20 Burst results for "Carlisle Indian School"

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Untrained Wisdom

Untrained Wisdom

08:19 min | Last month

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Untrained Wisdom

"From iraq and i had the stroke. A lot of that focus was on recuperating the body and the mind so tons of physical therapy. I was impatient for about a month and learned a lot of exercise. And at the time i had a lot of what they call trump tax you li- just stood up and move my feet too far apart. I fall over pat hard time with balance. I couldn't feel my right leg stumbled around lot house week on my right side so all that had to be recovered so what i do today as i continue that in the gym generally work out three to four days a week. I now give it a good hour. Two hours and i split it up between aerobics and weightlifting than balanced. And things like that recuperating the mind essentially what i do now is i do a lot of reading a just a ton of reading when i first started after. I had my stroke. My measured reading rate by psychometric measurements. Went all the way down to the third grade. So from dr level. The third grade and he's embarrassed morad goto librarian. I pick up a book and it was really difficult. I kept going down down down down down. Got the children's section and pick up a book. And i look at it. Kind take it and hide somewhere in a corner. But that's where i started and ever since then we've been rebuilding about two years into that recovery. One of my kids gave me a book. Was the hunger games. I have a rule at somebody gives me a book. I'll read it. I'll read it right away. I put it on the shelf for about three months anti said. I wonder if i could read this kind of intimidating. I mean demand. Here's a person's educated to the doctor degree. Having hard time reading hunger games. So i sat down and i could read. It was really fascinating. Because it's the first book in about two and a half years that i read that i could retain the story from day to day today. Used to be if i read a chapter and went chapter two. I couldn't remember what was in chapter. One so i had to go back star over but this book was different. My finished it. I was just amazed. I went to my brain therapist i said can read. I can read. He said what did you read. And i said well. My son gave me this book and we looked it up and it's grade level. Five point six. So i thought well okay. That's the starting point. And ever since then even this year. I've been improving my reading and i just read whenever i can. And the other part of it whole cognitive rehabilitation in continuing to grow an act aspect has been writing so reach. I write a little bit. I think about stuff and right and that's really important too so i continue to do that. And then on the spiritual aspect. I'll read spiritual material. I think a lot of my wife and i will tend worship services but i just find that the combination of body mind spirit in more of a holistic approach. So that's basically how i take care of myself tate's well i found out about you from a listener. Who attended a podcast listening. Course that i did. And i put that as a bonus episode on my show in february and one of the attendees of class relator and said hey. I think you need to contact john. Chriswell rate person his story and at the time i read the suggestion it made it sound like a stroke happened very recently. Allie stuff was my interpretation. And so i've just finished a book. Actually and i didn't realize that you're writing this book. After all this has happened. Which is amazing so i went back up kind of going early on in your life. With your undergrad degree in business and then eventually you get a graduate degree in business and nba and then you decided h thirty seven to go to medical school. Which is incredible. Because you've let thirty seven are thinking of like mid career move amid career management position. Ask the a complete career change but you always enjoyed science. You always enjoy medicine and anatomy and you talk about that in your boat from an early age. How you were really fascinated by the sciences. Let me go back to his five years old. We'll start here and build up. Yeah yeah we'll start at birth move forward so i'm native american. My grandfather was one of the first cadre of students to attend carlisle indian school in pennsylvania. And that's the first government indian school in the united states and their goal was to quote assimilate in students into the greater european slash white culture. So he attended there when he was eighteen years old and he was placed in the second grade. I think primarily because of language issues. Everybody that went there. All the students enrolled a five year program but the kicked him out after one year. After i wrote my book was doing some other research and pull his school records from the archives and it says on their reason for discharge and there's one word and says worthless so here's my grandfather who have been sent to the only the first educational institution in america specifically to teach young indian students how to get by in an american culture has a terrible experience. Obviously he knows he's not worthless. He goes back to the reservation in oneida wisconsin. United indian reservation of course raises his family. He's a lumberjack. He's a farmer. He does whatever he can. He has a melker out that he collects milk on a horsedrawn wagon and he delivered to the dairy will. He lived with us when he was older. And he put me on his knee and sing me songs in on either language and he prayed that he'd take out a medicine bag and he he take tobacco and he rubbed the back of my hands. And he'd say an indian. These are healing hands. These are good hands and he told me before he died. He said make sure you get an education yes clamp. While here's the man who had been labeled worthless telling me the value of university of american education so of course five six years old. We were poor. We had nothing we just had enough and while live that way and following on his steps. My mother said the same thing. Johnny you have got to get an education if you want to survive. She went as far as the sixth grade. So she yes mom. I'll do it now somewhere in there. I developed a love for medicine science. And you know bugs and leaves and all the natta me. I just enjoyed it. I should be a doctor now. Nobody in my family have graduate high school long. Go to college. Most of the kids my age on the indian reservation colleges out of question. The pattern was for young men in our tribe when it got eighteen. Joined the marines or the army and they out got their education. They did their service. They came back and most of them did not do the gi bill but they did whatever they learn in service so if they're cooked. They came out and became a cook their mechanic. They did mechanic work. That was her idea of getting a higher education. I said no. Mamma wanna be a doctor. She's i don't know what to tell you. Go to your franson highschool the ones who have fathers or moms and college people college trained people. She used to say and ask them my first year in college. You had to declare what your major was pre. Med pre med advisor. He said you'll never make it. I'm gonna send you the native american adviser. My native american visor looked at my classes. I had selected. He said we indians don't do the hard sciences and he just stopped me in my tracked. I said we don't know we go and education teach. We do social work. I said well. Okay i laughed. I still kept classes science at physics chemistry and mathematics first year. Course i did. terrible job. Came close to flunk out. Only tell later did i recover that dream and say no. I'm thirty something. What i really wanna do in life. I wanna become a doctor and house. Remember my grandfather saying you got healing hands. And i felt that i did so i took courses. I applied demand medical.

morad goto carlisle indian school li stroke pat iraq tate Allie university of american educati united states nba oneida pennsylvania john wisconsin franson Johnny marines army
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

03:36 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"John quigley who was also on the line. I own any final comments. I'm looking forward to great. Blessings of woah woah peace within the communities to we chose any good health but.

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:30 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"I and i did it with my son's in reverse this year and it is arduous today and so i think it took her almost a month By boat and by train to get back to carlisle indian school. I just i just can't imagine How sh- shell shocked. And i said she must have been by the time she got there in you a lot of work to make sure your relative Was able to make a return in and tell me about that and when you know the news reports are talking about those that return day. They also mentioned a relative from alaska. Is there anything you might share about how this came to be. Nobody was looking for sophia or her sister irene they were lost their orphans and they just disappeared so In two thousand seventeen. I received a phone call from a friend who said that he was looking into The the kids at carlisle and there are fourteen. Children that are alaskan native that are buried there. And could i find the three from my region meaning the aleutian privilege violence. And i said of course and the first name he gave me with us. I said well. That's my relative. how can that be. You know we didn't have alaskans all the way out on the east coast and started doing my research and contacting the family and the tribe. And there's no record of her anywhere and i'm thankful for the dickinson schools database. It has a lot of Of records about her there. And also the ray hudson wrote A book called family. After all about the alaska jesse lee home which was run by the methodist. And we're taking our children mostly are orphan. girls There to that school. And there's a lot of information about sophia and her sister. Irene died on On alaska island and one of the quotes that was given was when sophia got to the mainland off the boat and they got on the train and she saw power lines and telephone lines for the first time she said. Why do they hang their close up so high. And you know it's these stories that That would have been told you know passed down and pass down and they ended abruptly at carlisle and to be able to find some the stories about The fbi and her sister was really heart warming and and really made them very. I'm very protective. And i'm you know there my girls and when i went back to carlisle i was and we started the process. I was very protective of of them obviously. We don't have a great as native people don't have a great history with the army. Even though a lot of us are probably But i didn't need to be. And i wanna near something i said earlier. Is that the people that were there. Were the best of the best of our archaeologists and anthropologists but more than that. They had a huge level of compassion. They understood that these are children and anytime there was a time in the process they would stop and they would you know clear everything and then sit down with us and ask us how he wanted to proceed. And one thing i need really shout out Talking about youth is my son andrew as a senior at Uc davis in biology. And i asked him to. Come with me to be Her witness because seeing her being unearthed was too much for me and he did he was he was a witness in her champion and he put her to bed and I seal pelt and he was the last person to touch her and he was the last person to make Decisions on her behalf and was for paul bear In carlisle end up on saint paul island with my other son who carried her. Cross up there so You know it's it's a community wide. Look all different layers of people that it took to get one little child home and there are thirteen. More alaskan is at carlyle. there are about sixty tamala. I mean the so. This is really tip of the And i'm i'm really glad that Secretary hall in moving forward with her Her reports indeed and we invite her to be on the program today but scheduling conflicts. Didn't allow it. And you know there's people who are welcoming the totem pole to dc to so there's a lot going on And lorne just thinking about everything that was made possible. What kind of message does this send to community. especially sophie's community they were so welcoming In carlisle ammo and saint paul island. The whole community came out to welcome us. myself and my two sons and also Everybody came out to the airport to welcome sophia home. It took her three tries to get in because the weather is is rough out there and And we immediately formed a procession up to the russian orthodox church where she would've been baptized and then up to the cemetery and put her to bed next to Relative that would've known her as a child and the most beautiful part was when we were at the cemetery she was sung into the ground in two or bed with them to new. Which is the illusion island language which is would have been her language. He spoke at home and it was just It was just really moving and emotional for the whole community involving. Is there anything you would like to say to that. Maybe this is their story in the future of bringing home a relative. Is there any message you have for them. Well as far as the carlisle procedure. It's very straightforward You that they already have the forms to fill out a native american boarding school. Healing coalition has some and. The army has some You know you fill out the forms you get the motorized and that starts the process and you know everybody does their research The army only concerned about what happens to carlisle once the the Your child is is on the way they have A person that escorts. It's a native american person who escorts your child home and And then it's up to the tribal community after that you know What their processes are and what their procedures are and Their traditions are so it's It's a safe place to go. Get your kid I encourage people to do that. That are are feeling that it It's it's overwhelming The emotions are overwhelming but the process is simple. And i encourage those who have children there. That they Especially since we were so lucky that our children are named and have you know have a headstone with their name on it and a history and a and a database behind it We're very fortunate because a lot of other cemeteries do not in. We're learning big lessons on all this to Lauren thank you so much for being with us lauren. Peters and just before we wrap up. I'm gonna turn it back to.

carlisle sophia carlisle indian school saint paul island ray hudson alaska island alaska jesse lee paul bear tamala Secretary hall east coast Irene army Uc davis fbi pelt carlyle lorne andrew
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:59 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Supports this program. This is native. America calling interrogate would and we are glad you're joining us today. We are celebrating the return of some relatives who lost their life at the carlisle indian school. A lot of efforts have been made to bring these relatives home. We're hearing some of that today. There's another chapter in all this to that. We're going to get to here in just a moment but again if you would like to join us one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is the number With us today out of the rosebud. Sioux nation are. I own quigley as well as christopher eagle bear Both of them had role in making sure. These relatives returned home If you have any thoughts them you can give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. We now go to a caller who joins us today out of pagosa springs colorado Deborah is on the line tuned in on k. s ut debra. Thank you for giving us a ring your air. yeah they have been th that'd be She shown on managed as a achieve gene so I just wanted to really give a thank you to the people involved in these East children home. I think with a lot of nations. Your are facing the same prospect of getting some of these children home to To their birthplace. And it's true about their their umbilical cords. No that last part that falls off is buried where they were born and The process of bringing them home. You know and putting them away is to take them back to their home and and put him away in a good way like that so My parents were A product of the The a boarding school like That was in. Brigham city utah They called it the five year program and there was some they were taking their when they're about five and seven right right about the age when A lot of these cultural traditions are being taught to them We're didn't ask so. And and so there i live in colorado but i know of Another indian school Keller ordinance cool and how it was brought out some on on in a report. And as i read that and i understood what my parents went with that type of the boarding schools and So now we're with Colorado these boarding schools and we're we're invited to go to a meeting in work lewis in reference to some. Some of these children were falling found at some of these boarding schools that are buried there and for the knee. I'm donny and it's it's it's so important that this news about how or this information about how the people have brought their children home is the process of even looking into being. You know our even our children home And i just wanted to give them a really big thing q. And just keep on going with that and and get the information out there and this is the process to look into to to bring in our children back home debra. Thank you for reaching out. Thank you for your call. We now go to at aline. Who is in white swan. Washington tuned in on key white in our ethylene. Thank you for giving us a ring. You're on air. Yes hello hello adalina. looking forward to hearing what you'd like to share go ahead. yes I was in a boarding school for ten years. I'm no seventy pools. I think and i was in school for ten years. They took me away from me on my family. My sisters and my brothers took me away from our mum. Our dad had died railroad track accident. And then i don't know who knows why but anyway. I was in michigan indian residential school. That's in michigan. City british columbia. Hello and i hear you. Aniline in knowing that you are a survivor it's really important. Your voice is being included in this conversation. Today and anything else you wanna share glade owned yes Hi had a lot of i guess. Terrible experiences probably would be similar to death. I guess you know because sorry stuff for sexual sexual abuse and whole kit and caboodle. I didn't I try to run away from school twice. I think and of course both times got caught and my brothers were in. They were in the same school. I mission indian residential school and they kept running away try and go home to and so they sent them to a different school Up north post further away because of them running away To say a terrible experience. And i think i still suffer the consequences. Despite you know. I should have made because Some kind of a help. I guess to talk to somebody get ruined because i haven't gotten to it ethylene. I know i know exactly what you're talking about in no how how heavy. This is in indefinitely. If if you think that that's something you want to look into. You know just encourage you to keep on that path and reach out to resources in your area. Do wanna share a number that is shared at the top of the hour. The native american boarding school healing coalition is online and you can even call them to six one two three five four seven seven zero zero and i respect your story and align in really glad that you decided to call in just share Your thoughts today. My thoughts are with you in just wish you a lot on your own healing journey and commend you for the courage to share your story as well add a line. Think you for giving us a ring der out a white swan. Wyoming are washington tuned in on k y in our and it got one more voice to add to this hour. We now go to northern california on the line with us. As lauren peter's she's a phd student. The university of california davis studying native american studies. And she is other ado of king argo tribe of king cove alaska and she is also done ami Tribe of saint paul island in alaska in lauren. Thank you for being here with us today. interesting that you would start off with any thoughts on my first thought is to say goodbye to the rosebud sioux youth For their courage to stand up and and ask the obvious question right why. Why aren't children home. Children's still here and Opening up the gates that brought my relative home Who was born on. Saint paul island and with first stolen by the missionaries of for the methodist church and then sent on to carlisle. It's a four thousand..

Deborah carlisle indian school christopher eagle colorado pagosa springs quigley Brigham city michigan indian residential sc Sioux donny Keller aline utah America lewis Colorado Washington columbia michigan lauren peter
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:24 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Mellon. Thanks for giving us a ring. You're on air morning. Glad you have to subject or the things that we have to do and these young people are all feel great On this day they came to to santee. I live on the country and my dog who parked in. And i went outside here. A caravan coming down the hill about fifteen cars are fun and and but eight motorcycles and let another ten to fifteen cars behind it. It was just bad there had. That's those votes group. Picking those kids whole like this so good. Our young people this A few years ago. Myself and jackson system is a little background on these schools. We looked at loon rolled and who came back and our research we're able to do. We figured out at forty percent it come home. Ones that went enrolled got on the train. Where out east forty percents come home a lot. There was tens of thousands of children. But i'll he's schools everywhere we need to find. Bring all i went to school. That was back in the Really fifties or sixties and. This tough was still going on you know. I think we need to look at that too. You know this was still going on up until the sixties or even longer. I go but i have to research. It's and so i wear your big incurs with young people Keep it up. There's a lot to hope. We could all contribute to them. Though his shoes that might fit in helpful life urge everybody to get a hold. These young people give a patient who they are all very good to hear from me. Melvin thank you for your wards again if you want to join us one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the mo the number and that entire journey there were people who came out there were there were times where the caravan had to stop and rest in a lot happened on that journey including other nations. Coming out to pay their respects. Is there anything you want to share about this side of the story christopher. Yeah so when we started we. We didn't expect what we're doing to be as big as it as it is. you know. Expect that to be To move the nation the way it did we were just doing the mission that was given to us by our ancestors that were buried or and by our special leaders com combat Did their ceremonies to help us. Along the ways and so it was a really big eye opener to See everything that was born on. Our first bic stop was was in muskogee nation and That's an iowa they asked us They could honor us and cheetahs longer journey. And then you know go about our ways and so we agreed anyone we weren't. We're expecting like thirty people at the most but there was the whole nation was a over seven. Like over three to five hundred. People were there at the gymnasium and it was just full of love fula spirit. You know. I've seen a lot of When she's in la la la grandfathers and grandmothers. That came out because now you know these are things that you don't talk about in since we did this. There's been a lot of algiers coming out. How can about their expanses. Because now they have a voice that can express why these schools made them fill the way they did and they have faith in the next generations to come up that. Give them the hope that they can. No one else has to go through these things like that again. In this nation you know and so from a squawky we went to sioux city iowa and when we got to see city iowa There was a They had another ceremony over there. There are waiting for us nations around the city and we were kind of blake getting there. But there's still there waiting for us and that just shows the dedication and hard that we have for one another that we wanna see the stream and so let me arrive. There are still there and they had a fire that they're waiting. I live that they wanted to keep all night until we left the next day for the procession dot com and so he met some of the people and again. There are so many people that are you know welcoming warming that had stories to share that. They never shared before in their life. Because they feel that they can they feel safe. They feel out home. These people that made it back so years later these allergies that are telling them stories and then from city. The next morning we woke up around seven or eight to get going. They had a big thing for us. We had to speak for them then after that That's when it said in. This is bigger than us. This is bigger than the movement. We'd started because our nation. The nation came down. And you know by the boatloads by the buses pretty much they. There's so many not just our tongue nation but all the nations around him down rather be leaving. The possession through the motorcycles are just following along just to be a part of it. It was really a sense of. Wow you know like this is what happens. You know when i wanna come together and be a part of a movement positive that can make positive. Change helped me. I really hope we remember these moments in times. Moving forward when we need one another. Christopher i think that is a huge lesson To learn from this to and just witnessing on this end and seeing the different words that people were sharing is this journey was happening I'm really glad we have this space to talk about all this today and you can talk about it with us too but ellen in one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is a number and maybe there are some thoughts you had as these young people were making their journey to make sure this happen and then the return of the ancestors. You can sure some thoughts. Anything you'd like to share phone lines are open. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native as kovic. Nineteen vaccines are becoming available. Americans are eager to learn more but frustrated about where to find answers that's why. Aarp is working to protect americans fifty plus by connecting you to the latest information you can learn who's eligible for the covert nineteen vaccine in your state when where and how to get it and what you might want to discuss with your doctor at aarp dot org slash vaccine info. Aarp.

iowa Mellon Melvin muskogee jackson la la christopher sioux city blake Christopher kovic ellen Aarp
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:58 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"There are more out there and my thoughts are that we cannot stop. This is only the beginning and it is a sad thing to have to say this but we are just at the tip of the iceberg. Thank you for that on Go ahead you cut out but continue fun. Yeah yeah we have many more boarding schools everywhere and people have to look back and remember the relatives that went out and never came home and we have to bring them back to the place of birth. When we give birth to a child the after birth would be buried and that is where the remains should come home to so we have work to do yet. I can fully understand. Thank you for that. I own quigley. Anything any thoughts for her. You can dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number also here to from the rosebud. Nation in south dakota's christopher eagle bear. He is a member of the changle youth counsel and he is he jungle lakota. Christopher welcome to native america calling higher. Thank you for having me great to have you here. And you are part of this youth council that that did a lot of work and realize the importance of giving this pathway to these relatives to return home in same way likely to share some of your story on on how some of this got started and your thoughts on on where we are today okay. back in twenty fifteen. When i kind of. I don't know how to get get high point. A lot of kids come out and We're really hands on with the things that were done. Like the east group it south its initial project list out teach culture and teach the lakota core values and how we can apply them everyday life so it can be intertwined with our way of life in today's world you know and so taught. Was it. It really taught us leadership roles. That's how to speak and it taught us how to go about it. Really great on a lot of the kids. I came from our leaders. Now like today there's the honoring batch of students graduated college recently and it's really great so that most of these kids who are part of that you know and now the higher education system and all this and that but the whole process of it wasn't twenty fifteen. We went to a Us conference Native americans at the white house is that the white house was supposed to back. When president obama was in the office and it was really. It was a great way for us to get out there and present the projects that were doing. We met so many native americans across the country and it was a beautiful thing and on the way home we stopped in hershey pennsylvania to do the Her strike no kabul over there park and on the way back last minute one of shop around suggested we should go through call because carlisle plays a pivotal role in who we are today. But at the time a lot of issues we had no clue what a boarding school was because a boarding school isn't talked about the history books and it's not definitely not talk about with the people who are still alive that went to boarding schools because it's traumatizing thing and it's traumatizing really hard to talk about. you know. And so we went there and they gave us a tour and the tour was a very. It was very clean very american. You couldn't tell anything happen there with how they were talking to us. Anyways after that we want to Cemetery start all these children may read all the names seen how many of them were from and so a couple of a song said a prayer and we walked away and as we were walking away. Firefly's came out of the ground and there are so many firefighters and Mondays came they gave us a sense of this spiritual higher. That you get whenever you do something in the way of life and that's how these Firefighters gave us gave a question to one of the kids that pop the question for this whole movement. And that's why don't we being on you know. No one had an answer for that so a group of when we came home we Had the Had that fire set enough of these kids have to come so we went to the council. We asked for the to speak express. How each of us out and why these kitchen come on and thankfully for us they were honest. That there on us and go of course. It took six years and a lot of obstacles. But we're happy that are tried Did all the bureaucracy for the office did all the work that they did. I really wanna you know. Think the people that believe in us 'cause when we first started this project at the get go a lot of people didn't believe in a lot of people didn't think we'd be able to do what we did and But to those that did believe in us let have back. You really want to say. Thank you to them because without them. Another sort of happened without the support that we then have You know he probably still would be worth six years ago. And so i really you know fix later when we brought them back and to see not just my trunk nation but every nation that part of it come together to help us out and being. I'm home each played a part in what they did. That really extends that really gets to my heart so much because as a lakota that word i mean look people i mean it it. It means love and offense you know we extend ourselves out and so it was really really warming to see that these for kids. Not just the council but these kids being about home from one hundred years ago this nation together and i hope that we remember that as we go forward in what we do and listen to the use and what they have to do moving forward you know sure. This is a huge listen in many things in just knowing that a lot of this game from what the you said this needs to happen. I think that's very commendable in our youth. Become with a lot of spirit and they come with a lot of good thoughts and just seeing how supporting this and what led to and christopher knowing that these relatives have returned home. What are your thoughts today. that question is very like My quickly said it's really a bittersweet feeling like. I'm really happy that these nine children from the rosewood came home because an eighteen eighties. The child chiefs here requested for the children come home and they were that paper must have been thrown away or something documents that state that the tribal leaders back at home one of them home but they never came back. You know general pratt prejudiced way so one hundred years later. I'm happy that we went there. And we listen to what they had to say. And that's bringing them home but we kind of bring all of them and so our mission is just now beginning. You know what we do. We'll be catapult for every nation comes through and hopefully one day all these boarding schools that have burial sites and graveyards can just be grass lines and all these kids can go home. You know because that's that's what every kid wants to do when scared and not in the same place they just wanna go and if we can't go home you can make sure these kids can go on. I hear you. Christopher i see you thank you for that for that. And any thoughts. Christopher dial in now one eight hundred nine nine six two four eight and you know what. Let's go to the phone lines. And say hi to melvin who is in santee nebraska tuned in on casey y que.

christopher eagle quigley south dakota Christopher Us kabul hershey carlisle president obama white house pennsylvania general pratt christopher Christopher dial melvin santee nebraska
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:09 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Process and But after each individual disintermediated the relatives remains were taken into special unit for analysis which included the termination of age and sex to ensure that it was the individual on record. This was all completed with the as lost proper respect with much ing and prayer and after each analysis a meeting was held on the determination again then with care and compassion to give as much information on the individual relative and once analysis was complete. We did according to the spiritual ceremony again. The painting with wa- set the red ochre of the remains again with much prayer and song for each individual on july. Fourteen to transfer ceremony was conducted in which the remains were johnson back to the rsd T h. peel. Or the descendents of those relatives so when we completed that then My job was done with that. So i I hope that what we had done. What set a precedent. A model for which other types can Can do the same with their relatives. That are there but on a personal note My uncle Who had been who had done the The research for one of he and is relative. Alvin kill seven horses He was in contact with me asking me to go ahead and received the remains of alvin and At that point it got very personal with me. And and so i. I looked at alvin Records and i find that luther standing bear who was a survivor of carlisle. He had written a book. My people the sue and in there. He talked of my relatives alvin and he spoke. He wrote that Alvin was a good boy. You know i own. I'm just thinking of every story that goes with all of these relatives that were talking about in the families That remember them in what this process has just put in in their minds and in their hearts. And i just gotta give you know. Give some thanks to everyone who has been a part of this process and in taking us to this point and just wish a lot of strength and a lot of encouragement to even be able to talk about some of this and think about some of this out loud. We know these are relatives and we are honoring them today and learning about the story and the efforts that it took to bring these relatives home. If you wanna join us you can give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number will continue to keep the phone lines open while we tell you about. What's coming up tomorrow but again there space for you here. Thanks for joining us. Gathering i'm tara would host and producer of native america calling in two thousand. I joined native america calling team over the years through these native airwaves. I've had the chance to get closer to the stories lives history and cultures over native nations on our next program. I get the chance to reflect on this journey and hope you'll join me if you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. You're listening to native america calling. I'm tara gatewood from mistletoe pueblo. Today we are learning a another story in every time we sent on air. We learn more about our native nations today. We are hearing about the recent return relatives native youth who walked on at the carlisle indian school and everything that went into getting to this point. And we know there's a lot of people who are involved there also a lot of people who came out to show their respect as these ancestors made their way back to their homelands and if there is something you'd like to share today you can give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number. We have on the line with us today. I own quigley. Who was a tribal historic preservation. Officer for the rosebud sioux tribe. She is c. chun-goo lakota. And i own You know this is something that that know. Understanding that I it it's not our It it's a challenge to think about when somebody passes on because usually you know we welcome them into that next phase in their journey but to have to bring them out of the ground and then bring them back home. I'd like to give you the space and a moment to just share of how this is really challenging And many communities bet. There is no custom to do this and really the weight of what this all means. Is there anything. You'd like to say. That i own first of all. There is accustomed to do this at one time. I- relatives were put up on scaffolds. That was our customary burial and a grandmother a mother or aunties would go back a year later and get the remains paint them with the wasa. The red ochre and then bury them and so that was our customs so this is a couple of generations ago that we had them this so west that once i got the The ceremonies to proper ceremonies in the proper instruction from the ceremonies I to put Everything.

alvin Records Alvin alvin national indigenous women's re tara gatewood carlisle native america luther carlisle indian school johnson america tara rosebud sioux tribe quigley chun
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

04:50 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Or love because of the lack of parents The loss of an education system of the native culture being replaced by strange education system. And all this leads to chaos within the native communities which leaves us open and vulnerable to social in illnesses once we recognize why things turned out the way they did for all of the native communities than were able to identify those losses and were able to heal again. And that is where i want to focus especially for all tribal communities that have that have a void in their families and their homes for all these years. I want to say that. We need to start healing. Now that we have him back and that healing process will take a little Cleaning of the pain pointing of the plane pain and then we will start the process of healing. So i am very much looking forward to that happening within our communities here on the rosebud. Thank you thank you in iona and all that so much is probably going through your head right now thinking about what you just said and and the work. That's ahead as well as what it meant to be there to be there as this whole process started And you know even even before. They started making their journey in soya. Like you to share some of that story of what all went into this to you. Know be able to get the word that yes they could come home and then that process of actually escorting them home. Tell me some of the story. Okay as As you know. I'm the for to tribe historic preservation officer since august twenty twenty and i have been aware that a group of young people who had visited carlisle back in two thousand sixteen had approach the the rose to tribal council to ask for their students buried there to be returned to their auto our head meaning the place of birth or homeland and back to the relatives. Here the researcher on staff here peter gabes had done inquiries and studies on a rose to tribal members buried there and carlisle and i was able to see the challenges encountered and i was able to voice them to the holland are secretary of interior. When i had the opportunity to meet her hoping to make the process easier for other tribes and creating a model that would be useful for the other types to do the same. Peter and i met online with the administrators of the department of army regularly Since september along with mr loyd guide the rsd attorney general to work on a process and schedule for this significant endeavor starting from september. Twenty twenty right up to june twenty twenty one and within that. I was prepared in ceremony for the repatriation of the relatives through instruction of the lake. Grandpa leonard codes and the hand painting ceremony which was done By generations past and it was conducted by young medicine. Man waste his horses holy for time. So grateful gave me insight and strength that got me through this process. I worked with a team of very respectful and honorable people who included administrators of the department of army archaeologists and forensic anthropologist. All of these people were interested in participated in the lakota culture and traditions including prayers much and songs and they were so simple sympathetic to my peers. The emotions that. I highly appreciated and i did is. I was instructed and ceremony for each individual to smudging prayers and songs to comfort each spirit as they were disinterred. A hat stop workouts or t as t h appeal which was honored by the team archaeologist. Who are very very meticulous in their work going centimeter-by-centimeter throughout.

department of army peter gabes carlisle iona mr loyd Grandpa leonard rsd holland Peter
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:27 min | 2 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native America Calling

"This is national native news. Antonio gonzales the royal canadian mounted police has confirmed. They have been investigating allegations of sexual abuse at a former residential school in manitoba as dan carpenter chuck reports. The investigation has been ongoing for more than a decade. The large-scale criminal investigation was launched in two thousand eleven into allegations of sexual abuse at the ford alexander. Residential school officers traveled to ottawa to review archives of the school and to the manitoba archives. For historical information they ended up interviewing more than seven hundred people across america in the search for potential victims or witnesses since then rcmp officers have compiled a total of seventy five victim and witness statements. Here's dan vandal. The federal minister of northern affairs. The i think the fact that there's an ongoing investigation is Is something that that is is is justified. And we know that there were crimes committed the ford alexander residential school operated from nineteen zero five to one thousand nine hundred seventy it was built on the ford alexander reserve which is now the sad king i nation last week. The first nation began searching the former school site for any unmarked graves. Police say they will not be. Providing any further information about their investigation meanwhile rcmp in saskatchewan of opened an investigation into a death that is alleged to have taken place at a children's home which was not recognized as a residential school but which housed former matey and first nation students for national native news. I'm dan carpenter took the alaska. Supreme court has upheld the conviction of a medlicott. La- fisherman who is fine for fishing without proper permits as k r. bg's eric stone reports the case as part of a long running dispute over tribal sovereignty in two thousand fourteen. Us coastguard officers reported Latrell member fishing without a state permit. John's gero was cited for three commercial fishing violations and fined twenty thousand dollars. He appealed the case Atlas elected tribal government has long objected to state fishing regulations. The tribe filed a brief in support arguing that the eighteen federal law creating the net islands reserve intended to create a self sustaining community. They say essential part of the same. She and communities ability to sustain itself is by fishing both within and outside the reservations waters attorneys force. In the tribe argued alaska's fishing regulations infringed upon the tribes federally guaranteed sovereign rights. But the alaska surpreme court upheld the conviction in a four to zero ruling writing for the court justice. Peter maassen declined to rule on whether mettler atla tribal members hold a federally guaranteed right to fish outside the reserve but martin cited a raft of us supreme court cases that helped tribes off reservation. Hunting and fishing rights were subject to state regulations. If those rules were aimed at conserving fish and wildlife populations mental candle indian community sued governor. Mike dunleavy's administration in federal court last year on similar grounds. A federal district. Judge dismissed the case. It's now pending on appeal. I'm eric stone in ketchikan legislation in the arizona. Senate is seeking to address. Water needs on tribal lands with billions of dollars to improve clean water and gibson from arizona. Public media has more one of the senators. Introduce the bill. Michael bennett of colorado says. Roughly half of the household and travel lands lack. Clean water or sufficient sanitation. And those who helped him shape. This bill are bluntly saying what's at stake especially during covert nineteen. It's literally a matter of life and death. that was an castle. Who's part of the colorado river water and tribes initiative access to reliable clean drinking water supply. That's an essential human right. There's also another bill in the senate that's directly addressing sanitation across tribal lands. I'm emma gibson and demand tonio gonzales. National native news is produced by Broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support for law and justice related programming provided by hob strauss dean and walker a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for nearly forty years more information available at hob strauss dot com support by aarp. The native urban elder needs assessment survey will provide data to improve urban indian elder health equity elders are underrepresented in data and you can help info and survey at you. I a coalition dot. Org native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood coming to you. Live from my homeland. Ashir with we both grief and celebration are along with what we're going to talk about today. The remains of ten students buried at the carlisle indian industrial school. Nearly a century and a half ago recently returned home. Nine of those were reinterred at the rosebud. Reservation and one at saint paul island in alaska. It took years a steady work by many people to close this unfortunate chapter for these children who died while under residency at the school known for severing native children from their culture. Many hope this is the beginning of many more relatives who walked on boarding schools around the country to start returning home a warning about today's show. We are talking about the lasting trauma of residential schools. That this is something that you find challenging. We have resources on our web page and can also reach out to the native american boarding school healing coalition online or. You can call them at six one two three five four seven seven zero zero. And if you'd like to join the conversation you can do that to the number to call us is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight today. We are starting off on the rosebud. Sioux nation in south dakota with us on the line is i own quigley and she is a tribal historic preservation officer for the rosebud sioux tribe and. She is see jungle lakota. Our pleasure to have her here with us. I own welcome to native america calling very much and i own I know there were many people who who were sending a lot of good thoughts as These relatives made their way back to their homelands. And just to start off with with people who are still heavy from all of this the things that it has Brought up in their own lives and their stories or even a connections in their own family. Is there anything you'd dislike to start off with about This journey that these young people made to come back home and any heavy thoughts people might be having right now. Any words of encouragement. I own well first of all. It is a very bitter sweet Situation we are so happy to have them home after a long but the sadness is still there of the loss of time That we could have had with them. These are children than ever got to fulfill their destiny. And so yes we do celebrate but we we also have to face the fact that They didn't they should have been home sooner. You know make it home center now There is the historical trauma that we need to deal with including the loss of identity loss of language loss of social systems and also ceremonies with the cultural traditions. And so this makes up for a couple of things one of them being no sense of security.

rcmp eric stone alexander Antonio gonzales dan carpenter chuck ford dan vandal manitoba dan carpenter Latrell gero net islands reserve alaska alaska surpreme court Peter maassen america emma gibson tonio gonzales corporation for public broadca
Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

Native America Calling

01:29 min | 2 months ago

Accusations of Sexual Abuse at Manitoba Residential School Investigated

"The royal canadian mounted police has confirmed. They have been investigating allegations of sexual abuse at a former residential school in manitoba as dan carpenter chuck reports. The investigation has been ongoing for more than a decade. The large-scale criminal investigation was launched in two thousand eleven into allegations of sexual abuse at the ford alexander. Residential school officers traveled to ottawa to review archives of the school and to the manitoba archives. For historical information they ended up interviewing more than seven hundred people across america in the search for potential victims or witnesses since then rcmp officers have compiled a total of seventy five victim and witness statements. Here's dan vandal. The federal minister of northern affairs. The i think the fact that there's an ongoing investigation is Is something that that is is is justified. And we know that there were crimes committed the ford alexander residential school operated from nineteen zero five to one thousand nine hundred seventy it was built on the ford alexander reserve which is now the sad king i nation last week. The first nation began searching the former school site for any unmarked graves. Police say they will not be. Providing any further information about their investigation meanwhile rcmp in saskatchewan of opened an investigation into a death that is alleged to have taken place at a children's home which was not recognized as a residential school but which housed former matey and first nation students for national native news. I'm dan carpenter took

Rcmp Dan Carpenter Chuck Manitoba Alexander Dan Vandal Ford Ottawa America Saskatchewan Dan Carpenter
Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

Native America Calling

00:38 sec | 3 months ago

Rosebud Sioux Tribe Brings Remains of Children Home From Former Boarding School

"The rosebud sioux tribe in south dakota welcomed home the remains of children who died more than one hundred years ago at the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania native youth and their mentors repatriated the remains from carlisle last week and escorted them home. A four hour. Service was streamed online saturday where people gathered at the tribes college quilts photographs and other items line. The front of the gym for each of the nine children brought home. The service included speakers songs an honoring before the remains were escorted out to the burial site by native youth veterans and the community. They were placed in graves in buffalo robes and buried on the rosebud reservation.

Carlisle Indian School South Dakota Carlisle Pennsylvania Buffalo Rosebud
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

05:32 min | 3 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Johnson and johnson very famous for baby shampoo was one of the biggest manufacturers of potent kind of opioid a. Produced in tasmania that actually purdue pharma with all of hall the oxycodone that they needed in order to be able to market their drug. They wouldn't have been able to do it. Without johnson and johnson so there is a pretty big and robust and they paid a settlement johnson and johnson if two hundred thirty million dollars over its role and fueling the opioid crisis. They did but of course with all these companies we're talking about prophets of billions that's correct and also in many cases. We're talking about bearing the evidence in other words. The deal is almost always and this is something we've got to look at a country. The deal is almost always will pay a fine. We won't admit responsibility and most important of all the evidence will never be seen. Well we want to thank you for being with us. Alex alex gibney oscar winning filmmaker his latest. The two part. Hbo documentary titled the crime of the century which traces the origins of the opioid epidemic. And those who enabled it next up. The remains of nine indigenous children were buried saturday by the rose. But sue and south dakota after being transferred back from the former carlisle indian school in pennsylvania where the children were sent over a century ago after being ripped from their families. We'll speak with. Christopher eagle bear from an native american youth council. That helped bring them home. Stay with him. Who do love. And hey phil my being torn in this world all who what happened who love and we k- that and then per office sees a coming to but they will not be the Ono this whom we yeah Who he sit changdu. This is we will rise up by joanne shenandoah democracy now democracy. Now dot org. I'm amy goodman in eighteen. Seventy nine the first indigenous children sons and daughters rosebud sioux chiefs arrived at the carlisle indian industrial school. They were forced to attend in pennsylvania this weekend. Some of them returned home after they were ripped from their families. More than a century ago carlisle was the first government boarding school run. That was off of reservation land. And it's set the standard for other schools with its motto. Kill the indian. Save the man. The schools were known for their brutal assimilation practices forcing students to change their clothing. Language and culture more than ten thousand children were taken.

johnson carlisle indian industrial sch Alex alex gibney oscar purdue pharma tasmania Christopher eagle american youth council Johnson joanne shenandoah Hbo pennsylvania rosebud sioux chiefs south dakota amy goodman phil carlisle
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

05:48 min | 3 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Fred campbell. Newest coach kept the trio who had performed so well in earlier games. Nettie worth remained center and many burton and msn river were both still forwards net. He's older sister lizzie. Who was twenty. Three had recently graduated from carlisle indian school and she came on board as a chaperone substitute player so sipping langley who had been with the team from the beginning and had previously taken on a similar role was at this point engaged to be married and she left the team to take a fulltime job at the school. Also remaining from the nineteen o. Two team was bell. Johnson who had been friends with josie langley when they were both living on the black feet reservation bells. Mother sent her and her siblings to fort. Shaw on jozies encouragement and josie took them under her wing when they were orphaned after their mother's death in one thousand nine hundred rounding out the nineteen four team or katie. Snell jenny butch rose larose. Flora lucero sarah mitchell and debbie healy. He was known as gen. Katie jenny and sarah were all a cinnabon rose. Larose was shoshoni and chippewa on her father's side and bannock on her. Mother's jen healy was grow. Vaunt and flora was chippewa. Most of them had been substitute players in their previous season. Heart of the agreement for they're getting to go to saint. Louis was continuing to play as well as they had been but they didn't exactly get that opportunity. The state had not developed a formal structure for pairing teams against one another. There was no statewide association. Organisation setting standards for games playoffs and championships. It was the responsibility of individual schools to work out game schedules in fort. Shaw did not get that done the reasons for not getting that done or not entirely clear and it could have been a product of several factors like the general difficulties of scheduling games all across the state when there was not an organized way to do it reluctance by other teams to play against fort shah which by this point had proven itself to be a powerhouse and just being more focused on preparing for a multi month trip to saint louis according to the anaconda standard it was because quote. There is no girls team in the state that can give them anything. Like a tussle. They stand alone and unrivaled. Whatever the reason for schaja didn't get much of a competitive schedule together for the nineteen ninety three season so instead of playing against other teams fort. Shaw spent most of the season playing scrimmage games. This gave the new players more opportunities to play and practice performing in front of a crowd. Meanwhile the schools vocational classes made new uniforms still with long sleeve tops with sailor callers and bloomer like pants with red and white trim.

Fred campbell carlisle indian school josie langley Snell jenny butch rose larose Flora lucero sarah mitchell debbie healy chippewa Katie jenny jen healy Nettie Shaw lizzie fort langley burton Larose josie fort shah katie Johnson
Remains of Alaska Native Student to Be Returned to St. Paul

Native America Calling

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Remains of Alaska Native Student to Be Returned to St. Paul

"The remains of an alaskan native student buried more than one hundred years ago. At the carlisle indian school in pennsylvania will return to alaska the us army starting the process to return the remains of ten native students buried at the school. According to a us army press release nine students from the rosebud sioux tribe and one student so fia titov is identified as valued so entered the school in nineteen hundred. One died in one thousand nine hundred six w itf reports. Sofia's remains will be returned to saint paul island. the school operated from eighteen. Seventy nine to nineteen eighteen.

Carlisle Indian School Us Army Rosebud Sioux Tribe Pennsylvania Alaska FIA Saint Paul Island Sofia
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

Think 100%: The Coolest Show

03:41 min | 11 months ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Think 100%: The Coolest Show

"When first of all people need to understand that the. Us government actually lost the indian wars. It's called the battle of the little bighorn where the soup people the lakota people actually be a custer at the at the custer's last stand and so from there. They began to try to make things better and they came up with this concept of. Save the man. Kill the indian and so what they did was they began going into and a lot of this was sanctioned by the christian and catholic churches What they began to do is a lot of are. A lot of people had already begun to Be put on reservations and once that started happening. They kind of lost some of their culture. A little bit of their identity in a lot of them weren't living traditionally so what they do is they would send in mercenaries to come in and take the children from their parents and when they would take these kids from their parents they would take them to these boarding schools One of the most violent and one of the most horrific schools they actually. I'm pretty sure still exists today as it did shut down but the last one actually shut down i believe in the eighties was the carlisle indian school. And if you go and you research carlisle you're gonna find really to me. What is the essence of american history. You will see what's going on right now in terms of kidnapping kids and putting them in cages. That's been happening since the birth of this nation. That is nothing new in..

carlisle indian school Us carlisle
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

08:31 min | 1 year ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"So to help you with that we have called one of the country's most celebrated poets, Joy Harjo. In 2019. She was named US Poet laureate, and now she's using her platform and deep appreciation for this art. To service editor of the Norton Anthology of Native Nations, Poetry. It's called When the Light of the world was subdued. Our songs came through and she's with us now to tell us more about it. Joy Hodja. Welcome to the program. Thank you so much for speaking with us. Yeah, well, thank you so much for inviting me and native poets on your show. I do want to ask before we get into the anthology about being named US Poet laureate. I mean, you were named You had a beautiful reception at the Library of Congress welcoming you to this role where people got to hear you're beautiful work, and I believe that you are the first person from the native nations to be so honored and I recall From your investiture that there were people who had never been to Washington who came to see you installed. So in a way, that's kind of what you're doing with this anthology in a way, isn't it? You're bringing people To the limelight who have not had the opportunity to be spotlighted in this way. Yes, I think that's what's been so important about this poet laureate because basically I'm essentially a doorway. And I'm representative certainly of Native nations and of poets. And I say, Well, there's not just me. This anthology has 160 because of the page limitations. We couldn't put everybody in here that should be in here and There are many of us and we're not just poets were teachers were dancers where Were essentially we're human beings, and you would think that at this a time we would not have to say that, but we're still active. We have active living cultures and we are human beings and we write poetry. I think a lot of what you see out there as native poetry and translation that most people are aware of was not translated. You know, there's you know, there's also ethics involved, too. So There was challenging. What you do say that the English language provides access to native poetry because it does allow indigenous people to speak across tribes and to people all over the world. So with that being said, I'm going to ask you to read something. And tell us what it's about. This was written by a student at Carlisle Indian School, a school that was on industrial school. It was military style is many of the Indian schools were that was founded by Colonel Richard Henry Pratt in 18, 79 and Hiss. It was meant to be ah, tool of assimilation. He was known for his famous motto or infamous motto. I should say, Kill the Indian and save the Man. This was published in the school paper, and it was noted that it was written in 1913. And the student didn't want his name known and it's called my industrial work. At half past two in the afternoon. You can find me in the 28 room. About three or four covers deep. You turned them back and you'll find me asleep. And there I lie and patiently wait for the final exams we have in room eight. When the whistle blows at half past five. Once more, I am up and still alive. Then I run down and wash my face and call my here and I'm ready for Grace and 15 minutes. There's a bugle call the troops fall in and the roll is called Get out in front troops all stand saluting the flag with our hats in her hand while standing in the wind. Our hair gets wavy. Just the same. We write face and march to gravy. Now, this may sound like going fishing that this is my only industrial position. That could be almost anywhere. And even now, you know who has to go to school or any young kid in one of the other things I noticed, too. I just saw another one is kissing the ope a loo. There's a lot of reverence for and also grappling with relationship with elders in these pieces, too. Which I found really moving. I can't do that. When that's by Donovan CEO call ups He's cannot come Oli or Hawaiian from born in Honolulu, Hawaii and kissing the Oh paler. From my grandmother. I am water only because you are the ocean. We're here on ly because old leaves have been falling. A mulching of memories folding into Barry's Hand's the Cliffs. We learned to edge the tree trunk hollowed. Coming. I am a turn on Lee because you were the body planting stories with, um Soil crumbs clean to your knees, small stacks of empty clay pots dreaming. I am an air plant suspended on Lee because you were the truck. I clean, too. I am the Milky Fish Eye on Lee because it's your favorite. Even the sound you make when your lips kiss Theo Pillar socket is a mullah. A slipper is lost in the yard. Haku Lay is chilling in the icebox. I am a cup for feathers on Lee because you want to feel the hours. I am a turn wrist only because you left the hose on Hello, KONI ahs are singing underwater beetles are floating across the yard. It's lovely. I love it. Do you love it? Love it like Michelle. I was discovering the poem as I was reading it aloud. And you know, at one point in editing, we decided to read the whole manuscript allowed. That's how I revise So that's what we did is we took it into our mouths and took it to our bodies. Obviously, this collection is going to mean different things to different people. I'm guessing from people from native nations who, seeing this collection is going to be really exciting. But how do you want people to experience this? What would you recommend A poem opens a time It opens up memory. It opens up place the meaning of place. And so it's a It's a doorway and it says Here we are, where we were indigenous peoples and we are making art and I came across this quote. Recently, the cloak and helmet that was gifted to Captain Cook was returned to Hawaii. And I love this proverb. It was a Mallory proverb. I'll just read the English. It's is where there is artistic excellence. There is human dignity and that just stayed with me. And I think of this book being compendium of human of human dignity of artistic excellence. That is US poet laureate Joy Harjo. She's the author of eight poetry collections, including the best selling An American Sunrise and a memoir Crazy Brave. She's the editor of When the Light of the world was subdued. Our songs came through and it is out now. Joy hard, Joe. Thank you so much for talking with us. I do hope we'll get to talk again in person. Thank you, Michelle. I really appreciate this. And finally today, the town of Nemea in Fukushima, Japan, was once home to more than 20,000 people. But in 11 2001 of the worst nuclear disasters the world had ever seen happened just a few miles away. Everyone was forced to leave. The whole town sat abandoned for years. Slowly, though, evacuation orders have lifted and parts of the town have re opened and as NPR's cat lost or found on a trip to Japan earlier this year. There is at least one lively spot there during the day downtown. NAMI sounds like this. And this and this Teams of workers tearing down houses, stringing up new power lines. Rebuilding trying to bring this former ghost town back to life. At night, though. Mama is still eerily silent empty. In the three years the town has been reopened only about 5% of the population returned. But there is one spot tucked away in a mostly empty strip mall. If you listen closely, you can start to hear it. A.

US Lee Joy Harjo Norton Anthology of Native Nat Michelle editor Hawaii Japan Joy Hodja Carlisle Indian School Library of Congress Colonel Richard Henry Pratt Washington representative Captain Cook Nemea KONI ahs Mama Grace Honolulu
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"It's by an anonymous Carlisle student. And chart. Yeah. Carlisle Indian School was was an Indian school that was founded by Lieutenant Colonel Richard Henry Pratt in 18 79. His motto was his infamous motto is Kill the Indian and save the man. And more than 10,000. Children went to that school from 141 tribes, including some of my relatives and this form they they had AH, newsletter student newspaper. And this poem appeared in it, and the student didn't want to be named. It's called anonymous Poet from It's called My Industrial Work by anonymous poet from roommate So I've read this poem. My industrial work. At half past two in the afternoon. You can find me in the 28 room about three or four covers deep. You turn them back and you'll find me asleep. And there I lie and patiently wait for the final exams. We have in room eight when the whistle blows at half past five once more, I am up and still alive. And then I run down and wash my face. Then comb my hair and I'm ready for Grace and 15 minutes. There's a bugle call the troops fall in, and the roll is called Out in front. The troops all stand saluting the flag with our hats in her hand. While standing in the wind. Our hair gets wavy, but just the same way right face and march to gravy. Now. This may sound like going fishing, but this is my only industrial position. Huh? Can you give us your your thoughts about that poem and why that resonated with you? I support I loved the humor in it. This kid, I mean, certainly humanizes history, you know, and a particular person and, um, the militarization, you know? You know the policy Tio. The policy was. Well, if you If you civilized quote unquote civilized that the Indian will disappear by a civilized person as if we didn't and don't have civilizations. And still have civilizations that So it also reminds me I went to Indian school, too. It was a little different. By the time I went to Indian school, and I went to a school. That was an experiment in Indian education, where we had some of the bets, best arts classes, and even so. In the late sixties in one of my classrooms for English. Ah, we still had stows lined up against the wall with just a few generations just a few classes before a few years before students were taught the women students were taught How to clean and cook so they could clean and cook for you. Where was that in Santa Fe. And what is what? What was the notion of Did you say experimental Indian school at that time? The larger idea. Well, we were we had some of the best art teachers in the country like Alan Hauser fit shoulder oddly long a month. And and Louis Bell or major composer composed for Maria Tallchief. They were our teachers, and we also had the old system Bureau of Indian Affairs system, So I recognize we didn't have to go out like troops as this student did, where they militarized their education. But we had all of the military lingo. We had details and restriction and So that was in place. We still weren't allowed to speak our native languages and this was in the late sixties at school. And you are a member. I believe of the Moscow G Cree Nation. And the collection focuses on giving a voice to Native American poets from around the country. In fact, the poems I see a broken into different regions of the U. S from the northeast to the Plains and mountains to the Pacific. And more. Would you point out any particular stylistic difference? I'm sure they're many, many, many of them, but that might be an interesting one that we see..

Carlisle Indian School Indian school Bureau of Indian Affairs Carlisle Colonel Richard Henry Pratt Moscow G Cree Nation Santa Fe Maria Tallchief Grace Alan Hauser Louis Bell
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The bison were almost extinct and they were being pushed on the reservations and population and fallen to two it's almost all time low and a lot of other policy makers came to the conclusion that something had to happen fast or Indians would literally become extinct SO Pratt he comes to Washington with an idea his idea was started boarding school specifically for American Indian children it was kind of a radical experiment children will be taken removed for several years at a time they would be stripped of their what was called savage heritage and they would be civilized it was it was forcible assimilation of Pratt had a a slogan kill the Indian save the man that's far Landis Carlisle Indian school biographer we went up to Carl talk with her and her colleague character this and they told us at Pratt basically made that pitch hill the Indians save the man not just to Congress by directly to American Indian families all over the country I want your son is that how does that work I want your children because white people are going to keep coming and coming they wanna settling your lands they want to take your lands and you need to learn how to deal with these people so we need to teach your children how to speak English we need to teach him how to communicate with a white man so that when the white man comes and tries to get you to sign with the black hills you won't fall for it again and it was a convincing argument well you know back in those days you're talking about survival over here German introduce yourself okay my name is Joe American horse seventy nine years old and them and grandson of chief American horse Joe lives near the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota he's Lakota he tells a story about his grandfather who is a famous Lakota chief in the eighteen nineties his grandpa's led a delegation of American Indians to Washington well he went to Washington DC and his he was down but he's a lot of people down there just as he's gonna have this moment where he was just stunned by how many white people there were his face was there like ants and pretty soon they gonna come to the so he had the idea of trying to send his kids to school so they can intermingle or you know intercepted whatever basically just says is Graham I just had this realization we can't we can't go back we've got to go forward and it seemed to him Carlisle was the way forward.

Pratt Washington Congress South Dakota American Indians Graham Carlisle Landis Carlisle Indian school Carl Joe American Pine Ridge
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Bison were almost extinct and they were being pushed on the reservations and population had fallen to two it's almost all time low and a lot of other policy makers came to the conclusion that something had to happen fast or Indians would literally become extinct SO Pratt he comes to Washington with an idea his idea was started boarding school specifically for American Indian children it was kind of a radical experiment children will be taken removed for several years at a time they would be stripped of their what was called savage heritage and they would be civilized it was it was forcible assimilation of Pratt had a a slogan kill the Indian save the man that's barber Landis Carlisle Indian school biographer we went up to Carl talk with her and her colleague characterised and they told us at Pratt basically made that pitch chill the Indians save the man not just to Congress by directly to American Indian families all over the country I want your son is that how does that work I want your children because white people are going to keep coming and coming they wanna settling your lands they want to take your land and you need to learn how to deal with these people so we need to teach your children how to speak English we need to teach him how to communicate with the white man so that when the white man comes and tries to get you to sign with the black hills you won't fall for it again and it was a convincing argument well you know back in those days you're talking about survival over here German introduce yourself okay my name is Joe American horse I'm seventy nine years old an imminent grandson of chief American horse Jill lives near the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota he's Lakota he tells a story about his grandfather who is a famous Lakota chief in the eighteen nineties his grandpa's led a delegation of American Indians to Washington well he went to Washington DC and who he was down but he's a lot of people down there just as his grandpa had this moment where you just stand by how many white people there were his face was there like ants and pretty soon they gonna come to the so he had the idea of a trying to send his kids to school so they can intermingle or you know intercepted whatever basically just says is Graham I just had this realization we can't we can't go back we've got to go forward and it seemed to him Carlisle was the way forward right now as kids remitted here's how would work they would come in.

Pratt Washington Congress Jill South Dakota American Indians Graham Carlisle Landis Carlisle Indian school Carl Joe American Pine Ridge
"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

48:53 min | 2 years ago

"carlisle indian school" Discussed on Native Opinion Podcast an American Indian Perspective

"Take off I mean and mining amounts of people of color especially native people and this case native civil rights figure an article the US attorney argued that standing bear was neither a citizen nor a person and this this act really went to court and he had to fight to take his son's remains home to be buried with his ancestors I quote again the US Attorney General View that standing bear was neither a citizen nor a person and the such did not have standing to sue the government on the second day of that trial chief standing bear was called to testify becoming the first native American to do so he raised his right hand and through an interpreter sad and I quote my hand is not the color of yours if I pierce it I shall feel pain if you pierce your hand you also feel pain the blood that will oh for a mind will be the same color is yours the same God made us both I am a man in quote well so there was a human humanist as judge it would appear because the judge agreed ruling for the first time in us his trade that quote the end game is a person and quote and has all the rights and freedoms promised in the constitution the judge it's also ordered Cook Two free standing there in his people immediately and little a crook I'm sorry Little information on the gentle on mentioned as Crook he was army general sent to round up this group of people who wanted to take the chief son's remains back home all of this will be in the show notes in in in in the link will provide despite the landmark decision from the judge his opinion still drips with prejudice calling native Americans a week significant unlettered and generally despised race so he just blew his they the humanist Monica gave him right out the window I found in the section I found the section excuse me to be a particular interest and some knowledge I did not know about a few decades later in nineteen thirty seven the state of Nebraska sent to statues to the US Capitol each state is allowed to pick two historical figures to represent them and now National Statutory Hall and Nebraska Chose Politicians William Jennings Bryan Ann Arbor Day founder Julius Sterling Morton this provision is also why there are at least eight statues of confederates in the capital suits in recent years Nebraska lawmakers voted to replace both statues Brian was replaced by chief standing bear he's soon morton will be replaced by a statue of author Wilma Cather and she was the American novelist noted for trails of the settlers and frontier life of the American planes and they held a dentist nations ceremony for the induction of Chief Statue and Governor Pete Ricketts said that and I quote One of the most important civil rights leader in our country that almost nobody knows about is going to be inducted today and we hope to be able to correct that today until his story in quote and again there'll be an article included with Lincoln colluded with this article man having trouble today don't problem brother Yeah I mean the first thing I thought about of course was okay are people going to start complaining of the changes made right that these statues were going to be erected right to the American history well here's the thing I get a little more research and there is literally I'll site that list the statutory donations by state and it's this at the Capitol Dot Cov- affords last sites Blah Blah Blah Blah Lincoln's in the show notes which you can actually go on that site and see which states donated which statutes very cool okay we will definitely look for that but you're right how long's IT GONNA take somebody's whining about all this guy you know why is he in there and why are you taking out so and so you're just a matter of time were there was such type of reaction when they were when they started the construction on the ongoing Memorial yes same kind of thing which if there was enough doc they really should have went next to the president's had Rushmore blasphemy couple of the matter there and say bad blasphemy were so anti-american here on the show apparently gotten some feed back in that direction as well really yes but anyway I don't care because of your truth doesn't matter to me there you go sounded so I'll just I'll just leave it at that same type of people say that I don't love my country Yeah Okay that that type of thing alley yeah it it's matter of trying to understand you know a little words these are clearly people that haven't listened to more than one episode Oh and so I always that's what I always record I recommend this to people anyway if you check out our podcast anyway listen to at least five episodes at least five to get a better understanding of where the hosts physicians are on things but most people don't they listen to one they're like blasphemy there news on this on this show so what can I e yeah some people must realize that I use the acronym I won't I won't mention it it's kind of like I don't care but put the adult version on it yes well you know we we've had other people David I have to deal with sadly relevant to our position on the trump administration so You know hopefully some folks will have a a second thought it may even second look at the show but if they don't that that's fine that's their decision so it is absolutely all right moving on here this is an article that came out of the let's say inquirer dot com the before that and the title of this Article States follows the bodies of three young native American girls are returned to the Oneida reservation and a community heels the author on this was Charles Fox so I sort of sat up and took notice when I when I read this this particular Article but what what we try to convey on the show from time to time is that sometimes the events from America's tragic past can be brought to closure for some families we wouldn't define it necessarily is happiness but simply enter use some emptiness wondering perhaps a softening to sadness maybe you know this is the type of thing we always as you say Around the areas of families that are in continuous morning relevant to missing murder indigenous women right there looking foreclosure they're looking for their lost relatives the best outcome of course is that person has returned home but in other times the generational hurt goes back many many years centuries attacked so Tissa toe to some degree what am I referring to I'm I'm talking about repatriation Talking about the act of indigenous people being returned home for proper ceremonies and reburial in their their own homelands on this show if we're speaking about quote an amusing quotes a mirror his tragic past and quote in the reason I place that in quotes so to speak is a term used quite frequently by mainstream news media who apparently I have a bone to pick with this week we use it in the with respect to indigenous peoples from within the now defined borders of this country we speak of places such as the Carlisle Indian School which is the subject of this particular article in the inquirer dot com and In which Charles Fox the author chose to focus on the quote Indian Industrial School close quote which is really what it was it's actual title is in was located in Carlisle Pennsylvania commonly referred to as the Carlisle Indian school it was operated from eighteen seventy nine through nineteen eighteen and was endorsed by the federal government. Now why do I say endorsed if you put it in this context like modern day grants that are issued today by the federal and of course state governments but will stay focused on the federal government Carlisle was the first federally funded off reservation Indian Boarding School in the United States Carlisle Indian school and other similar boarding schools that followed represented an attempt by the United States government to assimilate indigenous that was issued and maybe even invented by a guy by the name of General Richard Henry Pratt a brigadier now Pratt is also most likely to some degree the father of racism in the United States as he used the word in one thousand nine hundred to describe quote racial segregation and quote an act so we'll call it ethnic minorities now he firmly believe that all ethnicities should be assimilated into white culture on a good guy so from the article Charles Fox dates the following and quoting three teenage girls died while attending Carlisle Jemima men toxin died of tuberculosis and Australia palace of pneumonia Fox continues imagine a situation of strangers walking into your parents home unannounced and uninvited and then they simply take you away and you have no idea why right now why might this happen because of a government made up of men who were not from anywhere near your home made the decision that you would be better off living in language English which is foreign to you and your told at that time that this is now your now further imagine being physically punished severely because you simply don't understand how to do something for the first time they let you know later bye thank you.

United States Carlisle Indian school Charles Fox General Richard Henry Pratt US attorney Indian Boarding School pneumonia tuberculosis Australia