7 Burst results for "Carl Solomon"

"carl solomon" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

03:31 min | Last month

"carl solomon" Discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP

"You let me ask you questions? Solomon? Let me just stop you right there. You seem like a good fellow. Do you believe in the free market? Absolutely well. If you believe in the free market, then you can't tell a kid he has to go to college. More than one year. He should get to go to college. The amount of years he would like to go. Okay, Here's my thing. Here's my retort to that. If you want to go pro right out of high school. God bless you go. But what if you want to go after your freshman? But what if you wanna go after your freshman year, so I I came after one year. You know what I decided? I'm good. Now. Why should I have to go back to college for you, Solomon? It ain't your life. It's my life, just like Bon Jovi said. It's my program. You don't get your case. It's not. Whoa, whoa, Wait a minute. Now, wait a minute. Did you hear that? All of a sudden, Joe. Obviously it's his program, but I think it's more important for the players life than for your program. If he's getting a scholarship, Let's say if he's getting you know, Coach K is going to be going soon. But let's say, you know, you've got coach King there's some value to college for a player. It's a lot more value to go in the league and making money. I appreciate Carl Solomon Joe, do you do you think? Do you agree with me that you think there'll be more people stay in college now because they can actually make that money while they're there or go to college. It's going to depend on the amount of money. I mean, Ultimately, the more money you'll be making from endorsements would probably correlate with how good you are an athlete, which would correlate with how fast you want to get to the pros to make even more money. Maybe so, I thought you could see a scenario, though. We're like a Tim Tebow might be worth more at Florida. Then he was in the NFL. So that's an interesting case. Because Tebow were the ton of money from a marketing perspective in in Florida that would have been worth obviously you know who this guy is the limit, but then at the same time The risk factor, which still exists. How much more time do you want to spend in college? Even though you're making bank preventing yourself from going and getting the guaranteed money in the NFL as well, it's a great question. I don't think there'll be a ton of people like you, Joe. The kind of guys that get endorsements are probably the kind of guys that want to go to the league. But I will say, I do think it will lead people to go to college. I think college basketball, especially, we'll see guys go. There's a kid named Jalen during right now who is trying to decide between the G League and college basketball? All and he has said this. Joe may send him to college basketball, whereas otherwise he might have gone to the Geely that I can see, because right now you have kids not only going to the G league, but they might go to Europe. They might go to Australia. They might go somewhere where they can not only play But they can get paid. So if you're going over to Italy, and you're making maybe $3 million for a year to bypass the time it takes to get to the NBA, why not? Then go to North Carolina State closer to home? Maybe you're more in a comfort zone. You're near your family. You don't have to uproot your life as much if you can still get that $3 million or close to it on a shoe deal or some other type of deal. Yes, absolutely agree with you. And if you're Nike or Adidas, you'd rather than playing college on a high platform that in the G League that nobody watches 100%. Nike's got to be all over this. You have to imagine. Yeah. 888 say ESPN. If you'd like to weigh in on this. It seems like some of you all have strong opinions. We gave you some straight talk and straight talk. Wireless has no contract, No compromise. Most of the talk we have is not straight. But that really was more on N I l plus some new coaches in the NBA. That's next on Game day, G J and T and the NBA.

Nike Adidas Tim Tebow $3 million Joe Solomon Italy Europe Jalen Bon Jovi Australia ESPN Tebow 100% G league Carl Solomon Joe G League Florida More than one year King
"carl solomon" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

WGR 550 Sports Radio

02:32 min | Last month

"carl solomon" Discussed on WGR 550 Sports Radio

"If he's getting a scholarship, Let's say if he's getting you know, Coach K is going to be going soon. But let's say, you know, you've got coach King there's some value to college for a player. It's a lot more value to go into the league and making money. Appreciate. Carl Solomon Joe, do you do you think? Do you agree with me that you think there'll be more people stay in college now because they can actually make that money while they're there or go to college. It's going to depend on the amount of money. I mean, Ultimately, the more money you'll be making from endorsements would probably correlate with how good you are an athlete, which would correlate with how fast you want to get to the pros to make even more money. Maybe so, I thought you could see a scenario, though. We're like a Tim Tebow might be worth more at Florida. Then he was in the NFL. So that's an interesting case. Because Tebow were the ton of money from a marketing perspective in in Florida that would have been worth obviously you know who this guy is the limit, but then at the same time The risk factor, which still exists. How much more time do you want to spend in college? Even though you're making bank preventing yourself from going and getting the guaranteed money in the NFL as well, it's a great question. I don't think there'll be a ton of people like you, Joe. The kind of guys that get endorsements are probably the kind of guys that want to go to the league. But I will say, I do think it will lead people to go to college. I think college basketball, especially, we'll see guys go. There's a kid named Jalen during right now who is? Trying to decide between the G League and college basketball, and he has said this Joe may send him to college basketball, whereas otherwise he might have gone to the Geely that I can see, because right now you have kids not only going to the G league, but they might go to Europe. They might go to Australia. They might go somewhere where they can not only play But they can get paid. So if you're going over to Italy, and you're making maybe $3 million for a year to bypass the time it takes to get to the NBA, why not? Then go to North Carolina? Stay closer to home. Maybe you're more in a comfort zone. You're near your family. You don't have to uproot your life as much if you can still get that $3 million or close to it on a shoe deal or some other type of deal. Yes, absolutely agree with you. And if you're Nike or Adidas, you'd rather than playing college on a high platform that in the G League that nobody watches 100%. Nike's got to be all over this. You have to imagine. Yeah. 888 say ESPN. If you'd like to weigh in on this. It seems like some of you all have strong opinions. We gave you some straight talk and straight talk. Wireless has no contract, No compromise. Most of the talk we have is not straight. But that really was more on N I l plus some new coaches in the NBA. That's next on Game Day G..

Tim Tebow Joe Adidas Nike North Carolina $3 million Europe Australia 100% Italy Jalen Tebow ESPN Carl Solomon Joe G league G League Florida King NFL 888
"carl solomon" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

08:18 min | 10 months ago

"carl solomon" Discussed on WTF with Marc Maron Podcast

"The okay. Odi because we're working on a project with William Burroughs is William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg and Carl Solomon and Dennis Hopper. Then Sam Sheppard came in and it was just another night. Terry southern he was writing a script for William? VERSION OF A. Of a junkie a really an play Mary but the it all fell apart. But for a while just hanging out with them was pretty great. I, can't imagine I I just. Like when I read this book, you know wh the the new one that's coming out in paperback. Now you're on the monkey, it seems like You're straddling some of this stuff that burrows did you know moving between reality not reality dream not dream you having guides you know and and because like when when all this shit started to go down for some reason, I went back to burroughs to try to decode some stuff because I in my life I always feel like it's all in there somewhere that you all the answers are within burrows somewhere. You just have to figure out how to find them and sort it out. From some of the other science fiction and weirdness he believed it was all out was all out there and he believed also if you were lucky enough to have suffered scarlet fever, which votes tonight had your you had an open channel for all of these things to come from this great pool. So he what you were getting from William, he was a good portal because William got all of those things from everywhere else he believed in that. So he was the right guide for you. So. So the scarlet fever created the the the the the ability, well He. Didn't create the the ability, but it opened the portal wider in the wild boys Johnny in the wild boys of had scarlet fever. We have club Man William called the scarlet fever club and. You really believed that if you had suffered a really deep fever at a very young age, it opens your portable forever. That's interesting. Yeah. I. Went I for some reason I started to plow into. The Western lands. You know which it seemed to me that I and I think that maybe you're dealing with a bit of a to that like he had to somehow. Reckon with mortality in a very sort of practical way for himself and it seemed like you know his interpretation of the book of the dead was how he was going to go about it. Is that true? I suppose I don't I've never analyzed I. Never, thought about it. I mean to me I mean that's the kind of thing enough to talk i. just read his stuff me to like I wanted to answer somehow and like I keep going back because structurally he's a little tricky for me. But like you know when I started to see that he was dealing with all these different levels that that once the guy person dies goes through and he created characters with names for each of those levels that were very borough characters I was able to figure out. Oh, this is the journeyman you know so. You think leaper than I do I mean to me Williams sometimes reading William. Or reading certain writers is like listening to Coltrane or something. Or a saxophone solo right I never analyze it i. just I'm just there and I just go with them and I go away as far as they're gonNA, take me and by. Comeback and don't even remember where we been because. I'm so immersed in the go and. I. Think that's right. I think that's the best way to do it. I always assume like I missing something there and Now. He's got so many blanks there he wants to to fill in I. Mean you have to be the third mind with with William Right because I I remember one williams great disappointment himself was that he couldn't write a straight laced detective story. Or straight laced novel he and we talked about this all of these books if you if you think about it, they start. Very conventional. Eight. Yes. You're going on your you're gone with this old guy sitting there with his. Shotgun barrel or something you're going to go straight through some plot with him and then starts cutting things up in going into several layers of worlds and he told me, he just couldn't help it. That's that's the way his mind works in that it's his process. He would have loved to have written even a two bit detective novel that's for sure. I've read his essays. It's interesting when he writes with that type of clarity or you read the interviews but like yeah and I get it there's a magic to it. He you guys I mean you're a magician as well. There is a magic to this idea of of transcending space and time through cut ups and through I mean I get it and I like it. So you were able to spend time with burroughs early on your before you started singing or as a poet I met him in. Nineteen. Seventy I think I met him I had a big crush on him. So I was always A. United pet. He would come into the Chelsea hotel and he was so handsome and he was always so well dressed and I just had the biggest crush on him and I would try to. Know, I would talk to him and I think he was amused by me. But also he got to trust me he I. Don't know we became friends but also sometimes in the course of night, William would get extremely shoveled because the come into the Chelsea. And you had to come through the lobby and then go through the door into the bar. WOULD START OUT WITH HIS Perfect, tie in ensued to an overcoat, and then when he left, he was a bit stumbling. He'd get a bit intoxicated and I would wait and then I would get him a cab and make sure that you know he didn't leave anything behind in. Just you know be as like little. Guardian Angel Girl. Three. We just got to be friends and friends throughout. His whole life. And right to the end of his life and he was a very kind and very principled man. I know people know. Different Aspects of William? And he was many things and but to me, he was very good to May. He. Was a good teacher when my husband died he was So supportive he was kind to my children. You know I'd Love I. Loved Him why feel a lot I mean? That's one thing that comes through the writing and your life is at like the. The sort of using deep and Lasting friendships. Is Really I. It's like enviable I I mean you know when the way you talk about William and the way talk about Sam Sheppard in the book just these. This real appreciation of of friends and people you love and and and other artists that you respect. It's just it really struck me because I I don't. I don't I think things have become kind of chaotic odd and I guess people still do it. But when I look at my life I have a few friends but there's such because you the generation and the people that you guys the crew of you are so. Daunting in in in in your output in in who you were in the world I just loved that you you're not only friends but you stay together until the end I mean it's really kind of amazing and it really is what life is about at least half of it. Right? Well, you find a few people that you. Really, trust. To feel you know understand you. I was just lucky. The people that that I? was close to his young girl run remained closed till you know they're passing We all of us had worked centric relationships as well.

Man William William Burroughs fever Sam Sheppard William Right Terry southern burrows Mary Dennis Hopper Chelsea hotel Allen Ginsberg Johnny Carl Solomon Williams Coltrane A. United Chelsea
"carl solomon" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

Rock N Roll Archaeology

07:48 min | 11 months ago

"carl solomon" Discussed on Rock N Roll Archaeology

"Today as a force in popular culture as as the baby boomers have aged pop culture. itself has become ever more stratified by demographics and Janelle resin platforms Elvis is no longer everywhere. But Bob Dylan is. At the decidedly non pop age of seventy nine. which is nearly double Elvis's age at death. Dillon has had the number one pop song in the land with murder most foul. Look to the chatter where the wheels of pop culture turn choose almost any point of view biographical, political, religious, literary, musical, philosophical, or historical, and the chances are that it's being used to explain Bob Dylan and his work hundreds of books, thousands of articles, and at ever expanding universe of list-serve websites, magazines, academic courses, and conferences Sing Dylan's loyal chorus of commentary. Edging towards seventh decade on the Public Stage Dylan continues to waive his baton in every direction urging the chorus onward. Even if we know he's not much for choruses. Dylan's work has repercussions not only for those of US still fascinated by his continuing contribution to popular culture but also for anyone who cares about how popular culture shapes the world. have got my back to the sun because the light is too intense. Dylan sings and sugar baby. I can see what everybody in the world is up against. You can't turn back you can't come back sometimes we push too far. One day you'll open up your eyes and you'll see where we are. From more than half a century trying to understand dylan songs has been for many. Like, unfolding the criss crossing lines of a map of the entire world. Well, we're going to take a shot at reading those maps particularly in a moment where the world we thought we knew seems like an charted territory. I'm Steven Daniel Arnav and this is Bob Dylan about man and God and Law a podcast that tells the story of how Bob Dylan sparked a revolution of spirit and why it matters. To open up our eyes to the music of Bob Dylan not only see where we really are. But where we need to go. So welcome to episode one of Bob, Dylan about man and God and Law Salvation to be. On, not to be. That is the question. Now long before the unlikely chart topper murder most foul expounded upon a line from Hamlet Taufer strange comfort to a world jolted by covid nineteen and protests and riots against racism in the Spring of two thousand twenty Bob Dylan was searching for salvation in a limousine hurtling across the British countryside. The year was nineteen, sixty five. Dylan and his posse had taken their places in a dreamlike reflection on the silver screen in a scene imagined in todd. Haynes is two thousand, seven film based on Dylan songs and story. The film is called I'm not there. But. Let's give this context. Some context by nineteen sixty, five dylan had become the most important cultural figure of the twentieth century. This was the period his most concentrated in fierce creative influence in the spin of just fifteen months March nineteen sixty, five to may nineteen, sixty, six, dylan released three of the greatest rock albums of all time. Bringing it all back home highway sixty, one revisited and blonde on blonde. His songwriting and recording were feverishly prolific had taken on ambitious publishing and film projects and took part in an exhausting live tours spanning four continents backed by a crew of road warriors who would later become known as the band. The shows on this tour documented in D. A. Penna Bakers pioneering rock doc don't look back included a first set of Solo Acoustic renditions of epic musical dreamscapes that had shattered the mold of songwriting for pop by the Time Dylan was twenty three. And then a scorching said of angry loud rock intimidated the punks just as those punks were getting their first guitars. In the UK the period that Hanes his film calls upon vividly there were walkouts heckling and even famous shout of Judas in Manchester as reimagined in. I'm not there dylan passes the time on a long ride. The quiet home of a black limo a well-dressed journalist with the patrician accent, stern jaw and diamond cutting stare of a very serious man questions him. As evidenced by penna Baker's film and other footage from the same period. Dylan was frenetic, sarcastic confident, and very funny as he conjured both the destination and the map for a new age of music celebrity, the Rockstar as a seeker of truth and hipster scene maker all at once. This new. Paradigm for the possibilities of Pop Gurus both confounded and excited the press and Dylan played his role. masterfully, journalists sparred with a scruffy haired chain smoking dylan whose press conferences from San Francisco to Paris became spoken word happenings. A flow of questions ranging from the nature of hygiene on the road to the meaning of life would be asked of rockstars for decades to come. And Bob, Dylan. He was inventing them. How many people? Who Labor in the same musical vineyard in which you toil? How many are protests singers that is people who use their music and use the songs to protest the social state in which we live today the matter of war, the matter of crime or whatever it might be how many? Yes. Are there many? There's about. One hundred, thirty, six. Say about one, hundred and thirty six. Are you mean, exactly a hundred and thirty six Thirty, six, hundred, forty, two as the press hounded him for explanations about where he was really at and what was it he wanted Dylan played with them like a cat plays with a mouse cigarette smoke curling to the ceiling and photo bulbs or flashing how for Carl Solomon. I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness starving hysterical naked dragging themselves through the Negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix angel headed hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry Dynamo in the machinery of night who.

Bob Dylan murder Bob Elvis Dillon D. A. Penna Bakers Haynes US penna Baker Carl Solomon UK Steven Daniel Arnav Manchester todd Judas San Francisco Paris
"carl solomon" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

14:16 min | 1 year ago

"carl solomon" Discussed on Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

"But after a while after nineteen seventeen he just said you know. This isn't working. I'm just GONNA paint in a classical style and then continued to paint in a classical style for the rest of his life. But what's interesting about it because we have a classical piece? S I think nine hundred twenty nine or something like that because he left the surrealist group in nineteen twenty eight and painted exclusively classical art style until he died But we have a classical like classical piece. That's just it's a still life of fruit with on a table with a like a city street background and like A drapery in the corner and while it's definitely classical style you can still see his weird like metaphysical stuff like. They're still really a lot of weird shadows and the orange look like they're kind of floating. They're not they don't seem to have any to them. So it's kind of funny because he was like surrealism. His Dad metaphysical artists dead. I'm painting classical style. But he's still couldn't ever like get away from it in any real way so it's cool He was also a writer. Who had a novel called Hebdo Morose? It presented a series of dreamscapes with an unusual use of punctuation syntax and grammar designed to create an atmosphere in frame. It's midges it. Sounds impossible to raise He also included Set Designs for the Belarus's and would create a decorative form of surrealism and he was probably the main influence for both Dolly and MMA. Greet okay before he gave it all up So in one thousand nine hundred eighty four Joan Miro Andrea Masan applied surrealism specifically to painting. So the first surrealist exhibition which was called Lapine Torso released or the lowest painters was held in Paris in nineteen twenty five and it displayed works by man. Ray Paul Klee. Miro and others and the show confirmed that surrealism had a component in the visual arts and techniques from Dada. Such as photomontage. Were you so? That's just you know you take a picture like photographs and Newspapers and you would cut them up. And it'll be a photo montage. The following year on March two thousand six hundred twenty six gallery so released opened with an exhibition by man Ray and Brittan published surrealism painting in Nineteen Twenty eight which summarize the movement to that point. Though he continued to update the work until the nineteen sixties So surrealism as a political force developed kind of unevenly around the world In some places more emphasis was on artistic practices and others on political and in other places. Still surrealist practice look to supersede both the arts and politics so they were like it's above it it's floating above us like as a missed so during the nineteen thirties. The surrealist ideas spread from Europe to North America South America Central America the Caribbean and throughout Asia as both in artistic idea and as an ideology of political change Politically surrealism was Trotskyist. Communist or anarchist. The split from data had been characterized as split between anarchists and communists with the surrealists as communists. So as I mentioned before like surrealists were more about the data. Were just like shut it all down. Sh fucking it up It should be mentioned though. That Salvador Dali supported capitalism the fascist dictatorship of Francisco Franco but cannot be said to represent a trend in surrealism. In that respect as you can imagine In fact he was considered by Bretagne and his associates to have betrayed and left surrealism. Also anti-colonial Revolutionary Writers in the negritude movement of Martinique. Which was a French colony at the time took up surrealism as a revolutionary method and a critique of European culture and a radical subjective. So it was interesting that there were groups that work using surrealism as kind of As the fuel to create political fire. Interesting This linked with other surrealists and was very important for the subsequent development of surrealism as a revolutionary practice and in one thousand nine hundred eight. Andre Brittan traveled with his wife. The painter Jacqueline Lamba to Mexico to meet Trotsky because he was staying sure as the guest of Diego Rivera's former wife Guadalupe Miranda and there. He met Frida Kahlo and saw her paintings for the first time and Brittan declared Kalo to be an innate surrealist painter so thanks so throughout the nineteen thirties surrealism continued to be more visible to the public at large it was huge in the thirty S. Like Dalian mcgary created the most widely recognized images of the Movement. Dolly joined the group in Nineteen Twenty nine and he participated in the rapid establishment of the visual style between nineteen thirty and nineteen thirty five Surrealism as a visual movement had found a method to expose psychological truth stripping ordinary objects of their normal significance to create a compelling image that was beyond ordinary formal organization in order to evoke empathy from the viewer Elsa Schiaparelli who I mentioned in my fashion episode. That's very she was episodes six. Yeah it's very early She was up considered a surrealist fashion designer. Okay Yeah and she collaborated with Dolly on the lobster. Dress that she had created so she was definitely like she was mainstream. I mean this is in the thirties for sure. So it wasn't like too weird but it was definitely surrealist. That was her. Jeff worked under that philosophy so nineteen thirty. One was a year where several surrealist painters produced works which mark turning points in their stylistic evolution so McGrath's Voice of space is an example of this process Where three large spheres representing bells hang above a landscape In another surrealist landscape from this year as East Tangiers Promontory Palace with this molten forms and liquid shapes Liquid Shapes became the trademark of Dali particularly in his persistence of memory which features the image of watches that SAG as if they were melting us. Tank we had has kind of a like a weird almost eighty s kind of reminds me like the the surface is very slick like Dolly is very small brushstrokes. That looks like it's created by a computer basically like very smooth and Tangy creates these long spindly legs. And then there's like these weird figures that aren't really humanoid or animal or anything but their three dimensional looking in have like a like a wet glistening quality to them that looks liquid so it looks like he took like droplets of water or paint or whatever and like painted them in three dimensions onto a bare landscape. It looks like a salt. Flat usually are like a desert. Wow they're very weird. I'm I mean I I like Dolly I think TANGY HAS MORE OF A. I don't know it has more of an interest to it like Dolly can. Sometimes you look at art near like all right. I got it like he's being like look at me. Look at a weird. This is and it's a little too like overly thought out and McGraw has kind of a weird Meritas cool because his later stuff especially when he was really like like settling into the surrealist stuff. is very thoughtful and beautiful and kind of weirdly. Sad like it's We went to the Agreed Museum in Brussels and they had a lot of his stuff and he was very prolific. He did a lot of drawing and printing as well as painting but Yeah his stuff is very. I don't know it has a a weird sadness to it. That is interesting that I'm not one hundred percent. Sure how that fits in but So the characteristics of the style surrealism. A combination of the depicted. The abstract the psychological came to stand for the Alien Nation which many people felt in the modern period combined with a sense of reaching more deeply into the psyche to be made whole with one's individuality. So they've got like modern society was pulling them away from being kind of primitive and so they wanted to get back to that like primitive quality so long after personal political and professional tensions fragmented the surrealist group agreed and Dolly continued to divine official program in the arts. This program reached beyond painting to encompass photography as well as can be seen from a man. Ray self-portrait who's Yousef Assam blush influenced Robert Rauschenberg collage boxes. So here's an example of like at peak surrealism. This is what an exhibition would look like. So Nine. Hundred thirty eight there was a new exposition. the international surrealist exposition at the Beaux Arts Gallery in Paris. With more than sixty artists from different countries and showed around three hundred paintings objects collages photographs and installations and the surrealists wanted to create an exhibition which in itself would be a creative act and so they called on Marcel Duchamp. Wolfgang Palin Man Ray and others to do so. So at the exhibitions entrance sell vidor Dolly placed. His rainy taxi okay. So rainy taxi wasn't old taxi. Rigged to produce a steady drizzle of water down the inside of the windows and a shark headed creature. In the driver's seat and a blonde mannequin crawling with live snails in the back. So this greeted the patrons okay. So everyone's in like full evening dress. They walk up. Here's rainy taxi. So stay also filled one side of the lobby with mannequins dressed. Barbaria surrealists K. So and also Palin deschamp designed the main hall to seem like a cave with twelve hundred coal bags suspended from the ceiling over a coal brazier with a single lightbulb. Which provided the only lighting as well as the floor covered with Like wet leaves and mud so getting into. I mean you'd think they would but who knows so. They're all in evening dress their like walking on mud and sticks and there's coal bags hanging in their faces and they were given flashlights with which to view the art and on the floor. Wolfgang Palin created a small with grasses and the aroma of roasting coffee in the air. So it was supposed to be like a multi sensory surrealist experience and of course much to the surrealists satisfaction the exhibition scandalised viewers. People were horrified. And they were like yes. We did it. They did it then. Yeah they hated it so then World War. Two shows up so World War Two graded not only general havoc for the population but of Europe but especially for the European artists and writers that opposed fascism and Nazism many important artists fled to North American relative safety in the United States. So the art community in New York City in particular was already grappling with surrealist ideas and several artists like arshile. Gorky Jackson pollock Robert Motherwell converged closely with the surrealist artists themselves albeit with some suspicion and reservations ideas concerning the unconscious and dream. Imagery were quickly embraced by the second world. War The taste of the American avant-garde Garden New York City swung decisively toward abstract expressionism with the sport of key taste makers including Peggy Guggenheim. Leo Steinberg and Clement Greenberg. However abstract expressionism itself grew directly out of the meeting of American artists with European surrealists self exile during World War Two. So it's kind of a natural progression of these artists coming over to New York and meeting up with New York artists where the surrealism kind of naturally went into abstract expressionism. Which is this idea of creating movement and expression through Abstract art so a perfect example of this is Jackson pollock so his his our work is about movement and not making decisions on where to put the art and just like literally like langer canvas on the floor and like throwing paint onto the canvas and trying to express this idea of speed and intense movement through a static two dimensional object so abstract expression became like the hottest of hot things So the early work. Many abstract expressionists Reveal the bond between aspects of both movements and the emergence of aspects of data is humor in such artists as Rauschenberg Which sheds even starker light on this kind of connection between these two and up until the emergence of pop art surrealism can be seen to have been the single most important influence on the sudden growth in American arts and even in pop art. Some of the humor manifested in surrealism can be found often. Turn to a cultural criticism. So all of these. I mean that's the thing about a lot of art movements is that they just kind of like do from one to the other and so things just kind of like emerge as they come so pop. Art Definitely has like very clear ties to surrealism abstract expressionism of course and so and it continues today. Right like these kinds of things like post. Modern thing is all built off of surrealism which was built off of data which was built off. You know like all of the stuff. Also many significant literary movements in the later half of the twentieth century were directly or indirectly influenced by surrealism known as the Post Modern Era Though there's no widely agreed on central definition of postmodernism many themes and techniques commonly identified as postmodern are nearly identical surrealism and Miami Writers From and associated with the beat generation were influenced greatly by surrealists. Such as William S burroughs Allen. Ginsberg Bob Kaufman. Carl Solomon and Gregory Corso So yeah the beat generation was definitely like influenced by the surrealists..

Dolly Ray Paul Klee Andre Brittan Wolfgang Palin Salvador Dali New York City Europe Joan Miro Andrea Masan Paris Hebdo Morose writer Jackson pollock Lapine Torso Frida Kahlo Bob Kaufman Jacqueline Lamba Marcel Duchamp Elsa Schiaparelli Caribbean
"carl solomon" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

09:54 min | 1 year ago

"carl solomon" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Radio app welcome to the conversation is after a start out on a I I think is a weighty is significant but somber anniversary today it was a year ago tonight that beautiful talented bright ambitious young woman who prepared herself to serve her community in a very very unique way was was the victim of the ultimate crime Natalie corona was shot and killed in the line of duty a year ago tonight and it's incredible that the passage of time how quickly it's been another regards it seems like it says been forever and I'm have the the honor and I don't I don't take that expression lately it really truly is an honor for me to have in studio as somebody whose life has been absolutely profoundly impacted by this horrifically rhyme and that is the father of Natalie Merced corona Sir good afternoon welcome to the program for its are honestly I'm I'm truly honored to have you here well it is my honor to be here the sheriff and I will I will refer to you a share of because I just I have so much respect old old habits Die Hard well yes and I look up to your world you're very kind and and I look at war this this horrific crime I started as a what happened and it wasn't something that happened this was a this was an evil act perpetuated against somebody who is the absolute diametrically opposite of the person who took her life E. was he was the embodiment the the personification of evil and from every indication she was the personification of everything that's good and graceful everything is wonderful in the world I know you know that better than anybody else yeah Natalie was a special special person to us and she was our daughter but she was just a a remarkable individual get the impression she was a bit of a Daddy's girl to shift law yeah that's it all she was my shadow and that I know and that but I've heard and read accounts about her donning your sheriff's department cap and and uniform shirt as a young child walk around the house did radio coach you know the phonetic alphabet she and she did she was she was a little shadow and she just I think she had it in the blood since he was very young and she she knew where what profession that she was going to go you know go towards and and I knew it had to be proud right I was I was very proud DHEA because we you an hour chatting off error earlier and you if you absolutely believe as to why this is it's not a job is not a career is not even a profession it's a calling that's true and you were called to this profession and that she saw that she saw the satisfaction you got from a she saw the extent to which you committed your your heart and soul to it and she won a farmer's footsteps that's got to make you feel very very proud yeah that was well one of the proudest moments do you know that we've had that we had was the pin in that badge on her hood her mom pinned it on graduation night at the academy and then I got the pin it when she got sworn in at the department that the Davis police department and that was just the to me it was just the the dream come true for not only for her but for us because we were just so proud of her as well you should be and and I know you have three other daughters yes and I I've I've heard I'm I'm I guess maybe I'm knows your that I want to admit so I've checked and I know that that you have a kind of an idyllic family living up in that close to county and were you now serve on the board of supervisors after having retired from a career of public service and I know you you're you're close knit group you get together to celebrate Denters into to go to church together and and do things that that they were probably considered I guess more the norm in generations past when the nuclear family was a big part of our society but you still in body all of that and that so that the the the blow that this had to bring to your wonderful family I I I I I wish there were words I could express to to offer some consolation but that but I I can tell you this that the people throughout this region are profoundly grateful to you and and for your wife for the the the the job you've done and the extraordinary matter which you handled the aftermath of this it's a you're an example for everybody to follow well I I appreciate those kind words and yeah we we do have a close family we have we also have a close extended family we get together for holidays and and and do all that kind of stuff but Natalie was just such a big part of of our families and she is the oldest right she was the oldest she was the policy was the you know the she just was the the mother hand to their tour yeah two or three sisters Jackie Kathy and Cindy and then an hour Jackie Kathy as any done well they're they're they're struggling and to be honest with you they are yeah they have their their their days you know they they have good days and bad days but you know I'm very proud of them because I I mean what they've gone through and it is just that is there there I think it's their faith now give some Golan and other mothers takes good care of and in Seoul thank god there's they're doing okay clearly clearly they have that incredible role models but that my heart goes out to them and and I know its I was extraordinarily difficult in part of the reason I think it's beneficial to have your story told is for people in the community the broad sat cross section of the community I understand that when you see that patrol car when you see law enforcement officers engaged in the practice of their profession it's so incredibly important to the safety and protection of all of us it's easy to disregard of the risk the sacrifice that they and their families make and regrettably Natalie's not the lot last officer to to pay the ultimate sacrifice in this region she's not the last one yeah so the the and I I wish that the the grace that you have displayed in the aftermath of this could be Calcutta replicated by the the community at large to understand exactly what that what goes into protecting them and I did they I I sense of from the political class in a way I have not historically and from other members of the community some in the media who are so quick to criticize her so reluctant to recognize the fact that these officers are engaging very very delicate work sometimes you're dealing with people at their absolute worst an extraordinary they and complicated nature of threat that exists to law enforcement officers today it is much much greater than it's been historically yeah I think these officers nowadays they they have to put up with so much in the ed I told you before we went on the air that you know I just we've lost the several officers here in this area yeah you know just within this last year Carl Solomon and her family you know what they're what they're going through and and Reinisch someone is male yell through smells family we we just the you know having gone through it before them it just it it tears your heart up when and when you hear about another off you're getting shot and killed or dying just you know on the freeway you know do entered their job regardless of the circumstances these are officers that are out there you know providing a service for us citizens out enjoying everyday life and so when we lose one especially now having having lost our own daughter it really tugs at your heart and in in in in you could you know with these families are gonna go through now what what could anybody or all collectively all of us in the community due to to help your family is there anything that even a message that the the family would like to hear well I had occasion to visit with your wife and I she's a delightful lovely person I've not met your your daughters but that but it what what what might be a something that would that be consoling for them to hear you know I think just the the every day you know text messages from friends and family you know just Hey we're thinking of you you know will pray we know we're praying for you today those those just carry so much weight but you know as a as a as an area of yellow like I told you before yolo county Colusa county Davis you know Dave is the city a Davis is just poured out their hearts to us some you know the city council did some things recently that are going to honor Natalie and so we're very thankful you know because she's in that short twenty two year life that she had that and we had she touched a lot of hearts not only in this area but in all around the world yeah and we got correspondences and letters and cards gifts from people throughout the world and we're just we were just the taken back in we're so grateful I had occasion to ever does spoke at a mothers against drunk driving luncheon where you and your wife on the tennis yes I saw the video of her I guess preparing for her the challenges that she would face in her career she knew that the emergency vehicle operation scores may be a challenge for such action rolled into the Alameda county sheriff's department driver training program on our own before you went to the academy to get prepared for it and there's a video of her engaged that method of magical smile and the the the spark she had in her personality and the the way she was received by her driving instructor obviously an extraordinary young woman that the that you you you and low pay created and that the whole world is a better place for it thank you and and the sad that reality is an event that that that never should have happened that that your life was taken so there's a lot we have a lot of things I want to share it to discuss with you still get take care of some other business right alright we'll take a break and come right back and.

Natalie corona
"carl solomon" Discussed on Reason Podcast

Reason Podcast

11:45 min | 2 years ago

"carl solomon" Discussed on Reason Podcast

"This is the reason podcasts. And I'm your house nNcholas Speight. Thanks for listening. I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness. Starving hysterical naked dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix angel headed hipsters burning for the ancient heavenly connection to the starry dynamo in the machinery of night. So of you might recognize those as the opening lines to Allen Ginsberg's mid nineteen fifties poem howl, which helped kickstart both a major cultural and legal transformation in America. When that made our country looser hip and one much more peace with all sorts of alternate lifestyles, libertine sexuality, and perhaps most importantly, speech was profane raucous inventive in unrestrained. What Ginsberg's fellow beat Jack heroic called spontaneous. Bob president. Immediately upon howls debut in print Ginsberg's publisher Lawrence Furlan Getty of city lights. Books was hauled into court on obscenity charges in San Francisco of all places the trial, which ended in a very surprising and unexpected not guilty verdict helped to usher in a new era free speech in America but is the euro free speech ending everywhere. We look at seems are more and more attempts to shut down things that are considered offensive or provocative speech. Sometimes in the name of protecting kids or protecting the sensibilities of marginalized ethnic, religious, and sexual minorities or protecting the political process from dark money in Russian influence. Sometimes we shut down free speech in the name of national security. But everywhere it seems the threats in the need to shut down speech is growing. My guest today is Ronald kale Collins. He's a lawyer and scholar at the Newseum first amendment Law Center and he's. The author of fantastic weekly blog called first amendment news. You can subscribe to that, at the website of the foundation for individual rights at education. Look for them online at the fire dot org. Collins is also the co author with David cover of the new book, the people vs Lawrence Furling, Getty, the fight to publish Allen Ginsberg's howl. It's a fast paced history of the obscenity trial that ended in a major victory for free expression in America. We're going to talk to him about his book, and the enduring relevance of the case, he describes to contemporary debates about free speech. Ron Collins thanks for talking to raise it. It's such a great opportunity to be here. And I really appreciate the conversation we're about to have Nick. All right. And you know, because this both is reason, and it's the twenty first century of American, the lights for free speech going at all over the place. I don't want to mandate that you curse a lot. But if you want to, you know let the expletives fly, but what's the elephant, member wrote a book on Lenny BRUCE'S, so I'm? That's. Which I reviewed favorably in Reza we, we'll get into that a little bit because I really don't think that Lenny, Bruce funny, but he is important. And he, he was a free speech, martyr. I mean, there's no question about it as is in a way Furling Getty, although Furlan Getty was able to get off the cross and live another. Dozens of years. I mean he's, he's still with us. Yeah. He's one hundred years old. But so I guess start off then who is learns? Furling gatty. Wow. Where do I begin? Well, Lawrence Farallon Getty first and foremost is the owner. And the original founder co founder of city lights books in San Francisco. He's a publisher he say, nationally or internationally, renowned poet, he's a bookseller and he's a guy with a lot of spunk. And a lot of backbone. And he knows what he wants and he doesn't let anything stand in the way in other words, he's an American maverick. That's how I begin the book with David scooper. He's a man of many stripes, socialist activists environmentalist first amendment advocate berry strong advocate. He's fat Trinh. Oh, yes. A veteran of the second World War. Yes. Yes. So PHD as well. And literature. I mean the guys just he's incredible. So, and you also for all of the tight Ed has he's best known as a poet himself for the collection. A Coney Island of the mind, which sold something like a million copies something. I mean it's one of the best selling poetry books of the postwar era, but you also at various points, just because I know some reason people be like is an environmentalists these socialists. These this is a pacifist after World War. Two are the dropping of the nuclear warriors and anti nuke guy. And I don't know that any reason, you know, listeners readers or anything are actually pro nuclear bombs being dropped. They may be I we can go all sorts of ways with. But you also refer to Furling Getty at various points as libertarian. What do you mean by that in that context because I think it's absolutely correct. Yeah. I mean like I said he wears many hats. I mean, we could be talking about another side of Lawrence felony Getty and talk to him. Talk about him as socialist socialist or what have you, but he's a man that is so committed and has. I've been so committed to free speech that he was willing to put up his business for it. He was pulling put up his career for it, who's willing to go to jail for it and all of this for a oppose that he didn't even ride. I mean he just did. This is a bookseller and book publisher, but we can get. And he loved the pope. He did. And so let's just go back in time a little bit this idea for this book really came many years ago. David, and I were to book on Lenny, Bruce, and, and the attorney for Lenny, Bruce, at least in San Francisco was kind of Albin dick who had worked with the ACLU, and he was Lenny BRUCE'S lawyer. And when we are done with Lenny, Bruce book, you said, you know if you ever want to do another book. There's this, I represented among some other ACLU lawyers Lawrence felon, get it in a obscenity case. And he had all of the trial transcripts. And everything may he had it all. And we thought, wow, this is just another book, popular culture, free speech. What have you? And so we had done a book called mania, and in mania. There was a chapter in their own Lawrence fail and Getty. But then when we saw that he was about to turn hundred. This was about a year ago. We said, you know, this is a book. This is something that just deserves a book in its own. Right. And so as our tribute to learn spelling. Keti. We put together this book and it all begins really. I mean it, it involves a Poet, Allen, Ginsberg, another poet alerts, parent Keti, who's also a bookseller and book publisher unin credible lineup of a lawyers and a most remarkable, but very unusual judge. And that's kind of the mix of it all. And all of this happens in nineteen fifty six and fifty seven and what's going on, at that time in America is culture collusion? A collision excuse me. I said that see were there. Yes, on everybody's mind. We'll say because it never happens. It never happens. It's never happened in the history of America, especially in the past couple of culture collision, and it's a it's a new generation. I mean the sixties really began in the late fifties with the beats and what have you Lenny, Bruce and Jack Carroll? Ac Allen Ginsberg Neal Cassidy and others. And, and this is an idea. This is people with different values people who are really willing to kind of fly libertarian flag to, to each his own to each, you know, the star and their own galaxy. Yeah. What is remarkable about an I think it's worth recovering from the beats, as well as other kind of nonconformist groups the individualism of it. I mean, they, they banded together, and they certainly created their communities and whatnot, but they were individualists in a way that sometimes libertarians get to I think hopped up on the idea of like our, you know you gotta support. Maximum second amendment rights or something as opposed to just the more basic, fundamental understanding that discussions about society and living good and proper light begin an aunt. They don't end with the individual, but they begin with it and uh so that these guys were not overtly political. I mean, none of I don't think any of them were, you know, big Eisenhower fans or Nixon fans, although you to Jack Kerouac probably voted Republican to the extent that he voted, you know, but they were also beyond politics like they weren't gonna waste a lot of their time, you know, ward healing for you know this or that district council mentors. Yeah. I mean they were so political that they were beyond politics. I mean really way beyond it. So what happens is in mid fifties. Allen Ginsberg is leaves an asylum in San Francisco. One of the things he was being treated, therefore, was his homosexuality. They thought that New York was a bad place for him to stay. So they let him leave only on the condition that he goes someplace safe, and so they pick San Francisco. So they so they picked they tell a hub of sexual who at that point. That's synonymous with being mentally ill. You gotta get out of New York, you gotta get a San Francisco to, to, to deal with your latent homosexuality. Yes. So good rely on these with, with a woman, and what have you, but soon enough, he goes back to his wild ways. And remember, homosexuality was crime, then. And so anyway, he comes into city lights bookstore, just opened and the Lawrence felon Getty became the owner was originally, coned. But and they get to the media other Alan pitches, some poems to him, at least the first set of poems, he pitched apparent Getty to pass. But then he started talking about how found getting was very interested in how from the beginning, he loved the fact that it was just so contraire so counterculture, so norm. Breaking so vibrant, so individualistic, so passionate, you know, and that the title, you know, how it was richly hall for call a Carl Solomon Carl. Solomon with somebody he was in the asylum within New York. And so one thing leads to another and found Getty says he's interested and Allen Ginsberg gives a very dramatic presentation of the poem and place called six gallery filled with all these counterculture types. Remember this is before the sixties is a nineteen fifty six other passing around. Big jug of red wine, a probably Gallo or Thunderbird and our. It's in the parlance of the day was dago red. It was a big jug of Santana cheap. Right. Right that karaoke, karaoke. Jack heroic. Was there and was collecting money yelling at him buying. That's absolutely true. And, and most of the poets that gave presentations that they were deadly dull, but Ginsburg he, he comes up. He's wearing a sport coat and a tie. And he's almost Rebekah CLE in the way he presents. I mean, it's just there's just a certain rhythm, there's a certain life. And as you heard him, you know, each stanza. Those who did this who did that who did this who did that. And you can just feel the momentum building and all of a sudden people start pounding their feet, and go and go go go, go. This is while he's reading the poem, and one person who's rather driving the way you describe it. And I'm sorry in bed. I wanna say one of the things that is fantastic about the book is, you know, the history and the legal argumentation in the archival research, and all of that, but I have to say, somebody who reads a lot about the beats and has consumed vast numbers of recollections and stuff..

Allen Ginsberg Lenny BRUCE San Francisco publisher America Getty Lawrence Furlan Getty Lawrence David scooper Lawrence Farallon Getty Furlan Getty New York Jack Ronald kale Collins Speight Bob president