4 Burst results for "Carlo Ratti"

"carlo ratti" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

Monocle 24: The Urbanist

06:37 min | 2 months ago

"carlo ratti" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Urbanist

"Zürich is known for its tendency to follow Law & Order, but at the end of April, the city erupts in a festive weekend for Sicily, the end with the highlight, the burning of the Berg on Monday evening. To understand why young and old equally enjoy waiting for sometimes up to 40 minutes to see the head of a massive snowman explode to determine the next summer, let's dig a bit deeper into its origins. The tradition of Cicero in its present form as a custom of the guilds was established around 1900, and since 1903, the burning of the book has taken place at its current location near the square has officially been called, say still London plots since 1948. For more than hundred years, process has remained the same. The festivities start with parades of guilt, the cutest of which is by far the one with the children on Saturday. And after a long walk through the city with people lining the sides, handing the members of the guilds flowers, they will end up at the Sicilian plots. There, preparations have started days before, bringing tons of sand, and even more wood to build a pile for the book. And there he is, ten meters above the ground, he stands, waiting for the guilds and onlookers to arrive. The dimensions of the burgh itself are also worth mentioning. It's a 3.4 meter tall, 8 kilogram wooden rectal filled with over a hundred explosives. The head alone has an impressive circumference of 1.8 meters. The burger itself looks like a snowman, reminiscent of its original purpose to mark the end of winter. Once ignited, the big bands, while equestrian groups of specific guilds ran around it, three times each, and yes, there is an outrage. If anyone there has tried for a fourth lap. The kills played a sexual march was the crowd anxiously observed the growing flames. The book must be burned at 6 o'clock on the third Monday in April. A tradition anchored in the name of the event means the ringing of bells at 6 o'clock. It must be the third Monday of the month, so as to ensure the event follows the Equinox. And at 6, the bells used to ring to signal the end of the working day. Contrary to the Swiss stereotype though, not everything always goes according to plan. And the have been a few rather unfortunate events. In 1944, the book fell into the Lake whilst burning down, and in 2006 he got kidnapped. He was later found on harm, don't you worry. In 1921, a youngster, even decided to prematurely burn down the book on the day of the event. But the replacement book? Yes, we always have already just in case was there to save the day, and the summer. Last year, the Berg had little extra ingredient in his stomach. A green Corona cell. And this seems to have done the trick as this year's activities went ahead without any coronavirus directions. The Berg did take his time though, and only blue is head of after nearly 40 minutes. Given that the average time is around 15, that seems a cold and wet summer is surely awaiting us. But for once, the prediction for the season ahead didn't matter too much. We're too busy enjoying the unique festivities without restrictions. Gathering around the barbecue next to the book until late at night in hope of a happy, likely Chile summer to come. My thanks there to Monaco's desiree badly for that report. We're in the Finnish capital next to visit our number four ranked city. Helsinki is becoming something of a climate superstar of late with the mission targets being brought forward rather than pushed back and plenty of enthusiasm from city hall to make the city a global leader when it comes to the question of climate. Italian architect Carlo ratti has further strengthened this mission recently with a proposal to decarbonize the city's heating by building four artificial islands that would function as both heat reservoirs, as well as urban havens for the nature loving fins. Our Helsinki correspondent, Petri butts off, met with professor atti, who began by explaining the background to this adventurous project. Usually cities look at best practices. They look at what other cities have done and just continue with successful recipes. However today, if you want to meet the big challenges in the goals that we see is set to themselves for decarbonization, for instance, we can not follow best practices anymore. We need to find a new way to innovate. And in this case, for me it was interesting that the mayor decided to pick a procedure which is very similar to the XPRIZE in the U.S.. The XPRIZE foundation or candle, some kind of moonshot competition, where actually over 250 people participated from all over the world ten finally east and then as I mentioned earlier, the winners. And so the hot heart was one of the winners of that competition is a way to decarbonize the city. In particularly by finding a very cheap solution for energy storage for heat storage, something we've been calling thermal batteries. Rati solution for decarbonizing housing is urban heating is to build hot water reservoirs for storing electricity. And these hot water reservoirs would also serve as warm forest islands that the locals could use for recreational purposes. We can actually heat Helsinki and many other cities were renewable energies, but the problem with renewables as we all know is that they are intermittent. Sometimes we produce too much, sometimes we produce too little. And so how do we solve it? Well, we solved the batteries. However, if you use traditional batteries, the cost is still very, very high. So in this case, because we're dealing with this heating, we thought about something like a floating hot water reservoir where actually electricity is turning into heat when the prices are not too high. And then that's been used to heat up the city. And that's the infrastructure, but on the top, then we thought about how this could become an attraction. For healthy. And so our initial proposal is this kind of four tropical forest. Every time I've been here in film, and going to the forest is something very embedded in local culture. We said, why do we use 0.5% of the heat in the reservoirs in order to change the climate and make it into, again, these four tropical forests from Central America, South America, Africa, and Asia. But more importantly, as a center for learning about climate change.

Zürich Berg Helsinki Cicero Sicily Carlo ratti Petri butts professor atti XPRIZE foundation London Monaco Chile city hall U.S. Central America
"carlo ratti" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

08:48 min | 3 years ago

"carlo ratti" Discussed on Future Tense

"Fennell. Along highway Niro, the fine comics, it's first test propeller-driven to mobile, also flies or if you Prevert it the other way play in the doubles as a car top land speed one hundred fifteen. It's the great unrealized, drink engineers and technologists have been working on the flying costs instantly s- the non teen thirties. Slightest ration- is the autonomous Ed seat. Lubar is investing money in developing one so is Airbus. And so is the American aircraft giant Boeing Boeing's prototype. Had a test flight in Virginia. Just a few weeks ago. Flawed is probably stretching to beat it. Basically just lifted several meters off the ground and then landed it looks like a cross between a small airplane drone with five roses, an uncon- person might suggest the company is trying to reinvent the helicopter but Boeing c o. Dennis Muilenburg has certainly been talking up its potential. He he's at the recent World Economic Forum in Davos, the time of innovation is incredible right now. And it's it's great way for us to draw talent for the future. Engineer at Boeing your entire career. So you lived in breathed this. And you think a lot about the future? You think that sell flying cars will be here sooner than we missed. We see that whole front of what I call urban mobility, transforming right before our very eyes. We're building prototype vehicles. Today. We spent to be flying those vehicles within the coming year. We're also working with. Yeah. We'll be flying prototype vehicles. Absolutely. And we're working with the thirties. Like, the FAA is well on the regulatory framework just really important when you think about these dense urban environments where think about a future where you'll have three dimensional highways to relieve traffic congestion and help people operate more efficiently. Not only do we need new vehicles. But we need an ecosystem that will allow that to happen safely and reliably. So we're working on both the ecosystem the regulatory framework and the new vehicles all of that is happening now, and I would expect within the next five years. We'll see initial operational capability being field. How successful will the craft bay in helping to build the sold of three dimensional transport ecosystem that Dennis Muilenburg just mentioned professor colorady is an urban theorist and the director of the sensible city laboratory at MIT he's skeptic. Let me say I don't get me wrong. But I think we need to make a big difference between cities densely populated areas on one side. And then on the other side, you know, if you're talking about the countryside places, we better leader infrastructure in. I think the draws flying cars, and, you know, you type of flying vehicles would certainly have the role to play, you know, outside of cities or think about as a very interesting projects right now going on Africa does not much infrastucture existed influence, scientists can connect places I'll be very difficult to connect. But in cities, I don't really see that much and reason you give simple. Simple reason that's physics just to keep some weight up in the air the way, those you're away to my weight, then you need the energy in you need to generated although movement on whereas in generates of noise in this reason, why when you have just a few helicopters in city, everybody stares at the sky because of the disturbance they generate now magin if if instead of having three five ten helicopters, the same time, you had ten thousand hundred thousand so I don't think that is feasible in terms of k he densely populated areas. But I don't see it. You know, I think it's all about the Jetsons all dream of humanity. But I don't really see how this can happen in this think about in a city, that's just Manhattan in little on this side. You know, sometimes some of them will have an accident, and you know, all helicopter landing was banned in the central Manhattan after big accident happens if you decades ago, so tousands of these machines flying nice would be. Embarrass in streets. Why then do we have reputable VA shin firms like Boeing and Airbus talking up this this idea of flying old minded vehicles as a way specifically of addressing our congestion problems in cities. What know? Want to sell their machines detention market there. But I see this market outside of cities gain. You think you're seeing all the new technologies innovation that can help suburban transportation. I don't really see too much in cities. But you know, we'll see a few decades who was right in one sense. This is a little bit. Like the discussion around driverless cars isn't an automated cars we've been promised those for a long time as a way of changing out CDs, but we don't seem any closer to fleets of automatic cows. We've now major metropolitan areas to we hear of disagree with you. Because first of all self driving cars something very recent flying cars, we've been seen flying cars in nineteen thirties movie such as metropolis by free slang. We seen them in the jets on we it for like a hundred years in popular imagination and it never happened. Now in terms of self driving cars that she as latest two thousand five people could not imagine Getty of self driving car in cities. So something has been developed over the past. And fifteen years such the beginning was a famous DARPA competition in the early two thousand in the United States actually DARPA funded day it contests between universities to develop something close to a cell driving system for for the and any ten or fifteen years developing has been amazing and already today if you go to Phoenix sweets rubber taxes over eighty by one of Google's sister companies, and you can just call your up and go through the city. So I think it's actually very different story in I would say is closely. -ality autonomy is not just the black or white many degrees of Ptolemies usually people in research talk about level one two five in order to describe five being the most Thomas equal. You can think about vehicle that does everything can manage every situation you can sleep in the end of equal take you to your donation, but not yet at level five, but we are getting close in people. Some people think is going to be in three years in five. Or in ten years, but you know suit on we wear quite close today. Now think about the human driver, you know, if you are in the United States in the middle of the winter was a snowstorm sometimes we stop thinking about Singapore when it rains very heavily of cars stops, just because human drivers don't see anything anymore kindle cope with environment in the same thing happen to Thomas car. So today, for instance, rain and snow are some of the issues that not fully solved with autonomy. And then we'll get bedroom over time. But you know, they're the same issues that face a human driver is very important to have discussion that needs to experiment to try things. And then we can respond to some of those experiments. That's we cannot let our CD's evolve. You something seem to natural flew flew the official world how we can try new things in our cities decide which way to go. Now, what it was saying recently that you know, decades ago when you think about the digital revolution. I time it was spite easy because he Navision was happening say into lab Univation was. Happening physical space. So you could actually test you programs connections. You protest the internet in a white. It didn't interfere with everyday life today. It's in your world is nothing. More internet is internet of things. So internet has entered our cities our factories our homes is so what he wants to do experimentation. There clearly need to interface with citizens with equal. If you put self driving cars into the city, the fact that this is going to affect all of us. And so I think we need to find new ways of stand boxing really trying things and have also excited. People citizens who are happy to departed this and help shape tomorrow cities, professor Carlo Ratti from MIT the Massachusetts Institute of technology. We also heard today from Nick Newman at the Reuters institute for the study of journalism at Oxford University. And I've Sohrab the CEO and co founder of podcast and Olympics firm charitable, my co producer here at future tents is. Benefits. I'm Anthony Fennell. You've been listening to an ABC podcast. Discover more great ABC podcasts. Live radio and exclusives. On the ABC. Listen up.

Boeing Dennis Muilenburg Boeing Boeing Airbus MIT ABC professor Manhattan Virginia DARPA Lubar Davos Fennell. Africa United States FAA Thomas Nick Newman
"carlo ratti" Discussed on Future Tense

Future Tense

07:01 min | 3 years ago

"carlo ratti" Discussed on Future Tense

"This is an ABC podcast. Streets congested with vehicles, but one of the world's largest aircraft manufacturers thinks it has the solution. It could be the traffic jam headaches of your commute. Brings flying car prototype, which the world's largest playmaker settlements. They achieved a successful inaugural test flight. I know it's idea that's been parted sci-fi for generations. But among technologists, it seems it still has come and see. Boeing so-called low stress mobility is competing with arch-rival Airbus and numerous other firms to introduce small cell flying vehicles capable of Bertel takeoff and landing it's a technological field. Sounds a lot like a helicopter to me. Hello, Anthony Fennell here. Well, future taints. Now one person who will know is Carlo Ratti, the director of the sensible city laboratory at MIT, the Massachusetts Institute of technology, and he'll join us a little later to talk about the potential urban impact of flying cars and also automated vehicles. I we're off to Oxford and the Reuters institute for the study of journalism, they have a report published called the future of voice and the implications for news. It's all about the potential of voice activated smart speakers, powered by intelligent assistance, think. Amazon Alexa, and Google assistant his senior research associate Nick Newman. What was saying is the moment of sort of lots of interest and hype around voice activated speakers in particular that growing credit quickly, but we know very little about how they're being used the platform selves of very secretive. About even how many devices have been sold let alone giving aggregated takes her about how for example that being used for news. And this is kind of important because that will so asking publishes to invest significantly increasing content for these devices. So what we were trying to do is essentially understand the situation today with early adopters. But also, what some of the barriers might be more people using voice. And specifically how these devices were being used for news. Are they going to be important in the news ecosystem on not the Reuters institute's report was based on user surveys in the US and Britain as well as focus groups in both of those countries and Germany what they found was that despite this -cation smart speakers are being used in a very basic way. Totally. Yeah. I mean when we asked people eighty four percent say that they using it for music and two-thirds say that it's the most important feature so sixty four cents cents most important feature early. One percent say news is the most important feature will though people. Are you know, saying give me the news Alexa, the news Google ferry? Few people think that's very important or finding much value out of it yet. And that was one of the main findings is actually and again when we went into people's homes as we use the news all the time. But then you can look at what's happening on their devices. You can look back at the history of what they've done maybe they accessed at once last Wednesday. So it's not yet. And I think there's number reasons for this is not yet becoming a sort of key device for news. We'll let's come to those reasons in second, but podcasts aren't being accessed via these voice activated. Speakers yet, either not significant numbers, according. Percents significant numbers. So we sort of got up this number different ways in the survey. Maybe ten percent fifteen percent said that they were accessing podcasts at least monthly through these speakers these of the owners, but actually if you ask publishes a new about one will two percent of their total traffic is coming from voice activated speeches Online's. Most of their traffic is still coming from all from district computers, and in terms of podcasts, and I think the reasons for that because Paul consequential personal thing and these really shat devices so the sitting there in the living room and quite often import cast you have very specific tastes that a specific to you may be back your passion or comedy, you like, whatever. So it may be the wrong device in their own place. And a lot of the podcast growth that we've seen young people particularly through headphones and out of home these devices, not yet out of home that is coming. They coming to headphones and cars, and so I think that is going to completely change the picture. But right now podcast is not from. Central so returning to the consumption of news. What you see what does the research tell you might be some of the reasons why there hasn't been a significant take-up today, we asked people in the survey. And basically people said thank you much news. Anyway from different sources. I mean news is just everywhere so complete different picture from twenty years ago when us was kind of scarce now, it's abundant it's in the air. It's kind of coming out through notifications on mobile phones. So it's not the people want more news. I think what people want is news that's relevant specific to them and in the right format. And at the moment a lot of the formats of this stuff is essentially just offcuts from radio. But the context is different. So people said, well when you say give me the news, Alexa, what we really want is is a minute summary and most of the publishers providing sort of five minutes, ten minutes, fifteen minutes, those guy we talked to New York who is a New York Times us, and he said just give me a minute. And he's getting the daily which. Which is the New York Times daily podcast, which is about twenty five minutes, and it's just a complete mismatch of expectations even though he's in the right grand? Now, you didn't just pick to news consumers for this research also spoke to eating leading publishes include. You have the Neil time and the baby say ABC, and the what do they say do do they see this is a potential new form of technology for the delivery of news and an Ave making efforts to try and work out how to tailor it to the potential audience. Absolutely. I mean, what you have to recognize these very early days, and I think pretty much everyone. We spoke to recognize that voice is going to be a really significant disruption to media and particularly to access to media the way in which we lax us voice is going to be an easy way to access the programs. You know, you love already it solves real problems. People have in the homes of picking up their phones. Trying to connect them then mobile phones to the television or the radio, whatever, I think, everyone recogni-. Is that? And if you're a broadcaster like ABC this is here today. So even though podcast not being used heavily these opping us as replacements for live radio today. So he spoke to the NPR National Public Radio in the U S nineteen percent of the online streaming for that system radio

ABC Alexa Reuters institute New York Times Google MIT Carlo Ratti Boeing Oxford Anthony Fennell Airbus NPR Nick Newman Amazon Germany Bertel U S
"carlo ratti" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

13:16 min | 3 years ago

"carlo ratti" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Okay yard, you know, about our exceptional GMC, Sierra, pickup, trucks, and Yukon and Yukon XL full-size SUV's, but we now have the second generation of the GMC terrain crossover, and it's downright phenomenal. And a great value, of course, for a compact luxury crossover. That's our Buick Encore and for something in a mid size SUV. Well, we have the Buick envision but for the most stunning luxury SUV on the market today. It's our Buick enclave near the reviews all claim it's beautiful on the outside and even more luxurious on the inside. And classic Buick. GMC has a great supply of must-have luxury trucks and SUV's GMC. We are professional grade. Classic Buick GMC. Mm sea Collins exit off I twenty in Arlington. Visit us at classic Arlington dot com. Well, I've probably run out of stories here. In fact, I dare say judged on what we just did. I probably ran a stories about twenty minutes ago. Eight eight eight seven eight seven five five four three eight eight eight seven eight seven five five four three. There was a very well done article this week about flying cars and. Of course, we're going into world. We're gonna have flying taxis of if you followed what happened at the Consumer Electronics Show this year. One of the big deals was Uber's autonomous air taxi was at the consumer electronic show. I'm gonna guess it was probably a mockup Vinas doesn't really exist. But it got a lot of draw to it. And that's the joys of markups shows they act like something pretend to something real. It's like when they brought the the Boeing Dreamliner out of the factory for the first time. It was like a mockup the wasn't even finished and Boeing had never done that before. And everybody's laughing about it. But I digress. The article says the flying car is the Godot of technology. It's always on the way, and it's never here. In fact, we have had flying cars before Bob Cummins, the comedian had a TV show a comedy show. Go back in the late fifties early sixties, and he had a flying car because he was real pilot. Okay. And it was a car that was not a very good car one very good airplane. But it has existed in the past. Nobody bought them. Henry Ford tried to create a model t of the skies as he put it. And so they have this little flavor. They're gonna make remember flying is actually slightly more difficult than driving a car. You have to know when you're flying how to deal with stalls, accelerated stalls all sorts of issues. Takeoffs landings software landings short field takeoffs, yet just have to learn some much just to keep you from getting yourself killed in a car. We've done stories were six-year-olds take police on chases. And go twenty thirty forty miles before they have a wreck in any case in the nineteen fifties. The US army commissioned the development of a flying Jeep and one of their partners on it was Chrysler Corporation again. None of these things really happen. So the new tech firms say the because the computers ation everything else the day of self flying air taxis and cars are here. And I'm going. Well, okay. If you say, so. He said, they're they're now seeing the rollout of the air travel business. He still flying taxis will be here. Twenty twenty three last week. Boeing debuted a personal air vehicle. And. Even the head of Boeing was a Davos and Dennis Muilenburg said global transit is going to go three D in the next ten years. Meaning. Like, not just on the ground. But in the air to which I would say, in fact, he says we know how to do this Dennis. We've been flying things which are considered global transit since the Wright brothers. I would think we would know how to do that. But they say the flying cars air-taxis vertical takeoffs and landing technology. A lot of people don't think is gonna happen. Even Elon Musk who by the way. Did I mention has use of Gulfstream six fifty ER jet. Says flying car dreams have a fundamental flaw. They'll always be too inconvenient for an urban commuter to rely on. Are we one of the test subjects for this? Are we building a little sky poured up, and I go and all this stuff the test this stuff out. Cities. Are not likely to let a hastily trained pilot commandeer these multi thousand pound machines with human passengers. That's right. It's not like signing up on Uber in three minutes on an app. You would actually have to know how to fly one of these before he could fly around town. The alternative is let the vehicle pilot itself. And that's no more likely if it's got humans in it. He goes on to say self driving advocates had to admit in two thousand eighteen that all this stuff about self driving cars was pretty much hype. It was crashing down. And it is it's coming just not coming day after tomorrow. And they talk about a machine the size of a small car hurtling hundreds of feet per second headed towards a skyscraper in the downtown area. Somebody's house or even headed towards a crowded intersection. Because it's out of control is not going to be well taken by most people. And because it'll make great video. It's going to lead the nightly news every time one crashes because it makes great video. Carlo Ratti who is the director of the sensible city lab at MIT sad. I think the idea of air-taxis is kind of BS only he didn't say Bs for the article he goes on to say technology can change many things, but it cannot change physics. He said helicopters are loud and expensive and for most forms of transportation. They're inconvenient. So how's that going to change with the self-driving self flying drone? The gone say building a fleet of electric powered aircraft. That shuttle passengers hundreds of miles between charges is going to require heroic advances in battery energy, energy density. I pointed out when we did that remote up in royse city was a week of these stories about autonomous taxis, and they're going to have a sixty seven mile range. And I said, well that'd be perfect. I could pick up one of the house and fly out here to do the remote. And I'd get within ten miles of fear before crashed because the batteries were dead. The chief executives at Davos acknowledged all of these challenges, and they asked about what kind of city infrastructure would be necessary for Thomas flying vehicles to take off and land. And therefore it asks the question, why would a dance expensive city like San Francisco approved construction of dozens of vertical platforms for takeoff. And so ready comes back and says last thirty or forty years technology have been about digitizing the physical world. That's Oliver advances computerization. If line cars having near term future, it's probably not urban but a rural area because the commutes are long skyscrapers are scarce. And therefore, that's where wall start out. I disagree. If you go to the more rural area in America. Is going to be hard. When the vehicle lands without a pilot for you to trust at the take off in. I'm guessing. Eight eight seven eight seven five five four three. Let's go to Joe and plano. Hey, joe. Hey, how you doing this morning? I do not know. But thank you for asking. Joe? You know, I like listening to smart guys. Like you. You've got a lot of good observation. Joe Joe, everybody's got it. All you have to do is repeat yourself out loud. What you see right in front of you? Instead of having somebody else tell you what you. What you're supposed to be seeing? Plenty of people willing to tell you what you should be there. Yeah. It's like I said it's like being an NFL fan. Everybody listens to the chatter from all the commentators. Right. Yeah. And every time there's wait until tomorrow. They're Super Bowl. So they're gonna talk to the players coming out on the field. Right. And they're going to ask the Rams are you going to beat the New England Patriots are going to ask the patriots other going to beat the Rams and the answers will be the same. Well, we're we're really motivated. We're going to go out there. And we're going to give it a hundred percent. I know one hundred ten percent. That's right. And it's going to be the same thing over and over again people listen to it like they're actually not making it up on the spot. Brilliant, guys. I had a comment on your thought on your business about the private jets. With mosque and all of those guys, you know, and it it is kinda humorous, but it's the same across a whole lot of different issues. We were having dinner last night with some some friends of my family. Some of the folks are on the opposite end of the spectrum as far as politics as I am. And they're all about, you know, giving away your assets and the poor people that can't earn stuff that you should take care of them. At all, I told them, you know, I'm I'm a hundred percent in favor of taking care of those people as long as you guys doing with your money. Don't make me with mine. Conversation end. All on hold on. Because I did that that story. Secondhand news about the states that get far more back in federal spending than we pay in taxes. Right. Okay. And Texas is one of the states where we get far more back than we pay in taxes, the equivalent of twelve hundred and eighty dollars per person or about thirty billion dollars. What tickled me almost put this into secondhand news. The people of New Jersey are paying about thirty billion more in federal taxes than they get back. The people in Kentucky are getting back thirty billion more than they pay in and almost put it in there. Yeah. Well, no because we're one society. What makes us work is like the road in front of your house or the road that takes you to work, right? Yep. That road would not be there. If you had to write a check for Joe, not me. But the people who use it. Should pay for it. That's that's my whole taken out do. And we do because we all pitch in. It's like when we were kids. How many kids were in your family Joe? Oh, how many kids know when you were growing up? How many kids were in your family? Oh, just to my sister. Okay. We'll they're foreign mine, and it's really doubtful and middle class lifestyle. My parents could have afforded to send for kids to school, which by the way before there were public schools. You couldn't afford to do it. I do backside stories all the time kids go to third fourth grade. That's it. That's the end of it. But we all pitch in theoretically to build a better society. Would you say this is the greatest country in the world? I would therefore my theory is correct. Not yours. Well, I I I agree with you part of the way. I'm I'm all about people who used things that directly pay for them. And sometimes, you know, things like schools and all of the Abdul expand a little spoken lakeside who's done well in life. Well, not not because it was given to me. I worked hard since. I was twelve years old, and you know, with a number of things. Yup. And and I have a I have issues with people that haven't done much of that and have made bad choices like things like drugs and things like that. And yet they still want those of us who have worked hard and earned..

Joe Joe Boeing GMC Buick Davos Dennis Muilenburg Arlington GMC terrain Encore Elon Musk royse city US army Carlo Ratti Chrysler Corporation Vinas