35 Burst results for "Carlin"

Kash Patel: Republicans Need a Committee to Expose Corruption

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 months ago

Kash Patel: Republicans Need a Committee to Expose Corruption

"Republicans take back the House and the Senate cash, what can possibly be done to hold this fourth branch of government accountable, the unelected unknown unchecked branch. It just seems like there's so many different scandals. So many different things they're doing or not doing or intentionally, you're not focusing on what is it, cash that they need to do, going in January, more than just writing letters. I mean, I think it's time for a church and pike committee equivalent. What are your thoughts cash? You're not wrong. They need a committee. Whether it's select or otherwise to run a russiagate style investigation that Devin and I ran, but they need to go ten times harder. And here's why. You're right. Issuing letters is meaningless. Go get subpoenas. Go get the documents. Make sure the American public are shown. The documents that expose the government corruption at the FBI and DoJ. And I've said this since the beginning, I think the reason the FBI went down there and raided Donald Trump's home was because they knew this political leadership that was in place that started Russia gate knew that Devin and I only got out 60% of the russiagate documents during our investigation. That means 40% were left. Why do you think president Donald Trump declassified then? Because it showed their extreme levels of corruption and illegality against the sitting president of the United States and others. So they come in and sweep up under the counterintelligence investigation umbrella to prevent their disclosure and this Congress is the only mechanism that can go in there and force the disclosure of the documents and then they must call these people up to testify publicly, Chris ray, Merrick Garland, John Carlin, all these people, and without time limits and without private jets waiting for them that are paid for by the government to answer hard questions as to why did you allow this investigation to occur when you knew the people and the personnel operating it had already broken the law during russiagate. And some of these individuals are supposedly under investigation at the FBI themselves. How is it possible that they can work on an investigation of this magnitude? Congress must act big time.

Devin Donald Trump FBI Senate DOJ House Merrick Garland John Carlin Russia Chris Ray Congress United States
Kash Patel: No Surprise John Carlin, Lisa Monaco Are Top DOJ Officials

The Dan Bongino Show

01:27 min | 3 months ago

Kash Patel: No Surprise John Carlin, Lisa Monaco Are Top DOJ Officials

"Minute I heard cash Patel say these two names this weekend on Maria bartiromo I knew I knew I'm like deep state back again Here we go He also mentioned something about these Russia gate documents too which was fascinating I want you to check this out This is cash Patel on Maria bartiromo this weekend Take a listen You know me as a former national security prosecutor in the national security division where this case is being run out of It's no surprise that the likes of John Carlin who was the assistant attorney general for national security who authorized a russiagate hoax to begin with is now the number three official at DoJ and Lisa Monaco is the number two official who was his superior back then These folks and this is the thing I want to stress with Now that this is a quote unquote ongoing FBI counterintelligence investigation they will come out to the American public and be able to say ongoing CI investigation you will never be allowed to see the Russia gate docs or any other docs at president Trump Lawfully declassified and they will hide it from the public and Congress as a monumental lift ahead of them come November They better start subpoenaing these documents immediately and putting these people before the American public Wait wait wait time out TO baby TO You're telling me the same people involved in spygate From the Obama Biden administration and the Department of Justice there Are the exact same people now raiding Donald Trump's house

Maria Bartiromo Patel National Security Division John Carlin Lisa Monaco Russia DOJ FBI Congress Obama Biden Administration Department Of Justice Donald Trump
Insider (2021): Mueller's Proteges Are Landing Top Spots in Biden DOJ

The Dan Bongino Show

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Insider (2021): Mueller's Proteges Are Landing Top Spots in Biden DOJ

"I'm using lefty resources for a reason So when you want to sit here and moan it's a conspiracy Really His Business Insider Bob Mueller's proteges are landing top spots in the Biden Justice Department Lisa Monaco is among the former aides of Robert Mueller joining the Biden Justice Department She's the one right now at justice that oversaw this rate of Mar-a-Lago She was bob Mueller's buddy She worked with him too She was one of his age just like John Carlin She was also in the Obama Biden White House as they were spying on Donald Trump Folks this is not This isn't chess it's not like this is like connect four when you were like 9 and ten years old and we did board games before there was the Internet This isn't complicated Again they're not hiding this They are overtly going after Trump and using the same trusted confidants Why

Bob Mueller Biden Justice Department Lisa Monaco John Carlin Obama Biden Lago Donald Trump White House Chess
Who Is John Carlin?

The Dan Bongino Show

01:03 min | 3 months ago

Who Is John Carlin?

"So John Carlin and Lisa Monaco and Merrick Garland are running this hit on Trump Again this other one out of DoJ Who's John Carlin What if I told you that John Carlin and Lisa Monaco were close confidants of bob Mueller You'd be like no way So just to be clear John Carlin who was in the Justice Department when they authorized the spying operation on Donald Trump under Obama Biden Is the same guy who was a very close pal to bob Mueller who then investigated Trump for the fake charges the DoJ with Carlin in there made up about Russia Who is now the same guy in the DoJ now that authorized a raid on Donald Trump whereas cash said to potentially seal away russiagate documents Trump may have yes that's exactly what I'm telling you

John Carlin Lisa Monaco Bob Mueller Merrick Garland DOJ Donald Trump Obama Biden Justice Department Carlin Russia
1945: Could Israel Destroy Iran’s Nuclear Facilities in a Strike?

Mark Levin

01:50 min | 6 months ago

1945: Could Israel Destroy Iran’s Nuclear Facilities in a Strike?

"I'm looking here At a piece by 1945 dot com Military site And I'm thinking well we're not going to destroy We're not going to be able to destroy these sites or this site because Biden won't do it Millie won't do it Austin won't do it So could Israel do it on its own Maya Carlin in this publication over the years Israeli military officials have hinted At the countries of and by the way you put noids in the media and the different parties I would think you would support this right Right Over the years it's really military officials have hinted at the countries ability to strike Iran's nuclear facilities if necessary The Jewish state has led successful operations in the past Striking nuclear facilities in Iraq in 1981 and searing 2007 While Iraq and Syria closely positioned to Israel Iran is 1000 miles away The distance between Israel and Iran remains the most challenging obstacle for this type of operation But Israel's arsenal of long-range fighters And its potentially nuclear capability intermediate range ballistic missile Would lead to an effective operation In February the Israeli government estimated that the Islamic Republic of Iran was merely four to 6 months away from achieving a nuclear breakout

Maya Carlin Israel Islamic Republic Of Iran Millie Biden Austin Iraq Syria Israeli Government
Rashida Tlaib Is a Vocal Anti-Semite in Congress

Mark Levin

01:11 min | 6 months ago

Rashida Tlaib Is a Vocal Anti-Semite in Congress

"In her speech Talib railed against what she called the apartheid Israeli government And urged Arab Americans to run for office in order to advance the Palestinian cause and Washington D.C. You remember the cause as they were celebrating on 9 11 Talib has emerged as one of the most vocal anti Israel activists free Beacon She's a vocal anti semite and Congress Well here they are And it's a strong back of the anti semitic boycott divestment and sanctions movement Which obviously intended to destroy Israel economically She has accused Jewish supporters of holding dual loyalties at term widely considered obviously Anti semitic Has an extensive history praising the terrorist groups Hezbollah and Hamas I wonder I wonder if he is a parent who speaks up at school board meetings and I wonder if the FBI and the Department of Justice with unmarried Carlin are keeping an eye on this bastard

Talib Apartheid Israeli Government Washington D.C. Israel Congress Hezbollah Hamas FBI Department Of Justice Carlin
"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:19 min | 7 months ago

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Aesthetically significant. Our jazz critic, Kevin Whitehead, says roach's landmark album, scores in all three categories. They were free. Through Mercedes must be lying can it really be can be can believe it, but that's what they say they know longer as they know longer this is freedom day. Street and day so those shackling chains away. That I see says it's really true if green Abby Lincoln in 1960 singing freedom day. Oscar Brown junior's lyric celebrates Emancipation and maybe looks ahead to freedoms yet to be secured. The album we insist max roach's freedom now suite, epitomizes African American jazz musicians, support for the burgeoning civil rights.

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:08 min | 7 months ago

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Out of the way. And when you got in there, how did you do inside? You mentioned you were a court martial three times. How did you respond to the authority within the military? Poorly to the authority. I was very good at the thing they trained me for, which was electronics and computer analog computers. There was a system called a K system bond system on the B 47 and I was trained in a very elite squadron. I'm proud to say it's one of the few conceits I have about myself, but it is a genuine one. I qualified for a highly elite school and passed with the highest T score they'd ever had. And therefore, but I loved it because of the theory involved. It was all blackboard. It was none of the screwdriver stuff. So when I got to my base to practice this art science that they taught me, I spent a lot of money on me. Right away they tell you, pick this up, put it over there, put those here and just take that. I didn't care for that. And so I became a disc jockey and a downtown commercial station instead when I was 18 and I had already begun my career while I was getting my military out of the way. But I was a behavior problem. They are just as I was in school because I didn't accept arbitrary orders from people who I thought were possibly were inferior. Who were the first comics that you heard where you thought they nailed it. This is what life is about. Like they just described life. Well, you know, I don't know. I know that the gist of your question I can answer. Of course, comedy changed in the 1950s when the individuals emerged and nobody was all the same anymore. It used to be very sane, very safe and very same. And then Lenny Bruce morsel, Nichols and May and a lot of other people in the improv groups and some underground press and so forth. Took hold of comedy and changed it. And so it was that crop in the 50s I was then approaching my 20th birthday. And Lenny Bruce was, of course, of the most, the one who inspired me the most because I saw for the very first time, utter and complete honesty on a stage, and it was a brilliant form of it. It wasn't just honesty. It was, it was a great satire, even in his days of his just his parodies were great. But then he started talking about religion, things and I thought, boy, that's wonderful to know that you can do that, that it can be done. I didn't say, well, I'm going to do that too. But I sort of said, okay, now I know that. And it really did help me later to decide to be myself. How much do you think your comedy has changed when you first, from when you first started doing stand up? Well, of course, the times helped the changes illustrated by the times I began in 1960, I went through about 8 or 9 years of what essentially were the extended 1950s, sort of a button down period. But that was when the country was changing. I was 30 in 1957. The people I was entertaining were in their 40s, and they were the parents of the people who were 20 18 in college changing, beginning to change the nature of our society to a great extent. So I cited more with them because I was anti authoritarian and the authority. And I just let myself revert to my deferred adolescence and be one of them in terms of my work rather than these people, I really disliked who I was entertaining these year old plus people. So that's how my comedy has changed. The times we're safer and I was a safer mainstream comic in the 60s and then I became this other person who was a little more honest and open with language and his thoughts. Were you performing to older audiences because those were the people who could buy the tickets in the places? That you were performing? No, not strictly speaking. What happened was this and I can do this briefly for you. I had always been this law breaker outlaw type kid and adolescent an air force guy as you pointed out. Never stuck by the rules. Always swimming against the tide. But I had a mainstream dream and my dream was to be like Danny Kaye in the movies or to be like Bob Hope in the movies. So I never put those two things together. I never saw that they didn't go together. And I followed this other dream in the way that you did because the only way you could do it was to please people with mainstream safe comedy cuts with the period demanded and so I did that until the two became it became an untenable situation. I couldn't. I could no longer be myself inside and serve these other things. And when I saw the mix when I saw the mistake, I went about correcting it in a slow and orderly manner. It took about two or three years for my change as it were to take place. Well, George Carlin, I'd like to ask you to end our interview by reading the final piece in your new book and the book is called when will Jesus bring the pork chops and this piece is called the secret news. And you're welcome to say anything about writing it before you read it or to just read it or whatever you prefer. I have a big file called news and it has a lot of odd news formats and one of them was this one called the secret news. And this was actually written and designed to be on an album, maybe a studio type album where you could use sound effects and you were simulating an actual broadcasting, but it works this way too with the sound effects indicated verbally. I'll do that for you. It's called the secret news and we hear a news ticker sound effect. And the announcer whispering, saying, good evening ladies and gentlemen, it's time for the secret news and the news ticket gets louder and he goes and the ticker lowers. Here is the secret news. All people are afraid. No one knows what they're doing. Everything is getting worse. Some people deserve to die. Your money is worthless. No one is properly dressed. At least one of your children will disappoint you. The system is rigged. Your house will never be completely clean. All teachers are incompetent. There are people who really dislike you. Nothing is as good as it seems. Things don't last. No one is paying attention. The country is dying. God doesn't care. Shh. George Carlin, thank you so much for talking with us. Sure. Thank you. I always appreciate them that flattering here, an intelligent interview and thank you for that. George Carlin, speaking to Terry gross in 2004. George Carlin's American Dream and outstanding new documentary by Judd Apatow and Michael bonfiglio premieres tonight and tomorrow night on HBO and is available now on the streaming service HBO Max. Coming up, Kevin Whitehead revisits we insist the newly reissued 1960 album by jazz drummer max roach. This is fresh air. Last month, max roach's 1960 album we insist was reissued on CD. It also was named to the national recording registry, a roster of works deemed culturally, historically, or.

Lenny Bruce Nichols George Carlin Danny Kaye the times Bob Hope swimming Michael bonfiglio Terry gross HBO Kevin Whitehead Judd Apatow max roach
"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

08:03 min | 7 months ago

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Get you into trouble as a kid? Well, because I liked language as a saying, my grandfather wrote out all of the works of Shakespeare and his adult life, longhand because of the joy it gave him. Those were his words. I do it for the joy. It gives me. So that gene was active in our family. So I had that as described earlier. But I then started collecting exotic combinations of curses that I heard in my neighborhood. I was probably 13 or 14 at the time. And there were guys who would put together a sentence in the heat of anger or in some ornate descriptive passage in something they were describing. And they would have an adjective or two self hyphenated. They would have made up a form and tacked it on to some noun that it didn't really go with. And the rest of the sentence might have been some colorful verb that was, again, very inventive street language. And some of them were very colorful and exotic and different. They weren't just flat out curses. So I heard these and I started writing them down in another situation where I could tell you what they were. You'd understand a little better even what I mean. But I wrote them down and I had a little list of them. I had about ten or 12 of them. There are a few I can still remember. But I've had that in my wallet. And my mother was a snoop and discovered things I had stolen that way and confronted me with them. But in this case, looking in my wallet, she found this list. And I heard her, I came in one night and I opened the door very slightly in the apartment on the second floor. And I heard it talking to my uncle John, and she was worried about me anyway because I was kind of I was getting like a loose to be a loose cannon kind of adolescent defying as you will and must then. And I heard her saying, I think he may need a psychiatrist, John. I think we may have to get a child psychologist for him because she was telling him these words and showing him this list. So yeah, they got me in trouble that way, but at least it was a creative effort. Although your mother was appalled finding this list of street words in your wallet, you earlier credited your mother with having a love of my younger and helping to instill in you. How did her love of language express itself? And first of all, just to put it in perspective, the portion of my life when my mother and I were at odds is when you're supposed to differentiate yourself from the adult, the parent of the other sex. And I had no father present in the home, so this was a battle between my mother and me for my identity sort of to overdramatize it. But she was wonderful. And she was my hero. She brought up two boys in the Second World War. And an advertising job. She had. And she stimulated that thing in me about language. She would send me to the dictionary. I mean, that was pro forma in a lot of families. I know that's what you do. But she would say kept addiction. I asked her once what peruse meant. I said, ma, I was peruse. She said, well, get the dictionary in here. Let's get that issue. So I look it up and she'd have me use it in a sentence of my own. And we talk about the root of the origin of it and which definition was more useful in current and so forth. And so the next day, when I gave her her newspaper in the evening, it wasn't a nightly custom, but sometimes I went and bought her a newspaper and she came home from work. I brought in her bedroom and gave her the newspaper, and I said, here my I said, would you like to peruse this? And she said, well, maybe I'll give it a cursory glance. It was right back. It was right back to the dictionary. And another thing she would do with that newspaper, she'd be reading a columnist, someone who wrote well, and she would call me into the room and say, look at this, listen to these words. Look how that word cuts. It just cuts through that sentence. And she would make us. She would do all these sort of dramatic they had an effect on her and she was able to transmit that to me through her. She was a person who employed a lot of melodramatic things in her life. She said I should have been on the stage, George. Someday you must tell my story, you know? Why did you drop out of high school in 9th grade? I could see that they weren't offering anything I really needed. I wasn't interested in merely having a credential. And I knew I had the skills I needed and all I needed to do was to work hard on the English language and these skills I had sharpened them. I had a very strong command of the language as it was as I was at that time. And I knew that would develop further. And I knew that I didn't really need all of that stuff that they offer that they teach you to do what I wanted to do. I was very self inner directed and very self sufficient. I had an autonomy in my heart that kept me moving in my own path. Did you know in 9th grade when you dropped out that you wanted to be a comic? Oh, yeah. I knew that in 5th grade. I wrote it a little autobiography then. I said, I want to be a comedian or an impersonator or an announcer or an actor. And I had a plan, the plan was radio first, because there's no audience there, present. You get away with more, be nervous. The nerves are different. Second step would be stand up comedy and once I was a good enough at that, they'd have to let me in the movies like Danny Kaye that was my childhood. I thought it was a birthright and I thought that I had a path figured out and the path worked that way. I just realized later I was a better comedian than I thought and I could abandon the actor part. No, I know you made it onto radio before you became famous as a comic. What was your radio persona? Well, I was on the first job I had was in a place Shreveport, Louisiana, which sounds like kind of a ignored place, but it had 9 stations. It was a hot radio market, as they said. And we were number one. I had a 52 share. Imagine that. A 52 share in the United States market in my afternoon show. So it was top 40, but it wasn't as rigid as it as top 40 became. It wasn't as it didn't sound like a robot time temperature and the label and the name of the artist. You could be a little bit of a personality too. So we played top 40 and I was a very, I was only 18. It was great to be playing the very music that I was dancing to at night. It was nice to go over to a girl in a situation like at a bar or something and say, would you like me to play a song in the radio for you tomorrow? Dedicated to you. It was a little undermanned, but it sure worked. It works like a charm. And would you tuck your way through the instrumental up to the vocal of the record? Some of the times I use the first 8 bars or 16 bars or whatever the instrumental intro was, you bring it up first for about three or four seconds, then you bring it down and say, okay, the new Connie Francis just came in. And I'm exaggerating my disc jockey voice. And here at 15 minutes past 5 on the George Carlin show on KJ, we're going to listen to this brand new one and then move up with the vocals. You know? I loved running a tight board. We ran our own boards, and I loved it. I was so proud of tight cues and segues that were tight, you know, it was just a point of pride. Now you've always opposed authority. I mean, you dropped out of school in 9th grade. You joined the military. You were court martial twice in the military. Three times. Three times. Okay. Yes. Why would somebody who opposes authority so much? Volunteer to go into the military, which has such a hierarchical structure. Yes. Well, at that time, in our history, there was a draft, and the way you avoided the draft was to join. It's an odd thing. It's a bad sounds like a paradox, but it's true. The way you stayed out of the military was to choose when to go in. Not to let them decide. I wanted the choice to be mine. I didn't want to wait. New York, the Jeff poo was very large, and therefore you wouldn't be drafted till your early 20s, which would have interfered with my life plan. I had a little plan when I was 11 years old and I was working through it in my teenage years. And I said, well, I'm not going to get to do this if they're going to draft me. Well, these other guys are 2021. I joined at 17 to get what they call then get the military obligation.

John Shakespeare gene Danny Kaye George Shreveport Louisiana Connie Francis George Carlin United States Jeff poo New York
"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:43 min | 7 months ago

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"An important point about the hypocrisy of all of this. Before we get back to our 2004 interview with George Carlin, let's listen back to an excerpt from his 1990 fresh air interview, in which we also talked about the court cases surrounding the broadcast of his 7 dirty words routine. Did the judges in the various trials get the point, do you think? Absolutely not. I don't think they even listened. I'm sure they didn't listen to the record to hear it in its fullest and best context. I'm sure they read portions of the transcript. It's in the interest, I guess, of the white male religious corporate paramilitary state that we live in to control us. And the FCC, of course, has control only over broadcast media, and I guess they found a way to interpret that form of expression differently from the printed word and the spoken word. The argument which I think is specious is that because this goes out into the home that somehow it's going to injure someone morally if it comes through the speaker. They don't take into account the fact that there is an on off switch on every radio and there is a station selector knob for changing the station. The man who made the complaint, one of these moral commandos, a professional moralist who wants us to live his way, sat in his car with his son and listened to the entire broadcast, and I assume they were not morally degraded in any way. I assumed the child has developed in a normal way in spite of listening to that routine. So where is the argument? I don't follow the damage. I don't see where the damage occurs in this language being used. You know, then he Bruce always said that when he was up on obscenity charges that he wished he could perform the material for the judges, you know? Because they were hearing either reading transcriptions or they were hearing people quote the material. Chop was doing his act. All right, that's it. Yeah, yeah. And Bruce really felt, well, if they're going to get what it's about, they have to hear me do it. Did you feel that way yourself? Well, I feel that the thing was rigged to start with. And I think the outcome was inevitable. But surely it would have been fairer to the process to listen to the recording. And the other thing about it is there was a warning given there was a disclaimer given by the radio station saying that they'll be language on this next recording, which you may find offensive. There was the point made that it was in the context of speaking about protected speech. And certainly, in that case, that has to be a redeeming artistic feature, which is one of the tests for obscenity. Of course, they didn't test it for obscenity. They called it indecency and got around the obscenity law in that manner. George Carlin recorded in 1990. Let's get back to our 2004 interview with him. Do you remember how you were first exposed to four letter words and what your reaction was when you first were? Well, I was I grew up in part of New York City that's a very interesting neighborhood. I lived literally my front door was across the street and I mean literally in its real sense here. Literally across the street from teachers college of Columbia University. And all around me to the south, I had Columbia University teachers college Barnard college, Juilliard School of music was around the corner, the original location, riverside church, the 23 story inter denominational cathedral, the gothic cathedral, was at the end of my street, union theological seminary, the largest seminary in the world of again interdenominational clergy, and around the corner of the Jewish theological seminary, the largest Jewish seminary in the world, St. John, the divine was nearby, and grant's tomb, so it was a highly institutional neighborhood full of learning and serious people. Immediately to the north, down the hill, we had the beginnings of Harlem. We called art section white Harlem because we thought it sounded tough. But there were cross pollination between these two groups. I lived very close by Cubans, Puerto Ricans and dominicans on the one hand and blacks on the other. And when you're in those neighborhoods at the border, my arts was a little Irish enclave, just a little wedge shaped Irish enclave in the middle of all that. Highly populated because we were quite fertile folks. A lot of kids, a lot of kids on the street. And when you live near the border between all black and all white, you don't have the attitudes that the people who are insulated and isolated in the center of those areas have. Those are people who are not in contact daily day to day to day with the opposite. But we did have contact all the time. And when you're on the border between two cultures, you sort of learn to live together. You have a common code of the streets in this case. And so I heard my language from the realistic people in the neighborhood. My big brother for one, but his friends and then all of the tears and Strata of the brothers and sisters under him. Everybody you knew had three or four brothers and sisters and each of them were the same age as your brothers and sisters. So it was kind of interesting, but that's where I got a realistic feel and look at the world. George Carlin, speaking to Terry gross in 2004. After a break, we'll hear more of that conversation. And jazz critic Kevin Whitehead revisits another classic from the 60s, a recently reissued 1960 album by jazz drummer max roach. I'm David B and Cooley, and this is fresh air. The following message comes from NPR sponsor, the almond board of California, chief scientific officer doctor josette Lewis shares why they are working to create new products like beer and bioplastics from all parts of an almond Orchard. So the almond kernel that we eat is only about a third of what comes out of an almond Orchard every year. We found that there's some new uses of almond co products that can deliver greater value to the industry and greater value to the environment. Learn more at almond sustainability dot org. We're listening back to Terry's 2004 interview with comic George Carlin. An excellent new two part documentary George Carlin's American Dream premieres on HBO and HBO Max this weekend. It chronicles Carlin's gradual evolution from family friendly joke teller to topical social commentator. Bombarding his audience with bold observations and passionate expletives. And many of his chosen topics are as topical now as they were then. Pro life conservatives are obsessed with the fetus from conception to 9 months. After that, they don't want to know about you. They don't want to hear from you. No, nothing, no neonatal care, no day care, no head start, no school lunch, no food stamps, no welfare, no nothing. If you're pre born, you're fine, if you're preschool, you're. Conservatives don't give a about you until you reach military age. Then they think you are just fine. Just what they've been looking for. Conservatives want live babies so they can raise them to be dead soldiers. Pro life. They're not pro life. You know what they are. They're anti woman, simple as it gets. Anti Roman and I like it. Now back to Terry's interview with George Carlin. When we left off, he was talking about how he was first exposed to four letter words as a kid..

George Carlin college of Columbia University Bruce Juilliard School of music inter denominational cathedral Jewish theological seminary FCC riverside church Barnard college union theological seminary Kevin Whitehead Columbia University almond board of California josette Lewis Harlem New York City St. John almond co Terry gross Puerto
"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:54 min | 7 months ago

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"To the NPR politics podcast. George Carlin was one of the more popular and influential comics to emerge from the 1960s counter culture. He died in 2008, the week after he had been named the recipient of the Mark Twain prize for American humor. Terry gross spoke with George Carlin in 1990 and again in 2004. We'll hear excerpts from both interviews. When Terry spoke with him in 2004, they listened back to his 1972 recording of Carlin's comic monologue, 7 dirty words you can never say on television. Of course, we bleep the words that made this routine famous. There are 400,000 words in the English language, and there are 7 of them. You can't say on television. What a ratio that is. 399,993. To 7. They must really be banned. They'd have to be outrageous. To be separated from a group that large. All of you over here, U 7. Bad words. That's what they told us they were. Remember? That's a bad word. No bad words. Bad thoughts. Bad intentions. And words. You know the 7, don't you that you can't say on television? Huh? Those are the heavy 7. Those are the ones that'll infect your soul. Curve your spine and keep the country from winning the war. George Carlin, welcome to fresh air. Thanks, Terry. Can you talk about what led to this routine? Like what you were thinking about how you wrote it well, I don't really know that there was a Eureka moment or anything like that. What happened was I'd always held these attitudes. I've always been sort of anti authoritarian and I really don't like arbitrary rules and regulations that are essentially designed to get people in the habit of conforming and obeying authority blindly. So I have always resisted that in my life as a child as an adolescent and as a young adult, and so I held that attitude. That was the fertile ground for all of this. Secondly, I have a strong interest in language that is in part genetic and part then fostered by my mother. And I have always taken great joy in looking closer, more closely at language. So those things were in place. On these other things, we get into the field of hypocrisy, where you really can not pin down why what these rules they want to enforce are. It's just impossible to say this is a blanket rule. You'll see some newspapers print F blank blank K some print F asterisk asterisk K some blank F blank blank blank. Some put the word bleep, some put expletive deleted. So there's no, there's no real consistent standard. It's not a science. It's a notion that they have. And it's superstitious. These words have no power. We give them this power by refusing to be free and easy with them. We give them great power over us. They really in themselves have no power. It's the rest of the sentence that makes them either good or bad. In your 1972 recording, you talk about how it's perfectly okay to say, don't prick your finger, but you can say, don't finger your blank. Yeah, you can't reverse the truth. You can't reverse the two words. So comics work with the power of word. And the fact that certain words are supposed to be taboo, as you point out, that gives them power. That's right. And that makes those words more powerful for you when you want to use them. So do you feel like you've been able to work with the taboo nature of certain words? And make that work in your favor. Well, like in that classic routine. Yeah. That is an interestingly disguised way. And I don't mean you were trying to deceive me or anything, but it was in a disguised way of saying, well, don't some people just use these for shock value. You get this phrase all the time from interviewers, shock value. Well, shock is a kind of a heightened form of surprise and surprise is at the heart of comedy. So if you're using the word in a way to heighten the impact of the sentence or season this, do they are, after all, great seasonings. There are sentences that without the use of hell or dam even, lose all their impact. So they have a proper place in language and in my case, I just like them because they are real and they do have impact. They do make a difference in a sentence, but if you're using them for their own sake, that's probably kind of weak. If you're using them in some way that you feel enhances what you're doing and delivering that's another thing. Did you ever expect that that comedy routine would be actually played on the radio? It would be part of a case that made it all the way to the Supreme Court. And that it would become as important and famous a case as it became. Well, I knew that it wasn't out of the question that it may be maybe played on the radio. FM radio stations at that time, and there were commercial ones who qualified as what was called underground radio. And an awful lot of liberties were taken with music to music that had very kind of hate the words explicit and graphic. But those are the words that would be used by someone to describe those kind of songs. Those lyrics, I knew there was a chance, but of course, you know, no one ever sees other things coming that are unexpected and larger. I just knew that I had done a piece that summed up my position very well and sort of had a nice, it had a wonderful rhythmic the reading of those 7 words, the way they were placed together had a magnificent kind of a jazz feeling a rhythm that was just very natural and satisfying the way those syllables were placed together. And so I knew I had done something that was making.

George Carlin Terry Terry gross Mark Twain Carlin NPR Supreme Court
"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:54 min | 7 months ago

"carlin" Discussed on Fresh Air

"With some of those who truly knew him best. His brother Patrick, his first wife Brenda, and his daughter Kelly. All of them look at George's life and their own with the objective honesty the George eventually brought to his stand up act. And while we learn of George's abuse of father and oppressive mother, and of George and Brenda's descent into drugs and alcoholism, respectively, we also learn about what drove George Carlin to keep developing and altering his approach to comedy. In audiotapes recorded for his autobiography last words, Carl and explains his disdain for authority figures in almost clinically detached terms. My own experience of authority is one of opposition to not just questioning authority, but actively opposing it and trying to undo what it had in mind. Everything that had rules and regulations, I managed to either get kicked out of or leave early on my own. The choir, the altar boys, the Boy Scouts, summer camp, and schools. The first half of this excellent HBO documentary follows George Carlin's many evolutionary stages, providing clear samples of each. Stage one arrives in 1957, when at age 18, young George joins the air force. He lands a part time job as a disc jockey in Louisiana using the kind of on air voice and persona, he would later make fun of. 18 minutes before 5 o'clock, and this is music from Carlin's corner, and that ain't half of it, $30 in the lucky license jackpot, a call going out soon. Coming up Warren storm with trouble. I got trouble. Troubles. He forms a two man comedy team with Jack burns, and they moved to California. The duo breaks up after only a few months, but Carlin stays put, pursuing his interest in comedy. He's in the audience of a Lenny Bruce show on one of the night's Bruce gets arrested. And Carlin gets arrested, too, out of solidarity. His own onstage comedy then, in nightclubs and on TV, is mainstream and conventional. Until suddenly it isn't. When he starts to introduce such counterculture concepts and characters as TVs obviously drugged out, hippy dippy weather me. Okay, the radar is picking up a line of thunder showers from Utica New York to Middletown. However, the radar is also picking up a squadron of Russian ICBMs. I wouldn't sweat the thunder, shower. Tonight. No 25° to Mars high whenever I get up. As the 60s progresses and Carlin decides to talk about issues more directly, he refocuses his energies. He starts booking appearances almost exclusively on college campuses, where the students would be more receptive to his new material. His beard and his hair get longer, and his comedy routines get more topical. As when heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War has him stripped of his title for several years before finally being allowed to step back into the ring. George Carlin, talking outdoors to a small college crowd, sees more than a little irony in that whole situation. Hey, they're letting Ali fight. He happened to lose, but at least they're letting him work again, right? For three years, the cat couldn't work. Muhammad Ali. And of course he had an unusual job beating people up, you know? But the government wanted to change jobs. The government wanted him to kill people. He said, no, that's where I draw the line. I'll beat him up, but I don't want to kill him. And the government got spiteful, they said, look, if you won't kill him, we won't let you beat him up. From there, George Carlin's comedy routines get more dense, more bold, and more obsessed with the poetry, meanings, and impact of language. All this leads to such uncensored comedy albums as class clown. Put out, I learned in this documentary by a record label owned by another groundbreaking comedian, Flip Wilson. That album includes his infamous 7 dirty words routine, which identifies and talks about the 7 words you can't say on television. When New York radio station WBAI played parts of that routine, it was objected to by an outraged parent tuning in, leading to a court case pitting the FCC against the corporate owners of the radio station. It was a free speech case, FCC versus the Pacific a foundation that went all the way to the Supreme Court. The court voted in favor of the FCC in what basically was a blow against free speech. Carlin wasn't saying those words for shock value. He was talking about their usage and symbolism and why they had been given such power. Many young George Carlin listeners recognized the subtleties in the issue and the comedy routine that the Supreme Court had not, and some of them grew up to also become comedians obsessed with words. One of those youngsters was Stephen Colbert, who later became a household name because of such self created words as truthiness. He was a giant George Carlin fan. Is that he's The Beatles? Of comedy. At a certain point in his career, there's this huge shift. You know, he's doing the community conversion of love me do for the first part of his career. And then suddenly he puts out the comedic white album. Another major George Carlin enthusiast was Jerry Seinfeld, who also, like Carlin, delighted in questioning the accepted norms around him and using precise language to do so. He personified that thing that you see when you're young and you go that. That's it. That's the thing. That's the thing to be. And I want it to be just like him getting every word in the right spot. Because when he did it, it thrilled me, you know. And I wanted to do that. I wanted that skill. And I've spent my life pursuing it. The first night of George Carlin's American Dream follows his rise to stardom, his 7 dirty words controversy, and his counterculture coronation as the very first guest host on the premiere episode of Saturday Night Live. It ends, though, with Carlin's seemingly on the wane, no longer in touch or in Vogue. But he was determined to change and rise again by being even truer to himself and his opinions. In part two of American Dream, and for the rest of his life, George Carlin did exactly that. George Carlin's American Dream premieres tonight and tomorrow night on HBO with both parts available today on HBO Max. After a break, we're going to listen back to portions of two of Terry's interviews with George Carlin. This is fresh air. This message comes from NPR sponsor, the John templeton foundation, who believes in advancing humanity's understanding of the profound questions in life, funding research and catalyzing conversations that inspire people with awe and wonder since 1987. The John templeton foundation is proud to support leading scientists, philosophers, and theologians from around the world. Learn about the latest discoveries related to black holes, complexity, forgiveness, and free will at templeton dot org. This is Tamara Keith from the NPR politics podcast. We've been following the news of the draft leaked opinion from the Supreme Court on roe V wade. For more on what life in the U.S. could look like if roe is overturned, listen.

George Carlin Carlin George Brenda George joins Jack burns Muhammad Ali FCC HBO Lenny Bruce Utica Carl Patrick Kelly Middletown Flip Wilson Louisiana New York Warren
Jim Jordan and Mike Johnson's Letter to Merrick Garland

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Jim Jordan and Mike Johnson's Letter to Merrick Garland

"So this is from Jim Jordan and Mike Johnson's letter to Merrick Garland. It says, and one investigation following your directive, the FBI's field office, interviewed a mom for allegedly telling a local school board we are coming for you. The complaint, which came into the FBI through the national threat operations center snitch line that he set up, the Carlin set up, alleged that the mom was a threat because she belonged to a right-wing moms group known as moms for liberty. Moms for liberty. And because she is a gun owner. When the FBI agent interviewed the mob, she told the agent that she was upset about the school board mask mandates and that her statement was a warning that her organization would seek to replace the school board with new members through the electoral process. Bravo, it's exactly what you're supposed to do. I thought this was a democracy, gets everybody's favorite word on the left these days. There's another one. The FBI's field office opened an investigation subsequent to your directive into a dad opposed to mask mandates. The complaint came in through the national threat operations center snitch line that, again, Merrick Garland set up, and alleged that the dad fit the profile of an insurrectionist. Because, quote, he rails against the government, believes all conspiracy theories and has a lot of guns and threatens to use them. When an FBI agent interviewed the complainant, the complainant admitted they had no specific information or observations of any crimes or threats, but they contacted the FBI after learning. The Justice Department had a website to submit tips to the FBI in regards to any concerning behavior directed towards school boards. You see how this works, folks? You give them a snitch line and then every wacko left left wing crazy starts calling in conservatives.

FBI Merrick Garland National Threat Operations Cen Jim Jordan Mike Johnson Carlin Bravo Justice Department
"carlin" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

07:37 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Will open. It doesn't. It actually doesn't. Like most people around us kind of see us more for who we really are. And some people that's like, oh, I've always wanted to be a writer, but oh, I can't tell my husband that or my kids that or my whatever that, you know, and then they start to do and it's like, their kids are thrilled for them, you know, or their husband thinks it's great that they're expressing them, you know, whatever it is. You know, and there's some cases where some people come to me and marriages do fall apart. And careers are walked away from, but these are things that were happening anyway in their lives and they needed some structure and support to get through that. I work with women who are mainly over 40 and you know kind of in that facing that like what is all of this about type of moment in their life. And then out of the emerging part of the process is really the embodying phase, which is this is where the coaching really comes in and what I love about it is and what is just so true about life is that you aren't really going to change until you actually take action. And I know that sounds ridiculously simple and clear, but I don't think many of us really get that. You don't. And that it's in the doing is where the real learning actually begins because it's where we then were kind of all like scientists and experimenters. And it's not like it's like, oh, I've had these insights and I've had this opening and I understand more of myself and I'm ready to go ahead. And it's going to unfold exactly as I think it will. No, it's going to step into something and you're going to try something and then you're going to come back and go, um, what's working now? What's not working? You know, you're going to start assessing immediately because that's how that's how we do life. Especially when we're doing something new in life. And so I just love watching this, I've had this program going for about three years now. And it's just been so amazing to watch women who are really ready for a more authentic fulfilling version of their life. And they just need community and some structure and some information and some coaching. And to watch them step out of their comfort zones and to step out of their ideas of who they think they were supposed to be, that's the big thing, you know? And the reason I started this work is because that's the path my life is taken. I always had this idea of who I thought I was supposed to be. And when I started to relax and just be who I am and live the life that really feeds me. Yes. Well, I'm sure you're familiar with Karen horney and the feminist psychoanalyst. Yes. Who really gave Freud a run for his money? She's like, you crazy. You're talking crazy talk Freud. You need some feminist psychology here. I've been trying so hard to tell people about her. I wrote an article for scientific American called the underappreciated legacy of Karen horney because she's been forgotten in the annals of the history of psychology to a large degree. That's unfair. She had this idea, this notion, the tyrannical shoulds that's her phrase. And so remember this. I was studying her at Pacific. This is what you're talking about. And I'm glad that you brought this up and that you talk about how a lot of women struggle this, of course, obviously a lot of men struggle with it too. But yeah, there are unique societal cultural expectations that are absolutely gendered to a certain degree in our culture, right? That need to be talked about. Yeah, absolutely. And men have their own version of this, a 100%. I mean, and it's funny because the, and I don't know if it's a fair word to use or not. But what I really feel like I'm doing and helping women with is dismantle the inner patriarchy within them. I know. And I know patriarchy is such a buzz word and it's kind of a trigger word and it is so interesting you brought up her work because it is a tyrannical system of thought. And, you know, patriarchy has that kind of bent to it. And it's most extreme form. You know, I mean, you know, if you've studied any Greek or Roman history, women were not treated very well back then. It was like the birth of democracy and women were like, I think third class citizens at that point. You know, there was not a lot of respect for women in those great thinkers. So it is this dismantling of this tyrannical should system, which is what I think how I'm going to start to talk about the article. I'll send you the article. Please do. I would love that because we did we studied her Pacifica and Pacific graduate institute where I went and got my master's is all about jungian and the sacred feminine and all that kind of stuff. So yeah, and we had a lot of early depth psychologists, stuff we studied. And yeah, absolutely. Awesome. Once you start going down that rabbit hole, your mind will be bold because she was also one of the first humanistic thinkers in my view. She often wrote about the importance of wholeness and she's like, how come the field of psychology is not talking about the whole personality structure? One part of us and she also believed in growth. She has this quote that I love that says something to the effect of, well, we can grow and change up until the day we die. Yeah. It's too late the day after you die, but at least at least some people think you go on to another lifetime and you're still growing, so they're still growing. To go, that's actually an interesting question. I think that's open for debate. You never see a ghost like change, like Casper never looks different. No, he doesn't. He doesn't, but he still may be doing work on himself. Who knows? There's a bit there somewhere. But anyway. Anyway, I just think the more you go down that rabbit hole and I'd be happy to load you up. I would love that. That would be awesome. Yeah, so this is a direct quote from your website. The world needs women more than ever to step up and claim their authentic power. It's time for women to get out of their own way to step into what they truly want and who they want to be when you commit to big things, big things happen. My question from that is about this word authenticity because I'm very, very interested in the definition of authenticity because there's various definitions in the literature. Anyway, without getting too much in the weeds about this, I just would love to hear what that means to you. Is it like a self actualized version of authenticity? Is that where you're kind of referring to? I've always writing about this stuff and my brain isn't very hooked in today to all of that. But there is something about it is for me authenticity feels like there is a congruence between my insides and my outsides. And there's something about being free of cultural restraints.

Karen horney Freud Pacific graduate institute Pacific Casper
"carlin" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

05:10 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Comedy. It was particularly interesting, talking to Kelly about how her father George Carlin would react to many of the debates and political divides that are going on in the world today. And now I bring you Kelly Carlin. Kelly, it's so great to chat with you today on the psychology podcast. It's about time. We've only been trying to do this for like, I don't know. Probably 5 years. Yeah, it's been a while and I keep seeing you on Twitter and I love the stuff you're putting out there and I'm really looking forward to sharing a spotlight on you today. Thank you. You've lived quite an interesting life so far. Yeah? Yeah, I would say so for sure. Lots of like twists and turns and plot on things. It's been a good fall life so far. I'd like more of it. I'm not done with it. Just in case anyone's listening, but yeah, no, I've had a lot of amazing exciting things and a lot of times and years where it was difficult and hard and weird and all of that. But I feel very grateful for where I am in my life right now. Yeah. Awesome. Well, I'm glad to hear that. I'm really glad to hear that. So for people who are wondering if there's any connection to the comedian George Carlin, yes, you are his daughter, right? Yes. That can be confirmed. That can be confirmed. And I was ring something interesting because interesting article because he had a bit in his 1999 HBO special. You were all diseased. He had a bit about coddling, you know? And when I was reading this article, you had remarked that your childhood with him was the opposite of coddling, even maybe to a degree where maybe there's a balance that needs to be struck. You have extreme calling on the one end, but then you kind of talked in a little bit about your own childhood, which might be an extremely end. Is that right? It's complicated. And you did a whole book about it, right? Yeah, I did a solo show about my life with my parents and all of that. But I mean, my dad coddled me in lots of ways. And then in other ways, I was a typical gen X or my parents, I was like, I was raised by wolves, you know? I mean, those of us who were born in the early and mid and late 60s, our parents weren't parenting. What's in a lot of parenting going on? There wasn't some ways, but for the most part, they were being out being adolescents when they should have been being parents. And so there was a lot of having to grow up fast and being the only adult in the room sometimes and being parentified and all of that stuff. And yet at the same time, my dad always rescued me, financially, and always rescued me in other ways, so I never had to kind of learn how to live with adult consequences in other areas of my life. So, you know, none of these things are that simple and that easy to explain. But the good news is that I was I knew I was loved. I knew I was a cherished. I knew I was a respected in many ways. And my mother had really serious addiction issues when I was a kid growing up and she got sober when I was around 12. So once she got sober, our family life changed a lot and my dad had certainly his own addiction issues also. But my mother was a drinker. She was an alcoholic. So that was really tough. But yeah, you know, parents are, you know, parents are people. Doing the best they could. And my dad always was looking out for me and always worried about me and felt really guilty about those crazy years where he and my mom really kind of went off the deep end with drugs and alcohol. But at the same time, it was the era, you know, we were really all of my Friends, parents. We were all left to our own devices. Yeah. Well, I know you're deeply interested in psychology. And I've got my masters in jungian depth psychology. Yeah. And I love and we could really nerd out about that for sure. We certainly could. I hope so. Part of my own interest in psychology certainly came from family Discord. This is apparently the first time I ever talked. My mom and my grandma were arguing in the front seat of the car in one of their usual arguments, heated fights. And I said, both of you just shut up. Grandma, this is what my mom's trying to say, and I did all that and said, mom, this is what my grandma is trying to say, et cetera, et cetera. And they were like, Joel dropped. I think I was 7 years old. I don't know. They looked in the back of the backseat of the car. And they're like, what? Is going on here? So I feel like being the peacemaker for me and I don't know, I just bring this up to see if you resonate at all with this kind of led to a real deep interest in human psychology because I felt like I had to be a peacekeeper peacekeeper in a big way as a child myself. Yeah, I was definitely the peacekeeper in the family. A 100%. I was an only child..

George Carlin Kelly Carlin Kelly HBO Twitter Joel
Michael West as "Tree"   A Comedy Interview   Show #84 - burst 01

Standup Comedy "Your Host and MC"

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Michael West as "Tree" A Comedy Interview Show #84 - burst 01

"But he's a big guy that has seen a block out the sun. He wore a black leather jacket. Like kind of like you'd picture from the biker movies and black leather chaps and and was kind of an intimidating figure. Well okay you were scary looking guy you would come on stage in everybody in the room would kind of lean back a little bit and what was so interesting was that you had this kind of scary big persona on stage but off stage. A lot of the staff commented on you being one of nicest guys they ever worked with and by the way. Thank you for that When i told several the old staff people that i was going to be interviewing you. They were not only a very excited. That we connected but wanted to share that you're one of their favourite people to work with because you were such a nice guy off state so there's that but then when i would go through the rules at the beginning of my set rule number one was always tip your server would. Yeah we reinforce. The course of the evening because i came from a background of like over thirty years in food and beverage the bartender by cook in my mom's restaurant when i was thirteen. So so food beverages my blood. We'll show you imagine this. Big intimidating guy Laid out in black leather coming out and pointing at the audience. And saying you will tip the waitresses. I learned. I learned to why you say the word server servers. Well there you go but still. It was a great way to start off your set. So let's let's back up a little bit. Because i know what Working with you how. That was it laughs but Share with the audience. How did you kind of fall into. Stand up comedy. It's something that i had. Since i was a kid and i'm probably dating myself but growing up watching the old ed sullivan show and shows variety shows I always loved the when the comedian came again. You like checking green myron cohen You know the old borscht belt comics the first ones and then Involved into you know cosby carlin's Which she prior. Before he turned into richard pryor notice when people were watching. You know family watching it. Everybody was laughing and so everybody was in a good mood. And i always liked

Nightclub Stand-Up Comedy Tree Michaelwest Laugh Funny Myron Cohen Ed Sullivan Cosby Carlin Richard Pryor
"carlin" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

The Jordan Harbinger Show

02:04 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on The Jordan Harbinger Show

"That's great. That's a great board. I think the two most different places. I could think of right. But that's what that guy was talking about with eleven or something different nations. I mean right. We have partly. This is a big country problem right. I mean china has great differences. You go to the west of china. It is a very different place and they have very different issues with people like the warriors or that were the muslim central asian areas of china which are so different than the han areas right. I think smaller countries probably deal with this less. Although look at a place like iraq iraq had three major divisions on a ton of minor ones. I mean yet shiite. She had soon as yet kurds and they used to. Before saddam hussein was deposed. They used to say about him. That it may take an iron fist in here that about yugoslavia to an iron-fisted regime to keep these people from killing each other. Which is what they would say at the time. They naturally want to do so. I don't know. I think all i can talk about with. Even a semblance of view is our country. And i do think we naturally pull ourselves apart. I think you're seeing that now and tie this all in a bow. I'm wondering if the social media aspect of it isn't accelerating amplifying the whole thing. I think you're right. I think you're right. I wanna clarify my earlier statement. Because i kind of cut my way to work clarifying statements. I have about six. I'd like to clarify. I just want to make sure that what i said. Look we don't want the united states of san francisco but we also don't want the united states of mississippi. I think. I only said half that. And i think a bunch of people were like this guy. He hates the south and love san francisco. I just went to san francisco. We don't want the people who run that place. Run the whole country but neither do we want. I would say that there are a few things about san francisco. I wouldn't mind having a few things about mississippi. I wouldn't mind having. I liked that i liked. The food in both places are extremely has lots to recommend itself. Great restaurants in san francisco. We can leave it right there for that particular line of thought right. I know you talk radio and you have to see this. Now when you consume media political hacks and talk show hosts. They love to misuse historical examples. Right they'll say like this situation this situation. We're in right now. It's the same as dot dot dot hitler in one thousand nine hundred thirty eight and it doesn't even matter what they're talking about..

china iraq san francisco united states of mississippi saddam hussein yugoslavia united states mississippi
"carlin" Discussed on Túnel de vento

Túnel de vento

07:18 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on Túnel de vento

"Vive <hes> vive equipped in what wall decor dogmas was when these incommoded civil the preakness creams crimson repeal. Waesche when you lose george carlin. Elliot's some the pursuer ulan swing caps. He's put ash muslim. Ms mc stemmed the goof francia mc stone doom. ish bureau. Sound which tom did. George carlin so stuckey steam. When you lose. So stu where might people east. You ought to the trash deal in june to do against knicks foot over in a ring ring at tech there suji arguing. Will miss holton do eleni. Blues josh scheduling. Follow swing george carlin misquakees fall. George carlin this strange mayes of again to is meant modern jentzsch as stay on rasa. He falcons super tuto volumes. And the viewer kyong content. Pow ash bookish segment. Gary defeated mentha qui vient tunes euch civil and would yell at. They're put in a while winchcombe with yellen and evokes greeted out these cologne management. Rather oku visual bookish. George carlin a swim falls assault. Quainton reached the epa vehement. The quizzes much relish could concern would mostly showering mesh niche premiss. Yeesh the v the professional. George carlin you'll come so wish them lucian rue the starred rather specified says on cordelia stars yakuza quiz via in leash. There's massive muslim men tutor. Yeah <hes> spat back fragments. Tackle fossil in contra owned george carlin star a seek proper you swim imagine teague bhaskar town. He starts getting seal to kill at the sweet at all to emit to issues issues so asked them make you zero s the possessing east salt abuse abysmal inconvenient masses. Kim them but look and lesions approve it before about the male democ cows into bullying. You know tweeted. E- employed gordon philosopher moore e caution shugart super convenient comedian fash mma piazza beata. Them seem own lack promising piano album or physics. You believe the law wish the comment cup. It open mass bruce. solve this. You seen you a visa ville ish compliment. Chronic is released each child. Because you seen you key amherst nikolas any savile. Ceo shikwati ouch who intellect wise yummies. Worcester see lasts orange diagnostics. Calm sewer a launch. Since this obscure every meant masuma parrot absolutely pass slow hip law few of survey mash up a besson kill susie casuals ilna. Sewers are starting a condition. Others steve nash. Mika mayes year process launch. Assu a decent government. No michelle manche shovel. The vehicles process. Windy didn't end since now. Who send the carleen. it also varies. So we'll see them. We need the fee. you'll muslims. There's india's ange tomato soup. Pursuant seizure incorporates as contests weaving password at the start are jewish bleached inch pew that this win to on the boys. Thirty the to my veg. E bull visitation school source will have result you into the school of zone team temp through petya mosquito visa cameras on my job movies. On scene path you movie. Zanchi address should is final. And the consequent team he continues to be carrying a former camilla. Barak mir out truce in india's and say and pavel groom wish that into still volatile yeston. Polat there's necklace by then soon. Easter viking cement clear for party push guessing as well so the gavitt nist cosmic yavuz seen liam show lawyer single and the person that you allow neglect well boom would eastern but ask your salted sue. We simple mesh cabal. Steve martin is seeing somebody. With whom wish that who should give a mccovey. Cigarettes bash diverse chronic bachelor firma. Camille follow mail. Order soon was compiled sues up now it but as momentum. Sewer reopens eastern point. New assassinate him to one in contempt. And you think of some old through but as would sipe needed serum quiz lakers res silent. Battling with asleep have ruined squished. Boone would remain this in psalm. Darville mash cross implemented. Stan stasiak nausea. Would pronouncing sundar will ever simp- park would add permanency schmancy that yes a patron. See the city of lalo book michigan apart here. A medical suit prison gyms nauseating forms known calcium. Scooting are woodenness. Would that seizure comedian. Sison sewer companies urge staff zone intellect one minutes on kosovo with deep zoom shirow europeans islamization malene. The stone do brute who start a patten's interested in carrying in tow inventory contain mercato longer. It pursue provided them falls become sean part indian rivera the interval scottish segment carmen ramya. You're seeing things simple zone. The geologist will sound substandard media. Mining a swanscombe force was with tricia them for a sweet crashing. The temps attempts zeroed encompass embargo sufis. You empathic is podcast level. Beijing volcker are mildly bluer. She can with lavish yet. Day bro sema.

George carlin Waesche suji jentzsch yellen Quainton lucian rue teague bhaskar gordon philosopher moore piazza beata amherst nikolas Ceo shikwati susie casuals holton Mika mayes michelle manche carleen stu Elliot knicks
"carlin" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

"I was supposed to deliver at the president's position I went there a person who outranked me delivered the opposite talking points with the vice president directly told me to deliver during that meeting and Can't tell you how angering that was. When i walked out of that room. Yeah louis. Were you raised republican. I was. I talked to you in the shadow of the goldwater miller from cancer conservative family. I'm mexican american. My mom is very very catholic I'm actually part jewish as well. So i hard time representative catholic school. I gotcha well just you know. It's interesting because i i sort of i look at the the sort of what's become of i guess your party or the you know my dad's party. Whoever i even. George bush who i think is war criminal. We'll talk about that later. But we got us into afghanistan. Let's not talk about it but my point is like you know when he talked about compassionate conservative was for immigration reform. I mean even then it was not this level of crazy worrying where you you've seen right wingers literally cheering for the taliban like some of these right wing republic anything to try to bash. Joe biden there rooting for the enemy. I mean this fight against colvin. Were fighting them the the enemies within i mean it's it's isn't that sort of a sad state of the republican party. The the you know. We're yeah we're fighting cove and them on the home front and they're rooting for the taliban. It appears over since it's insanity it's and i just don't know you know. Gop that i that i knew back in the day is dead right now. I don't see any relates. i mean there's few and far between people still stand for it. And i i think it's so fascinating to watch the divide surfacing within the republican party especially on the afghan refugees and the issue. Right you have some people we've got their. Us allies get him over here. And then you have split and it's very fascinating to watch where this narrative is going to go now. But i certainly. I don't identify with any of what is happening in the party. And i you know i'm i'm a moderate conservative but i don't really i can't. I can't call myself a republican anymore. When i am sick to my stomach. What who these people are what they've become or the past. Few years ain't got such good news for friendship. Okay but you should address. Greg abbott on twitter. You said you've continuously challenged leaders across texas making it harder for communities to fight this cova pandemic cave to trump pander to his base today a wishes speedy recovery from covet. But even more so. I wish you would change of moral compass conscience and i just i hear it in your voice. I don't i don't feel hope for this person. That's the republican party. Do you know. And i am extremely angry with abbott. And you. I grew up in texas. I have seen firsthand hand. What he's done to state and local leaders That are trying to manage on how to protect their local populations in school children. I mean i. I cannot wrap my head around the fact that you are purchasing going out of your way to make it incredibly challenging for people to fight this pandemic just because it's you know platform and you're doubling down on something that you started doing under trumpet your so scared of this base that you will go along with the narrative that puts people at risk that kills people. Yeah i. it's recalling shameless. And it's irresponsible as well..

goldwater miller republican party taliban George bush colvin Joe biden louis afghanistan cancer Greg abbott texas twitter abbott Us
"carlin" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

"I don't know it's not that crazy. We had donald. Trump is president for years. We had already schwarznegger. I know an arnold actually ended up being a decent governor. I mean you know. He's like kind of a heat basically. He's a decent human to start with so that helps but Yeah no it's it's kind of like a part of the script right now. I guess it's like any any buddy with who can say the word liberty out loud a bunch of times gets people excited on the other side. I may part company with you on schwarzenegger being greg governor. However he is saying he's been you know about getting vaccinated a lot. I mean he's the sand person at least and he's not really. You're right like a traditional right wing. Wack republican larry elder is brightest wing whack. You can get yeah. He's he's he's totally In his own little world. And that's what seems to feed people. These days is being your own little bubble and give people in. Let's say what people wanna hear. And and then you get to be president or governor. Who knows i mean. It's it's terrifying. It's like i feel like we do live in some sort of autocratic east european strange country right now. I feel like for all the people that go. What would your dad. Your dad might be like going on. Jesus glad i'm out of this. I can't even write this anymore. It's like so beyond idiosyncrasy. I mean i don't even know what he would say about. People eating horse paste cure cove. It i mean it's the fda had to tweet people you're not a horse or a cow. Stop it seriously. I mean yeah. Yeah he did talk about how Think how stupid. The average person is and then realize that half the population is stupider the more stupid than that. So you know i mean it. It really is. I mean. He always saw the majority of people as non thinkers and just followers. And and of course you know what's funny about. It is people who were in this kind of liberty First amendment you know no speech kind of place Think that just because he spoke out against the system that he would be in a line with them but they don't understand that he was speaking out against the very people who are luring them by the nose like donald trump. I mean my dad hated hated. Donald trump best common on twitter is. They're calling people that are vaccinated sheep and they're literally taking medicine that's meant for sheep. I mean it's it's i saw. The rally trump said to get vaccinated and he. He was booed so now. He's lost control of his own monsters. Monsters laws lost control of the other monsters that he created brainwashed cult and social media has done it for us and i really would love to see the internet just burned down. I think it'd be the best thing the planet we could all go back to just actually calling people on the phone writing them a nice note or or running into them at the supermarket. I'm i'm done. I'm done with social media. It's i'm on twitter. But it's like i just don't see the promise of it anymore. I just see it as a tool for really stupid people to get even stupider. Yeah yeah. I mean it's i now i can see why you're mostly distracted by. Steve is lonzo. Ball's on the white lotus. Because that's what i need. I need to turn off the tv watcher. Rom com watched something else and yes. I was also impressed by. Its very i guessing there..

schwarznegger greg governor larry elder Trump schwarzenegger arnold donald donald trump fda twitter trump lonzo Steve
"carlin" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

04:28 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on Stephanie Miller's Happy Hour Podcast

"Happy happy hour walked week right. I mean wearing my biden harris shirt. Because thank you. Mr president and we have kelly carlin anna libya troy. We brought in the big guns for a big week. Olivia tori who was in the trump. Administration's fancy schmancy national security something blah blah blah. Mike pence advisor. Flom nar but she was able to talk about the twin disasters that trump left us with coverted and this afghanistan deal with only the taliban. Thank god to her for speaking out We've had short-leg we've had short term memory loss about how we got in this mess and aghanistan and the visa program which trump fucked on purpose with stephen miller. This is why we've had the tragedy. We've had this week in afghanistan and the backlog of people trying to get out because they made it as difficult as possible for us to take africa afghan refugees and she was so bothered by what went on in the trump administration. She's no longer public. No thank god. Yes we were bonding willy. Nilly over former republican families. All right and kelly carlin yes was is just always fantastic. We said like she's she's always so gracious about. What would your dad. George carlin of fill in the blank eichel. I wanna know what kelly carlin because she is equally smart and funny and she was saying all these fucking anti vaccines that keep using the you know the him talking about your own immunity and we swam in the east river. That's why we need you know. And she said i gotta tell you he'd be the first in line for vaccines he was because he was a man of science. Yes yes he would have been the first in line vaccine. It's it's Okay anyway so these are the perfect and also it's all girls because boys are dumb and largely got all the shit. We're in this week for at us. That's my.

kelly carlin biden harris anna libya Olivia tori Flom Mr president Mike pence afghanistan stephen miller taliban George carlin africa east river us
"carlin" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

07:59 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Just the brookings institute alone has right not gonna be a fundamental deterrence to their behavior if you want to Attack them or impose consequences back to deter that type of behavior in the future. You need to instead focus where we're strong which often is in the financial sector. They're week to change behavior. All right. so let's talk about these indictments When you guys brought the p. l. a. indictment and for those who do not remember this was the first case where we and by we here. I mean you since. You were the Assistant attorney general for national security at the time named names of individual hackers working for foreign intelligence agencies to steal. Us intellectual property and the indictment was an uncommonly good read just as a as a matter of of prosecutorial storytelling about something. You know how this operation had happened. It was it followed A pretty amazing bit of private-sector forensic work on What has a on by the citizen lab and you know And you know other kind of private sector groups on on this particular advanced persistent threat And there was a lot of criticism of it including from my law. Fair colleague jack goldsmith which you know the nature of the criticism was. Hey you're never gonna get custody of these people you're giving up significant intelligence Secrecy in order to do this. It's not gonna change china's behavior and so other than sort of the us government thumping. It's chest what does it do. So i've been thinking about this debate in you and jack had a kind of public back and forth about this and i. I've been thinking about this a lot. Because of course you could make exactly the same criticism of bob muller for the hacking indictment and the the internet research agency social media indictment in the russia investigation case. Both of which we don't have custody over the people it's presumably not going to you know vladimir putin's not going to say. Oh my god. They've prosecuted people. I can't keep hacking people anymore so we now had a couple year. Few years of these indictments happening And the responses to them happening. And i'm interested for your thoughts on first of all. What is the history of this type of indictment so far. And what is the evidence that it does anything other than make us all feel good so i think you're right and then back up that that is where the justice department is now. They're moving full speed ahead with this approach that began with the the first public. Indication was the indictment of those five members of unit six one three nine eight a specialized unit of the people's liberation army. You can say ugly guerrilla gig by the moniker ugly gorilla there to make you Make you happy. But my favorite part of that indictment. I always think too i think Former director comey talked about china chinese economic espionage. Being so noisy it was like a guerilla going around your house in this case literally what he called him so ugly guerrilla when. Run your house so so you can draw a line from there to the justice department now continuing a strategy of figuring out who did it making it public and in seeking to us not just the criminal justice system and i'll a back up on that but but not leaving the criminal justice system off the table and instead using an all tools of government power to raise the cost. And you see that. Not just with the case. That director mueller Brought in his role a special counsel which i would argue vital to not just Whether or not we bring them before a court of law but to educating us about what the threat was and now you've seen that with a case that was moved from the special counsel to the national security division. The current deputy attorney general rod rosenstein announced a new policy at the justice department. Which said we are going to our policy. Presumption is is around september. Twenty fifth gonna make public science of election interference that we see before the election then under seal at easter district of virginia not brought by the special counsel was a case that was returned. An a complaint that said they laid out how the russians activity wasn't just in the past but charge someone with attempting to interfere in the twenty eighteen election. This is the atlanta luciano of her case. Exactly in that that strategic announcement that we're gonna make it public and then follow following through shows that they're committed to this approach and let me back up on why. That is the right thing to do. Yes so i like. I have no doubt that it exposes information. It put stuff out there. It really like i mean shows that there was this operation which has important collateral domestic political effects since the president denies the premise right. But i'm interested in it from a cybersecurity code war point of view. What does it get you so one. This is about bringing it out of the shadows one. It educates those who need to protect these systems on what the threats are by giving it in real incredible detail so when a company is trying to figure out how much to budget on putting in new systems to protect itself from cyberattack or and in twenty fourteen this was still very much the mindset needs to move from a mindset of thinking. Hey if i just get the right. it guy. i don't understand what they say. But if they just get the right guy they're gonna fix this so In keep the person out of my system changing that mindset to one that recognizes there is no government or private sector system that can keep a dedicated adversary like the second largest military in the world out of your system so you need to move more towards a risk management resilience mindset by the way a change that the government Needed to go through as well which we saw in the office of personnel management so when educating number two alpha use this example for non-lawyers you've Many lawyers who listened to your podcast but think of an easement. So this is the idea in common law that if you let someone walk across your lawn long enough they get the legal right to walk across your lawn and that's why we put up. No trespass signs won't international. Law is fundamentally a law of customary law and while we were accepting the gorilla banging around the house where everybody could tell that it was china and they were stealing and weren't even hiding their tracks. I mean they weren't even using proxies. They weren't even using service that hid their identity. Real you knew. It was coming from china when you're a company as long as we were tolerating saying nothing keeping it classified keeping an intelligence space. We were making international law. Doing nothing did something. It created international law. That said it is okay to use your military and intelligence services just like traditional.

brookings institute jack goldsmith justice department bob muller people's liberation army comey national security division rod rosenstein china vladimir putin us government russia jack mueller Us virginia atlanta office of personnel management
"carlin" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Or customers have given him that information. That guy asked for five hundred bucks. He was an extremist from kosovo and he actually moved to malaysia. Twenty one to get access to better ban Bandwidth believe it or not in part and so using that better bandwidth. he then works with fellow extremist in kosovo. The two of them hack into this. Us company steal information that's entrusted to them. Ask for five hundred bucks through bitcoin so from the perspective of the company if they don't work with government it looks like a low level Criminal computer hack for five hundred bucks buy from malaysia. He becomes friends with junaid hussain that extremist from england. Who's moved iraq assyria and they only meet through twitter. They exchange direct messages. That's like half my friends. I only know through twitter. Watch out they may not be. They appear to be although in this case. I think another work in this case they did and you see if you can convince him. Hey passover that information to me and you need to sing could care less about five hundred bucks but he wants to do is what. The islamic state does which is kill with And murder people. Muslims and non muslims alike with impunity. At that time they were bringing women and children into slavery and they were using rape as a political tool so instead of getting five hundred bucks would he does his take. This information personal information entrusted to a us company. Turn it into a kill list by looking looking for whose email address looks like their military or state police and then pushes it back through twitter and says kill these people where they live. We were able to take effective action. And that's why. I can go into so many details. That were otherwise untold in the book. So that you can tell We were able to work with malaysian through the state department. Get for easy arrest. Any serving twenty years in virginia for his crime the first time we charged computer hacking terrorism in the same indictment and was outside the reach of law enforcement iraq assyria and was killed in a publicly acknowledged military strike by central command. But think about that. You know ben you were talking about the new National security issues that we face. That's five or six different countries. It required sharing information at the speed and scale cyber and and i think this is the challenge of our time as hard as it was to get better at sharing information within and between governments we cannot combat that threat unless we give information to the private sector At the speed with which we're seeing it so they know what the risks are complied for them and vice versa. We need the information from the private sector. So we can do. Things like action Military responses law enforcement responses diplomatic. And when it comes to that sharing and that transformation we are not where we need to be. So is it fair to say that the defining feature of the full blown code war is that it hybridize with other national security threats that it requires net speed communications within the us federal government between agencies and components between the us government components and foreign components and between all of those components and the private sector. Yes i think that is fair to say and look for a long period of times part of the story. I know you've covered before when we tell but inside the justice department you know when i was a line computer hacking prosecutor. I worked with a great squad at the fbi but we just did criminal cases. There was another squad behind a lock secure compartment door that didn't tell occasionally agent switched and poof. They disappeared never to be seen again. And i even when i coordinated that program nationally on the criminal side at the computer crime intellectual property section..

kosovo junaid hussain malaysia twitter iraq Us england virginia federal government ben justice department fbi
"carlin" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

The Lawfare Podcast

09:55 min | 1 year ago

"carlin" Discussed on The Lawfare Podcast

"Law fair archive. This is author intern. Sarma with the podcast. From the law fair archives for july twenty fourth twenty twenty one thus far twenty twenty one has seen a number of high profile incidents in the world of cybersecurity earlier this month. The russian hacking group are evil launched debilitating ransomware attack on visa that affected businesses and organizations around the world and at the beginning of this week the us and its allies accused china of a massive cyber espionage campaign including the microsoft exchange. For today's episode from the archives. I went back to november twenty eighteen when john carlin assistant attorney general for the justice department's national security division from april twenty. Fourteen talk over twenty sixteen and the current principal. Deputy associate attorney. General sat down with law fair at during chief. Ben witness they discussed the book carlin wrote with garrett graff. Don of the code war l'affaire listeners will hear harlan discuss how the us government engages with cyber threats specifically those coming from china and russia which allows a better understanding of how the us government may respond to some of the more recent attacks john. I'm excited to talk to you about dawn of the cold war but before we turn to that. I would be remiss if i didn't start Your by your one of two people to my knowledge who has both run the national security division of jets of the justice department and served as chief of staff. Bob muller i'll do a quick correction 'cause believe there are three because ken weinstein lisa. Monaco and i also served as both chief staff to director muller and had a nascar ely. I forgot that can had also served as chief of staff to bob muller so fair enough. It's still it's still a very small group of people. And i want to ask you first of all about the mood in your former division at justice you must be in touch with a lot of people. It's difficult time for the justice department that are holding up. It's a fantastic group of prosecutors. Who are motivated by mission. Like bob muller himself and so i think there's a lot of right now discord between between parties but the folks in that division are focused on those who want to harm us as americans so when you get up in the morning and your job is to protect innocent civilians from being killed in terrorist attacks and you know the stakes of getting that right you stay motivated and similarly There was an initiative. We can talk about a little bit more later. That really springs from much of what we talk about in the book in terms of the threat. We've been seeing front in cyberspace from china. Russia north korea iran. And you look back about two weeks ago now to the initiative that the justice department announced to crack down on economic espionage until the behavior changes. That's the sort of a threat that gets those prosecutors and trial attorneys up in the morning but surely amidst the business as usual which is what you're describing in the counters counterterrorism and the counter intel. Space it is not business completely as usual when the president is you know publicly undermining the mission in important respects. And i'm you know i'm curious. What the what. The normally the intersection between the work of of of the division and the sort of public politics. Except when you have. Like edward snowden like events is pretty near zero and now it can't be near zero because you have the president out there publicly commenting on all kinds of pending matters. And so like. I'm just interested. What does it do. Yeah people are still motivated. Get up in the morning. Do their jobs but it can't have no effect on the way people think about people think about what they're doing every day. Yeah let's divide it into two things so one are the prosecutors and trial attorneys the law enforcement agents the fbi intel analysts. Are they motivated and going to do their job. No matter what type of crazy talk there is in the restive washington. Yes i believe that they are but that's different than the attacks on our institutions and the undermining of public confidence in those institutions undermining public confidence in the institutions can affect your ability to develop cooperators witnesses foreign partnerships and ultimately it's a strength of our country and one of the reasons why our country is both envied and feared by authoritarian countries. Is because we've been able to carve out a political institutions of the department of justice is the envy of the world for that reason so just like those agents and prosecutors are to protect us from terrorists and those who would harm. We need people on both party in both parties of good conscience to stand up and say it is utterly inappropriate to direct the justice department to not bring a prosecution for political purposes or vice versa. Your successor in that role as head of the national security division. Is this somebody you look at it and say this is in the bipartisan tradition of leadership of that department as it should the average listener of this podcast. Think whatever's going on at the You know between matt whitaker and and the president but with the muller investigation the national security division of the justice department is in good hands both at the career level which you've already said and at the political level yes the assistant attorney general now charged in nashville division. John moore's is someone known for a long time Dating back to law school and worked with when i was at the fbi and he served in the national security division. Under one of those other muller proteges can wayne stein and he is someone who is dedicated to protecting the national security interests of the united states and not political and if you look at the leadership below that of the national security division it has stayed almost entirely in place as it should be. And we've seen this. This'll be the third administration now where there's been a continuity because national security professionals are not driven biparti. Let's talk briefly about bob. Muller who shows up periodically throughout your book. You were his chief of staff and he has gone on to play a role very different from the role in which you served under him. How do you read from having worked very closely with him. What is your read on the state of play with with respect to the investigation. You'll ben easy good example and tell some stories about it in the in the book of not just a person who does his job with extraordinary competence and when you meet him and work with him day in and day out he someone he seems like he's sprang from the pages of history book he someone who's utterly dedicated to the mission at hand to trying to follow and solve the problems and facts and apply the law and as humility about the application of the law. So that's him just in terms of being a competent individual heading this investigation but there is also what he represents and we talked about a little bit in. There is this Increasing better to try to turn the justice department partisan he personifies and motivated people not with a great speeches though with the life that he led to dedicate themselves to a non-partisan mission oriented justice department and that dates back to his service as volunteering to go into the marines or he ended up not just risking his life but saving the lives of others. Something he by the way did not talk about is almost impossible to get him to talk about that time in his life but it had a great resonance for him his pride in the marine being marine he would talk about to his time as a career prosecutor to the legend that i knew when i went to the washington. Dc us attorney's office as aligned prosecutor. Exactly what led you to say. But it's a great. It's a great story so flesh it out. So this is someone who had risen up to Something that required senate confirmation in a presidential appointment to be the top official at the justice department in charge of all criminal prosecutions. He then left. Tried going to a private firm for a little bit. Decided he hated it. Miss the mission and went back to be able line prosecutor doing the equivalent of state and local crimes in washington. Dc to be a homicide prosecutor. Because he'd always wanted to serve In that type of that type of job. And so. When i joined the. Us trees office. Everyone knew about Bob muller who is their truck and his lip bag over to court and trying trying homicides. Let's.

national security division bob muller justice department john carlin garrett graff Bob muller national security division of ken weinstein us government muller china Sarma edward snowden carlin harlan matt whitaker national security division of Monaco fbi wayne stein
MLB Seeking Meeting With Trevor Bauer’s Accuser in Sexual Assault Investigation

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

01:22 min | 1 year ago

MLB Seeking Meeting With Trevor Bauer’s Accuser in Sexual Assault Investigation

"On Joey Chestnut. That in just moments right now, though, get more out of your summer with savings on innovative washers and dryers during the Fourth of July savings event at the Home Depot, Give your laundry room and upgrade with big savings in store and online on top appliances Right now, you'll save a bundle celebrates summer. With the Fourth of July savings event at the Home Depot. How doers get more done us only while supplies last free delivery on purchases of $396 or more. Valid through July. 14th what is left? Or a champion to accomplish. We discuss next Chris Carlin and for Barton Han on ESPN Radio and the ESPN app. Coming up Tuesday. Aaron Rodgers drama continues in Green Bay, and I'll tell you why the two sides need to figure this out right now. Keyshawn J. Willens Zubin Tuesday morning on ESPN radio. This is the story of Daniel, who was born two months early. He weighed £1.7 ounces. His lungs weren't ready. His heart wasn't ready. His brain wasn't ready. At the hospital. The nurses said Daniel was a fighter and they would do all they could to help him, the doctor said. Even with the best care, Daniel may never walk,

Home Depot Joey Chestnut Chris Carlin Barton Han Keyshawn J. Willens Zubin Espn Radio Aaron Rodgers Espn Green Bay Daniel
The Musical Chairs Between Robert Mueller, John P. Carlin, and Lisa Monaco

The Dan Bongino Show

01:26 min | 1 year ago

The Musical Chairs Between Robert Mueller, John P. Carlin, and Lisa Monaco

"If you go to John Carlin's scam MPD, otherwise known as Wikipedia Page. You'll see on there. That him and Lisa Monaco traded spots in the higher up positions in the Department of Justice Quite often, Look at this. United States, assistant attorney general for the National Security Division. Mm. It was John Carlin. Who was he proceeded by Lisa Monaco, the same people investigating Trump the same person again again. It's my Gator. Here. Acting United States Deputy Attorney general John Carlin. Who succeeded him. Lisa Monaco. It's like musical chairs. Where the deep state then why do the same people keep turning up in these positions all the time? They're both back. Carlin was appointed back into the Biden administration. And so is Monaco. They were key players in the spiky thing, and they're investigating Trump again. For the same thing they did spying on Nunes. And his phone records. This is again think that that Oh, I'm trying to keep this show family friendly. The great fruits on these people. The Democrats don't care. They know the media cover for

Lisa Monaco John Carlin National Security Division Deputy Attorney General John C Department Of Justice Donald Trump United States Wikipedia Biden Administration Carlin Monaco Nunes
Miami Beach ends curfew, but some restrictions remain

This Morning with Gordon Deal

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Miami Beach ends curfew, but some restrictions remain

"Miami Beach no longer under in 88 P. M curfew tonight for the first time in more than a month. What restaurants in the entertainment district will have to bring their outdoor tables in by eight tonight, Sidewalk cafes except for us when you're away, but Ocean, Carlin's in Washington would need to close at eight PM to discourage and we've crowds from forming and the criminal activity that we've been seeing last month. Vice Mayor Michael Gongora says the entire area does remain under Miami Dade's midnight curfew, which expires Monday. Commissioners are meeting later this month to figure out how best to transform the area into a cultural arts district, attracting high and crap. Outs, one ideas to turn ocean drive into an outdoor public art gallery.

Miami Beach Vice Mayor Michael Gongora Miami Dade Carlin Washington
"carlin" Discussed on X96

X96

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"carlin" Discussed on X96

"Because Careful, Gina on this day. What Carlin's probably listening. Carlin might be listening. He was the only one Carlin might be having a hard time today because because January 15th 2018 Delores a. Reardon. Irish musician singer. Troubled lady. Let's be honest. Passed away unexpectedly in London, England, where she was in town for a recording session. She'd had many troubles. She was loved it on an airplane, Remember? Being drunk and disorderly. Well, who hasn't? I mean, come on, really Be honest here. He was beloved by many. Laura. What's her name? Waris Reardon. Okay? I was thinking of something real for the cranberries, Cranberry and very well, I was thinking of somebody else. Thanks to, uh And thank you, Carlin for No, this is this is a little gigolo Mia culpa going from Gina here? I'm just saying, I know there are people like Carlin that Ms Delores and thank you, Carlin for for holding the candle. I Mm hmm. So that the Lawrence wrote, What's her name? Oh, weird. A rear. Did Laura so rewritten may never be for gotten As long as you keep that eternal flame burning. In your heart, at least, Carlin. She will. She will be forever remembered by at least one person you Miss Carlin. We haven't heard from Harlan in a while, or Tina or anything. Think about all the people that you haven't seen in a while. It's true, Yeah. And I'm not going to see him for still awhile. No, I'm not going to feel comfortable about this until Lot of vaccine is rolled out. I saw my I'm still masking up starts on my organ kid briefly yesterday for Like 45 seconds might slow him No on my front porch, and he came in the front door, actually, for a second. And then he was gone, and I hadn't seen him for weeks. You know, even I'm not comfortable with that kind of interaction, like when a friend of mine dropped dropped off a present for Christmas on the front porch. I didn't open the door. I just spoke with him on the phone. Yeah, so, Yeah. Merry Christmas, Mike. I can see your shadow. Okay. Thank you. That stuff out there is for you, too. Uh, my mom lives around the corner for me. I never go in her house. We've got him together outside around her fire pit a few times. But I don't go in her house either. And she lives pretty close to me, too. I don't go that idea. Just a good idea. All right. We will take a break. We will be back with boner of the day and then boner of the week. A reasonable amount of news all coming up After these ran life dot com. Oh, yes, indeed. I did a refinance with ran life. And that's a mortgage. By the way, I refinanced my mortgage. I've done it a couple of times and this last time because interest rates have gone so low, I save thousands literally. Hundreds of thousands of dollars because interest rates are low. So maybe you've done it fairly recently. It might be worth looking at doing it again. Getting your monthly payment even lower now ran life. You could do it e clothes. You don't you? Probably almost never happy. Even See anybody in person to do this anymore. You might have to have one contact..

Miss Carlin Delores a. Reardon Laura front porch Gina Harlan London Ms Delores Lawrence England Mia culpa Tina Mike
Pierre Cardin Was the First Frenchman to Open a Business in Communist China

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:31 sec | 2 years ago

Pierre Cardin Was the First Frenchman to Open a Business in Communist China

"French fashion designer Pierre Cardin has die made his name by a pending fashion styles in the 19 sixties and seventies, putting women in bubble dresses and futuristic space suits in 1978 Pierre Cardin was the first Frenchman toe open a business in communist China. He organized a fashion show in Beijing's Forbidden City. Carlin was also a savvy businessman on successfully licensed his brand name. Here's is one of the most familiar names in fashion. He died in Paris age. 98. Elaine Cobb. CBS NEWS Paris,

Pierre Cardin Forbidden City Carlin Beijing China Elaine Cobb Paris CBS
Justin Bieber's Pastor Carl Lentz RESPONDS To Hillsong Firing!

Mark Levin

00:43 sec | 2 years ago

Justin Bieber's Pastor Carl Lentz RESPONDS To Hillsong Firing!

"Knew today, the pastor that just And Bieber followed at the popular Hillsong Church has been fired. Justin Bieber's Hillsong pastor was kicked out of the worldwide mega church that has become popular among the Hollywood elite. On the church's Web site. One of the church's pastors posted a statement that pastor Carlin's had been terminated due to moral failures. The church did not elaborate, however, on his instagram, he explained, he wrote I was unfaithful in my marriage, the most important relationship in my life and held accountable for that This failures on me and me alone and I take full responsibility for my actions. I now begin a journey of rebuilding trust with my wife, Laura, and my Children. He then apologize to them and thank the church pastors.

Hillsong Church Bieber Justin Bieber Carlin Hollywood Laura
Social networks are bracing for a hack-and-leak operation ahead of elections

The 3:59

05:45 min | 2 years ago

Social networks are bracing for a hack-and-leak operation ahead of elections

"We are less than a month away from election day and we're all on pins and needles about potential misinformation campaigns particularly from leaked information. What are social networks doing about this? So it's not like you know all of a sudden last minute they're saying all we got to stop this. I think since two thousand, sixteen, they've been doing a lot. To prevent the leaking end of these hacking leak operations. That happened in two thousand sixteen. So you know about every month or so facebook will put out these these takedown reports same thing with twitter where they'll say found these campaigns and we banned them because we knew that they were inauthentic behaviour Russia or China or Iran, and the reports are always lackluster right? You see them and they say you know. This campaign got twenty views before we were able to take it down and it seems kind of boring but that's Kinda the point that they want to basically cut them off at the roots before they they're able to grow and have this whole network because once they do have that kind of influence than you know it's able to spread like wildfire so. A lot of these social networks have been paying a lot more attention now to these. Campaigns, when they're small taking action immediately, rather than you know, let's see this is leads to anything I They've also been working with the FBI who's in giving them tips. Constantly on you know this this this this information network is. Growing on your platform, you should investigate on that they were saying in their October report about half of the take downs that they did came from tips from the FBI So there there's a lot of that going on, and then you know to stop the hacking portion of you know campaigns have gone a lot better at preventing us. You know their their emails from being leaked they have a lot better security measures nowadays, and you can see that right. You see these reports from Microsoft and Google talking about how we detected this hacking campaign targeting the Biden in the trump campaign and they're not successful Overall, they've just gotten better at preventing both the hack and the leaks from. Growing, right. So you went through a lot there. So. You talked about the work that these copies do with in conjunction with the FBI with. Government officials, how else do they? Identify some this. There's obviously a lot of content on these social networks right millions upon millions of accounts, lots of just popping up like how do they identify? Is it a matter of using a I or a human moderators? How do they identify some of the stuff? It's a lot of both. Ai plays a big part of it facebook talks about how you know most of the time these disinformation networks that are building on facebook. Most of those accounts are automatically detected and removed. And you know they, they do these strategies where they try to remake the accounts both like a different name on satellite Alfred Ing. For example, they made a fake account is that they would say something like a sh- melford ing like let's say and then you know that might get around it but most of the time these are banned anyway. But you know they've been saying that these disinformation actors are aware of facebook and twitter tactics now so they're trying to do off platform stop. So they'll make a fake account and post something on Reddit and say this is this is a big deal. Everyone should care about this. They'll purposely target you know conspiracy theory focused some red it's something like that. But. What this information researchers have found is that unless it's on one of these major platforms unless it's Kinda, laundered by a respected or legitimate news source, these campaigns don't really get far and that's Kinda the other step that's really different nowadays is that you know. Newsrooms are there these hacked hacking leak operations and you know there are a lot more careful about now not just taking anything that comes in and says what? What? A what a crazy set of documents we've gotta write about this immediately. The. Washington Post for example, has standards. Now, where you know if they receive hacked documents, the protocol is to kind of question. What is the point of this? Why did we receive this? Who wants who would benefit from this kind of stuff? So it's yeah, it's it's a lot different. Now you saw in two thousand seventeen with the French presidential election. Hackers access you know presidential candidate. Carlin's the emails and they release them like two days before the election and the French media just. Write about any of it and you know most of those leaked documents just get an end up you know causing any kind of election chaos even though it dropped like two days before the election didn't you mentioned the work between copies like facebook and twitter and the FBI are these companies working amongst themselves as well as facebook corning with Goule or twitter or Microsoft like how did these countries coronate their defense yeah? Coordination between all these companies obviously like really important and I know that. Elected officials from the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security like they have regular meetings with these tech companies to tell them your user, the threats that were aware of you should watch out for this just because the Internet is not like an insular thing right to something can't only exist on facebook. So you know there's disinformation campaigns across the board and they are constantly talking with each other making them. Aware of these are the issues that we're dealing with. Are you seeing the same accounts for the reason why? When you see take down report from facebook, you most likely will see one from twitter at the same time

Facebook FBI Twitter Microsoft Washington Post Alfred Ing Reddit Biden AI Carlin Google Russia China Department Of Homeland Securit Iran Goule
A Love Letter to Short Men

Does This Happen to You

05:21 min | 2 years ago

A Love Letter to Short Men

"DOT COM and at her website Carlin Betcha. Dot Com and here is a love letter to short men. Your height is not an issue unless you make it one. It's one of the most common openers I see on dating apps a man's height. It's usually the first thing men list and sometimes height is the only thing listed. Yep just height nothing else as if those two numbers measured in feet and inches contain multitudes. I understand why it happens. We are a society obsessed with looks we treat beauty and both genders as a currency attractive people make more money are viewed as more agreeable and somehow more valuable. This is part of the halo effect, a psychology term where we assign one single trait beauty to other characteristics kindness. Personally I have never seen a woman who cares about height in fact, I find short men hot, not all of them but many. Let. Me Tell you a not hot short man's story. I recently wanted to date with a five foot five inch guy within fifteen minutes of our meeting. He ass is my height a problem. It was not until he mentioned it. I had not even looked at the height he listed on his profile. I then spent the next twenty minutes assuaging his fragile ego and explaining why many women like short men it was exhausting at one point I think he read the weariness in my slumped shoulders and tried to self correct. I'm only asking because you're right about love and sex. Sure if you went on a date with a dermatologist, would you ask her to examine the fungus between your toes? I didn't say that, but I wanted to my sarcasm is a feral beast. Then, there are the many many short guys who lie about their height. You know who you are. I once went on a date with a guy claiming to be five foot eight inches. He was five foot four inches. That's a four inch lie. If we're keeping track I wore three inch heels for that date that put me at five feet eight inches. Greeted him with a hug. This was pre pandemic days his head landed on my chest. Awkward. For most women height is not a deal breaker but lying is So. Here it is short men the painful truth your height is not the Lady Boehner killer. You think it is it your lack of confidence that makes women's ovaries shrivel up and never want to go on another date again, I have dated a lot of sexy short men and they all had one thing in common nothing to prove when Tom Cruise five foot seven inches was sexiest man alive multiple times. Did anyone add a footnote sexy for a short Guy Hell? No. When Bruno Mars five, foot five inches shakes what his momma gave him are women getting out there measuring. Sticks Adriano. then. There's Napoleon. Napoleon. Never had complex about his height nor was he even really that short you can feel his confidence oozing out of the impatient love letters. He wrote to Josephine one read a kiss on your heart and one much lower down much lower. Nowhere in that letter, will you find a postscript saying unless my height makes you not in the mood? Yet Napoleon somehow got his name attached to the height inferiority complex known as the Napoleon. Complex. The Napoleon Complex states that short men tend to be more aggressive lie more and try to compensate for their short stature by being exceptionally cruel. But researchers found the opposite to be true. One study from Nyu phone short men are thirty two percent less likely to divorce than tolman. The study also found women married to short men reported greater happiness and short men did more housework than tolman. Yes. There is a correlation between happiness and a freshly floor. Clearly short men are doing something, right? I pulled over twenty of my most dateable girlfriends for this article I asked the same question. Are you attracted to short men most had similar answer? It depends on the guy that's a nice way of saying that is not the package. It's the meat inside. So

Napoleon Napoleon Complex Carlin Tolman Bruno Mars Tom Cruise Lady Boehner NYU Adriano. Josephine
Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:10 min | 2 years ago

Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

"Jesse Thorn. Our guest is Alex Winter you probably know him best as bill from bill and Ted along with Keanu reeves he starred in bill and Ted's excellent adventure bill and Ted's bogus journey and the brand new movie bill and Ted face the music. Alex is also a director who's made several documentaries. His latest just came out a couple of months ago it's called show biscuits. It features interviews with former child stars about how their time working in the entertainment industry affected them. Let's get back to the conversation. There's a lot in this in this movie also about parenthood and the ties that bind to their and in particular how children kind of actualize the dreams of their parents in some ways for good and bad. I saw that theme also and show Biz kids. Your documentary that made me wonder if you saw parallel there to do you find that particularly compelling. I was raised by two artists. My parents were modern dancers. My mom had company in London, which is where I was born in my dad ultimately had a company in the Midwest. which is still going on when we moved to the states house quite young. I started out as a child actor professionally by like nine or ten I was working professionally by twelve thirteen I was in two long running probably shows back-back. Took me all the way into college so. My relationship to. My parents and to my family and the complexity of that and this idea of I wouldn't call destiny. That's the sort of of the movies that. But you know this idea of expectation and what is your life supposed to be, and of course, it's never going to be that and it shouldn't be that and and and how do the children affects the parents? How do the parents affect the children and of course now I'm a dad and so how'd now it's a triple layer cake right And Those are all those drams or fusing together and crazy ways and I had really wanted to make a film that allowed people who had experienced this firsthand meaning people that come up as child actors. I wanted them to be able to express the very nuanced layers of of that experience. Intimately I just had not seen that done and I had. you know obviously had done it myself in private, but I'd never kind of attacked at. So you that was very satisfying to be able to make and it was really odd to try to make show Biz because for the first time about ten years ago I couldn't find financing and it was exactly the concept. So it was very very strange to. Lovely. But strange to start making the film, shoot a bunch of interviews go away, make bill and Ted be dealing with you know Ted's problems with his dad our issues with our daughters live and our destiny that didn't end up the way it was supposed to in how did that impact everybody and you know, and then of course, like acting for the first time gangs I left act the acting business in after doing Dylan Ted to really Very consciously, and so acting again and I'm making a movie about child actors about parents and their children and it was it was like Oh did this all really need to happen at once was that necessary? I my Gosh. Every aspect of my entire life right now. So Yeah it was lovely and heavy Frankly yeah. Tell me about that decision to kind of I. Think you said, disappear for a minute and then come back and be doing more behind the scenes work than acting. Well. We talk about it in in show Biz kids and it's really not uncommon. It's. It's you know I had started acting I had a very, very public life from around ten years old to about twenty five on nonstop even through college. I was still acting on TV and doing commercials and TV shows. Nonstop and after bill and Tattoo amid and other film called freaked I was just psychologically. I was just worn out and I knew. That I was not I had some friends around me that were crashing hard at a couple that actually died. It was a pretty heavy scene. For Lot of us that had come up because we're all around the same age. So a lot of us were trying to transition from from you know sort of youth in the business too young adult business. We're not having the best time of it and and at the same time I gone to film school and was very very committed to my work as a writer director But it you know for me, I needed to make a conscious decision to get out of the public eye and just go live some normal life and I didn't feel like I'd really gotten to do that through pretty. Formative Adolescence and postal license and. Evan Rachel Wood speaks about this really well in the in the movie sodas will we? All everyone had the same experience I was sitting across from Diana Kerry, the hundred year old woman who was baby peggy, and she literally laid out my entire life story was completely jaw dropping. And that's what had happened to her when she had to really figure life out and she had to get away from the business and. And just be in the world and that's what I did I left. I left my acting representation and I moved and started a production company in London and I just shot commercials and wrote scripts and had a kid and live like regular Joe and. Got My head together and did some growing up and when I felt comfortable again, I started training again to act that was a while ago I just wanted to act for myself I didn't WanNA act. NAFTA, worry about it for paycheck I trained for a long time and it was just coincidentally had started kind of rumble back into life. But it was really lovely. It was a great way to come back can't owner. He's like, what am I, very, very dearest and closest friends in the world and. Everyone on that sat was family and if they weren't, they were really gracious and very happy to be there. So it was extremely sweet environment to step back into but Yeah, it was fun. But I I guess I needed the twenty five year break I I took it.

Dylan Ted Alex Winter Jesse Thorn London Director Nafta Keanu Reeves Evan Rachel Wood Midwest. Diana Kerry Peggy Writer JOE
Are You a Rock Star or Member of The Band?

The Daily Boost

04:11 min | 2 years ago

Are You a Rock Star or Member of The Band?

"It is Monday. On Monday. Fourteen years I've asked a question. And if you've ignored me for fourteen years, God bless you you are good. You're awfully good because I've been doing this every single Monday. Have you done your homework? Just sit down and just take a few minutes. Maybe five minutes just today maybe after this program has done. And look on yourself just to see how you doing. It's like your mom opening the look at any after she took piano at night right? You know she opened the door, but you pretended to be asleep. You can look at it on yourself say how how doing? Marolles my family roles, my relationships, roles, spiritual roles, my physical rolls, my financial world how many doing my life? Are there things in my life I just really love and he just want to keep so much gratitude for. WanNa make sure they stay in my life or the things that I don't love that much and maybe I'd like to have them go someplace else. But you haven't thought about how to do that yet. When you take a few minutes to self assess where your focus should be. I'll make you this promise. Next week when you do it again, a lot of the stuff that you are concerned about this week that you discovered, it'll be different next week it'll be you'll be on your way you'll be transforming moving in a different direction that's how it works. When you become aware would you like what? You don't like you start making natural changes its natural, right? So do homework. You know what are the ways it all begins is taking control of your time and allowing yourself time to well to be yourself and to spend time with yourself in the do things that are important to you. If you haven't picked up my perfect week planner, go get it. It's motivation and we've DOT COM or perfectly finer dot com. It's a quick little pdf download watch the video. It'll teach you how to gather control of your time and give your life back. It's fast it's simple. You'll see it it a change everything and just a couple of days I promise that. So you rockstar. Or you'll member the band which went are you it's Ok does it really matter which role you play I don't really care. I just WANNA make sure you're moving towards your goals a long long long time ago I remember this I was raising kids. Those of you that are. Probably remember the old George Carlin. Album called am and FM. What happened? Got A kid. What are you GonNa do with a kid. Going to raise them. So I was done I was raising the kid. Micah folks raise my kid I thought what he's eighteen. He's Outta here. He's done right well, that didn't happen. They never go away those who've had kids. It doesn't ended eighteen those you have older kids you know that never stops. But he was gonNA. Move Out. It was time to go out on his own. Conversation about that. The rockstar conversation. So he he's staying out to four in the morning being a rockstar every single night trying to be a rockstar keeping his mom up kind of disrupting the households twenty one years old he wasn't really working or anything. I don't do roommates. Just don't I mean I. Get it. But but this is a little bit disruptive. So because it's okay, I'M GONNA move out I'm going to go to Hollywood and sing on Sunset Boulevard. Yar. Now's a guy who's been all kinds of big dreams in my life and done a lot of things. A lot of experience a had some perspective and I just wanted to say it are you willing to do what it takes to get you to the top? To be that Rockstar. And if you don't get. Do. You think you want to be. Are there any other options that might make you happy I mean what if you independence as as a background player with that? Happy. He said, you know I don't think I would I think I gotta go for my dream said great as long as you know where you're going to go but then we talked a little bit about what may may occur on down the road but he said I gotta go from dreams at on I think you probably should his dad did that I did that I got out of high school and took off and I said I'm going to be a rock and roll radio DJ do morning shows I did all over the country everywhere all kinds of cool stuff had a great time is a Rockstar on the radio star back in the day when that's what they were back then. But you know what? I kind of learned something. My son learned to. As, much as it was really enjoyable as much as I really had a good time doing it. Then frankly as much as I was good and he was good to never forget him. Shooting facetime say hey, look I'm on stage on sunset boulevard singing the song is it how was it goes not what I expected

Rockstar George Carlin Hollywood
'Bill & Ted Face the Music' isn't excellent, but it's still kind of fun

Mark Thompson

01:51 min | 2 years ago

'Bill & Ted Face the Music' isn't excellent, but it's still kind of fun

"Ted faced the music. It's not significant nor extremely funny, but it's certainly fun. And it's so amiable that I'd be kind of a meanie to say anything too critical of it. In case you're thoroughly pop culture challenged. This is the third movie and a trilogy of Dumb Guy, Buddy Cos. That began 30 Count them 30 years ago with the time traveling Stoner Movie Bill and Ted's excellent adventure that was 1989. There was a sequel Bill and Ted's Bogus Journey and 91. These guys are best friends, suburban goofballs in one of the rock star's billing tender in high school in the original film, they're gonna fail history. Oh, and by the way, they're played by then and played by now. Alex Winter and the Evergreen Piano. Reeves. I mean piano Reeves. His career is Blowing back up. There's a big resurgence with John Wick films and The Matrix franchise is continuing, but he loves this character, and he's got a great relationship and report with Alice Winter. Eso. They've come back for this third film and You know. Initially they're visited by this hipster from the future named Rufus, who shows up in some kind of phone booth that can traverse time in space. Like like doctor who's police box, and by the way, Rufus was played by the late great comedian George Carlin, and he takes them on a trip through time to help them pass his history tests and tells them that they are going to write and record a song that will bring the world together in peace and harmony. Will, apparently by this third film. Three decades later, they still haven't written a song to sign the song. I've always felt that the world is just one song away from peace and harmony to to bad. Hey, Michael, do you exactly that I have to want hilarious.

TED Reeves Rufus Alex Winter George Carlin Evergreen Piano John Wick Alice Winter Goofballs Michael