kind of giving some of the back story about about the the project getting started and any add a line in there. You know I would have loved to have hired. Tom But he was terrible Tom at the time and I'm curious. If you could shed some light on maybe what that means. No light. No shedding. The next question. Yeah. No I assume that that it had to be. had to be a bit of him just being steadfast in his in his design is that is that fair a fair characterization? You know all designers whether it be McDonald seib, McDonald, Alister Mackenzie Perry, Maxwell Summer, my favorites Donald Ross. You have to have passion. And you have to have a willingness to know and to do the right thing and. You know as well as I do if somebody was to give you this unbelievable piece of land and then ask you to put in fountains and waterfalls you would have to speak your piece, right? Right absolutely and so honesty sometimes isn't the best policy but what I learned from Pete Dye is that just be honest do the best you can and everything will work out and I think that Tom was honest. That he when he saw good piece of property, if you thought that adding a pond or a fountain or waterfall was that idea he was going to tell you something different and that's no different than allers mackenzie no different than a w his tasks different than McDonald to conviction to do the right thing that conviction to stick what you have in your mind is the right. Puzzle. Solving the puzzle on this piece of land, and so you have to have conviction and you have to stand by that. How how did you guys Complement Each Other? I, mean, what was kind of his strengths? What were your strengths? I'm curious how that relationship was. We were total opposite. That's how we compliment. On US I'm being honest with you. We were total opposite. and. So when he was thinking about this idea for the green or This. Idea for the bunker? I was thinking of something different remember my background. I didn't go to Cornell. To train in landscape architecture where Mr Jones went. I. Went to the School of dirt and Construction Pete Dye and so we were opposite and I believe. I believe deep down in my heart because we were so opposite of each other. That the products that we produced. Were the benefit of us both thinking in different ways and different things and in different possibilities for for a different outcome. But blending that altogether to get the right green site to get the right Fairway Contour to get the right bunker strategy always thinking different, not saying an agreeing with them but being polar opposite. That was the best compliment we could give each other. Well, obviously you're you're heavily. Involved with Pacific dudes, which will be the episode that's airing this coming Tuesday that were running but I I'm curious kind of that project I came up when even even before that I mean when you the first time you heard about Bandon Dunes, I mean what? What was that story like? Well, the first time that Tom said, meet me because I lived in Denver I live in Denver Colorado. Tom Lived in traverse city, he wanted me to move to traverse city. And being an office and I said, well, you know it doesn't make sense for me to do that since we're going to always be on site anyway how I live in Denver and I'll just meet you wherever we need to meet and so he agreed to that and I remember him give me a call and said. Meet me in Bandon. We're going to go walk the CY for What's going to be the second golf course at Banna Dunes resort. and. So I remember landing in Eugene Oregon. Have you flown into Eugene I have. So. Just think of me. A neophyte still landing in Eugene. Oregon and there's a camera crew there's up four or five piece camera crew that's on the plane with me and they're landing in an Eugene and they're getting these big. SUV's and they're headed to North Bend, Coups Bay, and they're asking for directions and I'm thinking what's this camera doing here? I'm going down that way too little. Did I. Know they recovering a ship had gone aground? Your do you ever remember that store? No. Yeah. There was a big freighter container ship that had broke loose and grounded itself on the beach in northbound who's Bay and I was on the plane with the big camera crew. There was coming to cover the breaking story and I'm thinking what's this place must be fame. The clock. I'm going to be following this camera crew down there but little did I know I was still going to go twenty minutes south to a town called Bandon. I remember driving into the town abandoned looking for the property and they said Oh you gotta go north and I was just so confused and and trying to find the property took me all day to find it by the time I got to the property it was the end of the day but that's when I met Tom and Mr Kaiser and the next day was was a total opener the day we walk the property. Oh tell me about it what what was what you ever? I remember thinking how beautiful this place was I remember that we were asked to play bandon dunes. They had doing some preview rounds and I remember playing Bandon. Dunes. It was me Mr Kaiser. Tom I think Josh Lesnik. was there a shoe was was I didn't caddy for us. He had arranged to get some counties and I remember raining and I remember walking around the golf course abandoned dunes thinking while this is this is the first. Go around from Mr Kaiser we're GonNa get to do the second piece of second golf course whereas our land at because we I didn't get a chance to see the land. But when we got to the sixth and seventh hole I remember being pointed looking to the north saying that's our land up there and I'm thinking. Wow. We are so fricken lucky. I couldn't believe what my eyes had gazed upon. It reminded me of those golf course landforms of Scotland and Ireland that I toward twenty years ago. So I could hardly wait till we to to make the first walk around with Mr. Kaiser. Tom And I remember US walking and walking and walking and looking and thinking and working on route eighteen and trying to come up with ideas so that we would go back to the hotel at Bandon. There was no lodge at the time we stayed in the hotel band overlooking the minute cafe. Have you ever ate at the Minute Cafe I have? So that's a great place, right. So absolutely, we would go down to the minute of a have breakfast, and then we drive back to Bandon and for three or four days straight we walked and walked and looked always trying to find how this routing was gonna come about and I thought Tomasz I just kept saying to myself over and over I can't believe I'm on the coast of Oregon I can't believe we're going to get a chance to build this golf course I can't wait to get started. Can we start? Tomorrow. So when you're when you're going second, that's been the joke that I think Tom and and David Katie said bunches you know what would you do differently and and David keeps saying well, I would have gone second kind of implying that that there's there's quite a bit of advantage to going second. I'm curious if that's how you guys felt and and be Kinda, what what was that advantage? What did you guys? What did you guys see as things that you could improve upon? Well, I'm not so sure that was improving. On. But I believe that it was doing something different. And the recollection of golf holes that were inspirational to me where Prestwick and Saint Andrews and Royal Troon and Western gaels those were the holes that were inspirational to me and when I looked at Bandon Dunes, I thought while we gotta do something different than that and Tom was on board with that. He already knew that we were going to do something different. So when David says, you get to go second you gotta remember and you have to give David Kid credit he had to. Show Mr Kaiser. What links golf was about although my kaiser had played links golf. My David Kid was able to bring that style of architecture not having the clubhouse on the coast having the golf course route out to the ocean and back and we. A were now. In charge of doing something different and I'll never forget one of the shapers that worked for us as a gentleman by the name of Tony Russell. And he has done shaping for Bill Cour. He has done shaping for he has done shape and for David Kid he's done shape and for a lot of people and I remember walking him up on. The land, which is now the ninth hole at Pacific Dunes and I remember telling him see that of course down there Tony we're GONNA do nothing like it and he started laughing because he thought wait a minute that golf course a highly ranked golf course and I said, well, it's highly ranked but we can't be like that. We have to be something different and our land is different. So we have to come up with some different style of design of bunkering of Greens and our locations are going to be different. So I knew. Tom Knew that we were going to do something completely different but we also had to respect at that time bandon dunes what's highly ranked and highly highly off, and we were just going to try to do the best. We could to match David Kids work at Bandon. So for those who've been there are those who haven't I mean how how you? Specifically explain you know how the styles are different. Sense well, I always explained people to Pacific Dunes. Greens are on the ground. There within inches of where they were in the routing if that makes sense. Yeah. So. When you go to the seventh hole at Pacific Dunes those bounds in front and those blowouts on the left side I have a photo that I. I know what that looked like before we got started and it's not much different than what it is today other than a little bit of shaping of the Green Site. When you go to the Sixteenth Green Pacific Dunes that bunker in the back. Actually called Josh's pit behind the green doubt. was there that green surface was within inches of what you saw? The ninth green lower green that's within inches of what was already there. So we were building a golf course and taking the landforms that were there within inches and just massaging them to get ready for a putting green and I thought wow, we're we're we're we're taking these beautiful green sites sixteen lower nine. Eleven eleven was was what a beautiful setting I could go on and on. You could understand my passion for the Beauty Pacific. Dunes it was on the ground those bunkers were there. It was just clearing the land and installing irrigation and sowing the seed so that when you walked and played the golf course, it looked like we didn't do a thing. Then how how did the process of old Mac start them well, little. Did I know when we were working at Pacific Dunes I always looked landover they're thinking that's going to be a golf course someday I wonder who's going to do that Ten years later, Mike Kaiser caused us back because he enjoyed I believe he enjoyed working with the so much. I certainly did with Mike. He had this idea to build the Lido. So the leader was McDonald and Sept Raynor's second-best off course some people would say compared to the national, but Mike always wanted to do the Lido but we couldn't fit the actual lay of the land golf course on the land he had given us so. The idea was brought about that we would build golf holes with the inspiration of McDonald and rainer the template holes, and so we simply took the golf course topography that Mike gave us. And we instituted the for a template holes short. Eden, the Beer Ritz and Dan and any McDonald at Rainer. Golf. Course you always had to have those four one shot holes. So my understood that we were GONNA do. Alito style golf course not exactly but at. Lido style golf course using the templates that make McDonald and Rayner were famous for and so that's how the routing came about and with the help of my Kaiser. He is such a perfect person to work for. He never tells you. He never says you've gotta do this and gotTa do that he listens to you. We walk around he makes suggestions. It was such an honor to work for them at Pacific Dunes and it was such an honor to work at old Mac creating his idea of what McDonald and Rainer would have done with that piece of ground I. Think. that. We did our best effort and some of the best holes, the Alps, the channel whole, the punch bowl, the double plateau with the principal's nose I thought we did a pretty good job not exactly like McDonald's reiter dead but used that inspiration to create old MacDonald, and as you know, those Greens are some of the bringing screens you'll ever played still not as big as Saint Andrews but pretty doggone big. Feel, like there's a lot of creativity working with template holes defeat. There's restraint working temp with the template holes. How how how did you find that to be good question that's a great question and the reason that's a tough question to answer is because. You know that. The Redan Based on the sixteen tall at Baruch. You know that it has to play from right to left. It's a fortress and you know the short has to play one thirty, five to one, forty five, and it should have a thumbprint in it and you know that the Eden should have the strath bunker and the estuary. So. Those are some of the foundations for the template holes but taking those template holes and applying. No different than when Macdonald Ranger did at jail at fishers island at Camargo at shore acres at Chicago golf applying those template holster, the land given to you. That is the artistry that we and I got to enjoy doing. Now somebody would say, well, the road hole, you know how many times are you GonNa do that? Well, we did the road hole with inspiration from McDonald and Rainer and the seventeenth of Saint Andrews but we put our twist on it. We put our twist on the short I remember walking my Kaiser up to that green for the. First. Time number five old Mac we had walked to hogs back and we got to number five. It was Mike Kaiser, myself, and Ken. Nice he is the superintendent grow in for Pacific Dunes and old back and he is now director of grounds and director of all the Golf Courses Nair. Ken Nice was the reason Pacific dern terms out. So good can nice and his crew is the reason old Mac turned out so good it's the Agra nomex and it's the superintendent step toward their heart and soul into the into the astronomic of the golf course architecture. So. Ken and I were walking down with Mr Kaiser and we got to the fifth hole short and I had to fly. A flag with paint flags you gotta remember it was all sand after Tony. Also an Iot shaped it and I had a green flagged out and my walked up to Canada is Kanye's says Jim how big is that green? And I said, don't know Mike I I don't know and so I was trying to. I was trying to. Forgive. He asked that question because I was going to be concerned so we walked a little bit. We walked up on it and he said Jim how big is that green? I said, you know I don't know Mike and by then I figured out he wanted to know how big it was and so can I pay off and it was like I said I said it's it's around seventeen thousand square feet. And Mike in his typical Mr Kaiser way just kinda looked and some. Sixteen Thousand Square feet. Seventeen thousand square feet. So we walked around and I said Mike, it fits the scale. And the ocean is in the background and nothing compete compete with the Pacific Ocean. So I thought the scale looked right he said he accepted the fact that it you know it was going to work. I showed them all the waste potter rounded I made sure that there was a bump to hold his pen and there was a bump to feed the ball and it didn't have the. thumbprint like all the other shorts had but it had three distinct pinning locations and that's what McDonald's Rainer always tried to do and all their shorts. But we put our twist on it seventeen sixteen, seventeen, thousand square feet a lot of fun to play I could I could put on that green all day long. So after we had had discussed how the putting surface was going to work. Again. It wasn't copying template holes. Exactly. It was using inspiration. So we went to the sixth Hole Long We created the hell bunker and Mike wanted to play around it. So we gave you ninety feet of fairway to play around the hell bunker and I got a little creative on the green. By Kaiser's was suggested to create the ocean whole at at all Mac seven and so it was a combination of inspirations of the template holes and I believe that we delivered in the same way that McDonald and Rainer would have done for anyone of their clients in one thousand, nine, hundred, ten, nine, thousand, twenty error. I can tell you that that green at five is big it doesn't make it any easier to make too though that's for sure I don't know who shaped it, but it's hard to put. Tony Russell. Russell an I shape. I love that Green. It's so cool. I love it I float all the Greens out. On all of the golf courses I was involved with except for a number to the. Brian Slavic a very talented shaper floated that one out. So obviously you've got, you've got the templates in the back of the mind. Probably you know at all times even well, well, before old Mac I'm curious. Does it feel ever? Do, you ever feel hesitant to go to them or or does it. Is it always kind of Nice trip your sleep I'm thinking about seventeen at Pacific Dunes, for instance does that make sense to dino right when you see it like this Redan or is it is it something you're trying to work in? How does that work? I gotTa tell you a story a lot of people don't know this. So we got to the Seventeenth Hole Pacific Dunes, and that wasn't the original way. The whole was gonNA play. Sixteen seventeen eighteen don't think about how that plays now sixteen seventeen and eighteen we're going to be different in the routing, but it turns out that the sixteenth hole that you played today was was a can't miss hole. So we climbed up the hill and we and we played down to the Northeast The short one, one shot hold the seventeenth. and Tom I played with that we played with and we played with that and neither of US ever said to each other. The dreaded our word. And I said to him, I'll never forget standing there I said, you're gonNA build the are here. Aren't you? and. He's and he Nansen me and he wouldn't answer me and we played around with it and played around with it and it just kept devolving KEP evolving and We were done one at the end of the day we were walking down eighteen and I said, you couldn't help yourself. You add to do it. You did it didn't you built the are I refuse to say it, but it was the Redan. And so that was our little moment in time a Pacific Dunes Mike Mike Kaiser came back walked to whole. Really liked it. Tom was happy the way it turned out but. But. There's always one of those whole sitting in every routing. There's always one of those templates that could be used because you're used to them. You Love Them. You've seen them you understand where they came from the road hole at Saint Andrews High Conic. Cloth. Hall the Redan North Barrett by Connick Golf Hall. So they're always in the back of your mind to they need to be an every new golf course at never knew routing. If you ask David Kid, he says come on Jamf you've. got. To. Build your own designs. You can't use those templates all the time and you're right. You don't use those templates all the time but seventeen Pacific dunes it just kept devolving into the our whole and eventually lean it ended up being but it's a Great Hall I. Love To Play It. It's perfect for the wind direction that it's that plays into in the summer and even in the winter, it's a Great Hall I love it. So what it's the Redan I'll finally say it. Well I don't want to assume here but I mean obviously since. Since old MAC, and since Pacific Dunes, you've you've done a ton of restoration work renovation work and and a lot of stuff that really has to do with a lot of these template holes and a lot of this kind of golden age architecture. I gotTA assume old MAC was a massive help help in that process right? Well. I always my favorite golf because golf courses, the national golf links of America. It has been since one, thousand, nine, hundred, six when I first went to see it while we're dies and so I fell in love with it and I thought to myself what if I could build this Sunday who would have thought twenty years later, I would be doing that. So never say never, but I can tell you that I have some new designs with Mr Kaiser. I. Have a new design layout with Michael Kaiser and I think about those holes I think about the Punchbowl I, think about the Alps when laying out these golf courses but are they going to look like the punch bowl at old Mac or the national or Camargo or or Fishers Island? No they're not. But they were the foundation for many links, golf holes in Scotland and Ireland because the Greens were in these natural punchbowl settings. So you have to think about them when you're laying out in new designs and so I'll never forget them they always draw inspiration but to say that I would do one I don't think so but you never know. So. To you said the word, punchbowl a couple of times which reminded me of another contribution of yours at Bandon dunes of course, the putting course, the punch bowl, what was what was that like to build and and I was it just kind of Cathartic to actually be able to go nuts and build six percent slopes and all these things you could never do real golf course or what did that feel like? That's funny. I remember getting a call from my kaiser any says. I'd like to putting course a big putting course and I said Mike you mean, the one ladies putting courses Saint Andrews and he says, yes and I had been to, saint? Andrews and I had puttered on it. So I knew exactly what he was to do. So I sent my four locations at the Bandon dunes resort. That could be possible locations for putting course not punchbowl at the time but putting course much like the one at the ladies. potty courses. Saint. Andrew. Jr. So what are the sites was behind band trails? Another site was that open grass area By the first old MAC. I found another site. Out By the practice ground and then the last I drew up or labeled in a map was the one at Pacific Dunes. A lot of people don't know this, but we were originally going to build a one-shot hole in that location Pacific dunes where you were tee it up by the clubhouse in you just hit a shot down by. By agreeing that we built but we never did that we were always talking about doing that. But when might decided on the location for the Punch Bowl? I started to clear the land and started to come up with landforms and how I was GonNA shape but and the first iteration that I did Mike said. You think what you putted on the day you were there was crazy. You should have seen the I. I I was like going nuts I would start with the bull dozer and then I got on an excavator and started shaping with an excavator and I would go in a counter clockwise rotation. And then when I was done I we I would go back in the clockworks rotation but the same escalator creating all these leader features. I never thought about how it would route and and play I was just creating features and then I, walked Mike Josh Nick. And Some are the Kemper people around and showed them how you put an Arrow down and you would do like the latest putting course you point the Arrow in the direction, and then you could put the whole wherever you wanted to put it, and I actually had to eighteen hole routings laid out but they decided to go one eighteen hole rowdy that you could play in different directions. The first set of radiation we all walked around it and and Mike gasify could. Change just a little bit and change that a little bit. So I did all of that. It took me off Geez three or four or five days to float it all out with help from from Marcus. who was the Superintendent Old Mac? Now he helped me floated out we've built it what the What the maintenance crew from. Pacific. Dunes and we did it all in about a month. A lot of fun to play a lot of fun to build. I didn't have no plans just built. It had my do a little bit of added work and we shaped it and and and it opened up and and it's perfect for what it's purposes for social fun interaction parts that you would never think about putts that you would you're going to discover. It's the perfect compliment Mr Kaiser always thinking and what a fun place to hang out I remember the first time united spoke you asked me if I had had been to the punch bowl and I said I've even been there sober a couple of times. It is such a cool spot. It's the kind of place that makes you feel like A. Eighth Grade, kid to just hang out and run around with your buddies all day. It's just it's awesome. Well, I told Mike One time that I think I should go build one of these in every city across the United States. What better way to teach and tell people about golf courses by just handing them putter and a ball I could find out who I would talk to a New York I'd love to do a punchbowl putting course in central park. What if they? What if they had little boots they handed out. A powder and a ball and families could go putt like at Saint Andrews I. Wish I could talk to somebody on the board of a Central Arch and said, let me build a punchbowl putting course in central park and you'll see the social aspects of people having fun with family and friends hundred percent. That's that's an awesome idea. I know we've kept you for a while here. The only other thing I wanted to I, want to ask you about a lot more stuff, but I'll limited to one more thing and that's Your restoration of positive bow which. Turned out. So freaking cool I. Mean we're there a couple years ago that place is just other-worldly I'm curious how that how that starts I. Think this is probably a bigger question, but I mean, when when you go to to one of these clubs and and you've been a lot of the historical ones, I know Yemen's Hall of Alley Club San Francisco Golf Club a lot of those that's gotta be a it's gotta be quite a process to to start. Figuring out exactly. You know we wanna do something Jim you know what should we do and so I guess I'll limited to positive EMPA-. What was that process like with them? Well, you know Allison. Mackenzie died and lived in died on the sixth hole at parts of temple his house was there and so. The mandate from the committee, the mandate from the general manager the mandate from the membership was that this golf course although hit head gone through. Modernisation it had gone through iterations. From other Gulf architects it was time to recapture the essence of what Marion Holland's said two hours Mackenzie and Robert Hunter build me the Pasta Temple, Golf Club, and so when the when the committee, the membership the General Manager Scott. Hoyt. Who is now they're just managed the superintendent when they said we are going to restore this. To the best of your ability gem, help us restore this to what Allison Mackenzie had. I took aerial photographs I took ground photos I worked with Bob The historian for twenty years, a Labor of love to recapture what Allison Mackenzie and Robert Hunter had done and with Marion Holland's as the lead developer. Bringing out the best of what Mackenzie dead at Pasta Chapo restoring a labor of love with the help of superintendents, general managers, archives aerials the goal and nothing will be ever done to the temple that has. Hot of character of what our Mr Key? Alliston. Mackenzie would have done and did what would you for someone who's never been there what what makes that place specialty you? Well. First of all, it's the land form and the can't of the lance alarm towards the ocean. Second of all. It's the the Ba- ranker's or the ravines that are located and intermixed about the golf course. It's the walk it's the elevation changes. It's the the. The bunkering the the style of green it's all of those things in a beautiful setting. Looking out towards the Pacific Ocean, it's one of the great routings and golf in in a land plan development that land plan was done by. The. Olmsted brothers who who laid out central park is a matter of fact. So Mackenzie working with the old stepbrothers working but Robert Hunter working with the Vision Burien Holland's creating golf course. That's easy to walk entertaining using the natural features of the Barankyevish, the landforms, the hillocks, the the the the the valleys, and creating a golf course that could be enjoyed by all. It's it's something that you have to experience. It's something you have to see to know that Mackenzie would walk out of his house and hit balls on the sixth hole and called his home. That's a special place. Open to the public everybody should see it. Well I I will get you out of here on this one I know we're obviously rolling out a ton of banning videos. We had old MAC last week we had Pacific Dunes this week. So since you're in a unique position to to answer this question, give me your your favorite thing about old Mac your favorite thing about Pacific Dunes. I'll tell you my favorite story about Pacific Dunes and there's many there's many. But I'll never forget they had preview play. On the first twelve holes, Pacific Dunes, and I was coming in on the evening walking from number thirteen green i. had walked down thirteen green down. Three fairway and I had come up on top of the three t box and Dal into the second green at Pacific Dunes and I into a couple, a forum that was plane. And they said, where are you? Where are you coming from? Are you playing I said? No, I'm coming from the other part of the golf course that will be open next year. And this lady looked at me and she says, you know. I have enjoyed my walk here on this golf course I don't even play golf and it's one of the most beautiful walks I've ever had. And I just stopped and I was stunned that somebody that doesn't play golf. But enjoys the beauty of outdoors described. Pacific dunes like a park that she could stroll through every day. But if she had only known what we had done to create Pacific Dunes, it was the highest compliment. I could ever have and I thought to myself the beauty as Mackenzie said, the walk, the specialness somebody who observed it from a non golfing I. It was the highest compliment I could ever have. That seems like a good place to to cap it Jim. I sincerely appreciate the time and and appreciate your work. It's been. It's been awesome getting to know the band golf courses a little bit more and and that's in in huge part. Thanks to your help so. Appreciate it. We gotta do this again sometime I love it. You can tell my passion for what I do. Working with Mr Kaiser working on the coast of Oregon, call me back anytime. Righty, we'll take care. Thanks again. Thank you. Beat Club today. I mean, that's BETTER THAN MOST! About. Is. Better than. Most.

golf Greens Tom Pacific Dunes Pete Pete Dye Mike Kaiser Tom Doak Plum Creek America bandon dunes Pete Die Jack Nicklaus Jim Urbina Scotland Pinehurst McDonald Colorado. US Seth Rainer Charles
MW: Gresini Going Independent, American Racing Interview, MotoGP News

MotoWeek - MotoGP, Motorcycle and Racing News

1:09:34 hr | Last month

MW: Gresini Going Independent, American Racing Interview, MotoGP News

"The from ota week dot net. It's the motor week podcast. Your host wilson. Hello and welcome to mota week. My name is wilson. Thank you so much for listening to the only mode. Gp show on the internet. That's talking to a moto to team owner this week. I told you there was something big gun all right so i plan to do the awards. Show this episode. But then a couple of things happened. The news about marc marquez. Leaving the hospital popped up a grassy me announce that they'll officially be an independent team in twenty twenty two leading to a lotta questions and speculation. But most importantly after weeks of us discussing joe roberts and his decision to stick with motoo. Next year i just happened to have a conversation with the owner and team principal of the american motor racing team. Who also happens to be. Joe roberts manager and asked if he would come on the show and talk about both and he was gracious enough to say yes so we'll pushy wards show back one week not just to talk about the latest motor. Gp news and of course your opinions on a but to talk to american racing moto two team boss e tom bull not only the talk about the motoo two team in about joe robertson is decision but also the talk about some really cool stuff. That american racing is doing behind the scenes that we don't get to see on a daily basis that will help ensure that there are us riders on the grid. Not just a motive to but eventually motor g. p. for years to come so big episode a lot to go over. Let's get down to it before. We hit the rundown though. I do want to invite you over to the website at mojo dot net. You can find all of the latest episodes there. You can follow along on twitter at a week and on instagram at moto week. Usa and most importantly leave those comments a lot of great comments this week on facebook at facebook dot com slash week dot net and then over on the right at sub- at our slash most. And if you want to support the show no obligation but that would be awesome. You can do that on patriot. Patriotic dot com slash moto week. Thank you to robert. He is the latest member over there. Patriot if you want to join them just head over to the site you can also find out how some of everything that comes in ends up going to a charity that i work with all the details. Are there all right. So let's get down to business the rundown just about everything. We're going to talk about on the show. This episode. We're going to start with martin marquez. Finally being released from the hospital ten days he was in the hospital for ten days before he finally got out. He still undergoing treatment though. What does that mean for his prospects to start the twenty twenty one season. They'll move undergrad. Who announced that. They will officially be an independent team. Starting in twenty twenty two. But are they going to be an independent team for apprecia- or they're going to be working with someone else will try and figure out what's going to happen. There look marini. Unveils his twenty motogp. Gp bike and it looks very very familiar and then hey lorenzo somehow winds up very strange tax evasion story. We're not gonna dig into that too deeply but we will discuss it a little bit then after that. We're going to take a couple of minutes and talk to tom book bowl who's not only the owner but the team principal for american racing's moto two team. He's joe roberts manager. And yes i will be asking him about joe's decision to stay in moto two for twenty twenty one as opposed to taking the appropriate gig. We'll also talk about the team's prospects for twenty twenty one with cameron bobi coming in and marcos ramirez returning. We got a couple of other cool. Things that we're gonna discuss is well after that. Then we'll move onto your comments. Not only about joe roberts man marc marquez for that matter But a couple of interesting questions whether dorner pace championship at the end of the season The satellite situation for twenty twenty two and beyond. We've got some pictures and video. We're going to go over and then we will talk a little bit about the motor week. Awards i'll tell you what the new plan is since we moved it from this week. Show all right. So let's dive in with the moto. Gp news and of course the big story once again. This week marc marquez. Last week it was the surgery and the doubt as to whether he was going to be able to start the twenty twenty one season we talked about a couple of options if he has to sit out for an extended period of time who might replace him one at that. Same point h. r. c. Had mentioned that there was an infection discovered in mark's arm which is what was preventing it from healing and that he had to stay in the hospital for a few days to get antibiotics truman. Well that's day turned out to be a relatively lengthy one repsol. Honda announced monday. That mark had been released from the hospital. He underwent ten days both recovery for his third arm surgery as well as an intravenous course of antibiotics to stave off the infection that led to that third surgery in the first place or would it be the third place. No i think it's the first but you know when honda said that he was gonna do the antibiotic treatment. I didn't realize that they were expecting him to be in the hospital for ten full days. I think they may not have been leading on to just how serious the situation was. Because under normal circumstances he would've been able to go home and maybe a day or two. After having the type of surgery he had and in general doctors tried to get patients out of the hospital as quickly as possible in one of the main reasons for that is because they don't want to increase the risk of infection so the fact that he had to stay there that long i think it was a really big deal and post-surgery infections are no joking matter and you know hospital. Stay that long. Definitely backs up that idea. That's an unusually long time. And he's still on top of all of that. He's still going to continue his antibiotic treatment post hospital now. The positive thing here is that they did send him home. And let's hope that everything progresses mark very quickly does the fact that he stayed in hospital that long really affect his chances for a speedy return. I don't know i mean. It seems like the recovery process one way or the other is not going to be short but we can all hope that he'll be able to be back on the bike again sooner rather than later so until we hear something official from hr see or from repsol honda about the situation. I still think we have to assume that it is going to be a while. Now like i mentioned last week they do have the luxury of time right now in their hands. They've got the rest of december all of january and the first part of february before they're back is really against the wall and they've got to make a decision on a time frame and whether they're going to bring another rider in or not so. There is a lot of time to assess whether mark is going to be able to come back early in the season at the beginning of the season or maybe later on in the season. But i'm just not holding my breath right now that he's going to be at that first test of the year and then ready for qatar at the beginning of the twenty twenty one season or whenever the twenty twenty one season ends up beginning so off to keep an eye on mark. But let's move on now to grisanti. Who confirmed that they will become an independent team. Starting in two thousand twenty two now more brought this up on facebook and dj overarm read it and morton wondered what means for seaney. So let's talk about it. All of this is kind of coming up right now because it is in the process of renegotiating their contracts with all of the teams and manufacturers in fact just today before i sat down to record it was announced that. Ktm has re up their contract with warner which means that ktm's are guaranteed to be on the grid all the way to twenty twenty six and that's fantastic news because obviously you can always count on the big three honda yamaha and do khadi and now suzuki that they've won a championship. But it's great to see the. Ktm has done enough work in the past year and a half that they've had the success that's encouraged them to sign on the dotted line for an extended period of time after this now would assume that appropriate is next up in that department as well but let's talk about the any part of the announcement and this is really not a completely unexpected thing because there have been rumors for the past year or so. That really was looking at taking their factory effort entirely in house. It was simply a matter of when they were going to do it. And for those who are completely familiar with the situation. I'll explain Winter brilliant decided to jump in the motor. Gp in two thousand fifteen. They didn't do it like ktm. And suzuki which were all in house. Factory efforts the bike the team. Everything was run by the manufacturer instead. What they did. Is they partnered with an existing team with chris keeney who had previously been honda satellite team and they contract a democracy need to run the front facing part of the organization so apparently handles all of the development and they build the bikes and they hired the top management while gril seaney takes care of day to day operations with the riders in the team at the track and relationship certainly made it easier on brilliant in terms of fast their way onto the grid but obviously it also in a way has held a probably a back a bit and i'm not sure whether that was due to more red tape dealing with two organizations or the fact that it probably just wasn't as focused on the program because all of the responsibility all of the weight wasn't on their shoulders. They were sharing it with somebody else. And because of that. Maybe you don't take it as seriously but for whatever reason whichever one it was. They certainly didn't move as quickly as sukey. Ktm in terms of development or success in those other manufacturers did handle everything in house so in the end i think it's absolutely the best decision by apprecia- amd parent company piaggio for that matter to take on the entire task internally because it's going to force them to step up to the challenge and take more responsibility for the success or the failure of the program and while it will cost them more money and it could mean that they take a slight step back overall it lawsuit potentially pay bigger dividends and that means better racing for all of us to watch if they're more competitive in the end if they follow that path that ktm and sukey have taken before them and we end up with a full slate of manufacturers capable of getting on the podium and capable of winning races it just makes championship better so it's a good decision for appropriate. But let's go back to chrissy me where this all started. What does this mean for. Christine them saying that they are going to be an independent team. Starting in two thousand twenty two. That's a really good question. They signed a new contract with dorner. Remember dorner was renegotiating contracts. It guarantees them a slot on the grid for five more years as well so all the way through twenty twenty six and they said this was their exact quote. When they released this information they said quote we will continue as an independent team. Doing so with as much will and commitment. There's a lot of work to do. And many things to define and communicate obviously. Were already working on this huge project and we will reveal the details little by little stay tuned and of quote now while that confirms that they will still absolutely be an active participant in each round. What they've failed to specifically mention in that quote is whether exactly they will be racing for appropriate or if they be racing for someone else they just said stay tuned the details come out little by little now. The general consensus is that yes. They will indeed continue on as an appropriate satellite team but by not confirming that the doors at least a little bit open that they could go the different direction and go with zucchini instead assuming that everybody else kind of stays put you know. During his idea of one satellite team per manufacturer in the premier class that would suggest that their options Christine essentially boil down to sticking with or moving over to suzuki. And the reason that most people think that they are going to remain with apprecia- is because of the position that christine is in right now and their level of performance. And the position. That suzuki is right now. I mean they're in a much stronger position. Suzuki is to command attention from multiple teams. And there's going to be more than one organization that's interested in being their satellite team. Gril sienese potentially one of those but you've also got vr forty-six that we know is coming to the grid fulltime in two thousand twenty two bikes and they are going to be looking for someone and if they can wedge their way in yamaha then that means petronas would be the other option and when you're trying to decide if you're suzuki between petronas who's won races the are forty six and the marketing. Power of valentino rossi. Org rossini who's been lagging behind with wpro leah. Then the chances are that christine is going to have really not much of an option but to continue on with their current manufacturer unless obviously they develop a really good relationship with someone else. But that's not a terribly bad thing. Because if appropriate follows that same route as ktm and suzuki gets very serious about their development then ultimately is going to benefit christine and they'll end up with better bikes and less pressure. You know the opportunity to develop young riders instead of having that constant pressure to get this factory up to the level of all of the big teams but this entire situation could have played a role as one of the reasons that none of the motoo riders at approach the approach over the past. Couple of weeks. We're willing to commit to the factory ride in twenty twenty one because think of it this way if somebody had signed on for twenty twenty one maybe they even signed a two year contract thinking that they were going to be on a factory bike will they would be technically for next season but it will be super easy at that point for appropriate to relegate them to satellite duty. Twenty twenty two because their contract would still be valid. They would still be racing for graciani. But it's possible there that it probably could simply expand out to a factory team without that rider and then they would automatically find themselves on one of the lowest rungs of the motor. Gp ladder and maybe. It's possible that factored. Into the decision of guys like becky. Or fabio jamie tonio or joe roberts. Although we'll find out a little bit more about joe in a couple of minutes here. I'm of course right now. The moniker of lowest strong in the premier class does not belong to aprilia arguable But rather to eventually do qadi although that could change this year with the arrival of raining multitude champ and they abassiya mimi along with luca marini veiled his sky. Vr forty six colors for the motor. Gp grid this week. Soggy posted this one. Overarm read it. You'll delivery pretty much. Looks exactly like the organization's current motorbikes and confirms that both scion with you are going to sponsor the team in the premier class. There were rumors at one point last year. That sky wasn't really willing to kick in the money required to run at the highest level. But they're at least willing to do so for one bike for one season. We'll see what happens. When vr forty-six takes over the entire team and is responsible for picking up the tab for both bikes in two thousand twenty two that sponsorship could change but at least for now it will still be sky. Vr forty-six bike loss to be interesting to see how well the amini and luca marini can do if they can overcome. You know the situation. They're in with basically and underfunded team and not the best equipment but this is obviously also a big moment for valentine rossi not only is he semi-officially making his debut emoto gp as an owner. But he's finally getting the race against his half brother even though he should of course have a huge advantage equipment over his little brother but they are going to get the race together and that was really one valentino's major late career goals will put it that way. And i think that the fact that valentino is going to be able to race against luca marini makes it even more likely that the doctor is to retire to just simply run his team. Full time in two thousand twenty two now. Obviously that could change if he goes out there in the peronist bike and looks like franken morbidelli. Did this season so we'll have to wait and see. I think it's still kind of fifty fifty. But i think that it is a major step towards rossi considering what the next phase of his motor. Gp life is going to look like now that he is finally going to get to compete alongside of luca and then the last story on talk about here. The last motor gp new story before we get Utah abutbul from american. Moti racing is lorenzo story and this is a new direction for lorenzo style drama a solidly off track instance of lorenzo draw by the where as name has been linked apparently to some sort of financial person being investigated by spanish authorities for essentially helping rich people avoid taxes for lack of a better description now. Lorenzo denies knowing the person under investigation at all and he says all of his taxes have been above board who is technically a swiss citizen and he pays taxes in switzerland. The controversy arises because he still owns property in his home country of spain. Who of course went to make sure that they're getting their fair share. If lorenzo is indeed spending the majority of his time on spanish soil valentino. Rossi was involved in a similar type of dispute. This was long ago when he declared himself. A resident of london and italy wasn't too keen on that idea based on the fact that the doctor was still spending the majority of his time at his home into volume and by the way doesn't help. If you're somebody like valentine rossi to not just be ultra famous so everybody recognizes your round them like say in italy but also to live in a tiny town. That is super famous simply. Because you're from there. It makes it really really easy for people to know when you're around and how much you're around your property and if you're there more than you are in the place where you declare yourself a citizen. I'm not gonna comment on the lorenzo thing. I don't know you know whether he's involved or not. He says he's not i. I believe him. I mean honestly when it comes down to it. All rich people do something to avoid at least some of their taxes. Heck elon musk. The tesla guy just announced that he moved to texas like last week or something like that even though we know he pretty much spends all his time in california. Why did he do that. Well because texas has no personal income tax instance. He's rich enough to be able to afford a house in both places. Well then he can use that loophole to his advantage by buying a place in texas. And saying that's my fulltime residents right so a lot of times. Those ways of avoiding taxes are perfectly legal. Others though are a bit suspect now. Which category does lawrence fall into. I don't know but his financial people and his lawyers. If there are any good they made sure that whatever he was doing was being done in the correct way or a defensible way. Some i'm gonna leave it up to him and his people to spell it all out and i'll defer to them especially since lorenzo himself said he would actually sue any media outlet that suggested otherwise or suggests that he was implicated in this which all seems a bit extreme and not really in the spirit of free press. But whatever you do you. Or i'm not gonna complain about it. I'm all right so that's the motor. Gp news in a moment we're going to get to the comments but first we're gonna find out definitively from the person who knows best why joe roberts made the choice he did sticking emoto as opposed to going the motor g. p. We'll talk about the american racing moto two team and some really great development programs happening right here in the us to find that next rider that can step up to the challenge and be motogp star. We'll talk to american racing team boss on boot bull right after this and on this segment of the show. We're going to do something a little bit different. Because over the last couple of programs we've been talking a lot about american writers and about the american racing moto two team a with joe roberts facing his big decision disease. Stay motoo to gpa. And then of course the arrival of camera. Bobi a guy who we've talked about ever since he won his fifth moto america title. But we don't have to speculate anymore. Because we have the authority on the american racing moto two team and on joe roberts for that matter i tand bull the owner of the american motor racing team and team principal. Welcome to the show. Thanks for coming on with us. Thank you thinking me. How are you doing okay. And we're really excited to be talking to you about about joe about cameron bobi about marcos ramirez before we talked about the writers. I wanna talk about how you got involved emoto to because from what i understand. You didn't really mean to start a moto two team or the be the owner of a to bike team. You wanted to be involved in the sport and of all the series of all the divisions in the world championship to get into motor was by far the most competitive behind the scenes trying to get and keep a grid slot. How on earth did you end up in the situation in the first place I'm a big fan of this book for many many years. In the last. I think from two thousand fifteen was luck is gonna a sponsor with l. Honda i was there spending more time with the federal and then sometime in seventeen seventy and a summer that the bill young american do can sign up to the to the next year i approaching and his daughter to see you can help them in some way sponsor or support team and then walking manager. And that's it. We start on two thousand eighteen when he wrote for empty lot at the penalties manager and while we sign up for the two thousand eighteen and twenty four the differently trying to contract. We find out that the team has not you know financial difficulty and it was beginning to come and help them and then tried to you. Make sure that you'll going to have the right following your justice and the to the end of the eighteen and found out my job that i bought the owner with a nobody and the previous owner garnell lisa beer so i knew walkaway away and just jumping goal is to make sure that demons running joe heavy ride. So this is sometime. He's staring but you know it things up in more than you know we finally. That's okay. I got a d. money. Took care of me and my brother. We finished the season with our sources with no sponsorship. All and. that's not the way i'd become commander. Well it seems to be going okay because you already have one rider. Go directly into motor. Gp in euchre lackawanna. Another one that will talk about here. In a moment. With joe roberts who got an offer to go to motor gp and of course you know showed in the first season that the bike had speed. The team had potential. But then really. Joe pick things up this season. It was a breakthrough year for him. And what do you think was the main difference for joe between two thousand and nineteen two thousand twenty. Two riders is very common new rider. To would take some the better part of a year to really get used to the bike. Was it that process. That really got joe to where we saw him. This season or was it bringing in john hopkins to work with him was at luccio was at the switch to kayla from ktm or was it a combination of all those things. Plus you had a little bit more experience running the team at that point. I think it's a combination you know in terms of e care. You know. I was riding with these team. You know. sixteen people walking into the technical than you know between the gone guys. You need your head that we can find it. It's not just a team that was start from zero. We took over the previous successful years so they managed to do really good with care and even though we had difficulty on ninety indicate he managed to lose. And you know you got an offer to move through audio and then you know from this point. Jump with the gp window to nikki game. Obviously after nineteen that we saw that you know we have issue with gave game and then they decided to walk away from the championship. Besides they just you know if we say jump into and we spend so much money you know just do to be you know we. We need to win races and we need to do this step so you know switch to alex which is the most competitive the best package you can find the a degree right now obviously can game and joined the racing those stuff joel and mongols. That's was a big big big ed value to the team and what we can get. We changed the crew chief that most of the relationship the connection coochie the rider very crucial. The connection between them was very rude. It's not necessarily the good. You'd need to be superman or something spatial. You know the relationship between the most super good. I don't wanna kennedy for myself but you know we. We managed to sell this season in a job training a lot. During the winter. We seen in los angeles we can do. I can tell you. I didn't manage that. We do in a position and finish brought to finish the ten. Was you know perfectly result but it was a big surprise you know then we try to momentum obviously becoming break military thoughts i think for us and for joe. Everybody was when began. Best for this. But overall it's all the changes that we did between nineteen to twenty hard work from jo and the winter and loads of technical thing that we doing in the shop in france. Help the rider to get the best packages we because basically everybody riding the same bike then package colleagues. German theme need to find small changes of small stuff that you can do. The rider commission for everything. I think that must have been heartbreaking to sit on the poll not be able to make the podium but then joe comes back immediately after that and does land on the podium. What kind of feeling was that for you as a team owner going through this entire process that you never really expected to go through and next thing you know you're celebrating your first podium with joe the writer that you've really got into this because of it was great feeling. I wasn't personally on the boardman. I was back here because they didn't let me go. Get on the flight. These specific because i i was the only one that back and forth to the us. The stayed in europe hopkins. The new kate and pushing the was in there. But the general just you know after the really difficult year in two thousand nineteen to counter the first racing because we all this weird situation. The governor was in. We knew that all the lights on houses is the premium category. That they're gonna run this weekend and then be position and then even finish. Fourth was huge emotion for me because you can look at it like zero a year ago and then hope we manage to do the magic and he top and especially i think for the american fan you know we we can talk about a layer but you know to to create team american bring american rider and then managing one year to do some big big step from way wasn't nineteen wasn't big big emotion. Do joe got a lot of attention this year because of his performances that led the and that opportunity led to really a huge decision. It's one we've been talking about on the show for weeks now and we'll be talking about. I'm sure after this. How difficult was that decision. Do i go with one of the best bikes in the motor to paddock. Or do i make the jump to motor. Gp it's got to be an impossible decision you know. I've said before on the program. That if i were in joe shoes i have no clue which way i would go. How did he come to terms with that. How did they make that decision to go. The proposal last minute like one day rain we have you know managing joke and we have between us kind of rule that during the weekend. We don't talk about deals contract money anything but this is something that we have to discuss. The offer came. And you know we have to talk to joe and proposes. Doing it wasn't easy because for him for the weekend race. He was really strong when we sure that he can. He can do really good. It can result. Thank you know looking so. Brian eno because he just signed with the different team. A good thing that was on the move we were have to be some changes so it was good and then the game he really wants to win racist and the month of do and this is i think the main the main reason that he decided to stay he don't want to jump. I could do with the fact that we up neal was super good without the was mayor in very good generally looking on right there he stuff in a different way. He wants to win. He wants to move the mother you'd be somewhere in the middle was like you know all the way until sunday after the reds to get the decision and then finally the chemistry and i wanna stay. I want to try and make the best thing to to try to fight for the championship and the disappoint. But you know what the end of the day the right decision. What he wants a decision. Because it's very strict stein with good decision to three days and doing the race weekend but you know waco sunday you got his decision and that was the good thing for joe is that he's gonna be in a place where he's got a fantastic opportunity to not only get on the podium. He was already doing that but to finally get to the top step of the podium in moto two now of course that created an opportunity for you no matter what decision. Joe made one of our listeners. Steve just said a couple of days ago in our comments over red at that. Hey let's not forget in this whole thing about the potential impact. That camera bay could make this season. Fortunately you were able to sign him to the team. What are you and hopper really expecting from cameron in this return to world racing. I mean when he was on one. Twenty five's it was completely different time. It was completely different bike and a style of writing with his experience now on bigger bikes and his championship winning experience on those bigger bikes moto america. I would think that would translate quite well to motoo. And i know that you guys have already gotten him on the bike. I believe it was in says. How did how did things go there. And what are you expecting from him this season. It's really difficult to compare what they did. In two thousand nine. I god he was really young sixteen by himself in europe no language. They've tried to understand trump of consultation with the in. How do it wasn't like a pleasant experience for him for sure. I always gotten in. You know he's much more mature. We understand we waited team supporting. Whatever he needs in european is going to be easier over there obviously five time jumpy on you know how to win. He's a winner in very strong. Which is the most important is strong and competitive. He can up quickly. You know after you exit the came back on the with the coochy cooed. You gave him some few. You need to correct and do some stuff you went to. The senate did in like no stove you understand. You can add up quickly. Obviously the netherlands to hire the championship. You know but hopkins. And i believe that you can be going to take him rates and just do adopt you know to the weekend and the schedule and everything but you can be competitive now again. You know in terms of the results and depends on the trial. He's style you know. Condition weather condition and everything. But i think he can do very very be and is lucia going to work with him or is he going with joe over to lucho in to actually two different completely. Okay yeah the governor's joe even before jobs started joe at the door for it to go through different team to bring these guys to walk with him. And we brought the oxygen the war champion near but any legit run into walk with us. He gonna walk with cameron. We need to switch. Joe went over there and we took. It's like a slob. Okay that works out all right but the we over thirty game and you know the guy he did really good job with any. We can just smart guy many years. What he's doing relationship golden two days spent together between him and cameron was really good thinking going to be interesting year. Yeah and we would be remiss if we didn't mention marcos ramirez as well incredibly talented brighter with layup hard-racing. Sing and moto three. He's back for a second season and just like so many moto three riders making the transition. The moto two you can see in the results that it took him the better part of the year to really kind of get comfortable on the bike and things really started the move for him in the second half of the season that must have you feeling confident about both of your riders for twenty twenty one michael the difficulty in the beginning the different between multiple to huge in terms of engine. Break breaking lines body position. It came to raise it up and again you not think the is the break between the then google good for us but we saw in the end of the season the last few races strong. It can be competitive some stuff to work with and we believe next day going to be super good. He three that they can do. Really good occupied a good combination between marcos and camera on it's going to be very big interesting year for our listeners on the show from all around the world but everybody who listens here in the. Us is super interested in the success of this team because it represents us and it really goes beyond just having somebody to like joe on the bike or having somebody like camera bobi on the bike even though that's a major part of it but the philosophy behind this team putting american writers back on the podium opening doors to motor gp. It's something that's been missing here for a long time but it does go beyond just the moto two team and a lot of people really don't know about that so talk about some of the efforts that you're making to help other young riders. Get to the point where they can eventually become. One of the racing stars of tomorrow unfolded the championship. For many years. I think from eighty s and you know. Us american than was like the dog and dominated the last ten years about slow down. And i was always. What's the reason. I think when i came we joe to the championship and i was much more involved. I understood that is a big big problem to every american coming back to the world championship. Computers one of them. You have to go to more to almost no ride those today. That can jump automatically from superbike on america directly to you be impossible to so much to become the the enter. Category the most of the writers that one to one hundred and the biggest problem that is in your right in as a rookie. That coming from you want to join team in the championship. You need to come with a little money. Either your family or sponsor or something but these expensive extensive which. I didn't know so much about it. Before any on writing to gone with minimum two years about half a million euro and you know to move to europe and in the difficulties. I don't know if it's too many riders talented that can do it and the second innings the deliver. It doesn't matter. How much would you do in. Us when you come into these war championship very hard and very digital. So you know. When he started they must be okay. We need to make an american team uneven. Los angeles and i wanted to be american team and this finish and the reason is i want to create the plus blow that can bring american roger from us to write for me. You know one year to two years and then do this and tried to push them into but again. And then i still everything was going on in nineteen so okay. We need to do something different. Anyways can just be in the world championship and waiting for riders to anyways and we work. Did we talk games. And then something that the having my mind for a long time. I you know joking economist. Anyways tompkins in dino doing in italy to become the the most talented rider from the age of twelve all the way to eighteen have been kind of competition or got to go with big them up. You know trained in coach. Dan provide them everything they need. It's a free book on that. We pay for everything but the reason is to them the win they the they can come to the multitude but they can be competitive to real young american rather to write for the team and don't be competitive and be on the twenty and down problem for him. You never can be going up. Jobs was some racist stuff. It was super frustrated for him and then for the team in on the end of the day. Not the business but you need to create sponsorship package and everything. He's probably interesting. We need to create level and we want. I want to be competitive win win. I don't wanna be just to be there so the ball in. Us we walk into those riders to try and support them and help them as much as we can and to read them through the right level. One of the stuff that we do especially with the dolt one six and up. We have to to buy anyways those riding on the bike as much as they want. How many truck. They just to be familiar with the engine. Then the tunics dire the breaking the windows jumping on the bottom of what. Johnston understand what they ride. I don't know maybe too long. So maybe something that people say the crazy i think this is the only way to create electric. Said like the new start comments from us and sixteen. You going to be something that we still have. We still you know building the biggest problem the the size of us because we have been one writer that she's in pennsylvania. When one in miami with tuna sanju ms riding frosties and miami as well so we had some challenges that we managed to find solution to try their specific location to support game but the goal is to have somebody like sean. Kelly walk within these year to be competitive and then bring it into the team's lusty grow into one race and it was really nice. Any prejudice team. It was it was quick enough to be competitive on the bike and i think he can be competitive when he comes to write for us. The second riding. I think on the list. We have in brooklyn that everybody knowing. Us so he's writing. We are the bull gum and again goal within these support them and give him as much as we can the next two years over here. And he's definitely gonna ride for us. They will jump and chip. So you know they know ready. They have something planned for the next few years. Just think we'll card anyways. We support them. We held them as much as we can. You know they really. They can jump on the can be tried to be competitive. That's genuinely exciting. And like i said. I knew you were working with younger. Riders but i didn't know the extent of the program and even in the heart of moscow. Gp country in italy riders. Still like you said they still require the assistance of somebody like valentino rossi in his academy to be able to get that extra boost. They need to make it to to in the make it the modal. Gp and so without that here in the united states it's gotta be impossibly gone we've seen we've seen riders before. Try to move up to moto to and try to move up to moto three and it just hasn't worked out but you've already proven with the success that joe is had and the excitement surrounding cameron that it is possible. You just have to go about it the right way. So it's genuinely exciting. What you guys are doing. I do have one last question for you though because next year. Of course joe will be on that atoll trance. Spike and cameron is coming in. Is there going to be a rivalry between those two guys and if so which one are you rooting for. I'm sure there's gonna be revenue between dan. And i know inside because you know from doing all day Planning to give a lot of attention to you. Know the rivalry and the team again and cameron. Because he's coming a jump on you know the we getting lots of attention anyway the next day going to be even more everybody except to okay to america and again fighting jumping cheap bullfighting on the dog. And for the next. We're gonna ruin i. It's an the day when i'm on. The trump team is my home. And i wanted to win. I'm doing good cardinal coach. Oh yeah you know at the end of the day you know. The team is the main project because we didn't know meaning. Whatever we're doing for hopkinton i you know the main do mature that the is either log gozo cameron whose rights doing the best. They can get a wins. Everything american podium would certainly be a good thing no matter which trotter is on top. Because i can't even. I can't remember i couldn't. I'd have to look it up when the last time. A double american poetry devon was gonna come to story k. Race many years ago just to see the flag on the first position with the american anthem. Dennis okay. I did my plan. This was we waiting for years. And i'll be happy again. It's going to be joe. It's going to be cameron buckley's you know. We managed to do because the end of the day you know. I stopped me going over there. He's into whatever you do is about the project from the beginning. I think it's going to be good for everybody anyways. Finally we have some writers in reading to watch the races and books with somebody ple owner and team principal for american motoo racing. Thank you so much for coming on the program end. Let's stay in touch and when the season starts. Hopefully you can give us a couple of updates about riders on the podium. Sure thank you. Yeah there we go. That was awesome. Thank you so much for coming on the show. And being willing to talk about the joe roberts situation that could have been a controversial topic but he handled it in stride and obviously has joe's best interest at heart anyway because of his relationship both as manager and as somebody who wants to see american riders do well on the world stage all right so essentially guys had some comments about the whole joe robert situation. Let's then dive in to what you had to say this week on. Both facebook am read it. And we'll start joe and his impossible choice. Between one of the best motoo rides in the paddock or moving up to the big leagues emoji. P. we'll start with james on. He said that he thinks that joe made the right choice going with the best bike that he can get in this case the motorbike and with james thinking not only will you know getting podiums. Getting on the podium. Help him personally get better opportunities down the road but more importantly he pointed out that getting on the podium consistently and winning races. That's going to only improve. The opinion and standing of american riders as american racing brings more riders to the premier class. And that's a very good point. I mean especially when you consider that one of the reasons that joe specifically said that he didn't want that really gig was because of the country he was coming from. You know because of his passport is he. Put it and to even mention. That is suggesting that. Us riders are viewed as being representative more than competitive and getting podiums and winning races can go a very long way towards breaking down that barrier and making it easier for the next rider that comes along behind him and one of those next riders. Somebody that steve wanted to talk. About and steve by the way also agreed that joe made the right choice electing to go with a top moto two team but just like we talked about a second ago with eaton. Steve said hey camera bay. I mean this is going to be huge. Potentially with him replacing. Joe roberts on that team because there is so much potential there and i think we touched on that quite a bit during the interview camera mobile. Did for those of you. Who weren't around back then camera. Va did run an entire season in one twenty five and he came up. The rebel rookies but like tom. Thomas saying i mean. He really didn't have the guidance he needed to be successful so he comes back to the united states and he runs on much heavier much more powerful bikes which should have him much. Better prepared to jump in the motoo. Take off in a positive direction. And of course the team was helping him out by having bikes like that available that he could get himself familiar with and get a headstart on coming the moto motoo so i agree with steve. I think we should pay a lot of attention. The camera bobi. Obviously our expectations can't be through the roof because it takes every rider a little while to adjust to motor racing in the motorbike. But i think there is a fantastic amount of potential there and like james said if while cam is used to the bike joe is getting on podiums of maybe even winning races. That's only going to make things easier for cameron. Once he really starts to adapt to the bike and take off because teams and manufacturers will take him more seriously because they'll have that proof. They'll have that example in. Joe roberts if joe can continue to improve. He has been over the last year all right. So let's move away from that topic and move to marquez. Where'd you talked about the facts of the matter earlier in the show. Now let's talk about your opinion. Because both steve and john said it would be a shame. If mark's career ends up being seriously curtailed by this arm injury and i agree and the bad news we talked about earlier. Is that amount of time. That mark was in the hospital obviously his third surgery and the reason for it was no small thing but the good news is that even if the recovery process takes longer remember. We've seen writers like mick overcome serious injuries to get back to the top and if anyone is capable. It's definitely marc marquez. Who was at the top of his game when this happened so there is at least some reason here to be optimistic now. John thinks it wouldn't be out of line if he sat out. All of twenty twenty one. The only thing that i'm worried about there if he does have to sit out this entire season upcoming season after sitting out essentially all of twenty twenty. It's just from a fitness standpoint. Both physically and mentally. There's a lot that he's gonna have to make up for their even with his talent. That's going to be difficult. It's gonna be a lot of work but honda has so much. So much. Invested in marc marquez. At this point that especially given the history from earlier in the season. If i were them i would err on the side of being overly cautious. Now i said that after the first arrest race they should err on the side of being totally cautious. And i think now we know why i was so adamant back then but now. They're in a in a position where they had no choice. I mean they have to be overly cautious. Hopefully that does not mean sitting out all twenty twenty one for those reasons. I mentioned before because of the physical and the mental fitness. But if he has to it's better than rushing back a second time and then potentially having a career ending injury or complication pinks. Six six six responded to mark's comments about having the other surgery where he talked about the doctors and the recommendations and he said hey marks comments to me confirm what we all knew all along that it wasn't opening some sliding glass door. That was what really caused the plate mark to fail. It was all of the stress associated with riding physical stress. I mean not mental or emotional Of riding the bike that next weekend and you know it was interesting. That honda didn't qualify that when the second injury was announced because mark was in the physical act of opening door at the time they kind of just left that out there is hey man not our fault. It was a freak accident at home when we all knew the real source of the injury was the stress of getting back on a motor. Gp bike a few days after he'd had his arm pinned back together with titanium so it was really interesting at that point. That honda really kind of left to interpretation and left us all just to kind of assume that it was something weird that happened at home as opposed to the clearly obvious culprit. You know the eight hundred pound gorilla in the room at that point Let's move on to some other stuff. Now mr t. A very interesting question. He asked does dorna payout for the top spots in the championship. Both to riders into teams in. That is a really good question. A difficult one to answer to because dorna is very tight lipped about that and actually about all of the finances surrounding the teams and their deals with the teams which is actually great. Time to ask that question. Mr t. since dorna is renegotiating their deals with all the teams right now but it strange that they wouldn't come out and say whether they do or do not give bonuses for individual writer championships because it's so common in every other form of motorsport for to be done. I would absolutely assume that there is some sort of bonus money for the championship winners in each series. Although from what. I understand it's not a whole lot and that's because dorner already subsidizes all of the teams at the beginning of the year. And depending on who you believe the amount of money that they hand out is somewhere between one and two million euros per team with surprisingly the higher amount the two million going to the satellite teams the lower amount going to the factories with the idea. There being the factories already have money coming in and the satellite teams need something to help them be more competitive so with a large amount of money being given to the teams initially. The neck could probably explain why they either don't pay the writers a whole lot when they win the championship or they don't make a big deal about it. They don't announce how much they're paying to the writers. I will say this though. The riders don't really need to get a huge amount of money from dorna for doing something like winning a championship because they get a nice amount of money from the team and especially the sponsors and contingency money when they win races when they finish on the podium when even finish top five but especially when they win the championship. And i'm pretty sure. That's where the riders in the series. That win the big trophies are really making up financially. I think that's what their main goal is to get that contingency money the sponsorship money t money as opposed to getting the door money but very good question. I wish i had a specific answer for it but it don't but a bit just somebody out. There has some more information than what i have. And if you do posted on reddit or facebook and we'll talk about it on the show right now. It's move on the dj. He's already handicapping satellite teams for twenty twenty two. If you remember. He did this couple of months back when it came to do. Kati and their decision for their second cd was handicapping. All the writers. Well he's come out with a list already four satellite teams and he said hey with this news and it probably is gonna take their factory effort in house. That kind of jumbled things up a little bit we know the veer forty six is almost certainly going to have a full-time odor. Gp effort in twenty twenty two. They have strong ties to yamaha. So let's try and figure out who's gonna land where and dj. I totally agree with your segments. On cr pray. Mac and tech three their relationships right now with their manufacturers seem so strong that i would assume that you're spot on that they're all at or very near a one hundred percent chance of staying with their current organizations but yamaha's yuki and apprecia- that's where things get interesting now. Dj has petronas at an eighty five percent. Chance right now. Staying with yamaha. Veer forty six at about fifty fifty chance of either yamaha or suzuki and racine like we were talking about earlier. Kind of running out of options than being default for probably. Or whoever's left if a probably pulls out a wildcard and convinces one of those other two in turn. Vr forty-six to come over to their camp. And i don't really see that happening. One thing that deejay said that i found very interesting in his opinion he thinks that yamaha. The factory is going to work very hard to keep this. I'm not so sure about that. Not because petronas isn't the ideal partner. I mean it's amazing. How well organized. Those guys have been straight out of the box resume. Rizzoli has done a fantastic job and they will be incredibly valuable partner for whatever manufacture they're aligned with in twenty but bella generosity and the vr forty-six brand not only have a strong connection yamaha but also tons of marketing and merchandising power. And i think that's going to be a major factor for anyone vying for their services. They don't just want the bikes on the grade. They want the riders that come through the academy and they want all of the popularity and merchandising power. That comes along with that. And i think that yamaha will be very interested in that. I think they'll ultimately have the inside track because of their relationship with rossi. Although i agree if i were in yamaha shoes it would be a very tough decision to purposely. Turn down petropolis. If that's what happens because of the success that petronas has had already and like you said how well that organization is run and how well things have been going out of a partnership. That really wasn't even supposed to be just kind of happened and next thing you know. They're winning races all over the place and that could end up especially if it continues in two thousand twenty one that could end up being more important yamaha than the marketing potential that comes along with. Vr forty-six but if yamaha does go with vr forty six. Then i think that zouqi would be crazy not to try to get petronas which like dj said leaves seaney content to latch onto whoever's left most likely but based on what we've seen with twenty twenty two and motor gp and the prospect of twenty twenty. One could be just as crazy. Who knows what's ultimately going to happen in the end. I'm obviously in the first like say five or six months of twenty twenty one. We should have a pretty good idea of how all of the chips are gonna fall. But it could be very very interesting getting up to that point and while i do agree that l. cr is like a lock for honda and pray mac for coty. Ktm with tech three. There is like that point zero zero one percent chance that something crazy could happen there. Actually there's always a twenty five percent chance something crazy could happen with to kati but there is that slight chance just like we saw with the weird silly season stuff this year. That's something completely unexpected could happen. Do i want things to get crazy. Well really wouldn't hurt anybody. I mean all of those teams and bikes are going to have a slot on the grid. So why not make it fun. Give us something to talk about. do tend to agree with to dukes. Though in his opinion that suzuki is in a very very good position here because not only do. They have a vr forty-six avenue because petronas is locked up so tightly with yamaha but they're also then potentially in a position to choose their favourite between petronas and rossini f vr forty-six and yamaha do pair up in the end so they have more options than anyone. And of course having a rider chip to toss around in your conversations make sure position even stronger and that could be a factor here as well. We talk about that point. Zero zero zero one percent for someone like l. Cr or tech. Three or mac the one type of thing that could sway one of those organizations zouqi saying hey. We got bikes. That can win races. Everybody thinks are bike is the best you can have one. All you have to do is come over here and while that may not have so much influence over someone like tech three where hair vape trial is really bought into the philosophy of the tm system thing about somebody like l. cr. He'll lucci nello who's been around forever. He's worked very closely with honda. But what has it gotten him. Not nearly as much as what was able to get in one season out of yamaha. And so if somebody like suzuki comes along and dangles an offer that makes it look like l. Cr could be the next petronas. That could be enough. You never know. Especially it's zacchaeus promising. Maybe some riders that l. Cr would really like to be able to work with that would maximize their chances of going out there and getting on a podium and winning races so i don't know i mean i think the dj you're handicapping is pretty good so far. The only thing is maybe forty six. A little over fifty fifty with yamaha but to said suzuki could be the wildcard factor. Here that kinda blows everything up and makes it crazy heading into the silly season. Not just when it comes to rider contracts although all that stuff is pretty much been sorted for twenty twenty two but in this case when it comes to satellite organizations all right. So let's wrap up the show by going over some pics and video and we've got to start with a crazy crazy very unexpected photo. That chip posted just yesterday arm reddit. And unlike the vast majority of his other photos this one was not a happy one to see chip. Had a big get off. It was last weekend but the weekend before that he was riding in julian california which is up in the mountains of definitely written it before not for a while though But just fantastic road north of town there and they have this restaurant. That sounds awesome pies. They're apple pies are like out of this world good but it wasn't very good for chip. He high fifty one collected a list of injuries of clavicle ribs. A collapsed lung. That sounds really really not fun. Man i feel terrible terrible for you and i am confident that i speak for all of us when i say there were all looking very forward to you being able to get better. Get back on the bike. Quickly get back to the track quickly. And hopefully you're in a place where you can hear the show a know that we're all thinking about you right now man Chip doesn't even know the status of his fifty one yet and i'm hoping that it came out in not too bad shape because it would absolutely suck if you lost your second fifty one. That would be terrible but the important part is you making through the wreck. Because they're always more bikes out there. You can always find another bike but some of your parts are a little bit more difficult to replace. So the important part is zero right and then chip wasn't the only one chianti wheels remember. Last week he posted that video of his helmet. How it gotten pretty banged up while he responded about his wreck and posted a video to go along with it. He was not at the track. He was on a dirt road with his ninety which are such super cool bikes. Every to those are cool and he just pulled a little too much from break on the dirt road He had a video. Like i said posted a video worried me a little bit man because it clearly knocked the wind out of you and i'm thinking poor guys on the ground and i wanna do something to help and i can't because you know it's just a video But it was good to hear that you were able to get up and get the bike up and that you were both okay and that you're gonna be okay just a little bit banged up and i've got two stories for you john. That'll hopefully take a little bit of the sting out of the situation Number one you joked about a flock of wild turkeys trumping out in front of you on the track. I've had something like that happen before. Now on the track I was on another great mountain road. California carmel valley road laguna seca weekend. It was either after a friday or saturday session afternoon. Some was out. it was nice and warm. We decided to take carmel. Valley road great mountain road between monterey and carmel of clint eastwood fame and come around a corner and there was a damn flock. Turkeys that ran across the road and wild turkeys are not small their way bigger than the turkeys that you get you know at the supermarket more for thanksgiving and to come to a complete stop to let these turkeys go by thought. Funny that you said that while turkey's ran out in front of you and the other story also a laguna seca one. And hopefully this make you feel a little bit better about the situation that caused you to go down because at laguna seca. I was leaving one of the big dirt lots during race weekend. I think it was actually on sunday. Can't remember though and someone had shown up with a car to pick up one of the workers at the equipment check tent so there was this one car in the motorcycle parking lot and they were a typical car driver. They really weren't paying a lot of attention to what they were doing. And they started to pull out. Just as i got momentum on the sand to start to come up the path to get to the actual road. Will i panicked. Because i didn't know if they were going to stop if they were going to keep going and i was like i got to slow down a little bit here. I did. The exact same thing just grabbed too much front brake. The frontier instantly locked and i was down just like that now. It wasn't a forty miles an hour. It was a parking lot speeds but it was in front of a bunch of other riders. And i felt like such an idiot having to pick up my bike so at least nobody saw you think about it that way. You're okay in the end. The bikes okay in the end and nobody saw you go down. At least you didn't do it in front of a crowd of other. People still can't believe i did that. It was such an easy mistake to make though it really is an easy mistake to make ended up having to get a new set of handlebars the triumph. When did that to Woody eighty-seven racer moving onto some happier topics said it. Hey you guys are all wimps for not wanting to ride in the cold. That's the part of the year that he lives for because things don't even start to get interesting until it gets icy He was not only preparing his bikes with studded tires but also posted some pics out on the ice. That is totally nuts man. I would be so terrified that it would fall through the ice. But i guess there really. Isn't that much of a possibility when things get insanely cold. But i would just the whole time. I will be out there on the lake. I just be nervous that you know the spikes on the tires will start to cut into the ice just enough that one time around boom just straight through. There's probably some sort of name for that kind of fear. I should probably see professional about that. Fear from being perfectly honest and then our last pick in video really is in. The picture was a comment about a picture from last week. That then asked a question about. Ach moto moderator. I'm read it. Say hi to him. If you get a chance Posted a pic of his four hundred chuck walla where he won a couple of races in his division last weekend. And i asked really more from attract bike perspective but a dedicated track bike perspective in with the option of them being able to go racing whether it makes more sense to say by a used by combat sort maybe an inch four hundred or an are three or something and then modify for the track or by somebody else's race bike that they've already gone through and done everything with and yeah that means it's been hard and put away wet but at least the correct stuff has been done. And then if you put the bike down on the pavement. Well it doesn't feel as bad because it wasn't like this brand new bike or anything that you bought and peter booth. Bt's predictably that in decision between building a track bike and buying a bike. It's no contest. You should always buy somebody else's bike. And i kind of figured that was going to be the correct answer. He also suggested maybe a vintage racing bike. And i think would be a lot of fun to especially with my idea that it would more be a purpose built track bike track day bike as opposed to going out there and racing against other people bike although we think of that a newer small displacement bike would be just as much of a blast. When you're talking about track days out to see chuck walla has vintage division because that would open up options for people potentially selling bikes that they don't want anymore even if it's just a turnaround and do track days only not actually race with you. I seem to always get bug the time of year and mostly. It's because where i live is great weather in the winter and because of that everybody comes here for winter vacation or their winter vacation home because everybody wants it to be seventy five on christmas and it very well could be seventy five degrees and sunny for christmas. But because of that all these snowbirds show up in vacation town and the risk needle just goes through the roof riding on the street. And so i started to try to convince myself. Hey let's sell one or two of these bikes in favor of something. That's track only so. I can avoid the street altogether. Go have a lot of fun. Even though i'm not competitively racing get the speed bug out and not have to worry about. You know grandma and her buick running me off the road. Because she just wasn't paying attention so i'll know if this is going to be the ear bud. This is just the time the season for me to start kind of cruising craigslist to see if there's anything interesting that kind of pops up but i think there are better places than craigslist. Finds something like that all right so that'll do it for this episode of the program however we still have the award show now. If you haven't seen it yet there is a thread posted for suggestions on reddit. and then. There's also one on patriotic as well a patron only thread. And i've gotten a lot of suggestions both in those threads and then messages as well and so here's what we're gonna do. We were originally going to do the awards this week but knowing that there was the news and the interview with utah coming up i decided next week would be best. This is the plan. I'll put up a visual polls on reddit facebook and patron in the next day or two with those collective suggestions that you guys all through at me then. We'll have voting throughout the weekend. I'll tally up the votes at the end of the weekend. And then we'll finish the last full week of twenty twenty with the coveted and esteemed annual motor week awards. So if you want to participate just make sure you're either signed up for facebook or it that will you'll be able to do it and if you're on patron remember you get the vote there as well so if you're not on patriot and you can join if you want to and if you are unpatriotic after you get done voting red head over there and vote for your specific patriotic categories including some pretty prestigious once. So that's the plan can't wait to get it done because i'm super excited about this award. Show and dj us so you know there are a couple of more interviews that i'm working on lining up as well so stay tuned for that over the next couple of weeks. We will definitely have stuff to talk about in the off season. Oh and by the way. I heard back from adrian about the track sculptures on his awesome fantasy trophies. This year. he is willing to make one to give away. So now i just have to decide what track to have a make and where we're going to give it away and so that's on the docket to do before next season starts as well so If you having suggestions on what track would be best. I was pretty much. Going to let adrian decide because he's already got the patterns for some certain tracks. I think the maybe one of those would be best and any of them are going to be cool but if you want to a post on facebook or read it feel free to. There's well thank a million times to adrian. I feel like i'm kind of forcing you to do this. And i definitely don't want that to be the case. So i absolutely appreciate you being willing to do a little bit more work us as somebody can have something really cool to hang on the wall all right. So that's it for this episode of the program. Next up the motor week awards. The official polls will go up this week. You'll have some time to vote than the results will be revealed and remember. We'll have the red facebook categories. Then there'll be a couple of patriot only categories then. I'm going to pick a few myself as well. Plus if there are any major breaking motor. gp news stories. We'll talk about those and your comments on them as well. Although the majority of the program is really going to be dedicated to the award show for this year. So you wanna find out everything about the motor week. Awards that there is to find out a couple of places to do it on facebook at facebook dot com slash motor week dot net overarm. Read it at our slash mode weekend if you're a patriot member on patriot on patriot dot com slash mode week. And i'll put up an article on the website to that has links to the various places so that might make things easier of course. The website is mode week dot net. You can find all the latest episodes there as well. You can always subscribe to the show on any of the major platforms apple podcasts. Google podcasts spotify radio speaker stitcher any of them and of course you can always follow on twitter at motor week and on instagram at mode week. Usa and if you do want to support the show and get access to those extra categories to vote go to patriots dot com slash. Motor week all right so until we talk again just a couple of days from now keep an eye out for those polls and vote. It'd be awesome if you wanna thank you so much for listening ride safe and i'll talk to you soon.

joe roberts joe marc marquez dorner ktm luca marini lorenzo motoo marcos ramirez sukey american motor racing team cameron bobi honda valentine rossi Joe roberts mark suzuki valentino tom bull joe robertson
Uncovering UFO Podcast Mysteries | An Interview With Martin Willis

Vurbl Voices

1:05:44 hr | 5 months ago

Uncovering UFO Podcast Mysteries | An Interview With Martin Willis

"Either everyone and welcome back to verbal voices. I'm your host. Paul lumley the head of partnerships admirable on this episode. Iv invited justin rivers verbals talented head of design to join me for a few reasons. Justin is interested in hosting a few episodes in the future. So you'll be hearing from him very soon but he's also very interested in the topic. Our guest today has been podcasting about for over. Four hundred episodes. joining us. is martin willis host of podcasts. Ufo a weekly livestream radio show and podcast. Martin brings years of experience producing audio content in a category. That is incredibly vast and has a ravenous audience all over the world. Ufo's paranormal activities government cover ups and generation defining conspiracy. Theories are all topics that do extremely well in the podcast format and so we want to talk to creators to find out what makes these genres so entertaining. An aging martin talks to us about how to approach the topic of ufo's interesting sightings through the years interviewing guests as hosts and the early days of this podcast and livestreaming experience. Ready learn more. Let's jump right in with martin. Martin how are you doing today I'm doing great thank you. it's my pleasure were. We're excited to have some conversation with you but we do. Let's let's dive into the rep for questions and get to know ya bit more about that. All right what's your favorite type of audio. Besides podcasts I would have to say music. What else yep music. Who would be your your go-to artists. If you're looking to to relax or drive in the car. Oh well i have So and i'm an old guy. You know i'm sixty four years old. So so. I like a lot of the classics earlier. Music from the safe from the sixties. Well not so much from the sixties from the seventies leads up when moody blues. Sleep with max out. I was a fan of fleetwood mac. Before they they were even popular in Had a whole different sound at one time right all right. What's your favorite audio clip of all time. I would have to say when when president kennedy said we we choose to go to the moon and other things not because of their easy the hard because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills to. I love that clip. That's great with say that's it all right. What's your favorite sound ca jane on. That's great note. actually. I really like I like live violin music from some. That's very talented. It's absolutely beautiful. And the i was thinking about this the other day i was on my boat in ours relaxing reading on a lake under under the and i was hearing children like playing laughing and the other side of the lake and i wanna beautiful sound models so i'd have to say now that's great. That's great and what's what's your least favorite sound. i would have to say an animal distrust. we covered but covered it. But what do you listen to in the in the car. I'm not driving anymore. Rise driving I would have these daily program set up in. It's a mixture of of for artists. I like a lot of my never even have heard of an and believe it or not. Johnny cash is in there. I thought was great storyteller. I listened when my dad liked him years ago so i i still like to hear his music. I think he is a fun storyteller. If you could secretly recorded anything what would it be. Oh well because you know we're talking how ufo's here. I would love to hear what was recorded back in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven You know a fly on the wall. When they were discussing what to do about the roswell situation they were said to be in the range of three and a half to fourteen tall spindly looking with very oversized it And huge is nothing of the sort Resembles a one of these crash diets dummy and you know the cover up a cover up started very early on that whatever it was. I'm not saying entrepreneurs extraterrestrial but the cover up started immediately Story changed many times. Yeah and finally what would be your walkup song odd about that. I think it's two thousand one space odyssey. What else could be better right. That's great that's own. Yeah all right so thank you so much for letting us get to know you little bit more on the audio side. What you're into but Let's dive into the conversation here way. We kind of framed this early on was. I'm a bit of a skeptic or at least i'm on the fence i'm very uneducated in this genre but it's fascinating to me but Justinlabar rivers here is will self professed. He's into this Topic and justin. How did you first get into it too. So we have a little a little background shirt so super super nice meeting you. Zoom air martin Yeah i i wouldn't. I would definitely not say that. I'm self acclaimed expert by no means. I'm i'm i'm very much i Creative nine an artist so i And also very Spiritual i i. More day mindset of anything out. There is awesome right like i mean within certain strains within certain guardrails right like it is possible. I think that we are the only ones that have evolved to this type of intelligence in the universe remain doesn't seem it's very unlikely i feel like there's Endless possibilities on what can be out there. And so i'm more in that camp. I would say percent more than anything and i'm excited to iran. Shula excited talk you today. Well actually when you frame it like that justin. I think i'm very similar then. So maybe maybe. This isn't the automated. We're looking for. But but arm your four hundred over four hundred episodes into the the into this topic into your podcasts into your experience in audio the audio world. How often do you come across. People like us. We're we're just like we're interested. We don't know where to start and and actually Where do you recommend. Individuals like us get started to learn a little bit more about You have a hunting and paranormal activity. That sort of thing while. I think it's i think that's a great question that's rarely asked not really Asked by anyone and I would say first of all. Youtube is not not a good place to go. A lot of people will go on youtube. And there's so much Cgi and fraud hoaxers There's a good ten channels out there of people that are making a living You know one of them Friend of mine figured out there making over thousand dollars Said a day something like that. It was a lot whatever they're making but it's all it's all fake videos and every once in a while they'll mix a real video in their of someone you know that that something on film or whatever but i would say the best place to get started is to look at credible people talking about it. I i try to keep that going on my show for one Ala hundred rojo's over open minds dot tv. He also is very careful than there's a number of people that are as far as getting whatever information we have out there you know that you can trust And i have you know. I have called out guests many times that i think are going down the wrong road in also. Do not pay attention to anyone who says they know what's going on because you know the further. I dive into this topic. The less ice seem to know about it but but also getting all the opinions and hearing the stories. Just become so fascinating. So i would say there are some really good books to read. There's a one by roop halt I can't remember i name. It's an early book by rupaul. He was involved in a project. Blue book early on There is a really good book by leslie. Kean called I don't have it up in front of me but major's Pilots go on the record. Something like generals all go on the record about your fellows. That's a really really good book because it's The story ten really good stories directly from the eyewitnesses So we just say careful. If you're looking into the topic and make sure you check your sources. I mean i was working with a former. Dod up person that had a high interest in ufo and he was on a youtube on a cgi. Saying what do you think of this great video on now. No and this is you know. And now he's involved in to the stars academy and there I don't know if you've heard about anything about that. But tom delonge has got involved with a you. Know trying to get the story out there so but anyway i would just say be careful and You know just tried to focus on people that are a really solid out there. It's it's hard thing for me to say. Because i i don't wanna say publicly to stay away from the but there there are many to stay away from and I can just tell you you know there are some also some really good people out there. That are doing a lot of a really good research. Will you can plug some episodes at at the end but but of the four hundred plus interviews. That you've done. Who would you say justin. I should start with. Who was the most credible or even well known that we should Dive into right away. While i would say Dave david marla is. He's top-shelf david. Marr is known mostly for his his work on the triangle. Ufo's people have seen Over the years. But he's i would say that of all the people i interviewed. He was extremely impressive. and there there are there are some a lot of really good ones You know but he comes to mind right off the bat. Stanton friedman last year. He was a nuclear physicist. He did a lot of work he he made an error on one thing that i know of but other than that he was very careful There are a lot of people you know the people that believe in the story of bob. Lazar have you ever heard of bob lesser. I've heard the name. yeah Take that he actually worked on. Ufo's in idol by historic. I don't care how many times people try to convince me. I still don't buy a story for What about his story is unbelievable to you. Well first of all he. He doubts his mit You know graduating from mit in physics. And all that. He was asked publicly. Then this is good example. This is just one example. So he's at. He was asked in a public forum. Hey bob so you went to mit. What's the square right out. Front of the mit and bob Oh i forget and everybody knows you walk out of mit in kendall square in boston. I mean anyone that ever ever went there. Even today's knows that's where it empties out too. So right off the bat. I mean he. He has his academics are are false. I mean there's no record of them ever being an mit. There's no record of him. Ever being at caltech and then You know the conspiracy theorists wiped his records. No one remembers him it either place and And in in high school and he was subpar down toward the lower half of his glass. I'm not saying he's not highly intelligent. He's very intelligent. And some people do kind of filter down that way You know But there's a lot in his story that people say well look you knew what element one fifteen was But that was statistically out there that that was that it existed for many many years. So you know. It's not like he pulled a rabbit out of the hat. it was it. Was you know it was a known element that was had just not been discovered completely yet on your website. You do claim that you had a ufo experience yourself. Could you explain briefly what that experience was. Sure you know it was kind of i actually had a fireball experience In a hot tub many years ago that was unbelievable and much more exciting than my your experience but anyway i was again in a hot tub in two thousand six. I was in carmel valley at a neighbor owned a ranch there and they had a guest house they they said you're welcome to stay up guest. Also i was in. I was all alone and in a in a hot tub again. Second time And all of a sudden something caught my eye overhead. And i just looked up thinking it was a bird or whatever it was dusk and it was a blue glow disc. Best way i can put. It was like a disk. It looked like the size of a quarter say at arm's length. So i don't know how high was up in the air but it was perfectly round and it had like a blue like a cold blue glow around it. That's all. I can describe no lights or anything like that And it it stopped I would say You know an angle above me and just plain stopped and then just started going on an angle toward car Carmel monterey. I mean so i. I was completely baffled by one thing. I didn't have the hot tub. Honor anything's just hot water. There was absolutely no sound and it just baffled me how something could move like that and stop and then start again and have no sound. I got out of the hot tub. I didn't know what to do. I call the police department. And said i saw you wanna know of anyone over. Monterey is seeing it should be over there right now and the woman was sarcastic dispatcher. Sarcastic put me on hold for about twenty minutes and hung up so that was it so when you think back to your own experience but also interview other people that have had experiences themselves. What's mental framework. Do you put both your experience and their experience through To have that sort of healthy skepticism. I guess and my question is more along the lines of as as an interviewer as a podcast host. You know how do you approach these types of conversations where a healthy amount of skepticism is necessary and people that are certain as you said we should stay away from people that are absolutely certain of So how do you approach that as a as a podcast host while i generally just let people tell their story and ask them questions. You know a lot of times there. Are you know there was one guy that had this fantastic story in the desert in. Sometimes i think the more bizarre stories are the better ones. Because it's almost like if if someone was going to tell a ufo story. No maybe they'll get standard standardized kind of like my story you know saw this discussion over. But when they say something really really weird and bizarre to me sometimes that makes it even more credible. What's been the most bizarre that you've heard l. Like for instance Someone like looking up at this craft and looking and seeing all these pipes and and it looked like a muffler shop inside of it in and you know people with like some type of humanoids that were walking around in in one piece suits that they could see through a window. That didn't see them. And just wacko stuff than someone you know. Just saying like for instance it was an assiting where this guy said that he went up on like an elevator under crow sitting inside this craft. You know. I mean just really weird weird stuff sometimes like how. Could you make something like that although the pipes in the muffler that sounds like the millennium falcon to me. Yes yeah and that was from You know that was an old old citing two gotcha. Gotcha let's talk about the community itself of of skeptics of ufo hunters paranormal. This category and genre is so big in podcasting there. It really isn't any other medium that does justice in my does these teams in an stories. Justice Why do you think that is. Why do you think people are drawn to podcasts. As this this this forum this medium well i think for one thing the listener can choose what they wanna listen to to begin with so if they have an interest in something unusual You know you're gonna find it as a podcast and so that kinda narrows that down in weeds that out to You know. I mean when i started this ufo podcast and had done other podcasts. I don't know if you wanna talk about that at all. But so. When i started this i just started it and it just seemed right off the bat i have listeners in this is back before i get it live or anything like that. I get a regular podcast when things really difficult to set up They weren't so bad in two thousand eleven. But when i very first started podcasting things were very difficult to set up to get on i tunes and everything else so Can you rephrase the question again. Yeah the genre of appointing paranormal. It draws a big audience that ravaging audience ravenous audience. Excuse me for audio specifically. Yes i you said. Youtube does well and people find hoax. See stuff on on youtube but But why why do you think people are just drawn to podcasts or or live shows around this topic. Yeah i think a lot of people curious and it's like you know i've done this show for coming on nine years i believe and it's still fascinating to me and so i think it's still fascinating to the listener the because you know even though you may have the attitude that This probably has to do with other paranormal things too. I did a show for a short time. That i talked about Everything that's called the everything else show and so it talked about. You know ghosts experiences and all that and i think you know. There's a lot of things that happen. That actually do happen. We do experience in life. That are very very unusual and we try to find the answers for you know that something is really happening. You know and whatever it is we may not know what it is but it's still a very curious thing and makes you wonder you know how much of the real world we actually can see and take in around us and you know maybe the explanation to some of these things is something that is not in our spectrum that we can see or feel or whatever that brings up an interesting point about discovery. And if if you experience something you're almost forced to find other people that have experienced something similar or are and i think that community aspect is one big feature about this genre that goes on on talked about absolutely right and a lot of times people wanna tell the story just to get it out you know i mean i can't give you a quick example. Yeah absolutely i was out in phoenix and i was up that a conference out there. Ufo conference and next door to it was a casino and this casino worker. A woman was outside on a smoke break. And i was walking my dog. She said what's going on next door anyway. And i said well you f oh conference going on. She said well. Jeez i should go check that out. Because i had an experience i said really so. Tell me about your experience in. She said she was driving along. The road with her friend was driving. Not her may had a sunroof and they saw off the top. This plateau this big like triangle. Object like come down and then she could see it just above their car and it was following them so her friend hit the gas and they were doing near one hundred miles an hour to like the next town and then they didn't see it anymore and then all of a sudden she said in the strangest thing happened said all of a sudden this huge the biggest thing i've biggest al you could ever imagine just flew right out our windshield and then away man and it was such a baffling strange thing right. Yeah you don't know how many times als or associated with this topic really. Why does the guy wrote a book on it. Mal's and ufo's yeah and the speculation is that it's not really now that it could be something else and not i. It would seem kind of fringy if i get into that topic but i will tell you. That's not an uncommon thing. Okay okay justin. What type of question did you have specifically on. I think you brought up some ideas that we wanted to dive into. Yeah yeah for sure Never heard the altar before you know. Maybe they aren't messengers from somewhere else. Yeah messengers is actually the name. I think of the book that michael mcclellan i believe. That's his name road on it. Yeah so those start with tom. The big i think when it comes to skepticism around. Ufo's people always like how could you know were so far away from any other type of for fourteen hundred light years away from the nearest you know mass object earth like how could any intelligence ever gets to where we are at and so the the theory that i have her that i think could be plausible. It are around wormholes right like a lot of the stories that i hear around you. Those even abductions or whatnot is people kind of black out or or they're or they're in a car. One place. A uso comes down two hours later the car somewhere else. And they're like confused happen and rattled kind of stops right. And so do you. Do you think like do you think holes in those you think. There's some correlation right do you think or potentially exists and that's how you f os or potentially coming into our sort of planet or atmosphere because they've actually bound how wormholes work throughout our galaxy and and and and it's just kind of like spitting around in different areas kind of a thing or which kind of around were votes while i think that's a very good point. Now thanks bringing it up and just to give the listener out there. An idea of how far away the nearest star is. I had an astrophysicist. Explain this to me. If if this the sun were the size of a grapefruit and We would basically be the size of a ball on top of the ballpoint pen. Take that and you put that in washington. Dc that little ballpoint pen ball the nearest star would be in seven cisco so that will give you some type of idea. How far the it's very hard visualized distance in big numbers. So they have to kind of break it down like that now. There are there. Are you know i've I've interviewed people. Like seth shostak from the seti institute and you know other astrophysicists a lot of astrophysicists physicists. Think is very plausible that we can be visited by extraterrestrials. Only because There is possibly a lot of physics that we have not discovered yet There are different theories. Wormhole is one of them There is some Scientists that came up with his idea of how space time could be basically folded somehow some type of propulsion. You know there's it. It's really hard to understand. How the the if they are coming from you know Another star or galaxy even how they how they get here and that that is something. We absolutely have no idea at this time about if that's happening how they're doing But they obviously do. I mean take a look at our technology in how much we've gained in the last fifty years. I mean it's like if you through a cellphone backup to the civil war and say okay figure this out you know. They would have no clue and we are very as far as a civilization. We are very young as far as a plant. Our planet you know were this this This solar system is extremely young compared to a lot of them out there. So it's possible that there are civilizations that are you know millions of years of advanced of us. however we don't know how long civilization can last you know we obviously can wipe our selves out pretty easily. So it's hard to know. But did i answer that enough Yeah yeah no for sure for sure. I always kind of like wonder what the what sort of top u up the experts. Feel about. Just wormholes as it is is just over as an overall yeah. It's one of the theories now. The job and i think that's could be essentially Yet alive paul's earn being. Looked like you said with were very early on are sort of existence indefinitely as like intelligent human beings so you think about earth's in other galaxies that are billions of years potentially over the nas and potentially billions years older with intelligence than it seems like it could be something that's possible but possible maybe even probable with large numbers. Right i have a great quote from geoffrey bennett. Who is Visiting scientists at nasa. He's an astrophysicist. Astrobiologists his. He said to me that primarily between his colleagues at nasa and himself their conversation basically came to this Theory that if intelligence can get through the bottle neck of technology without blowing themselves up they will be traveling the stars. i thought that was a really great quote. The bottleneck of technology if they can get through the bottleneck technology without blowing themselves up. That's interesting to think about. What are what causes. The bottleneck of technologies. I all our are no no human Developments yeah look at us with nuclear bombs for one you know look at us with climate change probabilities You know are are we heading our own demise. I mean ninety ninety seven or ninety eight percent of everything that lived on this earth when extinct. Are we heading that way. He you know and the closer get more to more technology if we don't behave We can't be responsible and ways. I mean you know. The threat of nuclear annihilation is is still with us right now and and by the way Mulata are seen around Nuclear weapons deactivated. There's there was some that were even. Dvr deactivated a ufo visit. So it's That's another fascinating topic. Yeah that's interesting. I was gonna i was gonna to occur coutel into the into the energy thing. I think a lot of you. See a lot of unusual activity from what i've read in watched around like remote areas and power plants and all this stuff Know i think I think the most relevant topic even right now based on kind of like news and whatnot. Obviously we've got congressmen came out. And it's finally reveals release videos but something even more. Entertainment friendly is on unsolved mysteries on they just rooted on the net flicks if you've seen cd at large. I did yes so you probably watch the one that was on berkshire down to nine hundred sixty nine and i thought that was really compelling right because you asked not one but twelve people in the same night reporting on the same incident in like a half a dozen of that actually had these physical these counters in like. We watch these things as optimistic skepticism. Like all these people are crazy or alka dislocating now where he was at. And there's just something you know. There's something about their stories are something about. I don't know maybe just outlay. La described the incident. And you've seen you mentioned that before your interviews like when people tell a story in its outlandish like sometimes it's like how can somebody make that up the last third of slight basha crazy or they're just really imaginative or whatever it may be right So just curious to know like what. What do you think like that incident happened at the that particular incident or shire mass nightly six nine in like. Do you find those accounts awesome Accommodate you hear of dad Zoom bit end up into a aircraft. It look around at the table. Like that's like super wild. Not head goes back with fire in the sky and the early days earlier out. Persecutor your take on well. First of all. I had known about that case and Let's get back. i'm just gonna take jag quickly. Back to bob lazar. Mom i watched recently where there were these four Body language experts from different parts of the world. All going over. All bob was ours interviews in his body language and they were all convinced that it's a story many so well versed in saying That he has all these cues that They showed actually some discrepancies from israeli interviews. You know some things messed up a little bit. The second time or third time told up so anyway they were pretty much convinced. Bob lazar is not telling the truth. And this is what i thought for a very long time but anyway They also talked about the berkshires incident in. They said you know they were talking about watching that episode. You're talking about and they all agreed that the Eighty six year old woman however old. She was that woman. I don't care what anyone thinks. That woman is telling the truth no her experience everything about what she said. In that in that interview was one hundred percent right on as an honest account in all her body. Language cues I know tom reed tom reed. He was the person that would speak about this incident now. I've heard tom tell the story a number of times. He's been on my show and i never knew there were that many other witnesses until i watched that episode and i think that is a really fascinating. There's so many things that these people say that other people are saying to you. Mention fire in the sky outs on travis walden And travis stories very compelling. He's an intelligent guy of talk to him on many many times. historically is You know when we talk about the abduction part of it. I've always been a little bit on the fence but some of these deductions stories are just so incredible. They're hard to deny that something didn't happen. The question i have it really is. Why isn't there a framework. To discredit our qualify. A real claim the example. I have is actually from. There's an episode on solve mysteries about a waterfall slash bath in. I think it's like spain france. There's a kid that bathe they're like generations ago and he was cured of cancer or some type of sickness and that catholic church actually sent a bishop or a priest to go verify this claim of divine intervention and so ever since the catholic church has actually had a presence at this bath to actually verify and track all of the claims of divine intervention or becoming cured of sickness. And the reason i bring it up is because on episode. The priests that they interviewed had a set of ten frameworks that a credible claim has to go through and be verified for it to be deemed credible by the catholic church as a real miracle. Is there something similar in the paranormal activity or youthful citing genre or research that something has to go through is there a framework that these sightings have to go through in your eyes. Well there's no one to really set that up. You know. I will tell you this though Back in december sixteenth. Two thousand seventeen. There was an article that came out in the front page of the new york. Times about the pentagon Looking into the into ufo's researching ufo's and They call it you. Ap's and And actually yesterday. Another major article came out about the possibility in the new york times. Also about the possibility of a crash. Retrieval materials So that that's another fascinating thing that came out but why i'm bringing this up in the first place. Ever since that article came out there's been a slew of scientists that are finally saying. Hey look you know if this coming out in the new york times in the navy really. Is you know researching. Ufo's the air force and all that if the government pentagon is really researching ufo's and that program that used to be in the pentagon pentagon has now a navy intelligence and they're still looking into ufo says mostly as a threat but also trying to identify what is flying in our skies So all these scientists now have really decided that it's kosher to let's look into the topic. The giggle factors going down the more this gets exposed so people are trying to come up with you. Know what makes A ufo a more credible sighting and luella zondo He's on the. He is a retired from the pentagon program. In he's the one that actually exposed that existed in the first place and he has these five elements that have to come up with what there is a credible ufo And i can try to look for those online quickly. Because i don't have them memorized We linked to other if you can pull him Shirt yeah propulsion is a one of them Because a lot of them will display on very unusual propulsion techniques of for instance. You know going at save fifteen thousand miles an hour and then turning on a dime right angle if there was any type of being as far as we know the physics Would that being would be turned into jello and that type of a g force and so there's a different displays. I'm just going to see if i can find that while while moving ahead here but if you wanna go ahead and ask me To yeah i'm i'm interested in. I'm trying to look at what's his name again. Blue ellison dole. That's eat al high zero in d. Okay yeah but if you wanna look up lob to the stars academy. That's another one that tom delonge is involved. And that's where louisville zone though is working now but ellison dojo if you just say five characteristics of ufo's. I think that's how you might find that. I mean i think we're literally i think. Were very much on at least in my lifetime. So far on my feeling aren't cusp of some sort of breakthrough at least from government level on the release of not coming out and saying hey look. There's you know we found alien than we very well may have recovered a body roswell. I'm i'm a little. I could go either way on of led to your your opinion on if we actually have physical evidence of an et. A lot for what. I'm saying with congress what i'm saying. Some of the coming out is that they. They have address that we have found. We have found a crash or parts of a craft that is not from earth like the metals that they've found in it objects that have been found. And maybe that goes back to one of the five points. You're saying well but we have our congress government or government right now others to the public like yes we we have found. We found a they called. Martin took an unearth like craft materials meta material. Snap at aren't from here that just that just came out yesterday. That there You know the time. Yup so i found the five. Let me just go over them. Real quickly Anti gravity lift now A lot of times people are reporting seeing triangle. ufo's sometimes up two miles wide You know there's one experience Called the phoenix lights. That happened back in march of nineteen ninety seven and that was seen by thousands of people that were outside looking at a comment And this went over phoenix and actually another was seen in other states and right away the calls were coming into the sing was up to eight miles wide Acted like it was floating and just going real slow With no apparent pulse are going over the valley. There are pictures online of the phoenix lights. And there's only one picture that is real in a lot of them. It's crazy thing that after all the calls were coming in they I forget what was there. A what group it was that went out but they did flares. They shot flares out in the phoenix valley. And so a lot of people took pictures of that thinking. It was the the triangle. But i think that was just to defer some of the panic. That was going on so anyway. That's an anti gravity. Lift these are the things that the That people see that can kind of classify moore's unknown object sudden and instantaneous acceleration. There's so many there's so many times that that is People say that. I've heard accounts going all the way back to the nineteen seventy were actually was someone. I know In the business. That i'm in She was talking about a triangle. Ufo over their cards just shot off instantly and so many people say that Over and over again. That's one of the things you hear all the time hypersonic velocities without signatures of. That's right a lot of times under alter violet or are they see absolutely no heat signature or any type of propulsion wings or anything like that. A low observability or cloaking a lot of times people will see a ufo go in and out in front of them other witnesses. That will say you know. I don't think it moved just vanished now And trans medium travel out. There have been New no one has ever reported ufl no matter how fast it's moved first of all with a sonic boom which doesn't make any sense at all. People have seen them on radar tracked on radar going a twenty thousand miles an hour and come to a sudden. Stop a no sonic boom. No disturbances One stopped a few feet above the water at that speed with something like fifteen hundred gs and made no Movement on top of the surface. Water nothing a trance medium. Travel means that it can actually go hover over the ocean and all of a sudden divert in the ocean no apparent waves or anything. Like that. I've talked to a guy that was on a at the time not into ufo's or anything like that. He was on a submarine and all of a sudden. This thing underwater was going over two hundred knots and Everyone acted like no big deal. It's a fast mover or something like that and they won't talk about it so The sink they can move through water. and air and go in between at whatever speed they choose. It's it's really bizarre as crazy. I like the criteria. If i'm coming at something. I'm skeptical on. I need some type of a framework and it's nice to to see that there's some thought going towards these criterias and obviously it's nice to see that the government's taking deciding serious and the industry or the kind of cottage industry of of paranormal activity. Serious to give some hampton weight behind these claims. A lot of people will say. Ufo's are not paranormal. Because there are so many witnesses that have seen things and there's so much other evidences tons of radar evidence of this record data There's some trace evidence of landings and things like that. I don't know what they are still not claiming that they're from another world. I have no idea but it's up. It's definitely a fascinating topic. I had absolutely no idea that was going to get into this much information when i started. Either right i will. You've you've done other podcasts. As well so you know a ton of experience under your belt. What have you learned about hosting a podcast interviewing guests. Well i think know one of the most important things is try to find someone really good in. Try to vet your your guests if you can have a conversation with him before. I think that's a really good thing. Because i i've had an. I'm sure anyone that does a podcast is going to relate to this. Have a one answer. guest so when's the last time you like. I mean a one word answer and then you have to try to get information out of them. you know a starting podcast. Today is like a set so much easier. You know. The first time i started a podcast was in two thousand nine. I did one on fine. Arts and antiques Still going under and eighty seven percent episodes. They are And then i did someone comedy of but again you know getting started getting going that that is probably the hardest part getting your first guest of whatever topic. You're going to do that's that's a difficult thing. And i i still think mike first guest on the ufo show you know for for taking the time to come on. Do you remember that that first episode that i interviewed it was terrible and it was terrible because i didn't really know much about the ufo part of it. I had been doing interviews with people on the antiques in also in comedy and so that was a that was a lot of fun but yeah i didn't know the topic will was very good. So after four hundred episodes of not knowing the topic would you. Would you call yourself. well-versed enough to obviously you know people keep coming back so you gotta be but how do you how do you. I guess you're an expert. Now i mean i wouldn't. I wouldn't say that. I would say that people trust my show because i don't know if i'll call people out if they go over fringe end up so people trust income to me because of that i saw that i don't know how many years it has been three or four years ahead over ten million downloads mino- total. So that's that makes me happy that enough people listening to it. again. I wouldn't call myself an expert. But i know how to ask the questions. I guess that's the best way to put it on. That just comes from doing the work and the experience to. That's what i've learned just What eleven episodes into A little bit more once this goes live but Yeah what you mentioned before was vetting your guest But also doing your due diligence ahead of time is is so helpful when you bring on it now you also broadcast live and you said that that wasn't what you did early on what. What has the live broadcasting brought to your show. Is that something you recommend for other podcasters. While i have to say the first episode i did live was Horrific as far as you know that was live. And i was just used to editing everything sir night. I do have to say this. I'm lazy so one of the things that i get out of doing a live show. I don't edit anything. I just put it. Put it up here. it is But it also keeps you right on edge the whole entire time. You're not gonna be making notes off on the side or something that now i will tell you i. I also have a lot of people in chat. So occasionally i did. Have it happened. One time that. I was trying to read a question in than the gifts. Gather guests said something like so. What do you think about that. No idea what they just said out. That can be distracting. So now i have someone that'll look at chat a lot of times for me and tell me there's a good good question up there But i love doing why Because it's it's kind of a rush in it's also Like i said it keeps you on edge a lot of time. Some crazy things will happen. I had lightning strike With the guests his transformer blew and he was gone and so i started taking calls. I've i've had you know situations like that happen Were guests absolutely. Does it show up. And all of a sudden it's a call in show and bright net can be tricky and nerve wracking but I will never go back to doing our prerecorded. I still do. Some you know from my antiques podcast recorded but for the most part of really really enjoy. I like and so on a radio station as well live and as well as simulcasts to to go when you had to pivot or your guests you're doing your shows live now was more difficult to get them to agree for a lot of guests. It's comforting knowing that we can edit things out you know if they don't like the question or Didn't like their response to it. They can just ask. Lives much different. So was it difficult to get guests to convince them to come on a live show. No i think a lot of the people that i interview are used to doing. Live like on coast to coast or something like that so no. I don't the only time i have. Trouble is time constraints of interferes with someone's work schedule or right now really wanna interview someone in australia and when i go live. It's the next day in the morning. Virtually and You know some. Like i'm dealing with right now. He said. I'm sorry. I just can't do it. I i have my kids during those hours. I just can't do it so i will opry record. So it's a little bit restrictive as far as you know when you want to do an interview with someone in europe and it's in the middle of the night for them That's that's the hardest part about life now that your ten million downloads. In four hundred plus episodes what what has been monetization. Like for the brand for for you as a host and producer Is this your full-time gig. Oh no no it's not. It's not that easy it to to i. I believe maybe it's a category man but it it's a little tough to monetize. End was kind of like a last thought When i was getting having to pay for bandwidth than you know The show is costing me money. That's when i decided to monetize I i actually don't do any commercials or anything like that. I did have a complete subscription program that was through is called digital access pass and you know people could subscribe in that way i would give the first hour of the show freed everybody in ago editing again i would and then give the full show too subscribers. That's how i did that for all. I don't know maybe five. Five years something like that comedy subscribers. It wasn't it wasn't enough i started out at the like the dollar among thing get on but you know i went through pay pal and pay pal. Two thirty seven thirty seven cents out of that dollar and you know so. It wasn't like you'd make a huge amount of money but it would pay that nine hundred dollars expenses And then there'd be some leftover from that. And so i i got hacked back in may and severely hacked and there's some conspiracy guy that connected to me. I had someone that's on my show. That's now on tv and everything a lot in He was on my show in two thousand thirteen and he said while unlike other people in the ufo field. I never had any type of experience by the line. He said that. And then he's out there now talking about childhood citing everywhere this this citing. Now he's on. Tv all over the place. He talks about the citing and everything. I called them on it and some someone is speculating. He was he got involved in hacking. Take that site from episode down. I don't know if that's i don't i doubt that's true but anyway i got hacked got hacked really really good and even the copies in everything all gone so i lost fifteen hundred pages and and so i started. I decided i'm not gonna do this. Subscription service anymore if someone wants to support my show. I'm gonna offer full full two hours to anyone who wants to listen to it as wants to support the go to patriotic and support me joe. I'm not your ideal person to talk to. About monetize ing podcast. It's not really Have another life on fine arts appraiser and then right now. I'm not working so felt this does help out a little bit. But it's i'm not that ideal person to talk to about monetize their podcast. Because that was secondary from me. Gotcha gotcha will. Let's talk about other challenges. You faced As a as a host of producer d- an editor livestream. Now if i were getting it or a listener were getting into podcasting or live streaming. What are the big hurdles that they have to overcome and maybe some recommendations to to overcome them. Well i think I think you know trying to get through all the little technical glitches like for instance. I was using a software called. It's an open software for For streaming my Youtube videos so many settings in that so many problems. I had problems over and over and over again so i decided Is it okay. If i talk about another company okay I decided through talking with other people to try this service For streaming called stream yard dot com. And it's absolutely wonderful. I don't use oh bs anymore. i don't have to use it anymore. So i don't have a secondary software. people don't have to sign up Income through skype anymore actually goes to send out a link directly to the stream yard studio so to speak. They go into the green room. You pull them in when you need to have all types of graphics you can use on that site. So i use that i actually and then you have this option to download the audio afterwards. And that's what i do and that's my podcast go so it's very simple compared to starting new. You know i used when i started. No this is how i started. I had In two thousand eleven. I started a ufo podcasts. I had a recorder in our set. It up to a speakerphone. And i've record the guests. That one is horrible so lots changed. Since then i remember the good old quartered off skype. It was like wow. This is a miracle yet. I mean we've come so far in in the last what nine ten years alone that Oh yeah now. Anyone can produce or record. Publish and distribute a podcast. You know with their iphone or the push of a button so It's amazing. And can i go for that. What are used to be like in two thousand eight two thousand and early. Two thousand nine started my antiques. Podcast and there was absolutely no information on how to start a podcast back. Then you couldn't. i barely got it. Figured out in In this this guy helped me in the comedy world. That had up podcast and you know about it took so long to get approved by tunes. You had every think they didn't give you any direction how to do anything you just had to kinda wing it and then they'd come back and say you're not approved and you had to figure out what it was couldn't communicate with anyone And now everything is you can set up a podcast and five minutes acing and verbal. We're gonna make it even easier so hopefully Showcase that in the very near future but to close out. Justin had a question. Let's go back to the ufo's but he wants to know about the credible piece of the most credible piece of video that you've come across And can we. Can we share it can we. Can we can see it. Yeah sure. I can't pull it up for you right now it's You know the the one set the three videos that released by the pentagon You know they formerly the knitter tornadoes. Now the nimitz video. There's what's called the kimble video which was taken off the coast of florida in two thousand fourteen. Two thousand fifteen. By the way a very strange thing happened about that particular Citing that was going on with the uss theodore roosevelt. I believe it was something like that that went to overseas and To set up and forget what bay. it it was in the middle east but a win over there And the thing followed them over there you know. They started seeing it again over there. So i mean that's just so bizarre and so the strikeforce the nimitz strikeforce off of san diego in two thousand four. There's video of that. I'd love to see the original video because it exists but they're ju just see little clips but those are very compelling videos to watch those three the gamble the nimitz and the go fast. Some people saying the go fast is You know a drone or something like that. But i don't. I don't think anyone has a still unidentified at this point. And those are the ones that fit within those five criteria. We talked about earlier rights. Those are the except you only see it for a short. You don't see do the other things that was reported that they did okay so they're just no video of of to make four of the other like going into the water anything there's video of that and they they really There there's they've only releasing this part of the video because saying that there's nothing classified about it in saying about that doesn't mean anything about the video itself. It means anything that would spill. You know some type of weaponry on the on the right off jet or something like that interesting. Yeah well this is a really fascinating topic and we really appreciate your time. I'm sure we'll have you on again but to close it out once you give some recommendations on where listeners can start listening to seafo and where they find you online. Well it's Cut cast ufo dot com and we are the blog up their weekend. Every tuesday night. The show is live at six to eight. Pm eastern standard time. We have a facebook page with thick thousand people. That's pretty active and that's really it broadcast. Ufo dot com. And i'm also have a youtube channel can watch it live there. And it's basically martin willis live shows. I do other shows you know for antics and things like that. That's all fantastic. Will we really appreciate your time. And we'll have you on again in the near future. Well thank you both. Thank you all right. thanks a lot. Hey i want to thank you so much for listening to verbal voices. If you're struggling to discover new audio content go to our website verbal dot com. That's the u. r. b. l. dot com to read hundreds of podcasts and audio reviews. If you're an audio creator with stories to tell or advice to give reach out to me directly at paul at verbal dot com that's p. l. at b. u. r. b. l. dot com or tweet at us at get verbal until next time

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Jeremy Bash:Central Intelligence

The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg

1:02:18 hr | 1 year ago

Jeremy Bash:Central Intelligence

"I do solemnly swear I will support defend the constitution of the United States against all enemies foreign the master that I will bear to face allegiance to the scene that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion and that I will well and paid us as well as my older sibling older brother and of having the opportunity to go to Georgetown because mom was a professor there and that conferred some intuition benefits and that allow us to go essentially for free I teach there now occasionally and it's just a marvelous place in students are so engaged and Oh smart it was a great place for us for two reasons number one is I grew up in a religious Jewish household I went to a Jewish day schools intelligence and defense missions are fascinating timely and important on the oath Jeremy shares the remarkable story of the analysis and Planning Integral Rosenberg and I am honored to be your host for another thoughtful conversation with a fascinating guest Jeremy Bash graduate of Georgetown University and Harvard Law School D. C. The old D. C. General Hospital and deliver babies mostly for the poor and underserved communities in Southeast Washington and then come home at about six am and colleagues as the result of a two thousand nine terrorist attack at Camp Chapman in Khost Afghanistan a story we should never forget Jeremy Bash youngest I'm actually the youngest of the four I'm sure he reminds you absolutely he's eight minutes my older but he's smarter and better looking than I am the tour worked at the very highest levels of both the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Defense in both posts he had the privilege and the responsibility of serving and so they came down in the sixties and raised four kids and they still live in the house in Arlington where I spent my formative years my dad is a rabbi and he get us kids ready for school now as a parent of three young kids it kind of blows my mind to think that mom when out in the middle of the night worked in came back and has the chief of staff to Leon Panetta Mister Panetta of course was the director of the CIA and later the secretary of Defense Jeremy's insights about our oh life and then to Catholic school a Jesuit School for college was a terrific experience first of all it broadened my perspective but it also welcome to the oath paycheck great to be here thank you for doing this I pleasure you grew up in northern Virginia I did I grew up in Arlington. Actually they're not a lot of natives in whiff furry program for midwives at Georgetown University and when I was a kid she would get up in the middle of the night and go and take call and go down conducts funerals for Jewish war veterans who have fallen and their spouses how about your mom my mom was a nurse and she ended up leading the nurses it came down to serve as a pulpit rabbi at congregation in Arlington the only congregation in Arlington and he served there for thirty six years and then when he retired he Gulf War and then ultimately he became the chaplain of the Pentagon now conducting services weekly there and he also at Arlington National Cemetery Perform Oh it opened my eyes to a lot of commonality and common respect among religious faiths and among people of the cloth from different religious Washington DC area but my folks were Brooklyn Knights they came down from New York in the early nineteen sixties at a time when I think northern I decided you know I'm in northern Virginia around the government around the Department of Defense let me help out some way my country so he began to serve as a congregational rabbi at four p all to the successful mission to capture or kill Osama bin Laden Jeremy also describes the tragic loss of seven CIA personnel and to International Shinya Arlington and the whole area was experiencing a lot of growth because of course during the forties and after that the federal government really expanded I did all the mom duties as you would expect them to do she sounds like an extraordinary woman she certainly as my folks as I said raised four kids my twin brother and I are the editor in chief of the newspaper the Hoya and also got more involved in sort of editorial writing and I guess finding my own political voice and from Georgetown Face Second Georgetown obviously got a focus on politics in government and international relations which is what I kind of came to be super interested in it the law school this was in the in the late ninety s and really enjoyed law school I didn't know whether I wanted to practice law candidly but I looked up at what you mean by the Westphalian project when I think of the Treaty of West Valley I think of the concept that nations should be secure in their own borders and that governed or the the people who had served in government and when I was at Georgetown who was the time of the first Gulf War and there was a lot of discussion on campus about what should the United States is role be I invaded Kuwait in August of nineteen ninety I it really tested whether or not in the international norm context one Middle East once you we use military force what aggression by one state against another kind of testing the Westphalian project was under discussion could invade another and take it over and I think although our particular meaning the United States is particular interests and defending Kuwait were probably a debatable proposition citizenry of a particular nation should have a country to which they belong you belong to a country not just a tribe or clan or family and when Saddam Hussein I Bill Clinton was at Georgetown graduate so there was a lot of excitement on campus about his presidency and I looked at people like Warren Christopher who was coming in as secretary of state who had had a long career in and out of government in the law and at the Justice Department and I thought boy law school allows you to keep your options open and potentially do some public service along the way after law school in Germany I know that you clerked for judge Leoni Brinkema in the eastern district of Virginia she is a wonderful trial judge still sitting on the bench I had the privilege of appearing in her courtroom many many times that's actually where I met you that's right I went to that office in Alexandria i WanNa see what a federal prosecutor did what was really at stake was whether or not one country could invade another and get away with it I look to people including the incoming people who were serving in the Clinton administration in ninety two and justice what was fair in any particular outcome and she was tough I mean as you know you prosecuted cases in front of her she put the government through its paces and I liked that actually I thought that was one of the things I loved about Judge Branca's chambers was that she had a picture of all her clerks on the wall they were family to her absolutely and in fact every year we have a huge virtue she was tough she was fair I know that sounds cliche but it actually happens to be true it wasn't always easy in her courtroom but I never walked out thinking that an engine miles and got to see a lot of motions before the judges and as I looked around at the various judges in that courtroom I was really taken by the practical approach that you ask you what you intended to do with the rest of Your Life Jeremy What did you tell her I said honestly judge I have no idea and I remember the conversation distinctly because she came and she kind of plopped her and how the criminal justice and also the justice system in general worked in practice so I clerked as a summer clerk in the Eastern District Division you've got to see a lot of judge Brinkema took to the law she really wasn't and isn't an ideological judge she served always looked at the facts I and tried to weigh what was self down in a little chair in my small office in her chambers usually when the clerks talk to the judge we would go into her larger officer chambers and so she came into my office and she said we all went out to the final party which we hoped would be a victory party but you never know is close all of a sudden are flip phones began to buzz and primary against former New Jersey Senator Bill Bradley I decided Hey I wanNA volunteer for the campaign I've got no idea how leave my clerkship and see what I can figure out rations I drove home to dupont circle and they're on the corner I saw an old friend of mine who had worked with before on Capitol Hill I roll down the window Florida was so close you worked on that that's right I was living in Nashville Tennessee as the foreign policy director issues director for the campaign and on election night for Democratic think tank and working on foreign policy issues for Democrats he hired me and I began working with him and that job led me to a job on the Gore campaign as the foreign policy issues director as our listeners know the two thousand election ended in a remarkable thirty six day contested recount because the vote tally in the state the government in a criminal case and the defendant to draw nigh and come close to the bench and make their case heard give their attention and they shall be heard that's right yeah sickly I think you're capable you're nice fellow all of my other clerks have jobs lined up we know what's with you and I told the judge was look I reunion picnic and so many of the people who were involved with judge bring him his family including Oliver Clerks are still part of that family on the last day of your clerkship she came to they want to work on a presidential campaign and I wanna work in foreign policy and national security this was chuck in the fall of nineteen ninety nine so it was about in nineteen ninety eight was to do the Oh yeah oh yeah a and gavel in the session of court and that's not the case in every courtroom around America but the in probably Steve I thought you live in Seattle what are you doing here in DC and he said well I'm staying over in Georgetown you WanNa give me a ride I'll tell you what I'm up to and he was working basically well I literally left the chambers of the judge on my final day of my clerkship without a job in hand with no real connections to the core presidential campaign other than your aspirin our elections are we are a rule of law country in the end absolutely these things get decided under a set of rules under our system and whether aware the litigation strategy was being formulated I was drafted to be I guess a young associate on the law firm led by some real legally didn't you go to law school and I said I did but I've never practiced law I mean I was a clerk for a federal judge but that's about it and they say well we need lawyers good enough exactly good enough we're all told to go back to the headquarters late that night and we were told that there would be a recount in Florida that would probably last about three days and they said Hey Bash Jeremy Well I learned that had a lot more to learn about the law about our legal system and I also obviously learned how critical and important put us all in a charter flight for Florida Nicole Wallace who was a guest on this podcast tells a charming story she was working for the Republican candidate same thing Austin had been done she always kept open mind she did run a tight ship and one of the jobs of the law clerks when I've eventually came to begin my clerkship looking in of some important foreign policy decisions but of course no more important decisions could possibly fold until after the attacks of nine eleven in his strip mall in Florida eventually after a couple of days in Palm Beach County where they were hand counting the ballots and doing a manual recount. I went to Tallahassee the capital of Florida you're happy or unhappy with the outcome it's the outcome and you move on when I went back to Washington after December thirteenth two thousand which was the date that the supreme four months before the Iowa caucuses so this would be the presidential election of two thousand two thousand I wanted to work for Al Gore was vice president of the United States he was in a contested she thought she was going to Florida for a couple of days on his behalf forgot to bring her phone charger as I recall and ended up down there for more than a month s right so I bought a suit so go home and pack for three days you're going to Florida I went back to my apartment in Nashville by the way with the last time I ever saw that apartment I pat for three days and I went back to the headquarters even potentially some participation in Watergate you're referring to the Church Church Committee and the Pike Committee in the House Really Reviewed and reshaped court room in some ways like the prosecutors were sort of on the front lines dealing with the aftermath of nine eleven including novel legal issues absolutely one of the things that happened after nine eleven was the subject of intelligence was really thrust onto the front pages in a way that we really hadn't seen since the nineteen seventies including importantly creating a new position a director of National Intelligence Pellet oversee sixteen other intelligence agencies by late two thousand all the time and it's also a place where my father is conducted services and just knew so many people there that I felt it just so acutely and personally I guess that this repeat your son I probably can and I I always actually saw it as a huge honor to be asked to open a session of court and Beseech the litigants the intelligence community landscape for the most part since the seventies the community and its approach to intelligence had been largely the same well nine eleven changed all that time to get serious about whether or not I was going to practice law so I went to the law firm of o'melveny-meyers I worked there as an associate but you didn't really scratch that foreign policy which did you I didn't and again starting a job in DC in early two thousand and one at the beginning of the Bush administration I felt like I was really kind of on the outside into the war was also being discussed and debated hotly because it was impart premised on intelligence assessments about Saddam Hussein's nuclear weapons program board issued its final ruling and Al Gore ultimately conceded. I sort of thought to myself wash I do next I clerked worked on presidential campaign I figured it was probably coming out of other national security agencies and it had to do with potential impermissible wiretapping eavesdropping on American citizens and Manera including Warren Christopher who had been secretary of state you fought hard for thirty six days in Florida the Supreme Court ruled against your candidate what did you take away from that and I was like most people living in Washington with attacks happening so close to us at the Pentagon course as I said I grew up in Arlington and drove by that Pentagon building in the Nineteen Seventies Chuck as I think folks will know there were a series of abuses that were uncovered by Congress coming out of the FBI coming out of the C. I. A. US courtroom was charged in the Eastern District of Virginia in December of two thousand one the case was assigned to judge Brinkema the judge had clerked for Judge Brinkema and the other judges in that in trying to help the government defend itself and defend the country against the threat of terrorism. Can you describe for a moment how the House Permanent Look Committee on intelligence I began to be very energized about conducting oversight over the intelligence agencies and the way the Bush administration was utilizing intelligence and the House intelligence agencies they have enormous power they also have the ability to do things in secret so it's out of the public eye so we have to have somebody from Congress somebody from another did investigations over our intelligence agencies and the theory of that oversight was look somebody has to watch what's happening with her Kevin Commission a with stood up it was a blue ribbon commission of prominent Americans Bipartisan Commission and it laid out changes for the way the intelligence community should be reorganized Democrat on that committee was Jane Harman California Congresswoman who was very focused on national security homeland security and they've really been taking a leading role after nine eleven branch of government washing what the executive branch is doing and so that was kind of the essential bargain when these committees were created in the nineteen seventies which is we will tell the secrets was it security clearances so they can access the information we will brief them on all the major activities and programs but intern the agencies can't do very much watch unless Congress approves it and so it was kind of his bargain that basically Congress would be the is in the ears of the American people on secret intelligence activities and by the way that was for two reasons number one is because national security has tended to be and I think should be not a partisan issue and second of all chuck because a lot of their work the moment in our nation's history really call people to try to serve and do something good for the country and by the way when Zachariah sally the only person ever prosecuted in and and the Senate Select Committee on intelligence work what they're created to do and how they actually operate in the nineteen seventies congress conduct was behind closed doors so they actually had a big hearing room both on the House side in the Senate side a hearing room that was actually a room where you can handle classified Info and select committee on intelligence which is the congressional committee in the House that oversees the intelligence community was looking for a new chief counsel I apply for the job and I got the job the topic was somehow incorrect so after the allegations of the Bush warrantless surveillance program came to light Congress took a look at the underlying legal authorities and tried to reform the foreign intelligence and three in early two thousand and four as these changes were being discussed and as we were already several months into the Iraq war in which how we and that was also a time when everyone was trying to figure out whether or not the original intelligence case for the Iraq war with sound or whether or not that intelligence analysis warrantless eavesdropping on Americans as part of a counterterrorism program as it also is revealed in the papers at some point there were allegations that the CIA had engaged in abusive interrogation tactics including waterboarding against individuals meaning al Qaeda terrorists who've been captured and held in secrecy I facilities that there were so many changes there were changes to organization there were changes to budget there were changes to authorities one of the main things that happened after nine eleven was of course the nine nation and when it's behind closed doors it sometimes means it's a little more serious there's less grand standings right there no cameras in the room so there's no unknown pontificating for the cameras when you said it more directly there are no cameras in the room the House Intelligence Committee at the time in the mid two thousand was looking at a number of issues pertaining to Intel also preserving the core fourth amendment rights of American citizens to be protected from unlawful or warrantless surveillance at the end of prison Bush's eight years in office as Obama a transition team is taking shape you've got to meet a fellow named Leon Panetta who's Leon Panetta Leon Panetta was a son of Italian immigrants whose those committees one in the House and one of the Senate had always functioned in a much more bipartisan way than perhaps other committees in either chamber did that's right and I think the agents in as the New Democratic Council for the Committee I was asked to head up a number of investigations and inquiries I was a consternation by the Bush administration I the intelligence committees both the house in the Senate were analyzing allegations made in the news media that Bush administration had conducted eavesdropping analyzed that intelligence based on potential threats from outside the United States so foreigners not in the United States who are communicating using email and new technologies while surveillance act which governs the way the government can conduct surveillance which by the way ideally is how it should work unfortunately it was wrapped up in the vortex politics like all things when ground and congress passed legislation that is still in effect to this day which I think structure I balance of giving the government the ability to collect information collect intelligence and this came through Ellis island may their way to California opened an Italian restaurant near an army base called Fort Ord servicing a lot of the soldiers and service members we discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter so help me God so help me God so God welcome to the oath Apple Hill tend to be but once we kind of cut through the rhetoric of who is soft on terrorism who's on terrorism and who was more protective of privacy and who is less protective of privacy when you kind of got down to it there was a of what CIA is doing what NSA is doing with the FBI is doing to a few members of Congress some in house some in the Senate and their staffs and we will give them the Gratien and he came into work in that administration on civil rights during his tenure he came into some disagreement with the way the Nixon administration was pursuing the southern strategy which who were heading off to war in the nineteen forties that young man Leon grew up to really have a calling to public service and he came to Washington initially to work in the Knicks diminished gotten your name at that moment is one of the nicest people I've ever met he was raised right he was the son of Italian immigrants and there was an ethos of love of country and devotion to public service in gratefulness and gratitude that kind of permeates the way he was raised and it just emanates from him and so because he's got this kind of mode of being ocean's about what the CIA should or shouldn't do again chuck this was following many years of I would say boiling controversy about intelligence and in part also about the way that might WanNa consider meeting over the next couple of days to include the FBI Director Bob Muller to include the outgoing national security advisor to include the head of the National Security Agency and I'm going to show you to your office follow me we'll walk down the hall this is your office this is how telephone works by the way here's a schedule of individuals near Carmel Valley and Monterey when Brooke Obama was elected president he called Leon Panetta and said would you consider serving as CIA director and I think it's fair to say Mister Panetta's center of all the big budget negotiations between President Bush forty one and the congress and his expertise on the budget committee led President Clinton to appoint him as the director the director of the office of Management and budget and then ultimately he asked Leon Panetta to be his White House chief of staff Leon Panetta served as Bill Clinton's White House chief of staff until pitches just be a good staffer just help the person do their job is great opportunity if you're just kind of willing to just devote yourself to the job of helping someone do their job and the CIA director and he took the piece of paper from me and he looked at me said this is all grey stuff now what the hell did you say your name was again I learned this on Capitol Hill remove physically went down the hallway and this is exactly what happened shot elevator doors open and he walked out and I said Hello Mister Panetta my name is Jeremy Bash is a little bit surprised by that this is about the time that you met him that's right so this was in very late two thousand eight early two thousand nine president elect Obama said you know I really want someone early into Clinton's second term and then Mister Panetta went back to California where I think he thought he would just kind of enjoy a quiet life out there in the in the beautiful central coast of California to get your ego absolutely and it doesn't matter what your name is just you give them the information you help them set up a schedule and you help them get the job done but let's make one thing clear about Leon Panetta he may have CIA had conducted the global war on terrorism Leon Panetta came to Washington in early January two thousand nine there was a cold day in DC I was serving as a staff Matt your name kid to being his chief of staff when he became the director of the CIA that's right and couple weeks after we started working together and we went around to various Senate offices because of office of civil rights but that wasn't the end of Pinault wasn't and he went back in the early nineteen seventies to California and he began to practice law and then ran for Congress and was elected grateful he doesn't take himself too seriously he has a great sense of humor and he knows to treat everybody respectfully he just treat people right and so you went from what the hell was to Congress in one thousand nine hundred seventy six after Watergate ultimately rose to become chairman of the House Budget Committee where he oversaw the budget of the entire federal government and was really in the set you're going to be nominated on Friday and here's a draft of remarks and by the way here's the telephone number of every former CIA director you should call and ask them for advice including President Bush forty one who had one who understands Washington to take a fresh look at the CIA he said to Mister Panetta I think you can do that. You don't come in to this position of this job with any preconceived number on the transition team and I heard in the hallway that Leon Panetta was gonna be the CIA director site position myself near the elevator when he came up to the sixth floor there's a hearing and then vote that whether or not you can be confirmed and he said to me said would you be interested in coming over as chief of staff at the agency now having served as chief counsel course to be director you have to be confirmed by the United States Senate and so he as other people do go round and you kind of make calls on the senators and you sit with them in their office and then ultimate his most of which are located with our US embassies around the world so I've kind of seen a lot of activities and operations I received many briefings from the House Intelligence Committee I was very familiar with CIA activities I had traveled around the world to about forty overseas ca stations and base CIA officers. But honestly I really didn't know how the agency worked from the inside so I said to him I said to Mr Panetta I'll come over as chief of staff kind of onto conditions you are showing up at a place where people have worked for a long time they know it well they're deeply devoted to the mission listen listen to them here what they have to say don't come in number one is I want to be more staff than chief 'cause I'm not chief of anything at the A. and second is I think when you come in as director leading an agency let's not a lot of people know it certainly not how you know Jeremy the CIA grew out of an organization called the S. and the was a paramedic with a preset agenda right absolutely and especially because frankly President Obama was the source of concern at the agency because he had campaigned on ally on the professionals who were there let's not rolling with a thick posse that's the way I put it to us not rolling thick let's go over you as director Allgeier chief-of-staff event during World War Two collect vital information and bring it back to American decision makers and the C. I. A. which was established in nineteen forty seven acted or surveillance electronic surveillance sometimes called eavesdropping that say an essay may do overseas bring all that intelligence together by foreign intelligence what I mean is intelligence primarily outside the United States that affects the foreign relations or international interests of the United States is to conduct analysis to bring an all sources of intelligence whether it's intelligence that the CIA collected or satellite imagery that another agency should we have to bring a couple of other people their general counsel couple of other senior people but let's rely on the professional side they know what they're doing you know I think that's the best advice you could give the someone the organization during World War Two that the United States setup under wild bill Donovan who had been selected to lead an organization that could basically go into enemy territory ending enhanced interrogation techniques and that was seen as sort of a shot at the CIA officers who've been asked to carry out some of those counterterrorism programs and there was just a lot of associated with it because we fear or concerned that if America was seen as the author of it there could be blowback and these are basically the most secret sensitive intelligence mission let's not do what the previous administration had done describe for our listeners a little bit about the CIA how it's structured what it does I mean everyone's heard of it but it's very possible that enwright reports it's called finished intelligence in the parlance of the intelligence community to write finished intelligence reports about topics that are of interest to decision defined under the law as actions that the United States government wants to take to affect the political military or economic condition our agents of influence advanced certain ideas or maybe denigrate certain individuals or in some cases actually conduct sabotage is ten paragraph short one or two page documents that explain either something happening immediately for example a foreign leader is making a decision and the St military action and our soldiers where American flag patch on their arm and our diplomats driving cars with little American flags on the front but there are times and physically destroy a rail line or a warehouse or a facility at belong to an adversary where we didn't want the US fingerprints on it and so Erica any information or intelligence that bears on how we make our national security decisions is CIS tasked with collecting that number one collect foreign intelligence number two was designed to do three things and it does those three things to this day and really well and I think they do it the best number one is to collect foreign intelligence and document explains that decision or might be something a little bit more long range like for example what the military of say China might look like in ten years so number two in my view of covert action was a couple of guys in black masks kicking down a door or doing some special ops activity and it's really not like that at all I mean of course that kind of activity breath under our law and under our system covert action is treated very carefully what do I mean by that first of all under the law today before the actions so that the operators in the field know what they are expected to do and members of Congress understand what will be done that's right and I think before I worked on the House Intelligence Committee in some cases conduct lethal action against terrorists or others who were planning to kill Americans and so it's not just like a one off covert action operation does Hollywood depicts these rogue operations but actually they're done pursuant to law and guidelines and policy with written and stuff include conducting a quasi military or paramilitary activities on the ground to for example train local forces in another country or John's overseas where the hand of the US government is hidden. I WanNa unpack that a little bit because there's a lot in that clues so when the United States acts over a set of activities the activities can include working with individuals on the ground it can include advancing certain messages as I reference it could states can engage in covert action it has to do a couple of things the president of the United States has to personally sign a document called a finding I'm so glad you mentioned that Germany example during the Cold War there was a lot of things that we wanted to do to push back on the Soviet Union in a particular country in Eastern Europe A. B. Spread some information or have talk about and so this is our podcast it's called why is this happening and the whole idea behind it is to get to the root of the things that we see Lee out every day they're driven by the is in our history and if you think about what could possibly be as kind of hard to talk about them because they are all by their nature classified secrets however for sees whether it's our diplomats or our military we do so under the flag of the red white and blue we say this is the United States of America we have an interest in moving a policy in a certain direction or the United States code the military operates under title ten of the United States code a lot of times those two things those two entities tonight it's usually over months or years a set of activities at the United States is engaged in at your podcast but you alluded to this but it's a really important point the intelligence community in the United States operates under title fifty the ideas each week I sit down with a person uniquely suited to explain why this is happening new episodes of why is this happening every Tuesday listen for free wherever you Aliza report that's right and the third thing that the CIA does and this is the thing that I think is least understood is call covert action and covert action is are occasions where it will advance the foreign policy of the interest of the United States to do things overseas and kind of change the conditions on the ground but we don't want America's hey it's Chris as from MSNBC every day I come to the office and we make a television show and every day I think to myself there's so much more I want makers and the most important finished intelligence proc that the CIA writes and edits every day is the president's daily brief and these are articles like you might think of them as although the CIA has not lost nearly as many professionals as say the United States military has for a relatively small organization like the CIA which is close knit and for which there are no parades and there are no full honors military burials if someone falls to specific direct authorisation by the president which usually means that it's been reviewed thoroughly by the National Security Council which includes all the key agency military intelligence are conflated that's right and the separate legal authorities that you referenced are very important because when the CIA ax it has to act pursuant all is a book in a glass case and in that book is inscribed and careful calligraphy the name of every C. I. Officer whose name can be as the Department of State the Department of Defense and others and also chuck it means that Congress is overseeing it so whenever you hear things about rogue intelligence activity right is the memorial wall it's a wall of marble into which are carved a star representing every see I officer who has fallen in the line of duty it does happen by our government but that's mostly a military activity what the CIA really does in the realm of covert action is develop a program meaning Ghanistan the CIA lost seven personnel many others were injured in that attack foreign nationals who worked with the CIA were also killed and wounded battle because of course the service of so many of these individuals was anonymous and must remain anonymous this is a wall essentially of honor tragically falls in the line of duty their parents and their loved ones can't even really publicly mourn and so when you have to keep secret their relationship revealed because they're secret operations have either been declassified or because they are no longer sensitive you're referring to the book of honor but was fascinating about the book of Honor When you look early reviewed both by the second branch and by the legislative branch when you walk into the original headquarters building of the CIA into the main lobby immediately on your during anonymous service to our country and specifically there is a star on the wall for every person who has fallen in the line of duty and in front of that Marble Wall can identify them we just won't it really goes to the nature of their service and to the mission of the CIA and of course when one of them you talk about that attack the origin of that event really dates back to the hunt for the senior leadership of Al Qaeda and the hunt for bin Laden himself director Panetta besides some of the stars are names but besides some of the stars it's plank because even to this day chuck even many years after they've died and sacrificed everything law during Mister Panetta's services director on December thirtieth two thousand nine there was a devastating attack at Forward Operating Base Chapman in Khost staff a nine was that there was a potential lead to find bin Laden's number two I'm an al-Zawahiri and Zoya here he was actually one of the founders of Al Qaeda and the League came from our friends in the country of Jordan where they had arrested a jihadi an individual named Balawi and Balawi was a got it is there are a lot of blank spaces and there are a lot of places where there's no name they're all you would see as a year for example two thousand nine and you would see several stars services for the fallen we have tomb dedicated to people who we are unable to identify from previous wars at the CIA we shipped to the CIA it's a huge burden on family and I think one of the ways that we tried to see lighten the burden but I would say respect that burden is by honoring them at the memorial he's or CIA officers doing things just always know and always remember that what they've done has been heavily scrutinized heavily lawyer D- Heaven he was in Egypt who really promulgated the original doctrine of Al Qaeda and the underpinnings of the theology of the organization finding him was a key priority for our country we can't tell the public that they were associated with a at the two of the unknown soldier in Arlington National Cemetery where your father presided over no one else had ever offered to be effectively a double agent working not just for the bad guys al Qaeda also turning and working for the United States and they were actually standing outside of the meeting room when the car in which allow it was being driven came on as we figured if we could find him maybe we could find bin Laden and the trail on bin Laden had really gone cold and the fall of two thousand and nine the CIA got an enticing enthralling lead killed him and not only killed that driver who was working on behalf of the agency but it also killed seventy I officers and wounded several others again just who had been sympathizing with al Qaeda but he also had an interesting background he had some medical training and when he was arrested by the Jordanian intelligence viruses he after some time said you know I can get you guys to I'm an al-Zawahiri I can lead you to bin Laden's number two and his state irrational in Afghanistan we were going to send about a dozen of our best officers out to this remote base on that base we would have a CIA contact the local contact who on the operating table You'd better call the director this is between Christmas and New Year's and director Panetta was home with his family celebrating the holidays I called Mister Panetta at home I like in office at the CIA called me and she said that operation in Afghanistan has gone horribly wrong there was a bomb we've got several people who have been killed we've got several others began at the CIA he really asked our analysts to take another hard look at whether there were any significant leads and one of the important lease chuck that realized in the fall of two thousand and all these things were absolutely critical before we could actually entrust him with a sensitive operation so we sent a dozen of our best officers to that base in eastern Afghanistan it would hold a meeting with him and during that meeting they would talk to him and assess whether or not he was for real and they would as they say an intelligence parlins validate him the how was Zawahiri was a medical doctor and this individual Balawi had had some medical training if he had a way to find him well this was very enticing lead quite asked him to go secure on his classified phone I told them what had transpired and over the course of the next twelve hours as we began to realize what had happened was to end the desegregation of schools in the south and Leon Panetta disagreed with that Nixon strategy and so he was ultimately fired from his job as hitting the which many CIA officers along with other US officials gave their lives and of course Mister Panetta had to call President Obama Vice President Biden dyed his jacket and he detonated a massive suicide bomb and the shrapnel from the bomb was so powerful that it normally what assesses boniface they will figure out if he could potentially carry equipment if if he could report back how would he report back how would he communicate Maria true exactly and so we took a look at how we could figure out if this guy was telling the truth we devised operation we were going to go to a base chuck I remember distinctly the morning of December thirtieth two thousand nine a woman named Amy who was the senior executive assistant in the directors bend it became clear that this was going to be the single worst day for the CIA since the Beirut embassy bombings in the early nineteen eighties read a very critical to go after this important lead to get them lodden stars for those seven CA officers and employees were added to the memorial wall the base they told the security at the edge of the base you know don't search this guy because he's kind of a sensitive source or potential source and we got this and they drove him onto the base the chairman of the Joint Chiefs and explain to them that not only have you lost seven CIA officers but that we also totally missed well he got out of the vehicle he was riding in and he stood up and he was standing about fifty feet from as I said a dozen officers and he put his hand the driver pickup this individual alley on the Pakistan side of the border drive them across the border and drive him into the base once he was on the base officer in small towns across the country for people who had served the country and died too young I went to the services that were held at Arlington National Cemetery missed at the headquarters building there were funerals held all over the country and Mister Panetta attended those funerals he was very moved by the outpouring of love and support conversations with some of my favorite reporters about things we usually discuss off camera listen for free wherever you get your podcast thousand ten he said Director we've gone down to the end of that dead end street and at the end of the street there's a fortress and ponente looked up from his briefing papers and he said could be done to protect our country from terrorism we owe them our deepest gratitude could you tell us surnames their names were Darren Herald Jennifer of a flag draped transfer case or casket holding the remains of a fallen US servicemember after that ceremony at Dover on a very frigid Liz Scott Dane Jeremy After that tragic attack and after Mister Panetta had to go so Bob Mueller do that too well we did this for a couple of months through two thousand and ten and then in August of two thousand ten the view it's got one way reflective mirror tape on all the windows you can't see in there's no phone service there's no Internet service we tried to look through their trash to see if we can raise their hand because I think they thought that he wanted to see everybody owning the problem and he said we're going to go after bin Laden if it's the last thing we do four two brothers two brothers who historically during the days of nine eleven and the aftermath thereof had worked with bin Laden as his bodyguards as he had what he needed so these two brothers had not been heard of or seen since the weeks after nine eleven they found these guys in Pakistan and they gatekeepers described by counterterrorism professionals as his quote facilitators but basically it meant they kinda ran traps forum and drove him around and

United States director Florida Mister Panetta Georgetown University Arlington Central Intelligence Agency Virginia chief of staff CIA Washington Jeremy Bash Leon Panetta National Intelligence Pellet Al Gore House Intelligence Committee Mr Panetta Judge Brinkema