20 Episode results for "Carly Fiorina"

Carly Fiorina

Radio Atlantic

30:04 min | 10 months ago

Carly Fiorina

"Welcome to the ticket I must've air. President trump is flailing his poll. Numbers are way down. All the empty seats at his Tulsa Rally left him to trudge back to the white. House people made fun of him and Republicans have begun to signal a kind of worry about him. That has been in the past four years. All the same few have taken big public stances against him on today show though we have someone publicly oppose the president and is now ready to go the full step further. Carly Fiorina is a conservative Republican. Who ran for the two thousand sixteen nomination. You may remember her duke it out with trump. Facing down a sexist attack from him and being announced as Ted, Cruz is running mate in a last ditch attempt to stop the reality Star from winning the Republican nomination. Even before politics, fury, and ahead quite a background. She rose from working as the secretary to being the first woman to run a fortune fifty company as the CEO of Hewlett Packard. Now, she runs unlocking potential a group that works to encourage diversity among corporate leadership. She join me to discuss president trump the Republican party, and how her thinking has evolved recently. Take a listen. Is. Zach Hi Carly. How are you, are you? However any of us are at this point. Well. Although I have to say we have to find our moments of joy where we can and here it's a beautiful day, so yeah, you're. in Virginia right? Yes, our offices or in Alexandria and my home is in Mason neck. You know down the Potomac. River a little ways pass Fort Belvoir so if I have to shelter place. It's a lovely place to do. As we've all been trying to figure it out I. Guess that gives you a better way than some other situations could be. Your life has been one that's been out dealing with people all the time and must be weird to be socially distanced. It's intercepted point. It was of course from the point of view of the organization, concerning because everything just stopped and so. While on the one hand, it was personally kind of refreshing to be home every day and cooked in some my husband every night. You know. Be here on the beautiful Potomac River, organizationally, it was a bit concerning how. Focused and what we do. How do we work with our clients? I think we've found a rhythm as a family I think we've found a rhythm is an organization, and they've given us some opportunity to rethink things as well. Let's talk about some of that rethinking against Me Start with. Tom Nichols. WHO's a professor and a writer? He's a Republican, but he is. Someone, who has very clearly distanced himself trump. He tweeted a few weeks ago. I'm not sure whom I people are. You ran as a tea party. Candidate yourself for Senate in two thousand ten. Ran For President Twenty Sixteen. You were briefly candidate for vice, president. As you've reflected over this time and over the years with what's been going on in the Republican Party. Do you know who your people are? Never really thought about it that way. Honestly because I don't think our first loyalty belongs to our Party. and. I wouldn't describe myself as a tea party candidate wanting to start with that if you. Look back at the things I've said over many years I've been very consistent. People closest to the problem. Know best how to solve. Our concentrated is power abused small businesses, the engine of innovation growth in this country, not big concentrated businesses that. Big Concentrated Government to get what they want. I've been very consistent in those things and also been consistent in saying that while I. Am A registered Republican. I don't believe I. O Loyalty to Party. I believe Iowa realty as a citizen to my community to the constitution two other Americans. And I think we have witnessed particularly in the era of trump, but prior to that as well. What George Washington warned us about. which is the trouble with political parties is people will come to care only about winning. And they'll forget about values and governing. So I'm unconcerned about whether I'm a loyal Republican or not among unconcerned about where quote, my people are in a party structure. I feel like we should just get this out of the way. Have you made up your mind about who you're going to vote for November. Well I've been very clear that I can't support now. And you know elections are binary choices. I will say this I think. I HOPE That, Biden understands at this moment in history calls for him to be a leader, not a politician. But so you are voting for Joe Biden. Well! It's not till November is. I'm not putting for trump. But if it's a binary choice, it's a her choice so. You know if faced with a binary choice on a ballot. But I'm I'm making I. Think just as important appoint. Which is, he will get a lot of pressure as all politicians do to be a politician. And yet I mean quite. The Nation is looking for is a leader. What's the difference while? Politics is about Wim lose. I'm right, you're wrong. It is unfortunately often about an argument between extremes. Leadership on the other hand is about problem solving and making progress and changing the order of things for the better which means it's about the Libyan embassy in collaboration and. I think this moment calls upon Joe Biden qb leader. I am encouraged that Joe Biden is a person of humility in infancy in character I think he's demonstrated that through his life. I want to juxtapose that to is something that John Bolton has been saying. He's been promoting his book in the last couple days. He has described president. Trump is. Immortal existential threat to America says he hopes that trump loses that he doesn't have any real lasting impact on America. He's also said he is not going to vote for Joe Biden. He's going to write in a conservative Republican. And so what do you make of that? Because what? I what I'm confused by his? If you know you're not voting for trump, and it's a binary choice, then you are voting for by them, who which puts you in a different spot from where Baltin is right? I don't really know what to make of that. You know I think. I can't read Bolton's wind. But I think John Bolton is desperately trying to. Preserve some position in the Republican. Party is a conservative Republican. And maybe that's what causes him to say that. I don't know I can't read his mind. But that thinking. Is Not just his and it seems to me. It seems a Lotta people that have. Especially given what we saw in two thousand, sixteen, when president trump won forty six percent of the vote, but because of both the Electoral College, and before that because there were two third party candidates that people voted for in addition to a number of right ends that that was enough to win that. If you don't want Donald Trump to be president, then you. Must be voting for Joe Biden. Just by you can blame our two party system, but that does seem to be the situation here. I agree with that. But elections are. At least right now it's a binary choice. Look I voted for Donald Trump. I was happy to vote for Donald Trump. I did it with great trepidation. It's why I campaign for Ted. Cruz, because I thought he was the only Republican who had a chance of eating. Donald Trump and I thought donald trump was going to be devastating over time for our party, but I also thought. That Hillary. Clinton was a politician who had been around way too long, and WHO's policy positions? I didn't agree with. And I think. What I have seen. Since my vote. Is a person who? Lacks character. And does not have a set of principles. And I think character in Values and principles. Are actually even more important than posse. Because policy. Gets worked through the political system. But character and values and principles are the guard rails on the most important decisions that are made. And the most important decisions that are made are those that we don't see. And people talk about the judges or tax reform. Those sorts of things yes look I. Applaud. His Supreme Court justice pick send the justices that he's appointed to the lower courts and I'm pro-life, and I didn't agree completely with his tax reform package I didn't agree with the bail out of big companies I mean. I don't always agree with the positions the Republican Party has taken, but yes, there are plenty of policy differences that I have with Joe. Biden and there are plenty of policy differences that I have with the more progressive wing of the Democrat. Party and yet. I think when Biden talks about the soul of the nation. I think what he's talking about. Is, values, and principles and character. Principles like Coequal. BRANCHES OF GOVERNMENT Principles like. Problem Solving should be a collaborative process a-, Bi partisan process, humility and empathy really make a difference in leadership, and I think Biden has demonstrated both humility and empathy. Do you have a relationship Joe Biden and all dino him I've met him over the years, but no I would not describe myself as having a relationship with them. Have you spoken to him recently? I guess he'll get a surprise from hearing that he's got your vote. You brought up the issue of abortion. Which I think is. One that obviously for many people's. Very visceral and Goes, beyond politics. As you said you are pro-life, you're oppose abortion. Donald, trump has. He was just speaking the other day about how he participate in the march on Washington against abortion that he has appointed judges who would restrict abortions. That is an issue of life. As far as you're concerned, right, those are not fetuses, those our lives. How does one reconcile that and thinking that if Joe Biden is the president he at least in terms of the policy that he is backing would be for expanding abortion. Rights would appoint judges who would also be. In favor of Protecting v Wade but much more than that, too. I think it's a great question because I have many many pro-life colleagues and friends who believe that this issue is. More important than any other issue. Andy is one of the reasons that they as people, values and character are willing to overlook everything else about Donald. Trump and I don't. Judge them for that. It is however also. A great example of why I say I hope that Joe Biden will. Be a leader, not a politician. So one of the things that I have said to the Republican Party on the issue of life is let us not start at the extremes. Problem solving is different than politics. There are real opportunities to limit abortion in real ways. And Somehow. Republicans and Democrats have never come together on something that the vast majority of people agree on the vast majority of Americans agree that abortion for any reason at all after five months is wrong. And yet, we haven't made progress on that. Despite having pieces of legislation in front of us, that's because playing politics on the extreme. You're either pro choice in any abortion. Anytime is okay or you're pro-life, and there is no middle ground, and we have to pass amendments on Person Hood. We're not making progress. And so. Let's focus on making progress where people agree and actually solving a problem. Let's start there I would also say this. That if we care so deeply about unborn life, and I do because I think every life has enormous potential in his gifted by God and I think abortion is used discriminated against poor people people of color. But, if we care about life, it's unborn. We need to care about life. That's in this world. Who and that means we actually have to make progress on criminal justice reform and police reform, and we have to stand up recognized systemic racism and structural racism make real progress on that, because true many lives that are here are being wasted and ignored and dismissed and overlooked and sadly. Murdered in broad daylight. Let's take a quick break. We'll be back with more carly Fiorina talking about where this all heads to in a moment. This is Jeffrey Goldberg I'm the Editor in Chief of the Atlantic? This show and all of our journalism here at the Atlantic depends on the support of our subscribers. Please join us by getting a printer digital subscription. You'll get unlimited access to the Atlantic Dot Com are subscriber only newsletter our podcast and documentaries and a brand new IOS APP among many other benefits. To learn more into sign up, just go to the Atlantic. Dot Com slash radio subscribe. That's the Atlantic Dot. com slash radio subscribe. I feel like even though it's been ten years since he ran for Senate, there was an ad that you had that stays in people's minds forever, which was known as the demon sheep. Add It's worth watching for anybody who? Not Remember it, but part of what it was was criticizing your Republican opponent for being a fiscal conservative in name only FCC. That in name only was a play on Rhino Republican in name only. I'm guessing that a lot of trump supporters might listen to what you said about him. And what you said about voting for Biden and say you're right now. What would you say to them I'm not concerned by. We are not asked as American citizens to pledge allegiance to a party. We are not asked to pledge loyalty to any public official including the president. I have not asked as a citizen, nor are any of us to play on a team. Other than the team of our nation or community, and so I can call me whatever they like. But I think it misses the point and I think this is why people are so tired of politics, politics has become a game of winning and losing. And whose team are you on and what? Where you on, you know it's like worldwide wrestling. It's like. You doesn't matter what my team does. I'm from my chain, no matter what. That is not advancing American interests so. I've been called worse I guess. We're in a period where there's a lot of interest in rethinking the economy because of what has been exposed by the pandemic. In your mind in the way that you see fiscal conservativism, what's the fiscally conservative way to rethink the economy? I think it starts with this fundamental principle. Power concentrated is power abuse. What's happened over decades and decades is big. Companies have used the power a big government to make their businesses bigger and more powerful profitable. That's just a fact. It's true in many many industries Washington the way it's structured, favors the big, the powerful, the wealthy the connected. And so that means in my view that wherever possible we block grant money to states instead of keeping it in Washington DC. I think we should have done that in the cares act at a sweet deal with the coronavirus, it means that we have to have reasonable regulation that hold big companies accountable, and that's true whether it's finance or energy or frankly technology. And it also means I think that we have to take extraordinary care. To help small businesses survive. And to make sure that hourly workers have the opportunity to earn a living. I think all those things are required now. There are a lot of people who would listen all that and say boy. You don't sound like a Republican. Fine and maybe I don't sound like a Democrat, either but I think those are the things that would actually work. Look I agree with Elizabeth Warren for example that the financial industry has concentrated too much power. I agree with Bernie Sanders that. Our healthcare system does not work for everyone where I disagree with them profoundly is their answer is a big government program. If we continue to create vast government bureaucracies to control everything, the bigger GONNA get bigger and the wealthier gonNA. Get Welfare because they know how to play the system in meanwhile, the small get crushed. And the disadvantaged are no better off. This pandemic has exposed. How inequitable our economy is when Ted. Cruz picked you as his running mate that was. A strange Mona politics is because the primaries weren't done and running mate was picked and. Lead in the primary campaign wonder. When's the last time you talked to? Senator Cruz? Couple of years ago, I can't remember exactly, but it's been a couple years. Can you make sense of what's become of him these days because he like a lot of. Others who were opposed to the direction that president trump seemed to be taken. The party seems to now have signed on pretty much entirely to that direction. That's all about politics. Look I. don't excuse it. It disappoints me. I've been public in my disappointment about. How few politicians have been willing to stand up, but I understand it. Just wonder what it means about where the Republican. Party might go after president. Trump, there's some people who think that it will be Donald. Trump's Republican party and he'll be part of politics. Even if he's not president for a long time, even maybe for long after he's alive that he's lit up a sort of nationalist populist. Aggressive personal! Approach to politics. And then there are some who feel like. Should he lose? There'll be this kind of waking from a dream moment where people say like Donald Trump is sort of the way the president trump talks about people who've turned on him like I. Don't really know that, guy. and. When you see. The politicians who have attached themselves to president trump over the course of this time and Senator Cruz one who obviously has made a very. Abrupt and clear turn and his approach. What that means of what the future holds. What, do you think it would hold? You know Isaac Honestly I. Don't Know Yeah I. Just don't know. What I do know. Whatever party people attached themselves to? I do think that as we look out in our country and we see where we are. What all the polling data says is that the majority of Americans now think we are headed in the wrong direction. And so I, guess my plea. To Americans is. Let us not have the poison of politics. In fact everything we do. We have to find a way. This is what we teach through my business and my. Foundation this is what I learned over decades of problem, solving and leadership. We have to at some point say. The. Most important thing here is not whose team on the most important thing here is that we as Americans have to start solving some of these problems and holding our. Political representatives accountable not for party loyal. But for problem solving and character. One, thing that we do now is that Joe, Biden's running mate is going to be a woman. He's made that very clear. The only people who are being vetted are women. You had that experience of running as a woman for president and then briefly for vice president. What do you think we still don't get about how politics? Is Different for women running different for women running at the national level. Well? You know I. I would like an honestly to the experience I had when I became the first woman. To, lead a fortune fifty company. It's different when you're different. It's different when you're first. And what I mean by that is an I say that with no bitterness, no resentment. At all? It's just a fact when you're different or I. The scrutiny is different. The criticism is different. The expectations are different much higher much lower. There isn't the benefit of the doubt granted. There isn't the presumption of competence granted. The margin for errors are smaller. There must have been moments when you were in. When you were leaving the company when you felt like if I were a man, this wouldn't be an issue in the same way. Of course there were. Is there one that sticks out? I remember as a presidential candidate being on national TV. For an interview. And The interviewer said to made A. we have a viewer. In taxes who asks don't and women's hormones prevent her from serving in the Oval Office. In. Other words isn't a woman to emotional. And I paused on national television and I said Gee. And we think of a single instance in which a man's judgment was clouded by his hormones. Including In the Oval Office. Now, that's a funny example. But, it's a very telling example. I think. Men are some of the most emotional creatures I have ever met. And they are driven in no small measure by their homes and yet we are always worried about women's Emot-. It's different when you're different. and. Donald, trump is a pretty emotional person. The so much of the story of his presidency. In one way or another boils down. To what kind of mood was he in? An and yet you can imagine that that would be much more of a topic of conversation if it were a woman who was acting as erratically and Moody as he often does. Yes! You know I I. Had people say to me? You don't smile enough on the debate stage. No one would make that comment about any man any man. Well so then, let's see. This is the way to wrap it all together. What you said today? When people hear you I'm sure we'll be attacked for like a like. We were discussing. You've been attacked before. Some of it has been very gender. The Donald Trump said to look at that face or didn't say to you said about you. and. Just wonder when that is happening when you're living through. Whether it's kind of attack or that interview you discussed. What it feels like, and and how it how you process that in then obviously not letting it deter you from what you WANNA. Do and what you want to say what you feel you need to say and need to do. You know it's interesting when we. Develop leaders the first characteristic that I talk to people about is courage. Criticism is the price of problem-solving, leadership? And it is why so few politicians are prepared to lead. Because you have to be willing to be criticized. So if he tweets it you between the Bat, you let them tweet. Honestly let anybody tweet. I I. Don't spend my life trying to upset people. I spend my life trying to have a positive impact why working with other people? And that means that when I'm wrong I. Hope I can admit when someone teaches me. Something I needed to learn I. Hope I incorporate it, but it also means that I have to be forthright about who I am. And what I believe in what I have learned over a lifetime problem. Solving actually works. Having a good place to end it, carly. Fiorina thanks for being here on the ticket. That'll do it for this week. The ticket politics from the Atlantic. Thanks to Kevin for producing and editing this episode and to Catherine, Wells, the executive producer for Atlantic podcasts our theme. Music is by brake master cylinder. For articles and transcripts would be episodes. Go to the Atlantic, Dot com slash the ticket. Thanks for listening and stay safe.

Donald Trump Joe Biden president Republican party President Senator Cruz carly Fiorina Ted Atlantic Senate Potomac River Virginia Alexandria Hewlett Packard Potomac Big Concentrated Government Fort Belvoir Zach secretary John Bolton
Carly Fiorina: Overcoming Fear

Boss Files with Poppy Harlow

1:07:25 hr | 1 year ago

Carly Fiorina: Overcoming Fear

"Hello I'm Kate Raft and I'm here to tell you about a brand new podcast called celeb- news ride home. It's daily it's fifteen minutes long long and it's hosted by me if you're a person who cares about the sometimes ridiculous but actually always fascinating world celebrity gossip then. I'm here to scratch that. Little brain managed with top stories every single day. Searcher PODCAST APP and subscribe today to the Celeb- news ride home. PODCAST problems. uh-huh it's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things. Ben Things make things better her. That's why so many people work with. Ibm On everything from city. Traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays foodsafety. SMART loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT com slash. SMART to learn more. Hi everyone welcome to boss files. I'm poppy harlow. In this week's episode she ran for president was the first woman to run a fortune fifty company and a cancer survivor. Who say she is not afraid of anything anymore? Carly Fiorina trees out with a new book. Find your way unleash your power. Highest potential she was CEO Hewlett-packard during the dotcom boom and bust report being fired. What what she calls equal more room brawl? When you are leading change you get some arrows in your back? Change is hard and resistance is real and so it must be understood and manage strategically. I knew that then I new even even more now. She's face discrimination survived breast cancer and lived through the unimaginable loss of a child. Everything I feared in my life has happened to me not dying. I feared my mother would go unexpectedly and I wouldn't be able to reach her and and speak to her in time it happened. I fear getting cancer. I feared a child dying. I feared bad headlines. Everything I've been afraid of in my life. I feared the Strip club. Yes the Strip club. Wait until you hear that story. She calls herself a problem solver and says that's why she decided sighted to run for president after running against then candidate trump in two thousand sixteen. Does she think the president should now be impeached. I think it is vital that he be impeached. Do you recognize the Republican Bill Right now. Actually will you run for our president again. I have no idea. I don't think that's something. I have an interest in doing right now because the Republican Party right now seems to be all about pledging fealty. Donald trump no matter. What and I'm just not in that place? Let's jump right in with Carly Fiorina Carly theory and it's a pleasure. Thank you very much. Thank you we're going to start in a place where most of us don't start and then we're going to back up into your childhood and and all of those formative years. I would like to begin because you were the first woman to run a fortune fifty company. You were splashed across magazine covers. You became famous overnight. Frankly and then you say I was fired in board room brawl. So take me back to that morning. You're walking into each P.. You know you're not going to be at that company company anymore and it's not going to be pretty what was going through your head. Well what was going through. My head is frankly I was being fired over a matter. Our principal for me. I had board members who were leaking confidential board conversations to the media. I had board members who were trying to manage the company and put their favorite people into jobs that those favorite people couldn't do and so I had issued an ultimatum of sort part to my board and said this behavior has to stop. And if it doesn't either you go or I go and so the board got together and I knew fundamentally finally that the board would not have the courage to expel fellow board members and so I pretty much figured I was going to be the one to go. My husband was assuring me no no. They would never do that. They would never do that so I was prepared for for what came but more importantly I had made my own choices. I didn't feel like a victim. I could have said to them. Okay all is forgiven. Sure done a lot of things to keep my job. I chose to stand on my principles because I thought it was important and so it was terrible obviously The press that followed was terrible but I was prepared and it didn't crush me and unfortunately a year later those board members got fired fired in the company went through a terrible time. Do you think that it actually eventually made you a stronger person. Perhaps a better candidate when he ran for president he I think any time we get through setback or difficulty or face our fears. We are stronger and better as a result of it. I think that's always true. And so at that time my fear was oh my gosh. Yeah if I get fired heard the headlines will be horrible they were and they were but my greater fear honestly was I'm going to sell my soul and be left trying to do a job without the requisite authority to do it and that was worse to make. What is the most important decision decision you have ever made to be true to yourself? It sounds so corny to not sell. Oh your soul you know I think in life we have to make that decision over and over again the first time I made it was perhaps when I dropped out of law school because I figured it wasn't for for me the most visible time I made it perhaps was when I decided to let myself get fired on principle or maybe it was when when I decided I wasn't going to support A nominee or president that. I can't support but the point is I think are difficult. Decisions are always. He's the ones that perhaps cost us in the short term but strengthen us in the long term and define us and it's why I say to people all the time don't don't sell your soul. No one will ever pay you back. Nothing we'll ever pay you back if you sell your soul and there are many temptations to do so along the way till let's go back to to that brave decision to drop out of law school and you start your new book. Find your way here you are at your parents house you are in the shower yes shower important decisions and you have a realization that you don't have to do this but it's it's what your dad wants you to do and it's what you think you should do what happens. Well you have to. I have to say that I was apparent pleaser. I was a people pleaser. That was my core competence. I pleased people and so I was born in the family. Who always did what my parents said? I was the good girl and so it wasn't just that I was disappointing. Them it was that I was acting completely inconsistently with the way they had always expected me to act and so I really was very afraid. It seems so silly now but honestly the thing that I was afraid of is. They're not gonNa love me as much if I disappoint them in this way they didn't he didn't take it. Well no neither one of them well. But but on the other hand the revelation I had in the shower was I can't live a life for someone else and I don't like the life I'm living so I had to dry off and the suit up and March downstairs and say the words I quit. Dad was a law professor law school dean later appointed a deputy attorney general. I mean here you are not pleasing your parents walking walking away from the path. They think you're going to be on need to be on your. Your father said something that really struck me which was essentially like I. I don't know if you're GONNA amount to anything. Of course. He denied it in later years. But specific I would not forget this specifically what he said was. I'm very disappointed appointed dagger to the heart for parents policing child. I'm afraid you're not going to amount to anything now. In retrospect backed thank goodness. He didn't say will you can always get married or it doesn't really matter what you do right. I mean I would have rather her. Had Him challenged me in the way that he did. Well what are you going to do then. SORTA say it didn't matter but it was harsh. Did you ever make him proud. Oh my Gosh yes they ask why my dad would deny he ever said We parents have selective memory yes Yes of course. I made him proud and I made my mother proud and and I hope I still make them around. What was she like? What was her open her life like because you you you've talked about in the book something that I believe give you said she told you what you are is God's gift to you what you make of yourself is your gift to God so my mother in another the era would have been a CEO? Perhaps she had a very unhappy childhood. Her mother died when she was ten. She was raised by a very Callous stepmother her father did not support her desire her to go on and be educated in college. said it wasn't for girls so she ran away from home at eighteen and joined the women's Air Corps in World War. Two Pretty Gutsy decision just got on a bus and Latte. I'd say so. She was gutsy woman and had a lot of What we would call rectitude? You know. That's an old fashioned word but but my mother had a lot of rectitude and a lot of she knew the difference between right and wrong she never cut corners. She can be aggravating in that way. Sometimes but I think that's where I get it from A sense of right and wrong. She also had a lot of zest she he was a great party thrower. She was a wonderful cook. She was a wonderful hostess. She was an amazing woman. It reminds me of something that Superior Court Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG talks about and that my goodness all. That's my mom reminder. There you go we can keep that in the podcast. That's real life. At least it wasn't live. Don't forget to pick your kid up at school. Poppy but on a more serious note. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG talks about her mother and similar way in that in another era she would have been. This could have been this in society would have afforded her those opportunities that it is afforded that you and I and she talks about striving to achieve so much in part because of that what her mother wasn't given the chance to his the the same true for you. I don't think so. In that sense my mother ultimately she was an artist and ultimately she went back to to get her master's in art in her sixties and began to show her work later in her life. I think honestly her passion was art. It's it's definitely not my passion so I don't think I was focused on making the most positive contribution I could for my mother but I do think both my mother and father the message they always delivered to to me was do not waste the gifts you have been given to not squandered potential whatever you WANNA do whatever your potential allows allows you to do go do and you offered repeat and think about that. Merrick Mary Oliver Quote. You know that you have this one wild and precious life yes and I. I think it's why my parents although they were shocked and disappointed by my announcement. I'm quitting. I have no plan what I'm GONNA DO GONNA go back and type and file I I think at another level they understood what was going on. And it's why they were more gentle after that and gave me some Rove Rove to maneuver stay tuned how Carly Fiorina overcame fear and why. She says she is not afraid of anything anymore problems. It's human nature to hate problems. 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CNN there have also been in a number of very formative moment in your life but incredibly difficult personal struggles. I with with breast cancer. What was the moment like that? Your doctor I assume told you face to face or call. Do I had gone in for a routine physical. Oh I had found a lump on murder under my arm. It was couple of weeks after a clear. Mammogram ladies do your self exams. I'm here to tell you my doctorate said Oh. I don't think it's anything thing but we'll just do a quick biopsy and I went in for a physical expecting nothing and she came in looking literally Pale and said she was clearly very concerned and she said you have an aggressive form of cancer. We don't know what kind we have to begin. Tests immediately It's horrifying news. It's frightening in what I do when I'm shocked and feel out of my depth. Is I start asking questions so I started asking questions. Sort of to keep myself calm. Did you cry. No not but then and I. I actually don't recall crying at all until my second surgery. I he ended up. Having eleven rounds of surgery. It was a very difficult process and I remember being rolled into the operating room for the second time and that was the first time I cried and I also remember a nurse. I don't know her name. I never saw her again in but I will never forget her face and she looked down at me and she said Jess what I needed to hear in just the right way at that time and she he gave me peace when I need it. They are amazing nurses. I often get credit ruled. There are a lot of amazing zinc. And that's why I wrote this book. Actually honestly probably because people are capable of such impact more than they know. It's it's when people think true. They can't make a difference that they don't make a difference. Yeah that nurse made all the difference for me that all of it and my guess is she's made all the difference. The world is so many people. You're you're also a parent and you and your husband. Frank suffered unimaginable loss. Losing your daughter. AH in her thirties and losing her to drug addiction. Could you share with me. What you're comfortable sharing About that and how it has shaped you well I I would say like probably a lot of parents. We were in denial for a long time. You know it. It started out as what we thought was. You know maybe too much drinking in college and maybe too much partying in her twenty S. I know a lot of people in their twenties. WHO Party a lot? And so we sort of We were in denial for too long. And then it got to the point where it was was clear. This was a complex multi substance addiction. made worse honestly in many ways. By why the predilection of doctors to prescribe thanks. In all the truth is you can go see a psychiatrist and get prescribed stuff in ten or fifteen in minutes and so she got caught up in the same sort of addiction that so many have gotten caught up in. We spent many years and many tears and many hours trying to help her. And of course in the end Attest to make a decision themselves. You can't do it for them for many years. I couldn't talk about it and I number one because I couldn't get through it but secondly honestly because I think there was a part of me that was ashamed. That was embarrassed. That was Afraid that people would think. Wow what a terrible parent. You must have been a terrible mother mother. Couldn't you have done something. And so at a certain point I decided I I have to be able to speak about this. Because maybe it'll be helpful to someone what else And I think it has been helpful to others and so that has been helpful to us. uh-huh why have spoken to countless parents who have lost their children in the past few years because of the opioid what happened in this country. Who are living through what you felt that? Shame that inability to really talk about it. Because they didn't even know that their child Gal was even using any any substance. What is your message to America because this is the epidemic now but it will be something else later and it it? It hits every socioeconomic level every race every neighborhood It is it is a crisis in this country victory and as someone who has run the company run for president maybe running for something again. We'll talk about that and you know what. What is your message? Edge to America and to those in power at this point about addiction in this country and this epidemic. Well I in terms of move treatment and recovery. I think addiction is the classic case of what I talk about not all the time. which is people closest to the problem? Know best how to solve it. The best counselors are people who have overcome addiction themselves. How's the best programs are those that are grounded in a local community so that someone who gets through recovery actually has a community unity to return to part of what has to happen so many of the fixes are local? And it's why from from a policy point of view I think more money needs to flow locally. There are some things the federal government can do hippo laws. Get in the way. Honestly I mean hip. Allies were designed to protect people's privacy but the impact they actually have sometimes too often is to isolate someone from everyone. WHO's trying to help them? Um I can remember desperately trying to find doctors. Our daughter was going but I can't and when we finally found someone and they said I can't tell you anything they at least had the heart to say I can listen to you but I can't tell you anything. And so part. Part of what happens with addicts. Is they get isolated and they get they spend all their time with people like them and they're divorced from those was who can help them and it is an enormous waste of potential and I am delighted that the state's attorneys-general general are suing these drug companies. Because there's no question that just as the cigarette companies knew that cigarettes were addictive. The drug companies knew with these drugs were addictive and they did not level with people and they were over prescribed and the medical community is complicit as well you grew up with a fear of death. Yes isn't that child and you've gotten over it. You told a reporter for the National Review. I believe it was that when you're running for president you said I'm not afraid of anything anymore. So there's a lot of progress. Why were you scared to die? When I don't know I ah in thinking about it as an adult? I think it must have been because I knew that my father's father had died when he was Zhang and that my mother's mother had died when she was young and so there was this sense of sudden sure traumatic loss that suffused the Family Lor and so i. My fear was my parents are going to die suddenly and then my I'm going to die suddenly must be why so. How did you go from being afraid? Afraid of dying young too as a candidate for president being able to say. I'm not afraid of anything anymore. Really nothing nothing. Nothing scares Carly Fiorina practice. Honestly what I mean by practice is practice in overcoming fears. Everything I feared in my life has happened to me not dying but I feared my mother would go unexpectedly and I. I wouldn't be able to reach her and speak to her time it happened. I fear getting cancer. I feared child dying. I feared bad headlines. Everything I've been afraid of in my my life. I feared the Strip club. I feared looking like a fool. I feared all these things. Some of those fears were profound. Some of them were silly but the point is every the time I got through one of them. Yeah I was less afraid and so- practice makes perfect when it comes to learn courage and becoming fearless. Okay so you brought up the Strip club which obviously going to bring up for those. Who Haven't read your book yet? This is the moment. Meant when you're working your way up the corporate ladder and this is where you argue. Name your fear so who took you do the Strip club and why. Why did it eventually help you? Well first of all I wasn't working my way up the corporate ladder. Being far too general you know I was at the bottom of the corporate ladder and I had no notion Russian of working my way up the corporate ladder. This was my first job outside of the secretarial pool and finally getting an MBA. I mean I was a nobody I had honestly. My prayer prayer at the end of each day was please let me keep my job. I thought I was GONNA get fired every day because I didn't know what I was doing so I wasn't working my way up but my colleague colleague who I had been paired with and you can imagine he was not thrilled with this. Who is this young woman? She doesn't she. You can't teach me anything or bring any value. And he kind of wanted to scare me out of my job and so he did honestly what he always did. He always went to a strip club. Love for lunch with these particular clients. That's what they did and they thought why should I change it for her. So he said we're going to the Strip club you can't come. Sorry you're not GonNa meet the clients. I was scared really scared. I was scared of looking stupid which I did. I was scared of going into a screwed. Could've club I never been in such a situation but the more I thought about it what I realized I was even more afraid of is not being given the chance to do my job trying to scare me out of doing my job and so I decided I gotta show up. I gotTA show up and you know you've heard the old saying life showing up optus half the battle. It actually is half hour more argue. It's more so I showed up and once I showed up it wasn't as terrifying as I thought and the young women were very kind to me and everything in the office changed because people decided I had a little more guts than they realized and they decided he was kind of a classless guy for putting me in the situation in the first place again courage you went when when have you been most courageous in your life. And what have you been leased courageous. I don't know the thing. I The reason I'm hesitating over that question is I do think I am least courageous. When I don't stop and think about it I think courage takes reflection? It takes introspection and so if I react in the moment to something I am not likely to be my best if I take the time to think it through. I'm likely to be stronger and more brave so the Strip club. My immediate reaction was to say okay. I won't come but something told me not to say anything. And that gave me the time to think and I I auto longtime I thought a long time about getting fired from HP. I thought a longtime about dying with cancer. I one of the things I worry about in our culture holter were such an instantaneous culture but courage takes time introspection reflection actually wise choices take time Interest Action and reflection to be our best takes a pause something right. My mother often says is PAPI. Big decisions make themselves. Because I'd like to make them with the facts and the data and quickly and her point in that is it takes a lot of time for you to finally realize realize and know yourself what the right decisions. Well I think that's true and I also think most big decisions most say most big decisions are tough decisions. It's tough decisions are frequently not obvious. Actually lots of arguments can be sure and so they do take time to figure out. What do I actually think so before we move on I want to finally hear about Ghana and termite? Yeah well I had the wonderful privilege of moving around a lot. When I was growing up? I mean it was hard in many ways but looking back on it it was a gift and one of the places my father took us was to Ghana in West Africa. I was fifteen and I remember driving down a road in Ghana is a Ghanaian group of gay friends and seeing these huge food mountains of dirt on either side of the road. I mean huge taller than the ceiling. Here what are those. Those are termite hills. Oh Wow that's amazing. How do these little all things make these big hills and so my friend tells me how termites work and they have a pass and every day they go out and they pushed their dirt on along this paths? They come back they go out they come back and it's the same path their whole life. Wow what a terrible life and then on. My Wife's Canadian friend said he wasn't old but he was wise. He said you know people can be a lot like termites in. That's so stuck with me because it's true because we all get our heads down and we're pushing dirt day in day out. We got a lot of dirt to push every day. You got to pick up your daughter you gotta finish this. We all have our dirt and we kind of get our heads down sure and we go share and what we don't do often enough is pick our heads up and look around and maybe pause is And observe and reflect and reconsider that maybe just maybe we ought to go this way a little bit. Well this is. Why are you talking about having you know a path not a plan? Yes I have a hard time buying this argument that you make that you had no plan in life but it's true. Well I have plans for for many things. I have a plan to grow a business. I have a plan to turn a business around there things. You must have plans for but in terms of saying this is where I want to be in my life life by this point I have never done that and what I've seen. Except maybe when you were running for president the Oval Office you were not envisioning the vote. Well certainly you have goal in mind. It's not that you don't have goals in mind. It's that five years before that I hadn't said I'm going to go run for president but what I've learned in my own life is if you you are focused on making the biggest positive impact possible in the here and now opportunities are GonNa come your way. What I've seen is so many people get so fixated on their plan and I am going to finish law school no matter what because my parents expect me to that? They miss a lot of things in life and maybe what they missed. Most of all is actually what they're made of and what they're meant to do up next. WE'LL CARLY FIORINA RENA run for president again. I ask her newham like everybody in Palm Beach State. No one knows how he made the happening. He was threatening my short and pulling my body on already naked body after the night for the sixteen years. I've reported put on Jeffrey Epstein the man the multi-millionaire the monster. Now go behind the story with me Vicky Hurst of CNN's Newport cost the Jeffrey Epstein. Subscribe now wherever you get your podcasts. Can't get enough the NBA sign up for NBA League pass to gain access to every game being played across the association every night with all new ways to watch through the NBA APP visit Mba dot dot com or the NBA APP to get started today. Hi Everyone Poppy Harlow here. You may be a founder with a visionary the idea an employee at a young startup or at a big company. But when you think of your company's culture what goes through your head is it ping pong tables and beanbag chairs and free free employee lunch. Those are great of course but my guest today says they're not culture so what is company cultured truly. And how do you create created. Ben Horowitz is co-founder of the venture capital firm. Andriessen Horowitz think early investors in facebook lift and many more companies his first book the hard thing about hard things is a Silicon Valley Bible entrepreneurs now he's taking that one step further in a new book out this month called. What you you do is who you are? It's fascinating to hear his take. I hope you'll check it out. Subscribe to boss files today. So let's talk politics. Oh dear you knew this was coming. Why did you run for president? I ran for president. Because I'm problem solver and I think we have a lot of problems that aren't getting solved. I think we have way too. Many professional politicians political parties have captured. The system Interestingly George Washington told us in seventeen eighty nine ba where the rise of political parties. They will come to care only about winning. And we're there. What politicians care about is winning? The thing is the dynamic of winning is not the same. The thing is a dynamic problem solving and so we have festering problems that we argue about every election. I also thought it would be helpful. The government is a big complicated skated beast. I know something about it. I've done a lot of policy work in various parts of the government. I actually know a lot about big complicated bureaucracies. And what happens happens is we had this thin veneer of politicians over this enormous bureaucracy and neither one functions very well. Did you think think you're going to win. I thought the odds were incredibly long incredibly long but long odds have never stopped me there you go. I thought I could make a difference in the conversation. I hope I did and I also believed it was a year when people were willing to look at outsiders and I think you went through and I think there continued to be outsiders and I think that's a good thing like Mike Bloomberg. We'll see I mean that's for Democratic primary voters to to decide which you are not one of them not one of and I think you know would he weaker good would Mike Bloomberg make a better president than Donald Trump. I think Bloomberg actually knows something about running an organization. I don't think Donald Trump does I think a family business and the way he I don't think he is a successful business person. Actually okay. I think his bankruptcies demonstrate that I think a family business is very different than running a large publicly traded business. I think Bloomberg clearly has business business acumen and execution skills on the other hand. I think Bloomberg's vulnerability is people think he's trying to buy the office and people resent thank you well. I don't know if he thinks ads. We'll do it instead of pressing the slash. I think he could be accused of that. What what was your biggest surprise during your run for president might be surprise owes surprise Well Donald Trump was a big surprise. Honestly at many levels it was a surprise to me that he ran more than that. It was a surprise to me how he captured. Every remove. The compensation from the second came down the escalator. The media did not want to talk about anything but Donald Trump from the second. He came down the elevator and that remains true. That remains true so that was a surprise. I think a second surprise though honestly was I love talking to voters people talk about. Oh my gosh. Campaigning is such a drag. I loved campaigning. I loved the voters. I'm loved Iowa New Hampshire I mean I. It was a wonderful adventure that I wouldn't trade. Tell me about the morning you knew you had to get out. It was obvious. I mean I'm a realist. You know I I I've said I don't mind long odds but I don't Tilt at windmills. I don't swing fences. I'm not an idealist I'm I'm pretty pragmatic and it was very clear. I mean we had had a very disappointing showing in Iowa We had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire. We had outlasted senators and governors governors and everything else but it was clear there was no path so it's time to get out everything that I have read about you and heard you say recently carly makes me if I were a betting woman which I sometimes say that I would put money on you running again. Will you run for president again. I have no idea and I'm not trying to be coy. I have no idea you know first of all because I'm a realist. Because I'm a pragmatist. It's not simply about Out Me making a decision. It's about many other things in the environment. Many other things in the context politics right now running as a Republican I. I don't think that's something. I have an interest in doing right now because the Republican Party right now now seems to be all about pledging fealty to donald trump no matter what and I'm just not in that place. Do you do you speaking of the Republican Party de Recognize. Recognize the Republican. I don't I I have spoken publicly about the fact that in this country. We pledge allegiance agents to a flag and we pledge of loyalty to the Constitution not to a party and not to a president. And so I I think that's all about politics. The politics of winning the party is focused on winning. Just Democrats are too by the way and so I I think Republicans are behaving the way they do because they think it's going to help them win. You know president both President Bush's President George H W Bush and and president Bush forty three did not vote for president trump. Did you Carly Fiorina vote for president trump. Yeah I actually did. And I've been very disappointed pointed. I did I felt that Hillary Clinton also was corrupt. I think there's a lot of evidence of that. I thought what I did not agree with her from a policy point of view. I thought she was dismissive and disrespectful to too many issues and too how many people honestly I thought she acted entitled to the job and I thought well all right. We're GONNA give this guy a chance. I must say. I have been bitterly disappointed. Will President Trump get your vote in twenty twenty Assuming he's on the ticket you don't honestly it depends who the Democrats put up and I won't go any further than that right Biden. It depends on the Democrats put a so. Let's just play a few scenarios. Joe Biden the Mike Bloomberg. Let's really not because again. It's one of the things I learned in politics. Honestly yes is never answer a hypothetical I hear you. There is a scenario though in which president trump does not get your vote and and and a candidate from the Democratic Party could that there is a scenario and one of the reasons for that. I I think it's worth explaining. Why because people evaluate these things differently? And I'm on the record saying this character matters conduct counts so I will have people say to me. Yes but the economy's doing great. Yep It is and I give him credit for it No more than any president. You should get credit. But he's done some of the right things I agree with him on some of the issues. I disagree with them strongly on others but for me a Character matters character is destiny for party for a nation for president conduct matters and Some of this conduct like publicly berating. A decorated war veteran who shows up in response to a lawfully issued subpoena of Congress. I think that conduct is not just unbecoming. I think it's destructive to our book so looking net net you compliment him on the economy and some other other things take major issues with other Moves he's made and things. He said his president trump. Who did eventually get your vote in In the last election has he been a net positive for America. I don't know I think the jury's out and I think it's one of those things where time will I'll tell the economy by the way Obama get some credit for the economy too. I mean presidents take in many ways too much blame in too much credit the economy but he's I trump is undoubtedly done some of the right things. I do. Think that the systematic this dramatic tearing down of people institutions political opponents. We'll have long lasting damage. If it goes on for much longer so I think time will tell what was it like took run for President Against Donald Trump and then we have a few clips that I'd like to play for you in a moment. Well they say. Donald Trump sucked all the oxygen out out of the room immediately. And by the way the media's complicit in this and one of the things that I think never had we talked about introspection I think we would be better goff if the Democratic Party would be introspective. And say you know. Here's some things we did that lost the election. I think we would be better off if the media would be introspective and say. Here's some things we did. That helped him win. I think it would definitely be better off. If Donald Trump would be introspective but introspection and reflection is lacking in general. You met with him after he won. Yes I during the transition right. You went to trump tower. You met with him. As is is the reporting is about The position of Director of national intelligence is that right We never talked about a specific position. There was all kinds of there. Were people who wanted me did he want. I don't think so. So why do you think he wanted to meet with you. Because I think it's what you do I think he had the people who were telling him he should meet with me now. I think he smartly understood. It was important for him to meet with all of his his opponents and I believe he did and I think when the president-elect asks you to come meet with him you meet with him did he apologize for what what he had said about you no nor did I expect it nor did I ask for it. You told my friend and colleague. Se Cup on this network. That president trump quote wasn't the only man I faced nastiness. Yeah from on the campaign trail who else and why did they do. What did they say? Ooh I let me just say I face this all my life. Our men making comments about my appearance positive or negative. Goodness been there done that honestly when my campaign staff told me what he said about me. My Reaction Action was to laugh. It was like all of course he would say that so They were more upset about it than I was the example that I will give you is. I was in a debate and I was. I told a story from my personal life and a very well. Well known he shall remain nameless. He knows who he is. A very well known radio host conservative radio host tweets Out Carly Fiorina just played the vagina card. I guess he said that because I was a woman telling my story but you know really I mean really so this stuff goes on all the time in truth. Donald Trump gave me an opportunity. But I never expected apology for what opportunity to take it. He gave me an opportunity in the clip. That you're playing the People Mr Arena. I want to ask you about this in an interview last week in Rolling Stone magazine. Donald Trump said the following about you quote. Look at that face. Would anyone one vote for that. Can you imagine that the face of our next president Mr Trump later said he was talking about your persona not your appearance. Please feel free to respond what you think about his persona. You know it's interesting to me. Mr Trump said that he heard Mr Bush very he clearly and what Mr Bush said I think women all over this country heard very clearly what Mr Trump said the. I think she's got a beautiful face and I think she's a beautiful woman. Why the way that the you know? They're all kinds of teachable. Double moments people. Don't really focus on the second piece of that but Donald Trump said I think she has a beautiful the full face and I did not acknowledge him in any way in the reason for that is because his commentary about my appearance positive or negative is irrelevant and inappropriate period so he thought he was going to make it all better by saying he thought I was beautiful. No Oh you missed the point. You missed the point. An interviewer once said to me later. We'll isn't it nice when a man tells a woman she said it depends if my husband tells me I look beautiful. Yeah absolutely if a friend says I look beautiful absolutely if an opponent on a debate stage or a business colleague says I look beautiful. The Not so much so we have one more clip to play for you if we could about. This is a snippet of debating the president or MS Fiorina you were. CEO of Hewlett Packard. Donald Trump says you quote ran. HP into the ground you laid off tens of thousands of people you got viciously fired for voters looking to somebody with private sector experience to create American jobs. Why should they pick you? And Not Donald Trump I led Hewlett Packard through a very very difficult time the worst technology recession in twenty five years. The Nasdaq Stock Index fell eighty percent. It took fifteen years for the stock index to recover. We had very strong competitors. Who literally went out of business and lost all of their jobs in the process? Despite those difficult times we doubled would the size of the company we quadrupled. Its top line growth. Wait we do pulled its cash flow we tripled its rate of innovation. Yes we had to make tough choices news and in doing so we saved eighty thousand jobs went on to grow to one hundred sixty thousand jobs and now Hewlett Packard is almost three hundred thousand jobs the head of the Yale Business School. Jeffrey Sonnenfeld wrote a paper recently. One of the worst ten years for a CFO CEO that he has ever seen ranked one one of the top twenty in the history of business. The company is a disaster and continues to be a disaster that they still haven't recovered in fact today on the front page of the wall all Street Journal they fired another twenty five or thirty thousand people saying we still haven't recovered from the catastrophe. When Carly says the revenues went up that's because because she bought Compaq it was terrible deal and it really lead to the destruction the company now one of the company before that was loosened carly was at loosen before that back and loosened turned out to be a catastrophe? Also I only say this. She can't run any of my companies. What was it like debating candidate trump? What did you learn you know I? I think that clip that you showed was one of the few times when Donald Trump was actually debating. I quite enjoyed debate debate at other candidates on the on the field as well. You need to be prepared. You need to know what you think. I know what you want to say But I think many times donald trump distracted from the debate By making personal comments. He made personal comments about all kinds of people not just me. He was an equal opportunity in salter and he remained so so. I I didn't take it personally then So honestly no different than debating. Anyone else on that stage you have to be focused and clear clear and in the moment you enjoyed it. I do enjoy debate coming up. Why Carly Fiorina thinks it is vital that president trump be impeached on impeachment? Before we move on you have called before Nancy Pelosi very wise. There are words in the past. This country is in the middle of impeachment proceedings and an effort To remove the president from office Do you believe president. Trump should be impeached and removed from office. I think he is going to be impeached. And I think he won't be removed from office. Should I if you were are you ran for Senate in the Senate. It's a hypothetical if if let's a hypothetical for you as you're not a senator vote but this is going to a Senate trial. Yeah I think it is vital that he be impeached. Whether removed this close to an election. I don't know Oh but I think the conduct is impeachable. And what I regret. Is that the principles that are being debated in this impeachment trial separation of powers I abuse of power obstruction of Congress. Those principles are not as immediate or intense tense as partisanship or peoples belief that the policies that I care about impact me personally. So for example. The there is a large pro-life community in this country and they feel disrespected by by the Democrat Party and my prediction is they will stand by trump through everything because that issue is not only important to them. But it's personal to them. It is notable that you a Republican who has run for office for the Senate as a Republican for President as a Republican who may run and again as a Republican is saying it is quote. Vital that he'd be impeached. What are you hearing from your Republican friends in the House? And the Senate crickets yeah. I don't My prediction would be that. Republicans don't break ranks. I think what is your message to them. I'm not sure they're listening to my message. Honestly they were. Do you have a message to that. I think think my message is in this country. Hanging onto a job is not the most important thing in this country. We don't pledge allegiance to a party or to a president in this country principles matter and in particular the principle that we have co equal branches of government and that no one is above the law and that it is Congress's duty to oversee and to investigate the executive branch is the vital principle. Our Constitution was based on a fundamental belief. That power concentrated is power abused used and we have to stand up for that principle in the near term it may cost but in the long term those principles are everything. That's a pretty clear message finally in the Republican Party before we leave politics. There are so few Republican women in in Congress right now. They're only thirteen republican women in the house. Eight Republican women in the Senate that is down from two thousand and sixteen. Why why aren't there? More Republican women being elected in this country because I think the party does not value does not send a signal of respect to a whole a bunch of people women included. I mean I think there is a reason why women people all of color young people don't feel affinity for the Republican Party. It's because the brand the way business it has been conducted sends a message. We don't value you and we don't respect you now. I say that as a proud pro-life woman it's not about pro-life or pro-choice choice. It's about cow. Women and people of Color in young people are addressed are sought. What out or not by the same token the reason Democrats lost in two thousand sixteen is there was a swath of people who felt disrespected in devalued? Politics is personal so it starts with a real fundamental do I feel like you personally respect me. And until Republicans decide that. That's a problem. It's not going to get better. What does the Republican Party today? Stand for I don't know loyalty to trump is what I think it stands for and what has adly what what has the Ark of the last three years. Well you and. What do you want the party to be Republican already? Here's here's what I believe. Okay I the Republican Party was the Party of Abraham Lincoln. I think I believe three things that I thought. The party stood for number one and everyone has potential and we should not be defined by our circumstance number. Two people closest to the problem know best how to solve it it so let people close to the problems all that instead of taking the problem away from them and putting in some gigantic government bureaucracy. Three thousand miles away in number three power concentrated is power abused always. It doesn't matter how well intended the holder of power is power concentrated power abuse those of the things I believe. I don't know that the Republican Party believes in those things anymore. They certainly don't want that way. They used to be clear eyed about the danger from Russia or China or North Korea. I don't know that they are anymore so so have to ask them what they believe what I believe in having set I mean have you saying that. Got It significant especially given your member of the party are you. Do you still consider self Republican and if you run again for any conference registration then if if you do run for political office again will you run as a Republican or no. I don't know if I'm running and I don't know if I will so has is the party potentially lost you. We'll see I don't make rash decisions but My Party designation doesn't define me honestly it never has. I've never felt that the party was owed my loyalty I I do believe that in this country citizens are sovereign that we are actors in our own right I have voted for Democrats in years past. It wouldn't be the first time in twenty twenty if that's what I ended up doing But I do think the party thirty forget Corley arena. They don't much care what I think right now anyway. In most in all probability I think what the Party needs to think about is is power in the near term is great but what about the long-term what about the long term and and one of the lessons I know all the way back to my parents and I talk about my book. Character character is knowing that how you do things is as important as what you we do. Of course so how you win matters as much as the fact that you win and so I would just if anyone's listening I would just ask smile. Let's hope they're listening to think about how their getting things done right now. Let's end on each P.. Where your fame really really began and an experience that I know is difficult at the end but obviously shaped greatly when you look back? What is hindsight taught you about your time time at HP and being the best leader you can be so it has taught me a little bit as in that earlier clip clip? When you are leading change you get some arrows in your back? Change is hard it and resistance Israel and so it must be understood and manage strategically. I knew that then I knew it. Even I know it even more now. The second thing it is when you're different it's different and I didn't really understand that going in. You know I was so shocked knocked on my first day in the job that all anybody wanted to talk about was the fact that I was a woman who was prepared to talk about. HP LABS and our products. No nobody wants talk about that. All they wanted to talk about. Oh my gosh. She's a woman and when you're different everything is different. The expectations are different. The scrutiny is different the criticism awesome. It's different everything's different. It's true for women. It's true for anyone who's different. And so that makes everything honestly more difficult in many ways and the third thing I would say is if you are focused on something larger than yourself your name your headlines which I was. I was focused on that. I don't care about those things but I was focused on doing the best I could for hp then when the tough times come for are you there not as tough. I'm very proud of my time at. HP I'm very proud of what we accomplished. Employees lifted me up. They do to this. This Day. I wouldn't trade any of it. The Harvard Business Review wrote about your legacy in two thousand is an fifteen and these are two parts to wonder what you think several executives who worked with her found her to be inspiring a Rockstar a dazzling performer on stage and it went on to say she was the disruptive leader that she needed to be at the time but she missed one key element. She never took the time to develop rapport with individual employee's and therefore never got buying or support for her initiatives. I that was kind of the story. Line of Love was the storyline in the press. For sure and the proof point that I would give you to demonstrate how our wrong that is is we pulled off the largest technology merger in history successfully successfully the complexity of that integration was staggering and. It doesn't happen unless employees are brought in because it happens not because of what the CEO says on stage at all it happens because implies do the hard work that no one's paying attention to outside the company. Dan Day out day in day out. There's a reason most mergers and acquisitions sounds fail. It's because everyone's looking at the CEO giving a speech and no one's looking at what the employees are actually doing. You're talking about the Compaq merger. Obviously a lot has happened since then. HP is broken up into two separately traded companies. You talked about the layoffs that came as a result of the merger in the debate. Do you look at it now. Now in twenty one thousand nine hundred a success would you do it again. Yes I would. Of course context. Is Everything sure. Twenty eighteen and nineteen or a very different context in the technology allergies base than two thousand one was but coming off of the dot com boom and going through the dot com bust. We needed I needed to be a systems player to survive the pure. PC companies were going out of business. The pure software companies were going out of business. It's pure router companies. Were everyone was becoming a systems company. We needed to as well. That merger not only succeeded. It succeeded for a very long time. So I'm getting and that's because employees bought in actually. I'm getting two minute warning. Quick answers on these important questions. What's next for Carly Fiorina arena? So I am doing work that I find enormously fulfilling and I think is making a huge difference. We are working in companies and communities entities every single day teaching people how to become leaders in their own right. Solve the problems right in front of them be more effective team team team players because we got a lot of problems and a lot of institutions that are supposed to be solving them aren't and so instead of looking up and saying thank somebody else. Better solve this problem my message to people and I think we're helping them achieve this look inside yourself and look around you. Who is your hero? My mother will always be hero. We will stay tuned. We'll see if another political run is in the cards. I sincerely appreciate your time today. Thanks poppy PAPI. I enjoyed it. Thank you thank you. Thanks much for tuning into this episode of boss files. I would love to hear your thoughts on this week's episode and people you want to hear from so leave a review and follow me on social media at Poppy Harlow CNN problems. It's human nature to hate problems. But why is that after all problems inspire us to mend things. Ben Things make things better. That's why so many people people work with IBM on everything from city. Traffic to ocean plastic new schools to new energy flight delays to food safety. SMART MART loves problems. Ibm Let's put smart to work visit. IBM DOT COM slash smart. Learn more you can still send an amazing in gift. This holiday season with Omaha steaks. They'll get delicious tender stakes to share remember and love and you'll get the satisfaction of knowing you sent a special. Oh holiday gift if you act right now. podcast listeners can get the favored gift package for just sixty nine ninety nine go to Omaha steaks DOT COM and type boss ause files in the search bar. You're happy friends and family will open their door and find a cooler packed with deliciously tender filet mignons day CTS plus premium meats meet sides and desert. They'll be excited when it arrives and think of you. Every time they prepare and enjoy their meals. Omaha steaks is a fifth generation. American family owned company. That's been handcrafting. Incredible state gifts for one hundred two years and every package is unconditionally. Guaranteed so you can send this gift with complete eight confidence when you order right now with this exclusive offer. You'll get four Omaha steaks burgers added to your gift for free. That's sixteen main courses. Plus plus sides in desert. Christmas delivery options are still available. But don't delay order your Omaha. steaks favored gift package for. Just sixty nine ninety nine by typing hyping boss files in the search bar at Omaha steaks DOT com today.

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Carly Fiorina: Find Your Way!

Leadership and Loyalty

1:01:04 hr | 1 year ago

Carly Fiorina: Find Your Way!

"Hello I'm Carly Fiorina. I'm so happy to be on the podcast today. Hey we're talking about leadership and problem solving and how you can find your way congratulations. You're tuned into Dov Barons leadership and loyalty do show the number one podcast for fortune five hundred executives and those who are dedicated to creating a quantum leap in leadership your host. Dove Baron is the founder of full MONTY LEADERSHIP DOT com. He's an executive mentor leaders like you a contributing writer for Entrepreneur magazine. CEO World and he's been featured on CNN fox CBS and many other notable sites. Dov Baron is an international business speaker who is named by INC magazine. Eh One of the top one hundred leadership speakers to hire now over to Dov Baron. Welcome dear friends fans and fellow afficionados of leadership. Thanks Lynn thank you for joining us on this episode of leadership and loyalty tips for executives under the full monty interview series. I'm your host doll. Barron the founder for a full monty leadership and I'm here to tell you something into the one thing in your business changes everything. Let me ask you committed to up leveling. You'll leadership. Well well how you're gonNA find your way and step into your full potential. Find out about this episode already past episodes by going to either Lincoln or our facebook pages just luke for leadership loyalty podcasts. You're listening. You view a thank you for joining US yourself in. We're about to go full. Monty as always you can find us on apple podcast on spotify out radio wherever you tune into guest and we always need your help insane relevance please go over that and great eight review and subscribe to the show you can also catch traditional radio stations across the United States all the way from Philadelphia to Florida an even to Quantico area Washington. DC because froze on Roku TV was over one hundred thousand subscribers and if you are regular listener thank you for making us the number one podcast globally globally for fortune five hundred listeners with potential reach of two point five to four million listeners for every single show on it in grateful to be cited by INC DOT COM home is the number one podcast to make better leader and you can also catch on spotify Alexa or any of those home podcasts by our mechanisms uh-huh by simply playing say play of Man podcast again. Thank you for sharing the show with everybody. You know all right. Let's strip it down dive right in as a leader or the CEO sewn. The seat sweet sales leader on earlier in any capacity. You know that there is seems to be very prescribed way to the top of Success Mountain. But how do you know that you're climbing the right man. How do you find your way and unleash your highest potential well. Let's find out together because my guest on this episode episode Carly Fiorina. She is the founder and chairman of contouring enterprises and of unlocking potential nonprofit organization and is Asian in two thousand sixteen. She was the first decline female candidate to seek the Republican Party nomination for presidential candidate the first woman to head a fortune what you five hundred company and the author of several books including New York Times bestsellers and her latest book is find your way. Please ladies using digital and put your hands together for a lady. I that's quite a welcome. I feel special. Thank you great. I'm going to do and we're happy happy. Thank you so much. I I want to start the show with something. I'd like to start show. which is you know you? You're very successful woman in in all kinds of ways when we're GONNA get into all the details of that in a moment woman. It's easy for us to say well. You know this we hold this icon as opposed to influence but one of my questions is who somebody influenced influence to you that we likely wouldn't know wouldn't suspect somebody who's had a major impact on the way that you look world well. I could tell you so many stories I could start by saying honestly. My mother and father had a huge impact on me but maybe I'll tell you the story of a woman and I know you've never heard of in the slums of New Delhi India who had the courage to reject the consensus of her family and her culture who took a micro loan became an entrepreneur and now employs her entire family family as well as others in her village. I think about that woman all the time because for me she exemplifies what Leadership Yep is actually all about which is changing the order of things for the better and I talk about her a lot when I speak people about leadership but I guarantee you. It's not famous and no one's ever heard of her but she is a leader which proves that leadership isn't about your title or your commission. It's about the impact you have absolutely couldn't agree more open about the impact and I think it's often about the impact. Did you have in the face of how many people telling you you can't do it. I mean that's you know she. She resisted the audit. She went against the she found her own way it to do what it was. That's very cool. Thank you sharing that. I really appreciate that now. I believe this is your third book. I try to memoir that was tough. Choices and you also get a logistical raising the challenge. Why find your way why is that why this one at this time well because we have a lot of problems and businesses and communities and families as we have a lot of people who feel as though either it's not their job to try and tackle the problem or they they feel helpless or powerless or maybe hopeless to do anything about the problem and because there are a lot of people who assume home that if someone is called a leader or has a big office or a big title that they are leader and so people get disillusioned when leaders don't lead they feel helpless and powerless and hopeless. They don't know how to tackle the problem. That's actually there's to solve and so this book was written for for all those people out there who are problem solvers and leaders but don't yet know it right and I really WanNa get into that because I know that's a big focus of this book about about being a problem solver and contributing and and collaborating with others you know one of the things I wanna I wanNA step into here. Is You know let's let's look back a little bit because you ran. Hewlett Packard a you ran for Senate in California in two thousand and ten and in the presidential run up in two thousand sixteen you were pretty much an unknown and many people may have thought that you didn't have that background but you did run for Senate. You actually were a an adviser to John. McCain's run as well so we'll talk about your stepping into politics a little bit. I says listen go back a bit because that doesn't seem to be a part of the the Jeeva well. I like challenges and I run two problems. I always have when I figured out that I like challenge and I I run the problems. That's when I really began to achieve impact and so what I saw or a whole bunch of problems now oh george Washington seddon seventeen eighty-nine seventeen eighty-nine the trouble with political parties and politics is it will come to be all about winning and it won't be about problem solving and I think that's true. I think we have too many professional politicians. I know something about about the reform of large institutions which I think we sorely need and so what I saw was a set of problems that I thought I had some capability and a different approach to solving and so why not but again at the same time crime we're of generation that certainly has been very biased towards men and much less towards women. We've all heard about the glass ceiling but we've also heard about the glass cliff you know. Do you think it's fantasy see that you were hired to stood upon Hewlett Packard and that's what you did and then you know then then you've got. You've got grief for it. Well look when you're different. It's different. That's just a fact different different. It's different so if you look different or you act differently than most of the people around you it will be different for you and it has been different for for me all my life because as you point out I was introduced to corporate America when there weren't a lot of people that looked like me and I got got involved in politics when there were a lot of people on the debate stage who look like me and so what I mean when I say it's different when you're different is the expectations. Shin's are different. Scrutiny is different. The criticism is different. The treatment is drift. It's true on the other hand. You can let that get in your way or you can just be realistic about the fact that you will encounter different things than others do and plow ahead anyway. I was hired Hewlett Packard to transform a company that it lost its way. I ended up getting fired by a dysfunctional board at the end of six years. I don't have a single regret about my time. There and I think my track record has stood the test of time but there's also no question that I was treated differently all throughout my career because I look different and there's no question tonight was treated differently as a presidential candidate. That's the way it is and in some cases. There are advantages to being different but it's a hard road road. There's no question all your listeners who are different know what I'm talking about. Oh sure and certainly I fit into that category my own way. I think anybody who's a really fits into that category and I think that part of the challenges that we are looking to make things the same and and obviously lead the not a and the unification idea is different than the normalization and I think that that you know rather than same unique and I'm the unique and what do I bring them onto. You bring versus what we all need to be equal but I think that you know let's look at it from a point of women in leadership but I really want to hear about your point of view that because I'm very supportive of women Lee she bites they. Can't we need a lot. More women leaders is and whether that's on the right of the left it doesn't matter in business and politics in every form. We need more women leaders because I think we need more for empathy. We need more compassion. We need community. What is your thoughts on women in leadership and the fact that as absurd there's there seems to be bless human and often a glass cliff in that woman is promoted to the position. What accompanies about to go over the cliff so it was a full? Can you tell us a little bit about that or your thoughts are on that well. That's a wide range of topics. Put let me start by just quoting you some facts so in corporate America today. corporations in this country are spending eight billion dollars in a year on diversity training sixty percent aboard rooms in America have no women the number of corporate officers in the boardroom who are women sits at about sixteen percent overall less for people. All of color and those numbers have not moved in over twenty five years. There are more men named James who are CEO's. There are women who are CEO's start with yeah. Wow One name James Wow James outnumbers all the women wanted people stop just because that's a great way to put it because that really puts it in perspective picking the name James Those more James's at the top of the line and they're all women yeah and it's worse for people of Color Okay so now. The question is why because it's not that we're not aware of this problem we are. It's lot that people aren't spending money to solve the problem they are and and yet it's not changing and I think the reason it's not changing his twofold number one. I think people think of diversity still role as a nice to do the right thing to do but while it's a good thing to do the right thing to do what they're not saying is it is a business imperative that I have a diverse team. In fact the data supports that Liz a business imperative diverse teams yield better outcomes diverse boards boards yield better returns over time and yet people don't yet accepted as in their own self interest to work with others different than them which brings us to the second the problem and the second problem is it's just human nature but we are all more comfortable dealing with people like us. It's in order to collaborate with people who are like us who think like us who looked like us who finished our sentences for us. It's hard to collaborate with people who are different different and so people choose not to unless they know it's in their vital self interest to do so. It's one of the reasons why I mean. I built divers teams all of my career. I still do it to this day because I know they yield better results but it's one of the reasons why stress collaboration what does it take to collaborate effectively so much in all of the work. I do with both for profit and nonprofit organizations why talk so much about collaboration in my book. Find Your Way Way until and unless people learn to collaborate with someone who's different than them in the service of solving a problem they're not go cheap as much impact as they want number one but number two were never going to make progress on giving everyone regardless of their appearance parents the opportunity to fulfill their potential so let's let's holding on that a little bit so this this term which I think is one of those ones that's thrown around like light. Diversity is thrown around. I don't know the I actually don't know I've been doing this. I've been leadership leadership guy for thirty five years. I've been had I've had my show for eleven years and I hear these words that are you know the the phrase of the week of the phrase of the year even and one of them is diversity but another one. That's really come up. I wrote about it in my last book which is collaboration and I don't think the people really a young understand what that means. What does collaboration mean to you. What is the message about collaboration you want all of you is to really get people cannot fulfill their own potential for leadership without others. There is nothing worth doing nothing worse doing that. An individual can achieve on their own period so if you want to be a leader later if you want to have an impact if you want to achieve if you want to make a difference you absolutely -lutely have to learn how to do work with others and by the way there's so many people who are high achievers were listening to this. Who say you know Gosh? Sometimes it's a pain in the neck to work with other people and you know what it's just easier if I do it myself and I know what to do. I don't need to collaborate UH others and they're gonNA miss something big. They're gonNA make a mistake. They're not going to achieve their impact. So there are how to's of collaboration aberration things that you need to do to learn how to become a good collaborator but it starts by understanding that I cannot achieve my own potential. I cannot not achieve my own goals. I cannot be a real leader unless I'm willing to collaborate with others full stop but there's this mentality intelligently again. I think it's generational so the lone wolf mentality crazy idea hero mentality romantic Komo hero exactly it's. It's an in psychology which is my background. Eight is the the hero winner psychology and the hero winner is I'm. I am the hero and I have to win all costs. That's what happened in the last or I alone can fix it yet. Exactly it's the same same same same thing it's just and so you know this is fascinating me. Kelly because you know you're talking about this understanding about collaboration and and one of the things we're seeing right now is tribal politics. You know we'll all go to rally around the Republican Body therefore Donald Trump even even if we disagree with him. We're all GONNA rally around. There is no democratic leader right now but of Democratic Party but this rallying around a party rather than collaborating with or even within your own party seems to be like a we'll just tuck the full lock and Yoyo. You're the boss. It's it's like it to me and I know I've seen this from my own. Research is the we have not changed leadership really really we. We like to talk about it but Lee has not really changed since Roman Times. It's the same stupid system that actually brought down the Romans and we need to a different. I agree with you. Fully we need collaboration. But how do we get people away from this tribal metality because they are tearing the people who different well all the way back to George Washington. The trouble with politics is it will come to be only about winning the first the thing that a real leader not someone position or title first thing a real leader needs to understand. It's actually not about so you. It's not about you. It's not about you. It's not about you being a hero. It's not about you getting the next promotion. Although you may achieve with those things what it's about is changing the order of things for the better a leader changes the order of things the better they make an impact and so one of the hardest things about leadership and one of the most important elements actually redefine leadership is to take the eye out of it. I don't mean to be falsely modest. I don't mean to underestimate the impact that each of us is individuals can make an elite has catalytic impact but I do mean to say you measure the success of a leader by the impact they they have the problems they solve the opportunities they achieve and as soon as you decide. You know what it's actually not about me. Success is not getting the next promotion. Although that might be a great thing success is making things better and you can't make things better in. You can't can't solve a problem if you're acting like a hero all by yourself. You may have people pledge their loyalty to you may get a big promotion. You may get a super office but you're not leading doing something else and if I could just say I think people also confuse management and leadership are sued and management managers are bad people but managers do the best they can within the system within existing constraints and conditions. We have a lot of managers who take on leader titles. You're not leading. They're managing. They're doing the best they can. Within existing constraints and conditions in I think political parties are filled filled with managers who are doing the best they can within existing constraints and conditions and the goal is to win which is very different than a goal all of changing the order of things for the veteran actually solving a problem. It's not just winning self-preservation too but in politics it's winning is self preservation so preservation of me. I'm I'm very political. I studied a lot of politics. I'm fascinated by you know I've watched the people who are genuinely care about the the the the constituents also and then they get into congress system the system and they're in that system and they go gotta go to raise money today but I want. I want to serve my people I want. I want to go after this bill. No no you gotTA raise money today. Because it's this cell. It's a machine and I think that's so people so many people forget that and that's why I think that politics has to actually actually come back to the individual and say what am I gonNA do. Which I know is a big part of the work that you're doing with your foundations which is bringing things back but I still WANNA come after this question sandwiches. How do we get people to collaborate. Who are in the system? The that's the problem that I see is that in there in that system there in the self preservation Asian and yes I agree with you never going to really fulfil your potential unless you're collaborate but at the same time many of them. I I love to know your input on. How do we leverage them to say. Okay Steph out coach. Do something different is he. I think part of the problem is one of the reasons I wrote the book. Find your way. I think part of the problem is that we're all very frustrated with politics and politicians and so we keep trying trying to ask ourselves the question you just asked how do we change them in my message in this book and my message to all the organizations that I work with is forget them Let's change ourselves. If you're tired of waiting for someone else to solve the problem in your community and roll up your sleeves collaborate with others lead and solve the problem in your community we're not going to none of us are going to change someone else. What we can do is choose to lead in our own lives. I choose to collaborate with others in our own communities and actually make a positive difference or the other things I've learned over and over again as people closest to the problem know best how to solve it actually honestly a whole bunch of politicians in Washington. DC have no idea how to solve the problems but I go out and do work in communities unity's every single day and people actually understand the problem that is impacting them times they think they can't do anything about it but it turns turns out with the right support the right training right inspiration the right collaboration right catalytic leadership that they actually do know how to solve the problem and that's what we ought to be doing more. Don't point your finger at someone else and tell them to be different. Let's solve the problem right in front of us again I've been here so right because we we we have we tug the full. Ach relooked to the leadership and we say okay well. There's a problem you fix it but the willingness to roll a bus leaves actually take that on is is what will change leadership in every possible form because it will demand the collaborative capitalistic leadership that you're talking about that. I definitely think we need when you when you when you do this work now with the foundations you you you've got the unlocking potential foundation. Tell us a little bit about what that is and how it works. 'cause I know it. It ties very arief sweetly into your book. I find your way. Tell us about that. Well find your way is written to coalesce everything that I've learned about problem solving and leadership in a way that is accessible to anybody. They don't have to have an NBA. They don't even have to be in a business. The unlocking potential foundation takes everything that I know about problem uh-huh solving and teamwork and collaboration and leadership and white courage and character matter in Y- applies it with the great team of Folks Who Work With Me To nonprofit organizations in communities across the country because it turns out that while a lot of people in corporate America are used to getting a bunch the leadership training effective or ineffective however it may be folks in nonprofit organizations for dealing with incredibly difficult problems tmz don't always get the same investment in their human potential and so we do what we call leadership labs we work with people on the ground we give them coaching in for a period of six months afterwards so whether it's wounded warriors or disabled children or adults in through Easter seals or whether whether it's organizations that work with the homeless organizations who work with immigrant communities what we're doing is helping people become more effective the problem solvers were helping people unlock their potential for leadership whoever they are and wherever they are let me just give you a very very tiny example when I mean into because it's the most surprising example I can think of illustrate the points. We've just been talking talking about the don't look at other people deal with what you have in your in your own backyard. I have a podcast as well and it's it's called by example and in that podcast. I lift up people that I think are actually leading because they're solving problems. Some of them are famous some of them. You've never heard of well. I just had an episode. I have not yet put it out there but I just finished recording an episode with a young man who became concerned about the homeless community in his neighborhood and he he decided that what he was going to do was buy chicken sandwiches and distribute them to the homeless and while he did that he was going to talk to the homeless person gives them a hug and I asked him why he did this and he said well. They're people just like because and I said well. What do you do with the problem and he said you have to face it now. The young man I'm talking about. It just started kindergarten. He's five years old. WHOA is name is Austin parine and he decided that what you do with the problem is face it and what he's done along with his dad. TJ WHO's an awesome guy as well. They raised over ninety thousand dollars nationally and now Austin's ambition is to build a homeless shelter in his community unity. Okay rolled a five year old fighter old what but he said you know what why this is my problem. I have allowance. Money was his allowance money. I can help feed these people. I can make them feel loved and valued. I have a problem I can face it and that is the beginning of a journey of leadership. You have a problem. Let's figure out how to face it and Austin and figured out. There were lots of people who's helping needed but he was the one who said he's going to do something that is that is inspiring. Thank you for sharing that. That's so awesome. Just I love it when somebody who really steps into leadership but when somebody happens to be five it's blood the rest of us and so but we get so confused again. People want to check out Austin parade on by example sample go to Carly Fiorina Dot Com but the point is we get so confused. About what leadership is we get way late. We get waylaid by people's expectations nations we get waylaid by the corner office beckoning us we get waylaid by all these things and in fact leadership in his purest form is to figure out the problem that you are meant to solve your have the courage to step out and take criticism that comes with changing things to have the character character to keep going when the going gets tough to have the humility and the embassy to collaborate with others because you know you need them and you actually are prepared to hear what they have to say and to see possibilities the possibility that things actually can be better. I don't just have to sit around and complain about why it's so bad. You put a bunch of stuff that I'd love to impact but but the one thing I want to go after is this you said you've talked about the expectations and I think that we have all been brought up to. Have you know that we take on expectations of others. One of my quote says that we trade our authenticity for approval and that's a sad thing however you look at your life. I mean you know you raise through the ranks you side as a secretary in a law firm. I think real estate foam even worse and then you went on you you. Your Dad was a federal judge in law professor. You went to Law School School for about twenty minutes. You dropped out of that lead. Stop there. I mean that I mean there's gotta be an enormous amount of expectation on a federal judge's daughter or who goes to law school. Drop out must have felt pretty like older by you know. I'm on the rollercoaster here. Well actually it was the most difficult decision of my young life. I was apparent pleaser. I wasn't a rebel. I was the Middle Child who pleased my parents. It's I always met their expectations and my dad wanted me to go to law school. My mom thought it was a great idea. I was going so it was increased. It was excruciating waiting to quit and yet I was so miserable in law school that it forced me to come to grips with what's more important here pleasing someone else even my beloved parents or finding a life that I can live. I can live and I decided I had to find a life that I could live now. It got scarier. It was very scary to tell them they. They expressed grave disappointment in me but it got even scarier because I had no plan. No I not only had I just dropped out out of law school but my degree was in mediaeval history and philosophy. I mean literally unemployable degree for retirement. Yes exactly clearly so all I can do is get a job that I could handle and the job that I could handle was being a receptionist. I wasn't even the main secretary receptionist for or nine person real estate for that's what I did. It paid my small little bills but six months wants into that job to men who worked there came to my desk and said you know we've watched you. You could do more. Do you want to know what we do and I have never were forgotten. What it feels like when someone takes a chance on you never forgotten that and the truth is everybody needs someone to take take a chance on them? Everybody does and because they took a chance on me. I saw possibilities in myself that I didn't know there. So what I also learned is that none of us realize our true potential unless we go through who something challenging and difficult you know that but I think sometimes people expect the ride to be smooth news. If you're GONNA tap point you really made of you got to really be challenged and that's hard. I think it's extraordinarily hard and I think we all looking for the easy way but I know after all these years that I've done that. I've not met a leaders not been through it to use the term when I look at your story you know there's a lot in the aside from from sending you back on law and dad's expectations mum stations you know You ran for Senate in California. You didn't get you ran in the presidential race and I whether I agreed. Politics is actually irrelevant to me was relevant is the way you were treated. I think it was appalling because I don't think that anybody should be treated like that based on bizarre on the images just it's ridiculous and then on top of that you know. Let's also remember if it's okay for us to go there. In in nineteen ninety I feltham out and gus masterpieces. My life was changed dramatically because I actually died five times in two thousand nine. I believe it was. You were diagnosed with breast cancer so you've had banned. You've been hit. You've fallen off your mountain several times. Can you walk us through because it's it's a nice idea that that happened. Then I changed my mind but that's not the truth. That's not the process has more to walk us through a little bit of a can we won't be able to understand you the woman the human being not just the the CEO now just a politician not not just the person who runs foundations but you tell tell us a little bit about what experiences of be not done have been like in how you have gone internal around that one of the things that I would have to say is I have learned courage through practice. Sometimes people have described me as fearless is not true. Courage is in the absence of fear. It's knowing how to get over it and I spent so much of my life being afraid of something being afraid of disappointing. My parents being afraid of failing. My very first customer. Meeting was held in a strip club because that's where the men had lunch and they thought it would be an easy way to get rid of me to intimidate me to make sure I couldn't do my job. I mean I could tell you a thousand thousands stories of situations in which I was afraid and handed decide. Am I going to get over over this and get on with it or not. I start there because I think courage is the most fundamental quality of leadership no matter what we try and do if we're changing the order of things for the better. We're going to get criticized. We're going to get treated badly. It's just part of it and so I actually we feel as I know you do in reading something about you. I feel very fortunate to have had to learn courage bridge. I was always different and so I got criticized about a lot of things when I became a CEO for the first time the day I was announced as the new CEO of Hewlett Packard. I was the first woman the first outsider the first non engineer I didn't income from Silicon Valley. I didn't come from the computer industry and the conversation around me was what kind of suit route I was wearing. There was persistent rumor that I built a pink marble bathroom that I traveled with a hair and makeup artists. I mean the stuff that was around me was just unbelievably strange but by the time I got there had been through it enough. I'd learned how to be brave. I learned learned how to ignore the criticism in two thousand nine. You are right I was diagnosed with breast cancer. A year. Later daughter died of addiction addiction so I understand. I bring those two things up because in you do this you understand this as well. There are existential fears. I am going going to die. Someone I love is going to die. Those existential fears call upon our courage but there are also other kinds of fears that can be equally debilitating. I'm GONNA look stupid. People are GonNa Make Fun of me. I'M GONNA fail I will disappoint point people's expectations. What are people saying about me at the Water Cooler and what I've seen in my life is people are as flattened by those non existential fears a sometimes people are by truly existential fears and the other thing. I've learned is that everybody's everybody's afraid of something and so until unless we can get over our fear and find courage we will never fulfill our potential that is just part of the human condition so when you have to be challenged sometimes life throws it at you but how I've gotten not my fears is I go through a little exercise and this is in the book the first thing I do after freaking out about whatever it is still promoted because because I think it's really important the I want everybody to get yeah. We all freak out you freak out offering cats. You have that moment. I don't know when it happens. Maybe it's back to law school for me. I freaked out standing in the shower standing in the shower. Going Oh my God. I think I'm going to quit okay. You have your own my God. I have to go into a strip club. Oh my God they're asking me about my designer suit on my God I might die. Oh my God the next president United States is saying he doesn't like like my face on twitter whatever it is you have this moment of freak out and then exercise that I teach that I've gone through my whole. Life is name your fear name. It say it out loud triple credit if you write it down. What am I afraid of. What am I afraid Ada. I'm afraid my parents won't love me. I'm afraid I'M GONNA look stupid in my suit and my little bow tie and my briefcase in the Strip club whatever it is named your fear and then once you name it it already has lost some of its power when you can say the second you say say it. It's not quite as powerful anymore and then the next step is to say okay. Let me think through. What is the worst thing that can happen. What's the worst first thing that can happen here. Deal with it understand it prepare for it. The worst thing that can happen is ally. The worst thing that can happen is my daughter will die and then you start to prepare for how am I going to handle that and then you get to what's the best thing that can happen and in my experience if you've taken the time and again. I have a lot of practice with fear. If you've taken the time to name your fear if you've taken the time to really think through what's the worst thing that can happen and with those two steps. The horror that you're contemplating loses loses evermore of its power. You actually never can predict the best thing that's going to happen. It turns out to be far better than you thought. It would be SOM- Tom. Blessing will come along. Maybe multiple blessings mo so in I mean you no you're talking about these big existential moments in life and we've had those and what about this just the truth of the matter is you. You know he's a freak out moments but we also have those moments where you wake up and you go. I don't WANNA get up. Go to get so mad about okay now. You know I mean I when I when I watch what was going on in twenty six months so you're taking those hits. That must've been mornings where you want to just pull the flank of your no. I don't WANNA go out. Actually there weren't there. Weren't there really weren't and maybe it's because first of all again I've learned the critics are always the loudest critics are always the loudest. You saw me taking blows what I saw day. After Day. After day was people who lifted me up and who told me I was lifting them up. I was doing something that I thought was making an impact so if you're GONNA lead if you're going to have an impact if you're going to change the order of things the better at a certain certain point you have to start ignoring all the naysayers and all the critics so there was never a moment when I wanted to quit. If I had felt that way I would have quit. I ended up quitting when it was clear. I couldn't win and while I always knew it was a long shot. There's no point in doing something when there literally is no way to achieve the goal so if people are pulling their head they're the covers up over their head head and saying Oh my God. I don't WanNa do this anymore. That's a little bit like me and law school sink about. Why if if you don't want to be doing what you're doing. Maybe you need to be doing something else unbelievable so I think what I was suggesting is. I think there are days that are not not true. What I mean by that is there's a day is like off you know today's it just feels that way but the something bigger and so oh I can get out of bed now. That's what I was asking really for. You is like on the days where you feel like that where you feel like you know. What is it the pulls as you out of bed. What is it that gets you out into the world as as Kelly Arena c. I guess I don't agree with your premise. Maybe if if I may be frank I think absolutely look. We all have days. Were depressed our days when we feel less motivated than others. There's but the point I'm trying to make is if it's really a question of Oh my God I can't do this anymore. Then there is no satisfaction his faction in what you're doing and then you need to be doing something else. That's how I felt in law school. There was no satisfaction no joy and and therefore ultimately no purpose in what I was doing so I stopped doing. I'm not disagreeing with anything. You've said actually fully agree with it. I was just on the day when when you just feel that way on a day you know. Is there a motivating factor for you. Is there a purpose for you. That gets you out of bed. I know that if I have a day where I'm feeling a bit down I returned to my personal purposes and it's like okay get up because that's more important than the way I feel today because I know how I feel is semi permanent but I know my truth is always That's so that's my core of what I was referring to rather than I've certainly I don't believe there's such a thing as quitting in the context of the way that most people see I think smart people know when to walk away from something that is actually not not honoring who they are. Not You know you talk about following your own soul. I talk about that too so you're talking about doing stuff that walking away from things that don't own your soul. All are not just in when we evaluated. It's not gonNA work that so I get totally where you're saying about that. Moment in the show was that moment of going this is not my path and I know that's all of what this book is about is about finding what is that for you and how to how to stay on it right. Yes and I guess the other point I fully agree with everything you just said and I guess the other point. I'm trying to make is that and I make it in the book. I don't think that life is about a destination. I don't think life is about. Oh my gosh. I'm going to be miserable. If I don't win. The presidency aren't gonNA be miserable. If I don't get this exact corner off this job I think life is about out a path a path of how we behave pass of the problems we choose to tackle a pass of courage and character in in collaboration with others and making an impact and so I guess I measure my days in terms of am I doing things that lift me up and my having having a positive impact and making a positive contribution and my being true to myself and if I can answer those three questions in the affirmative that it is a day worth living absolutely pflieger that so so tell us Kelly with everything. That's going on for you and all the movements forward. What is do you find yourself presently most curious about curious about well. You know one of the things that gets me going wing in the morning just to Segue from your earlier question is there is a certain look. I think the highest calling of a leader is to unlock potential -sential in others. It is why I've never forgotten how it felt. When somebody saw potential in me highest calling the leaders to unlock potential and others and leaders solve aw problems so that is fuel for me? There's a certain look when people do more than they think they're capable capable of doing when someone's potential is unlocked. There is a look that people get when people are inspired. There's there's a look people. Get in there is it is the same look the world and it doesn't matter if you're young child or you're an old man or woman. It doesn't matter it's the same. I'm look and for me. That look is fuel fuel. So what am I curious about. What I'm curious. Suri is about is the you talked about fitting in. I worry maybe it's more accurate to say. I worry about it. I know will the people have so much innate potential and power. I worry I'm curious in an age each where we are capable of so much how we've gotten to this place where so many people feel like they are capable of so little and and they're spending so much energy for approval and fitting in I mean my gosh the the photos on instagram and all these crazy things we do on social media and all around them are opportunities to make a difference so I'm curious about. I'm curious about that and I'm concerned about that. It's a fascinating polarity that we live in a time where is the greatest grace opportunity for self-expression and we've ever known for leadership and for impact fully ship and impacting self expression of something magnificent within those what I call the greatness and at the same time we are at a catastrophic moment of loneliness. We see that is epidemic. Loneliness is at pedantic and tribalism together terrible terrible combination so these weird polarized right polarity which is I'm a member of this tribe no matter what and it's almost jingoistic in his content of okay. This is my tribe no matter what and at the same time. I'm so alone that's why I'm in this stupid drive as opposed to standing out and standing alone and that that binding community in the process exactly and that's it so I I am a great believer in that in in the Ui unique in your expression but you need to bring others into that so they can find find their uniqueness and step into that Dan greatness that we can all leverage into the world and make a better place but how how do we get across that barrier of that tribalness. That's that's fascinating for me because I look at some of the things that I see Republicans doing and I go. I really like that. I look at some things were Democrats to say. I really like that and it doesn't matter because you're in the decamp and you're in the outcome we're never going to it's almost a curse but you know what that goes on. In lots of different species not just politics and I guess back to the conversation. We had a a couple minutes ago. You see I think we get over both are loneliness and our tribalism when we sit down and solve the problem in front of us so when I you know people will talk to me and say wow you know I can't do this and doing that. And how do I bring up potential find a problem find a problem and solve it not a problem. Not Somebody else's problem not some some big. You know big huge problem the problem that's right in front of you. There are problems that each of us are meant to solve. That's why told the story of Austin. Okay Austin Green found three homeless guys and say you know what I'm not waiting for someone else that I'm going to go feed them. A chicken can sandwich. Was it a systemic solution no but those people feel fundamentally different after they had been touched by Austin Green mean you bet you bet so the point is what I tell people. Don't wait for someone else. Don't bitch about someone else. Don't decry the state of the world. Find the problem that you are meant to solve and find someone else who's also impacted by that problem and guaranteed both of you will have some good ideas about how to solve it and collaborate insolvent and make Progress I for me. These acts the thing that stands out about what you're talking about. Here is fine. The problem and let's come together to fix the problem and tribal thinking is never going to do that because we might agree as never. GonNa come together and and I love what you're saying about. Let's push that away and say okay. How can I step in. This is my I te problem in my community. This is my problem to solve. Is anybody else. Can I put up and say they want to join in. You do fantastic. Let's do something about sir. It's is pragmatic but it's also deeply soulful in connected an important for each of us you do well you know it's what I learned so I started in this big company. My first meetings in the Strip club. My resume reads medieval history and philosophy law school drop-out Secretary Secretary. I am not destined for success okay but everywhere I looked I saw problems and I saw people bitching about the problems gossiping about the problems problems but nobody was doing anything about the problems in so what I did was start talking to people. I tell stories about this book. What tell me about a problem you have okay now. Tell me about an idea you have to solve the problem and then we'd go tackle it. It doesn't have to be huge. It doesn't have to be world hunger. There are problems uh-huh. We are meant to solve their right in front of us. I love it's simple and it's powerful. This has been wonderful. You're ready for the lightning round around the lightning round. Well you can make it a lightening around. My answers may not be lightning but I get the point. What makes you cry as Incentives Thaddeus. Oh usually honestly I cry when I see or I hear the best of humanity so a beautiful piece of music will make me cry. A beautiful display of empathy or leadership will make me cry way. I don't usually cry. I do cry sometimes very tragic things but mostly I cry when I am touched by the best of the human human spirit from testing makes you cry laughing. Yeah Oh gosh there. There's so many things but on the flip flipside honestly people can be so ridiculous. Sometimes that my latest favorite example I had never heard of this. I'll show you how out of out of a Diam but have you ever heard of muck banging. Okay well Muck Bang. It sounds vaguely obscene. Maybe it it is but muck banging camp comes from Korea but it is the process of eating a whole bunch of food really really fast and filming yourself why why you do it and putting it up on Youtube. Okay and there are people who become millionaires muck banging well. This is such a big thing now that one of the major hotels here here in Washington. DC called the W hotel has a muck banging room service menu for two hundred and twenty five dollars a night. You can order a Muck Bang Menu and they will give you a stand for your phone and you can video tape herself eating this and putting it up on Youtube that makes me laugh out loud. How how exactly that is crazy. That makes me laugh insane okay. I'm not go to that one because that we spend an hour just talking about just how crazy that is. The beauty of humanity makes me cry and the foibles the foolishness sometimes if people made me laugh in in a parallel universe who are you. What do you do. Oh I have no idea honestly I have no idea I only know one life. I only know one set of choices. I've made I spend no time thinking about out what if should have would have playful so has your mom was an artist. You dead was a lawyer you you. Maybe maybe you guess a musician. I guess yeah I guess particularly I. I spend no time thinking about it. That's why I can't look through Maybe a singer. You're very cool any particular kind of sin now. Gosh you've taken it way past. I I was thinking about it. Does the idea entirely in mind I I you know somebody asked the question came out of we were out of Work Kim with or their corporate team and the codes looked me one day and said in a parallel universe. What would you be. I know I don't think about anything else. I love what I do a my wife. My wife is actually my business. Partner is just go for Soda and she goes who you kidding. I go watch because you'd be Gardner an interest. That's true I would 'cause. I Love I love and I don't think about it but when I'm there that's the only thing that exists so it's very recode an interesting thought thank you. You're welcome as we finish one of the things I like to always finish way is to ask my guests to show one piece of very practical advice. I think you've probably already advice that you'd like for our listeners out of us to go go away and put into action perfectly in the next twenty four hours so they can actually take in what it is that you've been sharing with us well to good solve. Don't worry about what other people say about you. Don't let it get under your skin. Worry about the choices you make every day. The rest will fall into place fantastic Kelly. It's been a real pleasure. I want to thank you for taking the time to be with us. Today is wonderful and my pleasure would you please share with our audience where they can find out more about you and all the wonderful resources you asked to offer. Yes please go to CARLY FIORINA DOT COM. If you have an organization that you think might benefit from our work you can also find out where to get the book there or the podcast or all the myriad of other programs we offer Carly Fiorina Dot Com. Thank you so much and you can hang out with other conscious. It's just leaders and chat about this episode steps owns by simply going to facebook Lincoln into groups there and you can chat about these shows and you can hire me. He does Baroness Speaker of strategies for your organization can simply go to full Montego leadership dot com forward slash consulting or full monty leadership shift dot com forward slash speaking leave your weapons research consistently shows that even the fastest growing companies face exactly the same Jones as you do spending time money the energy never attracting training developing top talent but also having the same challenges them leaving before they get our Y if that's challenges facing then income so to us at Monte leadership dot com but we provide you central leadership skills to rekindle it amplify it and lows yes. It's inside of your organization by tapping into full monty ship. Don't come because you can't outsource authenticity WANNA. Thank you for sharing this show with everyone. You know so next time. Stay curious my friend. Stay curious about the problem. You came here. H Soul stay curious about the courage confined to solve it the world need you to be in your greatest so find the old way I'm baron tapping into your deep greatness to reach the next level of clarity hocus pocus improper business to life and leadership in fact I.

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Why You Must Hire Character and Train Skill | Hiring People in a World of Moral Relativity

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

13:51 min | 2 years ago

Why You Must Hire Character and Train Skill | Hiring People in a World of Moral Relativity

"Character and trained skill hiring people in a world of moral relativity think about them again. Hiring people in a world of moral relatively in today's world people are taught if it feels good do it who am I to judge you for saying that's wrong. My friend, it is imperative that you and I hire for character and train for skill especially in today's twisted in hyper put it the correct world where seventy five percent of employees steal from the workplace, according to the US chamber and CBS news. My friend today over eighty percent of potential employees are now lying on their resumes in this Letitia, hyper politically, correct world. We live in you must hire for character. And then trained for skill again. You must hire per character and train for skill. And so on today's show, I thought I would celebrate my favorite web developer and coder while also showing. How many coders I've had to go through how many web developers I've had to go through in route to building one of the top three. Search engine optimization companies on the planet. Our web optimization company. Make your life epic. Clem shows don't need celebrity narrator to introduce this show. They show. Two-man eight kids co created by two different women thirteen multimillion dollar businesses. Ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to thrive time Shaw. So Devon a how long ago did you start working here? This is a staff meeting started back in two thousand fourteen he doesn't four five years five years. And I believe the time you is outside and working for WalMart. Driving design inside wife. Okay. So your wife would roller credit, and you do graph design inside guess in. How did you hear about this job this through couple people who heard about it through Arthur Arthur Reno from chiefly face, try to mind, and so you wanted to come work here. Right. And a person similar to what you spritz Felicia. Because we should you were told that you could never be a what you were told you could hear me a what? What are you? Why could see you were told what I was told? I've never going to be right in the same geniuses. That said that also told Devon he doesn't have what it's needed to be code. Is that right, basically, we're not hiring right now. So I'm gonna come to work for how much did we did you turn free? So he came to work for free, and how long did you work for free? I have three weeks oak. So now because we're going to turn this into a podcast. We can't Mitch because you mentioned the name, it's considered slander stroke. But it's considered to be not slander if you live. Think about that. It's slander, it's true. But you're considering why about team up think about that for a second? It's slander if you tell people what's true, but if you fly about and then it's not so look singly coders. We'll put will start little bit Mr. teeth. Okay. Mr. teeth because how many coders county coders have you seen? At least five at least what kind of weird stuff with Mr. T new. New drugs. Take weird photos of himself. Hooker's online. Oh, yeah. That's ordering hookers online. See? And then I think PD to a client and pets. I'm married clock these things so then I'm like, well, probably should fire. You know, the guy who had to meet for a variety of reasons. Right. So I bring it up. We should fire. The guy brought to me of well, you're slandering this person's character. How is it such as being honest everybody here wants to Khokar online today that's grounds for termination, my mind or drugs, maybe that maybe you could but you couldn't do drugs to or maybe getting a client and his married of the sexually transmitted disease. Maybe that to move on the negativity what kind of a bomb nations. Did you see because he he's last fans, Dan? Easy last man standing. What kind of stuff did you see? Never coating so coding, we have one guy who would break the site on purpose. So that it would be broken. And then he would send us notifications about tickets by he'd break it. So we fix it. We create a self sustaining job. Literally break the site every day, and then say some drum with the fixed, and there's these three guys that can you saw the oh, all right. All right. Silly. Brought in another guy running outside coders for another company. We'll call it Mr. b and he brought in Mr. Kent, Mr. Bean's special. K b what did keep what did Mr. KU or? They. They work. Sometimes not very often. I'm paying like I think I was paying seven thousand a month to each guy and they ever. I don't think so in total how many coders have been here out of your since except for you. I mean think about if you all coders counter fingers. How many have we gone through to find the diligent Devon sin from heaven gift from God? I almost cry when I see him off. Sometimes I'm just like. How many gosh? Coming up. I think we've probably had we've had at least eight eight coders, probably buddy. And I personally spent over one point two million dollars on coders. It's crazy. So it makes Devon awesome. As he has awesome character. It's just wanted to peek into your mind and see you could share their body. Why do you not screw me over on the basis? I think part of it's just gone. I guess how has raised. You know, you always wanna treat people how you'd like to be treated now part of it is just lot of reciprocity for me in my family like clay, Vanessa and all the thrive team has just meant so much to us just as a family because whenever I started working here. Like, I wasn't making very much doing design on the side doing freelance stuff. So my wife was bringing in most of the income just working fulltime at WalMart. And then once I actually started getting paid here. It was enough that she didn't have to do that anymore. And so now, she gets to be home with our kids, and you know, have fun with them. Raise them teach them stuff that you know, public schools wouldn't necessarily be able to do. So just means a lot a lot to us that. So just going off of that. You know, why why would you ever want to repay that with you know, anything other than just thanks and coming in and trying to do my best every day. But he is best everyday and perfect perfect now, but the idea that he's been diligent, but I wonder to she put this I had this idea with seven years ago to mentor. Seven years ago. But I think we're down right down our country seventeen percent of Americans after you said where do you get that magazine says eighty three percent of people lion? The restaurants. Eighty three percent now, according to US chamber, what percentage of people still in the workplace. Seventy five is the number. And then what percentage of people this was Craig what percentage of people in American company at the website is Ashley Madison website is what's up upset? Supposedly secret fears. In America, right now, we just passed for fifty five million accounts in America. That means that our country one out of six people hasn't Ashley Madison County. Seventy eight percent of the Mets surveyed seventy by Washington Post. Check the box. They've had an affair fishy. Seventy eight percent. And I said say we have a bubble here because I didn't John awesome gentleman. It doesn't jump do doesn't. Join ashville. Yeah. So we have vetted. It the best. We can make sure no morons here. Now. There is a moron. You're gonna tell me get out of here. We've got a really cool team here because you guys are diligent Harper people. But that's what you know. Sometimes you don't hear the stories Denver. I mean when you're seeing people all around you screwing us turned involves invoices. And all that. I mean, did you think yourself they're going to get pushed, and yeah, I knew eventually it would come out. I mean, everything that anything that you try to hide as eventually gonna come to light. So it's not worth it. But Devin has been very very diligent we started. He was say, okay, Cody, and I would say now has gotten very very good at it. But I just want to encourage you said you've been hearing howling in just about Fokkers years, and he's been honest diligent guys. Great husband. He's a great day out. He's awesome. And I don't have any reservations about him coming over my house or whatever until same way about the Browns fill. There's a lot of you guys feel that way about but I didn't superpower is diligence. And so I would encourage you to just. Listen to that podcast demonstrated. The great guy for a long time. But I can't express guys how much diligent people need to me because they're so rip. What happens is you? Discover Mr. man is when someone works for me, they get fired three a, squirrel. And if I tell you what actually happened that's called slander is it not. Never because you you apply to your you told me, what did you say? Which part you said you asked me, you said have heard some things. Oh, yeah. What did you say personally from her employer about you that you've done in the past? Wondering and just interesting though. But if you tell someone the truth about what someone actually does it slander. But if you say what's not true, if I were to say that person was a great guy. He got let go for personal then I'm like a good guy. But if I were to tell you he got fired for her hookers. Then I'm a bad person. You see how that works? Our culture how Jack so I just wanted to a big free round laws for Devon three the most diligent. Denman know that he we're coaching clients if we couldn't trust that he wouldn't log into a client's website do weird stuff. If we couldn't trust that he wouldn't scrutiny lower by taking their passwords or we could a lot of guys do that crap. And if we couldn't trust and a lot of things fall apart here so throughout the week just high five Demi, let's hear one more time for. Hire for character and trained for skill. Trust me, I've learned the hard way. If you have somebody on your team right now who super talented, but super nefarious super-low character and somebody who has got serious psychological in life problems. Somebody who's hiring a Hooker in from your office. Computers. Somebody who is having an affair with employers in your office. Somebody who is stealing your headphones. Somebody who is stealing your acquaint. Somebody who's perpetually showing up late get them out of your life as soon as possible because if you don't do it a Benchley they are going to create a high drama situation. They're gonna cause a big problem into organization, and you're going to say I wish I wanna fired him earlier again higher for character and trained for skill. And now without further ado, three to what? you may not feel like you're living to your highest potential because you're stuck in a rut with your head down just trying to survive when people are trying to get out of a rut the first impulse is too often dream of a new destination a new job a new location, and maybe even a new career. Most people think unlocking one's highest potential requires a new vision for a new destination and many books actually encourage that type of thinking, however, Carly Fiorina believes that this is where most of us get off track. It's got a destination. It's a path and being the type of person who will take that path. You may know Carly Fiorina as the first female CEO of a fortune fifty company, but you may not know that she started out as a secretary and rose to success one step at a time by solving the problems in front of her and empowering those around her per new book. Find your way, we'll help you. Choose your own path to unleash your highest potential. Start your journey today. Please. Visit find your way thrive time dotcom. It's find your way thrive time dotcom or purchase a copy of find your way wherever books are sold.

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Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina: Trump is doing lasting damage to the Republican Party

Recode Decode

1:07:01 hr | 1 year ago

Former HP CEO Carly Fiorina: Trump is doing lasting damage to the Republican Party

"I was the first climate change correspondent un-american nightly TV news and before that I was a science reporter for the verge and I learned that tech isn't hi I'm Arial Jim Ross I'm the host of reset a new podcast that explores the unexpected ways technology impacts our lives experience and ultimately ended up leading the spin out of the technology arm at and T. which became Lucent Technologies Feet and you'll automatically get our very first episode when it drops on October fifteenth high it was a great privilege to lead HP for six years and it was a tumultuous Archer talk about that every day and when I see those changes I see worlds I can't wait to dive into question these days every story is tech story really I went on and got an MBA and landed here in Washington DC actually working for at and T. in a very low level we're going to show you why subscribe to reset for free on apple podcasts or your favorite podcast APP right now you can hear my conversation with Care Swisher about our philosophy oh entry job when at and T. was a million employees and really didn't think that corporate America was the place for me but figured I'd get some good Republican nomination for president back in the distant year of two thousand sixteen today she advises for profit businesses through Affirm Carly Fiorina Enterprises and nonprofit it's way early and missed nine quarters in a row profitability failing and the board was looking for a transformational CEO back and you're listening to Rico decode from the VOX media podcast network today in the red chair is of course Carly Fiorina the former CEO of HP and also a former candidate for most story one of the most storied tech companies one of the most storied tech companies actually Hewlett Packard started silicon valley actually and Dave Packard fits through charitable foundation called unlocking potential she's also the best selling author of several books including most recently find your way host a podcast called by example and Walter Hewlett 'em started Silicon Valley they were the foundation of Silicon Valley so it's very story to company but it was a company that had lost Harris Wisher editor at large of recode you may know me as someone who knows none of this would be happening in Carly Fiorina won the nomination two thousand sixteen but in my spare time I talked from the moment I arrived people were obsessed with my clothes my hair there were rumors circulating in Silicon Valley for years so talk a little bit about your background you'll get an idea of the stuff you did before well I graduated from college with a degree in medieval history. CEO was a brilliant arrogant connor down yes cult of founder man and so everything was different little bit because again you're one of the first woman CEO sued a lot of attention on you and a lot of new attract a lot of criticism and and talk a bit about that experience respect I was the first woman I was the first outsider yeah it was the first non engineer right I landed from the east coast and Silicon Valley where the archetype so being there as well I you know when you're different it's different it's true and I was different in every conceivable lawson heavy use why had to go to law school I thought and dropped out immediately my first job and business was as a secretary event Karl Welcome to recode decode thank you so much you were noting we have not seen each other since we wrangled on stage at all things d yeah all fifty there's that I had built a pink marble bathroom falls that I traveled with a hairdresser and makeup artist at all times false I mean it was just crazy and was recruited from there by the Board Hewlett Packard to lead Hewlett Packard which is tumultuous years don't know should know eighty seven separate business units all with their own panel CFO Ryan L. Chief information officer HR percent in the middle of the big technology uplift in history for company that large to miss nine quarters in a row is really hard and then on top of all of that you add the fact that I came at the height of the dot com boom and then we went into the dot com bust so it was a years ago seems like it might be running remind me of how to carly so let's a little bit about your background so people who when things shifted really quickly in terms of the business well when I arrived Hewlett Packard we made all of our right on printing we had smooth but the transformation succeeded and I knew when we set out to acquire compact that the stock market would three and culture and so in that circumstance change is always going to be very difficult it is even more difficult when hard to do and yet we had profitability deteriorating across the board this was a company that was in trouble and yet it was also a company with a very proud his in fact the transformation of Hewlett Packard was very successful not without setback not without bumps as no change process can be wide range of things including acquisitions so no I wasn't surprised at the pushback one of the things that I tell aspiring eaters all the time is criticism is the price of criticism is the price I wasn't surprised by the criticism I wasn't surprised by the pushback and ah the currents around both the CEO but around the industry are very swift running and that was the amount well as services the acquisition was necessary for us because customers were demanding systems solutions we had many it but I knew the market wouldn't understand it because stockmarkets honestly follow conventional wisdom officer I mean it was this bloated out of control bureaucracy clan mission creep which always happens well mission creep and growing at less than two sure they had previously acquired deck so they had both very high end computing as well as PC's as on thought was going to happen if they didn't know much about the industry honestly and so we were saying no actually the system plays where it's going that's clearly what happened the piece parts but not critical mass we had evaluated literally every alternative in the marketplace this was clearly the best alternative and yet oh you understand you know you've had a long career in tech and was one of the first significant CEO Women CEO's and I'm not going to focus just on the moon but you were it was kind of yes computer before we announce star deal the bankers came in and told the combat board that their stock would appreciate by ten or fifteen percent and wordplay Microsoft the pure storage play. EMC The pure play del the pure router play Cisco that's whatever of pushback is one of the things you had done is you would try all kinds of things I remember you try to do an ipod that was branded you try to do a whole bunch of those are the prominent things but you did that was before the sons of the founders decided to wage a proxy battle and try and stop us right all over time we're not doing this for short term pop in the stock we're doing this for the long term leadership in our industry but we're going to have a rough go of it others actually had said publicly that they wanted to keep their sons away from the company the sons of the founders knew that as the fight us should I have anticipated that maybe although honestly when you have a unanimous board saying we're going to conventional wisdom said that after the dot com bust was over it was all going to go back to the way it was so everyone assumed owner no we're going to have the pure soft this powerful they would own less of the overall shares of the stock and so they and their foundations decided to we had made exactly the right move and what I mean by that is the sons of the founders who had never been involved in the round Fanie who's around the fact that we had two board members who began leaking confidential board conversations to the press the reason they did that care honestly I'm not saying I'm perfect but the proxy battle occurred not because we had made the wrong strategic move the proxy battle occurred because Actually Company got larger and more successful it would separate itself from them and their legacy their stock holdings would be less ideas but more importantly the majority of the board disagreed with those ideas and so after a lot of discussion about their ideas for who should be in which job fight really no I actually don't think that's true I think what happened was I mean the papers wanted to the press wanted to say that my ouster and so I called a teleconference of the board and I said I will not stay under these circumstances so either the people were eerie difficult time right to navigate a company through products like for you at all made so much money on printers and all kinds of different things and given the amount of stock they own we had to win virtually every other shareholder and we did but you are damaged after I mean from HP was about the merger I don't think it was oh I know what it was and I've been very public about it the ouster was worked in surprised in the end we won that battle resoundingly despite the fact that they owned almost twenty five percent of the stock so think about that I said in front of the bankers it will not your stock will drop and our stock will drop and our stock will drop because the market will not understand this deal all of our board conversations on the front page of the Wall Street Journal that is a violation of a board members code of conduct it is a violation of confidentiality had board members resigned over this I ultimately chose not to cast a vote although I could've I was chairman and CEO Because I felt the board needed to major acquisition board members are negotiated on and so I didn't feel that I had a lot of latitude given all the battles I was make a decision about whether or not they were going to confront this behavior or not they chose not to and I left and a year later of course these two board members were fired I should have worked very hard to keep on and there was one who returned that I should have blocked from returning right all right so you here you are possible for this leak have to come forward and we have to talk about why this is going on or I'm not going to be here in a major fight ensued and ultimately we who govern a business these two board members didn't like the outcome and so they went and talk to the press and I woke up to see we took a vote in the board room and said we're not doing that we're doing something different and of course I don't think it's aboard job to manage a business it is awards jobs owner so remember that when I mean we transformed virtually every part of the company the management team the product line our engagement incredibly important advice he said carly don't do anything for six months don't make decision for six months wait you're going to see one of the most wonderful things that happened to me is that my good friend Steve Jobs called me so stephen I it is because they had very clear ideas about who should go into what job in the management team and I disagreed with those understand it I remember going in visiting people contact was so we acquired compaq at the time or more computer manufacturer L. differently and it turned out that was incredibly important information and advice because I got inundated with phone calls with customers what I didn't do was transformed the board and I didn't because I felt I wasn't in position to I was hurt rail sometime well I was hired by a board to be a transformation CEO I didn't pick the board members and they picked me then we went through a merger and in a merger of course I heard that was a huge scandal because the rest of the board was engaging in spying those board members it was all pretexting one up on would you know compare notes and chats and less than twenty four hours after this news break Steve Jobs fighting to go pick a fight with certain board members but there were two who left who were active. CEO's that saying wait was incredibly important and I did wait so you did wait and then you started to do a variety of things yeah well you know the opportunity to do something huge and impactful and meaningful and that my bar was going to be really high melot I mean remember the financial crisis it was all going to be great until suddenly it wasn't so I remember meeting with the Board of Compact candid throughout I said what I meant I behaved consistently was what I believed I was not embarrassed in any way and I felt as though my soul was intact nevertheless the press was brutal and I was exhausted mostly and so steve literally hours later President Bush calls come work for the administration I got all these people calling do this do this do this and Steve Jobs oh I would this deal you actually don't expect the children of the founders to say no actually we don't WanNa do it and in fact the market was quite shocked I mean you're to marketing you're not enough you're not this but it was sort of a moment what would you move done differently when you're looking at I would have done differently honestly is tackled the boards Capitol Hill I mean it was this unbelievable scandal yeah she missed but would you have done differently I mean you know being being in your position then is were definitely out for you would've run for senators yes Barbara Boxer is longtime incumbent right honestly what prompted me was I do so tell me about that what what mistake do you think you made in that just not anticipating the resistance or or a strategic error I don't think I made a strategic after that and so I went back to the touchstone I always go back to which is I want to make a positive difference and I think people have enormous particularly don't have any idea about what's going on in the businesses in California and frankly I got angry because I could see find yourself in this situation what did you think right after because it was really quite a thing well it was quite a thing so I'll tell you miss potential and I like to help people unlock their potential I went back to that and so I got involved in a number what was happening to California middle class families just getting pressed and squeezed more businesses leaving every day it was never embarrassed honestly care because I was very comfortable with how I had behaved I'm not saying I was perfect but I was honest throughout CBS words rang in my ear don't do anything I mean I was exhausted right I was traumatized some low Baresi wanted it wasn't embarrassed action prevent tastic nonprofits and I began to advise other businesses and then I because I love challenge and I run into problems I said Gee politics is kind of a it was all as colisee didn't wanNA run versus senator what was that calculation very different jobs very different jobs well one of the calculation well it didn't seem very practical to me and it didn't seem very productive to me to run for governor to challenge her for governor and I saw the damage I realized after waiting for six months was that I didn't really want to rush into being a CEO again that that had been an extraordinary so you're saying no no no it's a lot of people get mixed up you know I don't shy away from challenge otherwise I never would have taken hp and I never is calls me at home and he's spitting mad and he said Oh I can't believe how stupid these people are at hp he he got very frustrated with hp all the time actually in real impact on real people's lives which is why I had a number of Democrats in Central Valley endorse me because boxer was incredibly counterproductive about was crushing right senator boxer in particular was I thought dead wrong about the water policy in California and it was thing in winning running and winning you actually have no idea what the people are doing right claim to care about and thing about what they're talking about it's not that they're bad people all of them but if you have spent all of your life in politics running and winning this charge that someone was a Republican in name only I mean honestly find I you know I don't mind yeah no actually Senator Senator Senator Oh that's right we had another CEO Forgets Whitman but ultimately they're just a lot more Democrats in California than there are tokens and as you'll recall the entire Republican ticket from the top down was four votes in that election while losing it than any other Republican running anywhere in the United States so I got a lot of votes and I'm proud of that that we have way too many professional politicians and I think most Americans agree with me I think we have people in both parties who actually don't know any just your smartphone or laptop it's the way we develop new medicines it's how we compose music it's our connection to friends and strangers tech is changing you think about it now and so much of political discourse and political ads political charges are just when you step back from the ridiculous and so for me this ad sort of crystallize the ridiculousness of that in a very memorable way and it's clearly memorable he said I just can't believe how stupid they are and they're gonNA regret this and this is a terrible thing and he went on and on so that made me feel good but then he gave me Zhou this you'll have to remember this was at the time when California's droughts were very bad when the water policy coming out of Washington DC was the Meg Whitman was already running for governor I mean and she's a very capable individual cable executive so that didn't seem like the place but okay longtime ago but first of all things that I'm very proud of in that election it was a three way primary which I won resoundingly and I won wiped out right yeah absolutely all of them so you you do that and it's tough to lose a race it's tough even if you probably aren't going to win it it's still something you put a lot of hardened a stereo lemme Lemme go look at this problem right what prompted you and you'll explain you know that was quite a run to that was you know well it was quite a run you and you moved free your name kept getting popping up at different administrations and things like that as I recall you didn't take job in Washington no here you are now all these years later say I love the sheep and I I like them more now what is going over Karl Wien Arenas House policy how do you look at that campaign the sheep aside I loved your sheep I love the new by the way a lot of other people too but -fornia is a deep blue state and Barbara Boxer had governors. Who are they a long time Schwarzenegger happening over there but the run again wasn't successful why do you know why was it accessible wherever it was successful because among other things California's not recant I wanna now here we are in twenty nine yeah we'll get it right I mean we backed the sheep Ed was about the fact that there was the thought of that was that I had to shut the Zombie sheep is well you know it's so because I'm pretty picky about what I do meaning I don't feel any need need to be given a job or a position or title to prove something to someone else I I really don't help for later race I mean a lot of people do it out by searching for explain or vox on Netflix or going straight to Netflix dot com slash explained that's Netflix dot com slash explained when you registered to attend Jay Street the political home for Pro Israel Pro Peace Americans we're here with Carly Fiorina everyone in Silicon Valley this episode is brought to you by Jay Street an organization redefining what it means to be pro Israel Jay Street represents the mainstream voice of American Jews this fall like show the show was called explained every episode is a fifteen to twenty minute deep dive into one important topic this week that topic is called I got an early ninth in Washington dc go to Jay Street dot org slash vox to learn more and register this year Jay Street has teamed up with crooked media producers of the hit podcast pod can make a positive impact? If I don't feel that I will be satisfied with how I'm spending my time I'm not going to take the job join with Jay Street to fight back against the anti-democratic forces threatening both the US and Israel registration is now open for J Streets National Conference Tober Twenty Six through twenty major nonprofits and I got to learn a lot about what goes on out there and by the way I think lack of political dot org slash vox and use Code Vox for twenty percent off your conference registration again that's Jay Street dot org slash vox and Use Code V. O. X. for twenty percent off things the most provocative thing is the connection to religion as Raza Aslund says in the episode cults Plus Time Equals Religion make sure you check the street team to discuss the future of American leadership in the Middle East registered today for the J Street National Conference October Twenty Six twenty nine th in Washington dc go to Jay Street osteen and more when we get back we're here with Carly Fiorina the host of the leadership podcast by example and the author of the Book Find Your Way Unleash your power in the highest potential she also was the former CEO HP So whether it helps me or not so you go into a president you just go right you didn't go very quickly but you decided to run for president in the meantime Iran preview and watching it made me think about cuts in this country in a whole new way to must watch episode it digs into how colour people in and can get regular people to do horrible save the world and Pod Save America to bring you thought provoking interviews with leading advocates policymakers and two thousand twenty candidates host Tommy Vitor and Ben Rhodes will join the A and a former candidate for Republican nomination for president in two thousand sixteen we'll be back after this you're GonNa love the second season of Fox's Netflix he knows who she is he was the former CEO of hp she also ran for the Republican nomination in the last election to that would seems like one hundred and nine years ago outside it's not fewer I agree we're here whatever you think of the current no no I get it it was never a fan hour we're GonNa talk about your run for office in two thousand six arguing about debts and deficits were still arguing about social security were still arguing about healthcare. We're still arguing about veterans affairs the problems never get solved politicians aren't incentive to solve problems there incented to win and winning is a fundamentally different dynamic then problem solving which required Olver in Washington the reason people are sick of politics is because problems never get solved we just talk about the same problems cycle after cycle after cycle we're still arguing about immigration we're still now you know with with Mary Williamson Cory Booker all over the place well I knew the odds were long I also thought it was time for problems else and and I agree with you on professional politicians but how did you think your chances were then because there's so it was sort of like the same landscape that the Democrats face now collaboration and finding common ground winning is about pounding your opponent into the dirt unfortunately and so we're seeing anything like it but engaged in public policy and the Defense Department in the intelligence community in the State Department I understand business and government are different but I also office is not disqualifying no be president of the United States. Now I see that we're GONNA have most Americans agree with that we actually need either but you you got in there and immediately controversy because of misogynistic stuff from the cause of dysfunction so thought it's time for an outsider somebody actually understands how to solve problems I had done a lot of public policy work by then I had been intimately when my staff I told me that trump had said this I literally laughed right and I laughed because thousand sixteen and there were no it's true but the dysfunction had been I argue that trump although he's brought it to a new level trump is the result dysfunction not he says what prompted you besides the fact that you don't have to be a I agree with you I think it's that's ridiculous argument despite Donald Trump I think it's a ridiculous I mean you can't have done anything neither one is welcome by the way they're both totally inappropriate and so at the time my staff was you have to say something and I said there will be a time when trump were you surprised by that during that that that debate which was the first debate it was the second said it was the first one when I was on the main stage so headlines ready right but I had thought about it and what I thought about his comment was been there done that 'cause I have been dealing with men talking about my appearance for so young you're used to it you know been there done that it's either a positive comments were negative is to do that in the setting of also trying to put yourself as a can't just a candidate and you had sort of the business bent not on similar to trump was pushing I'm a businessman I'm an outsider similar knew that I would get asked on the debate stage I did not know precisely what I was going to say I was a candidate who never had at this is so typical of so many people unfortunately and it's completely inappropriate at the time he gave me my line and he had accused trump accused Jeb Bush of saying something inappropriate and Jeb Bush defended himself and has right before I said every woman in America knows what Mr Trump Matt right before then he and Jeb Bush were having an argument it's time to say something right and of course the time was the debate stage right right where you were there and so what did you want to accomplish there because it's really hard like various one not only could I care less but it's completely irrelevant in an appropriate were you surprised by successfully was with stuff like that because it never seen yeah no the point is I'm not surprised that that stuff is still successful and I'm not surprised that unfortunately there's still a lot of guys sitting around punching each thirty years so on the one hand you would think wow we've come so far and on the other hand we haven't come very all silicon valley we'll get to that in a minute and are and in some ways we haven't come very far at all I mean think how few women CEO's we still have more men named James Right on the fortune five hundred said well everybody knew what you meant and so the second he said that I knew I had my line right so I then said I think every woman in America understood what Mr Trump candidates have had a very difficult time pushing that back and Megan Kelly tried it you know on stage about his discussion about women talk about how difficult that is then there are women. CEO We haven't budged at all in terms of the number of women who sit on Boards Corporate America and not we haven't budged at all it was a very well Ben Carson was an outsider but yes it was a tough road on the other hand I'm quite proud of the fact we lasted senators sitting governors as I'm sure many people kept saying I kept thinking surely people will figure trump out but they didn't or they did or they I and of course they did and then Mr Trump said oh it's a beautiful face what he didn't understand was what he thinks of my face did he clearly tapped into a deep seated frustration and feeling that people had been disrespected people surely he would get revealed and I worked hard to ensure that he wouldn't be the Republican I'm to stick and it's still and will now it seems like it might be stick sadly I'm not surprised sadly I'm not surprised I mean in some ways we have come so far party is anymore but I know what I believe based on experience I believe that every person is filled with potential and convince millions of American that he actually was a business person and so I understand why it happened but I kept thinking someone circumstances their appearance what they believe where they come from should not prevent them fulfilling their potential and too many people stand there are things that we do in business could help government right absolutely so that's again that I understood a lot about government until you put yourself out there I mean Howard show has done it in this election cycle didn't work out well for him we have to break up powerful lobbyists powerful bureaucracies powerful centers on Capitol Hill was ladies nominee because I thought and still think that he has done lasting damage given a chance if they're given the resources they can figure out how to make something better and people three thousand miles away usually can't and finally I believe that raised money I mean we did pretty well for quite a long time I kept thinking what I find really discouraging is the fact that people will not speak their minds so I wrote a I think concluded he is going to fight for me maybe he's an uncouth sob but he's GonNa fight for me and no one was a businessman when she is yes they the oppressed it based on experience and so I think power and money in decision-making need to be dispersed out of Washington I think `institution not a president it is not our job as citizens to pledge loyalty to any public official then obligation to be informed and we have obligation to speak up I've also said publicly that character matters behavior pledge their loyalty to trump by the way that pretty much happens when you have an incumbent president but it's happened to a really startling degree post two weeks ago which I said we pledge allegiance to the flag not a party right we pledge fidelity to the are prevented because of circumstances appearances or beliefs or where they come from I believe that people closest to the problem know best how to solve it always if there murray at least to this point that a primary opponent is impossible there will be no primaries there will be no debates delegates our concentrated is power abused always so if you have too much power concentrated in the hands of Washington which we do and which we have for fifty years is going to be he was says the current treasurer of the Republican Party have you thought about running again have you well look the Republican Party has made it very clear that a nor loyalty to the Orthodoxy of a party that's not how our country is built and so I think as citizens we have started to like how did you you you really were like do it was the outside you were the outsiders yeah you know everybody else look who's a career politician your political self interest demands that they stick with them isn't disappointing absolutely but I think it's not surprising I think as Sir and their political self interest demands right now that they stick with trump and so they're going to stick with him as long as they judge own opinion and my opinion is having read that report cover to cover that at the very least president trump's conduct is unbecoming and at the very most he was clearly engaged in an effort to obstruct I think that's just crystal clear from that report now we fast forward into the party we'll talk about that a little bit so you didn't get you pull out of the race and you don't you don't participate you don't participate in this administration obviously then women also spoke up like this one of the few at least tech Republicans who spoke up about the same thing how do you assess now and put into an absolute equating by the president of the nation's interests with his political self interests I think he honest is crystal clear this is at the very least conduct unbecoming a president and at the very most it is your matters tone is set at the top and trump's behavior his tone and his character are destructive to what happens I mean ah politicians play their part and sadly it's why people don't trust politicians so what is the part of a Republican politician today as if the polls continue to move I think you'll see more expressing doubt when I say their political self interest of the polls Titians with some notable exceptions and you see a few right elected officials expressing some misgivings doubt if the Romney I and you to move in favor of at the very least an impeachment inquiry use may see more politicians speak out but I just think this transcript of this call is crystal clear you have a president sitting in the residence apparently but context before this past couple of weeks because I think something is maybe not like everybody you know there was a very funny. SNL skit like nothing's going to happen like everyone's like we believe his political self interest is the nation's interests that is the definition of an autocrat so what happens with the Republican a message of trump drain the swamp yes that was the message of trump and of course was I don't think the swamp is getting drain no in fact at all he is the part apparently of a Republican politician is to base their words and their behavior on their political self interest quarrier not obstructing an impeachment inquiry is far more serious than simply failing to comply with a subpoena subpoena I think the Democrats are on a course from which they cannot deviate now and so in a way I think both parties are going to play their part other in the ribs go you will I mean governor him good for him right satellite inside that campaign was surreal it must have been surreal as as extensively in the Oval Office asking a foreign government to dig up dirt on his political pundit pretty black and white we need we have a duty to inform ourselves I read the whole Muller report cover to cover maybe not everybody wanted to but I felt I needed to 'cause I wanted to form a lot of people a lot of your sort of the classic Republican in that in that regard in or maybe you don't think of yourself that way well I for me to know what the Republican pitchman enquiry is ongoing I think the White House apparently now will make a judgment about whether to obstruct an impeachment and leader of the Party as well as speaker of the House I think she has handled this extremely well I think she has been careful she has been sober she

CEO Carly Fiorina Silicon Valley Hewlett Packard president Washington America Netflix Carly Fiorina Enterprises VOX media Dave Packard apple EMC Walter Hewlett CEO HP So Arial Jim Ross Lucent Technologies Feet Cisco reporter
56: Q&A with Carly Fiorina: Unleashing Your Highest Potential

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

30:30 min | 1 year ago

56: Q&A with Carly Fiorina: Unleashing Your Highest Potential

"Hey welcome to another episode of the crucial leadership podcast. You're in for an amazing treat a bonus episode today and i've got carly fiorina and incredible business leader and executive at a._t. And t. the former c._e._o. Of hewlett packard leader and a coach to multiple nonprofit organizations carly is a a world class leader. She's a cancer survivor even a one time united states presidential candidate. I'm excited for you hear from her. Let's now go to the interview with carly fiorina arena. This is the cregg rachelle leadership podcast honor to have you with us today. In i've admired did your leadership for many many years learn from your wisdom and i've been really looking forward to learning more about you. In this league conversation on your amazing new book congratulations relations just out find your way unleashed your power and highest potential congratulations on a fantastic powerful book. Well thank you so much craig and thank you for your kind comments. You are an inspiring leader as well and have accomplished so much and it's great to reconnect via. This podcast will thank you what i love about your book. Carly is is both incredibly practical and down to earth and at the same time massively inspirational and as i was reading it i kind of felt like you were my personal leadership coach like we've been friends for thirty years and like we're sitting across the table and you're counseling me giving me advice is to make my leadership better but you're doing it in a way that made me like ready to go and attack so that you're writing style is is so personal and and again for both practical and inspirational some real excited dive into the content and let you share that with our broader audience and then i know they're going to want to get the book when they're through listening to this so let's let's let's kind of go back to the story behind the story or the story before the story and could you tell us a little bit about your childhood your family where where you grew up and include what you thought you do later on in life when you're starting out as a child well first of all thank you so much for those kind words i think so many people right now are feeling helpless and powerless and hopeless and frustrated and none of us are and <hes> i've learned in my own life life that we all have so much more potential than we realize and sometimes we can't unlock that potential unless something unexpected in challenging comes along wrong and in a way that's the story of my own life. I had wonderful parents who taught me wonderful things. My mother said to me when i was about eight. What you are is god's gift to you. What you make of yourself is your gift to god and those words landed d- with me for a couple of reasons number one because i didn't feel gifted all of my life really <hes> through my twenties was about being <hes> scared insecure. Everybody was always so much smarter or better or prettier more prepared you know and so her words sort of felt like a promise to me that i had gifts but they also were a challenge. What you make of yourself is your gift to god and she was telling me you have gifts gifts. You have to find them. You have to apply them and so when i got out of college and while i was in college it was sort of the plan that i was going to go to law school and so okay i go off to law school and i go off to law school with my parents expectations weighing on me very heavily. I wasn't going to be the kid that disappointed them. My sister was rebellious. My brother was rebellious. I wasn't going to be the kid that disappointed them. I was going to go to law school and you know do what they thought i should do but i got there and i hated. It really hated it. It made me physically. Ill almost how much it was not not the right path for me and so one day before the first final exam thankfully i really feel as though i got this message from god i truly do because it was this revelation this moment of revelation where i realized this is my life and i can't live based on other people's people's expectations even my beloved parents expectations and so i went downstairs and i said i quit and at that point. They were very concerned as you can. Imagine imagine what are you gonna do. You're never going to amount to anything. You don't have a plan and i didn't have a plan and i had no idea what i was going to do but i knew i had to go. Get a job so i did and and i became a receptionist for nine person real estate firm and typed and file an answer the phones and what get me going in. That period was awards from my dad. He always said to me carly. No matter what you do work hard focus on excellence do an excellent job and so i said okay. I don't know where i'm going doing and you know. This isn't the dream job but i'm gonna work card and i'm gonna do an excellent job and what i learned is. If you do that opportunity ax well you you obviously did that and it really means a lot to me personally to hear you talk about your insecurities and i think that's what i love about your writing. Is you you. You know we know you from the headlines. Your previous presidential candidates you were the amazing c._e._o. Of hewlett packard and so we see this massive powerful powerful leader and yet you. You didn't see yourself that way. In fact i think there was a there's a quote in your book from mary oliver that that seemed to almost move you out of state of complacency into the the the ability to take risk even though you might have felt a little insecure and unprepared for can you tell us about that quote. Yes so the quote from mary. Oliver is one in which she describes life each of our lives as a wild and precious thing and i think it's such a beautiful way to describe the potential that each of us have in our lives. I believe that people are created on on purpose and for a purpose i also know that many people never get a chance to find or fulfilled their purpose and i know that fear or or insecurity or doubt hold so many of us back from finding and fulfilling our purpose and so that decision to drop opt out of law school was the first decision that i had ever made where i literally had to overcome my own fear and the reason that was so important because i want as i went on it wasn't that i became fearless. Not at all in fact one of the things i've learned is everybody's afraid everybody's afraid of something and most of the time we're afraid aid of some kind of silly things but all those kinds of fears hold us back and so it was interesting. I was with a group of people yesterday and this man and asked me he said we're where have you found all this courage that we've just we see you display and i said you know what courage takes practice and until and unless we can get over our our fears we will not have that wild and precious thing that mary oliver calls our life and we also will never fulfill our potential and we won't make the kind of positive ositive contribution that we're meant to make so i'm curious as you grow in your leadership expertise and as you have success on the way does the fear diminish or do you just get better are dealing with it. Well a little bit of both honestly yes. The fear diminishes in the sense that the small things don't scare you you anymore but there are big things that still might scare you for example by the time i got to be a c._e._o. I wasn't afraid of people's criticism. That's a good thing because criticism has always the price of leadership and you have to be able to withstand criticism and you have to be able to say what other people say about me doesn't define me what defines me as my own character my own behavior my own choices my own impact and so you you get better at bigger fears but fear is part of the human condition and all of us have it courage takes practice. I love those ideas carley. Ah courage takes practice and then it kind of hit me and i can imagine some people listening right now. You get better at bigger fears because i know like right now. I'm facing some things things at. I almost said it out loud last night but i was feeling it almost told my wife i actually feel afraid that i'm not gonna be able to do this and so that speaks to me and i think one of the things about your heart that just comes through on every word of the page is your your belief in the limitless resource of human potential can can you talk to me about that phrase and how that could inspire someone to have the courage to attempt to do more think about it for a moment every resource in the world is limited did accept our potential that's just true and we so often overlook people's potential because of their circumstances or because because of their appearance or because they don't agree with us or because we don't really understand them and so were suspicious of with them but the truth is all of us have god given gifts and all of us actually have more potential than we realize so so helpful in fact in your book you kinda wrote a little bit about that that that people can't get locked up and and we even everything he said is can move them pass that i think one of the biggest things that you you write about and i've experienced as well as that are self. Limiting beliefs often hold us back from living to our full potential. I think in that vein you say that it's it's really more important if you're going to max out and fulfil your potential that you write about choosing path over plan. Can you unpack that idea. I carly people feel. They get all these messages from the culture that says you're supposed to do things a certain way and one of the things the culture sure lifts up is success means very specific things when you getting married. How many kids are you having one. Are you graduating from college. How much money are you gonna make you know you have to achieve this title. By this point. You have to get the perfect job. You have to have all these things to prove that you're successful and what what i've seen happen over and over and over again is people get so fixated on the destination on the plan that they miss all these amazing the opportunities all around them and what they miss so often are the opportunities that will actually unlock them and free them to focus on the things they're really meant to be focused on the things that will give them joy or the things that will give them fulfillment and so what this book talks about his get on a path get on a past asked unlocking your potential which involves key behaviors like courage and character and collaborating well with others and seeing possibilities get on a path and don't get hung up on the destination the so helpful carly i i. I'm curious a lot of c._e._o.'s. They they'll talk about knowing you know. They always wanted to see all that was a destination for them. I'm curious for you. Was that something that you had in your mind. When you started out or did the somehow the path lead you there a little bit about how you ended up achieving that well first of all no. I didn't think about oh. I'm going to be a ceo someday in fact so far from that when i finally got an m._b._a. And i finally landed in corporate america in a entry level job job. Honestly my prayer was please. Let me keep this job and so here's the thing that happened. I saw problems everywhere everywhere and so honestly what i did to go from secretary to c._e._o. Was not get on the plane and i'm going to be a c._e._o. Someday no it was their bunch of problems all around me. There always always are there a bunch of people all around me and they have a lot of potential and they have a lot of good ideas and so we're going to get together and we're going to solve these problems. We're going to make a difference and when you do that you find out what you're made of you. Find out what other people are made of and results get noticed. I think that's so helpful because is is really tempting and you're right culture and social social media kind of it defines what is success and so we end up you know creating goals that may end up either not delivering or take place it really is is is under our potential and i love carly the way you write about <hes> those closest to the problem and in fact you just kind of mentioned it that you you say those that are closest to the problem or most inciteful about the solution. Would you mind telling us the illustration. You gave in your book about the person supervised at a._t. And t. that was able to solve the problem that the organization never even knew existed yes so here's an example though the person you're referring to his name jim- he was an engineer <hes>. I didn't know anything about engineering but <hes> you know he was <hes> in my very small organization. Jim was a guy who i sat down with early on in my job and said jim d._c. Any problems and he said well yeah. I designed circuits. That's what he did. Jim kim was by the way talk about judging someone by their circumstances are their appearance. Gym was totally on remarkable. Everybody just sort of overlooked him. He you play the game. He didn't manage up. He ate lunch at his desk. Every day. He was just completely on remarkable and he said i designed circuits and i noticed that when we're build for those circuits the bills don't match the designs now the bills those worn his job. The bills were accounting's job and so often what happens is in big organizations. People focus on management and say things like well. The bills aren't your job. Jim just do your job but jim saw a problem and so i said well. What do you think we ought to do and he said i think we ought to check. I think we ought to check the bills against my designed. So at first he and i started checking them bells and the more we checked the more we found and eventually i gave him. The resources provided the resources to him where he could supervise supervise a whole group of people and three hundred million dollars saved later. Nobody was overlooking. Jim just not three hundred million dollars later in fact. I think it's interesting because you don't end directly. A lot of leaders may avoid problems. I don't want to know about them. And can you ask him specifically. Do you have any problems. I love what you write. In your book about problems in this may shock some people but the first thing he says problems are opportunities opportunity for growth. I think as a little obvious but you also say that problems are a signal that we're on the right path. Can you talk about that idea. Yes well i. I think you're correct iraq that there are a lot of people who avoid problems and i would tell you that they're not leaders. They may be managers doesn't make them bad people a manager. Will we'll do the best they can with the way things are and the way things are include some problems that have been around long time. That's okay not my job. I'm just going to do the best i can within the way things are again. It doesn't doesn't make 'em bad people but they're not leaders. Leaders change constraints and conditions leaders change the order of things for the better and therefore leaders have to focus focus on problem solving. That's a change order of things for the better they're always problems and so it is a key difference between leaders and managers. Here's if the purpose of leadership is to change the order of things for the better then they must run towards problems but it's also also true that if you want to unlock potential if you want to achieve more if you want someone to figure out what they're made of they have to tackle something hard not something easy. Jim learned so much about himself by tackling a problem. Now jim needed support to tackle that problem. He needed leadership to catalyze his ability to tackle that problem but had he never tackled that problem. He'd still be sitting in his desk unremarkable jim eating lunch every day and just doing his job as as a manager and so- problems the hard stuff not the easy stuff the problems that have festered. That's what leaders leaders apply their energy to their potential to and it's how they unlocked potential in others correlate. I love the way you talk about that. In fact you told a story about a problem that you had add and i think one of the things that made me love your book. Even more was that you tell stories in a way that all of us can relate to everyday life for example sample. Sometimes when we talk about leadership we tend to think you cast vision. You defined your values. You're gonna create systems. You're going to build a culture and those things really really matter but sometimes leadership is dealing dealing with a really difficult person. Who's sitting right next to you. How do you do that. You tell which kind of a funny story and yet really powerful <hes> about a guy that you are paired with named carl that puts you in an incredibly awkward situation and yet you seem to learn a lot about dealing with fear and courage. Can you tell us a little bit of that story and what were some of the big takeaways that you got from. Call was sure if you want to collaborate effectively with other people he you have to be willing to deal with people that you don't always agree with or you don't always like or that. You're not always comfortable with so karl was a great lesson in that so carl was my first team mate when i joined the corporate america a._t. And t. at that entry level position. I talked about a few minutes ago. There weren't a lot of women and you know look my resume reads medieval well history and philosophy law school drop-out okay. She has an m._b._a. I mean no one was real impressed with me and so he didn't really like being teamed with me so the very first meeting that i was going to have with his clients who were now also going to become my clients he showed hold up my desk and said you can't come to the meeting. Why not well because we're going to a strip club and so i had to really think about that and i remember going the the ladies sherman sitting there for literally hours saying to myself. What am i afraid of. What am i afraid of because i was terrified while i was afraid because i'd never been in that situation. I was afraid of looking stupid by the way i did. I was afraid of so many things but then i had to say to myself. What's it's worse than being afraid of going to the strip. Club is being knocked off my ability to do my job the very first day so i went and i look stupid and you know it was a very awkward several hours. I was humble enough to understand. I have to work with carl. I don't know these clients. I don't know this company. I need need some of the knowledge the relationships that he has if i'm going to do my job but i also began to have empathy for carl because it turned out the coral was afraid to what carl was afraid of was being kicked to the side of the road after a lifetime of her career that he was proud of and so with that combination of humility and empathy in carl figured out he needed me because i would attend to the details of getting things done one that he wasn't very good at so we became good colleagues and good teammates and reason i tell that story is not just just illustrate that we're all afraid of things and courage takes practice and you've got to overcome your fears. I also tell that story to say look there are bad people out out there that engage in bad behavior and that needs to be confronted but most people aren't bad they may be thoughtless careless clueless clueless. They may be afraid of something themselves but they're not bad and we have to figure out how to work with all kinds of people if we're going to solve problems and we're going to unlock our own potential and we're going to change the order of things for the better so humility empathy are important. If you're going to collaborate with people aw i thought that story was was really interesting because there are so many different ways that you could have responded to that and i think a lot of people would have been angry. Agree would've disconnected would have recognized he was kind of having a power play against or whatever but you seem to engage with him in a way that that built respect and trust can can you tell us what did you learn in your kind of own discovery about your ability to still have relational power when someone someone else might have been leveraging up against you well. I'll tell you another story to illustrate this. Perhaps i had a boss who was introducing me to my new to subordinates and who introduced me with the line. This is carly your new boss. She's our token bimbo that was another attempt at didn't minuteman and dismissal and in that case i didn't confront him publicly but i went into his office after the fact and shut the door and said you will never speak to me that way again. There are times james when confrontation is required and an honest conversation not an angry conversation not a judgmental conversation precision but an honest conversation is required. You will never do that to me again. There are other times when you make your point. I went to the strip club and then you settle down and figure out how to work with someone i couldn't rely on position or title to demand respect from people. I didn't have a position or title what i had to rely on was my own capacity in the capacity of others and what i had to figure out was how do i work with other people to produce results by changing the order. Thanks for the better and that was a huge blessing. I like the way you contextualized the the extremes of both stories you had two examples of people that were incredibly disrespectful dishonoring and one guy with call you you stepped into his world and you ended up having empathy for him and then another person when they were really online in a public way you realized that that took an entirely different approach and so when i look at your leadership from a distance and try to determine what are the big contributing tribune factors that brought you to such a high level of impact. I see so many in reading your book gives me more insight and i could list you know fifteen or twenty things that that rise to the top immediately. I think though when i look at it one of the things that really stands out above anything else is that you are principled in your leadership always trying trying to do the right thing and i think that your idea of path over plan helps illustrate this. You're you're gonna do the right thing. You're gonna take the next right step. I'd love you to bring some commentary around the whole idea of when you're running for president and you became clear that you didn't have a good path to presidency. Can you talk about that realization allegation and how choosing path over planned doing the right thing. How helps you right size that circumstance. I knew when i ran that it was a very long shot. <hes> it was a long shot because people didn't know who i was. I mean the leadership. Summit audience may know who i was but most people didn't i was an outsider already didn't have infrastructure so i knew it was a long shot. I don't mind challenge as <hes>. Perhaps you've picked up on. I kind of like it but at a certain point it became clear there was no way to win and continuing on a plan just because a destination beckons. This is isn't helpful. It wouldn't have been helpful to voters it wouldn't have been helpful to the process wouldn't have been helpful to me and so when and it became clear that the long shot has become impossible it was time to step aside and so people remark on that decision and wow that must have been so difficult but honestly it wasn't very difficult for me. It was very obvious to me that this was the right right next decision to make to the point of not getting hung up on the plan and the destination. I was prepared to win the presidency and do the job but i was always prepared to lose and to do something else to make a difference and so i think when you are prepared for all kinds of outcomes when you're open to all kinds of destinations but what you're focused on is i will behave with courage and character and humility and empathy and collaborate with others see possibilities all around me when you focus your energies on that path half instead of getting hung up on a specific destination the right choices are easier not harder so hello and and make sure that our leaders know the name of your book is find your way unleash your power and highest potential and i wanna thank you for the years of sacrifice and faithfulness and the price you paid to get to where you got and then to take the time to sit down and to write a book that is so personal so inspirational so practical. It's been a real honor just to get to know the leader behind the headlines and i'd love to kind of close out with giving you the chance to offer a final encouragement to our listeners and <hes> maybe can answer this for us if leaders could do one thing today to find their half in life. I i want to be on a path. I'm not trying to plan but i want to be on the right path to live out their wild impress life as as you quoted in the book what would you say would be the very first step we do to get on that path to fulfil the potential. This put inside thought of us find a problem. That's close to you and that you care about. Don't pick an abstract problem. Find a problem. That's close to you and and then impacts you and think about why you care about that problem and then begin together others who care about that problem and that's the kind of a practical advice. I'd give some practical advice about how to find the right problem and then when you get afraid when you come up with all the reasons reasons why you shouldn't do it you couldn't do it. No one will understand. You'll get criticized then. Take a big pause and ask yourself the basic question. What am i afraid of. What's the worst that can happen but in the end honestly success us a successful life is not defined by the destination you achieve. It's defined by love and moments of grace and positive contribution and i've considered my life despite its setbacks in its travails in its troubles and those are part of every life i consider my life a great blessing and in a life filled with joy solving problems can bring joy in addition to unlocking your potential. I love so much. I try to tell myself. This success isn't isn't something that you accomplished in the future. Success is being obedient and faithful today and that kind of idea just run through everything that you right and so to everyone listening right right now. I hope that you hear the heart and the passion behind carly's words that find problem there. There's something nearby that you care about that. That's not outright and leaders tend to make things wrong right in that could be your next assignment. The book is called. Find your way unleash your power of the highest potential. <hes> go out and get it right down and carly. It's been amazing to have you at the global leadership summit in the past. I'm excited about the global leadership summit this year. I have the honor of serving again. I've got a new idea that we're going to talk about and we've got an amazing faculty so i know we've got leaders all over the world that still have time to be a part part of the global leadership some sites carly. Thank you for your amazing book. Thank you for your example. Thank you for your heart your passion and thank you for writing a book that that was <hes> just like you're my my leadership coach. Thank you for being my mentor through your book and all that you've done. It's been an honor spend some time with you. Well thank you so much craig. This has been ah very wonderful conversation from me as well. Thanks carla if you're new with us. We come out with a brand new leadership teaching on the first thursday of every single month so i look forward to sharing sharing that with you next time if this podcast is helpful to you means the world to me when you share on social media thank you for doing that. Please rate it review it get the word out. I can't wait to share more with you. We always say this be yourself as a leader confident what is inside of you because people would rather follow leaders always real and when he's always right. Thank you for joining us at the craig rachelle leadership podcast. If you wanna go even deeper into this episode and get the leadership guide or show notes you can go to life dot church slash leadership podcast. You can also sign up to have that information delivered straight to your inbox every month in the meantime you can subscribe to this podcast rate rate and review it on itunes and share with your friends on social media once again. Thank you for joining us at the craig rochelle leadership.

carly fiorina Jim carl mary oliver hewlett packard cancer rachelle craig t. Jim kim executive america craig rachelle iraq ceo craig rochelle c._e._o.
Prosecutor Harris Makes Her Case

The Forecast with Harry Enten

06:06 min | 1 year ago

Prosecutor Harris Makes Her Case

"Tired of spending hundreds of dollars prescription glasses visits any today at Xeni dot com slash CNN. Hello, folks. Welcome to another addition, the forecast with Harry Anton, I, of course, am that person. Harry Entin last week. We spoke about Joe Biden's magic number averaging thirty one percent in the polls this week. We're going to talk about the first democratic debates, and folks, there's nothing that gets my blood going a good democratic debate, or Republican debate, a primary debate in general, and let me tell you the second night, featured one of those moments that I think that we will remember for a long period of time when comma Harris confronted. Joe Biden on a host of issues, including his opposition school, busing integration through school busing, and let me tell you, it reminded me of when Rick Perry said oops, on the stage. It reminded me of one Chris Christie, went after Marco Rubio in the two thousand sixteen GOP debates it was one of those moments. But of course, we need to take a step back because just because something is a moment that we may remember it doesn't mean it will change the course of history. We have to remember that Joe Biden has held his position on the polls, but he has done so in large part because of a large amount of support from African American voters, comma, Harris recognized this recognized that she needed to infiltrate. Joe Biden support among African American voters. And I think the question is did she do that last night issue going to be able to rise up among African Americans cut into Joe Biden sport. That is a question that will have to wait and see. I will point out debate moments in the past, having fact, moved the pulse from time to time you may remember when Donald Trump and Carly Fiorina gone on a stage and Carly, Fiorina confronted Donald Trump about statements that he made about her appearance and you know what the polls didn't fact move, we did see Donald Trump drop about five points in the polls after that twenty fifteen debate we did see Carly Fiorina jump about five points in the polls. But of course folks, what did we also see we saw that those bumps faded for Carly Fiorina and Donald Trump was able to rise back. In the polls. But I shouldn't just dismiss it that easily that perhaps, even if there's an effect, and it may fade because there's one thing that we've known all along in this primary season and that is that Joe Biden was most vulnerable on the age question. When you looked Paul's, what did vote or say they said they didn't actually feel comfortable. Nominating someone over the age of seventy five to be the democratic party's nominee. And you know what folks to me? Joe Biden looked like he was every bit of that over seventy five that he is. So the big question for Joe Biden and coming out of this debate is, let's say that the polls do in fact show that he has faded a bit. Can he recover? Can he ensure voters that despite being an older gentleman that he can go up against Donald Trump because, comma, Harris last night showed that prosecutorial spirit that she has wanted to show on the campaign trail, all along, and that she can prosecute the case against Donald Trump because that folks is the number one issue in the eyes and minds of democratic voters beating Donald Trump? Of course, I. Couldn't failed to mention that there was a first night to the democratic debates on that particular night, Elizabeth Warren, of course, was facing off against basically one and two percent candidates, and most people thought that she came away doing what she needed to do, but I was reminded how far left a lot of the democratic leading candidates are Bernie Sanders, comma, Harris, Elizabeth Warren, all in some form of fashion wanna Medicare for all plan, that, even if it doesn't eliminate all private insurance, companies, it will in fact, limit their ability to practice and that, folks, not a popular position within the General Electric, and indeed public option that Joe Biden, and a host of other candidates are calling for, which basically allows you to buy a Medicare, but doesn't necessarily require it. That is a much more popular option even among Democrats, and I think there's going to be a real question, going forward is these Democrats? Get more into these debates and go after one another weather, an elective -bility argument can be framed around Medicare for all package because I'll tell you looking at the polls Medicare for all. Eliminating private insurance is not a popular position with the General Electric. Well, that's it folks. That's all the time that we have. But I once again that was debate on Thursday night. And that just shows you the power of candidates going against each other. Mono iman. Oh, the ability to show that you have better ideas and can prosecute a case better than your opponent. If you like what you heard, why don't you subscribe? Apple podcast Stitcher, Google podcast. Leave a comment, so other people can find the podcast, give us a five star rating once again, so other people can find the podcast. Plus, it makes me feel good Shalom have yourself a good weekend. And thanks for listening. Are you interested in learning? How great companies grow. The download the Mark podcast Amar tech podcast tells the stories of real world marketers who use technology to generate growth in chief business and careers exists from advertising to software as a service to data getting brands authentically integrated, the content performs better than TV advertising. Typical life span of an article about twenty four to thirty six hours for reaching out to the right person with the right message and it clear. Call an action that it's just a matter of timing. Ready to learn the secrets of technology driven marketing, download the Marta podcast. Just search Martin. Ami. A. R. T C H wherever you download your podcasts.

Joe Biden Donald Trump Harris Carly Fiorina democratic party Medicare Harry Entin Harry Anton Xeni dot Rick Perry CNN Elizabeth Warren Chris Christie General Electric GOP Marco Rubio Martin Paul
Episode 108: 7 Degrees of Steve Bannon [Patreon Preview] feat Erin Gloria Ryan

Yeah, But Still

10:37 min | 2 years ago

Episode 108: 7 Degrees of Steve Bannon [Patreon Preview] feat Erin Gloria Ryan

"What's up guys? It's Jack before episode starts. I have a quick announcement. Very exciting one. I've been teasing it for a while. But the but still patriot discord is officially live. You should be able to join very easily through your patriot account. And it'll assign you roll based on your tier there's there's a feat tear roll a alpha role and God alpha role and probably some more to keep evolving. It as it goes. But yeah, very stoked. Our community page is getting very active, and I figured there needs to be an official discord so logon. Please join the discord. And if you have no idea, what discord is or need some help. I'm gonna put a link in this description that God teaches you how to connect your discord to the patriot on. All right. So here's the episode, and hopefully you on there. Welcome to podcast was do the air lawyer. I am. Oh, yeah. We have Aaron Gloria Ryan returning to the podcast act on that on the pod. That was the first the first one that you did Felix in air. And I was like, oh, I feel that was like the first podcast was like this where doing yeah, we're ready to sign that was that was that was a hot one. Yeah. But I mean, we were we were talking before pressing record. And it was just getting to a point where it's like, you know, I think should be on air because Brandon was telling you this. The topic of Steve Bannon came up Steve Bannon came up, and and circle back to a a story that we've we've talked about on this podcast. But I'm Brian you're telling version of it. Well, it's starting to get into the semantics of it. Well, I was tricked into thinking. This girl is Steve Bannon daughter her friend who was like, okay, my friend. She was like, my friend wants to have a three. Awesome. And she like, she shows me these pictures, and then she is a issues, I should tell you. She's Steve Bannon's daughter. And I I'm I'm full resistance mode. I'm like, okay. Let's fucking go. Wait. How is how is? I'm gonna let you before jumping feeling somebody's sexual wishes form of resistance because because Seve. Seve Bannon probably wouldn't want people wouldn't want me in there. Okay. So this is so that's that's sort of my mental that was sort of my mentality at the time. And then these these like I can't I don't want to reveal too much because I don't want to give out her last. I mean, whatever it's Bannon. Yeah. But like, I mean last was banned in and then like, I searched her name, and it was like, okay, see ban and has a daughter with his name. The seems real Aaron is telling you a glossy he's been telling himself this lie for a long time. There's he's racing me from the story because this he brought this information me, and he sends me this girl. And I like I was like well Steve Bannon really bad divorce and his daughters. Don't talk to him. And I don't think they go. I don't think that use last name go by different last. Yeah. And I was like and also this girl looks literally nothing like either daughters, and he's like, I don't know. This. Like, I think I should still do it just in case. Like, wouldn't it be you know, like? Why should I should if I could bang Steve Bannon's daughter, I should right now is like I mean, I guess like, yeah. So I pretty much I laid out to you everything you need to know. Like, this is literally not Steve Bannon daughter, and you're like, it could be I think I should do it. I guess there's only one way to find out. It's a weird story. I mean. Yeah. Story presented to me originally is like I'm going to be doing this for the good of our country. Daughter. Here's the thing though, if okay imagine the opposite of Steve Bannon in your head like imagine, if it were somebody that you really looked up like Joe Biden or Barack Obama or whatever and love today. I'd love to Obama. But here's the thing that the just men always wanted men would always find justification for sleeping with a for having sex. They would be like, you know, what I got to have sex with the daughter of former President Obama for the good of the country. And also, I gotta have sex with the daughter of Steve Bannon for the good of the country just going to twist it to you getting your penis touched. No matter. Warm of service folks, will can I what can I say, I'm having sex not for me for you for the whole country. So that's I mean, I'm I'm addicted to to babes, but I'm addicted to patriotism resisting. Yeah. Also. Yeah. Fuck Steve Bannon, if foreign resistance what like why would that be form of resistance? I'm not really sure. I'm not following exactly. Could keep him occupied. He was going to do something really bad. And you had you see about to do about this situation. He's still in the White House, and he has his finger on the nuclear codes. He's about to tell Donald Trump to quit NATO. He's about to be the one to and you're like, what can I do? And you're like, well better how distractive. Yeah. Bugs Bunny style routine where you out and. Deuce him. I yeah. That's I'm not gonna rape Steve. Bannon. Like, I don't like, I don't know. Sorry. But that's big of you know. Even if even if it means protecting the country, I'm not going to rape, Steve Bannon. Okay. I'll I'll say that. I'll say that Tom what your real feminist? Yeah. Real feminine will not rapes you've been. Listen where you're the only Ahrends the only one here with see Bannon's phone number. I don't have his phone number. You have his Email Email? You have his Email. We know all about this. But what we take it where one. Yeah, you're probably the only person who in errands Aaron's, very liberal. But she's the only guest of. Yeah. But still it's been guests on C, Bannon's that's true. I have been a guest on Stephen is twice both times. So now, it's equal numbers of times on. Yeah. But still and Stevens radio show. Oh, wow. Yeah. So I better go back and hit up Breitbart. So yeah, I was covering CPAC for the place that used to work in link. Twenty fifteen I was at Jacksonville. And we were there kind of hanging around in the Breitbart radio booth and like Jackie Ben to CPAC though. It's a real carnival of loneliness freaks. Yeah, freaks it. Any convention is sort of a Colonel confession. Jack was there is a fan a fan. Not working. I was by myself it Ted Cruz costs play showed up your crews head to hang out. But we're in the Breitbart, my my old colleague, and I were in the Breitbart radio booth and somebody saw where we were from. And they were like, oh, my gosh, we have to tell Steve. And this is before everybody knew who Steve Bannon was issues just like in charge of Breitbart, and Steve came over and said hi to us and was like, oh, that's so cool. It's so ballsy you guys are here because like jazz bells like liberal feminists website and Breitbart is not and he was like, yeah. She come to this party. We're having a big party tonight. At this mansion the Breitbart mansion he called him. Yeah. Then we asked around. Yeah. Breitbart man instead of instead of playboy bunnies. They just have like like that girl on Twitter that like, where's he? Rifle who's never cut her hair her like one. One lock all the way to the back of her knees. It's like home schooling there. But yes, like we asked around and they're like, yeah. It's it's a fun party. Yes. It's legit. And so we we went to the party Bannon came out and like greeted us personally in brought us in. They had like doormen they add like a cigar room. Of course, all kinds of conservative stogies. Yeah. It's almost it. Well, I don't want to it's very Freudian. And to me like there. Anyway. So so, yeah, we're the party was fine. Bannon had asked me to go on his radio show the next day, and I got super drunk at the party and ended up going home. I think I threw up in my hotel room, and then the next morning had to wake up, and I was still like very drunk, and I went on vanish. Oh, it was. Yes. It's still talk about find politics. I'm assuming I have no memory. I just remember Carly Fiorina to remember her. She was like on right before me. And I remember watching and I was standing and waiting for her to stand up, and I remember sitting down on the chair, and it was still warm from her. But and I remember thinking, wow, this Carly fearing his but warmth. We yes, she was on Steve Bannon show too. I hate when I go to a party, and I drunk unle- agree to do Steve. Bannon's radio show. Yeah. That's quite a hangover morning. Yeah. I really shouldn't agreed to these. Yeah. I would I would imagine that there's probably one night stands that person could wake up from an feel lesser gret. Dude. I shouldn't have I shouldn't have fucked doing roof last. Goof. Yeah.

Steve Bannon Breitbart Aaron Gloria Ryan Barack Obama rape Breitbart Carly Fiorina official White House Seve Donald Trump Felix Ted Cruz Brandon Stephen Brian Twitter Jacksonville Joe Biden President
Mainlining Controversy: Carly Fiorina talks us through medias contribution to the polarized state of our nation and how leaders can turn things around by taking the long view.

Oxford Road Presents: The Divided States of Media

1:08:45 hr | 6 months ago

Mainlining Controversy: Carly Fiorina talks us through medias contribution to the polarized state of our nation and how leaders can turn things around by taking the long view.

"Welcome to the divided states of media presented by Oxford Road in in collaboration with the National Institute for Civil Discourse. I'm your host Dan Grainger. You need not look further than the social or news feed on your phone screen to see how bitterly divided we are as a country. Many of us are wondering how long this divided house can yet stand. This program is a journey of discovery where we are talking influential people about how we got here what we can do to unite and asking ourselves. Some hard questions for those of us that are in media, how much are we contributing to the problem? What can we do leaders in the private sector to walk some of this back? This is a complex challenge and we need all the help. We can get sodas with great pro pleasure and deep gratitude that I introduced to you. Our first guest who is. Carly Fiorina Carly is the founder and chair of fearing enterprises and the unlocking potential foundation. She was the first woman to head a fortune fifty company when she became CEO and President of Hewlett. Packard in one, thousand, nine, hundred, nine, she also served as economic adviser to John McCain during his presidential run in two, thousand, eight and carly also sought the Republican nomination. For President in two thousand sixteen and I can only wonder if she had one, would we even have caused to be doing this podcast? Incidentally Carli has since endorsed Joe Biden for the twenty twenty elections. So welcome to the show carly it's so good to have you here. It's great to be with you Dan. Thank you for having. You know worthy topic indeed. Thank you. Yeah. We like I said we we need a lot of help on this one. So where? What I said is maybe a good place for us to start, which is when you look around at all the divisions in this country, how different would be today if another candidate you, for example, had won the two thousand sixteen election in terms of the the polarize state of our country. Well honestly, I think Donald Trump is both a symptom and a cause. He's both a result of polarization and the cause of further polarization. You know there's an old saying that politics is downstream of culture and I think there's a lot of truth to that. If you think about the culture that social media has created that reality TV has created that an explosion in various media channels has created. What all of that has done is I think exacerbate our tendency to be tribal. I mean your mutual friend and Mine Henry Cloud would tell you that. As human beings we are attracted to people like us. We're physiologically wired to recognize people like us to be vaguely suspicious of people who are different from us. And so we're at a place where we can find our tribe so easily. And we can stay in our tribe. We can stay with our tribe. We don't we ever have to leave our tribe these days and all that predated trump. And it means we become less and less likely. To seek out those. From whom we are different. The court thing that I mentioned is reality TV. I think what reality TV did is sort of. Give this high. On controversy and conflict an outrage and the more outrageous and controversial people were the more we were entertained and somehow or kind of. Drug Marin. So Donald Trump is a symptom of all of that, but there is no question. That Donald Trump has made all of that worse. The media to your point has played into that. Let us face it Donald. Trump. Is. Fantastic. Content people, watch it. and. So the media amplifies it as well. In the last thing, I would just say Dan sorry for this long answer. Importantly. What social media I think has done what technology in general has done and we see this in business we see in politics, we see our own lives. It's shortened our attention span. And it's shorten our horizon. So we get so fixated on the short term. What's happening in the next ten minutes? What's happening in the next ten years? We don't really think very hard. About what's happening in the next ten months? What's happening in the next ten years? And that shortened attention span I think also has. Very, negative consequences. Actually on families on businesses on our nation. Carly. That's A very healthy and balanced perspective and at the same time, it's also terrifying you when you know look, it's so easy. No matter who you are. You can see some of the behaviors of the president. It's easy for people get outraged and go look at him if we can just get rid of him all of this goes away and the reality is some of those behaviors are a reflection of what we asked for whether we voted for him or not, and when you think about the press who by and large is not a fan how much do they really actually like it because what it does for the the attention economy and so I think that It's unfortunate. But I think what you're saying makes a lot of sense and is is a good chance for those of us you know and and as I mentioned, this program is focused on people in the private sector and people who were in media but we've got a lot of introspection to do here and not pretend that there's a magic wand that if you don't like the way that the president might conduct himself. Imagining that that goes away if he goes away and so unfortunately, it's a, it's a good answer, but it's hard answer well to your point if I may just amplify for a moment, I was a Republican presidential candidate in two thousand sixteen right I believe that we have too many professional politicians. We need an outsider and I think actually a lot of Americans agreed with that what I observed in twenty-six. I observed to this day is no one could get any airtime except Donald J trump. In fact Hillary Clinton had a hard time getting airtime against Donald J trump Joe Biden has a hard time getting airtime against Donald J trump because Donald J trump is fascinating. Love him or lows him people watch him cancel. The, yes, and so the the media has given him an extraordinary amount of time and access, and of course. He's a creature of the media. He knows how to draw their attention and keep their attention. Yeah I think I think we can all agree that he plays the game well and I. Wonder what the precedent is. You know and I think you can go back through history and and you know wherever you are politically if you look at folks whether it's Or Newt Gingrich you know there is something about being able to make a splash and get people's attention because that attention becomes currency that becomes power that becomes influence right and so I wonder now that we've kind of reached this level that we're at as a society, are we now addicted to this forever or or is there area in a bit of an outlier situation and and and we really will go back to normalcy perspective on that? Well, as I suggested in. My answer to your first question, I. Think this trend has been developing for some time. And so I think it's going to take some time. To Change Our habits if you will or more specifically. To change our culture. I do think part of our issue is we have gotten really confused about what leadership actually is. I think we by way this confusion has existed for a long time, but it's very stark. Now I think we tend to think. Oh A leader is someone who was a big title. maybe a lot of fame maybe a lot of money maybe I see them a lot. That's the leader Unfortunately, leaders may have all those things, but it isn't why air leader a leader. The purpose of leadership. is to solve problems and change the order of things for the better as what leaders do. So they're fundamentally different from celebrities or people with big titles they focus on solving problems and they changed things for the better. And in order to do those two things true leadership. Serves. A leader serves. It actually isn't about the leader. It's about those they serve. It's about the problem they seek to solve. It's about the change they seek to bring about, and so we have to I think as citizens as. Participants in our nation as Americans, we have to wean ourselves off of the fascination. With, celebrity same money and get reoriented towards. Leadership. And problem solving and humility and service and character. No small task? No. Although we have on history of being able to do it. Yeah. Yeah. No I hear you in. You know we're we're kind of all in this this battle together kind rowing in the same direction on that note ca can we back up a little bit and and can you just share with our audience a little bit about what you've been up to since the two thousand sixteen election and how you've been working on this problem? Yes. So My Business Carly Fiorina enterprises is focused on developing leaders and leadership skills, and the foundation unlocking potential is directed specifically at leaders community based leaders who are working in the nonprofit sector. We have a lot of problems, and so we need a lot more leaders and a lot more problem solvers, and so I concluded that I could make the biggest contribution by helping others develop their own leadership skills, giving them the confidence and the tools to tackle the problems that are right in front of them. I believe based on experience. That each of us are capable of leadership. All of us are capable of leading many of us don't have that expectation for ourselves. Many of US unfortunately don't have the support of the resources to become leaders, but each of us can. and. So that's my small contribution to try and focus people on unlocking their own potential for leadership and positive change in impact and contribution. And reframing it it seems like so we're not taking shortcuts and mistaking attention for and the quick winds for for the hard work that that can really create a legacy. I would imagine. Yes. In by the way that same dilemma existed business to you see businesses they get so addicted to the short term, win of a popping stock price and hitting the quarter that they don't do the hard long-term work necessary to sustain a franchise they can have a positive impact in many many ways. So this Desire to take shortcuts let's face it. It's a human desire and Positive unnecessary change always always takes hard work and patience and commitment over the long haul. Well as somebody that runs a business that focuses on media and to an extent, you know we're an AD agency. So we trade and attention right and so so I I say this with an acknowledgement that we are probably contributing to the problem more than we realize I'm interested in understanding from your perspective having gone through the Gauntlet and being a candidate. How, much of the what I'll what I'll describe as rewarding bad behavior how much of that is media and how much of that is structural in our political system? Will I think it's both and I think it's honestly assume bionic relationship. So You know in seventeen, eighty, nine George Washington said to the nation. Beware the rise of political parties they will come to care only about winning. Political Parties Care About winning. which is to say, they don't actually care about problem solving they don't actually care about. Positive change they care about winning and staying in power that doesn't make them evil people but that's the truth. That's the purpose of the system is to win an accumulate power and retain power. So that means that we as a nation aren't necessarily well served by the structure of political parties. It also means that if you're focused on a long term, win running, win run and win running, win raise the money to run and wit. Then what you actually are trying to do is remind people problems not solve them because it is problems that caused people to get all agitated and particularly if you can blame the other side for the problem. Wow. Then everybody gets really agitated and that raises money. Right, it raises money and it gets people out to vote in so. Politicians really are focused on. How do I galvanized people? So that I win. And get power or keep power. Okay. So there's a couple pieces of that that I want to unpack. The first is it sounds like you're you're saying at least in this country it's really been that way from the beginning once Washington pass the baton is that fair? I think the the I think the structure of political parties is around. Gaining. Amassing retaining political power. It's not a good or bad statement I. Think it's just a fact and so built for therefore. It becomes very important. That citizens understand there will guess what? It's not a citizens job to pledge allegiance to a party. Actually we pledge allegiance to a flag of the United States of America not to a party. So when we get all hung up on the fact that all my political parties like my football team I'm with them no matter what not or no it's totally backwards they worked for us not the other way around point one point two I think we need to reward. which we don't always leaders who were margin politics. And that means that we actually have to hold them account for a record of problem solving, which we don't really do honestly frank term limits would definitely help. That's a subject for another day. By Way to the second half of your question about media, of course, media plays into this because a fight is compelling. You know unpacking prob woman listening patiently to both sides so that we can learn from both sides and collaborate together to solve a problem that takes a little more energy takes a little more time. In it's so much easier if you can just have a quick kit and get every riled up about the fight and. You know? Place your get your money and redone. Well Okay and to go back to the thesis about. Washington's point you know some people have argued that when when he said that in his farewell address that really that was largely written by Hamilton and he was sneaking in a jab that he thought would hurt. Jefferson. Right. So so who knows right but but I do feel like there is a disincentive for fair competition in politics is something that I think we've been discovering in the process of doing this show. Where I've heard that if you're a third party, you know you. You are going to. The the the Democrats or Republicans will raise three hundred times as much money because of those alignments and it, and it does feel like we've orchestrated a duopoly which in business is absurd and yet our whole political system is set up on that so. So. So do you think that part of the problem maybe less about the fact that you can have a party and more about the fact that we have kind of created this forced choice? Well. I. Do think you're absolutely right when you describe it as do -opoly and in business if you had a duopoly the way to solve that problem this through competition. Structurally. It's next from possible to compete with these two parties. On the other hand? Let me take the other side of the coin just for a moment. A two party system when it works. Presents different solutions to common problems. And what I know about problem solving. Is, that problems get solved best not when everyone agrees because then you're probably missing something. I'm get solved best when people disagree in a constructive way learn from each other. They're united not necessarily in their views one hundred percent about how to get it done. But what they are united in his what to get done what's the goal? What's the problem we're trying to solve? and. So at its best and his best. Political parties would. We as citizens would demand that they align on what's the problem were trying to solve, and then let's have a real debate, a real back and forth about the best way to solve it. This is where I think trump is a cause because a president. A leader. A leader who happens to be president when we say it that way a president who is actually the leader would say, let us align as a nation. Let us agree as a nation on horror the most pressing problems for us to solve. And then let us engage. From both sides and all sides on what's the best way to solve those problems and let's collaborate to get to the answer because neither party on its own has the best answer together might find the best answer I. Honestly it's one of the reasons I have endorsed by because he he is saying. That what his purpose is, is to align the nation around common causes in common problems and that he will reach his hand across the aisle and collaborate with Republicans and I do think if that's what he does. That is what we need and he has a track record of doing that. But that's what we as citizens are going to have to demand. So whenever this election is over. we can't. Just retreat to our corners. We're going to have to engage one last thing if I may Dan please, it's not fair for citizens to take this passive role and say it's all the politicians fault. Yes. What you guys are just gals you're supposed to force, feed me the answers and you know I'll go with whoever I go and then I'm done I, just check out and I go on with my life citizens are going to have to play a very active role as we always have during the best times of our history. Were warning have to play a very active role in finding unity again, and in being willing to listen to people with whom we disagree and actually coming together to find common ground. And so listen I. Know You. You did a brave thing as as I understand it as a lifelong. Republican. Coming out and endorsing the Democratic candidate. What's that been like for you? How would tell us share that experience because I you know I can't imagine like we can. We can talk about the policy implications and I? I. Think That's interesting. But like as a person when you have a set of beliefs and then you go, I am actually going to set all of those aside because I think that there's something more important and then people start responding to you I can't imagine this is a great way to make a ton of friends. Well. Let let me say first that the set of beliefs that I hold. People closest to the problem, invest how to solve it. If they're given a chance, therefore, government should be limited and decentralized. That everyone has enormous potential therefore. Has To be given the opportunity and the resources to unlock their potential and finally the power concentrated power abused always no matter what therefore you have to check power and distribute power. those beliefs have never been perfectly. Aligned to the Republican Party nor perfectly aligned to the Democratic Party I start with that because although yes, I had been registered Republican life. The Republican Party has disappointed me on many many things. Point to. I don't think loyalty to a party. Is. The most important thing that is citizens we should be I think as citizens. What's most important is that were loyal to our nation were loyal to our family were loyal to our community, and so I start was all that to say it didn't really feel all that brave honestly although I knew I would take a ration of you know what? Which I did. Yeah. I would imagine that there's a lot of people that are very unhappy and probably been unkind in the process, and then I also wonder if people on the other side are. Welcoming your participation or if you're being you know, I don't know how that's being received. So so yeah, what's a? What's it like to be you right now? Well Let me say first that when I coach leaders or teach leadership. I say that the first and most important quality if you WANNA lead. is to have courage develop courage to practice courage, and the reason for that is because criticism is the price of leadership always. So I have learned over the course of my life to put criticism in its proper place if you are leading, you are being criticized period. And so. And let me stop you because this is so fascinating to me. So so have you really truly hone your ability to compartmentalize that type of feedback and not feel emotionally. Are Are. You're able to separate that out and it doesn't matter. You're you're bulletproof in terms of them being able to penetrate and really hurt your feelings on that stuff. I have gotten there. Now by the way, let me quickly say need back is different than criticism sure. Back comes from someone who actually cares about you and who wants to be better and they may need to tell you something you don't really WanNa hear. Is really important. The criticism is just people yakking. And it happens all the time in social media exacerbates it, and by the way it gives people a feeling of power to be able to fire law some nasty tweet and I get a lot of them but it's not. impactful to me there was a time in my life when criticism, hurt A Lot but I. Learned over and over and over, you cannot do anything as a leader without getting criticized so either. You are stopped by the criticism. Or you learned to put it in his likes. Well, that's that is impressive and and. I don't WanNa go too far down the policy Tunnel but I am interested to know when you take you know forget the party but there's policy right and and do you do you get concerned that? If Biden winds that that things like court packing or adding states do you believe that some of that will? Like, you afraid of some of those consequences happening and and are you willing to kind of stand by your view if fighting comes in and he doesn't govern as a as a centrist and somebody that really wants to reach across the Aisle if Democrats win the House and the Senate, you know there could be a tidal wave of changes that somebody who's generally supported. Republican. Policies don't. Believe in or are you prepared for that scenario in which you still stand by that choice or is your money on the fact that no, he's going to govern from the center and really be more inclusive. Well I am. Banking on the fact. That Biden will stay. The man he has always been and I say that because Biden has a long track record. Of reaching across the aisle of collaborating with others, he has a long track record of being very humble very empathetic. So. I'm banking on the fact that he's going to be who he actually is. And I I also believe from a political perspective. That the larger his mandate is the more he must govern from the. Center. Because the people who will have brought him to the table. Are Centrist for example, if not to get too far into this, but if you owning data. Biden will win if he continues to win with seniors and women among others. Seniors and women, and even a great majority of the African American. Vote. They are not progressive leftists. They are not a oc they actually are pretty the middle, and so I think the coalition he's putting together will. I hope magnifying his core characteristics as a person. But yes, of course, I'm concerned about that look pork packing is a really bad idea and we got here. Of course, both parties have played in getting us here. The Democrats don't like to remind their constituents, but it was actually Harry Reid and the Democrats who I said you know what? We're only going to require fifty one votes for federal nominees that started this process that leads us now to the point where Supreme Court justices only have fifty. One votes both parties have thrown out the rules that tended to help the Senate be as our founding fathers intended a cooling saucer for the nation's emotion. Well, now, the Senate is a house on steroids and they don't really deserve their six year terms because they're playing in the same stuff court packing to me is a very different thing than DC in Puerto. Rico, becoming states I personally favour of DC in Puerto Rico becoming states. I think I think. They should be state whether they're mostly Democrat or not, and if Republicans want to represent the nation, they better figure out how to look white. NATION THEY WANNA represent. Well, you're awesome being objective I'll say that. Okay. So let's let's go back to this polarization issue. And you know I think we've we've established that. This is this is the political system. This is social media. This is all media to some extent. You've seen the charts that show how the centers of both parties have kind of moved further towards the extremes over the last few decades, right? And what I wonder from your perspective. Is. The problem that we are getting more different or is the problem the the civility in in nature in which we express our differences or is it both? How do you see that? So I would correct your language just a little bit county, I? Don't think the centers of both parties are getting further apart. I think the base of both parties is getting further apart. And I may send you. I'm going to send you something. Well, let me tell you why I make being sure and I've been out there a lot et as a as most people in this country despite what it looks like in the media. People in this country are knocked political activists. They're not sure you're leading their lives they're doing their business and most Americans leading their lives and doing new business spend a whole lot of time. With people. Less now, perhaps them previously but they spend time with people that they don't always agree with. The basis meaning the power base, the money base, the base of each party has moved further and further to extremes without a doubt. will all the way back to? It's all about winning. Then, who does a political party appeal to my base base cars? They give me the power they give me the money they give me the votes. That's why everyone needs to vote. It would change the balance of power in his country back to the cell. If all those people in the center who aren't politically active when he just get sick of politics and say, I'm not voting I can't stand it say instead I have to vote because I can't stand. Okay and so so what happens if we don't go in that direction? What happens if you play this out five, ten, twenty years down the road. If we don't turn the tide. On on the way that we are. Governing and expressing ourselves in polarizing divisive ways. What happens to the country? Well. Our success as a country is not preordained. It is not assured And at the very least. What will happen in the timeframe that you described? We will become a smaller. meaner. Less, impactful less influential nation, we will no longer be inspiring beacon for the rest of the world and it won't be a very pleasant place to live on. So it's a degradation of America as we've known it in our lifetime. than making forward progress we start sliding backwards does the whole thing come apart. Well let's a little perspective. Megyn will here you know Joe Biden gave a speech yesterday in Gettysburg we have to remember that there was a point in time in this nation, for example when we were so divided. That went to war right along bloody horrible war. It was a period of time in the sixties in this nation where. Political figures were being nominated where there were riots in the streets where you know. Literally, thousands and thousands of people were protesting against the government on a daily basis. So we have seen division before is my point by the way you're you're proving my point on a short and timeframe. People on social media. Don't think about history very often, and yet it's instructive and reassuring sometimes. So we have been divided and we know what happens when we're that divide or smaller or meaner were less influential or less impactful in yes. If we cannot figure out a way. To, come back to pull back from kind of the slide we've been on. And slide that Donald Trump has most definitely accelerated and exacerbated. Bad things for this country, not just in terms of lessened impact would in terms I fear of greater civil unrest. Well. So if we were to make the assumption that that what you're saying is true Donald Trump has exacerbated the problem he didn't start the problem he is in many ways a byproduct of the problem, but he has hastened Do you believe that the country can make progress on this in a meaningful way in spite of whoever the president is. Sh. You know. Tony said at the top. leadership matters. Character counts. Yeah. It's another reason why I got to the point where I felt I had no choice but to endorsed by because leadership matters and character counts and Thomas set of the top. And so I think if we have four more years of this divisive. Raging tone. That, it's very hard to operate in a way. That is not do this is an enraged. So we touched on this earlier but do you feel like a third party would be helpful if there were one that could be established in legitimized or is the system really designed to where that's not a realistic? That's not a viable. Outcome look I think anything that Hastens the. On. Decentralisation deconcentration of power is a good thing I. Power concentrated is power abused. Always it doesn't matter how well-intended it is. It doesn't matter who the people are power concentrate Arab us whether it's in. WASHINGTON? D.. C. A corporate headquarters in a political party it doesn't matter. So anything that is going to. check concentrated power is a good thing. It's why term limits would help. It's why a third party absolutely would help. There are things structural systemic things that absolutely would help are those things extraordinarily difficult to get done? Yes, they are. But Maybe after the experience of the last five, ten years there will be an appetite to get. Carly, have you seen the film? Stars strife. I have not actually. Okay. It's very cool. We had the director on. We're actually posting it today but we spoke last week and it was co-produce with Barry Levinson and you know they've got rahm Emanuel Leon Panetta James Baker. I mean people on both sides that have done some real stuff talking about this problem of polarization. Ken Langone the the Home Depot co-founder is on. He says you know politicians around money is like you know a drug addict around cocaine you know and and one of the. What's that? It's true. Well. Say you know with the fact that you were you know it was such a large corporation running it. You were in a sense in in the room where it happens on that level and one of the the pinions that keeps expressing itself by guests on the show is oriented look politicians are working for. Multinational corporations and that that is really kind of the top of the pyramid that in high net worth donors a really at the top of the pyramid in terms of influence on our politicians. Is that true? Well, concentrated power the system in Washington DC Works best. For the big, the powerful, the wealthy, the connected. That's just a fact. It's The power needs to be distributed and the Republican Party has made no effort in that regard even though they claim that's with therefore. So Yes that's true. If you are wealthy donor, you have influenced that the donor who can put in ten dollars have if you are a large corporation was an army of Accountants and lawyers who can lobby in DC you have an influence that a small business. WHO's barely making it does not have The system works for the wealthy, the powerful, the connected and the big, and it's one of the reasons why Complexity I said this during my campaign, but it's just true as a problem solver. It's true as corporate leader when you have a system that is so complicated. That is so complicated. It only works for the people who can take advantage of that complexity. And that's what we are. Right. And that too is a long-standing row. So, if a if a candidate or a politician is thought to be business friendly, usually that's there's a difference. It sounds like between whether you're friendly to large multinational corporations and you know the small businesses that are on main street is. You're saying, and by the way we have evidence of this. Look look at the Kobe nineteen relief packages. I've been very public about this Democrats, and Republicans alike rallied around the fact. Oh my gosh. We have to bail out the airlines even though they'd spent ten years buying back their stock and loading up on cheap debt. We gotta bail out the big guys we gotta bail out with the guys. Yeah. We gotTA get around a small business and they did but they. Didn't do it with the same focus and energy and the small business program hasn't been as successful as it needs to be. They didn't have the same energy around when they do the auto bailout they didn't have the same energy around bailing out all those small companies supply the automobile companies they got more focused on union workers, big concentrations of influence voting powers, and they did on just regular employees who are unionized. It happens all the time. I think we should have started with was relief for communities, schools, small businesses, working families, but we start at the top of the pyramid always do eventually maybe we got down to. Little guys. and. You know let's stay on the business trained for a little bit here because most of the people that are gonNA listen to this are playing a prominent role in the operations of a business and you know HP has been recognized for its stature as a corporate citizen What's your take on the the movement towards stakeholder capitalism away from just pure shareholder capitalism as we've understood it Well. Full disclosure in the year two thousand. So that was twenty years ago. Asked the question. What is the role of the CEO and orders a roll company and I said to balance the requirements Of Customers. Employees, communities and shareholders I've always. Done. Each new are focused on long term. The stain -able shareholder value not the short term hit not a year or two, but a decade or two. If you're focused on long term sustainable value, then you have to take care of your employees and you have to focus on your customers and you actually have to be good partners to communities in which employs live and work, and by the way yes, you have to. Build. A return for your shareholders and so that's always been in my opinion. What's the best of free enterprise is about and we have in the business community him moved very far away from that no it's about the short term hit. It's about making quarter to hell with all the rest but I think honestly that has been a perversion. Of anyone who understands what long term success looks like versus short term success and I will say one other thing Dan you know we talked about attentions and social media well, technology has transformed. Wall Street. It's transformed Wall Street to this extent. You know the average share holder. Owns a strong. Now less than a month. Any. Racing -ly increasingly. Stock Market is moved by algorithms that own stocks for less than a minute. Okay, it's hard to focus energy on a shareholder. So to speak trading your stock minute by minute. When everything is tinder? Yes. It's a currency and that's also why it think you see the stock market disconnecting from the reality of the real. Economy. What's happening is stocks have become currency. Let's trade in the ups and downs of this currency. Yeah. That's trade on arbitrage. That's not the same. As investing in a company for sustainable value. Well, and so much of what we're talking about is just time horizon rate and the reason I say tinder it's like everything is so transactional. I, want what I want. I want on demand I, wanted one and now and Give it to me. But this is. This is a complex problem. So you know when you think about all of the you know the the Business Roundtable shifting their focus and making these pronouncements, and then now we now are in two, thousand, twenty you have. All. Of this chaos and you see what some people would call virtue signaling. It's critical that you say the right thing you know what we had one guest called it the the Woke Olympics For what you put on Instagram and making sure it strikes the right tone. How do you feel about that? Does that feel in line with with the progress you're describing or does that feel more when when companies are getting political and opportunistic about things that are maybe outside of their expertise? Is that a good thing is that stakeholder capitalism is that the purpose of a corporation or is that more the perversion you're describing? Well. Look I have to say that I'm a board member of an organization called C e C. P. Corporate Executives. At chief executives for corporate purpose and so I know I I noticed from my time at HP I know this from the time I spend with many business executives. There are many many many companies in this country who invest deeply in their communities who have long term positive impact to take it very seriously their employees take it seriously in fact, one of the positive trends I, think is that younger employees really are focused on what good. Accompany. Does you know do all and do good and that tends to be increasingly a requirement of some employs I know at during my time at HP, our employees whatever their age was got really engaged in our work with in communities. It motivated them gave them purpose because guess what is you and brings we don't just want to be a carbon wheel we want to have a purpose. So I do think there are trends that encourage companies. To not just declare to your question of virtues eagling I'm not interested in the company's declarations I understand. They're important what I'm more interested in is in companies demonstration what are they actually doing and what do they do over the long haul? I think. Represents an opportunity because companies are being called upon. By their employees, you need to have a positive impact is always want to know we're having a positive back. I want to tribute to that positive impact. I truly believe most employees feel that want that are prepared to invest their time and energy. Covert represents an opportunity in another way. You know crises are always opportunities. I honestly believe you talked to lots of people probably more than I? Do what I talked to a lot of people. And all over the country all the time and I think this forced lockdown. allowed. Everybody to sort of take a deep breath and say you know. This pace we've been on this frenzied checking my phone every five seconds. It really is stupid. And it's really not very satisfied work and there's a lot about being locked down that I don't like. You know what I do like I like having a little bit more time. And like having a little bit more quiet, I? Like having that more opportunity for reflection. And I'm learning perhaps to be more empathetic because everybody's going to heart. That's an opportunity. No, you're right in. It's it's why everybody's moving to Montana. Idaho but. They're having conversations like this. Exactly. Well, you know that's one of the great things about podcast. As you know as you see, it's not about soundbites. It's about you know actually having a nuance conversation and you know one of the things we keep observing this country just isn't doing nuance very well, but you know one thing that. PODCASTS at become. Yeah, really. Oh Yeah Precision yeah. Well, and that's been that's been at the cornerstone of our business and that's how we were able to launches. We've got to kind of ride the get in early and we wrote the podcast wave starting in thousand thirteen but it'll be it'll interesting to see when we have the choice to go back to all the crazy frenetic everything how many people hold onto some of these lessons and I I agree with you I think to some extent you know the longer this goes on, it's frustrating as it is to be limited in our freedoms. Hopefully that we take some of the good with us but who knows you know the this may be I. Just WanNa. I just want in twenty years to watch the Ken Burns documentary on all this and to see what the hell happened and you know what happened next and what was really going on behind all the headlines Right. But it'll be very, very interesting to see and and I think we should all hope for that. So if I can just say Bama apologized interrupting but. You know people ask me all the time. Well, I mean. What what people get frustrated by they didn't predict the future they can't predict the future right never can predict the future, but we can shape the future. We are not observers. I mean some people sit by and observe and it's a shame each of us are actors. Each of us can act and play our part and I think the most dangerous thing of all for our nation is that people sit back handsomely and say it's up to someone else. It's up to someone else to vote. It's up to someone else to govern. It's up to someone else to change our divisions. Now actually it's not you can play a part. You're doing this because you wanNA play a part as an example we're all each of us can play are and we should Well and and I, I couldn't agree more and yet I am not pleased with what I am seeing when you think about the age of ask not what your country can do for you. I don't know how popular that is right now and I'm fear fearful that we do not have enough incentive. You know it's like we've been able to create our own echo chambers and we can design a life that fits whatever preference we have. So why go out of our way for anything that is not self serving and so I? I. Don't I don't know how you deal with it at you know in a in a macro sense like that we're trying to be a little bit. You know from our little corner of media. But it's a, it's a big opportunity but it's a big problem. It is. There's no question. It is the only thing that I would say again. Crisis is opportunity it is easier. When the times are really good. To get distracted by all this stuff. Mean, it's easier to be tribal and Selfish and passive. And seek instant gratification all the time when things are pretty good. Yeah. I guess what things aren't so good now. When things aren't so good human nature turns to get more focused on the fundamentals. So what we need is real good depression to follow all this, knock some sense into us. Enough is, enough. Rage anymore now, it is the upside I mean if this isn't a. Smack across the head and you know it's coming and yeah, I think you're probably right it takes pain. Right? You've got gotta get sick and tired of being sick and tired. So carly I want I. Want to go back to this thread around stakeholder capitalism because I I wanna be I want to hear your perspective. On. As. We as we think about corporation serving communities if if you're talking to a business owner or business leader. And we. Pretty common now, everybody says, well, you know we really need to be ecoconscious and worry about climate change and take actions to you know to manage our carbon footprint and and and you think about the ways people are trying to be more conscious in the way that they do business, and yet here we are what powers media advertising and what powers advertising attention and all of these divisions in polarization. So. Do you believe that corporations have a duty to include. Unifying themes and connection and empathy for the other as part of the obligation truly serve people in their communities. You know the royal horrible way to ask question I know there's like thirty things in there but. The sounding principle. Of. Free markets. Is. Enlightened. Self interest. I use the term enlightened self-interest enlightened suggests over the longer vault. What motivates economy is self interest. Why do I start there? Because again when times are good and everything's GonNa win. Okay. Maybe you'll have to think about this what all business experience, which is substantial. Demonstrates to me over and over and over again. That it company's brand is strengthened when customers and employees believe that they are a good actor. A company's competitiveness is strengthened. Their market share grows when customers and employees believe that they are doing business with a company that is principled. Now you can get away with bad stuff for a while. And there are companies that have gotten away with bad stuff a while. But in the end, it always catches up just like always catches up with the person I can give you chapter and verse of. Hewlett Packard investing deeply immunities to lift people up in that community and what we got out of that was motivated and engaged employs we got. Partners and customers who were. Deeply grateful in attached to us over the long haul, we got a powerful lift in our brand and we also got increase market share. All those things can happen, but you have to have the patience to. Invest in those kinds of programs and then let it happen. It won't happen in a quarter in mainly won't happen in ear, but it'll happen in two or three or four or five years it absolutely wilted I guarantee. This very helpful and I'm really excited. We're about to play the the unsolicited advice game, and before we do have to do a little bit of business with the audience here to say if you like what we're doing, please make sure you subscribe and and if you really like it gives us a review on Itunes spotify or wherever you get your shows also make sure visit Oxford Road Dot Com and subscribe to the influence or our weekly newsletter for industry updates and thought leadership and one other thing that's very very important is. You know we're talking about care for the other and we're talking about making an impact and I think so many of us right now feels so powerless in. So many ways If you're running a company that wants to make a real difference, there's a a a caused I want to invite you to participate in called the Koala core. Basically, what what it is is that in children's hospitals across the country, there's wonderful care. World Class medical staffs but there are so many parents who cannot be bedside with their infants twenty four seven if working parents, single parents, and so these children are alone with no one to comfort them and there are usually tons of volunteers that want to come help and hold these kids and give them the nurturing that they need that yet, there's never funding to actually have somebody managed that program and facilitate to train schedule manage. And Vet and everything like that. So. When my youngest daughter was in. Children's Hospital for about the first six months of your life my wife and I saw this problem and said, we wanted to do something about it. So we started something called the Koala core. We don't touch any money at all goes directly to children's hospital, and if you're able I would just invite you to go to Koala core dot com. That is Koa. La Co R. P. S. THE PS is silent dot com that is Koa la. CRPF's? Dot Com, and which can it's an important cause So, we are back with carly and we are about to play the unsolicited advice game, which is GONNA be awesome. She She didn't get a lot of notice for this. But again, we're we're trying to take the maximum length of a tweet and give you twenty seconds to give advice to a group of people who didn't ask for it but but it's really really helpful to get your perspective and so the first person that we want you to give twenty seconds of advice to is Donald Trump and we're ready. Let's go. If you want to be a real leader. You need to realize it's not about you. It's not about you. It's never about you. It's about the people in the nation. User Wonderful. Okay. Now, I'm Joe Biden. Who you are a humble empathetic man who has spent a lifetime collaborating with others the core of who you are. Is. The core of what the nation needs. Now said, listen to your handlers or the politicians in your party be who you are and lead from who you are. Leaders in the marketing community. People. Actually want. Has. It of messages that they can connect to. I know negative cells. But people do like to be lifted out? Want, to. Be. Lifted. Up. Take the time to think through how lift than. You're good at this members of the media. Do some real introspection. It's easy to throw rocks everyone else. You guys need to really think about the role you have laid that you are playing and that you can play going forward. Okay here's a good one for you registered. Republicans. You don't owe allegiance to the party. The, our next year names who you are. Think about who you actually are and what you actually believe. We needed a leader and then vote for that I. Okay registered Democrats. Same Message. We are. Citizens I? Very. Good. Okay. Last one is all. American citizens. Citizenship. Is. A high order it's a huge responsibility. In this country, the citizen is sovereign. We are at the top of the pyramid although we rarely act that way. We need to act that way. Okay now, I have a bonus question for you, which is if you could write and one person and they would become the next president, who would you write in and for because I'm talking to you. I just want you to know I'm not gonNA judge you if you say to yourself Well. I'M GONNA. Take a punt on this one Dan because one of the really important lessons I learned in politics is never answer theoretical hypothetical question it will only get you into trouble. You, just gave me those seven. So I'm going to be happy with what I have heard. You Carly Talk to me about your media you know we're we're coming to the final round here. I want to understand what do you? What is your media consumption diet is is a way to put it where do you get your information to understand what's going on? So I purposely go to lots of sources. So at a national news level. The Wall Street Journal and the New York Times and the Washington, post and usually a regional paper of some of course, all read on. Is the same with my business news. You know I listen to Bloomberg and I listened to CNBC, and so I go back and forth and it's the same with television or me I tend to be more reader. Than a viewer. So I tend to do a lot of reading on my phone or in. Computer comparables on my phone of a Watson different media sources. But I purposely try and get different points of view about the same of that. Are there any go to's? You can tell us about well I always go to as I said journal Hosa. York Martin's I always go there and I always kind of hop Scotch between You know one of the Big Three ABC NBC CBS. And cable you know if I'm GONNA DO MSNBC was get your blood pressure up and you want to watch a food fight and you turn on Cable News. I don't watch it for very long. But I am sort of interested in the PERSPEC-. So, let's talk tactics for a second. You know because we're so focused on media here in united talked about this already. But what specifically can we do to walk back the polarization engine that media has become? And particularly from the perspective of corporate citizens. So if I'm understanding your question, the first thing that I would say is media Ken. Consciously and deliberately. Present multiple points of view. And not just as token that you attack the whole time. Let's bring in the token liberal or the token conservative that was it. That's not what I'm media could actually present. Alternative points of view. I, think media should spend a lot of Tony. Laying the foundation of fact. Laying the foundation a fact because one of our problems in this nation is that we don't have the same view of what the facts actually older. Right. Therefore, we don't have the same view of what the problems actually are. If you don't agree on the problems, you can't move forward very well, we need to level set on one of the facts and of the problems not everybody's GonNa do that balloon enough people? Will and what we're trying to figure out here is, how can we move the carrot because we're not GONNA wait for everybody to just figure it out and decide to stop you know maybe you have like you said a straw man or a token perspective but you know is this something that's going to require government regulation. You know do we need to go back to the fairness doctrine? Is this something that? Brands can demand. How do you de-escalate? How do you disincentivize what is so heavily incentivized? Well I do think brands do have an impact. I mean you seem companies pullback advertising from certain. Media figures or certain shows when they feel like it's just gotten over the top I think actually that's a positive trend I think that's a salutary signal certain fair to say we're talking about canceled culture. Is that what you mean? No I mean when advertisers see something just as an example. Tyzzer see something on a cable channel program that is so outrageous in terms of either its offensiveness or it's willful disregard of facts bay have acted by pulling advertising dollars and I actually I don't think that's canceled culture I think that's called accountability. We're not going to advertise on your program because it does something to my brand. I think that's real. Kennett devolve into canceled culture. Yes. But that's not what I'm talking about. One of the things that we we've seen is You know groups like media, matters or sleeping giants that are. I think the the outward appearances that they're there to hold media accountable for the things that they say that the the problem with it as somebody who gets stuck in the middle of this a lot is that it is highly partisan and it's soundbite. Here's what they mean by that. No, go get them and if you don't renounce your affiliation with. This group and there's no nuance there's no context. There's conversation is. So that's where it starts to become like cancer cultures but very problematic for a lot of brands, and by the way media matters is political organization, right? You know one of the things that I think would be really useful in this introspection that I hope media will engage in in A. Way. Within your own industry. Get real clear about the difference between journalism and media everyone likes to festoon themselves in this word journalist. Truth is very little of the media is actually journalism anymore it's entertainment it's a business. Those are very different things, and so there's nothing wrong with admitting what is obviously true look for journalists few and far between, and this is what journalists do they report the facts there balanced in their appraisal and then there's media and media's entertainment and it's a business and we are driven by eyeballs drive revenue bottom line just say it out loud. It's true. We all know it but when you have people organizations that are. Masquerading as journalists but what in fact they are are either political organizations Or? just entertainers. That's when you get distrust of the media and let's remember that distrust of the media is at all highs on all sides right now. So media as an industry, maybe getting the revenue, but it's not exactly satisfying its customers. Do you think that we should require that the media designate whether it is opinion or? Fact based journalism. Well you know there was a time in journalism. You're far more expert on that issue than I have but there was a time. When you would go to a new show, for example, and there would be a clear delineation. Between this is the news. Now, this is an opinion and it's an one person. It's not the opinion of the whole network. There was some demarcation I actually think that's useful. Yes. In the portion of the program that's called news you actually have journalists, us. Journalists as. Integrity perhaps. Yeah. Yeah. No, it's. It's a good point and it's something that I've been thinking about a lot. Okay. Listen you. You've been so generous I'm going to. Just kind of land the plane here Do you what's next for you. and We'll you again, seek high office please. Well I. I have never planned out my life believe it or not I didn't have a long-term landed become the CEO I didn't have a long term plan for what to run for president the way I tend to live my life. Is To do things that I feel are challenging impactful recognize opportunities when they come my way and not be afraid to tackle those opportunities and so that's how I'm going to continue to live my life I love running my business in life foundation I hope we are making an impact I believe we are, and when opportunities come my way I won't be afraid to at least consider them. To your open. For anything take. Good. Good. Let's get some plugs in for you. Where can people get involved with you and follow what you're doing and support you. Please go to Carly Fiorina dot com very easy carly fearing dot com. You'll learn about our business you'll learn about our foundation we have lots of opportunities for people to get engaged as a client as a coach so check us out. Carly this has been wonderful. You are wonderful and thank you so much for what you've for the time that you've given us in the perspective This show is dedicated to the notion of E. pluribus unum out of many one we believe that we can work through our differences without deepening divides and value welcoming perspectives that are different from our own. Thank you for joining us as we embark on the long road to national recovery and sustainable discourse, and as always if you found this helpful, please subscribe on I tunes spotify wherever you get your shows and special. Thanks to Bianca Kyle Jennifer in the team at whip for making this happen, we have a Republican. Let's try to keep it.

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Episode 27: Carly Fiorina

5 Questions with Dan Schawbel

07:45 min | 2 years ago

Episode 27: Carly Fiorina

"Are you looking to reach your full potential and achieve success in business and in life want only tried and tested guidance from people who have truly made an impact you have come to the right place. Welcome to five questions with Dan Shah, bell, New York Times bestselling author Dan shop bell distills. The most actionable and tangible advice from a variety of world-class humans including entrepreneurs authors Olympia, NHS politicians billionaires noble prize winners. Ted speakers celebrities, astronauts, and more inspirational guidance, practical advice and concrete solutions our fifteen minute. Power chat starts now. Welcome to the twenty seven episode of five questions with Dan CIA bell as your host my goal secured. The best advice from the world's smartest and most interesting people by asking them just five questions. My guest today is former CEO of HP in former US presidential candidate Carly Fiorina. Born in Austin, Texas to mother who was an abstract painter and a father who had a variety of jobs, including being a professor university. Dean deputy US attorney general and judge she frequently moved in her childhood living in London Ghana and North Carolina to name a few Carly studied philosophy in medieval history at Stanford University while working as a secretary during the summers while originally aspiring to be a pianist, she attended and eventually dropped out of law school Carly ended up getting an MBA from the Robert H Smith school of business at the university of Maryland and a masters at MIT's Sloan school of management in nineteen eighty. She started as a AT and T management trainee and eventually became the company's. I fee. Female officer as senior vice president and then led its North American operations in nineteen ninety five. She led corporate operations for Lucent Technologies. Playing a key role in an IPO, and then was named group president for their global service provider business in nineteen ninety eight fortune magazine named fear Rena as the most powerful woman in American business from nine hundred ninety nine to two thousand five she was the CEO of HP since leaving HP. She has served as chairman of good three sixty the world's first product philanthropy organization as chairman of opportunity international, a Christian based organization that lifts millions out of poverty around the globe through microfinance and chair and CEO of the feary foundation that donates to a variety of important causes. Fear. Eater ran for the United States Senate in two thousand ten and the Republican presidential nomination two thousand sixteen her new book is called fine your way unleash your power and highest potential. You talk about how you should find. Path instead of six to a plan. Can you explain that? Yeah. There's so many people who especially to get into corporate America Nate immediately start thinking about the plan, I need to be at this level. By this time, I need to make this much money by this year. They get so hung up on the destination. And what happens in my experience is they're so focused on the destination that they miss so many opportunities around them or they make so many sacrifices to achieve that destination that they're not at all they wanna be by the time they arrive or they arrive, and they figure out she this isn't what I wanted at all. And so my advice is don't get hung up on a plan but follow a path a path of how you behave a path of focusing on collaborating with others path on making a positive contribution of path of solving the problems right in front of you. And when you were growing up, you're moving from place to place to place how. That impacted your path. Well, I think it did because moving around a lot. You don't have much time to build or to sink deep roots? And that meant that I had to be very flexible, I had to learn how to get to know people quickly, and I learned to really love that. But I will also say that early on my plan blew up. I thought I was going to go to Las school. That's what my parents wanted me to do. I went to law school. And I hated it. And I faced this for me. Very excruciating. Dilemma DOI stick to this plan that I know I don't like or do I bitch the plan and have no alternative and just sort of find my way. And that's what I did. People say you, you must've had a plan to be a CEO. No, you must have been planning to run for president for years. No, I've never had a plan. But I hope I sick to the path. That's one of the big challenges. We all have whether it's you. I anyone. Who's listening at some point or multiple points? You're going to be stuck. So what's the first thing? So much ado when they feel stuck well when they feel stuck the first thing they should do is look around them and say where is there a problem that I'm impacted by that I understand because I'm close to it that others are impacted by. And how can I work with others and make it better? Because what happens when people focus on solving problems. They learn how to collaborate with others. It's a win win experience not a win-lose experience. But more than that when people focus on solving problems and changing the order of things for the better, which is the essence of leadership. They figure out how much potential they have. But they also help others figure out how much potential they also have. And that's really fulfilling where do you think men can learn from women about leadership? We know I think so often we confuse leadership with position entitle power wealth fame, and so often men because they more often have positions and titles and power. Unfortunately, still because men more often have those things they think, well, I have position entitled a big office. I must be a leader the position entitled doesn't make them a leader. So often people without position entitle are actually leading more effected with one of the stories. I tell them this book is of a woman who had no position. No title. No power. And yet she represents the purest example of leadership, I can find men need to learn. It's not about your. Position. It's not about your title. It's not about how many people report to you. It's about or you saw them from changing the order of things for the better. And importantly, are you unlock potential in others? Once your best piece of career advice. My best piece of career advice is don't get hung up on the plan. Don't worry about which job wherever you are. Do the best job you can solve the problems right in front of you look for others with whom you can collaborate and change order things better. Thank you so much for share your wisdom Carly to follow her journey could read her books and find her Facebook Instagram Twitter Langton where she shares her speeches media appearances, political views and motivational advice. We hope you enjoyed today's show and the amazing advice. Our guest provided. Remember that you can only benefit from advice if you can act on it before you do we would appreciate your feedback in form of. Review you can leave a review on I tunes, Stitcher or a pod catcher of your choice. Your feedback would be very much appreciated head over to Dan Shaw. Bell dot com slash review. Now.

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Carly Fiorina

The Strategerist

20:49 min | 2 years ago

Carly Fiorina

"Carly Fiorina is the first woman CEO of a fortune top twenty company, she's also relentlessly optimistic leader who believes to solve problems we have to unlock everybody's potential. One woman is like a pebble dropped into a pond. The pebble may be very small, but the ripples go very far. That message echoes our beliefs that the Bush institute is at the heart of our women's initiative. Carli has also recently become a podcast or taking her brand of leadership to the internet airwaves with by example, a show featuring leaders from all walks of life. So let's talk leadership. I'm your host Andrew Kaufman in this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic has a podcast form from the word strategically which was appointed by us. The now in braced by the George W Bush administration we highlight the Americans feared of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laughed. The Bush institute believes that developing leaders that are committed to solving problems as critical, and so does our guest Carly Fiorina who has a long history of leadership in both the for profit and not for profit realms. And I think it's also important to point out that she is a fellow optimist Carly, thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me, we're also joined by the Bush institute's expert on all things leadership policy and so much more executive director, Holly cues Mitch great to be here. So Carly you lived in Africa in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine as your father took a sabbatical at the university of Ghana and acros to teach the New Guinean constitution to law students. Can you tell us about that time, and how it shaped your perception of democracy and has that perception changed through your lifetime? Well such a great question to start with. So the thing that I remember I I was a teenage girl fourteen fifteen and we landed at the airport in a cry. To a totally different world. We were the only white people, obviously. However, I remember sitting in this wonderful brave new world to me where everything was different and exotic and strange, and yet everyone was so welcoming, and so warm and once a week, my father would invite some of his law students to our home, and we would sit around the table, my father, my mother, myself, my sister, and brother and all these law students, and I would watch them talk about their new constitution. And they were these law students were so passionate about what they were doing what they were building. This was a country that had just overthrown a dictator. This was their first real experience with democracy. And so it was a palpably emotional and uplifting experience. That's what I remember. About it. I didn't spend all that much time thinking about our own democracy until I got much older. I just you know, we're a democracy. It was like the air we breathe through the water. We swam it. If we were fishes unlike something brand new for these Ghanaian laws dunes. So I didn't really think about Ariza until much later. But there are features of ours. That are quite unique in quite powerful. The fact that we're a Republic, actually, not a democracy. The fact that so much of our constitution is focused on preventing the concentration of power. The fact that in our country, we believe local problem solving is better problem-solving. The fact that individuals have in Illinois, -able writes that don't come from government. These are things that are unique about our Democratic Republic. So Carly you just mentioned that what you when you lived in Africa. You you are often one of the only white people in the room. You've also often been the only female in the room. What's your advice to people? Who find themselves in these kinds of scenarios, and how did you handle that? Well, in short, I would say I've learned over the years that in some ways if you're in that experience a lot it's more uncomfortable from the for the other people than sometimes it is few. I remember when I was running for the presidency and standing on a debate stage, and I used to get the question all the time from remorse. What does it feel like to be the only woman on the debate stage? And I said, I feels like the rest of my life. I actually think the guys are more nervous about how to deal with me than I am about how to deal with them. And that turned out to be true more seriously. However, what I would say is the advice. I give all the time is don't get a chip on your shoulder. And don't hide your light under a bushel. And what I mean by that is when you're the different one, whether it's because you're a person of a different color or your different gender. Whatever the case may be when you're the different one. There are people who will. Will tear you down and those kinds of people can give you a chip on your shoulder, which in the end hurts you not them. But there are also as many if not more people in my experience who will lift you up. And so go to the people who lift you up. Don't get a chip on your shoulder about the people who tear you down by the same token. Don't hide your light under a bushel. And by that what I mean is don't be different than you are to try and accommodate the fact that you're different from everybody else in the room be as good as you are as brave as you are as strong as you are let them figure out how to deal with you. Don't change yourself to deal with them, as you know, the Bush institute were committed to investing in women and girls and most recently we've brought nineteen women from Afghanistan. Egypt. Jordan, Lebanon, Tunisia to the Bush institute to empower and equip them to become more effective leaders into advance economic opportunity and their communities and countries you spoke to these leaders tell us why. It's important that we empower women globally. Well, I want an amazing group of women. I was so uplifted by each of them in their stories. So let's talk about it at a macro level. And we'll talk about it at a micro level at a macro level. The data is unmistakable when you get women and girls more engaged everything gets better. So it's true. I mean, the data's inescapable illiteracy poverty conflict all those issues. Get better when women are engaged, and the reason is because women girls have half the brain power in the world. So we got a lot of problems. And the only way you solve problems is by applying human potential and brain power to those problems. If you have half of the brain power and the potential in the world sitting on the sidelines. You're not going to get as far as if you have one hundred percent of it engaged at a micro level. I'll tell you a story at the human. Level personal level. I was engaged with an organization called opportunity or national which is a microfinance lender. And you know, that microfinance is lending a very small amounts of money. The founder of microfinance a man named Mohammed Yunus began microfinance in Bangladesh. He wanted it to be sustainable, and he started by lending to men because that was the culture in Bangladesh, you lent to men, but what he figured out over time. As the men weren't always the best investors are the best credit risks. And over time. He learned he had to engage women at opportunity international ninety three percent of our clients were women not because we had a quote or to make the Moines women. But because we learned with experience that they frequently were the best investors. The best entrepreneurs they didn't invest just in themselves. They invested in their families and the communities around them women and girls make a difference for everyone. One women and men because something we've seen a lot through our work is is it always comes back to that principle that women invest back into their communities. When women are powerful the community is power. I think we have a common history in a way to with Dr Condoleeza Rice. Yes, who obviously is a is a strong force in the Bush administration. Also was connected to you. Yes. Kind of Lisa, and I form something called the one woman initiative where we focused funding on small grassroots organizations in majority Muslim countries, and we were looking to lift these organizations up to give women and opportunity for access to Justice access to economic opportunity and access to leadership training, and we called it the one woman initiative because we know that one woman can make an incredible difference in her community. In fact, the analogy that I used. Was one woman is like a pebble dropped into a pond. The pebble may be very small, but the ripples go very far. Let's go back to your lessons in leadership. You've talked about how it can be lonely at the top. What advice would you give to others for how to deal with that challenge? I often say that leadership is not about position and title, and it's not the fundamentals of leadership or not about the position of the title. You hold. It's what you do. With them. However leaders who do have position entitle for them frequently the buck stops with them the decision has to be made by them. Ultimately, when you have finished getting all the ideas and all the input, and you've collaborated with everyone who can help you make a wise and well-founded decision. Sometimes the final decision is up to you, certainly something President Bush knows so much about and at that point after you sifted and weighed all the evidence and all the input. You alone must decide. So I is to recognize that recognize that that comes with the territory the fact that as President Bush one said, he's the decider in chief that sometimes you're the decider in chief the second thing, I would say is recognize that no matter how you choose. Or what you decide you will be criticized. So no going into it that not everyone will agree with you. Not everyone will be happy with what you've done changes difficult. I think sometimes people expect when they make a tough decision. They hope for the agreement and the accolades in what they get instead is the criticism, and they get deflated, but it goes with the territory, so just know that going in you're going to get criticized how do you deal with that criticism? When it when it starts coming in. Well, and of course, criticism in this day and age is so much harder. Because it's omni-present I mean, soc. Well, media everybody's criticizing in the most personal cruel terms. Sometimes the first thing that I would say is I have learned over time to distinguish between criticism and feedback criticism comes with the territory, if you are changing the order of things for the better, if you are solving problems if you are challenging the status quo. If you are making difficult decisions, you are going to get criticized. So don't be surprised criticism is distinguished from feedback in this sense feedback is input that you need to hear from people who actually care about you the decision you've made in the outcome. You're trying to achieve and so when someone gives you feedback and says, you know, maybe you miss something. Maybe you've made a mistake. You're listen, very carefully criticism is just resistance criticism is just people saying, I don't like it. I'm throwing stones and over time. I've come to learn to. To ignore criticism and seek feedback. I would say you're quite an optimist, and we like to think of ourselves at the Bush institute is Optimus and one of your famous phrases is is leadership is seeing possibilities. Can you tell us about your outlook? So I think that leadership requires equal measures of realism and optimism realism is required. So that you see the problem as it really is sometimes leaders most important role is to hold the mirror up. So that people can see the truth. The leader speaks the truth, and therefore you can act on the truth. So realism is you can't be pie in the sky rose colored glasses, you got to be realistic on the other hand optimism is the belief that things can get better that people will rise to the occasion. And unless you believe that you don't start solving anything you just sit and wallow in the way things are seeing possibilities. Is being able to look at the realities of where you are. But nevertheless, see the possibility for improvement and particularly see the possibilities that the human potential all around you can provide to get you to a better place. Is there something you're particularly optimistic about the you don't think others are necessarily seeing or paying attention to. Well has such a great question. I think our culture right now celebrates fame for fame sake. I mean, honestly with all due respect what is Kim Kardashian. She's a famous person, that's it fame for fame sake. I think we celebrate outrage. I think we felt celebrate controversy. I think we celebrate the nastier is the better, it is certainly our politics reflects that it sort of our public discourse our social media feels like worldwide wrestling and so. I think it's easy to get numb to that. What I think people are missing is the enormous potential that every human being has and the fact that we have so much untapped potential all around us in our communities in our schools in our nation in our world. Truthfully. Human potential is the only limitless resource. We have it's the only resource we need to solve every problem big or small, and we've got a lot of it lying fallow. And so that makes me optimist it, but it's also why I applaud the work of the Bush institute for teaching leadership and lifting leaders up. And it's why I focus on that. Same thing myself. So the unlocking potential foundation, and you can learn more about that Carly Fiorina dot com. But we are United in our belief that people are capable of far more than they realize and leadership is always the catalyst the secret sauce. To go from what is to something that is better in terms of education for the past thirty five years since a nation at risk. We've all been bemoaning educational performance in our own country. And how we're lagging in terms of the rest of the world. You have a perspective as a businesswoman. As somebody who's run for public office to be able to see that we have really not made very much progress on this that issue talk about why you think that such a big challenge. The business community has been calling for this for decades. And we haven't really gained any traction. Now, you know, one of the things that I think it's important to be realistic about is the power of the status quo. Whatever the system is even when it's deeply unsatisfying and everybody knows it the system the status quo is very powerful the status quo in education is very powerful dislike the status quo in politics is very powerful. And the reason the status quo is all. Always powerful because because people are invested in it. There are so many vested interests not to mention political alliances around the status quo and education in order to solve education. We have to realize how powerful that status quo is. And I think as President Bush tried to do wanted to do when he came into office. We have to go back to first principles. And I think the first principle is the student is who we ought to be focused on the student is who we ought to be focused on principle number one principle number two. We cannot afford to leave any student behind our nation requires all of us would be better off if we were lifting more students up and equipping them and preparing them to be productive problem solvers in their lives and number three the resistance that is encountered Israel. It's. Powerful. And so we need powerful change warriors on the other side. It's why I happen to think charter schools while not perfect are part of that lever because they provide choice, and they put parents more in charge. But all the way back to your previous question about what makes me optimistic. So a place where the status quo was incredibly powerful, California. Incredible vested interests a group of parents banded together. In sued their local school board, and the teachers unions took them on those parents one in court, and what they were suing for was give us a choice when our kids school is failing. Wow, how fundamental if that happened in California that can happen in a lot of places. The other thing that you're doing to unlocked potential things is little interesting is that you're you're launching a podcast, and we were talking a little bit before about. So your first guests such as baron. Davis was not someone you would expect. How how did that? To happen. Well, what I wanted to do to the point of what am I after mystic about what I want to do through this podcast is to show people the leaders that are all around us because we do get so focused on fame and controversy and people with big titles and positions. When there are leaders all around us all the time and the truth is there are leaders problem. Solvers people who are changing the order of things for the better in every walk of life baron. Davis has happens to be an incredible leader in problem-solver most people who know him know him from basketball, but these folks are all over and speaking of unexpected we're looking for a little bit of an unexpected answer where we ask some of our guests this question. What is no one talking about that we should be talking about? I think what no one is talking about. And so honestly, I've started talking about it that we should be talking about is the role and the power that each of us as citizens have we started with a question about democracy in this country. The citizen is sovereign. Not a president not a government on a congressman not a mayor the citizen is sovereign. And I think as citizens we have spent way too much time looking up to somebody else. Dallas where we are today is a fantastic example of a community that has come together citizens that have come together to make a real difference on problems that afflict this community, the private sector, the nonprofit sector government. Those are all citizens who said you know, what we're not waiting. We're not looking to Washington. We're just going to tackle this here. I think we as people in some cases, we as citizens certainly need to reclaim the power that we. Have in this country and use it to solve the problems that are right in front of us and quit looking to somebody else to do it. For us. Carly Fiorina has a book coming out in April. Find your way, you can pre-order it online at Carly Fiorina dot com. She also has an upcoming podcast, and is an incredibly busy lady who he can't take enough for taking the time to talk to us. If you enjoy today's episode like to help us spread the word about the strategic to please give us a five star review until your friends to subscribe for available on apple podcasts Spotify and all the major listening apps if you're tuning in on a smartphone tapper swipe over the cover art. You'll find episode notes with helpful information and details he may have missed the strategic was produced, but you Anna Pappas at the George W Bush institute in Dallas, Texas. Thank you for listening.

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Sunday Special Ep. 51: Carly Fiorina

The Ben Shapiro Show

1:02:28 hr | 2 years ago

Sunday Special Ep. 51: Carly Fiorina

"If we want to reconnect the social fabric, we have to rebuild relationships and the most effective way to build relationships is collaborate with somebody else, and solve a problem. Don't talk up here in abstract. Get down on the ground and solve the problem. Hey and welcome. This is the Ben Shapiro show. Sunday special. Our guest today is Carly Fiorina. She's the head of the unlocking potential foundation. Of course, twenty sixteen presidential candidate we'll talk with Carleen just a second. But I no one really has time to go to the post office, you're busy, who's got time for all that traffic the parking the lugging all your mail and packages. It's a real hassle and that's why you need stamps dot com. It's one of the most popular time saving tools for small businesses stems dot com eliminates trips to the post office, and we'll save you money the discounts. 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That includes a four week trial, plus free posted John's digital scale with no long term commitment. Just go to stamps dot com. Click on the microphone at the top of the homepage type in Shapiro that stamps out calm and her Shapiro Carly Fiorina. Thanks so much for stopping by really appreciate it. It's great to be with you, Ben, thank you for having me. So for the vast majority of people who are familiar with you. I'm sure they're familiar with you from the two thousand sixteen presidential campaign obviously at a huge name profile before that you were CEO of Hewlett Packard, and you'd run for Senate, and California, as well. So what got you from business into politics in the first place. We don't I kind of realized that politicians and the policies they pursuant impact all of our lives. There were periods in my life where I didn't vote at all. I fought politics wasn't for me. And then I realized actually politics affects me affects a lot of people, and I also think. There's so much that's broken about our politics. I think as George Washington observed in seventeen eighty nine it's about winning more than it's about problem solving. And I think the vitriol and politics is really soul crushing to a lot of people. And so, I thought, well, maybe I can make a positive contribution, and perhaps speak about it in a different way and speak about a citizen government, which is what I think we were meant to have looking at the state of politics. Now, are you optimistic still about that vision of getting into politics because it seems like we're getting more polarized, there's sort of movement by Rodriguez, and others to move away from the political to just say, listen, nothing's getting solved there. Let's move back into the areas that you occupied beforehand that's where the solutions are going to get done. Well, I'm, I'm kind of there at the moment, you know, I think that for small. We know this from our founders, but I've learned this in my life, power concentrated, his power, abused always, there's too much power concentrated in Washington DC, and what happens when power gets concentrated, especially in big bureaucracies. And let's face it government's big yard Crecy is power starts to serve, it self, preserve itself, and so- problems, don't get solved when you're focused on keeping things the way they are. So the work that I do now is really to lift up problem solvers wherever they are in communities in companies in organizations, so that they can be focused on solving the problems right in front of them because they're frustrated by the fact that the people, they thought were, solving the problems are really getting absorbed. Okay. So let's talk about you jumping into politics. So I, I became aware of you, because I, I didn't really read the business section when I was fifteen years ago. But when, when you first started running for for Senate in California, so what? Was that two thousand ten twenty nine. Okay, so you're running for Senate in California. What prompted you to take on quixotic task running for Senate in California? Well as I told you, I don't mind tough challenges, I've been attracted to tough challenges all my life. So that was a tough job. That was a tough challenge in a very long shot. But honestly, I felt as though there was nothing in the conversation in the political conversation about the people that I saw in California, who didn't think the way Barbara Boxer did who were being harmed, by the policies that Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein. And the Democrats in Sacramento were pushing, and I felt as though it was important to have somebody with some small shot to be able to stand up an articulate what I thought were real life realistic policies that actually work that. I know something about see one of the reasons I think we were intended to be a citizen government is politicians, don't know, a lot about a lot of things especially if they've been in politics, all their life. I'm not saying they're bad people. There's some very good people in politics. But if all you've done is run and win run and win run in win. You don't know a lot about what's going on. And yet, you're making policies that impact people tremendously and so- California's business environment was getting harmed crushed by these policies. I happen to know something about it and Barbara Boxer knew nothing about it. And that kind of ticked me off. Well, turns out Barbara Boxer knew very little about anything but. She wouldn't be the only politician that way, but I think so much of politics, just gets to be is like sports. It's win lose went my team. My team and we've turned into tribal team players. I'm on the D team. So I always go with the d- I'm on the art team. I always go with your that win lose never solve problems. Although it may win elections. So after that taste of running in, in two thousand ten what prompted you to think? Okay, twenty sixteen. I really want more of this. Well, it's such a doubting question. Ben, I'm she. I talked to tons of politicians and I always look at them, and I say, like this seems horrible. Why would you want to do this? Well, you know there are things about it that are very hard, but the voters, make it great. I mean I have no regrets. I loved talking to citizens. And one of the things that I said the media wants asked me was the biggest surprise about running for president. I said, the yawning chasm between what citizens talk about and how they talk about it, and what the media asks and how media talks about it. There is a yawning chasm still, which is why it's important that you do what you do, for example. So why did I do that? I did it because once again, I knew it was a long shot. I knew a tough challenge, but ours was intended to be a citizen government. And I know something about big bureaucracies. And I know what makes them tick, and I know what has to happen to reform them in Washington is one gigantic bureaucracy, and it is a system that seeks to preserve. Serve itself at all costs, Republicans and Democrats alike. I know something about that. I know how to reform those systems. And so, I thought, well, I think my voice can make a contribution here. And you famously made a courageous stand in the middle of the debates. When you started talking about Planned Parenthood openly, and shots, the top of, of the polls, what did it feel like to go from nowhere to the top of the polls in a matter of well wasn't exactly the top of the pulse, but I think we did get to something like nine percent. And so that was a big change. Because when I started less than three percent of the electorate had ever heard of me. I mean, I had no name, I ID, you know, I focused less, honestly on what the polls were saying and more on what I was saying. And the Planned Parenthood that was the time, of course when the whole scandal about selling body parts was coming out, and literally the medium machine was saying it wasn't true. And of course it was true. And it's been demonstrably shown to be true, and that was just outrageous to me, at -rageous, because it is a crime against humanity outrageous, because it says something terrible about the character of our nation, but also outrageous, because here is something that's actually going on that a whole bunch of. People for political reasons, say it's not happen, and it was, so, you know, you're in the middle of this campaign. You suddenly start to pick up enormous team and then Donald Trump then candidate Trump decides to air mail himself into the middle of the campaign effectively and an insult you personally, I, I have to admit, you know, I, I did not I was not a voter for President Trump in two thousand sixteen for any of the candidates at the top of the tickets. And one of the reasons was because President Trump routinely attacked people in ways that I thought were unpalatable, and it wasn't just you obviously, he accused Senator Cruz is father of killing JFK, for example, does right. He's still does behavior continues. Right. So how did you how did you not get cynical about politics given both his statements, and then the reaction to his statements specifically targeting what you look like? Well, first, let me say, when, when Trump entered the campaign, everything changed instantaneously and you could tell us a candidate. The minute Trump came down the escalator every question became about him from the media, every question became about him on every network, because he was interesting. He was a celebrity he drew eyeballs, and so the whole conversation shifted, it's one of the reasons I said, what voters wanted to talk about was so different than what the media wanted to doc. Right. And Donald Trump knew that he was brilliant at it. And so, okay, give me the media attention he said, and it worked. Regarding President Trump's comments about me, and I actually tell that story in this book, but. She President Trump isn't the first man, however, said something about my looks either positive or negative. Women's looks are discussed as a way of demeaning, reduce missing them. It's happened to me all my life. So when it first happened, it was just kind of like oh, go here we go. Again, my staff was stunned. And I just said, we'll, we'll find time to deal with it. And so I finally dealt with it in that debate. People were shocked that he said it in a presidential campaign. But in fairness, he's not the only man or the first man to have said things like that were you perturb Bill by the reaction of primary voters that they that they looked at that and they didn't find that. Offensive enough to, to be even close to disqualifying, obviously, he won't. He wins the nomination that goes on to become president of the United States. Well, I find it disturbing. I do I find it disturbing that we have come to accept a level of discourse and behavior that should be unacceptable. I don't think Trump is necessarily because of this, he may be the result of it, but the level of. Vitry all conflict insult that we now think of as routine in civil discourse should not be acceptable in this nation and it worries me because and that's what I meant. When I said earlier, politics, somehow, the way we conduct politics is it has infected everything. Part of that is social media, people will say things on social media that they would never say to your face. And yet, we've just sort of come to think that's okay. It's not okay. So moving forward. We what do you make of President Trump's now? You now obviously is the president. How'd you great his performance as president? Well. Let me say a couple of things I Republicans have rightly criticized Democrats for assassinating someone's character because they don't agree with them. Remember John McCain was racist. Mitt Romney was a misogynist. Neither men were either one of those things. It's wrong to assassinate someones character because you disagree with them. But it's equally wrong to defend someone's character just because you happen to agree with some of their policies. I think Donald Trump is an entertainer. So he focuses on himself and a leader focuses on those they serve. I think Donald Trump is a politician. So he focuses on winning a leader focuses on problems all day. I think a leader understands that how you do things matters hugely it matters as much as what you do. Because how you do things. Build support or not it builds character or not, it lifts people up or not. And while I agree with some of the things Donald Trump does. I rarely agree with how he does any of them. So moving forward to twenty twenty and is the hard question, obviously, do you plan on voting for him in twenty twenty? I don't know. So what would he have to do in order to win your vote in twenty twenty some they don't traffic in hypothetical never have won't now? Okay. So looking at the future of the Republican party, then I as I've said, did not vote for any of the top candidates in two thousand sixteen many of my chief worries about President Trump as president involved him alienating, young voters, particularly. Yeah. My generation is very anti-trump. That's that's true for many young Republicans as well as many young Democrats. What do you see is the future of the Republican party? The theory of media is that it's demographically shrinking base that, that base will continue to shrink demographically. I and that the future of the Republican party is basically there is no future. The Democratic Party is going to win from here. So it's hurting where do you see the Republican party going? Do you still consider yourself a member of the Republican party? Well, I think that depends on people who call themselves conservatives and Republicans. I really do. So, for example, when people who are Republicans say that it is the duty of Republicans to pledge loyalty to President Trump, that doesn't bode well for the future of the party, this is America. We don't pledge loyalty to a president, not in this country in this country, a citizen is sovereign, and a president has to earn our respect. So I think it depends when there are constitutional principles at stake, and yet those get swept aside because all my gosh, we have to stand with President Trump because the Democrats are bad. I don't think that bodes well for the future. The Republican party. I mean, let's just take the Mahler report. I've read every single word of it. There are real constitutional principles at stake there. And so for people to say, oh, just never mind. I don't think that bodes well for the future of the Republican party. So the ask you in depth about since you've read the Muller reports into the hot topic of the moment and looks like it's going to be unfolding. The consequences of it over the next couple of months. What do you think ought to happen? So my brief take on the mullahs report is that it has an enormous amount of both embarrassing and terrible behavior by the president of the United States, as a voyeur. I didn't see anything that rises to the level of criminal destruction of Justice, obviously William bar, felt the same Robert Muller had the capacity to rule on that he didn't he sort of kicked it over. Do you think number one that, that there, I didn't see more evidence of collusion than was already there? I didn't see criminal collusion. What was your overall assessment of the mullahs report and what ought to happen from here? Well, first, let me say one of the things I learned at my brief time in law school is that lawyers can disagree. And apparently a lot of lawyers disagree about this. I'm not a lawyer, but as a citizen reading this report, I found the report, first of all, you're right. And Muller's, very clear in the. This report that he sets a very high bar. It's called criminal conduct. That's a very high bar to have to clear. I would also say the report is carefully and precisely written, I would say that Trump is not exonerated. I would also say Trump did not fully cooperate, but more to the point the Russian interference that volume of the report is stunning and shocking. And the fact that we are not having a conversation in this country about how to prevent that from happening. Again is. Really dereliction of duty. I think honestly, and the fact that both Republicans and Democrats and fairness have taken that as a political issue. It's not a political issue. The sweeping systemic. I'm quoting, as you know, the sweeping systemic interference in our elections by the Russians. Is now a political football, and it should not be your remember when Republicans were so upset because President Obama whispered to present Medved and, and said, I'll have more flexibility after the election and will publicans went up in arms. Oh my gosh. Of course, the FBI had to investigate the hints that they were given there was a lot there. And we should be shocked by what has been uncovered an alarmed, and I would also say that in volume two. I accept I'm not a lawyer wasn't criminal conduct. But this is not the way a president of the United States and his staff should be behaving. And my question is, if it were democrat doing this. What would Republicans bay sang see here's the thing about principles. There's sometimes inconvenient. And if a principal is right when it's a democrat in the White House, then that principle remains right? When Republican is in the White House. And I think the Republican party, the democrat party to, has to kinda get focused on what are our principles and I think our principles as a conservative our power concentrated, his power abused decision. Making has to be dispersed shoes. Bureaucracies have to be reformed, people closer to the problem know best how to solve them and that definitely doesn't mean people in Washington DC. It means people in cities and communities and families. And businesses and we are a long way from those principles. So in a second own ask you to turns his Democratic Party and give your diagnosis there since you've given your diagnosis the Republican party, but first communication in a marriage is but if we're honest, some things are kind of rough to discuss with their spouse, or with anyone for that matter, one of those things is sex, even though fifty two percents of dudes over the age of forty and twenty six percents under forty experience rectal dysfunction study show that seventy percent of men who experienced the don't get treated for it. And that's where our friends at Roman. Come in thankfully Roman created an easy way to get checked out by doctor and get treated for ED on one with Roman. You can get medical care for AD if appropriate from the comfort and privacy of your own home, you can handle everything online at a convenient, discreet manner. Getting started to actually really simple. 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I do think that there are a lot of people who obviously, I assume you agree with this who back president from not because of his worse aspects. But because they feel they are getting what they want in terms of policy, and they are pragmatists when it comes to okay, there's only one guy on the ticket in front of me. He's the person I got four. Absolutely. Absolutely. And, and then they will get Democratic Party and they say all these people had to do was be saying, and that's not a thing that seems to be happening. What's your diagnosis of the of the Democratic Party? And could you think is best positioned inside the Democratic Party? I know you're not in the speculation, but who are the top candidates in the Democratic Party position for twenty twenty so I think the Democrats have taken the easiest possible route and rather than really be introspective about why they lost. Who they're missing who they're not appealing to any more because of their rabid identity politics. They've taken the easy way out. And they've said it's all Trump, it's all Trump. It's all Trump in. It's not all Trump Democrats have contributed to this climate, as I said, earlier, I think, in a way Trump is the result of a long decline in our political discourse, not the cause of it and Democrats have been unbelievably insulting, and assassinating people's character because they didn't agree with them. And now they just say Trump is bad. Trump is bad everything Trump does is bad. And everything has become a partisan football. And of course they go further and further and further and further to the left. And so if Bernie Sanders is their nominee Trump win and a landslide. If Elizabeth Warren is their nominee Trump will win in a landslide. I still think we should call out bad behavior. When we see it, I still think we should stand up for constitutional principles. But when faced with the choice between policies that will ruin this country and policies that generally speaking, her working for this country people are gonna vote for Trump. So. I think the question for the Democrats, the question for someone like Joe Biden, who I think many people would say maybe has the best shot of beating Trump because he appeals to some of the same constituents that took Trump over the top against Hillary Clinton, Biden has to survive. A democrat primary, and we'll see we'll see so far, you know, apologizing endlessly forgetting into someone's personal space wasn't a strong start. So looking at sort of the problems that face the United States, there seems to be a couple of broad consensus items that I think, I personally believe are incorrect, but seem to have become common wisdom. Some of those broad consensus item seems to be that the that there is a large group of Americans who are being comically left behind. Thanks to income inequality and that the only way to rectify that imbalance is either through government redistributionism or through restrictions on trade. What do you make of the argument that the rising populism of the left and the right are driven by the edge of the major corporations have been outsourcing that, that communities are being left to empty, and what do you think, is the solution to that offending? See to me, this question is a classic example of problems being placed in the wrong place. So why do people say, income, inequality redistribution trade because those are federal solutions? Yes, there are people being left behind. Unlocking potential foundation, does a lot of work in communities. There are structural impediments Washington DC is most rapidly gentrifying city in the nation, and as a result, people who have lived there all their lives can no longer afford to live there. If you live in a neighborhood, that like ward eight in DC, your life expectancy is thirty seven years, less than ten miles away, because there's inadequate medical care, because there's not as healthy food options. All of these things have been building up for a very, very, very long time. So it's naive for us to say actually, there is no problem. Everyone everyone is doing better. Everyone isn't doing better. On the other hand, the solution to that is not federal it's not made trade policy could help in certain ways we distribution. Who do you give the money? Two for what these are problems that require collaboration at the community level. This is the work my foundation does to bring people together in a community lift leaders, not based on their position or their title, but their ability to solve a problem. And one of the things I see happening all across this country is people are so sick of politics. They're so sick of suck nothing happening. But they're saying you know what? We're going to have to kind of buckle down and do something with this problem because we actually know something about it. It impacts us. Not everything is going to get fixed in Washington DC. There are some federal solutions that are required, but most things actually, and this is the genius of our founders. Most things actually get solved a little closer at all. So when we talk about solving things closer to home. Yeah. I've written extensively about the breakdown of the social fabric, my new book is, is all about that. Obviously people, Tim Carney have talked in there. His book called alienated America, talking about the disintegration of the social fabric. How is the social fabric rebuilt, because it seems like without that social fabric, people are going to look more and more to government, including the federal government for solutions that used to be solved on a community level? And my solution has largely been you need to reengaged, not only with the ideas of the founding, but also with your religious roots, and Tim Carney, sorta believes the same thing that with the death of church, particularly the middle of country allowed social fabric has disintegrated. How do you think that social fabric can be rebuilt people have to connect with each other? I know it sounds so basic but church used to be a place where people connected with one another people have to connect with one another and solve problems. It's amazing what happens when people decide I'm going to collaborate with you, and solve a problem. It could be a simple problem. It could be a complicated problem. We have to stop looking up there. We have to reconnect with one another. The. The work that we do in my foundation. We work with all kinds of people. We never ask what's your political party? What are your political beliefs? What your religious affiliation? We never ask. Instead, what we do is what problem do you want to focus on what problem do wanna solve? And when people get focused on a problem that impacts warn them, then they start reaching out to others. If we want to reconnect the social fabric, we have to rebuild relationships and the most effective way to build relationships. I've learned this over and over and over is collaborate with somebody else, and solve a problem. Don't talk up here in abstract. Get down on the ground and solve the problem. And it turns out people kinda like doing that, and they figure out, okay? You and I look different. We may sink different different generation, but we can actually get along and get something done. So you mentioned a little bit earlier that you do think that there. Certain areas where federal solutions are available. So what are some of the federal solutions that you think ought to be applied and that are not currently being applied? Well, you mentioned trade, I mean trade policy, absolutely impacts people in all kinds of ways. I, I don't happen to be a big fan of tariffs, because I think, demonstrably they harm our consumers, and our businesses more than they harm. The trading partners were trying to punish but that's clearly an answer. I think there's no question that the deregulatory movement that the Trump administration is led has had a wonderful effect on the economy. The more confidence businesses of all sizes have in the economy, and that confidence in part comes from there, knowing that, you know, if I see an opportunity, I can go after it, if I see someone I wanna hire, I can hire them without being burdened by a whole set of things coming down the pike that I can't afford all those things help my point. However, is that I think government so often gets in the way more than it solves. Problem. And I also think that politicians don't actually focus on solving problems. They focus on winning and the truth. Is here's the dirty truth, about politics, unresolved problems win elections. How long have we been talking about the same problems? How long have we been talking about immigration, fifty years, how long have we been talking about care veterans? How long have we been talking about debts and deficits? How long have we been talking about government reform? We've been talking about those things forever. How long have we been talking about abortion forever, and the truth is having those things, unresolved and getting people all riled up about him wins elections, we've seen it over and over again. If politicians aren't going to role model problem, solving, and I don't think they have for very long time, I think citizens are gonna have to in what I know now what I say in this book is were actually all meant for problem solving. We have the potential to problem solve and it's very fulfilling when we do it, do you think the American people are ever going to get the hint about and vote this way? In other words, the, the American people we like to make a lot of overtures about problem, solving and getting together and fixing all of these things, and then we tend to vote for the most entertaining politicians the people who tell us what we want to hear the people who pandered to us, the people who yell at each other, without est, and that's not unique to President Trump this existed long before President Trump. So do you think that we ever get the hint? Or do you think that basically, what we end up with his, you know, to come full circle where we ended up at the beginning that we ended up with more and more people disengaging from politics. I used to believe pretty strongly that the people who are going to be most involved in saving the country, where the people who are politically aware, I'm not so sure that's the case anymore. I think that the people who may save the. Are the people who are least politically aware, because then we're focused checked out the people who've decided, you know what I can't focus on all this noise out here. Instead, I'm going to focus on the stuff that I can do right in front of me. Do you think the American people clue into this? Or do you think the basically, we have a widening every on and gap between the political class and everybody else? Well, what I see happening in communities. Yes. I do think people are climbing into it. But I also think that we have to be in a one of those things that I think you have to do to solve a problem is be clear eyed about what the current state is. So I mentioned George Washington, seventeen eighty nine the trouble with political parties. They will come to care only about winning the system is designed to win on both sides, political parties have put together a system that narrows choices quickly that supports people who are already in office that provides. Benefits to the folks who are already in politics and makes it very difficult for people who aren't in politics. So if you doubt that think about what the system produced and has produced honestly, in the United States of America, this political system, both parties produces, Hillary Clinton versus Donald Trump. This is the best we can do. I think not I think not, so eventually, I think we're going to have to figure out that political parties are not always operating in citizens, best interest, their operating in their own interest, and they're operating in the interests of people who are trying to win elections. But in the meantime, I think we've got to solve the problems right in front of us and quick look into Washington to do it for us, and that means as well, by the way. Role modeling the behavior that eventually, we want out of our elected officials instead of parroting their behavior. So one second to ask you about your role is a publicly facing woman in the business world. But I it spring, the time of year when seeds going to flowers and you grow up, or at least you should financially, your family needs protection, if something happens to you, and that means you need life insurance. Thankfully house genius makes it easy to get that financial security without any of the growing pains policy genius is the easy way to buy life insurance. Online in just two minutes. You can compare quotes from top insurance, and find your best price. 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What sort of public requirements? Do you think we're different? Maybe because you're a woman there would have been for male CEO in the same position. Did you feel that there were certain burdens that you had to carry just publicly your challenges that you had to face in that role? That if you've been a man, you would have had to face. I don't I wouldn't use the term requirements. But what I would say is the scrutiny is different. The criticism is different. So, for example, when I took the job, I was very focused on the fact that this was a great company that had lost its way. We'd missed nine quarters in a row, we losing market share. Profitability was deteriorating. We had to fix some things. And so I was ready on the day of my announcement to speak to the press about those things. Why this was still a great company, but we needed to make some fundamental changes to restore our innovative spirit. And what did the press wanna talk about? Oh my gosh. You're a woman, the editor of the most widely read business publication at the time the very first question, I was asked was, what designer major suit when I was a presidential candidate, my campaign was routinely asked, what kind of shoes was wear? So these are things that men simply don't have to deal with, and they are a distraction. The other thing that I would say is I think that there is an understanding between men of the necessity for respect, and how it's important to give another man respect. I'm not sure that understanding exists where women are concerned. And so people will talk in terms about women that they would never use for men. Now, the reason I say, I don't think it was a different requirement. I was chief executive officer of publicly traded company and my job was just the same as any other CEO's I needed to worry about our customers are employs the communities in which we lived and worked our shareholders, we had a massive transformation that we needed to take that company through. And so it was my job, not to let all this noise distract me, but there's a lot of noise. And it takes energy, not to be distracted by it. So what were strategies for forgetting over that. I mean, I know that, you know, just being in the public eye even in what I do the amount of flak, that I take which is nothing compared to the amount of like the you've taken over your career can be extraordinarily draining just on a personal level. How did you deal with that on a personal level being attacked a much being in the public is so much being under scrutiny so much? I Nord it, I know it all is one of the things I say, in this book, if you can't get over. Over being criticized you will never fulfil your potential. If you can't get over being criticized you will never lead. You will never change the order of things for the better. You will never actually solve the problem because criticism is the price whether you're man, whether you're woman with your different whether you look like everyone else criticism is always the price. Yes. The criticism of me as a woman was maybe different. Gee, I don't like her suit. I don't like her hair on the other hand the fact that there's criticism that accompanies every leader. And by the way, leader is not about your position. Your title is about whether you're solving a problem and changing the order of things for the better criticism is the price. And so I learned very early on. I got criticized a lot in her early in my career who does she think she is why is she doing that? My gosh, people have been trying to solve that problem forever. Why does she think she can do it? I learned to tune it out that doesn't mean by the way that I didn't seek feedback those feedbacks very important. And feedback comes from people who actually care about what you're trying to do. And they may be care about you. The criticism is just noise from people standing on the sidelines who don't have the job that you have, and don't have the responsibilities that you do whatever your job is. And whatever your responsibilities are. So what's your social media strategy? Social media is just criticism. That's right. Exactly. Right. So first of all, you have to put it in perspective. And I know it's very difficult again, social media's one of the reasons I wrote this book, because if you think about it people are growing up in an environment. They're trying to find their way in an environment where criticism is omnipresent. We're criticism is unbelievably intense cruel even where we have national debates and dialogues at the highest levels of politics that kind of feel like vitriolic cruel superficial criticism. That's an incredible environment to have to find your way in, and yet it means that when you get all that stuff you gotta put it in perspective. And you have to realize if you're doing something worthwhile. If you're doing something worthwhile. If you're solving, a problem if you're providing another point of view, eighty five. Percent of what you're gonna get is criticism. Okay. That's the way it is. So when asked about, you know, you mentioned education earlier that the loss of the fact that you dropped out of law school, the, you ended up going for an MBA. So what are your thoughts on people who are looking at a career path, and thinking about college law school MBA? What do you think? Our colleges are worth at this point, because obviously there's big controversy. Everybody should go to college for free or whether we should pay five hundred thousand dollars to get our kids into crew at USC. Yeah. Wow. What a create the talk about a terrible lesson for those kids not to mention for society at large. So I what I say to people, and I say, in this book is don't get hung up on the plan. I see so many people honestly, and I've seen it all throughout my career who have so much potential, but they get on a plan, okay? I'm going to graduate from Moscow, then I need to make this much money. And then I need to be a partner in this firm in, then I need to get married. And I need to have so many, they have all these things that have to happen for their. Our plan to come through, and they missed so many opportunities along the way ambition is fine. But if you get so, hung up on a particular destination, I have to be here by this point if I'm not here by this point. It's over. That's a real dead end because what happens to people is either they get there, and it isn't what they saw or they sell so much of their soul to get there. They give up so much to get there the by the time they're, they're, they're not at all, who they should be where they never get there at all. And they're devastated. And none of those outcomes are good. So, yes, be am bishops, but see the opportunities around you and sometimes the opportunities around, you might cause you to take a detour in it won't be fatal. It might be exactly where you're meant to go. So what's the contrast between following the opportunity and the so-called ten of follow your bliss movement of the nineteen sixties? You talk about how you looking for self-fulfilment when you dropped out of law school. This wasn't something he felt was fulfilling for me. I had a similar experience. When I finished law school. I worked for a major law firm for about ten months. I thought it was the worst thing ever. I dropped out. I went to work for one third. The pay at a different company, and that started me. On a on a different career track. And I very much encourage people to, to do that sort of thing. But how do you know the difference between when you're when you're dropping something that you're doing in search of another opportunity? And when you're dropping something that you're doing in, in favor of something stupid because you do see this to people who have a plan, and then they decide to follow their dream, and it turns out that they're dreaming finger paid. How do you how do you do you distinguish? Well, first of all, I would never have occurred to me to say I was dropping out of law school for self fulfillment. It's not how I thought about it. And I realized that was somewhat tongue in cheek in the sixties and all that. But I think there in lies the truth. If you hate something, you're going to be bad at it. When I it's just human nature, if you hate something you're going to be bad at it. I think the difference between dropping something you hate and following an opportunity versus finger painting is are you actually wanting to be excellent. Are you prepared to work hard? Are you trying to make a positive difference working hard and being excellent is really key. It's not just key to success. It's actually key to fulfillment, and so wherever a path take someone the question I always ask them is do you like what you do? Are you learning? Are you making a contribution? Are you working hard? Are you doing the best job again? And if the answer to all those five questions is, yes, yes, yes. Yes, then you're probably on the right path. So here's a question that is very often asked to females not as often estimates probably should be. S two men more often, but how did you balance career with family life? Now, this is obviously something that my own wife struggles with is she as I've said, she's, she's a doctor? Let me and she's been basically in medical school since we met, which is now eleven years coming up in July. We'll be married. She's finally, finishing residency. Thank God in, in two months. But she's taken time off, when, when we had kids, she took six months off our first kitsch Beth remains off our second kid, she's planning on, on working part time after she's done because she's looking for particular balance. How do you think it's important to draw a balanced between what you're doing in terms of family life, and what you're seeking in terms of career because there is a prevailing view out there that women can have it all? And they're only twenty four hours in a day. And I wonder how much that's true. Well, I think first of all there is no silver bullet there is no magic answer. And there is no cookie cutter answer either I sort of face this when I realized that something very fundamental. How each of a spend our time becomes our life. And so therefore, we have to own the choice of how am I gonna spend my time because how we spend it becomes our life. And so I got very intentional very deliberate about how do I spend my time and the revelation for me when as I was, when I realized, whatever choice I make someone will be unhappy, whatever choice I make someone will be unhappy because someone always wants more if you're focused on work, your family wants more if you're focused on family, or work once more, and so that also is something I think we have to learn to live with. But when I say, I'm deliberated intentional. I began a process of looking at how am I spending my time in a week? How am I spending my time in a month? How my spending my time in a year and then to look back at it and say, are these the choices that? I think I should be making in each one of us has to make that choice. There is no one-size-fits-all, and there is no silver bullet. You have to own those choices, because it becomes your life, and you have to realize, not everyone will be happy, but that's part of the price to do you think that the media have sort of purveyed, a mythical view of what of what the balance can be in other words, it seems like there's an Instagram view that you can work fulltime at a job, spend twelve hours a day with your children vacation every month and all of this somehow works out perfectly. If you watch TV, there seems to be little struggle to, to draw that balance. It's, it's basically, I'm a high powered lawyer, and I work fulltime, but I also am for everyone. My kids baseball games as well. I'm not sure that, that's just the case. I feel like there's what what it's leading to in. Many ways is women sometimes putting off, they I mean statistically women are putting off marriage. They're putting up childbearing. They're putting off child rearing until later in time because they've been told by. Media that that career ought to come first when in reality, maybe good for, for certain women, but it's not in variable that there is a ticking clock on one end when it comes to family, and there's not a ticking clock necessarily, when it comes to career at what do you think the media's role is in drawing sort of a model for for how women should pursue career? Well, I do think that I give women may be a little more credit for thinking for themselves, but I do acknowledge your point that so much of what we see on television, and in social media is just a fantasy. It's a fantasy. I mean so much of social media is a complete fantasy how much time if people spend curing their Instagram photos that's a fantasy and it's not only a fantasy. It's a superficial fantasy and so part, again, part of, I think, what people have to deal with in this environment. And part of the reason I wrote this book now is to say understand what all this is it. It's entertainment, maybe it's a little bit of propaganda. Frequently. It's driven by a business incentive to make money on the part of the media. So therefore, they want people to watch who wants to watch about real life. Isn't it easier to watch about some fantastic, you know, fantasy about how everything can be, but I think that. Life is always trade-offs, it is for men to, and there are a lot of men in my father's generation who got to the end of their careers, and said, oh, my gosh. What have I missed how much have I missed, and they regretted that far more than they thought about the corner office? They attained so inner book, find your way into covers an enormous amount of ground. You also talk about sort of being driven and focused with regard relationships. So you talk about this, specifically with regard. Your first husband, I was wondering if you could could tell that story. Well, my first husband was a mistake. But. Without getting into all the sort of details. Let's just say he betrayed my trust in very significant ways. And so. I had to come to grips with that and say. This isn't gonna work. I'm it wasn't the first person to do that. But it felt incredibly difficult and dramatic to me. And fortunately, I met the love of my life, and my soul mate, and thirty seven years later, here we are so life worked out. But I think often about what might have happened to me had I not had the courage to make that choice courage. Features prominently in a fulfilling life or a successful life, or an impactful life, and what ends up happening to so many of us is it is our fears that hold us back. And most of those fears are kind of silly mean my fear. Honestly with my husband, my, my first husband, my mother, never really liked him was on. No, my parents are going to say I told you so while how silly is that. And yet, how often do people get held up by I'm afraid, I'm gonna make a mistake. Of course we all do. I'm afraid, I'm going to get criticized. I'm afraid, I'm gonna look foolish. I'm afraid my likes will do go down, all those are such stupid fears and so getting over those fears being courageous is a huge part of an impactful productive fulfilling successful life. So I want to get back to your tips that you have in. Book, find your way which is really terrific book. I in, in a little while I wanna go back to the very beginning for people who don't know your whole story. So your story is really fascinating because it had a lot of ups and downs. You talk in your book, find your way about your story about the fact that your parents expected you to go to law school and you decided not to go to law school. And then somehow you end up going from secretary to CEO of Hewlett Packard. So can you tell that story about why didn't you decide to go to law school? You started. Yeah, I started because I was one of those kids, who was apparent pleaser. I was a middle child. I was the one who has never going to disappoint my parents expectations for me. Wade, very heavy on me. And so I lived through their expectations, by the way, there are a lot of people who live for other people's expectations. And so I go off to law school. And I just hate it. And then I realize I have to make a choice. I'm either going to pursue something that I truly hate, and please, my parents or I'm gonna please myself and find my own way. So I dropped out. Out and that was an incredibly difficult decision. I wasn't a quitter. I wasn't the person who is going to drop out. But now I have to go make living in. So I had put myself through school as an undergraduate as temporary secretary in local businesses. And so I went back to work fulltime typing and filing an answering the phones we don't really even have those positions anymore. We keyboard, we don't type. But that's what I did. And I was grateful for that job. I really was, I typed and filed an answered the phones for a nine person real estate firm. It was a dead end job, man. But it paid the rent and maybe six months into that job to men came up to my desk. They work there. And they said we've been watching you, you do such a good job. You're so focused, maybe you wanna know about what we do. And that was my first introduction to business. I had never thought about business. I ran away to Italy to teaching. For year you could imagine. My parents are really concerned and Finally, I buckled down and get an MBA and I land in an entry level position in a vast company with literally one million employs and I'm at the bottom of the totem pole. I didn't have a plan to get ahead. I didn't think I would make it a year. But what I saw were problems everywhere, that just festered that everybody talked about, but nobody did anything about, and I saw people impacted by those problems who actually knew a lot about them. So I started working with people in solving problems. And what I figured out is if you saw problems and change the order of things for the better and produce results, people pay attention. And then other opportunities came along literally that is the story of my life. So how do you get from working at the lowest level at one billion person company to being the head of a company that hires hundreds of thousands of people Iran to problems? I know. Sounds so basic but that's the truth. I ran to problems. I always took the challenging jobs because I figured out, I like challenge. I like solving difficult problems that everybody else is saying, do stay away from those problems. And the reason I liked it so much is because everywhere I went, I found people who knew something about the problem people closest to the problem know best how to solve it. It's just there, so often not asked. And so I would ask people, and they always have good ideas, and then we'd worked together and I found I loved that I loved the teamwork of it. I love the collaboration of it. I liked the intellectual challenge of it. And when problems get solved when things get better, I guarantee you other opportunities come along, and they always did. And I wasn't afraid to say, okay, I'll take on that challenge. So your story is, is actually somewhat like my mother's, my mom started off, as a an education major, northwestern than Boston University, and she started off, as a secretary to company, she ended up becoming vice president of that company and I used to get your thoughts. On what it was like to be a woman working at that time, you know, there's a lot of talk now about sexism in the business world. And about the so-called glass ceiling in the business with what were your experiences with being a working woman? You know, a couple of decades ago, I went, apparently, there was, you know, allegations of a lot more of that kind of sexist abuse in the workplace obviously, now we still experience people who suggest that, that's a prevalent problem. We'll both are true. It was then. And it is now. That's just a fact. And let me quickly say most people are not bad people. There are some bad people who engage in bad behavior. And that babe you're has to be confronted. But most people are may be thoughtless or careless or clueless. Or maybe they're afraid. So I'll give you three examples, the first one, I already mentioned two men, come to my desk, and take a chance on me and say you can do more. And they encouraged me to go on my first client meeting ever at that vast company called AT and T was held in a strip club because. That's where the men went to have business launches and my male colleagues didn't really want me to come. So he said, we're going to the strip club. And I assume you won't come I went because I couldn't be scared off of my job. We turned into very good colleagues over time because it turned out he was afraid of me he was afraid the NBA would take away his job. I had a boss introduced me as this is Carl your new boss. She's our token Bimbo. I've been called all kinds of names. My appearance has been commented on here's the truth. It's different when you're different it is the criticism is different. The challenges are different and yet for every thoughtless clueless. Careless person in any organization in my experience. There are ten times as many people who are well-meaning, who want to lift people up. The problem is too often the well, meaning people don't. Don't say anything. And so the bad behavior continues, and we've seen a lot of that in the press, as well made Harvey Weinstein. Pick your Matt Lauer, Harvey Weinstein, the gymnastics coach people knew that was going on. And they didn't do anything about so what's the best way for, for women to deal with anybody who's being mistreated at work, because one of the things that we see is, obviously, I totally agree, people who do this sort of stuff should be called out Natalie's, my momma working woman. My mom, actually worked, my dad stayed home. My wife as people know is a doctor. So she's a working woman. What's the best way for folks to deal with this? Because on the one hand, you want to call things out when you see them on the other hand, there's, there's a converse, sort of tendency for some people anyway, to hide behind the eight ball of victimhood to feel like there's so much, there's so much opposite. There's such an obstacle to overcome that I can never overcome it and to themselves in the process. What's the best way to deal with with these situations? Well, the truth is it depends on the situation. So I'll tell you two stories the guy who said, we're going to go to the strip club. To have lunch. Right. Who was doing it, obviously purposefully to humiliate me and scare me. It almost worked after that he and I became great colleagues. We never talked about that day again because the truth is I actually needed to work with him. He knew the clients he knew the company and he figured out he needed to work with me because he was kind of a pie in the sky guy. And I would work hard and understand the details and get it done. So we became good colleagues. We worked our way through it. The boss who introduced me as a token Bimbo, I went into his office afterwards, shut the door and said, you will never speak to me that way. Again, sometimes behavior has to be confronted. Sometimes you have to realize that someone was thoughtless and careless and clueless and get over it, and what I tell young women young people of all kinds, but young women especially is my advice is don't get a chip on your shoulder. There are bad people and bad. People need to be confronted. But most people aren't there may be thoughtless or clueless. So don't get a chip on your shoulder in look for the people who will lift you up, because they're plenty of people who will men and women, but also, don't hide your light under bushel. Don't try and fit in don't be less smart than you are as smart as you are be as brave as you are be as tough as you are. And if somebody has a problem with that, it's their problem. Don't ever, let it be your problem. Mean what's really inspiring about this sort of stuff? I think is that it's very individually based stuff. It's not stuff where you're calling for now we have to call for a giant piece of legislation, a big piece of social changes just stand up for yourself in the moment. And by the way, the other thing that I think, is going on. You talked about victimhood, and when people feel victimized, they feel helpless, and powerless and one of the reasons I wrote this book is because actually all of us have enormous power. We just don't realize it sometimes. And we don't realize. How to unlock it and to use it. But the other thing that I worry about in this current climate of me too is everything is the same and everything isn't the same a gymnast coach of gymnasts who is abusing them routinely, or Matt Lauer, or Harvey Weinstein, it's not the same as Joe Biden putting his hands on someone shoulders. You can't create a situation where the real issues become trivial is by people saying I felt slightly uncomfortable. So what, what do you think let's take the Joe Biden thing? For example. What do you think the proper response both on the part of Joe Biden and society should be to the sort of Joe Biden said, I totally agree with you. By the way, I think that the failure of society to recognize gradations in behavior to suggest. Okay. Well, this is a bad thing. And for all bad things are equivalent bad. Things is really silly. And that's why I've said that the attempt to paint Joe Biden assumes, her great sexual victimize her. When there's not been a single allegation that he was. Actually victimizing. Anyone is bizarre. I'm but, but how should society deal with that sort of thing? What, what should attitude toward the Joe Biden's of the world when they do this? Well, I think a lot of people have come to the conclusion that this is silly. This is silly in a lot of people have said, this Acilia lot of women who said, this is silly, both democratic women in Republican women. I think really what the Joe Biden. Episode illustrates is politics in one of those things that I think is unfortunate about politics is that vitriol, we talked about that tribal. I win you lose. It's infecting every conversation. It's a shame when we can't have a serious conversation about real assault and real abuse. Because our headlines are filled with what we think about Joe Biden, that's all about politics, and it's all about his primary opponents trying to take him down early. That's what that's about. So in a second, I'm gonna ask you one final question on to ask you about whether you think that the American people are ready for a female president, which is one of the questions that has been in the air since Hillary Clinton since you ran. But if you want to hear Carly Fiorina's answer, you have to be a daily wear subscriber. To subscribe, good daily wire dot com, click the subscribe button, you can hear the end of our conversation. They're highly for your thanks so much for stopping by really is a pleasure to see you. Thank you. Ben Shapiro show Sunday specially produced by Jonathan. Hey, executive producer Jeremy boring associate producer Mathis clever. Edited by Donovan Fowler audio was mixed by Dylan case, Herron makeup is by just what over title graphics by Cynthia and Golo. The Ben Shapiro show. Sunday special is a daily wire production copyright daily wire twenty nineteen.

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Episode 050: Carly Fiorina: Unlocking Your Potential

The Global Leadership Summit Podcast

33:36 min | 2 years ago

Episode 050: Carly Fiorina: Unlocking Your Potential

"Hey, everyone, welcome to the G S podcast. I'm Tom debris president and CEO of the global leadership network before we dive into today's episode, I need to take a moment to share some exciting news. It's my pleasure to announce Craig Rachelle, as part of the global leadership summit team, as our new summit champion Craig's been part of the global leadership summit for a number of years. And we're excited about this new more formal and long-term relationship Craig's in incredible leader and is respected in both the business in church cultures as one of the most influential leaders of our generation, we look forward to how he's going to mobilize and multiply more leaders will increasing global leadership impact, here's Craig to share more, or thanks so much, Tom. We could not be more honored or more excited to be a part of the global leadership network for so many different reasons. One thing we all believe that everything rises and falls on leadership. So there's. Nothing more strategic or more important in the world today, that investing in leaders the best place to find fresh actionable content. We all need new ideas, we need new encouragement. We need to learn to think, in a different way. So we want to do is we want to partner together with some of the best leaders from around the world and invest in emerging leaders. We're going to develop relationships. We're learn new ideas. We're gonna apply them. We're going to cast vision for a better future. And we're going to lead the way, with courage, and integrity. Thank you for partnering with us. I hope that you'll be a part of this year's global leadership summit because we know that everyone wins when the leader gets better, you can hear Craig's passion. We believe this partnership will have tremendous positive impact moving into the future. Be sure to join us this year for the global leadership summit. So you can hear more from Craig bear Grylls, mayor Asia, Brown and other world class leaders, we'll see. You there. Everything rises and falls on leadership. You don't know what you need to work on his leader. You know, who does everybody out the halfway to your greatest potential is straight through your greatest fear? If you want your team to stay relevant leisure team into the unknown, wouldn't it be great? We said the puppets of what discover that which you loved on, I'll have to have the same style. We don't all have to have the same goals, but with good values and a vision. Everyone can be a leader. Welcome to the global leadership summit podcast, where we provide fresh actionable and inspiring, leadership content. For leaders on the go. Thanks for joining us, according to corley fear. Rena human potential is the only limitless resource in the world in this episode of the podcast pastor and leadership expert. Craig GRA shell interviews Carly on her insights about every person's potential and the counter intuitive ways you can find the right path for your life. Let's dive in. Here's Craig and Carly. Hey, welcome to the global leadership summit podcast, you're in for an amazing treat today. My name is Craig Rochelle. And I'm here with Carly Fiorina and incredible business leader. Previously, an executive at, at AT and T the former CEO of Hewlett, Packer leader, and a coach to multiple nonprofit organizations. Carly is a cancer survivor. She's even a one time US presidential candidate. And I'm excited to get to know the amazing leader behind the headlines at Carly instead amazing honor to have you with us today. You and I both got to serve as a multi year faculty at the global leadership summit, and I've admired your leadership for many, many years. Learn from your wisdom at the global leadership summit. And I've been really looking forward to learning more about you in this leadership conversation on your amazing new book. Congratulations just out find your way unleashed, your power and highest potential. Congratulations on. Fantastic. Powerful book. Well, thank you so much Craig. And thank you for your kind comments. You are an inspiring leader as well and have accomplished so much. And it's great to reconnect via this podcast. Well, thank you. What I love about your book Carly is, is, is both incredibly practical in down to earth. And at the same time is massively inspirational, and as I was reading I kind of felt like you were my personal leadership coach like we've been friends for thirty years. So I'm really excited to dive into the content and let you share that with our broader audience. So let's kind of go back to the story behind the story or the story before the story, and could you tell us a little bit about your childhood, your family where you grew up. Well, first of all, thank you so much for those kind words, I think so many people right now are feeling helpless, and powerless and hopeless and frustrated, and none of us are, and I've learned. In my own life that we all have so much more potential than we realize. And sometimes we can't unlock that potential, unless something unexpected in challenging comes along, and in a way that's the story of my own life. I had wonderful parents who taught me wonderful things. My mother said to me when I was about eight what you are is God's gift to you. What you make of yourself is your gift to God. And those words landed with me for a couple reasons number one, because I didn't feel gifted all of my life, really through my twenties was about being scared, and insecure everybody was always so much, you know, smarter, better prettier, more prepared. You know. And so her words sort of felt like a promise to me that I had gifts, but they also were challenge, what you make of yourself is your gift to God. And she was telling me. You have gifts you have to find them. You have to apply them. And so when I got out of college while I was in college, it was sort of the plan that I was going to go to law school. And so okay, I go off to law school. And I go off to law school with my parents expectations weighing on me very heavily. I wasn't going to be the kid that disappointed them. My sister was rebellious my brother was rebellious. I wasn't going to be the kid that disappointed them. I was going to go to law school. And, you know, do what they thought I should do. But I got there and I hated it really hated it. It made me physically ill almost how much it was not the right path for me. And so one day before the first final exam. Thankfully, I really feel as though, I got this message from God, I truly do because it was this revelation this moment of revelation, where I realized this is my life, and I can't live. Based on other people's expectations even my beloved parents expectations. And so I went downstairs, and I said, I quit. And at that point, they were very concerned as you can imagine. What are you gonna do? You're never going to amount to anything. You don't have a plan and I didn't have a plan. And I had no idea what I was going to do. But I knew I had to go get a job. So I did. And I became a receptionist for a nine person real estate firm and typed and file an answered the phones and what gets me going in that period was words from my dad. He had always said to me Carly. No matter what you do work hard focus on excellence. Do an excellent job. And so I said, okay, I don't know where I'm going, and you know, this isn't the dream job, but I'm going to work hard and I'm gonna do an excellent job. And what I learned is if you do that opportunity. Knocks will you obviously did that in. It's, it's really means a lot to me, personally to hear you talk about your insecurities. And I think that's what I love about. Your writing is you, you know, we know from the headlines your previous presidential candidate, you were the amazing CEO of Hewlett Packard, and so we see this massive powerful leader. And yet, you, you didn't see yourself that way. In fact, I think there was a there's a quote in your book from Mary, Oliver that, that seemed to almost move you out of state of complacency into the, the, the ability to take risk, even though you might have felt a little insecure and unprepared for can you tell us about that, quote? Yeah. So the quote from Mary Oliver is one in which she describes life each of our lives as a wild and precious thing. And I think it's such a beautiful way to describe the potential that each of us have in our lives. I believe that people are created on purpose and for purpose. I also know that many people never get a. A chance to find or fulfill their purpose? And I know that fear or insecurity or doubt, hold so many of us back from finding and fulfilling our purpose. And so that decision to drop out of law school was the first decision that I had ever made where I literally had to overcome my own fear, and the reason that was so important is because I went as I went on. It wasn't that I became fearless not at all. In fact, one of the things I've learned as everybody's afraid everybody's afraid of something, and most of the time were afraid of some kind of silly things, but all those kinds of fears hold us back. And so it was interesting. I was with a group of people yesterday. And this man asked me, he said, we're where have you found all this courage that we've just we see you display, and I said, you know, what courage takes practice and until, and unless we can get over our fears. We will not have that wild and precious thing that Mary Oliver. Calls are live. And we also will never fulfill our potential, and we won't make the kind of positive contribution that we're meant to make. So I'm curious as you grow in your leadership expertise. And as you have successful on the way does the feared, diminish or do you just get better at dealing with it. Well, a little bit of both. Honestly, yes, the fear diminishes in the sense that the small things don't scare you anymore. But there are big things that still might scare you for example, I wasn't by the time I got to be a CEO. I wasn't afraid of people's criticism. That's a good thing because criticism is always the price of leadership and you have to be able to withstand criticism and you have to be able to say what other people say about me doesn't define me what defines me as my own character my own behavior my own choices my own impact. And so you get better. At bigger fears, but fear is part of the human condition and all of us have it. Courage takes practice a love those ideas Carly, Kerr's takes practice. And then it kind of hit me, and I can imagine some people listening right now you get better at bigger fears. And I think one of the things about your heart that just comes through, on every word of the page is your, your belief in the limitless resource of human potential. It can can you talk to me about that phrase, and how that could inspire someone to have the courage to attempt to do more think about it for a moment every resource in the world is limited, except our potential. That's just true. And we so often overlooked people's potential because of their circumstances or because of their appearance or because they don't agree with us or because we don't really understand them. And so were suspicious of them. But the truth is all of us have God, given gifts, and all of us actually have more potential than they were then we realize the so helpful you write about choosing path over plan. Can you unpack that idea I Carly people feel they get all these messages from the culture that says you're supposed to do things a certain way? And one of the things the culture lifts up is success means very specific things when you getting married, how many kids, are you having you graduating from college? How much money are you gonna make you have to achieve this title by this point, you have to get the perfect job, you have to have all these things to prove that you're successful. And what I've seen happen over and over and over again, is people get so fixated on the destination on the plan that they miss all these amazing opportunities all around them and what they miss so often. Are the opportunities that will actually unlock them and free them to focus on the things that they're really meant to be focused on the things that will give them joy or the things that will give them fulfillment? And so what this book talks about his get on a path, get on a past unlocking, your potential, which involves key behaviors like courage and character and collaborating. Well with others and seeing possibilities. Get on a path and don't get hung up on the destination. The so helpful, I'm curious, a lot of CEOs. They they'll talk about knowing you know, they always wanted to be a CEO, that was a destination for them. I'm curious for you. Was that something that you had in your mind when you started out or did the somehow the path lead, you there a little bit about how you ended up achieving that? Well, first of all, no, I didn't think about. Oh, I'm going to be a CEO someday. In fact, so far from that when. I finally got an MBA and I finally landed in corporate America in a entry level job. Honestly, my prayer was, please, let me keep this job. And so here's the thing that happened. I saw problems everywhere. And so, honestly, what I did to go from secretary to CEO was not get on the plan. And I'm going to be a CEO someday. No, it was their bunch of problems all around me. There always are there bunch of people all around me. And they have a lot of potential, and they have a lot of good ideas. And so we're going to get together and we're going to solve these problems or we're going to make a difference. And when you do that you find out what you're made of you find out what other people are made of and results, get noticed of the go so helpful because is is really tempting. And you're right culture, and social media kind of defines, what is success? And so we end up creating goals that, that may end up either not delivering or tickets to a place that really is under our potential, and I love car. The way you write about those who are closest to the problem. In fact, you just kind of mentioned it that you, you say those that are closest to the problem are most inciteful about the solution. Would you mind telling us the illustration gave in, in your book about the person, you supervised at AT and T that was able to solve the problem that the organization never even knew existed? Yes. So here's an example, the person you're referring to his name gem, he was an engineer. I didn't know anything about engineering, but, you know, he was in my very small organization, Jim was a guy who I sat down with early on in my job and said Jim DC any problems, and he said, well, yet, I designed circuits, that's what he did Jim was, by the way talk about judging someone by their circumstances, or their appearance. Gym was totally unremarkable. Everybody just sort of overlooked him. He you know he didn't play. The game he didn't manage up. He ate lunch at his desk every day he was just completely unremarkable. And he said, I designed circuits and I noticed that when we're build for those circuits the bills don't match the designs now the bills weren't his job. The bills were Accounting's job. And so often what happens is in big organizations, people focus on management and say things like, well, the bills aren't your job, Jim. Just do your job. But Jim Saad is a problem. And so I said, well, what do you think we ought to do? And he said, I think we ought to check, I think we ought to check the bills against my designs. So at first, he and I started checking the bills and the more we checked the more, we found an eventually I gave him the resources provided the resources to him where he could supervise a whole group of people and three hundred million dollars saved later. Nobody was overlooking Jim just not three hundred billion dollars later. The in fact, I think it's interesting because you, you don't indirectly a lot of leaders may avoid problems. I don't want to know about them, and you ask him specifically, do you have any problems this may shock some people, but the first thing you say is problems are opportunity for growth. I think that's a little obvious. But you also say that problems are a signal that we're on the right path. Can can you talk about that idea? Yes. Well, I, I think you're correct, that there are a lot of people who avoid problems, and I would tell you that they're not leaders. They may. Be managers doesn't make them bad people. A manager will do the best. They can with the way things are and the way things are include some problems that have been around a long time. That's okay, not my job. I'm just going to do the best. I can within the way things are again, it doesn't make them bad people. But they're not leaders leaders change constraints and conditions leaders changed the order of things for the better and therefore leaders have to focus on problem solving. That's how you change your of things for the better. They're always problems. And so it is a key difference between leaders and managers. If the purpose of leadership is to change the order of things for the better, then they must run towards problems. But it's also true that if you want to unlock potential, if you want to achieve more, if you want someone to figure out what they're made of they have to tackle something hard not something easy. Jim learned so much about himself by tackling a problem now Jim needed support to tackle that problem. He needed leadership to catalyze his ability to tackle that problem. But had he never tackled that problem he'd still be sitting in his desk? Unremarkable, Jim eating lunch every day and just doing his job as a manager and so- problems, the hard stuff, not the easy stuff the problems that have festered. That's what leaders apply. Why their energy to their potential to? And it's how they unlock potential in others corley a love the way you talk about that. You tell stories in a way that all of us can relate to everyday life, for example. Sometimes when we talk about leadership, we tend to think you cast vision, you defined your values you're gonna create systems, you're going to build a culture and those things really, really matter. But sometimes leadership is dealing with a really difficult person sitting right next to you. How do you do that? You, you tell what kind of a funny story and yet that really powerful about a guy that you are paired with name Carl that puts you in an incredibly awkward situation. And yet, you seem to learn a lot about dealing with fear and courage. Can you tell us a little bit of that story? And what were some of the big takeaways that you got from call was sure if you want to collaborate effectively with other people, you have to be willing to deal with people that you don't always agree with or you don't always. Is like or that you're not always comfortable with. So Carl was a great lesson in that. So Carl was my first team mate when I joined corporate America AT and T at that entry level position. I talked about a few minutes ago. There weren't a lot of women. And, you know, look, my resume reads medieval history and philosophy law school drop-out. Okay. She has an MBA. I mean, no one was real impressed with me. And so he didn't really like being teamed with me. So the very first meeting that I was going to have with his clients, who were now also going to become my clients. He showed up my desk and said, you can't come to the meeting. Why not well, because we're going to a strip club. And so I had to really think about that, and I remember going to the ladies room and sitting there for literally hours saying to myself, what am I afraid of what am I afraid of because I was terrified while I was afraid because I'd never been in that situation. I was afraid of looking stupid, by the way, I did. I was afraid of so many things. But then I had to say to myself, what's worse than being afraid of going into. The strip club is being knocked off my ability to do my job. The very first day, so I went and I look stupid, and you know, it was a very awkward several hours, I was humming. Enough to understand. I have to work with Carl. I don't know these clients, I don't know this company, I need some of the knowledge and the relationships that he has if I'm going to do my job, but I also began to have empathy for Carl because it turned out. The Carl was afraid to what Carl was afraid of, was being kicked to the side of the road after a lifetime of a career that he was proud of. And so with that combination of humility, and empathy and Carl figured out. He needed me because I would attend to the details of getting things done that he wasn't very good at. So we became good colleagues and good teammates. And the reason I tell that story is not just illustrate that we're all frayed if things and courage takes practice and you've got to overcome your fears. I also tell that story to say, look, there are bad people out there that engage in bad behavior, and that needs to be confronted. But most people aren't bad. They may be thoughtless careless clueless. They may be afraid of something themselves, but they're not bad. And we have to figure out how to work with all kinds of people if we're going to solve problems and we're going to unlock her own potential, and we're going to change the order of things for the better. So humility and empathy are important if you're going to collaborate with people thought that story was, was really interesting because there are so many different ways that you could have responded to that. And I think a lot of people would have been angry would have disconnected. Would have recognized. He was kind of having a power play against you or whatever. But you seem to engage with him in a way that, that built respect and trust can can you tell us what did you learn in your kind of own discovery about your ability to still have relational power when someone else might have been leveraging up against you? Well, I'll tell you, another story that to illustrate this, perhaps. I had a boss, not that long thereafter, who was introducing me to my new subordinates, and who introduced me with the line. This is Carly, your new boss. She's our token Bimbo. That was another attempt at didn't management and dismissal. And in that case I didn't confront him publicly, but I went into his office after the fact and shut the door and said, you will never speak to me that way, again, there are times when confrontation is required, and an honest, conversation not an angry conversation, not a judgmental conversation. But an honest conversation is required. You will never do that to me again. There are other times when you make your point I went to the strip club, and then you settle down and figure out how to work with someone. I couldn't rely on position or title to demand, respect from people, I didn't have a position or title. What I had to rely on was my own capacity in the capacity of others. And what? I had to figure out was, how do I work with other people to produce results by changing the order things for the better, and that was a huge blessing? Like the way you contextualized the, the extremes of both those stories you had to examples of people that were incredibly disrespectful, dishonoring, and one guy with Carl you, you stepped into his world, and you ended up having empathy for for him and another person when they were really online in a public way you realize that, that took a entirely different approach. And so when I look at your leadership from a distance and try to determine what are the big contributing factors that, that brought you to such a high level of impact. I see so many one of the things that really stands out above anything else that you are. You're always principled in your leadership. Always trying to do the right thing. And I think that your idea of path over plan really in so many ways helps illustrate this, you're gonna do the right thing you're gonna take the next right step. I love you to bring some commentary around the, the whole idea of when you're running for president and. You became clear that you didn't have a good path to presidency. Can you talk about that realization and how choosing path over planned doing the right thing, how it helped you right size that circumstance? I knew when I ran that it was a very long shot. It was a long shot because people didn't know who I was. I mean leadership summit audience may new may know who I was. But most people didn't I was an outsider. I didn't have infrastructure. So I knew a long shot. I don't mind challenge as perhaps you've picked up on kind of like it. But at a certain point, it became clear, there was no way to win and continuing on a plan just because a destination beckons is isn't helpful. It wouldn't have been helpful to voters, it wouldn't have been helpful to the process, and it wouldn't have been helpful to me, and so it when it became clear that the long shot. What has become impossible? It was time to step aside and so people remark on that decision. Wow. That must have been so difficult. But honestly, it wasn't very difficult for me. It was very obvious to me that this was the right next decision to make to the point of not getting home. Hung up on the plan and the destination. I was prepared to win the presidency and do the job. But I was always prepared to lose and to do something else to make a difference. And so I think when you are prepared for all kinds of outcomes when you're open to all kinds of destinations. But what you're focused on is I will behave with courage and character and humility and empathy and collaborate with others, and see possibilities, all around me. When you focus your energies on that path instead of getting. Hung up on a specific destination the right. Choices are easier not harder so health low, in a mixture Carly that our leaders know, the name of your book is find your way unleash your power and highest potential, and I want to thank you for the years of sacrifice and faithfulness, and the price you paid to get to where that, you, you got and then to take the time to sit down and to write a book. That is so personal, so inspirational so practical, it's been a real honor, just to get to know the leader behind the headlines, and I'd love to kind of close out with giving, you the chance to offer a final encouragement to our listeners and maybe can answer this for us if if leaders could do one thing today to find their path in life. I want to be on a path. I'm not trying to follow a plan, but I want to be on the right path to live out their wild impressions life as as you quoted in the book, what would you say would be the very first step, we do to get on that path to fulfil the Patel? This put inside of us, find a problem that's close to you, and that you care about don't pick an abstract problem. Find a problem that's close to you and that impacts you and think about why you care about that problem. And then begin together others who care about that problem. And that's the kind of practical advice, I give some practical advice about how to find the right problem. And then when you get afraid when you come up with all the reasons why you shouldn't do it. You couldn't do it. No one will understand you'll get criticized then take a big pause and ask yourself the basic question. What am I afraid of what's the worst that can happen? But in the end, honestly, success, a successful life is not defined by the destination you achieve it. It's defined by love. And moments of grace. And positive contribution. And I've considered my life despite its setbacks in its travails in its troubles. And those are part of every life, I consider my life, a great blessing and a life filled with joy solving problems can bring joy in addition to unlocking, your potential a low though, so much I try to tell myself this success isn't something that you call pushing the future success is being 'obedient faithful today, and that kind of idea just run through everything that you. Right. And so to everyone listening right now. I hope that you hear the heart and the passion behind Carly's words that find a problem there. There's something nearby that you care about that. That's not right. And leaders tend to make things wrong right in that could be your next assignment and to those of you that are listening in this podcast family, if this content is helpful to you and this better because gold what you just heard today. It would mean a lot to us. If you could rate it and review it and Carly it's been amazing. Have you at the global leadership summit in the past? I'm excited about the global leadership summit this year. I have the honor of serving again. I've got a new idea that we're gonna talk about, and we've got an amazing faculty. So I know we've got leaders all over the world that still have time to be a part of one of the global leadership summit sites. Carly. Thank you for your amazing book. Thank you for your example. Thank you for your heart, your passion. And thank you for writing a book that was just like you're my, my leadership, coach. Thank you for being my mentor through your book and all that you've done. It's been honored spend some time with you. Well, thank you so much Craig, this has been a very wonderful conversation from me as well. And I hope to reconnect with you at a future global leadership summit, that would be fun. Thanks carly. There's lots of different ways to stay involved with global leadership network through the year and so plug in less grow. Let's all get better because we know that everyone wins when the leader gets better. Learn more from great leaders, including Craig Rochelle at this year's global leadership summit, visit global leadership dot org to see this year's summit experience options. Thanks so much for joining us today and until next time, don't get better.

Carly Fiorina president and CEO CEO Craig Carl Jim Craig Rochelle AT Craig bear Grylls corley Craig Rachelle America US Mary Oliver Craig GRA partner Brown Tom Hewlett Packard
Carly Fiorina | All Markets Summit by Yahoo Finance

Yahoo Finance Presents

18:57 min | 5 months ago

Carly Fiorina | All Markets Summit by Yahoo Finance

"Hello everybody i'm rick. Newman with yahoo finance carly fiorina former. Ceo of hewlett packard and twenty. Sixteen republican presidential candidate. Thank you for joining us. Thank you for having me rick and good afternoon. You wish you were running for president again this year. No definitely not tussle it. Would you tell us a little bit. would you learn from that experience Especially given that one of your Your competitors donald trump obviously ended up being the president. Well you know. I got into politics. Because i'm a problem solver. And i think we have a lot of problems in this country that our political system has an address in quite a long time and i actually think that's why donald trump won. I think people across the board thought you know what the system just isn't really working. We keep arguing about the same issues and so it's time to try an outsider I think we're still at a point. Where the political class fails us a lot witness that we do not have another stimulus package when we clearly desperately need one but i also think that one of the reasons joe biden won the primary and one of the reasons i endorsed him quite some time ago is because he is seen as someone who has been willing to reach his hand across the aisle and work in a bipartisan fashion. And in the end the only way you solve problems in business or in politics is why actually working with other people some of whom you may not agree with all the time to get something done and make some progress do you. Do you still consider yourself a republican. It's a great question. The honest answer is. I don't know because i do not see myself in the current republican party. What i will tell you is what i believe and what i've always believed. I believe that everyone has enormous potential. Usually more than each of us realize and then in this country everyone should have an equal opportunity to fulfill their potential. I think people closest to the problem usually know best how to solve it and so we need to give them the resources and the opportunity to solve the problems that impact them and finally. I believe that power concentrated is power abused always whether that power is concentrated in washington. Dc or whether that power is concentrated in a corporate headquarters and so we need to disperse power and money and decision making so. Let's talk about joe. Biden's plan Some ceos are uncomfortable with some of his ideas. You know what those are. He would raise the corporate tax rate. A little bit about who wants to raise it about half the way back to where it was before. President trump cut it. It probably would do more to regulate the financial industry He has talked about this. Minimum tax alternative minimum tax. You might call it on corporations. If they're act tax they pay to the irs falls below a certain level. Mideast do not sound like business friendly ideas. So what tell us your take on those ideas in what you think ceos and other business people you know what they think about this biden plan. I i would say that. Not all taxation is bad taxation. That may sound ridiculous but as long as a level of taxation is reasonable we've demonstrated as your previous guest pointed out that economic growth is possible from so for me. The issue is the level of taxation reasonable. And for what purpose are we taxing. And i think what by has proposed a certainly a reasonable level of taxation on corporations and on those individuals making over four hundred thousand dollars a year and the purposes for which he proposes to use that money. I think frankly are reasonable as well. So for example getting this pandemic under control is clearly impacting economic growth. Having the right kind of stimulus particularly for small businesses and working families and resources for schools and communities is clearly an economic issue having such unequal access to education is an economic issue now having such unequal access to healthcare and infrastructure is an economic issue. Now one of the things that the pandemic has revealed is the fact that we actually all are connected and for those who are really struggling. And the pandemic is revealed how many people and businesses truly are that has an impact on economic growth. And so for all of those reasons based on what biden has put forward so far. I am satisfied. That is a reasonable plan both in terms of how to tax as well as in terms of how to spend so. How would you prioritize the things that need to be done. I mean you just tiktok. A long list of things. Biden has way more on his website. He's been talking my way more. Some of them are social programs. Some of them are economic programs. If you had to list three things let's say let's say you were a presidential candidate again. What what do you think are the three most important things we need to do. And let's agree Getting control of corona viruses number. One a beyond that. What do you think of three top priorities. Well i i would say unifying the country. I i know that sounds may be too high in the sky but the truth is this level of division and partisanship and rancor is not good for our nation and it's not good for our economy witness the lack of a stimulus package in the last several months which everyone agrees is necessary so unifying the country is hugely important. I think in. It's one of the reasons why joe biden leads in the polls and won the primary because people see that. Secondly i think we do have to deal with the level of inequity. And i don't just mean economic inequity between families. For example. our frontline workers are critical. Workers are in many cases not able to make a reasonable living. We have to deal with that. It does have an economic consequence. But i also mean for example the disparity between how big businesses are surviving and thriving and how small businesses are surviving and thriving. Small business never has enough political clout in washington. That's become very clear in the last nine months in particular one hundred thousand. Small businesses are probably gone forever. Already in this pandemic that's hugely important and so dealing with some of these structural inequities over the long haul. I think is critically important and then finally of course not throttling business. And that's why the level of taxation is important that's why the level of regulation is important. Not throttling business. So that when the pandemic is under control A big. If i think unless joe biden is in the white house We need to make sure that those animal spirits are are running. Just the audience knows you have not. You're not working with the biden campaign. you've just endorsed him on your own correct. That is correct. I am not working with the campaign. I actually haven't been in touch with a campaign so you know we hear from lots of business. Owners and business operators yahoo finance and it seems there are many who do not like donald trump personally but they do think that his deregulatory agenda has been good for business in general and that is tax policy has been good for business in general and they're kind of reluctant to change even though they they know he's he's trouble in a lot of other ways is your read on the business community. I mean do you feel like the business community is just fed up with donald trump and ready for something else. Do you feel like the business. Community is split are all in for joe biden for me to speak for the entirety of the business community. So i won't try. But what i will ask you. And the audience to reflect on is how many businesses are willing to associate themselves or their brands with donald trump. And it's not very many. You don't see a lot of business. Ceo's going to the white house you don't see a lot of brands associating with this president in any way and i think that's telling The other thing that i would say is yes. I agree that Generally speaking fewer regulations are better than too many generally speaking less taxation is better than more but even in a time period when donald trump was lowering taxes and Getting rid of regulations economic growth in this country prior to covid was not the best in history. It's not the two point three or so percent is bad. But it certainly isn't the best we've ever done and so. I don't think that our economy has been performing at full throttle during donald trump's tenure and i think part of the reason for that is because we have these longer term structural issues that we just have not been willing to deal with so far when ask you about how a different sectors in different companies have responded in reacted in corona virus pandemic obviously lots of on companies and workers And it may be hard to generalize in this regard but do you like the way you see the business community responding to this It's very difficult. If your cash flow is down by forty percent or more to keep workers on board But deal do you like the way. Corporate world is responding. Or do you see things trouble trump. And if it's amidst about what do you like what don't you like. Well i let me say and it relates both to companies and how. I see them behaving as well as to politics. Leadership matters and character counts. It always does but it particularly does in a crisis. And so what. I've seen i look. I know how much companies contribute to better communities and a better nation every day and they frequently don't get the credit they deserve for it but what. I've been really pleased by. Is i think. Companies have really demonstrated not everyone but most of them have really demonstrated leadership and character and they've done so by declaring right from the beginning the safety and health of our employees really matter to us and they're the most important things in the safety and health of our customers really matters to us even when it hurts our bottom line and i think there are a lot of employees who really appreciate that and we'll remember it and i think there are a lot of customers who will do the same as well. I do think that in general the business community plays such a vital role in the quality of our nation. Not just the growth of our nation and so i would as i always do continue to encourage companies to make positive contributions Not just to the health and safety of their employees and their customers they are but also to the health and the safety and the unity of the communities in which their people live and work. This is a time. Actually now. When i think business has gained credibility through this pandemic and so i think business can continue to step up and play a really positive role in knitting the nation back together and helping to address some of these long standing issues. You know the thing that distinguishes our country from so many others is the strength of our civil society. Alex to tocqueville commented on that a long long long time ago and it still true and businesses of course are the big players in civil society. Hurling us you a few moments ago if you still consider yourself a republican and you said you're not sure where where is the home Among the political parties at this point for what you might call the traditional sort of the pro business. Republican favors limited government. But not you know but has also favors immigration and civil rights and things like that. Where does it where those people reside at the moment or are they homeless. Well that's well. That's a really good question and i think a lot of people who believe as you just suggested and i certainly do right now. are in the biden campaign. And you've seen long lists of those people come out. I think that question can't be answered until after this election. If trump wins this election he will win this election with an even more fervent base of people. Then he went into. I mean it's very clear that trump's political strategy has been to re energize his base and to bring more like minded people to his base. And so if that's the future of the republican party I don't know. I think there are a lot of us who are going to consider another option on the other hand. Trump were to lose then. I think there is perhaps an interesting conversation in the republican party by people who did not support trump or his policies or his personality or character or leadership. What i would call it and who will begin a conversation about the future of the republican party after trump. I'm wondering. I mean people are having these conversations now i mean it seems quite plausible. Trump could lose although like everybody. I don't know if the polls are right writing. I think we all are learned not to get ahead of ourselves from twenty sixteen. I mean what what are. What's the chatter. you hear him. You're a prominent republican by virtue of having run for president and bid on the stage in two thousand sixteen are people saying we need to somehow. If if trump loses we need to somehow excommunicate the trump wing in reclaim the republican party. Or is it more like start a new party or try to go back to some kind of big tent or what. Well you know. The conversations honestly are kind of all over the map and every single one of the alternatives. That you just laid out is being discussed by various people in the party I also think however that that conversation hasn't really happened to the extent it needs to because in the trump republican party. it's all about loyalty to trump. that is the definition of a loyal republican. Now is loyalty to trump and in fact one of the things that i have said publicly and said to many of my colleagues is we are not asked as citizens of this country to pledge allegiance to a party and we're certainly not asked to pledge allegiance to a president. Any president were asked instead as citizens to pledge allegiance to a flag one nation under god indivisible with liberty and justice for all and to pledge loyalty to a constitution and so i say all that to say this one of the things that i think we would be. Well advised to get rid of a little bit. Is this feeling that we either have to be always loyal to one team or another george washington. Many many years ago seventeen thousand nine to be exact said the trouble with political parties as they will come to care only about winning. And i think we've seen that and so i just start from the point of view that becoming a loyal party member is not necessarily our highest order objective as citizens or as business people in this country if trump loses maybe he will do the republicans a favor and try to create his own party and sort of go off and do his own thing. But you know they're rumors that has been created on tv number. We'll see but you said At the beginning of our session here you said before you got into politics or when you got into politics so you did get into politics. Are you still in politics. Are the things you want to run for or some roy you wanna have the political world. We know the answer to that is i. Don't know and the honest answer is. I didn't have a plan to get into politics. I didn't have a plan to run for president but I do want always to make a positive contribution and i am not afraid to take advantage of opportunities when they present themselves and i thought there was an opportunity in two thousand sixteen for someone outside of the political world who understood how to solve problems. Many voters agreed with me. That's why i think as i said that donald trump was elected president in the end. So we'll see we'll see what the future holds. But in the meantime in the meantime We have an election in thank goodness only eight more days now and i am fully occupied and fully satisfied. I must say with the work. That i do Lifting up leaders helping leaders become more effective whether that's in the corporate world where i do a great deal of work or in the nonprofit world because as i said earlier i think civil society whether it's for profit or not for profit has to play a bigger role going forward. We can't just leave it to politicians and say my job is to make money or serve the homeless. It's the politicians job to take care of everything else. I don't think that's worked very well. So so in the last minute we have left. Is there any advice. You would give joe biden if it were one single thing. Whether it's his manner of presenting or the way he delivers his message are who is trying to deliver his message to anything. You would suggest he do better now. I would tell them to be who he is. He has said that he wants to be an american president. And that's what we need. So don't be the leader of the democrat party. Listen to your political operatives. Don't listen to all the folks telling you about what your policies need to be. Be who you are and who he is. I think is a collaborator. Who he is is a decent humble man of character. Who's willing to listen to anybody and work with anyone. And who's focused. I think pretty singularly on unifying the nation who he is. I think is actually what we need right now carly fiorina thank you so much. Carly fiorina former. Ceo grabbing me and a republican president kennedy back in twenty six sixteen. Thank you very much thank you.

donald trump joe biden biden republican party four hundred thousand dollars Biden carly fiorina yahoo hewlett packard forty percent trump washington white house Newman irs Dc nine months joe Trump tocqueville
Carly Fiorina and Dave Discuss the Importance of Character (Hour 1)

The Dave Ramsey Show

39:54 min | 2 years ago

Carly Fiorina and Dave Discuss the Importance of Character (Hour 1)

"Live from the headquarters of Ramsey solutions. Broadcasting from the dollar car rental studios the Dave Ramsey show. Or dad is dumb cash is king in the mortgage has taken the place of the BMW as the status of symbol of choice. I'm Dave Ramsey your host to thank you for joining us. Open phones at triple eight eight to five five to five that's triple eight eight to five five two to five as we talk about your life, and your money Corey starts off this hour in Salt Lake City. Hi, Cory welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Hi, dave. How are you today? Better than I deserve. What's up? For the to be on your show. I really appreciate it. So Dave, my my question is well little little little bit of background. So my wife, and I combined income we take about eighty six thousand dollars a year and me and my wife were new to your baby steps we have about twelve thousand nine hundred dollars in student loan debt. And I have recently taken an interest in a software coding Mike earned job. I I'm kind of capped out in my income, and I'd like to make more, but I need to go back to school. I found a software boot camp here in Salt Lake City that is about fourteen thousand nine hundred dollars for three weeks or three month course to learn coding. My question is should I pay off my student loans? I and then save up money to pay for the software bootcamp or put my my loans on hold save up money and pay for this. Boot camp in and and do that you make eighty six thousand dollars year household income. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Why can't you do both in a year? Yeah. We can okay can more or less. My question is what should I do? I should I pay off my student loans. I say up and do the the 'cause it's not delaying you if it was five years delaying you to get to do your thing. But it's still laying you six months. Okay. Yeah. Go get your student loans knocked out and save up the money and go to school now the code the coach goes at night or day. It is a fulltime day course, it's from nine AM six PM, and they're gonna quit your job. That was another thing is the I'd have to save up some money or work work nights. Or what do you make? What do you make at your job? What portion of the Sixers you sixty eight. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Okay. Technical writer, and there's not a lot of job growth in Utah for that. There's about seven grade open positions right now, and and I've actually entered how much how much how much of that. Can you? Do freelance. I've done a little bit of freelance. I made about four thousand dollars last year freelance about that dried up I'd have to find another another contract. That's that's an option to I think I would find three contracts to do while you're in school. Okay. Before you quit your job and go to school. Okay. Does the most disturbing math part of this whole discussion is. Sixty eight seventy thousand of your eighty six is going away. That sounds like starvation. Yeah. You've got to have that covered. Okay. Some way or another. How's your family gonna eat during this time? Unless somebody wants to hire you before you have finished code school and pay you while you're in coach school. But the Detroit and think about. Maury about. Yeah. Somehow, we gotta cover that three months of food and. Yeah. I could be three contracts or laying there and you're doing your technical writing, weekends and nights while you go to school during the day. I think you'll get employed very quickly coming out a code school as my guess. There's pretty much a shortage out there. And what which language are you thinking of learning while this code school? They teach Java skits, and I believe it's no didata jazz. Yeah. Scripts pretty popular. I mean, we've got some of those folks on team we got a bunch of ruby folks on team, and yeah that I think just based as an employer in the marketplace hiring people that that should get you landed in a position very quickly. Once you come out of code school. I might want to have that lined up though. Okay. I don't wanna come out. And then start my job search, okay? At least I have a about four warm leads of where I'm going to go to work upon completion. All four of them expressing interesting. Hey, call us when you get out. We think we're put you on. In the meantime, you've got some technical writing gigs. And again once you learn the code, and it'd be better to get on with somebody. That's going to be a little tough to do. It freelance when you got no experience, but but I'm just trying to make sure your family eats at the end of the story before you land in the big Java scrip- job from the time. You quit your job until you land postcode school in that that gap that three months, plus getting hired gap is scaring me if you got that covered then. Yeah, I would pay off that. And then I'd say about my fourteen and I would go I think it's a good move. I like the overall move, and it's a direction I would go, but you've just got to think through the pieces of it. So you don't leave a hole in there? And it derail your your plan. Turn your plan into a night your dream into a nightmare. Josh's in Indianapolis. Hi, Josh, are you? I'm doing good, Dave. How are you better than I deserve? What's up? Well, I have a leave trucks that I wanna get out of. And that was my dumb decisions of the century. And we don't me, and my wife, we don't have the money saved up to get out of the lease for that penalty that I would incur. So I was wondering what your advice might be. And I move forward. Okay. You have to borrow the difference or save up the difference. Okay. And it's not a penalty. It's the difference in what the buy out or the payoff on the lease is and what the car is worth. And so going Kelley blue book k b b dot com and find out what the is worth of trucks worth private sale. And so if you sell it to me for twenty, but the police company says you still twenty seven you got a seven thousand dollar hole. You gotta have that covered with saved money or borrowed money in. So you could talk with your local banker credit union about borrowing an small unsecured loan like that to get you out. That's done all the time. But if you've got really bad credit or a bunch of other debt that'll be very hard to do. But I think you're on the right track. And that's that's definitely the direction. I would go. So, hey, thanks for the call. Open phones at triple eight eight to five five two two five Meghan is on Instagram if you really believe people shouldn't use credit cards. Why does your web store take credit cards, Meghan? It doesn't very clear sign on there. Saying not to use a credit card in the store to use a debit card. Only. So I know you'd like for me to be a hypocrite because that would make it where you didn't have to do all the crap I'm telling you to do. It's uncomfortable for you to win. But darling, I'm not hypocrite. We don't suggest people borrow money to do anything. We do here. And we do not take credit cards. We take debit cards on our site. So very clear sign age. They're they're easy to find. Open discussion about it. You technically could run a credit card through there. But you would be disobeying what we told you to do. And then that would make you the Hippocratic not made. This is the Dave Ramsey show. Listen, if you're a budget conscious guy like me, and you're looking for liable company to host your website checkout. Host gator hostgator is the trusted. I stop to get online and the best value in the market host Gators incredible hosting plan allows you to host as many sites as you want. You'll run out of ideas before you run out of service base. And if you already have a site with another company switch to hostgator, they offer free site transfers tried today and get up to sixty percent off their hosting packages at hostgator dot com slash Dave. Well on the phone line. Carly Fiorina is with us Carly. How are you? I'm wild. Dave. How're you doing today? Better than I deserve. Congratulations on your new book while thank you so much find your way unleash your power and highest potential. This is a great book. You did a great job with us. And I love the cover. It's real clean and in your face. I really like it too many people. Well, that's a good combo. It is I mean people clothes things up, and we do books all the time around here, and we have to work real hard. Not put too much on them. And it's just it's well done very well done. Good job. So what were you thinking of what you have in mind when you put find your way on paper and decided it was a book. Well, I think there were two things I was thinking about one is I feel a lot of people who feel some degree of helpless, hopeless, powerless and frustrated, and they kind of look around them, and they see all these festering problems, and they sort of throw their hands up. And there's a lot about what goes on around us that can contribute to us feeling that way, you know, we're a lot of people are disappointed institutions disappointed in so-called leaders or disappointed in politics disappointed in whatever. And the other thing that I worry a lot about is. I think our culture sends all the wrong signals right now, particularly young people, but all of us, our culture lists up controversy, conflict, outrage, fame, power wealth. We don't lift up so much character or. Being who your intended to be instead of just going along with the crowd and finding your tribes. We celebrate how many likes you get on Facebook. And you know, how many followers on Instagram those are all wrong things. And so I felt as though it was a good time to tell people all the things I've learned along the way including it came. The plan. It can be done. And here's how you do it. I'm talking with Carly Fiorina jumped right in if everyone knows you assumed that they do, but I one ever lied a fortune fifty company she was recruited to lead to HP in as she changed. The whole the whole culture of the company on innovation as a leadership junkie. I've studied your stuff for years and market leadership. Revenues grew innovation tripled growth quadrupled HP became. She grew it to become the eleventh largest company in the US more recently. You may remember her running on the Republican ticket for president recently. And I'll bet that was an experience or yes, it was. That's one word. Because you mentioned that word what's right in what's wrong about our politics. Brief the voters are right. The system is wrong. Okay. All right. I love what you said that we're telling people to do the wrong things. Character does matter and when we're teaching leadership to small business people or you know, doing leadership conference hours next week in San Diego. I always tell if I if the if the thing at the top is rotten the whole thing's going to end up being rotten someday. Character just invades every part of an organization. Well, that's right and invades every part of a life. Character is destiny overtime for a person for an organization for nation, honestly. And. What I meant when I said voters right in the system is wrong has everything to do with character. You know leaders I believe change the order of things for the better specifically that means that they actually have to work with others to solve problems. And a lot of our political system is not geared to solving problems. It's geared to winning and frequently what helps people win is not the solution of problems, but the magnification of problems. And so we're not here to talk about politics, and that's not my purpose. But my purpose is to say the character does count that leadership isn't about title or position or wealth or fame. It's about changing the order things for the better, and to do that you have to have character because character. Is knowing that how you get things done is is important is what gets done, and it's about integrity, and courage and decency and honesty over time. Every time not just one. It's easy. Inconvenient. So when you were at Hewlett Packard, and you are looking for a leader of a division or a company our section of the company, or you know, putting someone in a leadership role, and you're making that decision there that senior leader ship role. One thing that I think folks are confused about and some of them are running businesses. And some of them are in politics is they think if they hire talent that's devoid of character that that's going to be enough. And I my personal experience. I mean, I've got a little company it's only about eight hundred fifty people, but my experience has been I would rather have somebody. That's a little short on talent and really deep own character. I'd rather have both actually, but but if I choose great, but if I got a character. That's right. But what happens is someone is devoid of character. They closed everyone and everything around them over time because they make choices that are corrosive because they ask other people to do things that are corrosive, and you see that happening in companies all the time whether it's Enron or Sarana or it doesn't matter if you have someone who's gonna make. The wrong choice because of their lack of character. It doesn't affect just them it affects everything and everyone around them. And of course, the higher. They are in the company the more people and situations it infects. The book is find your way by Carly Fiorina. She is with us the segment unleash your power and your highest potential. You mentioned earlier the prevailing climate of distrust of suspicion of government suspicion media suspicion of church suspicion of large corporations are. What do you think can be done about that? Well, I I would say in many cases, the suspicion is well placed I mean, that's the reality. People are disappointed in suspicious because they have been given reason to be so that doesn't mean that everyone in the institution or everyone in mature everyone in politics is bad. It means that the institution the system is failing to meet expectations. I think it starts Dave with exactly what you just said. It has to start with the recognition that character. Does matter the culture of an organization that stems from its character is gonna matter over time. There are so many institutions organizations where people are taught to cut corners because it yields results, for example in comes. Any a lot of people are taught just hit the number hit the number the number doesn't matter just hit the number in the short term that works. But over time it never works. It takes a long time for it to be clear. But I think that's what's happening and institutions, of course, always seek to preserve themselves. And so people kinda rationalize it. Oh, you know, we can't really fix this. 'cause we'll jeopardize a bigger thing. If it's rotten in character. It's rotten to the core. So we got just a second. But before I let you go. I wanna hear quickly the story of your campaign manager telling you, it's time to pull the plug on the campaign. Well, I knew that I didn't need him to tell me that I had already come to that conclusion. I knew it was a long shot. I thought it was worth doing. I believed in my reasons for doing it. I still do and it was clear when the shot went from long to impossible. And so it was time. Thank you so much for joining us apologize for cutting you off I'm so on her to have you. Thanks for being with us. And the book is find your way Carly Fiorina is with us unleash your power and highs potential highly recommended check it out. Thanks carly. Thank you. Dave. Jonathan and sonnet are with us in Phoenix, Arizona. Hey, guys. How are you? Say to talk to you to see on my screen, you're debt free. How much have you guys paid off paid off eight thousand five hundred ninety one very good, and how long did this take twelve months to the day? Oh, love it and your range of income during that time we went from one hundred thirty eight to two hundred eight to two what down to one eight hundred thirty eight to two hundred eight oh two. Oh, eight I'm sorry. What do you guys do for a living? I'm a special engineer, and I'm a registered dietitian. So why did your income? Go up thirty percent. So I it's amazing that they actually pay you more when you work harder. So we started one hundred thirty eight star base. And then we went to then we started working as many hours because it's not picked up a second job. I was doing fifty five to sixty hours, and she was doing the same with the second job fifty five to sixty cruncher hours both of you way, up in your given professions. And that gave you that that boosts. So you can crank them back down and apple better life now. Good. What kind of debt was the eighty nine thousand? It was a little bit of everything we had student loans. We had a personal loan from family for down payment for a house. We had credit cards, including at home people card, and then we had a vintage car because that's what we need to. We were brokos of his car project. What kind of car you have as nineteen sixty nine triumph GT six. Sweet. So did you sell that? We did not. It off. So did you have some money in the Bank? I mean, how did you find eighty nine thousand and twelve months making one thirty eight. So we did sell some things and not a lot. I mean, we probably maybe three or four thousand stuff. But one of the big things was when I wanna start listen to you on the radio and started going through the home study course at talks on it into we have some individual stocks about ten thousand individuals stocks. Okay. Help move the needle then. And then just crank the hours up everything else is cutting back. Yeah. So the majority of the twelve months you've been up above up at that two hundred Mark you started one thirty eight and you said, okay, both of his turned the heat up. Here we go. And so most of that twelve you've been more to await than one thirty eight we've been probably over a little over half of it. We were we're closer to lay. Yeah. Okay. We had one final raise the very end up pushed it over Mark. Okay. Well, that makes them after work. Very good. Good for you, guys. What got your started on this twelve months ago? What was the vote is the thing that lit the few? News. I think so so it started actually three months before that twelve months before we started on the program expectedly lost my job. And we said I mean that's called into the office. And they said, we're letting you go when you turn in your company, car keys, your company phone and your computer. So we went from living paycheck to paycheck with a double income to less than half of our income. Yeah. That's a wakeup call. Was we had a one and a half year old at home? Definitely just rocked the world. You know scared. We're gonna lose it house scared that we're going to, you know, have to sell our items and try to figure out how we're gonna provide for the family that point. How'd you bridge the gap or how quickly you get reemployed? I it took three months. So we we basically wiped out any things that we had maxed out every credit card that we have that time. Okay. And then at the end of that time, you said we gotta clean this mess up because I don't ever wanna be your again. Exactly. Yeah. But my my parents are FPU coordinators. They'd give us a home, steady course. And being that I lost my vehicle. We started showing them like, you know, we're going to have to new vehicle now where we're just gonna find something in by some and they said, no don't do that you don't need anymore debt, and they gave us so one of their old vehicles stews. Oh, wow. Okay. That way the project car doesn't have to get on the road. It wasn't even ready for it wasn't ready to roll. Okay. All right. Very cool. Guys. What do you tell people the key to getting out of debt is? So one of the things is definitely you have to be working together. You have to be on the same page can't be doing a budget. And then doing something else on the side. And ultimately, we just decided, you know, we're in control of our future and our destiny. So are we going to just sit back and let life happen to us? Or are we going to take control of that? And then just not being afraid of working hard. So you know, when opportunity presents itself take the job work, the extra hours, you know, actually show up and work. And maybe if you haven't asked for raising awhile ask for that raise. Could it hurt? And it was fun for us because we would just we start dreaming the future too. So we drive around different neighborhoods. Oh, that'd be cool. You know, someday? You know, maybe we can have a house like this or dreaming about family vacations. We'd love to go there. And so that really helped us stay on track. This is going to be worth it as what you were telling yourself. Oh, yeah. Yeah. Job. And so natural university home studies. What you did we did? And then we we we actually in the middle of our third recording our third peo- class right now. Wow. Thank you too. It's. Coordinating make you do the stuff. I mean, it's like the the teacher must behave. You know? So it's good stuff. Well, congratulations. You two. Very proud of. You. Bet your mom and dad are. Oh, man. Yeah. Excited that they finally got us on the planet. I'm sure they cringe in entire time with it. Probably. Good for them for good having good boundaries. And let you find your way. This is good stuff. Well, we got a copy of Chris Hogan's book for you every day millionaires. How ordinary people built extraordinary wealth and how you can too. And that is definitely the next chapter in your story. Right. Oh, yeah. All right Jonathan and sonnet from Phoenix Arizona, eighty nine thousand dollars paid off in twelve months. Mike at one thirty eight two two eight count it down. Let's hear a debt free scream. Why? Well done. Well done man. That's fabulous. Good job. Very good job Jenny is with us in Asheville, North Carolina. Hi, jenny. How are you? I'm great, Dave. Thanks for taking my call. Sure. What's up? Well, we live in a house that's going to be too small in the very near future for our family. We're trying to get out. We have a roof. That's leaking into the bathroom in the hallway. We have a twenty by thirty shop that roof is leaking. It's ten thousand dollars to fix it. By next paycheck will have seven thousand saved. Then all the rain came, and we have a landslide behind our shop in about a thirty foot cliff now that's five feet for the back. And and our driveway washed out, we don't know what to do or what we're gonna have to borrow money. I don't I don't know what else to do, but you have to have retaining mall to save our shop. So we always more property. And. Yeah. But what do we do? Well, what what I did. When I was in the same situations, not not didn't have a landslide. But I did have a leaking roof, and I did have a bad driveway. What I did in those situations when I was broke was I had to break down my problems in two smaller bites and say, okay, what is the most important thing on this list? And what is the cheapest way to at least Patchett to where we could get to the next thing. And so like I bought a it was a thirty dollar pale of this liquid rubberized stuff and got up on the roof and painted around the thing with rubberized stuff and quit leaking. It was not a permanent fix, and it was not going to enable me to sell the house with that fix. I did go back later and save up the money and put a success not a roof on the house, but I had water dripping from the roof through the dining room fixture onto the kitchen table through the electric fixture. Which is probably not a good thing. You know with little kids running around and so forth. So yeah, that's what I did. And so I don't know. But what what you can do if you're not careful as you can get so emotionally overwhelmed with stuff coming at. You is you can become desperate and everytime. I become desperate right after that. I become stupid. And so go real slow reel deliberate. What are some stopgap things? We can do. Then what's the next thing? And then what's the next thing? And how are we gonna use the seven thousand? Michael is with us in Scottsdale. Arizona welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. Michael. Gone. Hear me. Absolutely, welcome. How can I help? All right. Let me try to paint the picture for you. I'm twenty three. I've been married for two years. My wife, and I are income was pretty low for like the past. I would say. So the first year of marriage our income together with forty grams. However now, I'm making closer to one hundred twenty. Wow, good for you. And we have no debt our monthly expenses like four thousand or closer three thousand dollars per month. And we have about seventy thousand dollars and savings right now. Good for you. I'm in. So our question for you. And I know you talking about the lot about not going into debt. However, I know mortgages are okay. We're looking to buy a home here pretty soon. My question for you is what size home where I guess what price point would be okay for us. Well, we are obviously we we love the one hundred percent down plan. The 'cause that's the shortest path to wealth is to be out of that and stay out of debt. Right. We don't yell at people for taking on a mortgage. I don't take on mortgages. I don't borrow money for anything ever under any circumstances. And. I haven't for almost thirty years. So, you know, I need to tell you that, you know, my this is the one time that you'll hear me say something that I'm okay with but I don't do. I don't want. You think I'm hypocritical. In other words, now the the guidelines we use your baby step three, which means you have your emergency fund in place. In addition to that, you have your down payment, and you have no debt, which is sounds like you are. Okay. And then so you would take some of that seventy thousand as that over and above your emergency fund of three to six or is that include it? I have a separate Bank account for my down payment, which is like fifty thousand. Now, you none of the other twenty thousand we have fifteen thousand savings for emergency funds run. We have five thousand dollars in like our spend account. Okay. So so fifties your downpayment. Okay. And then we got your you still have your emergency fund and your debt for you've done, very, well, but Twenty-three great job. Excellent. Now, if you put that down payment, then you don't want to buy a house, the maximum you would by no one says you have to buy maximum, but the maximum I would ever recommend is where the payment is no more than a fourth of your take home pay. On a fifteen year fixed rate mortgage. Not counting. I'm not telling 4._0._1._K's, and I'm not counting health insurance. But I'm talking about your after tax income that you come home with you don't want more than a fourth of that going to your house payment and a fifteen year fixed rate, plus you figure out that amount plus fifty thousand and you have your maximum. Okay. Now, when I get my mortgage, should I try to pay that cause might all kind of like like you said I'd rather pay that off in spouses possible paid off a lot of thinking about making payments on top of that like maybe two or three thousand dollars a month on fifteen year mortgage to be able to pay it off and closer to five years. I love it. You're gonna wanna play that much faster that you're gonna be problem? I have with that. If I were to do that, I probably wouldn't be investing money during that time. I was on a slowdown. That's called baby. Step six pay off your house, and I would slow down your baby step six by enough to put fifteen percent of your household income towards your retirement plans. And that would that means that money wouldn't be available to reduce mortgage reduce the mortgage a little bit slower. So if you would have made it in five years under that plan, you'd probably make it in seven years. Which by the way is about the average. So if you had a paid for home and for seven years you've been putting fifteen percent, or which really is almost twenty thousand dollars a year for you a way into retirement, and you have a paid for home at age thirty by age thirty five to forty right in there. You're gonna have a net worth of over a million dollars. Faster than that. And that's where depending on your your income does. But that's not moving your in. Ray if you don't move your income. That's where you're gonna end up. So you're rocking. It dude. You're doing a great job. Very well done. Proud of you are right Bill is with us in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, high Bill. Welcome to the Dave Ramsey show. How's it going better than I deserve? How can I help? Okay. I'm a pretty new listening. I started listening to just a couple of weeks ago. And I'm gonna be graduating at you it up here bay about fifty thousand debt and since listening to your show up and trying to reconsider my plan for the future. I've got a full tuition scholarship for law school next fall. Wow. And I was just wondering if I should try to cash flow the living expenses. Yes. Then the problem that I've been running into as we have to sign an agreement for first year that we aren't going to be working. So when do you start law school in this coming fall? Yeah. In august. And and you graduate in may, right and calculate. I went through and I like made a budget like you commend to people and my living expenses are going to be about seven hundred eighty a month. Okay. So you need ten thousand dollars. Well is the first year September through may or September September. The first year. It's August to me. Okay. Time's seven eighty right? Right. And so I've got non thousand dollars. Yeah. Okay. So we have from may until August to make nine thousand dollars. Yeah. Do you think that's feasible? Yeah. Yeah. Definitely. Okay. Definitely. You're not gonna do anything else. You're going to collaborate. When you go to law school, you're going to be so happy to go. 'cause you're gonna be so tired. Because you're going to be sick of pizza and over and you're gonna be sitting waiting tables, and you're gonna be sick of cutting grass. And you're gonna be sick of whatever it is you're doing, and you're gonna do a whole bunch of a lot of it. I mean, you're talking like eighty hour weeks here. Okay. But you can get nine thousand dollars three thousand dollars a month for three months. Above your other living expenses. You can do that here. Here's here's a typical person delivering pizzas six nights five nights. A week is making fifteen hundred dollars a month. That's at night drive Oberdorf today or cut grass during the day or walk dogs during the day. I don't care you're not taking any seven dollar an hour jobs. You can't afford to you gotta make more than that. But you're gonna you're gonna do some crappy stuff that pays a lot. So you have your money in the Bank. Got in. Here's what's going to start to. Here's what's going to wear which we're to happen. Okay. You're going to make the nine thousand dollar Mark early. And you're gonna be so on fire you're going to keep working because twelve is going to feel better than nine. Okay. That's what I wanna do. Once you get lit on fire. It's gonna be hard to put you out. Awesome. But you got this. You can do it. I'm no, man. That's so cool. How did you get a scholarship to law school way to go stud? Sell sad DC. I guess I'll big big time scores. So you're you got an intellect on you. Then. Yeah. I wonder if there's something you can do with that that would make you more than me putting you a manual labor. Like, I wasn't minute ago any ideas or where you can go make twenty bucks an hour doing something. That's the problem. Running into I've been able to find a job where really apply maga- graduate degree. You know? I don't know if it's that it might be just your intellect. Okay. 'cause you're obviously extremely bright. I mean, if you score so high on the L sat they give you dadgum scholarship. You ding, the bell on that. I mean, that's not that's unbeaten. You're like already. Top two percent, right. Yeah. For the school. I yeah. That's the only way you're gonna get that number. Why man Waco? How you can do it. I i'm. You know, I put you to doing stuff that anybody can do any of us can go do that. I mean, I chopped wood. But to one Christmas during Christmas break debate for my winter tuition and sold at firewood sold a door to door that was back when the dinosaurs roamed the earth that won't work now. But I mean, I got a chainsaw of pickup truck and went so would so you can do anything. But I mean, I'm not as smart as you you probably come up with something better than that with your intellect. So that's awesome, man. Well done. Wow. Okay. So we just wanted to law school. No, dad. Did y'all hear that? No miss then that just happened right here. This is the Dave Ramsey show. This is James Childs producer of the Dave Ramsey show. Gino, you can now listen to the Dave Ramsey show on Pandora and Spotify for all the ways to watch. And listen, check out our show page at daveramsey dot com slash show. Hey, if you've got questions about retirement investing, becoming an everyday millionaire, go bigger and broader with my man Chris HOGAN on the Chris HOGAN show. I am excited to be able to talk to you all weekend and week out. We're gonna focus on your calls, and it's going to focus on building wealth investing, and how to become an everyday millionaire. Subscribe to the Chris HOGAN show wherever you listen to podcasts. Hey, it's James producer of the Dave Ramsey show. This episode is over the check the episode notes for links to products and services you've heard about during this episode. Thanks for listening.

Dave Ramsey Carly Fiorina Chris Hogan Hewlett Packard Instagram Mike BMW Ramsey solutions Salt Lake City Arizona US Utah Jonathan Bank Sixers Maury
55: The Art of Energy Management

Craig Groeschel Leadership Podcast

23:03 min | 2 years ago

55: The Art of Energy Management

"If you're like most leaders i know you often feel like there's way too much to do. There's not enough time in the day so you often focus on managing your time but you'd also also be wise to focus on managing your energy in this episode. We're going to talk about the art of energy management this. It's the crank rochelle leadership podcast as great to have you back with us for another episode of the craig rachelle leadership podcast where we are incredibly passionate instant about investing and leaders because we know that everyone wins when the leader gets better. If it's your first time to watch or to listen let me just tell you what we we do on the first thursday of every single month. We release a brand new leadership teaching in fact. It's helpful to you. I would love to invite you to subscribe to the podcast. If you would like the notes that have <hes> the questions and other helpful content you can go to life dot church slash leadership podcast. Give us your email and we'll send the show notes to every single month. You can go over this with co workers or friends. If the contents helpful to you who would mean a lot to me if you would rate it or review it writer review wherever you consume the content and a big big thank you to those of you. Who are i sharing on social media inviting others to be a part of our community. It means so so much to me. Let's dive into new content today. Here's something that i know about you as a leader what i know is you're very very likely driven to succeed and to make a big difference in the lives of people around you and because you're driven. You'll often say things like a lot of other driven. Leaders will say you'll say which i had more time in the day. There's not enough hours the day i often feel overwhelmed. There's just too much to do. You might say i have a hard time disconnecting after work is it's difficult to be in the moment. You might say my work. Life balance isn't great. You might say. I haven't seen my kids in so long. I can't remember their names. I hope that's it's not the case but perhaps it is. So what do you do when you're overwhelmed with too much to do. If you're like a lot of people you tend to come into work earlier or you stay later you. You work harder. Perhaps when you go home you work some more home your mind too so wound up. You can't sleep at night. You'd like to do things that you enjoy but you feel like you don't have time and then if you do something you love. You feel guilty because you're not producing so you try to take some time off. You can't completely unplug then. You're really really excited about your upcoming vacation or your break but when it doesn't deliver exactly what you expected you feel more. Hopeless more overwhelmed more irritable more desperate. You've got more plates spinning but you believe you can't stop. You feel trapped like it will never ever change. I'm guessing this. Perhaps ops describes some of you at some portion or another even now in your leadership. What you likely think is what i often thought and that is this that you have to many things to do and too little time but what if the real issue is that you're doing some of the right things but you're doing them at the wrong times or in the wrong ways you often think that you need to work on your time management which may be true but more likely you'd be wise to focus on your energy management and that's what i want to talk about in this episode. The theme is the art of energy management now. Why does this matter so much it matters because time is a finite resource in other words no matter what you do you only have twenty four hours a day seven days a week. Time is finite but energy on the other hand is a renewable and replenishable bowl resource in other words. You can never ever create more time but you can create more energy. That's why i want to look at energy management richmond not just as a science but also as an art energy management is a science in other words. If you get adequate sleep you exercise sure size. You eat a healthy diet. Your body will naturally create more energy on the other hand if the opposite if you burn the candle at both ends eat nothing but junk food you live a very undisciplined life your body will diminish and be depleted with energy energy management is a science but it's also oh an art and that's what i want to focus on. If you observe your own rhythms you're gonna notice that what energizes you is going to be different than what energizes energizes me what sucks the life out of me is going to be very different than what sucks the life and a view energy management is an art so knowing that this is what we're going to try to do it twice. We're gonna experiment to create the optimal environment and rhythms for your peak the production and fulfillment let me say it again. We're gonna experiment. We're gonna try different. Things and we're going to study the results. Were going to experiment to to create the optimal environment and rhythms for your peak production and fulfilment why because what is leadership there many different definitions of leadership but here's a good one leadership is the art of harnessing human energy to create change harnessing human energy to create change to make a difference and to get results and the first person you have to lead is always you so as we talk about about the art of managing energy. Let's start with two big ideas. The first one is this number one. You're better at some things at some times than others. There are things that come more naturally to you. You're better at certain tasks at certain times of the day or week. Then you are aren't doing those same things at different times for example. Some of you are more creative early in the day others of you. You get bursts of energy at night. Some of you like to work under the pressure of deadlines that gets you motivated others of you. You wanna work way way ahead and finish long before there is any deadline deadline inside some of you energy from being around other people others of you get energy from time alone some of you. You're better early in the week when you're fresh others of you better later in the week when you gain momentum by getting things done and you'd like to finish strong number one. You're better son things at sometimes sometimes than others number two. We need to acknowledge that different tasks take different amounts of energy different types of tasks that you do conversations that you have responsibilities that you perform they take different amounts of energy for example creating content takes a different amount of energy than just sitting in a meeting which takes a different amount of energy than making decisions which takes a different amount of energy than coaching coaching someone or a different amount from giving a presentation. That's why you can do something that you just hate something that you dread for four hours only four hours and at the end of that time you are completely drained frustrated and exhausted on the other hand you can do something that you love for ten hours and the end of the day. You may be physically tired but you're emotionally charged your your replenished and you. You may feel like you need a good night's rest but you're ready to go and attack the next day because you did something that was energizing to you something fulfilling to you something that hit in the sweet spot now. What does this mean aimed for us because you're better at some things at some times and because different tasks take different amounts of energy. What i would encourage you to do is do what i call. An energy audit an energy audit our goal is to very clearly and very specifically determine men two things number one. What is it that drains you and number two. What is it that sustains you number one. What drains you what empties sometimes you what takes energy away from you number. Two what sustains you what fuels you invigorates you and refreshes you now. How how do we do an energy audit. You can do it however you want to but here's my suggestion i suggest that you use the numbers between negative two and positive to a negative to negative one positive one and positive to negative to is something. That's very very draining. If you know you have to do this you dread it. You feel exhausted when you're done. You often feel discouraged. You'd rather not ever do that again. That's the negative two and negative. One may be draining but it's tolerable <hes>. You don't want to do it every day but you can do it every now and then. It's not that big of a deal a. Plus one is something that's energizing something that you enjoy something that gives you life. A plus plus two is off the charts. It's amazing. You live to do these kind of things you love it. You feel better at the end of doing these types of tasks what i would recommend commend you do is go through a week. Maybe two weeks maybe three weeks and keep track of what you do every single day then give yourself a score score for the tasks as you go. Look at your score your average score at the end of the day the end of the week and such which you want to do. Is you want to be able to clearly define in here the things that give me energy here the things that deplete me of energy when you understand that it gives you the tools necessary to make the changes that will help you be stronger stronger in your leadership. I would encourage you to audit everything that you do for example. Let's just talk about meetings. We all have meetings. Do all meetings energize you like they're all a-plus to yell love meetings or do all meetings during the life out of you. They're all a minus two or maybe there are certain types of meetings energize. Is you in certain types that don't for example meetings that focused on the past where you're looking back that might drain you meetings that are focused on the future where you're planning to do things things that might actually energize you. Meetings with certain people might drain you meetings with other people might energize you so we're going to audit. Even the different types of meetings is that we're in you want to audit the tasks. You perform the responsibilities. You have the conversations you have with other people the types of decisions that you make you might also audit your time away from work in other words when you're not working. What is it that refreshes you is. It reading is resting. Mm-hmm is a time alone or is it when you're active doing something challenging with lots of people you want to audit everything now. Why are we doing this. What are we doing. Specifically typically is. We're experimenting experimenting to create the optimal environment and rhythms for your peak production and fulfilment in other other words. You may not be doing too much but you might be doing too much of the type of work that drains you rather than the type of work that sustains you now as we move forward award with application. I just wanna be clear acknowledge that many of you don't have full control of your schedule in other words. If you say meetings drained me. I'm not going to meetings. You may not have a job and so. I just want to acknowledge that this is true for many people but here's what you want to do as often as you can. You want to try to do things that are more energizing to you than draining. Let me break it into three very applicable thoughts. The first one is number one when possible delegate eliminate or automate drains you in other words if there's something that you just don't like and you're a leader and you can actually empower someone else who loves doing delegate that or you want to eliminate it. There's some things that we don't like doing that. Don't really move the needle. Just stop doing those things or automated in other words create system that gets that task done without a lot of energy from you and possible delegate eliminate or automate what drains you number knbr to when possible do more of what sustains you and energize you. This appears to be obvious but what you wanna do as you grow in your leadership. You should also be growing and doing the things in your sweet spot that really bring fulfillment that maximize your gifts and your production. You want to do more of what energizes you and number number three. Here's roman spend the most time will be here. Always create the rhythms for your peak production and fulfilment. You're going to try to create the daily daily weekly monthly and annual rhythms that help you perform at your best and fulfil you the deepest and this last point is where i kind of nerd out so we'll get ready to deal with nerd crag i study everything and i'm constantly tweaking define. The rhythms bring the greatest production and fulfilment in other awards. I study when i produce best <hes> on going to bed getting up in the morning the foods i eat the supplements i take how hydrate my body how i exercise size when i do certain task when i don't do certain tasks and on and on and on and i'll explain from my perspective these would be the things that help energize direct. Let me yours would be very very very different but i'll tell you mine as an example. That's why you want to do your own audit and you're going to study and you're going to experiment to find your peak rhythms rhythms so let me give you some examples first of all. I'm never living just day to day or leading just day to day and i'll explain on my wall. I have visual calendar of the whole year what habits twelve different frames and each frame. There's a piece of paper that has a month swaggie. Look at a month at a glance quarter to glance <hes> six months at at a glance or the whole year at a glance so what that does is it trains me and not just a day to day not just week to week not just month to month but i'm looking at the flow of the whole year as i'm looking at the year. I'm acknowledging ahead time. Here's the seasons when i'm gonna go hard and here's what i better guard my time to regroup and to refresh or i'm going to be in trouble so during certain months. I have almost a blanket. No for example in my world. June and december are two of the best month for me to regroup and to spend time with my kids in my family so i say no to almost everything in june or in december with very few exceptions. I'm not doing outside work. I'm not doing speaking. I'm not doing extra deriding. I'll either be working with very focused time or i'll be off in a way with my family. There's almost a blanket no and those months because it gives me that time to to refresh your going to want to do the same thing. Let's talk about daily and weekly rhythms my next day and this is important my next day stars before my next day starts in other words. I'm already thinking about tomorrow before tomorrow. Is today so again. This is nerdy but on the evening before i go go to bed i prepare everything for the morning i put out my bowl and my oatmeal and my clothes and my backpack loaded and my workout bag is packed. The reason i do this is because i know i am most creative in the morning. What i'm not going to do is knock it allow a drop of energy to go towards anything else. I'm going to be as prepared it is i can so i can start the day fresh and use my energy to create. Let's talk about the rhythms of my week. Monday is the day after i typically preach on the weekend dan. I'm generally drained so i start the day with a meeting at which i don't contribute much at all in the meeting. I'm listening. I'm setting the priorities for the week. I'm answering questions and people are keeping me informed then do a meeting with my assistant what we do. Is we review. What's coming up for the week. We're planning. We're prioritizing prioritizing but listen to what we're not doing. We're not making decisions. It's rare that we ever make a decision and the reason is because i'm very drained. I'm not at my best. Decisions is or more draining. I'm feeling pressure about the upcoming message that i need to create so i wait until later the week after i gain energy from creating creating a message my brain is then freed up and i make decisions later on in the week. Here's something really important. When you're planning your week you might consider consider putting some different categories on your list instead of just having a to do list. I actually have a list of things to do then. I have another list of things to who create that. I have another list of things to decide to do to create to decide. You may have to these categories. You may have four different ones but when you walk walk your task into different categories you recognize when to do those certain things at the peak point of your energy so you can have the highest production and mm fulfilment for me at the end of monday morning my weakest planned my sister and brings lunch into my office and it's a preordered pre made pre pre delivered meal which means i don't have to spend any injury thinking about where to go anytime going to a restaurant and is the food that my body responds best to after i start pushing message ideas around on monday afternoon i leave and go to the gym and the afternoon the evening times with family at the end of the day. I winedown a stop looking at emails. I stopped looking at screens. I'm preparing my mind for sleep tuesday's content day. I start early often four a._m. Or five a._m. a._m. Why because the time before eight a._m. Is far more productive made them when people come in the office. I get more done in those early hours than i do in in the later hours. I try to keep my calendar completely clear. If you want a great book about focusing deeply on your work i like the book deep work by cal newport court <hes>. It was really helpful to me later in the week once my message preparation is finished then. I'm more available to things that my team needs from me and then end start making decisions later in the week on friday. I take a day off. Why because i rest better wants the tasks or finished. I have other friends friends who wanna take monday off or off early in the week because they need a rest up for what's coming and that's why you needed determine clearly what rhythms work best for you. You're going to be different. You study you experiment. What i know about you is this. Your energy audit will tell you something very different from my energy audit and it no matter what our goal is never to work harder but to manage our energy smarter because you can't create more time but you can. Dan create more energy now in the next episode. We're gonna talk about your four energy forms very important but before were we do application questions today. Let's do a quick review. What do we know time is finite. You can't create more time but you can create more energy since energy managements not just a science but it's also an art here we're going to do we're gonna experiment to create the optimal environment and rhythms for your peak production and fulfilment why because leadership is the art of harnessing energy to create change to make a difference and to get results and the first this person you have to lead. Is you remember number one. You're better at some things sometimes and others number two different tasks take different amounts of energies. She's so what you're gonna do. Is your energy audit. You're going to determine what drains you what sustains you and as often as you can as often as you can. You you want to do more of what energizes you and less of what drains you when possible delegate eliminate or automate would drains you when possible awesome do more of what energizes and sustains you and always create the rhythms for your peak production and fulfilment three application questions nations number one what energizes you and what drains you. If you're with a group talk about it openly number two what are are you doing now that drains you that you can delegate eliminate automate. What are you doing now. Sucks the life out of you that you can give give to someone else. Stop doing completely or create a system to handle for you number three. How will you reprioritize your leadership around what energizes this is and fulfils you. How can you reprioritize your time and your energy around the things that give you life and bring great fulfillment. I am really honored and excited that you're part of our leadership community two weeks from now. We have a bonus episode <hes> releasing on june the twentieth. I was <unk> honored to interview carly fiorina the first female c._e._o. Of a fortune fifty company a presidential candidate an amazing leader who released a brand brand new book called find your way this is super insightful interview where we hear the story behind her success and hear how she thinks about leadership also i will the honored to teach this year at the global leadership summit is on august the eighth and the ninth there are sites all across the u._s. and then globally globally around the world all year long. I'm excited to bring the opening talk called binge your carve and the closing talk heart overhead in leadership the power of emotions in leadership. You can find out information online about the global leadership summit. If this podcast is helpful to you it would mean the world to me. If you would rate it review it or share about it. Let's invest in our leadership. Let's apply what we learned because everyone wins when the leader gets better go go out. There lead strong. I know we all feel pressure. Take the pressure off. Just be yourself because people rather follow a leader who's always real than one all right. Thank you for joining us at the craig rachelle leadership podcast. If you wanna go even deeper into this episode and get the leadership guide or or show notes you can go to lifelock dot church slash leadership podcast. You can also sign up to have that information delivered straight to your inbox every month in the meantime you can subscribe to this podcast rate and review it on itunes and share with your friends on social media once again. Thank you for joining us at the craig rochelle leadership pod.

craig rachelle writer lifelock carly fiorina craig rochelle Dan four hours two weeks twenty four hours three weeks seven days six months ten hours
Making a Summit Virtual with Adam McWethy (DHS35)

The Dental Hacks Podcast

19:28 min | 8 months ago

Making a Summit Virtual with Adam McWethy (DHS35)

"Infection control has on a new importance in the Cova era. You're wearing new personal protective equipment. Your office is taking new precautions and maybe most importantly your patients notice and care about this stuff. Micro copy dental has been making single use burs polishers for over thirty years. Each one of their single use diamonds comes to ready to use in sterile packaging I want you to listen to the sound. Did. You hear that here is again. Do you know what that sounded. It's the sound of a sterile single use diamond being opened in sight of your patient. It's out Saudi your patient being confident that you're taking cross contamination seriously. It's the sound of knowing that you're doing everything you can to reduce cross contamination in your dental opportunity. It's also the sound of you getting the sharpest most efficient cutting every single time. It's time for you to hear this sound in your opera opportunity. Go check out all of the amazing single use rotary instruments and other cool stuff they have to offer at dental hacks, dot com slash micro copy. The new bur every time. Micro copy. Dental. Dental hats shorts. Dental X nation will come back to episode of the dental hack shorts joining me for. He's been on a bunch times I. Don't Know How many times I was going to give a number. Have no idea joining me adequacy of Spirit Education Adam how you doing Can. I be. Can I be considered a reoccurring character? Who Are you're? You're like you're like a regular guest irregular all right I tell you so okay I wanNA. Talk to you about is that last year line not quite a year ago because it was in September I went to my first beer summit and we got a chance to podcast live there and we got to see what the summit was about in the summit was this amazing spectacle of spiritedness if you will. yeah. I mean it is. It is a great meeting was a huge me. I didn't realize how big it was. It was all people who are super into continue -cation into comprehensive care dentistry an indisputable in particular. But if it was just a great time, we had a really good time. We're looking forward to it again, and then the world ended kind of. Kinda. It changed. Yeah. So you guys had to close campus for in-person courses like the rest of the world did. But you didn't know how long it's GonNa go, and so you didn't know how if the spear summit was going to be able to happen live or not. So tell us a little bit about what what changed what you're doing differently for the summit this year in what people can expect from us. Yes. definitely Trade. So campus campus closed down in March and right now we are still shut down but we are actually looking to start hopefully start workshops in a couple of weeks because Arizona's. Finally, getting it together a little bit and. You know, but the large gatherings are still not going to happen. So seminars summit. So we took the seminars virtual, which actually we're still tweaking with it, but it's been. It's been a lot of really positive things about it. Some it. We made a decision about two months ago to go virtual. So Big Challenge of going into a virtual environment. Right? Is Nobody wants to sit on a webinar right everybody is. Just drew they're. They're done figured on one more zoom thing and listen passively. So what we did is we actually quick did some research we met with a couple of different companies and we've actually. We've gotten a platform that we're using called Intel them, and they do live events, virtual events, this kind of what they do and they run have a learning management system. So first thing we did was get the platform together and I am still in the middle of getting it ready for this first event all my teams are pressure, but it's going to allow people. To be able to kind of communicate to be able to have some community within the platform to be able to kind of go back and forth, try to capture some of that. But what we decided is we could do a couple of things that were really neat in the virtual summit that you can't do in a live some. So we actually broke over three days. So, our first one is August twenty nine. The second one is September twelfth, and then the third one is October tenth any to the days are GonNa be about Siva showers in that neighborhood so that they're going to all be on a Saturday so we're not interrupting with practice. Things like that to run like eight to one ish Pacific Time and they're all going to have kind of themes right? So the first one, I, twenty nine is really about clinical excellent. So we've got Bunch of really cool outside speakers who are going to be there you know like Kinda like we're known for it some at. But then also we're going to have some pretty neat faculty presentations where we're GONNA have like Jeff Rouse and Jim McKee are going to do a presentation together looking at a single patient from a joint perspective in an airway perspectively. Rebecca Michael Gunson are GonNa do something together, Ricardo and his partner jacker going to be doing something together. So you're gonNA see some really neat sort of back and forth neat presentations. The other thing that we're doing with this that is pretty cool is were. We discovered you KINDA got a record ahead of time to deal with. Internet. Issues I don't know if you're familiar with that we're not not. We'd never have to worry about that at all right. But what's neat about that is we're not trying to like pretend that the ones that are live aren't aren't live We're not GONNA like photo shop in a new Spit Greg Holden, a newspaper with today's date or anything. Should really look at the day's news the bad voice over. Exactly right. But what we're GONNA do is while the presentations going on. You know they'll be a live chat that's going on associated with that session and you'll have most of the resident faculty. If it's a guest presenter, you'll have them. So it's Dr Joe Con as one of our you'll be in there. So you can actually go back and forth with both faculty and the presenters which is not something you'd be able to do during a lively. 'cause I mean you were there if you had gotten up in the middle interestingly, excuse me excuse me out made here. We have a really important question. Yeah. So or frank would have given you a very disappointed lock. I than any security could possibly yes. Yes. So So you're GONNA have this. Yes So you're actually have this opportunity to kind of interact with faculty and guest presenters because normally the way that you would. Get to interact is you would you would stake out the bathroom yeah. There's like a fight is. Exactly yeah. Hang on you'd be like. So. There were there were plenty of chances for you to pull someone aside to ask them. You know there was receptions there were you know but the reality is in a giant room full of people while they're giving their talk, it's it's not the best. Easiest way to have interaction, I'll give you that. Right. So this fee this good, and then we will have like they'll be live portions like all the QNA's going to be live things like that. So that's kind of the first day second day the September twelve focusing all on. The business of Dentistry? So it's not gonNA be Kinda inner. So it's really going to be all about how a practice when times are nuts. So we've got stuff on you know what? What do you do with the team what you do with your patients you know also trying to draw on a Lotta, the lessons we've learned from the consulting business. Because it's you know our clients have. been really really engaged over the last few months. Good. Feeling engaged this morning. Yes and we've actually got a guest speaker. WHO's GonNa Carly Fiorina. Rampant president. Who she was the CEO of HP, she's going to actually do a talk for us on. How do you find leadership potential anywhere and again you a kind of things like that. It's going to be just a neat and then on the third one, we're going back to clinical going to be a couple of really interesting presentations some airway stuff. So Jeff Jeff Rouse's he's pumped but then also we're actually going out and we're going to have were having Greg, go through a live patient and so what he's GonNa do is you're going to. Actually, be able to. He's going to go through as he's treating that patient and kind of narrate the INS and outs of what's he's doing like actually perhaps the teeth and kind of things like that, which is some you really haven't seen before like you see greg's before and after. So to have him go through and we're GonNa, record the whole thing you know live, we're not gonNA editor or anything, and then he's GonNa. KINDA walk everybody through the video and just like. Yeah. No. I know. You. Know it not a I'm GONNA try to see if I can go up and have like A. Behind him. He's got working without a net if you really want it to be impressive, it's got to be like, yeah. Yeah. Yeah. So tell the patient to to stop in the middle or bite down on the hand piece I'm like that just to make it attic. excited. Thank. Thanks for that. Know appreciate that yeah. Yeah. So Anyone would love to see that to watch him work holy cow to be a fly on the be excellent. Yeah. And then kind of go through his because he's got. All this sort of unconscious knowledge at this point right where he was like does things that. Probably nobody thinks about but were kind of unpacked. So it's everything from like you'll see him prepping not. Repairing his provision trimming on all these other little tricks and things that he does. You'll get to kind of walk through and then not only just like watch it is it'd be the thing right? It would actually be. Any. Maybe, it'd be interesting. I'm not a dentist but to watch like just four hours. Adam. This is not for you just think. But like because, we're going to do it ahead of time he'll have the chunks that are the best teaching points and so you'll see it but then he's also going to be like here's here's the why. So you can actually learn something from it because. I've watched a lot of microscope videos and I think they're fascinating but. I don't know how you necessarily learn from some of those with no commentary or anything. It's no commentary oftentimes techno music. So those are that seems to be the most. It'll be better with commentary from Greg. I'm all about techno music. Don't get me wrong but no I know probably better. You know who else actually is all about technical music afraid to Jim. Janikowski. Very actually was a really popular EDM DJ real in Canada. Little known fact with Greg. So there's Times that there's not a lot of commentary. We could get a little just saying I feel like I mean I was really surprised. But. Yeah. That was that that's his thing. He was really popular apparently like why we do podcasts, we can learn these. Things Really WanNa know just saying I know I have never been an idiom DJ. I have not either. Less so so that's exciting. So three separate. Days over. So summit that used to be three days or two and a half days or something all in a weekend and it was it was bombastic with it was it was an intent like brain melts the first day in the another just. Another day they come back and it's like it's just like a lot of spirit of it's a lot to take in having over three weekends or having on three Saturdays three separate months i. think that's brilliant. Actually I think it'll be interesting to see. What happens is you? I'm figuring that you're hoping next year we'll be able to have one like regular, but maybe there will be some stuff you take away from this experience that you can use I don't know I mean I think maybe next year again I'm I just gotTa. Get through next week. But. You know I think I think there's going to be a place for this. In the future because I think if you think about like you can't recreate there's important things about being together and being live especially with like hands on workshops but we're kind of looking at it. There's a middle ground that is not, hey, here's an hour free. Webinar but how can you have that interaction? What topics can you actually teach in an online environment? Well so treatment planning lends itself really well to that. So we're trying to look at like how does that work and you know when we think about education? A lot of the places like us that have done hands on or on campus you actually gain a lot of freedom when you go to the virtual model because. Like I have to have a seminar take two days right and I have to put enough in that. It's there because somebody's GONNA fly out, they're not gonNA fly out for an hour right and they're also not gonna fly out and stay for ten days and if you look at adult learning theory, it really talks about is that adults actually it's the single worst way for them to learn. Yes. So there's this thing called the forgetting curve answer within forty eight hours. If you don't do any episodic lake review, go on at least ten minutes a day your retention within forty eight hours about ten percent. So. That forgetting. You know you are the cutting edge forgetting yeah. You're. You're in the highest percentage, the end of that. Break in the curve. Getting curb gun. So that's where we look at now like you could have two hour thing and then give people some stuff to do. In the interim so they can. They can really apply what they're learning again. Never, GonNa replace some of the other stuff but I just think I think it's an interesting. It's something we're really exploring. Now because we've seen some, we've seen what works what doesn't work and we're kind of really looking at how does this become a bigger part of our overall sort of offering as we think about it and not just. Slap it into. Here's your three days sitting on a computer for three days and listen to lectures. You don't have to wear pants necessarily but the storm I mean, that's like the only real upside I suppose. Yeah why I've been working from home so i. I'm more Pants Montanelli Getting. So with that in mind so we got the, we've kind of covered the summit, but you guys are now actually going to be starting live workshops in youth. You think you're hoping for September this is going to come out come to the. You're hoping for September, but it's only workshops in for those who are not super familiar. The workshops are smaller group. What how what? So Yeah this has been a whole thing for us too so. A lot of the reason. So obviously, Arizona went through a spike and didn't WANNA run the risk of getting anybody sick but then the top of that, you've got states like new. York. If you go to Arizona, you have quarantine for fourteen day. So that's not real good for people. Who are trying to run a practice? So we're keeping an eye on all of that, but we've actually normally are workshops her thirty to thirty six people. So we're actually taken them all down to either twenty or twenty two depending on which lab urine we have. A million safety things though temperature jacks, p. b. e. giving out we've got all these lines in the floor. We've actually put up the partitions in between participants. We've had alter a couple of the workshops a little bit. So the inclusion workshop for instance, they would normally put. In and then do some adjustments on the articulate after they. Made those dots not remembering the name of A. The dots the green, the red ones. So we've had to change some of the procedures in there because that could generate aerosols I mean the nice thing is is that the dentists are like, Hey, we do this every day we understand aerosol prevention we understand how the works so they're not as worried as you know. In some cases as we are. So we're to just really be careful. and. So the workshops are going to be a much more intimate experience. Gary, to would in has matt suit would feature in there to kind of hoping. I'm trying to get. Them to lecture in a Fait Shield and ninety five. But. Wireless right on the inside of the. Year it'd be. Geography. Yeah so Angry and put up it'll be like a gallagher remember him from row they have plastic. And the other thing is the more that once you get going with this, you guys will figure out the best ways to do. It won't be long before you're you're able to do you know closer to what you were normally doing but I, I'm glad that I'm glad that it's going to go back to some semblance of normal. 'cause we got a lot of people who really really want to come out and this. I, mean putting. Putting we were closed as an office for two and a half months are just seeing emergencies and we we still have patients like practically beaten down the doors they want to come in. You guys are still close I mean like through that and still closed I can only imagine what what kind of pent up like people wanna come there probably like chasing your doors as we speak, get him in. We. Do we do all this social media monitoring to Kinda see what? People are saying the best when we got two weeks ago was Amazon, you need to get your s together I, WanNa come to spare so It sounds like Arizona has has made some good changes in the right direction. So you got a lot of stuff going on Adam, thank you very much for being on, and if you guys are interested Adam unfortunately for him is quite often on the dental hack nations very questions it might find him there ask him there in Stupid commentaries my deal. But the mostly stupid commentaries deal too so you. Really when you think of like three jokes. Like, Oh, there's a podcast as a joke. It works every time that's the beauty of every time. So Adam thank you for being on will send you some links to the summit to spirit education workshops, all that stuff and spirits coming back. So thank we'll talk you. All right. Thanks.

Times Greg Holden Arizona Adam Jeff Jeff Rouse Jim McKee Intel Carly Fiorina Canada Fait Shield York Dr Joe Con HP frank Rebecca Michael Gunson gallagher president editor
The Bongino Brief - Mar 20, 2021

The Dan Bongino Show

07:35 min | Last month

The Bongino Brief - Mar 20, 2021

"Dan bongino welcome to the bongino brief. I'm dan bongino all right. So what is trump twenty twenty four. Look like you dropped some hints last night. Well let's go through step by step. What exactly this should look like. Step one step one is important and he's doing it already. President trump. he went on fox with maria. Barreda romo last night. And he provided a contrast contrast in politics or everything yin and yang black and white contrast are everything and he laid out last night. The first contrast which i think is going to be big and bald. It's the biden immigration agenda versus the trump immigration agenda. And he said this. We have so much to get to with you. President biden's first order of business on january twentieth. And twenty first was to overturn your policies at the border immediately stopped construction of the wall triggering an onslaught of new illegal immigration. Your reaction. Do you believe this would not have happened. Had he not overturned your policies well. My policies were working better than they've ever seen on the southern border. The wall is almost complete. We just had a fixed little sections complete little sections that had to be together. We needed them in order to get the truck back and forth from side to side. But they've chosen to stop right in the middle They could have it finished in a month and it would be just magnificent. That already is magnificent. What is done in the areas where it's totally completed but just small sections the remaining. This is what step one. You can't screw this up okay. Step one has to be a constant contrast from this point on with failures. The grotesque failures of the biden administration just two months. In contrast human beings think in contrast. That's what foils about provide that foil do knife anybody gives. I don't think they'll do this. But if anybody gives president trump advice we should stay quiet. Let biden do his thing. It's classy classy thing to do. But to lose the country and watch it get flushed down the toilet bowl no way step one provide a contrast he did last night a memory about a romo. He was on point. I started some people say. Oh the interview. Wasn't that exciting. No no it was exciting. It may not have been as emotional as we're used to a president trump but it was exciting because he did what he needed to do. He provided a contrast step to. He's a businessman. Ladies and gentlemen. He's always been a businessman. It's just bread and butter man. I tell me what you think about this. Give me a thumbs up thumbs down to. When i ran for office in maryland in this seat i had no business even competing in it was a democrat plus six congressional district. We won that race on election day. We lost on the absentee count. No one's ever come close. Since one of the things we did was a contract with the citizens ladies and gentlemen people love contracts yet. They don't believe politicians they think you're all full of it. People like contracts. Remember the contract with america. I don't care we call it call it if you want liberal flowery language you do but call it the promise document. I don't care what you call if you need slow flea snowflake language. I don't care what you call it. A promissory note. If you like financial stuff people love contracts. So step one. He needs to provide the contrast step two. He should provide some contract with the citizens about exactly what twenty twenty four is gonna look like. He's a businessman. Contracts are natural and by the way he's got a record to back up that is contracts. Mean something he's got a record. He's got the bona fide. He's he's got the backbone to do it and he's done it before. So what. Step three. This step three. You might not agree with it i. I'm sure a lot of brilliant political consultants. The lovey lovey lovey class. Joe bow ties and everything and ninety and then it gives both sides. You know. i'm not both again. I'm outta tiga. The political could song will not like this. I don't care. I like and i like to think outside the box. And sodas president trump step three. He should immediately announced his vice president. The minute he minute. He declares wait a few days. So you get two bites at the apple maybe two or three days. Maybe announce on a monday and wednesday out your vp. That's crazy dan. Nobody's ever done that. Yeah exactly that's why you should do it. But there's a reason you split your forces right away. He's already been president once folks. It's not like a mystery what he's gonna do when we we. Gotta we have to keep the tension. Bill joe we get the buildup detention and we have to pick someone from a swing set. Try get rid all that crap. That doesn't mean anything. Indiana wasn't a swing state for get rid of all that stupidity. Why would naming your vp. Right away matter and it's never been done before crews named carly fiorina early but it wasn't right away. Because what do you do joe joe just a quick question. Yes hi meg. This is not a trick Is it better to have two people on the road and a campaign with your agenda or one not a request to joe just to check to man. You know you can do a whole box for. I'll go for the two for two. That's what that's the whole idea behind. The big mac hamburger worked at why not put to one. They're right right because on every five guys. Oh i know. I'll probably lose it thousand listeners. A minute off my humble opinion. I think five guys makes the best burger much respect to what a burger. And what is it in and out but five guys you got to you got to. You got the double. I eat three doubles. No you don't yes. I do ask my wife. I have a large yesterday. I know you do write code. I i can eat like a nine thousand pound elephant three the you got the double get both of them out there early split your forces early my opinion right now as it stands could change but my opinion. That person should be run. The santos governor florida. Can you imagine your daily gulf gay. Finally keys i three weeks. He's like hanging our like just injecting himself. I liked that takes. Some initiative gave me two thumbs up and decide. I liked that idea. Can you imagine a contract with the citizens trump on the air providing contrast with the disaster biden's doing and dissent this and trump out there in the media all around the country hitting swing states a year from now or right after the midterms. This is the best time you wanna get. The midterms done i. He has provide counter programming. Step for every time biden shows up in his spot once he gets going after the midterms trump he should run a two year campaign immediately after the midterms him. And the santa's boom out there get out there right away. It's an awesome ticket and imagine the fury biden shows up. Say kenosha wisconsin to tour whatever auto factory whatever may be an end trump into santa's hold a rally one trump's in kenosha and descent. This is in madison or something. Can you drive the which apps essay. We'll talk more about this as time goes on. But that's what trump twenty twenty four should look like dan bongino show if you'd like to hear more subscribed dan bongino show wherever you get your podcast.

dan bongino Dan bongino President trump Barreda romo President biden biden biden administration yin romo maria Bill joe fox maryland joe joe carly fiorina america Joe dan apple
Burn Boot Camp Founder Devin Kline on What Being an Entrepreneur Really Means

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

30:26 min | 2 years ago

Burn Boot Camp Founder Devin Kline on What Being an Entrepreneur Really Means

"During today's interview with Devon Klein, I made the promise that I would throw down a wrap that I would record. A rap song for him. Just for a customized rap song that would fit him like a glove to show him some of that time show, burn bootcamp love. I tell you. What Devon Devon Klein is phenomenal entrepreneur. And he has great hair. Inter have you seen his hair? I have seen his air. It's great heads. Incredible. His wife Morgan client great entrepreneur their brand is explosive. You gotta check it out. Very few people open up a franchise ever. Very people can franchise their system. Let alone open up hundreds of locations in just four years bird. Boot camp is a phenomenon in it deserved. The customer rap knowledge bought. Sir. I'm persuading you're having your sexual both from Texas is this interview, the founders of birth both mortgage. It's the beginning. And how are we going to this content? And again, how about them Benjamins powered boss self-discipline, just again, but it's converted three hundred. Plus who can't with the burn people have had on the show debit line mortgage Kline? Here we go there the payments next. Well, Kim when they go out said the half Mexican, fitness, but this end Kardashian, Devon has grade hair. Now three to one. With the burner. Just skip us with his his kit with the par burn. With the per pack. Tap is Dr. A tip with the part. Pat. On today's show. We're joined with the founder of burnt bootcamp. Devin Klein over sixty five thousand worldwide clients with over ninety four open franchise locations in just four short years of franchising, Devin Kline and good people at bird bootcamp must be doing something right on today's show shares with us about the mindset of successful entrepreneurs. What being an entrepreneur really means how to scale business and much much more. Clem shows don't need celebrity raped to introduce this show this show to may eight kids co created by two different women thirteen multi million dollar businesses. Ladies and gentlemen. Welcome to time Shaw. Yes. Yes. Yes. And yes, Dr see I have fired up today's guests humped up. This guy's got. He's gonna give me Jack Z this this guest. We had him on a while back in the listeners. Just love this guy. He actually is a former professional baseball player turned founder of a franchise that is growing all over the country. His franchise has caught fire. It's burn bootcam-. We have the founder the co-founder burn boot camp. Devon Kline Morgan Klein, Devon and Morgan. Welcome onto the show. Hey, welcome guys. Welcome. What's going on? I am so excited to be here. I really am. Okay. And this is great for the second time for me coming on. And I have to tell you that my kids just had an emergency. Call and literally five minutes before this Morgan had to go take care of my six, son. So I apologize today. She's not here. But you know, she is she's way cooler than I am. So maybe you don't want anymore. I don't know tell captain Morgan hill from us here and. Dr. And I we we have four tough questions for you today because we're on your website right now. And we're noticing every time I go to your websites, even since I've interviewed you enter every even since I've interviewed you last time. You've added a lot of new franchisees. Tell me how many units do you have open now, and how many territories are reserved? Yeah. Then it's crazy. So thanks for asking. So we actually vis last month had one of our biggest months ever in this next month. We'll have any even bigger months. We opened our one hundred and ninety four unit yesterday. So excited about it's been crazy growth. And by the end of may we project have over two hundred and fifteen so it's gonna be a we plan to have like nine locations opened in one weekend over the next six weeks in one of the next six weeks. So that's a big win for us one hundred ninety four you said hundred ninety four today. Yep. Just open one ninety four. Okay. We're when ninety four where where did it open? The one hundred ninety four location opened in Holman, Wisconsin, Wisconsin. Wow. What we'll we'll cheese when you join what's up with that. Wisconsin is a sweeper state press. I had no idea that it would be like it would be just a state that we call it bleed blue the state just bleed blue sorry, badger fans. I know y'all read, but we have over fifteen location there, and every one of them is thriving, and the we have to power house sisters that are that own pretty much the entire state, and they just absolutely kill it. We'll Devon I wanna I wanna ask you this. If you're you're wear. I have you been to Wisconsin, you spend a lot of time in Wisconsin. I went to the lacrosse Wisconsin opening I've been to about let's see I've been to connotion Milwaukee. Yeah. I've been pretty much everywhere Madison all of them. Okay. Well, you know, this to be true, then 'cause I'm from Minnesota, which is the next door neighbor of Wisconsin can a kid, brother. There is an insane number of bars in Wisconsin. You have a lot of fertile ground there for the fitness industry. A lot of people that have you seen how many bars there are? It's cheese Kurds, it's football. And it's bars. It's beer. That's it. I mean, that's the three pastimes in Wisconsin for sure now how many and burn bootcamp now. That's that's right to the be. So now, you have one hundred ninety four that are open you're planning on having two hundred fifteen units here by the end of may how many are reserved. I mean, do you have more than are reserved haven't opened yet that aren't gonna open before me? Yes. So there's three hundred and seventy two as we sit today when we're doing about ten to fifteen each month. So the remainder of those that one ninety four to three seventy two they're getting Lisa's recruiting the best trainers in the country. They're taking their time on that super important to our brand. And they're scoping out. The real estate getting ready to impact communities we go into. We have a lot of people that listen to this shows who want to buy businesses this. I get it. I I have one business. I want to buy another one. Can you give us the quick pitch? Let's say you went to burn bootcamp. We say, you know, what number, but we're interested in buying a fitness business. Gives us gives the pitch. The overview of white people are wanting to buy these. These burn boot camps. Well, burn just much more than a gym. You know, we have a we have a belief, and and when you have a belief in you have a community culture that stands for something then people become attracted to that belief like, and so burned do can't just has this vision of this world where people can be empowered to love themselves for who they are. So many people are on this like emotional recession. And and when you're when you're happy with yourself today and you're excited, and you accept yourself who you are. Then you have a greater prospects of the future. And so we've just really take it a step or two or three further past the physical nature of it, fitness is just a gateway for us to become, you know, emotionally, healthy and get mental clarity and have that vitality and the energy that we can we can give to the other areas of our lives. And I think largely it's the community most most companies that, you know, we are, you know, quote, unquote competitors with they they have workouts. That are amazing and they have technolo-. Gee, that's amazing, but communities and after thought when we started in a parking lot, all I had was myself in twenty one women here in huntersville North Carolina that had each other in the hot Carolina's son. And then we figured out how to make a workout on top of that. So I think that's the main difference in, you know, if somebody wanted to invest in us, they'd be investing into their community burn is definitely a staple every community where in because when you're there, you know, everyone's there for the same reason, you can be a nurse. Doctor a firefighter. It doesn't matter you. You're not Vinnie's mom when you're there, you're Sarah. You know, or you're not someone's dad, your clay, and it gives you a chance to be yourself a moment. Now, the average location z the average gross revenue of a burn boot camp is four hundred and sixty thousand dollars I believe and he hasn't been doing this for four years what kind of investment if z wanted to open up Z, you might want to have to hear about this. I if you wanted to open up a series of these on, I know you can't make statements of. A claims about the profitability because it's a franchise, and it's regulated by the federal government, and such you can't talk about that gross revenue, but how much money are we talking about? If we wanted to get involved in owning one. Yeah. So anywhere from about a buck fifty to three fifty somewhere there and the as the investment range, depending on the market that you go into, and it's it's cool that you mentioned the four sixty number because it is the gross average units sales per year last year, but this year, we just got our FD in which is our franchise disclosure document. And we went from four sixty two five hundred seventy one at the needy and then come just here. And we are. Well, I mean, do you think about it? We just started four years ago. So when you look at even the numbers for sixty two five seventy one those are those units are still two years old a year old and had hit maturity yet. So I'm really excited about the next two years, and how that number's going to grow, but I know anger units one fifty three and I know in the franchise disclosure document of the drivers out there. They're unaware of this. You can't really disclose how much profit you'd make because everyone's going to run their own business differently. Similarly, owner operators do you have to operate the business on a daily basis to own a burn bootcamp or getting kicked me something that you buy and then have somebody else run it for you. You can you can buy it have somebody else run it for you. But what we really like to see is that you you you you're there's Tashin behind buying it that it's not just a passive investment. So if like, you're purebred entrepreneur, and you're just trying to allocate an asset portfolio, and, you know, diversify your income, and that's your goal, then it's probably not gonna work out for you. 'cause like I said we're built on that community really want people who, you know, want to. To change lives are best franchisees are people who just seek that a deeper purpose in a deeper meeting with the work at the do every day. And this is such a great opportunity to do. So we'll tell us about a franchisee of the week. That's really me up. You have so many great people in your system. And then nothing's going to work unless you're people, do, you know, tell us about maybe a franchisee, you can think about today or you can think of today, that's really just getting it done. So I wanna I wanna make their conversation congruent and go with my Wisconsin gal, Tina, shoemaker and Sonya Pinot. But I can't today because they get so much props in our organization, and they just do so. Well, so I'm gonna have to take it out to the west coast. I think let's go west because we we started in Charlotte. Right. And we can't even buy Burgu camp in North Carolina and South Carolina. But how California we're kind of a new brand. We only have four locations open out there and the Costa Mesa, California location, Shinhan Boyer and telly hall. I was just out there before my seven day trip to Costa Rica, and those gals pioneered the brand on the west coast. They're absolutely killing it in Costa, Mesa Newport Beach. They have over three hundred and fifty members at their gym. And they are just they're just there's just doing such a great job in a tough environment out there in California, and I cannot wait for us to as headquartered team too. Come up behind them in support them, even more than we already have you know, because they just worked so hard. So we're looking to expand in California, and they believe in since day one and shut up to their husbands as well who just who we glue. So they're debt is there the people as you give us an update I wanted to share what makes California kind of a tougher environment to open up a franchise in. But before you answer that question about what makes California tougher environment to be in business in the I want to queue up some west coast music here. Okay. We'll play this underneath the track here. So Devin you can talk over the track. Let me get this right here for you them. You just get the west coast music going J comes out. Here we go. Let me let me get okay there. We gonna leave it pulled Alabama. Okay. Get what makes it tough to do business over there on the west coast. Hold on. Let me feel that'd be hold on Terry. Okay. You know, what makes we'll make the different is a lot of times the landlords are going to be looking for some there's some serious parking issues. First and foremost down those markets like Los Angeles, Orange County. And you know, you're close to the beach. You're in LA county. There's the parking permit issues that go on put nothing we can't get by income taxes. Obviously a hurdle for any bids. Now, a -fornia, but at the end of the EMMY, we all know that. But hey, it's it's it's the sunshine is sickle, folks, right coast. We wanna we wanna make sure that we're represented out there, and those are little hurdles that we can get over, you know, it's competitive there, but it's competitive everywhere. And that's what a lot of people don't realize is that it is competitive all over the country, not just in California. But people gotta look good your round. 'cause it's right. So there's always bikini season southern California like in the mid Kent like in a man. So if I were to ask you, what is your opinion on how many you can let's say the United States is full up with burn boot camps. How how what would that number? Look like a thousand five hundred what you're what do you think your your saturation rate is? So we do really good in tertiary markets where you know, other other fitness franchises might not go because they might not have the, you know, the top tier demos. So we can we can we can sit in to more communities because we're willing to go in those markets. We actually do really really well in those markets because of the community culture and element. So we predict that we have twelve hundred fifty territories across news day. I regret that. We can. Yep. And so we're we're now we just as of like two months ago, we're getting ready to expand into Canada. We're fully legal. We're gonna direct franchise and Canada's well, we shouldn't have have in a little under two thousand gyms between the United States and Canada can just use them advice. I'd recommend you stay the heck out of Kushida. It's our it's our neighbor city. And I know you're you're a good guy. You're not going to say that on the show. You're you're not going to say, we're not gonna open, and but Z can you explain him? Why could we maybe not a market? He would want to look into yet. It's developing but why right now. No. Because what he's saying when we say tertiary what size is that. When you when you go down to us. How many people ten thousand fifteen thousand forty fifty thousand what how big is it? How many teeth per head duty to have to have a franchise and that city? Average of fourteen. Oh, that's an arbitrary number. I have no idea we need. We need to have fifty thousand people because we need the people there you fit. The income can fluctuate. Okay. That's pretty cool. So if somebody out there system selves. Kind of thinking about getting into your franchise. Yeah. What do they what do they do? I mean, what did they just get a homing pigeon and some snoop Dogg, and you just kind of jam out while you marinate on this podcast. And then what happens and then what happened? Then they send their message on their horse across the land. Pony. Express franchise that burn bootcamp dot com is a great place to go. I'm on Instagram, and you can direct message me on Instagram. I answer all my DM's. So Devon dot Klein on Instagram. And you know, we just really socially our Facebook page anywhere. You can find us online. All you gotta do is message us. We have a great team of engagement people that are on all the time ready to ready to speak with people, and we're getting anywhere from, you know, four hundred five hundred leads a month at this point. And so we try to take care of each and every one of them. So if I got an Instagram in DM Jew and asked you a question like, what hair products are you using because your hair spot the spot on? I mean, it's pretty pretty rental hair. And kristen. Spot on. It's nice. It's well well done. So obviously some heavy product load right there. What what what we how would you answer that? Or would you say, okay. There's one I'm really not going to answer. Four step process. I you gotta have you gotta conditioner. You gotta use conditioner. You gotta get out. Gotta towel dry. Oh, do well there. And then you gotta put product then you blow dry oh in the last. Then you've gotta lock it in. You gotta take that extra. Hold hairspray just rocket right in. That sounds like five steps. I mean, I think it was six. The president. Instagram's page, I'm just just on a half year Ivan Drago, I mean to secondhand stuff. I haven't had one. Yeah. Okay. I was going to be like I just want to go to the discrepancy is hair down. Now, we go I want to tap into your brain. Because you are a fitness expert. Yes. But you also are a business expert. So give us a quick tip to us for all the thrive for all the thrives out there who are trying to get that traction and that momentum in their business because you had to build one successful burn bootcamp before you could sell the plan to a bunch of people. I mean, you had to make it work for yourself. I one is one quick tip for being more effective in your business. You could give all of the drivers today. You know? I think I think people underestimate how much work that it actually takes, you know, entrepreneurship is this buzzword that a lot of people who are interested in business. Call themselves an entrepreneur, but I just want to people to really understand. And know what entrepreneur is, and what the definition is. And just see if you up against that. And it's okay. And I think people need to know, it's okay to not be an entrepreneur. Like, it's okay to be the fourth person or fifth person at a big company, but you need to know yourself self-awareness is the most important element. Understanding whether you're a good entrepreneur or not or fit for entrepreneurship and its first and four you gotta be you gotta be risk adverse. You've got to be willing to like, you know, like, Yvonne musk. He did one hundred sixty something million exit and bought two companies. Tesla SpaceX and had to, you know, pay his own rent with like his bottle who took back to the store or something. True story. I mean that was spot on it wasn't. But it was close enough. And you know, it's just that amount of risk aversion. You need to believe in yourself so much that you're willing to put every ounce of resource in it, whether it'd be a blue resource in terms of your time or humans or green in terms of your money. And that's that's number one. Number two. Is you got like the time? What are you sacrificing? Because I know a lot of people had DM me. And they're like, hey, Devon, I love what you've done with the business. Can you teach me how in the first thing? I asked him tell me how you spend all hundred sixty hours in the week. And when people are sleeping for ten hours, or they're, you know, watching TV for two hours or the scrolling on Facebook for an hour and a half mindlessly. It's like those are the times when everyone else who is an entrepreneur are actually working, and you're just not in your saying that you want something so badly, but you're behaviors don't align. With the words that you're saying, so it's spending every waking. Minute being obsessed with the craft and being obsessed with building. And then the last part of it is like, and I also learned this for baseball. It's you can't get too high. You can't get too low. You've gotta stay on in the middle. Yes. You know, what I mean so excited when you have a great month, and then go into, you know, manic depression, when you know, you lost money or you were in the red for a month. And it's just understanding that the long term is what you're working for. And you gotta pay your bills, you, you know, you gotta make sure you get by. But it's the long term that you're working for and that quote quarter over quarter a month over month. Success doesn't really matter as long as you're covering your Dacian. So I would say that those three things people need to look at those and say, look y'all am I really if I'm being honest with myself, am I really had on Chipper Noor or do I belong working for an entrepreneur? Now, this is something that I you didn't just share by notes happening behind the scenes because you said you want to look at it and make. Sure your risk versus. Did you hear that part the risk averse part? Oh, yeah. It was beautiful. It was well set, but your wife Morgan has been with you every step of the way. Right. I mean, Devon she's been with you. Right. So in your case, I think your wife has to be risk adverse to I mean, she has to be willing to support you. And even though I couldn't harass Morgan on today's show as I plan to see I will harass her soon. But I talk about the her role in the business because I think that she I mean, I know a lot of guys a lot of guys who are very entrepeneurship, but they're married to somebody who will not tolerate they can't handle the risk. Can you talk about Morgan's role with burn boot camp? So boring is definitely less. She's less of a risk taker than I am, but what we will we made a pact on when we first got like because we've been we've known each other our whole lives. But when we I decided to do this, but we made a pact on is. I was just like Morgan look I in like so ambitious and being an entrepreneur to me is like if you told me, I couldn't I wouldn't be able to breathe and you would literally suffocate. My life. And I need you to know that if we're going to step forward into into this that the expectation that you have to have of me is that I'm going to be crazy. I'm going to take risks. I'm probably going to lose money here and there, but I promise you over the long run that I will do whatever it takes to make this thing worked for us. And then she shared her expectations. Right. And we just knew each other from the get like it was there was after that you have that conversation. You just know each other from the get, and I think a lot of times, I think just being honest upfront with your spouse and just sharing your feelings as hard as is for us guys to do that to sharing your feelings and letting your wife, or if you're a wife letting your husband, if you're a partner just letting them know how much it means to you and in how it's connected to you emotionally into your own happiness because at the end of the day all that person wants for you and them is to be happy together. And that means porn it in eighteen hours a day, sleep and six and not, you know, taking vacations then. That's the the expectation, but you have to sit up front, so I would say share your expectations with each other. But don't have expectations of one another. And that's the key. What time did you wake up to four? I did a five K this morning. I woke up at three fifty and got on. I got on the treadmill this morning about four ten into the five K. So I was I decided to challenge myself physically because I haven't had a physical challenge since training for baseball. And then a couple of bodybuilding shows that somebody environment, and then I haven't had anything a couple years to like motivate me. So I just I woke up, and I'm like, well, I'm going to start training for five ks and then I announced on my Instagram like road to the races. Everybody told me all the five ks that are around you and I'll train board, and we'll come we'll do it together. And so I just started training for that this morning. So didn't you wake up today at three forty five hundred six K I woke up at three forty five. Is that why you're not in bodybuilding because it's it's not your not true thing. I mean, it's not sure what would you say again? Devin, you said, that's not your all it. It's not my nature. I wanna I wanna practice this with like, it's nothing against bodybuilders, y'all. But like in order to be the best in the world or be a pro which get involved anything. I don't have the opportunity to be the best thing. I would. But you have to you have to you have to do drugs. And I'm I'm not into that. And nothing not taking away anything from the people that are in that sport. They all openly. Do it. You still have to work really really really hard to do what they do. I'm just not into it. You know that turned me off. And then I just I it's such a selfish move when you have a large business and family. It's very selfish thing to do because everything is revolved around your diet and your exercise, and your, you know, semi pissed off all the time. And so I didn't why. Dan. Here's. I stopped doing it. Because I didn't like the person I was becoming there you go. Oh, well, well, okay. Now, my final question for you is a quick fitness tip. Let's just say that the listeners out there. The average listener is an entrepreneur they are working on average. These guys are getting up at five AM. Devon average entrepreneurs pie work until five PM not taking lunch breaks. You know, what are a couple of things they should take out of their diet and will help them to lose weight healthily. Take on other diet. Let's see I would say that a lot of people try to do these crazy diets like Kito or intermittent fasting or tarp cycling or paleo and they've never actually eaten an appropriate amount of calories with clean foods. I like, you know, you're trying to like you're trying to like run the Boston marathon. And you've never ran in your life before you know. That's the first thing you're trying to do. There's nothing against all of those diets look at the end of the day, all they are is just different ways for people to stay in a calorie deficit. That's it because you could eat five thousand five hundred calories of chicken and broccoli if you're one hundred seventy pound person, and you're gonna gain weight because you're just giving your body too much of that energy, and it has to go store somewhere. So I would say when you're looking to get healthy like just start with eating vegetables and fruits and lean meats and nuts. And and. And really understanding. How many calories that your body needs of those things I not worrying about the sugars that are in the fruit, or like, you know, going levels into detail on like mangoes versus bananas just eat healthy foods in a in a an academy allotment that you feel good that you feel vital. And then once you can master that that's like step one. Then once you meet a challenge, you can go do carb cycling or intermittent fasting or these other things. So oftentimes, it's it's people know exactly what to eat. They just don't execute on it, right? Self control. Just yet. But they don't have the purpose behind it. Jevon. I appreciate your time more than you know, what if you're out there, and you're in the Tulsa area, there's a burn boot camp located Z right next to us at the river walk. Yeah. There is one there. And you're somebody out there. I'm sure you guys have different specials and promotions from time to time. But if somebody does go on the Google, search, Tulsa, burn bootcamp, Devon how much does it cost for the first month to try out burn boot camp right now, we have this. It's actually the best promotion we've ever done in Bern with testing it out just to see if it works. We don't know if it's gonna work or not. But we're doing fifty nine dollars for four weeks at all of our gyms. And right now, the jinx location is right there right next to you guys. Right. Yes. Yes. Well, I'll tell you what we have enormous coming soon too. By the way, Norman, really, boomer sooner. Unbelievable. We might get. We gotta get Devon out to one of our conferences. We gotta high pressure impact. I'm gonna aggressively overtime penalty them. We'll see we'll see we'll see and you and don't forget the hell you guys as long as after after I come. I still get to be on the show. Is that a deal, you know? Yes. And then and then we just need the big the big cardboard cutout of you. 'cause that's all I'm looking for just a big because it do we need that kind of beauty in our office. And what we do. We can we can put it open whereas faces we have his hair on their that people can walk up with their face end is a great idea picture with his hair. And then they'll feel better about that's a great idea. We'll talk more about it next week. Devon, thank you for joining us, my friend. Hope you have a great day. You guys are so often. I always a pleasure. Love listening to the show. Everybody needs to listen to thrive. Time on podcasts. I'm an IT guy. I'm always there. Thanks for entertaining. Also, informing you're the best out there. If you were out there listening today, and you got a knowledge bomb. It isn't come upon you to schedule time to get it done. Ask yourself. What did you get out of today's show and wind can you apply? It and write it down before the thought leaves your head Thomas, Edison. Once wrote he said vision without execution is hallucination. My friend today is your day. This is your time to thrive. And now if any further issue. Greek to what? You may not feel like you're living to your highest potential because you're stuck in a rut with your head down just trying to survive when people are trying to get out of a rut the first impulse is too often dream of a new destination a new job a new location in maybe even a new career. Most people think unlocking one's highest potential requires a new vision for a new destination and many books actually incurred that type of thinking, however, Carly Fiorina believes that this is where most of us get off track. It's not a destination. It's a path and being the type of person who will take that path. You may know Carly Fiorina is the first female CEO of a fortune fifty company, but you may not know that she started out as a secretary and rose to success one step at a time by solving the problems in front of her and empowering those around her her new book, find your way, we'll help you. Choose. As your own path to at least your highest potential start your journey today. Please visit find your way thrive time dotcom. It's find your way thrive time dotcom or purchase a copy of find your wing wherever books are sold.

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How to Effectively Manage Millennials 101 - A Knowledge Bomb

Thrivetime Show | Business School without the BS

34:28 min | 2 years ago

How to Effectively Manage Millennials 101 - A Knowledge Bomb

"The Bram the duct tape and mentally prepare yourself for yet. Another mind expanding knowledge bomb from America's number one business. Coach clay Clark. What is going on nation? Welcome back to other exciting addition of time show on your radio and putt cast. Download on today's show I joined here with Jason. Beasley these superman of the elephant in the room men's grooming lounge. Mr. Jason, how are you this incredible morning at three twenty three AM? I'm doing fantastic at three twenty three three twenty three AM. It is in fact, three twenty three in the morning. What time did you have to wake up to be so vivacious at three twenty three in the morning. I woke up at two and drink a bunch of water. Remove. Yeah. Okay. All right. So how old are you? I am twenty six as a February. Oh, here we go. So this this show is going to be about a subject that somebody out there is gonna find to be offensive. It's called managing millennials one one. Let's start off first off on this concept of managing millennials. You see a lot of people like forty five fifty five sixty on. How do you manage millennials? Let's what like saying. How do you manage occasions right abroad statement that it makes it seem as though all moneys are in fact, the same person? Oh, yes. Do you? Have you ever heard the statement like how do you manage millennials? And have you ever had that thought when you heard someone say how to affectively manage millennials, whatever you've seen like an article, you talk about if you've ever felt like are you kidding me? We all should be managed the same. Have you ever had that thought? Oh, absolutely. I've read a ton of articles. I've been sent articles by like superiors who are much older than me like baby boomer generation like so I think you should read this because we're going to implement because. There's really fit your whole age demographic. Right. Okay. So again, real quick if you have millennials on your workforce as part of your team, I would highly recommend you don't run around going. Well, here's how to manage money. Also gonna roll out of hand, look how to manage cock Asians. That's going to be tomorrow. So you can't you can't I wouldn't paint every millennial with a broad brush. But we do have some facts. And why do we like to typically use facts Jason on today's show in every show? Oh, you should always use facts. I mean, they are not opinions. They are hard facts. It's evidence proving something actually exists. I'm going to read you some facts about those people the millennials some facts, and I want all the listeners to embrace. These facts are facts that are true. These are. That's why the facts, okay. These are verified bona fide, and then we're going to get into the specific mechanics of how to manage quote, unquote. Those people the millennials. All right fun. Factoid number one coming in hot from Forbes is seventy nine percent of them from this. Article says seventy percent of them a millennials would want a boss to they want their boss to serve as a coach or a mentor. Would you agree with that? Jason that you believe that you and people that you know, who are proximate your age would like to not just work for a boss in exchange for a paycheck. But you'd like to have some kind of ongoing mentorship. Do you do you believe that I actually wholeheartedly believe that? And that's why you and I get along. So well is you are a coach and mentor. I and that has been super important for my growth, and that makes me want to do better my job. And I have also experienced other people that when they have just a boss not so much a leader. They don't do as well. And they ended up bouncing from job to job. So this is what I found, and I'm just going to throw this out there. And maybe you you disagree with me for not. What I'm saying jive with you got you. It's a seventy nine percent of them. A seventy nine percent of millennials want their boss to serve more as a coach or mentor. I would argue that seventy nine percent of people on the planet want their boss to serve as a mentor of some kind. It's just millennials. I think we're now in the information age where back in the day, if you're working at Kimberly Clark, and you're working at IBM or Coca-Cola or some big company. You didn't have access to the internet. You might take job for fear that it is the only job you'll ever find. And then you might work for a boss and a virtual coal mine. But you don't think there's other options? So the information is what's made? Quote, unquote, millennials be more demanding from their bosses. I think back in the day. People didn't have as many options. They didn't think they did. And that's why I mean now bosses have to be more of a mentor less of a jerk boss because there's other options when you do you agree. Oh, absolutely. I also think about the economy now right down the American economy. We're in a time we're at a time whether you like Trump or not, and whether you like President Obama or not this is the reality of it under President Obama's watch. The unemployment rate went down under Trump's unempl- a presidency. Unemployment rate continues to go down. There are now. More people looking to higher than people looking to work so people have options. Exactly. So this isn't just a millennial thing. This is an economy thing to right. We don't agree with this. Yeah. I would agree. One hundred percent, okay. Now, we have another fun factoid coming in hot. I'm gonna have you read. His next message from Inc magazine. Jason get yourself psychologically prepared to read this notable quotable. Ready? Sixty four percent of millennials said that they would rather make forty thousand a year at a job they love than one hundred thousand a year at a job. They think is boring. Do you agree with that? Yes. Now that is something that I have found that is unique to this generation and any generation where there's more opportunity out there right now. There are tons of opportunities in the economy where so many job opportunities. That's when people can be selective. Now, if the unemployment rate change we were facing ten percent unemployment rate or twenty percent unemployment rate. I think people would be less selective right now. There's so many opportunities out there. And I think because there are so many opportunities that is why you're gonna hear that statistic overture. Now, I do agree with us about this. This is sixty four percent of the millennials surveyed said they would rather make forty thousand dollars a year at a job they love then one hundred thousand a year. To job. They think is boring. So you do agree with us. I do I've seen I've seen evidence of that. Which just people of my age group as they have matured and gone through the job market had various different experiences, a lot of people take lesser paying jobs because they enjoy going to them. Yes. And I believe just as my lineal opinion, we are. So actively engaged in the external stimuli that everything that we do has to be exciting. And so if your job isn't exciting, then you're just gonna punt and go for something else and you say external stimuli. Let me keep my mind on my just in here. What what do you mean when you say external stimuli? So one of the reasons that I don't do social media is there so much coming from the outside world. Notification -cation here opinions. Opinion this picture this part black and so with that. It's so many different opinions. You're having that that foam. Oh, the fear of missing out. And if you are in an environment that is boring. You don't feel like you can contribute to that exciting environment. You're not gonna wanna stay there. You just use a millennial word right there foam. Oh, oh, yeah. What does that stand for fear of missing out? Oh, what is yo- Stanford yellow? Is you only live once I think that one's dead though. You'll dead. Yeah. No come on. I mean those coming back it's hot it's hot. There are people right now in Latvia who are just out getting to use the word foam, oh and yolo in sentences consistently. We have no proof of that. That is not a fact that is my opinion that the people in the foothills and lot via have now begun to use the people in the Appalachian areas of America, though, for the foothills we don't have internet service yet. Those people are beginning to use the phrase foam. Oh and yellow we have no proof of that. Which is why it's not a fact, okay? Let's move onto our. Third Baleno factoid. Jason are you psychologically prepared to read it already? What are you? Seventy four percent of millennials want, flexible, work schedules. If you're listening out there grasp this idea seventy four seventy four percent of millennials want, flexible schedules, sixty four percent of millennials. So they would rather make forty thousand a year then a hundred they wanna love their job and seventy nine percent. A money's say they want a mentor or a coach not just a job. So this is these are the move. These are the the five super moves that you can use to affectively manage all people some of which may be money's true. Here we go so one you have to have a shared vision. You just have to have a vision that your team buys into you have to have a common goal. Now. I'm gonna give you example. Let's say today. I started a company Jason here. Schuster's huddle around gas guys huddle around. So it's you and me, and let's say forty millennials. Yeah. Tell me if this would work. Okay. Tell me if this would actually happen. I'm ready. So guys, I'm working on this new business. Now, this this business is going to be awesome. All right. I'm going to allow a commercial arm to grow more. And my Boston accent bettas, we do this. We're going to grow of got this thing, I've created that allows commercial farmers to grow more corn, and soybeans and various things. Now, the only drawback just being transparent. Okay. Is it what it's going to do as these pesticides and chemicals? They have what we would call koscina just costs engines. So the byproduct of opera is probably going to cost cancer and small doses. Just small and it will make seeds that once they up to seeds of the cords. We put we plant. The corn? The corn grows it'll grow fast, beautiful huge. But the the seed. That come from the call and will not be able to plant other coin. You know what I'm saying? It's this. There's no corna Conal. There's the seeds with corn can't make other. We're gonna call this company. Monsanto now with. That wouldn't work now would it. No. So do you know about Monsanto, I do think all know about money, but I'd like to talk about Monsanto from what you know about it where you got your data because I almo Lineas know about Monsanto in Monsanto is a company that if you look up the name Monsanto and everyone out there look up the name Monsanto once you look it up today. Monsanto when you look up the Monsanto, you're going to find a lot of information from major credible news sources that are going to show Monsanto has a long history of ongoing allegations ongoing settlements ongoing lawsuits due to its practices. But what do you know about Monsanto? Jason another Monsanto was the biggest topic when I was in college, my freshman and sophomore year, I went down to that's my buddy was studying and hanging out with all of his little door mates. And there is an hour long conversation. I hadn't even heard the name. Monsanto up until then we got people really don't like these people what's going on. And then after that getting into my nutrition class learning about how they're see development isn't natural. And can you know, pollute the whatever, it's it's huge. And it's bad and people hate them. Okay. So let me give example a Monsanto article right now, this is just from. I'm not sure when this'll be released, but this this is dateline this was dated March. Twentieth. Twenty nineteen. In CNN, jurors say round up contributed his second man's cancer. Now, thousands more cases against Monsanto await now thousands of more cases against Monsanto await. Is it shocking to you that that the product roundup is bad for the environment. This just in that product Monsanto has made the product is it shocking to you Jason that product is bad environment. None at all kills things. It kills the environment. Now, is it all shocking to you? That Monsanto is not created by a millennial. Is it shocking to the millennial did not make Monsanto stood? Don't start the company. No, no in do you think under today's current economic environment? Today's current millennials. We're talking about managing do you think that anybody could start a company called Monsanto with money will work force as of today? I don't think so I don't think you could either. No, I think Monsanto's a company that could not be started akin with Kultura now. So yet the shared vision of the division has to be something awesome grant. So let me just get example of one of the companies are involved in together elephant in the room elephant in the room. It's a men's grooming lounge. It's a country club from hair you or the super manager of three stores and for every first haircut. We do we charge how much one dollar and that one dollar is donated to compassion international. It's a it's a nonprofit that provides clothing shelter, food and education for underprivileged kids throughout the world. The vast majority of every dollar goes directly to impact the kids. That's a it's a very transparent thing you see my wife round up the number does the accounting. So she'll ask how many people came in this month for their first haircut? And why does she do that? So we can see exactly how much you're donating. There we go. So if you had to guess, how many first time haircuts have we had so far Elvin the room in the history. Maybe even this year. What do you think how the first time clients have come in for their first haircut since maybe you've since this year since this is in the last twelve months, I would say in the last twelve months we have done well over. I'd say two thousand two thousand growing hundred and fifty a month hundred and fifty first time customers every month. Oh, easily because I think as as right now, we do about thirty to forty first visits per week per shop. So you're saying that we're doing thirty to forty first time per week Mercia. And so if you're other we've been in business for, you know, seven years, so that gives you kind of look at how much donate we track that, and we're very intentional that but that you have to have a shared vision. Right Molenaar today that want to come to work for a job with the bosses. So he's the free deal. We're gonna chap some freaking mops go out the chop those mobs, right? Shut up that doesn't work right now. So let's talk about a business that you're working with right now, the great company they're based in the Boston area. Yeah. And they have a dog named what boss talked me about the boss dog and bosses the Boston terrier, and he is hopefully soon to be the face and just overall. Folks. I and four angels touch. Angels touch is a what what kind of businesses angels touch. They do auto body repair detailing and full restoration. And are they how been doing since you've been working with them coaching and consulting them? Oh, they are killing it there, some of the most dedicated people, they're very action oriented, so they think they heard of us through the podcast, and then they filled out a form. They scheduled a thirteen point assessment with myself, then after we had the thirteen point assessment with myself, I'm made a business plan for themselves, and I gave it to yourself. And then you've been coaching him down the path. Yeah. How long have they been a client? So they have a client for I think it'll be a year this year to go back and check it because they started with Victoria, and then I took over and what kind of growth have experienced so far so far over all they are up forty three percents year over year from working with us. So let's create a potential win win for the by. Let's shut that door. We have so much smoke into the man cave. My eyes are. Beginning to transparently, make me cry. And it is beginning to suck out myself though. I love the smell of pin. What is beginning to make my eyes cry? That's what you have too much Pinon would in the studio as when your eyes begin to cry. So I'm gonna help this company real quick. So they were trying to hire millennials. Yeah. And retain them. They might have a deal where they say, you know, the the mascot of our companies dog named bossed unin, boss. He's Boston terrier. So we're going to do is for every first time customer. We're going to donate five dollars to the local animal shelter. Ooh. There you go to help dogs. Yeah. People that are adopting dogs. And wouldn't that go over good with the employee's? Good morale. They'll go fantastic. And what they took a picture of every dog that was adopted as result of their program. Even better they put that up over the over the business. I might have to steal that idea. You have still. That's why I'm doing every business needs to have some sort of gimmick. That's why Tom shoes is done. Well, Jason what's to give back with Tom shoes by hair give there? So you buy per time shoes, and they give away. Oh, okay. So again Monsanto. No give back. Yes. Lotta no-go to Monsanto. And maybe even go to to yo zero might be true. But we have it is ago with what was the phrase, you said foam foam, which stands for fear of missing out. Okay. Awesome. Okay. So we're gonna continue now second the second super move for managing millennials affectively. And all people is you wanna make sure you find everybody's goals. Napoleon Hill's a goal is a dream with deadline now, I think this is so important for all the listeners to know this because think about this for second Jason. I think we all have goals, and I think millennials more than any generation ever have been taken advantage of just promo any oil commercial been working on. Yeah. Okay. Let me kind of cute up here. Let me get here. Yep. Have you graduated from college with an excessive amount of non actionable, non practical are forty granted student debt? You find yourself saying what the heck? File class action lawsuit on behalf of all people went to college and earned worthless. Degree who can't find a job today by going to millennials without jobs dot com. But how you treat a lot of money that went to school. Yes. And got a degree being told by their because you went you went to high school guarantee. It talk to you about what kind of stuff you heard your guidance counselors, what kind of things you heard on TV what kind of promotions, you heard what kind of how hard was the idea of going to college sold to you. And your generation. I mean, how hard was it sold and win win win recall the first sales pitches beginning so I know the first sales pitch was definitely when I was in elementary school. And we were going over. We're being introduced to like bedlam like, oh, you've owes you think about the indoctrination starting elementary continuing from. But then even since then so you go into what we call an Oklahoma middle school middle school and so six eighth grade. And it's all prep-work they start asking you. What college? Are you going to exactly they have people come in to speak from the local colleges? Hi, my name is Becky Davis. Because if you're in Tulsa, everyone's name, everyone who works for a college names, Becky beckey-dey, right? Money's Becky Davis. My name's Tom, Gordon. There's always Tom, Gordon or kind of a sweet person. Let me get my sweet person kind of thing going. Hi, my name's Tom, Gordon. And I'm here on behalf of the university. And I wanna talk to you about the importance of degree. Did you know that people with degree on average earn three times more than people with added agree there does do you know, the degree unlocks it's the golden key to financial freedom. Do you know that then they skip the part about do, you know that the average frequent millennial is forty five thousand dollars in debt in depressed as a result of it. That was never part of the pitch never ever. Do. You know, people are depressed about how much money though. You know, I'm not asking for names, do, you know, people who've graduated from college, and maybe they made a comment to you. Or you've talked to them about like gosh, I can't Indem dude. I have friends who have gone through medical school just now to the point of the nursing program. Right. And they're not even they're like full doctor yet, and they're still working crazy hours. And they're still super in debt. Was it worth it? I mean, it's my passion. So here's the deal when you have employees that come to your workplace and their Valenti's or any generation it's up to you to say, I realize you had that goal of getting the degree. Now, you're done. You had the degree great. Now. We've got to set a goal which Napoleon hill defines as a goal goals dream with deadline, right? We have to set a goal to in order for you at say a year from now to become a business coach or a year from now to become the super manager or a year from now to become a manager or five years from now to own your own store or and why? Do you have what is your boss have to help you set realistically achievable goal GIS will one if they're acting as your mentor or coach it's going to give them more credibility, but it's also going to give you assistance. There are a lot of people that without direction they have no way of achieving their goal. They have what they like the implant in mind, but they don't know how to get there. You have to do if your if your boss out there, and you wanna keep employee engaged on your team. You have to set these smart goals. A smart goal is since for a specific goal goes has S stands for specific. You gotta be specific. Why because it was vague. It's not cheap realistic. Okay. You have to make sure that your goal is measurable. So specific and measurable. Jason. Why does the goal has to be something that you can measure you can measure something to put on a time line something that is actually plausible and measurable? Well, it's just like our debate with the facts early. Why do we use facts anything that's measurable? You can actually see what's working. So like with we have a membership goal. Every. Week that we want to be able to sell so we're profitable. If we didn't have that. We'd be well, we actually don't know for him urging money or not. So we can see week over week month over month or year over year, if what we're doing to reach our goals is actually working so he can reassess look up real quick look up the type in disengaged employees type it into Google. I want you to see the Gallup research G A L L UP. We'll put it on the show notes. I want to show us with listeners because you've seen the stat before, but we'll have the stat. And just it'll show how many people are disengaged in the current workplace. There are many reputable media outlets like Forbes, FOX CNN that have done stories about this. Have you found the percentage of disengaged employees in the workplace? Oh, yeah. So according to Gallup only thirty three percent of workers in the United States are engaged in their jobs, which means they actually care about what's going on yet. What percentage thirty three percent actually care, right? Right, right. Okay. Nice. Then ING but true. So you want to sit down with your team and set smart goals? S stands for specific im- stands for measurable. A stains actionable are stands for realistic N T stands for time sensitive specific goals that are measurable and actionable actually doable practical the realistic, and they are time sensitive. That's what you wanna do. Now. Step number three to manage millennials those people and everybody is what Jason what is step number. Create a clear path for them to continue learning. Why is that important? Well, it's important because if you get stuck doing the same thing over and over then your job is boring. They're gonna take a lesser paying job because you find it more entertaining. I love to learn I love new systems like when we changed. Our software for elephant. Yeah. I was super excited because it was something new, and I got the chance to learn it anytime we make new policy or like the FD I'm super stoked to get into that. Because it's new information. The franchise disclosure document, you speak and all that fancy jargon over there. So we have to create a path four your team to continue learning to create a path a clear path for continued learning. Can you read a notable caudal here for Mr. Steven Jobs who is the founder of the co founder of apple he is the former CEO of Pixar and the founder of next year, the notable quotable for Mr. Steven Jobs. Yes. Mr. job says your work is going to fill a large part of your life. And the only way to be truly satisfied is to do. What you believe is. Great work. Do you? Do you? You believe that first line? Yes. Okay. Continue. Yes. And the only way to do great work is to love what you do you believe that part? I do. Okay, continue. If you haven't found it yet. Keep looking don't settle. I'm like to read it. Again, this time I'm gonna kinda cue up some music. I'm gonna provide some some echoes to get that dramatic effect. But I need you to read this. It's like imagine. You're you're standing in front of the class of twenty nineteen graduates asked to speak Steve Jobs could up either because he's dead all the dignitaries couldn't be there because they're being dignified somewhere. And they said we want to superman of elfin the room to deliver this dress. So you're speaking to an audience of how people graduating class eight hundred thousand. Probably five to six was graduation health L to maybe center and local gym coffee house hotel. Where was your graduation, maybe centers or you, right, right? Yep. Okay. Oral Roberts verse desert. You everyone's got caps and gowns on and you get up there. Oh folks here for Jason busy Jason. Disability busy. You're you're at the Mike. You've already read a lot of your speech. The audience is pretty, you know, enamored with you. They're excited. This guy's like. And he's given us a talk relate to this guy. And this is the final the final the final sentence before. You're this is the flight you're gonna end with this. Notable quota kind of passion we need here. Okay. All right. Go for my friend. Your work is going to fill a large part of your life in the only way to be truly satisfied is to do. What you believe is great work and the only way to do great work. It's a love what you do if you haven't found it yet. Keep looking don't settle. Yes. That's the thunder show. Right. They're pretty good because right there that's powerful powerful. People are not going to work with you long term. They don't have a path for continued learning. Correct. People wanna learn skills. They want to do more than just pay the bills baby continued learning batting cleanup move number four for managing millennials. And all people is what Jason commit to ongoing mentor ship. How is ongoing mentorship different than ongoing learning? Let me just give you some specific examples. This mentorship is helping people with life. So let me just give you some mentorship. Moments happened in the last week. We've never talked about it is just just this week. One member teams has hey, hey, how you doing? I said I'm doing fine. How are you, sir? He's as good can we talk. Sure does this out happens as mentorship. Can we talk? Yes. Sure. What's up? I am going through a divorce is there. Anyway, you could help me I said, what do you mean serious? I don't know what to do. I don't know who what attorney to call called an attorney. And as soon as I called him. He sent me a Bill for just talking to. Oh, yeah consultation. And then sit me a Bill, and I know you have good attorneys that you recommend. So we I answer that question. And then it says with my ex wife, she is wanting total custody of the kids in exchange for XYZ one-two-three. Do you think that's a good move? Now at answer that question, then it's like, hey, by the way, she's taken the house. Do you think that I should get any of the house that we own together? Or should it be hers? We go on and on I'm answering that this is also a person that earlier this week was asking me about automating their savings. You know, how do I save money? How do I set that up? Yeah. Now, why would I as a boss who wants to hire inspire train, retain good people? Why would I take time at a my schedule to talk to this person about how to deal with divorce how to plan their finances and how to buy a home? I would I do that. We'll because you're a mentor. I mean that that that's what you do. Is you provide that life building? Knowledge, and it's also important to to that employee because now they're going to see it as well. I find myself in that job that I love going because I'm surrounded by somebody and I managed by a boss that is not just a boss, but they are a life coach of sorts. They are mentor. They're providing me with the needed knowledge and direction that I didn't have before this is this is this. Maybe going to be tougher somebody out there. The days of just hiring people and saying Larry just go on in the coal mine and get to work peace out. I'm Abbass on the boss, that's not gonna work anymore. No. Maybe it worked in nineteen eighty. Maybe nineteen ninety. We had a guest on our show Carly Fiorina who ended up becoming the CEO of Hewlett Packard about that. Yeah. The first female to be in charge of fortune fifty company top fifty companies in the world. She started out as a secretary. And during the interview Carly Fiorina. Have you heard that yet, by the way, I've not yet? Destroys gonna blow your mind. Do you heard boss used to meet her for lunch? No, her boss used to say this is back in the day. Now, she looks young stories back early nineties. Guess we're her boss it. Hey, let's meet for lunch. Where do you think? Her boss suggested. It's in the interview, you're gonna hear this in the interview if you go to thrive time show and look for the Carly Fiorina interview guess where her boss wanted to meet her for lunch where consistently where's that the strip club? Oh, no seriously. No, he would meet her for much at the strip club. That has not a move. Could you imagine a time in American history where that happened? Could you imagine that sadly, yes? Yeah. I, but I mean could that happen now? No, no. That would be. I mean, why I don't know if I wanna named Joppa take it from the Weinstein's every generation there's no way that that would fly because everything is so public now, and it should be so yeah. So maybe that was cool. Then I can't even imagine that scenario like how awkward what the crap if you were to ask me Jason do you wanna meet me over at night chips for lunch? Mick figure a female to what if. You're a male boss, right? And your meeting a female at a strip club naked so weird that crazy where does that thought come from Haiti's? L from the pit of hell so now that is again management ship UK just mail it in now, you really do have to mentor your employees if you do not care about the ongoing improvement, and you actually don't care about your team. They're not gonna stick around. Now. Move number five move number five four affectively managing millennials. Is what Jason what's never create a sustainable will give back that you and your team can believe in that is so important because if people feel like they're going to work for the soul purposes of making a profit what is going to happen to your team very quickly Jason with today's current job market. Today's current millennials. Today's what's going to happen? Well, first thing is they're gonna get burned out. They're going to be doing the same thing over and over with no hope for growth or any chance of something new and exciting happening and then second they're going to start to drift. And then they're gonna become part of that fifty one percent who aren't actively engaged, and it's just going to turn out to be the snowball effect of boredom disobedience, and then finally just bouncing moving onto the next thing. Now, somebody out there is saying this is what they're saying. They're going said that Monsanto I said the company like Monsanto could not be started today with today's employs. But somebody out there's kind of a. Cynic or smart person skeptical person, they're going. Yeah. Well, how come millennials then are all about vapor products when that's now showing to be bad for you? True. How come lineal are all about that? How come Lineas are all about that? If that's proven be bad. How come Molyneux's are all about? Let's say medical medical marijuana when that's been shown to make people lazy or make people. Unbelievably relaxed at all how come how come millennials still ice cream? If is creams bad, welcome lineal, still eat it. I think today this is how I would I would describe millennials just like maybe a baby boomers wanted to smoke cigarettes millennials one smoke vape Manila's just want to know how bad it is for them when they're smoking too. They don't actually want to stop smoking. Does this abroad state? I'm just saying millennials today. I mean, they just wanna know how bad it is. They want to eat ice cream that is super bad for them. They just wanted the label to say so. Yeah, right is full transparency in your. They just want to larger warning label on the cigarettes. They want the the their nicotine products to taste good. My correct. No, that's that's exactly right. So it's like don't mind if you know their boss is not necessary. Early a great person. They just want their boss to be transparent about it threw off. No, not at all. So I think if you're out there the word, I would call I would use his integrity millennials above all what integrity which means a non divisible person, they want someone who is the same all the time. They want somebody who's indivisible who is always the same person all the time. That's what most millennials are looking for other boss and recapping again, if you wanna manageable and effectively one have shared vision to find out your employees goals and create a path for them to achieve those goals. Three critical path for continued skill learning. It's so important employs are learning new skills. Step four, commit to ongoing mentorship and step five criticize stable giveback that you and your team can believe in and other further ado in each and every show with free to what though.

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