9 Burst results for "Carl Shire"

"carl shire" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

Red, Blue, and Brady

03:16 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Red, Blue, and Brady

"Andrew johnson had it basically issued blanket amnesty to many of the confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in those governments and they started drafting constitutions in laws and one of those laws was the black code and the black codes did was to basically reinstall slavery by another name requiring the control of black labor but that control also required. This arming black people because the war with the war black folks had guns. And so this disarming you had the rise of these era military groups that were working in league with these neo confederate government to disarm black people and it was vicious. It was brutal carl. Shire's had come down to do a survey of the conditions in the south and his his travelogue is just one mangled body after the next It was so horrific that historian annette gordon reed called it a slow motion genocide. And you had the troops were there as part of the occupying army in the midst of this violence and they kept trying to get in between these paramilitary groups in these white mobs who are trying to put the freed people back into some form of slavery and what the white mob said as they went to president johnson. They're like look we know. There's violence we know there is but the reason why there's violence is because you've got those black soldiers who are streghten around at all they want to do is to kill us. If you get rid of the black soldiers you know we will have peace. What that means is you get rid of the folks who are black people and we can do what we want to do. And that's what happened. Johnson had those black soldiers removed from the south and the violence rained down. You get the rise of the ku klux klan. You get the rise of the red shirts. the rise of the white camelia and the slaughter is just intense and in many cases that's lauder was linked up with black folks right to vote blackman's right to vote black attempt to exercise their citizenship rights and so in colfax louisiana for instance where there wasn't election that the right wing that the white supremacist did not like the results of that election so they decided to stage a coup and stormed the courthouse. Which was the the site of democracy in colfax louisiana and overthrow that government and install their own folks will. The black militia was called out to help protect that site of democracy. They were overwhelmed by the firepower. And by the brutality and they were slaughter over one hundred black men killed at colfax louisiana because the state was so politically split in divisive polarized..

annette gordon reed Andrew johnson white mob Shire president johnson carl colfax army lauder louisiana blackman Johnson white supremacist
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Yes and so. The dread scott decision was designed to try to stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who wasn't slaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois. And then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said written by chief justice roger -taining was that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens anathemas with uniform militia. Act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people passports saying they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. On all of these things proved. They're not citizens there he said in this decision if they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went. And so in there you see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship in this in this framing and essay. they're not citizens dreads. Scott was the one that said that a black man has no right that a white man is bound to respect. Dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war you had a andrew johnson as the president of the united states basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions and laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states trying to disarm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right. After the next. There's a travel log of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed calls it a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the occupying army in the south. You have white southerners absolutely outrage. That you have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force in what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here then we this killing would be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal fortifications and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror. That was raining down on them. So the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it it the safety and the security of white southerners. i mean. that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black defense calls upon the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this. Carol anderson to respond to bobby seale so bobby seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those rift conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as a response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about open carry in california and the also knew the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the black panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that they were allowed to have and the police did not like it. They did not like it and so the oakland police department went to. Don mulford assemblyman a california assemblyman and said we need your help. We need to make what the black panthers are doing illegal. Because currently it's legal. We stop them but they got the right kinds of weapons. We can't arrest them for what they're doing. We need to be able to make their work illegal. And so what mulford did with the help of the nra was to write the mulford act which banned open carry which was a gun control act and there was a gun control act targeted at the black panthers so for said now there's no racial targeting in this at all this is about the clan as well but it wasn't the the letters make it really clear that the genesis for this the catalyst for it was the. How do we curtail the black panthers. How do we make them. Ill legal fascinating moving for twenty years. I wanted to go to former supreme court chief justice warren burger nineteen.

scott justice roger andrew johnson united states missouri kansas carl shire Annette gordon reed panthers bobby seale seale co wisconsin california legislature illinois texas Carol anderson africa Scott oakland police department panther party for self defense
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Yes and so. The dread scott decision was designed to try to stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who wasn't slaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois and then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said written by chief justice roger -taining was that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens anathemas with uniform militia. Act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people passports saying they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. All of these things proved. They're not citizens there he said in this decision if they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went. And so in there you see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship in this in this framing and essay. they're not citizens dreads. Scott was the one that said that a black man has no right that a white man is bound to respect. Dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war you had a andrew johnson as the president of the united states basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions and laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states trying to disarm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right. After the next. There's a travel log of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed calls it a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the occupying army in the south. You have white southerners absolutely outrage. That you have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force in what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here then we this killing would be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal certifications and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror. That was raining down on them. So the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it it the safety and the security of white southerners. i mean. that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black part of self defense calls upon the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this. Carol anderson to respond to bobby seale so bobby seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those rift conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as a response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about open carry in california and the also knew the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the black panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that.

scott justice roger missouri kansas united states andrew johnson carl shire Annette gordon reed wisconsin illinois texas africa seale co Scott california legislature bobby seale army panthers Carol anderson anderson
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

06:51 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"And so the dread scott decision was designed to try to stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who wasn't slaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois. And then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said written by chief justice roger -taining was that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens anathemas with uniform. Alicia act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people passports saying they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. On all of these things proved. They're not citizens there he said in this decision if they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went. And so in there you see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship in this in this framing and a say they're not citizens dreads scott was the one that said that a black man has no right that a white man is bound to respect. Dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war you had a andrew johnson as the president of the united states basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions and laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states trying to disarm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right. After the next. There's a travel log of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed calls it a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the occupying army in the south. You have white southerners absolutely outrage. That you have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force in what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here then we this killing would be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal fortifications and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror reigning down on them so the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it it the safety and the security of white southerners. I mean that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black part of self defense calls upon the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this. Carol anderson to respond to bobby seale so bobby seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those horrific conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as a response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about open carry in california and the also knew the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the black panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that.

scott justice roger missouri kansas united states andrew johnson carl shire Annette gordon reed Alicia wisconsin illinois texas africa seale co california legislature bobby seale panthers army Carol anderson anderson
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who was enslaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois. And then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said ridden by chief justice roger. -taining was that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens a netters with uniform militia. Act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people. passports say they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. All of these things prove that they're not citizens there. He said in this decision. If they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went and so in there. You see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship. In this in this framing and saying they're not citizens dread scott was the one that said that a black man has no rights that a white man is bound to respect dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war. You had a andrew. Johnson as the president of the united states. Basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states. Trying to this arm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right after the next. There's a travelogue of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed causing a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the pine army in the south. You have white southerners absolately outrage that. You have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force. In what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here then we this killing what be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal fortifications and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror. That was raining down on them. So the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it. It challenges the safety and the security of white southerners. I mean that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black part of self defense calls on the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this carol anderson respond to bobby seale yes. So we're bobby seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those riffa conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as a response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about the carey in california and the also look the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that they were allowed to have and the police did not like it. They did not like it. And so the oakland police department went to don mulford assemblyman a california assemblyman and said we need your help. We need to make what the black panthers are doing illegal. Because currently it's legal. We stop them but they got the right kinds of weapons. We can't arrest them for what they're doing. We need to be able to make their work illegal. And so what mulford did with the help of the nra was to write the mulford at which banned open carry which was a gun control act and there was a gun control targeted at the black panthers so for said now there's no racial targeting in this at all this is about the clan as well but it wasn't the the letters make it really clear that the genesis for this the catalyst for it was the. How do we curtail the black panthers. How do we make them. Ill legal fascinating moving for twenty years. I wanted to go to former supreme court chief justice warren burger nineteen.

Annette gordon reed andrew johnson twenty years anderson illinois Act of seventeen ninety two cleveland carol anderson wisconsin Johnson bobby. seale black panthers scott don mulford andrew united states california nineteen carl shire newark
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who was enslaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois. And then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said. Ridden by chief justice roger -taining that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens a netters with uniform militia. Act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people passports saying they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. All of these things prove that they're not citizens there. He said in this decision. If they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went and so in there. You see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship in this in this framing and a saying that are not citizens dread scott was the one that said that a black man has no rights that a white man is bound to respect. Dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war. You had a andrew johnson as the president of the united states basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders. Who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states trying to diss arm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right. After the next there's a travelogue of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed causing a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the pine army in the south. You have white southerners absolutely outrage. That you have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force in what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here then we this killing what be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal fortifications and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror. That was raining down on them. So the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it. It challenges the safety and the security of white southerners. I mean that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black part of self defense calls on the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this carol anderson respond to bobby seale. Yes so bobby. Seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those riffa conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about carey in california and the also look the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that they were allowed to have and the police did not like it. They did not like it. And so the oakland police department went to don mulford assemblyman a california assemblyman and said we need your help. We need to make what the black panthers are doing illegal. Because currently it's legal. We stop them but they got the right kinds of weapons. We can't arrest them for what they're doing. We need to be able to make their work illegal. And so what mulford did with the help of the nra was to write the mulford at which banned open carry which was a gun control act and there was a gun control targeted at the black panthers so for said now there's no racial targeting in this at all this is about the clan as well but it wasn't the the letters make it really clear that the genesis for this the catalyst for it was the. How do we curtail the black panthers. How do we make them. Ill legal fascinating moving for twenty years. I wanted to go to former supreme court chief justice warren burger nineteen.

andrew johnson twenty years Annette gordon reed anderson carol anderson illinois cleveland Act of seventeen ninety two wisconsin bobby. seale scott sixties nineteen newark united states court civil war carl shire africa oakland police department
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who was enslaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois. And then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said. Ridden by chief justice roger -taining that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens a netters with uniform militia. Act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people. passports say they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. All of these things prove that they're not citizens there. He said in this decision. If they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went and so in there. You see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship. In this in this framing an essay not citizens dread scott was the one that said that a black man has no rights that a white man is bound to respect. Dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war. You had a andrew johnson as the president of the united states. Basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states. Trying to this arm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right after the next. There's a travelogue of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed causing a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the pine army in the south. You have white southerners absolutely outrage. That you have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force in what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here than we this killing what be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal vacations and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror. That was raining down on them. So the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it. It challenges the safety and the security of white southerners. I mean that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black part of self defense calls on the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this. Carol anderson to respond to bobby seale so bobby seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those riffa conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about open carry in california and the also look the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that they were allowed to have and the police did not like it. They did not like it. And so the oakland police department went to don mulford assemblyman a california assemblyman and said we need your help. We need to make what the black panthers are doing illegal. Because currently it's legal. We stop them but they got the right kinds of weapons. We can't arrest them for what they're doing. We need to be able to make their work illegal. And so what mulford did with the help of the nra was to write the mulford at which banned open carry which was a gun control act and there was a gun control targeted at the black panthers so for said now there's no racial targeting in this at all this is about the clan as well but it wasn't the the letters make it really clear that the genesis for this the catalyst for it was the. How do we curtail the black panthers. How do we make them. Ill legal fascinating moving for twenty years. I wanted to go to former supreme court chief justice warren burger nineteen.

Carol anderson andrew johnson twenty years Annette gordon reed anderson cleveland illinois Act of seventeen ninety two wisconsin scott newark oakland police department court bobby. seale united states warren burger black panther california africa bobby seale
"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

07:53 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Stop the the explosion that was happening. The secessionist crisis that was happening in the united states Because there had been a series of events the the the missouri compromise the war with for texas the the kansas amd bleeding kansas. All of these things were about the expansion of slavery and the fight to contract slavery and and so the dread scott decision so dread scott was a black man who was enslaved and his owner had taken him to free soil states wisconsin and illinois. And then he was taken to missouri which was a slave state. He had argued that because he had been on free soil for years that he was free. What this decision said. Ridden by chief justice roger -taining that africa black people. We're never considered citizens of the united states. They weren't considered citizens at the founding with the constitution. They weren't considered citizens a netters with uniform militia. Act of seventeen ninety two. They weren't considered citizens when the secretary of state refused to issue. Black people. passports say they're not citizens. They denied the ability to carry the mail. All of these things prove that they're not citizens there. He said in this decision. If they were citizens they would be able to go easily from state to state but there were laws that prevented that and he said and they would be able to carry arms wherever they went and so in there. You see that being able to carry arms is a sign of citizenship. In this in this framing and saying they're not citizens dread scott was the one that said that a black man has no rights that a white man is bound to respect dread scott in fact did not stop the crisis in fact it added to it and it helped lead to the civil war after the civil war. You had a andrew. Johnson as the president of the united states. Basically issuing these mass amnesties to the confederacy to confederate leaders who then reassumed their positions in the states and they passed constitutions laws that denied black people their rights one of the laws that they pass where the black codes the black codes among other things besides trying to control labor. The black code said that black people could not bear arms. They could not have weapons and that they needed to be disarmed. You had the rise of these paramilitary groups working in league with these neo confederate states trying to diss arm black people. You had a bloody massacre one right. After the next there's a travelogue of of carnage by carl shire's who writes on the report of the conditions in the south that is just heroin historian and legal scholar. Annette gordon reed causing a slow motion genocide and you have black troops black union troops. Us troops who are part of the pine army in the south. You have white southerners absolutely outrage. That you have black soldiers. Black soldiers as an occupying force in what they see as their space and so they begin to talk about the violence that we're seeing. The virus that is happening is because these black soldiers are here. If these black soldiers weren't here then we this killing what be happening. So andrew johnson removes the black soldiers i he removes them from the interior of the south and puts them on coastal fortifications and then shortly thereafter removes them as an occupying force in the south altogether. Those black soldiers saw themselves as a line of defense protecting the newly freed people from the terror. That was raining down on them. So the denigration of black soldiers the attempt to disarm black people after the war the the the the language that black people aren't really citizens that black people are dangerous and they cannot have access to weapons because it it it. It challenges the safety and the security of white southerners. I mean that's what was going on at this time professor anderson. I wanted to leap forward to ask about how authorities responded to the black panthers which urged black people to arm themselves in the sixties. This is bobby. seale co-founder of the black panther self-defense. Party speaking and nineteen sixty seven. The black part of self defense calls on the american people in general and the black people in particular to take full note of the racist california legislature which is now considering legislation aimed at keeping the black people disarmed and powerless at the very same time that raises police agencies throughout the country. Are intensifying terra. Brutality murder and repression of black people. So if you could respond to this carol anderson respond to bobby seale. Yes so bobby. Seale is talking about is the depth of the police violence and brutality. That was raining down on the black community. The uprisings that we saw in watts in in cleveland in newark in detroit were all fueled not only by those riffa conditions in those places but also by police brutality and and black panther party for self defense was founded as response to the brutality of the oakland police department. And so what the black panthers did. They said we will police the police. They knew what the law said about open carry in california and the also look the law said about the distance that you had to maintain from a police officer arresting someone so the panthers would come to those arrests fully armed with the kinds of legal weapons that they were allowed to have and the police did not like it. They did not like it. And so the oakland police department went to don mulford assemblyman a california assemblyman and said we need your help. We need to make what the black panthers are doing illegal. Because currently it's legal. We stop them but they got the right kinds of weapons. We can't arrest them for what they're doing. We need to be able to make their work illegal. And so what mulford did with the help of the nra was to write the mulford at which banned open carry which was a gun control act and there was a gun control targeted at the black panthers. So offer said now there's no racial targeting in this at all this is about the clan as well but it wasn't the the letters make it really clear that the genesis for this the catalyst for it was the. How do we curtail the black panthers. How do we make them. Ill legal fascinating moving for twenty years. I wanted to go to former supreme court chief justice warren burger nineteen.

andrew johnson twenty years Annette gordon reed anderson illinois carol anderson Johnson Act of seventeen ninety two cleveland wisconsin bobby. seale scott nineteen bobby seale andrew newark panthers black panthers united states oakland police department
"carl shire" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:19 min | 1 year ago

"carl shire" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Breath stinks. Yes, I mean, you were, you know 808 for 892 to 2 and then Brian, Of course, Mongol, Luc's old man, Mangal oot. Walk in the streets complaining about smelling what red paint or some What did you say this? Oh, yeah, So like last week, they were repainting the bus lanes on Second Avenue, and they were sent literally sanding the roads and it was painted. So I was. You're sanding it getting hot and you're breathing these toxic fumes in your mask and God forbid you take your mask off in the bus. People give you you know, you know the evil eye. It is hard, so give you them alike. Look, right. Exactly. So now you know, now they're saying the road down and they're repainting and it was just the smell was unbearable And you're staying out there waiting for the bus. Then you get on the bus try to get a breather. And you can take your mask off. Yeah, I mean, it's rough Look wearing masks is not fun. I can't wait till this is over. Hopefully it will be over soon. But I mean, I have to tell you why I take the stairs up as much as I possibly can. You know, one about the the subway, the train stations and so forth and I get to the top, especially in those double staircase ones, ones. You know where it's really, really, really steep and I've got my mask on and I'm gonna get to the top of like, there's no way that this could be okay. There's no way that this could be healthy for me. I've got to be breathing in some crazy stuff. I agree with you. You really opened up my eyes. You know, Like I say, I was just bringing up a conversation by the big galoot. You bring up a good point Like you're a new dad. You and your lovely wife. What Madison is what? Seven weeks old? Seven weeks? Seven weeks old. Are you going out? You know, especially with now with walks and getting hurt the baby out. Yeah. Would so we're doing walk? Are you concerned that no, really with breathing in and stuff now with I mean, To be honest, I mean, I'm going to work every day. My wife is taking her for a walk every day. So you kind of got to get get out there you have doing yourself. Amu is not taking her to Newark to the things that are right in the nose. So she does that every day, But you can't think you know what a nice park It isn't safe. I mean, I know Carl Shire's Yeah. Oh, yeah. I mean, sometimes there's you know, things going on over there. I mean, you got you got, I think. Just take it. Take it day by day. No, just I agree with you. I'm not saying you should. I think you should. But you know, there are people also I mean, I'm a big believer. Kids get sick if they're locked in and they don't get. I mean, I got to get out. The kids have got to you got to get out. People have to get out. Let's go to Marien in New York, A Marianne Hey. Hi. How are you? Good. Good comment. I'm sorry. I don't know you co host named. It's Russ. It's right time, but I think he could have crossed the stream. Mary Ann Mary Ann, you're missing the point. It's not a question of I could have crossed the street. I was walking on the street that I was going into the place. The point is It's smoke. It doesn't matter if it's me or somebody else. What is everybody gonna walk it? You totally missing the point. And actually, I do get that I do get that. But my, you know, we just can't take everything and I don't smoke. Okay, okay. More importantly, I think when Juliette said, our politicians, I'm very discouraged, could have politicians. I'm not getting rid done. Lots of I think more important things to me and a lot of people. They're just not doing it. Oh, yeah. I mean, you're preaching to the choir. Marianne. You know if you listen to this show, it's driving us. Yeah. I mean, it's just for me. It's both sides. I look. You know, you guys know that I'm not the trump fanatic at all. But I laid in the lap of both sides. Both sides are complicity. You know, both sides are Marianne. So you said you're not a smoker, but try admit it, though, Because we've talked about this The next time you walk through smoke, you're going to go away in a minute. Hold on a second. Somebody blew this out. Okay. Contest years and years ago. I.

Marianne Mary Ann Mary Ann Juliette Amu Mangal Brian Luc Carl Shire Madison Marien Newark New York