28 Burst results for "Carl Sagan"

"carl sagan" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

TIME's Top Stories

02:25 min | 3 months ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on TIME's Top Stories

"Of all the objects in the night sky, only the moon is sufficiently close to appear as a disc as opposed to a mere point, close enough to visit, close enough to touch. When I go outside and look at the full moon, I feel very connected to the universe. Michele dollar, the assistant director of science at NASA's Goddard space flight center, once told live science. The moon is so there. It's a part of our lives. It may have affected the way humans thought about the universe, our evolution as a culture. As the late astronomer and author Carl Sagan wrote in his blockbuster book cosmos, the reappearance of the Crescent moon after the new moon, the return of the sun after a total eclipse, the rising of the sun in the morning after its troublesome absence at night were noted by people around the world. These phenomena spoke to our ancestors of the possibility of surviving death. Up there in the skies, was also a metaphor of immortality. Supermoons are forced multipliers for the metaphor. As are other celestial phenomena, the sturgeon moon, which also got its name from Native American tribes because a supermoon that appears in August coincides with peak fishing season for sturgeon and the Great Lakes, will be this year's final supermoon. But it won't be the only spectacle on offer tomorrow. Also playing out will be the perseid meteor shower, which happens once a year, as the earth passes through the remains of the tale of the comet swift tuttle, a body that flies through the inner solar system once every 133 years, and last came our way in 1992, leaving debris behind that lingers today. And just 5° to the south of the moon will be an especially bright point of light, which will be Saturn, photobombing the sturgeon moon. Tyson might be right that we make too much out of supermoons, and young may have a lot of people in his camp who don't care nothing about our love of the night sky. But humans aren't entirely rational beings, we're aesthetic beings. We're romantic beings and as Sagan hinted, we are also frightened, beings, haunted by our own mortality and the enormity of a universe, we only partly comprehend. If a supermoon serves as a comforting nightlight, we'll happily take it

Michele dollar Goddard space flight center Carl Sagan NASA Great Lakes Tyson Sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

05:14 min | 4 months ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"So we've all heard some version of that famous Carl Sagan Lion. We are made of star stuff, and it's true, we are. And that makes it easy to believe that what matters is what's visible. The trees, the stars, because it helps us feel connected to everything that we can see. Today we know that everything visible in the universe is composed from a basic set of building blocks known as elementary particles. Comprehending the standard model is an enormous achievement. But we are now certain that it describes very little of what's out there. It turns out that most of the stuff which fills our universe is completely invisible to us. In other words, visible matter, the kind we in the stars are made from, the kind that radiates light is not what's normal. And we, the luminous matter, we are the cosmic weird ass. So how do we know we can see that stars and galaxies are affected by the presence of something more? Something completely invisible to us. So we now know that the universe is more queer and fantastical than it looks to the naked eye. That's right. So how did the universe get this way? And what exactly is inside? So I'm a theoretical physicist with expertise and particle cosmology. And it's my job to use math to study the origin and evolution of spacetime. And every single thing that's inside of it. I connect the very small elementary particles with the extremely large galaxies and galaxy clusters. And I'm agreeing over the universe. I develop creative mathematical narratives that may just be our cosmic origin story. Now as a theoretical physicist, I really love doing math. And coming up with different ideas that may describe our mostly invisible universe. But it's important to be accountable to data to the real stuff. So after mathematics, my second favorite tool for addressing these large cosmological questions is the biggest laboratory we know. The universe itself observatories with capabilities from visible light to high energy x-ray and gamma ray photons are still some

Carl Sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

Astronomy Cast

05:28 min | 6 months ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Astronomy Cast

"The trappist systems being like, hey, I've got planets for days. Oh, you want a planet? I've got many. And so the more we look, the more we realize, planets are just gonna be everywhere. But the one thing we have seen so far is little red dwarfs have, for the most part, little or planets. And so there's that tendency. And so far we have only been able to find massive planets around massive stars. And so there's this human tendency to say, well, massive stars must only have massive planets. And it's not going to work that way. And figuring out what the transition is going to look like from little stars have cute little tiny planets, many of which can be in their habitable zones. To massive stars can have any possible kind of planet and what is the trend. We don't know how to get between those two points right now. There's many things possible. Now, we've been talking mostly just about physical characteristics of these planets. But I want to sort of think in the time domain as well. We're here 13 points have been billion years after the Big Bang, the earth formed four and a half billion years ago. Does our time in the universe have any factor on whether or not we're normal? Were there more planets earlier? Do we think? No, just the opposite is likely true. As our universe has evolved with time, it has had the ability through stellar evolution through supernovas going off through neutron stars, merging, to create more and more heavy elements. We are as Carl Sagan pointed out, star stuff. To think of it more grisly, we are the leftover bits of stars dead bodies that have been disputed across the universe in amazing explosions. Right. We are made of rotting star corpses. Yeah, exactly. Right. Take that Carl Sagan..

Carl Sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

04:24 min | 6 months ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"So getting that information more deeply ingrained into the school system, I think, is a much more effective approach than trying to throw facts at people, right? Oh, yeah. I agree with you a 1000%. Those are my biggest science communication failures personally, but also the fact that even now teaching, and I've been teaching in the university system for 20 years or even longer if you count times as a grad student. And for me, it was always like, let me bury you in the facts of the discipline. But now it's much more I give you some information and then I test on you go out to the field and here's what you see, what do you think you should do? And my students freaking hate it because they'll say like, can't you just give me a multiple choice exam where I can't write? But I'm asking them to put together the data and then make a decision. And then write an essay about it. And for me, the worst part is, is they'll say, well, what's the right answer? And I'll say, I don't know. There is no right answer. I just wanted to see what you would think. Right. And from the class compilation of answers, I found a few that were really good. So this was why we think about critical thinking and analysis and synthesis of data. And I agree with you. I mean, all the information we have in the world is at our fingertips in terms of the facts and the evidence. So what it boils down to maybe is how do we get people to understand what is reliable evidence versus BS? Yeah. I agree completely. And I think the evolution of critical thinking and skepticism is really leaning towards that. If you go back 20, 30 years into, you know, when Carl Sagan was publishing the demon haunted world, when you get back into that era, critical thinking was mostly or scientific skepticism rather was mostly about.

Carl Sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

05:13 min | 8 months ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"To it, then that will sort of improve my focus or if only I could be more disciplined than I'll sort of transform into this different version of ourselves. We see this in particular around news resolutions and things like that. There's these periods that we really fixate on this one thing that will help us to change, but actually I think that countered intuitively to that it was when I sort of stopped trying to perfect my routine because I was constantly stumbling over that. I had this ideal version and what that meant is it was so easy to sabotage that and it meant that I was perpetually postponing my life because I was waiting until I was someone with a routine before I could sort of step into the life and do the things that I wanted to do. So it's actually putting that idea of a routine aside was the very thing that helped me to become more aware of what works for me and kind of interestingly arrive at even though it's Hickory pickled is something that's more like a routine than when I was trying to force it or trying to be quite prescriptive about the day or rigid and there's this beautiful sort of Carl Sagan quote that says, you know, when you stop trying to change that's actually when you end up changing. And so I think that it's when we can be more accepting of our imperfections and when we can kind of be more fluid with what the day might be bringing us and instead of trying to control it, we're able to sort of embrace it and maybe forgive our own stumbles within the day that we can kind of pick ourselves back up again and step into that..

Carl Sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

Oh No Ross and Carrie

03:17 min | 10 months ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Oh No Ross and Carrie

"I think the overall impression of this meeting was, oh yeah, there's a lot of really competent people in their respective domains. They've got a lot of knowledge and they want us to get active, so let's give them money. Let's get involved. So let's help them with their agenda here. And I think it could be very hard as a layperson to separate the good information from the bad. Totally. I'm reminded of the Carl Sagan quote, we've arranged a society based on science and technology in which nobody understands anything about science technology. And this combustible mixture of ignorance and power sooner or later is going to blow up in our faces. I remember someone sending me that quote on Twitter just before Trump was elected and saying, I fear we're right here. There was a certain irony too. This group struggling with zoom. And yes, it was early days of us all being on Zoom. But struggling with this technology too at the same time rail against this technology that they clearly don't fully understand. And sowing a lot of fear, uncertainty and doubt about it. Yeah. Which seems like it's partly an artifact of specialization. Oh, right, where our overall domain of knowledge is so large that you can't possibly hold all of it. You have to trust other people. Right. So you have your area, things that you know well. And yeah, you have to trust experts in other areas. Yeah. And be able to recognize that expertise. Which is really tough when if an expert gets something wrong, suddenly you have to go, okay, wait, I have to really quickly learn this thing I've never known about and make sure I'm testing the right group. Oh my God, that's so complex. And then your quick thinking your gut gets involved and something's just sound intuitively right and some things don't. Yeah. Yeah, so we really just have to turn to the other experts in that thing and go like, I don't know, what do you think? And that's for me, this is what this really boils down to is like, I look at the other experts in this kind of thing and go like this okay? Oh yeah, all right. And that's a form of humility. You know, just being able to say, okay, it doesn't sound right to me, but I guess I have to take your word for it. Right, right. So that was the first call, which Ross mist. Yeah, which I miss so I only got to hear it after the fact. Not nearly as fun as watching them. I struggle over Zoom. And texting with Matthew about how much he hates the entire experience. But next time we'll be able to tell you about meeting some of these people in person. Yeah. Will they wear masks? Your guess is as good as ours. No, it's not. We were there. Will we be indoors? Will you be outdoors? Will there be more potent sources of radiation than the ones they're talking about? Floating all around us? Will every single person clearly have a cell phone that they're using? We'll see. Will Ross still get side eye for using his cell phone? We'll see. Only time will tell. Turn and look at her inside her up. We'll see. All right. You can use your rhetorical questions too. With very obvious answers. All right, we'll look forward to seeing you again in our 5G conspiracy series part two. And until then, 5G's bad bye. Bye. By the way, this episode was edited by Ross blotcher..

Carl Sagan Trump Ross mist Twitter Matthew Ross Ross blotcher
"carl sagan" Discussed on Untangle

Untangle

06:15 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Untangle

"To be. And so my personal practice is traditional. I know that in many practices, sometimes we start with ourselves first, like wishing ourselves well, because that is a person that's closest to us, however, I always found that really difficult because I am usually the last person that thinks of myself. When I think about love, I've asked people questions before some of my students when I say, give me a list, list all the things that you love. And they rattle off a bunch of things. And very rarely does somebody include themselves on that list. And I often was really curious about that. And I happened to be one of those people that would probably, if somebody had asked me that question, especially long ago, I don't think that I would have necessarily included myself on that list. And so I usually start with a person that I love very dearly. They could be somebody in my life currently could be somebody that has passed, but somebody that is very close to me and that I can naturally feel very easily and affection for. That's the easiest place for me to settle. And the phrases that I really repeat again and again are maybe you have joined happiness, may you have freedom from suffering. It's so weird to say it out loud. I usually don't ever say it out loud. So I'm like, hold on, what do I say? I know, I feel your pain. Freedom from suffering may you have peace in your heart and experience peace on earth and may you ride the waves of life. And so these are the four things that I say again and again. And I envision because I'm a very visual person, right? And I realize not everybody who meditates is. If you're not a visual person, this may not work for you. But for me, it's always been really easy to imagine that from my heart center is this theme of light that is just almost like if the listeners are my age, they'll know what a care bear is. And so like a care bear, you're like, you're shooting out this like rainbow or this bright light from your heart center. And it's engulfing that person. That is either standing there and you're vividly able to discern and to visualize or that you can sense in some way because sometimes you could just sense a person using any of your senses, right? How it makes you feel even in your heart center. And so I envision that. And then I moved from that individual to a person who is an acquaintance or somebody that I don't know very well. Maybe somebody that I pick up my dry cleaning from every single week or somebody that I see at the checkout counter, the supermarket who's been working there for a long time or a waitress at a restaurant that I frequent often, just somebody that I know, but I don't really know, and then I can wish them the same wishes with the same heartfelt intention that I wished for my loved one, sending them again that beam of light and energy and golfing them completely in that light. And then I move on to somebody who I have difficulty with. And that practice, as you know, is not always easy, depending, especially on who comes up for you in that moment. Sometimes we default to people who are the least of the worst, if you will, or the easiest of the hardest for us to deal with, but I think that the more that you do this practice, the more you can challenge yourself to really get in there and allow yourself to feel really that, immense amount of discomfort and notice how differently that feels in your heart and where that difficulty lies so that you can combat that difficulty. And really wish that person freedom from suffering and be able to acknowledge their afflictions and their sufferings in life. And understand that they too deserve peace and definitely if they had peace and if they had love and joy and happiness and all these things, would they act differently would the world be a better place? Certainly we could think of many of our national and world leaders that we may have a lot of difficulty with that we can wish this poor and we can imagine that if they had all of those things really and truly how differently they might behave or how their life may have taken a different turn. And the penultimate is me. I bring it back to myself because then it becomes easier after the difficult person than I am a piece of cake. That's a good idea. I like that. Right, because I can be really self deprecating on I think sometimes we're hardest on ourselves. And so after that, it seems like a relief to get to yourself. And to just connect with yourself and I love to and I do this throughout really the day and even when I'm not in meditation, I'm oftentimes you can find me with my hand on my chest on my heart center just because it's really incredibly comforting to connect with yourself. And then last, again, being a very visual person, I imagine that I'm starting like a feathered like a balloon to float up above the world and I am able to see my house and then the town and the coastline and the stratosphere, the continent and then finally I could see this pale blue dot as Carl Sagan used to say right in front of me. And where there's no borders where there's no individualism. There's just this one collective earth and planet of beings and energy. And I send that beam from my heart center to just wrap the world in that love. And I send those well wishes to all beings on earth that they may too experienced peace and happiness and joy and be free from all the suffering immense amounts of amount of suffering that happens on a daily basis on this planet. And I slowly find myself floating back to earth, and riding that wave or that beam of light and yeah, that's how it ends. It is like a visualization prayer in a way, the way that you're doing it, which is really so beautiful. In the book, you say that it's really for anyone who's ever felt lost and that inside of the book in some ways is.

Carl Sagan
John Zmirak and Eric Discuss the Possibility of Life on Other Planets

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:13 min | 1 year ago

John Zmirak and Eric Discuss the Possibility of Life on Other Planets

"John's my friend. We have a lot to talk about. We've already been talking about many important things. Now, we did talk about Camilla Parker Bowles. We're not going to talk about her anymore. We're going to talk about Camilla Harris who's the vice president of the United States. And she styled as the duchess of Sacramento. And or actually, we don't have to talk about her. What would you like to talk about? Rather, move to more elevated topics. I've got a piece of stream dot org called a pale blue dot, I think not. And in it I talk a bit about your book is atheism dead. I talk about the book, the privileged planet. Carl Sagan on the old cosmos from the 1970s and 80s. Used to present the vastness and emptiness of the universe. And are small rather off center position in it as proof of human insignificance. He would say things like in a wear on a third rate planet with a second tier star and an unfashionable neighborhood of the back end of nowhere of an universe that is vast and seemingly empty. Where there is doubtless life on billions of other planets, and maybe far more advanced than our own. Well, since then, science, capital S, science, TM, trademark, has discovered something new. It's discovered that there are very few planets in the universe that are in fact inhabitable. We used to think, oh, maybe there's life based not on carbon, but silicon or magnesium based life forms. No, no. Science is increasingly found that life has to be based on carbon, it has to have water, it has to have tectonic plates. It has to have a moon. It has to be within a certain distance, perfect sort of Goldilocks distance to a medium sized star. The number of constraints on inhabitable exoplanets has kept growing and growing and growing. And the number of candidates for planets that might have life has been shrinking and shrinking and shrinking and shrinking and shrinking and shrinking and shrinking until it seems increasingly as if earth and maybe a few other very earth like planets somewhere. Are the only places where life could possibly exist. I would go, I have gone a step farther in what I have written. I have said that the number of planets where life should exist shrank down down down down down to zero and then kept going. In other words, the odds against life even existing on a single planet like earth went below zero to increasingly impossible to the point where I now argue in my book miracles and in the new book is atheism dead that the odds against any life existing are

Camilla Parker Bowles Camilla Harris Carl Sagan Sacramento John United States
"carl sagan" Discussed on MinddogTV  Your Mind's Best Friend

MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on MinddogTV Your Mind's Best Friend

"Knowledge. I guess involves in and you can look if we want to characterize it as that certain people who are predisposed to not trust see that at and can use that as fuel for then for they distrust saying where you got it wrong last time. Why why should we believe you now. Sure but what do they have. I mean now zakho that they have a belief in beliefs. I even more questionable than evidence-based signs right on such a strong link. They have such a strong position really. Yeah let's talk about that because a lot of people will adopt a belief and then look for evidence Any evidence what whether it's really solid evidence or not but they look for ways to support that belief in. Call it evidence. That's not the way science generally works. Your you have to not have a conclusion in mind Am i correct that you don't reach your conclusion before you start looking for evidence you look for evidence to see where points to to draw conclusions from that evidence directly. Look for everything she's right. So what do you say that. Those people who use their belief system as a reason to distrust science. Well as i said i believe is something very very questionable. I mean it's l. founded. It's even more shaky then science at least scientists evidence which may change but a. What's the evidence for belief. Belief rests on weak evidence. I would say. I would say i i would tend to agree now. Now a big part of. And i'm jumping way ahead now for past art and philosophy and all that stuff to the idea of spirituality. A lot of people Confused religion with this idea of spirituality and again i'm a big fan of carl sagan's and so i if somebody asked him if he believed in god and answer took thirty minutes. Here's he said. First of all you have to. We have to have clear communication on what we mean by that because the word god can mean so many different things to so many different people and you had einstein's use award god compared to the pope's he says the word god they don't mean the same thing So that conversation it and where does science fit in in that conversation or does it at all it. It fits in sure. For example in spirituality and emphasizes very much in the connectedness in oneness. Risk the universe in science has provided much evidence for the connectedness of a ecology ecology showed us said many things which appealed separate are really connected. You throw a dt new goblin and then you find it. Independent incident antarctic right. So everything is in the connected so this interconnectedness in oneness that to me is one link between science and spirituality in that has been pointed out by number of authors. I am not the first one who is who is saying that. A but they're still in spirituality. I think there's a personal component science. Still person you know you look at things. Objectively in spirituality. There's also the personal subjective experience like renewal meditate. I mean this is a personal subjective experience which is also important. Mitch i would say is complementary to objectivity and so one can experience through meditation..

carl sagan einstein Mitch
"carl sagan" Discussed on MonsterTalk

MonsterTalk

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on MonsterTalk

"Not unflappable. But i do try to keep my emotions in check when we put together munster talk but you can't spend a decade putting together a show like this without underlying passion to keep going karen. I have lots of reasons from we spend so much effort here but among the top reasons are that there are narratives out there about how the world works which are quite frightening if true and those narratives definitely get promoted by the loudest voices with the whitest reach but some of us. And if you're listening this might be you like to know. Is this stuff true. We know there are tools for evaluating the validity of a proposition. We talk about scientific skepticism. Logical fallacies evidence inductive reasoning syllogisms. Forensic tools comes razor a mini other kinds of thinking tools that can be used to push you towards being able to tell whether something's likely true or false. Those tools properly wielded can be incredibly powerful. Help you see past hype and sensationalism. We can use those tools to test things that have happened in our own lives and we can use them to test things that we see in the media but those tools are technologies to use them. You need to be aware of them. Learn how they work and remember that they're available when the time is right and i don't call them technologies lightly. Carl sagan talked about. These tools is being a metaphorical candle in the darkness. And i deeply wished that was true. But i think they're much more like night-vision goggles. They let the people who will them see the world more clearly but they only help bothers if you take the time to share. Not just what you see but how you can see what you see and without these tools are default methods for evaluating whether things are true is based on emotion and trust narratives can wrench our brains into all sorts of conclusions. Sometimes the stories people tell us carry payloads quite different from the pretty packaging in this volatile. Mental ecosystem is constantly being hacked and influence by people. Who want you to believe something or to do something. And this kind of approaches the heart of conspiratorial.

karen Carl sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

"If one were to look at your career. It's very fascinating to go from. Being the chief scientist at nasa then going into aerospace and then smithsonian. There isn't undercuts of education to everything that you've always participated in. And so how have you seen that evolve to get audiences to care about the true core of your work. You hit on it earlier when you said it's about storytelling and these are things. I care deeply about. Obviously i love nasa and i have incredible passion for exploration of why we explore getting humans to mars. I want people to share that excitement and to me the way you do it is through storytelling. Why are we doing this exploration where we going but then you have issues that have come up especially the last twenty or so years around climate and the planet is facing climate crisis. So how'd we use scientific storytelling to get the public engage to get them to understand. We have a biodiversity crisis on this planet. we have a climate crisis on this planet. And how do we use the science that we're doing to get the public engage and to make them realize they have a role in making this planet sustainable for the future but when you talk about the exploration or better learning around mars i think most individuals think of that as abandoned earth or that. We're beyond the point of return. And so i am curious about. Should we be betting more on earth. And what do we need to learn more about to feel more optimistic about the relationship and outcome. We can have around the climate crisis. Carl sagan said it better than i definitely ever could have been for people who are curious. Go read his pale. Blue dot speech. The earth is where we make. Our stand is what he said. There is no planet b. mars is great. I do want to send humans there. We think life could have evolved there three and a half billion years ago. That would be really amazing to find a second genesis of life and really understand the nature of life itself if we could find another place where it evolve. But you're not gonna move lots of humans tomorrow. It's talks the surfaces raid. It's cold air is not breathable. This planet is the planet for humanity. And right now we're pushing the planet towards its boundaries. We do still have the ability to pull it back. Are we going to see the effects of climate change no matter what we do about carbon in our atmosphere. Yes you see things like what happened in seattle over the last couple of weeks crazy. Temperatures huge rainfall. Those of the kind of things that are going to become more common over the next couple of decades we are going to see some degree of sea level rise. That's going to be harmful the coastlines around the world but we still have a chance to pull back if we move towards net zero over the coming decades. We have to do this. It's an imperative in your career. You probably have had many opportunities to were fully for private individuals private funded and you've really worked in the public sphere. Maybe with less resources but a lot more maybe commitment to some of the core functionalities of government work. Does this mean that nation states need to be working in a different capacity to be dealing with impending climate refugees or some of these things where they're started the crux of process and financial institutions verses. Climate needs for earth. How do we move some of these boundaries that feel like they're moving at a glacial pace or something that were already over. The goal line of.

nasa Carl sagan seattle
"carl sagan" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

Zero Blog Thirty

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Zero Blog Thirty

"I do believe there's something to it. I know lot was popularized by The tv show things right And i know people who began worked on that show and everything. And i really i do but i think they only expected to last a season they had enough material and then they started kind of looking at everything under the lands of could it be. I think there's a stretch for sure however some of locations that i've been to And you're trying research. How far back people have seeing things. It does go back. In some cases hundreds of years you have petroglyphs and things that are very very strange. You know it. Looks like alien creatures in spacecraft there painting on the walls so it's really hard to know how far back but The the government report does not give you. History of anything doesn't even go back to roswell. It's just as well it axes if this started happening a couple years. I think it's absolutely fascinating like the way that people almost ufo's and the study of ufo's for a lot of people especially where i'm from in the south is almost like the inverse of religion where people can look for answers and religions for things that they don't understand whereas they will say no. There can't be ufo's because i can't wrap my head around that there's life forms and other areas and that scary to me. I recently saw this clip of carl sagan who is astrophysicist and scientists who passed away and he was talking about star wars and how some of the aspects of star wars led him to a discovery that people don't even think about whereas star wars. Even when you're talking about alliens or life beings from other places they look like us and he was talking about the evolutionary traits of how humans got to be at this point and what aliens would be or what we consider to be aliens from other life forms. Are you super interested. More in the technological aspect or the being aspect behind. Ufo's that's a good question. Probably both that like if we are being visited it might be by multiple races if you will i. I don't like lumping it all together. They all have different motivations different technologies. I have thought a lot about what they would look like. And there's laws in the universe of probably symmetrical listen product not like a giant blob of some sort. Maybe but they probably have to. Is you know. Two arms two legs for functionality. So i i do take those into account we're talking to alleged abductees and the patterns you know and what they're reporting and now. The technology to is is to pin down. Because it seems like there's a pattern from the fifties until now where we're more of one type of craft so for example the fifties and sixties was a lot of saucers and nuts and bolts types of disks. Right and then you got into the seventies eighties and there was a lot. There's actually more. Triangles cited now than there are saucers and then finally in the last couple of decades. We have what i'd say light phenomena so you can't even necessarily say that it's a tangible thing unless you're to touch it i guess if you're that close because they'll appear sort of like an orb intelligently controlled sometimes morph into several.

roswell carl sagan
"carl sagan" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"1600 a. M. 92.7 FM 92.7 FM wham radio As cool as it gets, it's on the edge with their own. That call me now. 73482 to 1600. The plot thickens. Reporter Prince Haiti have absolute crap all the same now. Haiti suspected assassins caught amid state of siege After presidents killing There was assassination of the president of hated them become the president of hating world it a lot. His name was job in Elmo's a voice of one another, saying that it looks like one of the suspected that, uh, session is an American. Maybe a soldier of forcing. Mm. You think anything will get any better for the Haitian people? I don't That's uh Pretty much a given. They're still going to be eating dirt and grass and a chicken every now and then and practicing voodoo. That's a huge voted on their huge hugely. So, uh, this is why I me personally. I don't want to see the world wanted to do with the rest of the world. I don't want the aliens coming here. Now we're here. They're spaceships flying around how you know if they're here, I wonder if it's because those dumb ass scientists give our position away. You know about that right? These people out there and the desert with his giant giant giant giant. Uh, telescope type antenna rigs, transmitters, and they they send signals out to space We're going to. We're going to give our space time coordinates. What do we do? We put some kind of a plaque and one of them. There are satellites we sent out. That day that Carl Sagan said, Uh you know, some representation of where we're at in this particular solar system or galaxy. Are we nuts? We don't want them knowing where we are. These clowns are given away our position. These are enemies, man. Uh, But we don't know what's out there. That could be friendly. But we can't assume that we can assume they want to eat us. Uh, I mean, don't don't the Chinese want to eat us? They certainly do, figuratively speaking, would enslave us. So just what we want to do is get a bunch of aliens coming here. Oh, man. Uh, well, they might like Chinese food You never know. Uh, The other thing is that now there are people out there that are trying to engineer effect they already have. They said they had these mice that they were using the, uh, murder virus on that have been cloned. To have human, uh, lungs or something or kick some type of, uh, human lung capacity so that they can say Okay, Well, we've weaponize this virus. Now we can see how it X on people by putting it into these humanized mice. You saw a picture of a guy in the lab today in China right now, what's happening? What's happening all over the place? They're trying to bring about some type of an animal human clone for just that type of experimentation. Well, that's a good thing really. Mm. These are the people that will bring back dinosaurs if they get a chance. Biden throws out Trump's crackdown on foreign student visa overstays So that makes sense. Who the hell would want to have anybody ever follow any rules here? Who That's crazy Talk. I mean, why shouldn't people just be able to come here on a visa that they applied for where there was a specific lemon on it? And then if they stay past it, why shouldn't they be able to do that? Come on, man. Yeah. Mhm. President Joe Biden has thrown out Reform sought by president of reform They call the reform like as if this was an issue to begin with, that somebody shouldn't overstay their visa that Trump would have brought more federal oversight to foreign Nationals in the United States and student visas. What do you think the multi billionaires that are hanging out in Idaho? That's this big billionaire picnic con fab. What do you think they're going to be talking about, in large part, cheap labor. Yeah. Furniture's coming here. Yeah, they're they're the reason this happens anyway. For the most part This week Brands Department of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas Well through a regulatory proposal by Trump, which would have set fixed limits on student visa holders. We don't want fixed limits..

China Trump Biden United States Idaho Carl Sagan Alejandro Mayorkas This week today President 1600 a. M. Haitian Prince American Brands Department of Homeland Joe Biden 73482 92.7 FM Haiti Elmo
"carl sagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I would bet Carl Sagan and these energy sources? Yes. The origin of life. There's a star is now. And waiting in the sky. He'd like abdominal leads us. Let me things he blew our minds. There's a star back. Waiting in the sky. His nose is not knowing I want to move ahead. Uh, well back down, we should say to earth and let's get ground. Yeah, let's get grounded. Actually, let's like, get really, really into the nitty gritty of the earth and microbes love them. Karen Lloyd is the scientist We want to talk about next, and she studies microbes that are actually found deep deep in the center of the Earth. Tell us about Karen Lloyd. So Karen Lloyd is an incredibly vivacious scientist who prospects all around the world from the bottom of the ocean. Two volcanoes and in Costa Rica and elsewhere for microbes that are kind of living an unusual lifestyle. So the micro living an unusual lifestyle. Who are these microbes? I mean, they're special, so the microbes at the bottom of the ocean might undergo division what we think of as life once in 1000 years, once in 10,000 years, they're really moving at a kind of glacial pace. The microbes in these not the center of the earth, but deep beneath the Earth are interacting with kind of the the rocks down there in a way that is not possible on the surface because you're dealing with all that oxygen we talked about. You're dealing with all these other things. They're.

Karen Lloyd Costa Rica Earth Carl Sagan earth Two volcanoes 1000 years 10,000 years once
"carl sagan" Discussed on WBUR

WBUR

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on WBUR

"Really are just stardust. You and me. You and me. You do not exist without stars going kablooey, We are stardust. We are gold. Mother dust. We are we to gain on themselves, Man do the guy the lives and deaths of the Ours seem impossibly remote from human experience. And yet we're related in the most intimate way to their life cycles, very matter that makes us up. Was generated long ago and far away in red giant stars seriously, all the songs where you hear about that, where they referring to research like this, they were referring to research like this, But how do all these songwriters know that I would bet Carl Sagan and these energy sources? Yes. The origin of life. There's a star business. And waiting him sky He'd like to come and meet us somebody things he'd blow our minds. There's a star waiting in the sky. His house is not don't know it does. You know, I want to move ahead. Uh, well back down, we should say to earth and let's get grounded. Yeah, let's get grounded. Actually, let's like, get.

Carl Sagan earth
"carl sagan" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:39 min | 1 year ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on WGN Radio

"It's 6 40 Have we done talking about the Super Bowl? I think so. We're awaiting the Nielsen ratings report, which in past years would have been out by now, but Not out yet on did it's supposed to be out today, though. We were thinking here that because of the pandemic and because much of the country is frozen these days that it would be an all time high rating, But the experts are saying it's not gonna be that way. It's going to be lower. I think because There's no big bar viewership this year. Because normally you have those big Parties on the televisions around in the sports bars, and you don't have that this year. So they're saying that's why the ratings will be lower. I mean, it'll it'll be huge, but, um So they say, not as big as in past years. Well, let's see, I would. I would think it would be the other way because people aren't congregating in bars to watch the games. That means they're watching them or sets in. Yeah, that's what I thought. You know. Right? Well, well. This is like my chicken wing formula here, which pizza and pizzazz. You don't have or hopefully, we didn't have the big Super Bowl parties because of the pandemic. So everybody bought food for a small gathering. Therefore, with that equal, more chicken wings or fewer chicken wings, more pizzas or fewer pieces will be about the same with it. I don't know. I mean, I think ultimately it ends up being the same amount of dough, but I just divided into where's Carl Sagan when you need him. All I know is we're still working on stealing the Dolly Parton commercial for use here to promote our show, not stealing you respect it. Well, that's gonna be my testimony. It was square space, the website company that teamed up with Dolly Parton to create a Super Bowl commercial reimagining the title track. From the 1980 film. 9 to 5. There were bored office workers. In live and dancing around two dollies music and ostensibly after they published personal websites, so well, here's a little bit of it and you'll hear why we want to use it to promote our morning show here looking fat.

Dolly Parton Carl Sagan Nielsen
"carl sagan" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:23 min | 2 years ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Um, in my communications with him. I asked a number of questions, such as where it might have originated. He told me that it came from the direction of Vega, which is about 25 light years from Earth. On September 6 2017. The artifact crossed the orbital plane of the solar system and on September 9th It made its closest approach to the sun. And then on October 7 to past Earth moving in the direction of Pegasus, a zoo you mentioned the Northeast Sciences were able to study it somewhat. They discovered it was about 300 ft in diameter and had Somewhat of a guard cigar shape ever was. We totally rotating slowly. Can't say, rotating tonight for some reason, But you could say the name of the object. I bet I think, Give it a try. I'll give it a shot. Oh, Moab. Oh, uh, which means scout in Hawaiian. It's um it was at first believed to be a comet, but exhibit number of the characteristics of a comment that suggested Dr Loeb that there was something completely different. Nearly all the sciences agree. The object is not originate in the solar system, which makes it the first alien object to be observed in our solar system. Dr. Lo believes that it's an artificial object. But many of the science scientists disagree. The nature article published in July, 2019 concluded, we find no compelling evidence to favor an alien explanation for almost all who are I. On the other hand, I'm rooting for Dr Lobes explanation, but note here that the object is certainly a lee and not necessarily artificial. That kind of wraps it up for this week, George and isn't Kevin that Vegas star system was highlighted in the movie contact where the E T s came from? Yes, Yes, I thought of that, too. And I thought about bringing that in Carl Sagan was responsible for that. And yeah, he mentioned Vega's the point of origin for the For the aliens in contact. Super. Kevin will talk to you next week. Thank you. So Watch up next. The mundane astrologer joins us. Mark Lerner. What's in store for 2021? He's next on coast to coast. Am I If you're looking for a New year's resolution that's easy to keep. I have just the one resolved to help protect your identity and personal info with Lifelock identity theft protection, Lifelock alerts.

Vega Carl Sagan Kevin Lifelock Mark Lerner Dr Loeb Northeast Sciences lee Dr. Lo George
"carl sagan" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"carl sagan" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Some of the realistic depictions of variety of places in our solar system. And how else do you convince the whole world that we're supposed to leave the planet Explorer? You bring Carl Sagan. And you bring them in from his pull. Audio recordings of the pale blue dot weren't twisted that which made it as special film for those who are into science fiction, or at least the idea of a journey into the future. A journey into our new evolution Triple 8673 37 100, That's triple 8673 37 100. It finally ended up in Wanderers that we have a base near Saturn. Once again. Saturn is the focus of everybody because, of course, Saturn going into sanitary. It means that the Saturn return Will be happening again. And Saturnalia will also arrive on December 17th triple 8673 37 100. That's triple 8673 37 100 will be back with more Cuban right here on ground zero. Is America Safe is the virus of Phantom? Socialism a possibility. What are our chances of surviving is a nation. Dr. Rodney Howard Browne is a South African immigrant with a love for America. He became a U. S citizen and is a revivalist who has spoken and over 85 nations sharing a message of hope and salvation. He took a stand for freedom, which led to him being arrested for holding church in Florida and his warnings for all of us about the imminent dangers were facing..

Dr. Rodney Howard Browne Carl Sagan America Florida
National Pretend To Be a Time Traveler Day with Jack Conway

Podcast Gumbo

03:01 min | 2 years ago

National Pretend To Be a Time Traveler Day with Jack Conway

"Hey paul this is jack. I'd love to know more about pretend to be a time traveler day. I did some research. And it doesn't seem that all scientists think time travel's impossible but i don't think we've quite figured out yet so until then we'll just need to pretend which actually sounds like a lot of fun anyway. I'd love to know more about this day. Thanks there's been a lot of national days of my friends have challenged me with throughout this year. And although i won't commit to this. But jack's choice may top them all today. December eighth is national. Pretend to be a time traveler. Day any guesses what you're supposed to do today. Apparently we are supposed to wear some very close from yesteryear or act confused by certain technology. Okay maybe for some of you. That's not too difficult. Say with me. Rss stands for release simple syndication for my first recommendation. I've gone back in time to the year. Twenty twelve and found this live. Talk from comecon by the stuff you should know. People they discuss time travel. Works and reference people like carl sagan. They also get a visit from a time traveler and talk about the musical paradox from back to the future after listening to gout and strap on your steam punk or victorian close and share using the pretend to be a time traveler day hashtag. Today's guests is jack conway. Jack is the editor of podcast review. Which delivers podcast. Critique and recommendations each week sure some people may see us as competitors and he's never reviewed my ward winning podcast. But i won't hold that against him. Because i'm a fan podcast myself. I love getting and reading the podcast review newsletter for a third recommendation. Today jack travels back to last year for decoder ring. Episode jack says and i quote my episode. Recommendation is gotta get down on friday from dakota ring. It's about the two thousand eleven viral hit friday by rebecca black one of those songs that so bad. It's good in the episode. Willa paskhin the host of dakota ring which is one of the few podcasts. I never miss an episode

Jack Hey Paul Carl Sagan Jack Conway Dakota Rebecca Black Willa Paskhin
Robust Fit to Nature

Data Skeptic

05:42 min | 2 years ago

Robust Fit to Nature

"I enjoy bringing neurologists on the show from time to time as I'm going to do today. In invariably I work in some sort of question about how different the brain is from the machine approach to intelligence. How apples to oranges? These things are in many ways that's fair, and we may eventually develop Agi in some exotic way that bear similar resemblance to our existence, just a computational process that exhibits this property called consciousness who knows but as often as I say it's apples to oranges. It's I. Don't know honey crisp to gala or Fujita red. Delicious Carl Sagan said about Apple Pie the point being that. If you frame it this way, the brain is a highly over parameter. Is the machine yet? It's still learns pretty well. We also have artificial machines that are highly over parameter. That's a complication for us there, so maybe just maybe there's a roadmap somewhere in here and things like evolution in urology can point the way forward. Along. This week on the show. I'm talking to reassign one of the authors on the paper, robust fit to nature, an evolutionary perspective on biological and artificial neural networks. Can't. My name is Alexa. I'm Apple Festival. Neil scientists. According to Department at Princeton, university, or can you tell us a little bit about your specific interest? Within neuroscience, we study out the human brain function in the real world, severely using naturalistic setups and care a lot about our people communicate the thought people, non woods and neuroscience and fields. I may be more familiar with like computer, science and machine learning. Certainly, there's some overlap and collaboration, but we're not known for collaboration per. Se yet I know for meeting some of your papers in particular the. The robust fit to nature paper. We're going to discuss. You have a strong fluency in these tools, so I want to ask you. At what point did you become interested in machine learning so relatively recently, I was saying the last five to ten years. What is unique about my? We understand other brain is operating in life, not realistic setups, so we really don't usually use a lot of the control experiment that are used in cognitive sokaia Daniel signs so most of the modeling and competition. Competition Walk in our food was not given to us because it was never applied to listrik setups excitedly sounded like a black tool in in Messina attention to have modest that sort of cognitive problems. For example you have minded cocoon is faces as good as humans. Instead they ask why these like new models are coming out of fill in computer science. Oh, by companies start to slow cognitive problems in life and second to ask out of this mother's relevant to kneel. Scientists are quality. There's. There's a lot of I. Suppose perspectives on this. Certainly the way of human learns in the way machines currently learned I guess some similarities, but they're quite different. Are we even in a place where we can have strong discussions about this, or is there something exotic Lee apples to oranges about the way machines in the human brain work? It's a good question I think. If you ask most of the people in my field, they will say well, not so, what actually really relevant to in? Kings? It was so different and if you look at the Tilles, that people use now to think about the way and psychology and cognitive functions it will also look very different. But the more we looked into this modernist related, actually that they might be to the same family of models as human brain and amusing details, family of models to say that the obviously a lot of differences between biological networks in official neural networks, but we now think that they might belong to the same family of and broadly speaking. What is that family? Can we characterize it in some mathematical way? We. Can I take what unique about? It down models. What is the time to act down model? The title understand and let me explain if you think about go back to the example of faces face net is a model tied to give the proper name, the Labor of the name of the face. We Batticaloa image. If you think about language modern, it's modern to predict the next world in sentence or complete a sentence if you think about driving a car. To drive, so if you think I'm GonNa, sit downing. It's what I to act in performance. Pacific function and they don't think down what a tight to understand the world. To Act in the world, and we stopped to think that the brain also have is like when without desire to act now brain designed to acting six and not designed to understand the situation, and this is very different perspective. Perspective of must people in our field I think actually the to understand other lengths factor so I will give you an example Devesh simple example in I. think it will help us to think let's say I. Five Thousand Points that will simple from Pablo, if a student of mine will come we ten thousand parameters to predict it's like. Like ten thousand nine points or not scientist. He didn't gain any understanding, Abud, on the next track so I really unappreciated if he understood that Pablo can be monitored by CLAMATO.

Pablo Carl Sagan Fujita Alexa Apple Festival Apple Batticaloa Neil Princeton SE Messina Tilles Scientist Daniel Abud LEE Official
Listener Mail: An Appreciation for of Cultural Perspectives

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

06:31 min | 2 years ago

Listener Mail: An Appreciation for of Cultural Perspectives

"Well maybe we should I take a look at this e mail we got from Ming Now This was in response to our episode. M I B or in IB. I think this was to be feature this from the vault recently. I think we did. I believe we dared. Yeah Yeah So. This episode Concerned similarities underlying traditional paranormal experiences that people attribute to supernatural forces like the Devil. And then you know mid to late twentieth century experiences of the so-called men in black. Or what could be the you know what could be the common underlying psychology and stuff like that With those two types of experiences so essentially we're talking about the ways that ufo beliefs might spring from the same wells is more traditional religious or supernatural beliefs and toward the end of the episode. I think I wondered out loud if there is any modern folklore in Chinese culture similar to the alien abduction in men in black complex in in American culture. I couldn't find any evidence of that but I asked a listeners if they knew of anything like that and so in response. We got this great message from Ming. Ming says hi again Robert Joe. Hope you're both doing well and staying safe inside during this crazy time. Your playlists have been powering me. Through my work. From home days here in Toronto I wanted to write in after listening to the MIT or in IB EPISODE. Again as your conversation about aliens. Mib and what it'd be like In other cultures reminded me of Fu- fun thoughts. I'm not an ancient alien person but I do like to speculate in the name of science fiction and lower Growing up Chinese. I've also fed off of legends and myths of Asia. There's an idiom in Chinese that literally translates to heavenly clothes have no seams but figuratively describes things that are perfect. Flawless and seamless the story behind the idiom was written during the five dynasties and relates that a poet napping outside one night so heavenly figure descending from the skies. She was beautiful in her clothes were glowing. She introduced herself as the Weaver Girl. From the myth of the cowherd in the weaver girl and he noticed that her clothes had no seems when he asked about it. She simply answered. That clothes in heaven are made perfectly do not require stitching and therefore have no seems going off the aliens idea. It's fun to imagine if she had been alien and was wearing some kind of seamless body. Suit that aliens are often Kitted out with in movies to further link it to aliens in space. The weaver girl is the Chinese name. For the star Vega. The cowherd is in alter Which makes me wonder if she'd meant She was from Vega instead of actually being Vega or the weaver girl. Oh like she was from Vega which is great because Vega is where the alien radio signal comes from in. Carl Sagan's contact oh but Back to Ming's message There's also another piece of lore about Chinese legends that loosely relates to the theory of relativity a day in the heavens a year on earth protagonists of stories who were mortal or earthly to start with often. Find out too late that once they ascend to the heavens a single day up in the sky means a year has passed down on earth so the mortal family they once had were all gone by the time they've managed to finish the task. They needed to do up in the heavens. I've read some discussion in Chinese about this. Some people think that the concept came about because ancient people understood that time passes differently depending on perception but a great many who were into fi or the ancient alien troopers. Believe this is possible. Proof that an ancient people understood the theory of relativity because someone somewhere had experience with space travel. Anyway these stories have some very loose ties to things you spoke about in the episode beings descended from the heavens or space ancient alien sleep related phenomena. So thank you both for reminding me of these interesting if stray thoughts. Thank you also for pulling in threads from other cultures while discussing many of your topics it may seem a small act for you but it really enriches the podcast experience for people of other cultures. Keep doing what you do and much love from Toronto. Ming Awesome. Well that was a wonderful male. Obviously love to hear about a multicultural samples of some of the topics we've discussed and the other one was Was a real treat because I guess for me when I'm hearing this. It reminds me a lot of what. I'm pretty sure we discussed in that particular episode. The idea that like an incubus or sucky boatswain in various European traditions would have like a telltale flaw like goat feed or duck feet or something like that They would allow an individual to realize they were dealing with something that is not quite human and in a way this is a version of that right instead of a fly to perfection and like too much. Perfection is kind of a flaw in any sort of design that is allowing inhuman entity passes human. Yeah and I also really like this idea of ancient approximations of relativity now. Obviously I don't think it's very likely that that ancient Chinese people had experience with aliens or space travel. But I do think that relativity is one of those interesting things where you can intuit kind of General version of the theory just from experience of subjective experience of life right like you don't actually know that you know that the That mass or velocity alters space time you know or makes a you know extends or contracts space time you do at least know that time doesn't always feel like it flows at the same rate. Yeah you would. You would have some idea that that toiling in the soil Seems to take all day whereas just you know a an hour of pleasure seems to pass by in a moment so it seems reasonable that there would be the base acumen experience of of relativity. They'd be able to draw on and then working to some sort of You know a mythological structure but I do also like at this idea how there are myths of people going up into the heavens and then experiencing this time dilation It reminds me of like the scene in In interstellar where they have to go down to the planet that's very close to the black hole in the you know for them. They're down there for like twenty minutes or whatever but they come back to their Their their friend and colleague up in the space station. That's been orbiting it in for him. It's been twenty years.

Ming Toronto Vega Asia Carl Sagan FU MIT IB Robert Joe
Explaining Occam's Razor

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

11:43 min | 3 years ago

Explaining Occam's Razor

"Today we're going to discuss a problem solving principle that many of you probably heard of and we've we've definitely referenced on the show before and that is autumn's razor that's right. It's it's one of the classics one of the hits of like the skeptical toolkit and I think it's a really one to get into because it's something that is widely known but in different ways and often To whatever extent it actually does have value. It often gets deployed in ways that do not actually make use of its value right like like an actual razor blade. It may be misused from time to time. Yes now. What one specific place that. I know we've talked about it before. Is that is in the context of Carl? Sagan's recommendations for the the tools of skeptical thinking he these out and one of them is autumn's razor. He writes all comes razor this convenient rule of thumb urges us when faced with two hypotheses that explain the data equally well to choose the simpler. Okay now why did we end up talking about this today? We we were in the studio the other day Discussing upcoming episodes. And you said that. Seth had mentioned this our producer Seth Yeah. I was in here and set a nickel Johnson was working on. A crossword puzzle was at the New York. Times he tells us it was the New York Times And he he asked me how to spell. Autumn is in razor and I took a guess at it and I can't I can't remember. I was correct. I was probably wrong but also probably hit one of the multiple acceptable spell things for razor But anyway we started talking about it and I was like. Oh Yeah we we could do that as an episode and so here we are. I'm very glad we picked this because I think one of my personal favorite genres of of critical thinking is is being skeptical about the tools of skepticism. You know is sometimes people who identify skeptics can ca- can I get a little cocky. You know they get a little too sure of themselves about what the reasoning tools they use and it's worth putting those tools to the test. Giving them a closer look. Yeah absolutely now I have to say I definitely remember. The first time I encountered the concept of outcomes raise or at least the first time I encountered it and it on some level stuck with me and that was when viewed the Nineteen ninety-seven film adaptation of Carl Sagan's novel contact the movie. I can't watch without crying. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah well. Why does it make you cry? Oh God there's no point especially the first part where you know it. Zooms out from the earth and you're hearing the radio signals go back in time and then and then it shows the young. L. E. Airway experimenting with the Ham Radio and her dad's helping her and get so emotional. Yeah Yeah it's it's been a very long I. I haven't seen it since initially came out and in fact the main thing I remember from it is seen in which jodie foster's character. Eleanor Airway has having this conversation with Matthew mcconaughey as character. Who How old was Matthew mcconaughey at this point? I don't even know how old he is. Now is this ageless demon but anyway. Here's this character He's scared Palmer. Joss in the scene in question foster's character brings up autumn's razor in a discussion on the nature of God she. She says well which is ultimately the simpler hypothesis that an all powerful God exists or the human beings made got up in order to feel better about things and then this ultimately comes back around is kind of flipped on her later on film regarding her characters encounter with an extraterrestrial intelligence right. Is it more likely that she really had the experience? She thinks she had with With all these aliens or that. She like hallucinated. Something that would give her emotional closure. Yeah and so. Yeah I think I was in high school at the time so it was. It was interesting concept especially in the context of of atheism verses of faith in a creator deity inserted to suddenly have this tool from the chest. Skeptical thinking just thrown up on the table and you and seemingly used by both sides. Well Yeah I think this is funny. This is a great example because it highlights some of the most common features of all comes razor as it is actually used to like. It's often invoked in a kind of fuzzy way without an objective measure Just kind of invoked to back up your intuitions about the probability of something right but another thing is that this example shows how. It's not always easy to find a way to compare the simplicity of two different propositions like is the existence of God a simple hypothesis or a complicated one that I think that really depends on kind of how you feel about it like like what kind of objective measure can you come up with to evaluate that question right. It's GonNa depend so much on your like your background your culture what you grew up with. And you know how you how you've come to view the possibility of Of God's existence. Is it just kind of the bedrock of your your worldview or is it this thing from the outside that you are contemplating and also how do you view it at like the coherence of the idea? Do you view it as something. That's like That's full of all these little kind of ad hoc accommodations or something that is a holistic coherent Sort of like fact about nature. Yeah you know I it's I I think this is a perfect example. That shows like win. People used the idea volumes razor in a way that is not helpful and doesn't really doesn't really get you any closer to figuring out what's true now if you're if you're still questioning what the concept really means. Don't worry we will get to some. I think some very understandable examples of how it can be a used properly and used improperly. But let's go ahead and just start about the concept itself the the word autumn You know where this comes from. We'll get to the origins of autumn's razor so Oxfam's razor is also known as the principle of parsimony and parsimony means a tendency towards cheapness or frugality. So I like that. It's like the principle of parsimony is like you. You want to be cheap with your with your logic right yeah. I don't need more than two steps of logic between me and the solution. Don't give me one with four or five. And it was named after the Medieval English philosopher William of autumn. Of course William of Arkham So he he lived in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries from twelve eighty five to either thirteen seven or thirteen forty nine. I've seen different death dates given forum. I've seen different birthdates as well. Eighty seven twelve. Eighty eight looking at That's interesting so he was a prolific scholar. Franciscan friar we'll get more into his ideas in a minute. I you know one thing I've always wondered is where the heck is awesome. I've never heard of that. Well yeah because the word sound has kind of like a remoteness to it. It sounds alien in some ways. Autumn is very much a real place. It is a rural village. In Surrey England. You can look it up online. You can find that the website for the church in Oxfam for example and this area has been occupied since ancient times. It's about a day's ride south west of London and it was the birthplace of the individual who'd come to be known as William Volume now beyond that beyond the fact that he was born here. We don't know a lot about William's life We don't know what his social or family background was or if his native language was French or Middle English. As Paul Vincent Spadea explains in the Cambridge companion to Arkham he was likely given over to the Franciscan order as a young boy. Before the age of fourteen and here Latin would have quickly become his language of not only writing but also just conversation Grey Friars Convent in. London was likely his home convent but later he traveled he visited Avalon he visited Italy and he lived the last two decades of his life in Germany. Now philosophically William was a Nominal List and spayed writes that the two main themes of this for William were the rejection of universals and ontological reduction in these two teams are are not necessarily interconnected like you can you. Could you could believe in one but not the other and vice versa but basically like let's get into what these mate so the first rejection of universals is perhaps best considered and this is very brief and broad Certainly you can find so much written in instead on this topic but basically think of it as a rejection of the tonic idea of the realm of forms. So that idea that all chairs that we might make design and carve a symbol are an attempt to create the perfect chair which doesn't reside in our world but only resides within this realm of forms. So all chairs that we create our like an aspiration for the ideal chair another way. I've thought about it at least as I understood it was. The nominalism is kind of the idea that there is no such thing as a chair. There's only this chair and that chair in this chair over here. There is no chair right like this. This is the kind of the situation gets too. When you you get into the genre classifications of say albums artists or movies. You care a great deal about and someone tries to limit it to a classification and say oh well that's classic rock where that's alternative rock near like. No no no no no. Don't don't try and fit there is there. Is these categories. Do not apply. There is there is only you know whatever. Your band of choice happens to be. There is only tool. There is only primis or whatever right there yeah there. There is only things not category right. Now let's move onto the second theme here. Ontological reduction this is as Britannica defines it quote the metaphysical doctrine that entities of a certain kind are in reality collections or combinations of entities of simpler or more basic kind. I think your classic example here is molecules atoms. Yeah so another example. Here's while our aristotle defined ten categories of objects that might be apprehended by a human mind. These would have been translations vary on on how you wanted to find these but substance quantity quality relative place time attitude condition action and affection. William cut these down to two substance and quality. He's really getting in there. That's the razor. That's what a razor Dutt. Cia slices away. It cuts off the fat and gets down to the meat. Spayed writes quote. Although these two strands of thinking are independent. They are nevertheless often viewed as joint effects of a more fundamental. Concern the principle of parsimony known as Oxfam's razor okay. So we're getting to the razor. Yeah so William. Devoted a lot of energy to arguing against What spade calls the bloated onto logical in inventories of his contemporaries and became well known to his peers for this as such either towards the end of his life or shortly after his death a kind of greatest hits album came out on his thoughts and ideas titled On the Principles of Theology? Now it wasn't actually by William of Arkham but it featured his doctrine as well as verbatim quotes there is no ascribed author either so later generations would often just attribute it to him as well as the notion of outcomes razor however the specific phrase was apparently never actually used by him. He never said autumn in the house. I'M GONNA get the razor out and started carving on some some some some some ideas

William Volume Seth Yeah Oxfam Carl Sagan Arkham Razor Dutt Jodie Foster Matthew Mcconaughey New York Times Eleanor Airway New York London Producer Grey Friars Convent CIA Johnson Paul Vincent Spadea Palmer Joss
The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

Science Friction

09:21 min | 3 years ago

The radical experimenters: a rapper, a poet, and a biological artist

"The first three minutes of the universe doesn't expansion simultaneously Teini Asli everywhere not zero second but close the first hundred of a second hotter than the hottest star blew hot bruting rooting halt. The nor Smith Says Earth was not found or heaven above but in a yawning gap. That was grasp but no way there were no vikings kings. No Vanilla no lampshades but there was Lego like for life in the first three minutes of the universe everything started added to come together. ferment began to develop lips to form the word poem. one-star dreamed of turning away and now they're just so it could have time. I'm to shape clay. The universe became a rogue gallery of Jigsaw fighting for space and in quiet moments. Mango juice squeezed from the heavens and sparkled like Shaq suits. There was the first spoonful of the CARTWHEEL GALAXY N G C one. Three six five with its. Jim Like bots spiraled wills sentence hyperion Jupiter's moons pulsars born cramping the styles of the middle. I molecules began collecting just so that the wood Po Quaid could be part of this missing in the first three minutes of the universe. Atoms rose dancing and just like the poet. Rumi said they were dancing like madmen. Happy on miserable and they just kept on dancing lover. Melvin poet and performer Alicia. Sometimes there with her pace the first three minutes of the universe and Tesha Mitchell joining you for science friction. We're at this end of the universe you are about to in Canada. I eight poetry cosmos a biological artist who grows organisms as living artworks and a rat performer. Whose lyrics ricks pulse site with? Science Professor Oren Katz is co-founder of the Tissue Culture and art project and director of the University of Western. Australia's influential art. Science lab symbiotic. Baba Brinkman is a new york-based rep performer and playwright whose awesome Rep God's to science audits range from climate change to consciousness and Alicia sometimes is most recent show. Particle wave gathered audiences under planetarium dimes times. These three creative experiment is pushing the elastic boundaries of both at n science and shared a stage at the quantum words festival in Perth. Recently cently he's Aleisha reflecting on those first three minutes. What we want to do when we passion about and scientists connect with an audience? And I I have that problem I'm full of hyperbole and scientists aren't and I love that about them and they care about the mess they care about the facts and I hear all that and I read all that and then I'm just like oh his blitz. He's some poetry so I remember Reading Steven Weinberg's book the first three minutes of the universe and it's full of great fact so this was my interpretation mango juice squeezing from the heavens technically correct Richt by the way the physicists would disagree in that universe buddies taking a obviously a poetic license. But that's what I as a poet what I can never find the right words and the reason the movie dirty dancing connected so well with me. Is that moment. That one of the main characters is carrying a watermelon win and she goes up to Patrick swayze who she likes and says. I carried a watermelon. And that's all she can say and that is what I am like so often. I can't find the exact words and I love that about science that they can find words really matter and in a scientific communication or scientific paper hyper words mean everything but I love as a poet. I can sort of pie around with that and Taika Pot. Isn't it interesting that you draw contrast because as I often think when I'm reading your work that infect poetry and science scherer conciseness and brevity of language precision each word gets placed with intent. And yet your thinking of the relationship is quite contrasted. I totally understand what you're saying. And Brevity is so true and as a poet and I'm sure poets in the audience. They can understand this. Every word matters this and carries it's white but the thing is how do you communicate dark matter. Or how do you communicate Nebula something in biology or does I mean I can never find the right words. I love in contact. A film inspired by. Carl Sagan's book by the same. I'm Nice Cellular pinup boy. I'm so glad it was there. I didn't know you were gonNA talk about him. When demon haunted world is such an important political inspiring because well the Jodi foster character Elliott Airway says when she's thrust into space they should have center poet and finally why Korea I get to go in space so maybe on Amazon or something? I'll get to go just to ago. Mango juice everywhere. Do you feel like you could take sides. Or is that that's not your raisin for you all the Wanda I'm about to wonder in storytelling. I do understand that sometimes the failure of can you just beautifying science and that is somehow not enough and and that's why I love what so many people do is they take it apart in question and what aren was hanging is just so incredible what they do but I yes yeah so just like the storytelling and I really need to communicate it to audiences so they can just take away a little bit of wondering their pocket full of wonder. Hey John Adams Americans said you never learn if you have a poet in your pocket. I just loved that I said what are you trying to do with. I've seen your show particle wave. which takes you inside a planetarium? Describe it for people but also what you're hoping to do with that piece it's musical visual Poetic Extravaganza yes. I loved canvas of the Planetarium Dome and from when I was young and a lot of you would feel feel the Siamese diaby lie back. And you've got this gorgeous. Almost three sixty canvas above you and so I wanted to use that canvas to sell tell held. The story of gravitational waves got to work with a lot of scientists and I recorded a lot of scientists and I want the general public to coming and have a sense of awe four so it mixes poetry music visuals just to tell the story from general relativity some black holes look lookit to kill an and just sort of pint pitcher and I want people to come out and say well I might go read up on that but I had a science instinct come in an eighteen year old. He said that she walked in wanting to do chemistry and came out wanting to do gravitational wave astronomy. And I'm like my works done. That's enough poet delicious. Sometimes there when you think about rap song lyrics what comes to mind politics. Maybe six drugs love last year. American crime and punishment. Absolutely what about science though not really well here as Baba Brinkman canadian-born and and married to a neuroscientist at some point these graduate in comparatively chat court the science bug big time and he's now a renowned science communicate through he's rap gods to things like climate change evolution human nature religion and culture my first rap theater popularisation project CHAUCER's Canterbury Tales and a An evolutionary biologists in England saw that and he said good job. Now do you think you could do for Darwin. What you did for Chaucer and the first time I was introduced to do a performance which was at the Darwin Bicentennial Mark Pailin? The biologist introduced me by saying. Don't worry I checked his lyrics. You're about to witness the first ever rap performance. That's peer reviewed house like peer reviewed rap. That's the best idea ever confession. Spend my whole life perplexed. By Religiousness Front doorstep debating with Jehovah Witnesses I was a teenaged empirical thinker a spiritual seeker obsessed with rap. I considered it liberal research. This was the medium the Daca thinking speaking flipping ridiculous speech over beats like every weekend weekend my CD collection became my personal gospel. I wasn't apostle I think part of it was an unexpected side effect of doing science. This communication rap projects and that side effect was that I became way more gangster rapper

Baba Brinkman Alicia Vikings Teini Asli Shaq Rumi Smith Patrick Swayze Steven Weinberg Po Quaid Planetarium Dome Carl Sagan Canada Australia Tesha Mitchell Taika Pot Perth JIM
Ross and Carrie Meet Nick Little: Homeopathic Lawsuit Edition

Oh No Ross and Carrie

07:50 min | 3 years ago

Ross and Carrie Meet Nick Little: Homeopathic Lawsuit Edition

"Hello and welcome Ndo no Ross. And Carrie the show where we don't just report on for in science spirituality and claims of the paranormal but take part ourselves Yup when they make claims we show up. So you don't have to. I'm nick little. I'm Carrie. Poppy I as well to nick little. I'm spartacus the lawyers in the room. Thinks on his feet I guess. No we have a special guest today. Nick little welcome tone arising thank you good to be here. I pleasure you met nick in Las Vegas yes at Sei con and then again here in Los Angeles shortly thereafter and and Nick was giving an excellent talk about a fight against homeopathy. But Nick has a very special position as the sole lawyer I am. CF is legal department. Yes yes this is at now center for inquiry. Yeah we talk about CFI every now and then on the show we all talk about the CFI the investigations group wing of that. I've been involved with for many many years and our first episode was recorded at the old. CF I- office and guess what we are now at the new CFI office which is still in La but now on Temple Street yeah come on by visit. There's going to be lectures all kinds of stuff. And that's at least that the old one that's where Kerry and I I met that's right club a club. I'm now co lead of that Book Club. We still meet every month if anybody's in L. A.. And wants to come talk about. Books is trying to get people to your book. I am absolutely the more the Mary Nick. How long have you been working with just over six years? I think it was six years in September that I started. And how did they lure you in. I'd like to give this sort of great story about how you know. I was led by the heart and emotion to the nonprofit world but I'll to law school I worked for a a big law. Firm represented fortune five hundred companies and received obscene paychecks. So doing and probably would of ended up doing that for the rest of my life because the paychecks are really compelling sure I'm syncing regretted and my phone went bankrupt really ooh God which which kind of happens to law firms occasionally and just imploded and through a combination of very weird circumstances and says I was offered another couple of jobs and failed the conflict check because I've done and then I was offered a job and it turned out that it was the law firm that my brother works for in the London office. And they have anti nepotism world. But he's not your nephew. Indeed you know I got. I need a job. I saw advertised that which was an organization. Confess I had never heard of. I was looking for somebody to though I amendment law which was kind of a passion of mine and so I applied without thinking a lot about that and then the more all right look at the organization I was like this is great. And if I don't get out of the big low world now I am never going to do it right. I'm so I took the plunge and I went off from work and I always say that I much prefer my job now to my old job two days a month when eh the first one came into nightly took it back to run Lensey at the time. I think there's a misprint. No zero somewhere. Oh my goodness misplaced. We should probably describe. CFI A little more. The center for inquiry was founded in nineteen seventy six thereabouts By Paul Kurtz and other leading lights of the critical thinking skeptical humanist Atheist Movement you had Isaac Asimov Carl Sagan. I'm James Randi Lot of those types involved early on in it's kind of existed for many years in two parts. You have your council for secular humanism which is all about sort of that humanist side more the philosophy side and then what was originally the committee for skeptical inquiry of claims of the paranormal S. I I just notice I cop yes okay. Not sure I had ever known instead I I may have messed up the CSI part of it because now it's just CSI it's not to be confused with CSI Miami or the other TV shows but it's the committee for skeptical inquiry. I think the original psycho had a different acronym boot good. Yeah so you came in six years ago now. We really brushed past what sounded like a very juicy. You See story what the Hell happened with your firm and what what were your conflicts of interest. This is the real juicy stuff neck. I wish I mean I wish the the foam went bankrupt Tom if they even have. La Office okay and a fell into the problem of expanding too quickly. Okay and have have a Salt Lake City office. I think which never made any money. Okay Mormons elements and they don't do anything wrong. Yeah and what happened with me on conflicts. lex They totally bizarre was had done seven hours work on a huge class action lawsuit that was representing. I can't even remember if we were representing or defending against the dairy farmers of microbes. Like milk price fixing literally did seven billable hours on this house else. Just something I filled in when I had some slow time And we would have to have got a signature to waive the conflict from every single angled member of the plaintiff's class that was like every thousand dairy amazing. CIC probably wasn't going to happen so net could go off from what for another. Solis got it. Wow a milky or story than I thought but not that. Jessie yes. Okay so then you came here. Also Solis but in a good way. Yes yes good solace and you were drawn to the First Amendment side of things so why would cfi what. Why would they be interested in First Amendment Law? Well they advertised the position in this was I was a little concerned about it I they described himself as a secular organization tonight. The first time I read it I thought it said sectarian organizations convinced applying to sort of a Catholic human human rights so tons out so get it did was talking about work and international human rights work and charged site separation law. And if you look at law school everyone takes criminal law classes in everyone takes the constitutional law classes because that Pham on and it's Great. It provides you conversation to talk about in bars some when you walk in lower northern things and then you end up working proofreading some four hundred page contracts for an oil company. Nobody practices what they want to. And everybody goes to law school saying I'm going to be a public defender or I'm going going to be a prosecutor on the. I'm going to work for a nonprofit and no one ever done you end up doing the drywall in the the lawyer industry. Yes and you get rewarded awarded very very nicely for but every lawyer I know they live for that. Pro Bono cases. Yeah I had some great ones arm and gives you a chance to you feel I making the world a better place. Exactly one person at the time you get the cool stories out of at night so many thought. Maybe I will get to do this like all the time. We're on the five percent of the time that my law firm would allow me to work not paid.

Mary Nick CFI Los Angeles NDO Carrie Solis CF James Randi Paul Kurtz Kerry Lensey Price Fixing Isaac Asimov Carl Sagan London
How Does Venus Work?

BrainStuff

06:13 min | 3 years ago

How Does Venus Work?

"After the moon the Venus is the second brightest natural object in the night sky partially because this planet is covered by reflective clouds that make it is an optical telescopes can't penetrate eight with the Venetian surface hidden from view generations of fiction writers used to speculate wild about the mysterious terrain beneath those clouds for example Tarzan Creator Edgar Rice burroughs portrayed Venus as a world with lush forests in our boreal cities in a nineteen eighty-four pulp novel but then science intervened B eight at Venus's habitable pretty much imploded during the Cold War in Nineteen fifty-six Radio Telescope observations showed that the planet had surfaced temperatures in excess of six hundred and eight eighteen degrees Fahrenheit that's three hundred twenty six degrees Celsius and believe it or not those readings were kind of low we now know the average surface temperature on Nisa blistering eight hundred sixty four degrees Fahrenheit or four hundred sixty two Celsius it's the hottest planet in our solar system even though mercury is closer to the Sun on the face of Venus the atmospheric pressure is crushingly extreme and lead would melt into a puddle but as hellish as this place sounds actually has in common with Earth the two worlds are quite similar in size if you were to stuff venus inside our planet matric doll style it would occupy roughly eighty six percent end of earth total volume Venus has earth beaten in some key regards though earth displays a slight midsection bulge being wider around its equator than it is from one pole to the other conversely Venus is almost a perfect sphere what gives well when a massive celestial body like a star or planet spins quickly around its axis centrifugal force will give it a more dramatic bulge around its equator however Venus has an ultra slow rotation speed it takes the equivalent of two hundred and forty-three earth days for Venus to complete one full rotation around its axis and only two hundred twenty five earth days to finish a new lap around the Sun so in other words a day on Venus lasts longer than Vanesian year does and get this from our self centered perspective Venus spins backward word most of the planets in the solar system rotate from west to east Uranus and Venus Buck that trend on those two worlds the sun appears to rise in the West and set in the East nobody knows how that came to pass. Astronomers think Venus us to move in a counterclockwise direction like Earth but at some point it's been I have reversed alternatively perhaps the sun's Gravitational influence or a collision with a large object caused the entire planet to flip upside down in December of nineteen sixty two Venus became the first planet to get a fly by visit from a manmade spacecraft exploiting brief window of opportunity NASA's Mariner two probes studied this world up close from distances as near as twenty one thousand miles that's about thirty four thousand kilometers onboard instruments taught us a great deal mariner two firms that Venus does not have an earth like magnetic field and it recorded surface temperatures within the expected range a young Carl Sagan helped design the mariner to probe yes successfully lobbied to have the space craft fitted with a camera because close up pictures of Venus might quote answer questions that we were too dumb to even pose by the time Mariner to launched scientists already knew that there were high levels of carbon dioxide in the vision atmosphere and that composition should give us pause carbon dockside makes up a whopping ninety six percent of Venus's atmosphere scientists attribute this to a runaway greenhouse effect theoretically the planet used to have a more temperate climate that could have remained stable for billions of years back then oceans of liquid water may have covered its surface though we don't know for sure things changed as are growing son became hotter any oceans would have evaporated during this time astronomers think much of the carbon dioxide invasion rocks leached out and traveled guy word while the atmosphere changed it got better at trapping heat creating a vicious cycle that worsens the problem inevitably temperatures spiked and stayed since our own planet has a major greenhouse gas problem Venus could offer us important insights regarding climate change but sending probes to explore it has always presented major challenges on Venus the surface gravity is comparable to what you and I experience on earth what's not comparable is that atmospheric Asher which is ninety two times greater on the face of Venus than it is here faced with extreme temperatures and high pressure it's no wonder that manmade objects don't last long long in the planet's environment when the Soviet venire thirteen probe landed on Venus in Nineteen eighty-two it stayed intact for record setting one hundred and twenty seven minutes before it was destroyed mind you this wasn't the USSR's first Rodeo previous Venero spacecraft's successfully visited the planet's atmosphere and touched down on its outer crest brief though their visits were these probes captured the first ever photographs of the Venetian surface Nasr's Magellan spacecraft provided further insights has it mapped ninety eight percent of the planet's face all in all Venus boasts more than sixteen thousand volcanoes and volcanic features but we don't know of any these are still active highland plateaus deep canyons and meteorite impact craters have also been discovered there although Venus's about four point six billion years old crest is thought to be much younger with an estimated age of just three hundred to six hundred million years Venus lacks tectonic plates as we know them on earth nonetheless Sunday August think that upwelling magma occasionally recycle sections of the crust long before it was an object scientific study or of Edgar Rice burroughs. goals Venus mesmerized our ancestors bright and beautiful the cloud adorned planet derives its name from the Roman Goddess of love into mathematicians mapped it's progress across the sky and Galileo took detailed notes about its moon like phases somehow knowing that Venus is a stifling hot house doesn't diminish its allure with every new discovery inspires curiosity aw

Edgar Rice Burroughs Radio Telescope Nisa Eight Hundred Sixty Four Degre Three Hundred Twenty Six Degre Eight Eighteen Degrees Fahrenh Thirty Four Thousand Kilometer Six Hundred Million Years Ninety Eight Percent Twenty Seven Minutes Eighty Six Percent Ninety Six Percent Six Billion Years One Pole
Contact: The Movie That Changed Drew Hammond's Life

This Movie Changed Me

08:39 min | 3 years ago

Contact: The Movie That Changed Drew Hammond's Life

"The movies adapted from the science fiction novel by The scientist Carl Sagan and tells the story of L. E. We first meet her as a little girl with her dad watching the stars and fascinated by the idea of life on other your planet's we see her playing with the radio trying to make a connection with people from outside her hometown and that curiosity that she has a little girl will eventually guide her through her work. Could we talk to the moon. Wow Big enough radio. I don't see why not can we talk to Jupiter or or what's one after that. Don't tell me give you in Hula hoops Saturn. Could we talk to Saturday. dad could be talked to mom. I don't think even the biggest radio could reach that far. Yeah people on other planets. I I don't know sparks but I guess I'd say if it is just as it seems like an awful ways to space ellie grows up to be this amazing astronomer who works for this organization that is trying to find aliens on other planets and many people don't take her work seriously other scientists give her credit for her hard work and for her intelligence and her amazing determination in her projects but it's the kind of science that is often equated with faith the kind of science. You can't prove true what I'm I'm doing you promising scientists to be wasting your gifts on this nonsense consider what could potentially be the most important discovery the human race nonsense incense okay. There's four hundred to one. There is intelligent life out there but it's so far away you'll never contacted in your lifetime Carol Disisto. Oh there's nothing out there about noble gases and carbon compounds and you're wasting your time in the meantime. You won't be published. You won't be taken seriously and your career will be over or before. It's begun so my life. That's search is one that takes l. e. directly into the path of Palmer Joss this this kind of spiritual pastor seeker played by Matthew mcconaughey elliara mutually studying all the usual Nabulsi quasars pulsars stuff like that. What are you what are you writing. The Usual Nouns adverbs added to here and there I worked on a project called city search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Wow out there l. E. is played brilliantly by the one and only jodie foster. One of my heroes and the relationship between her and Palmer is so important because it is going to kind of demonstrate and play out for us that divide divide between science and faith science and religion and it becomes the guiding light for the movie. How can you be sure that something really exists when you can't prove it Orig- book. Would you like me to quote you. Ironically the thing that people are the most hungry for meaning is the one thing that science hasn't been able to give them yeah yeah come on. It's like you're saying that science killed God. What if what if science simply revealed that he never existed in the first place the character of Palmer Joss was important for me because he inhabited this religious spiritual seeker identity but he also really understood were Elliott as a scientist came from and that was really important for high school teacher Hammond. Although he related to Ellie you know he had never seen a scientist. I figure like her before someone who would ask these hard questions of everyone around her and even of herself and the work that she did and yet but really really comfortable with the idea of mystery and unanswered questions so I want to hear the story behind when you first saw contact and this is kind of a meditative exercise that we found really useful here on the podcasts which is free to close your eyes so I'm looking at you so I know you're doing close your eyes and then for ten seconds distinct about that first time you saw the movie and then I will look at the clock and I'll interrupt you so what memories came for you then it it was the it was the summer after high school high school graduation. I think it was yeah and and about two weeks before the movie came out my long-term term crush that had a you know I wanna say it was love but it was not for sure. It was just highschool crush but for four years I had you know wanting wanting to be with her. and then towards the end of highschool. She got engaged to her youth pastor well from her church was he he he was like a good seven years older than she is right. Yes right but you know. Jesus was cool with it so I guess it was all part of the plan anyway but so I was I was crushed and I remember like I went to the wedding and and I remember thinking like Oh. Oh you know if if I if I was more of a person of faith if I was going to be somebody that could go to church this would be this could be me love me and I I I was just I was depressed and I felt so alone and and then a couple of my friends like we went to the the movie just because it was a science fiction movie had aliens in it and if you if you go back and look at the trailer it does not know it does not sell thus you knew like Carl. Sagan's work had no idea the kind of dialogue that it just looks like a cool science independence day was going to be it's been fun a fun romp and we watch the movie and and win when it was done my friends I got up and started to walk away and they were like let's get them scream and I was just sitting there bawling and I could not I could not bring myself to leave the theater for like a good ten minutes because it was just such a yeah. It was just such a profound and deeply personal experience that I don't think I've ever had in a movie like that where I felt like this movie spoke to something that I could never even put into words and I didn't know how to talk about it with anybody. I didn't feel like it was okay to talk about and what that what that movie brought up for me what I'm saying. Oh yeah definitely it's one of the things that I love the most about movies and that experience when you see one in the theater is it's you're kind of hit with the impact of the film and then you're processing it. I mean days weeks years later for sure. I went back and saw the movie again in the theater. You know maybe within the next week and finally started to figure out like Oh. This is speaking to this disconnect that I felt for the last you know whatever the the time probably eight years of being a young kid who never had a relationship with church and and was surrounded by very spiritual and religious people and always feeling like an outsider because you know it's funny. I think I had a similar experience to you watching the movie as someone who grew up actually very religious my parents are pastor eventual Christian but he's also a man. He's like a botanist and he always man of science. Yeah I think watching this movie felt in a lot of ways like seeing a lot of his own or inner conflict a lot of the things that we grew up hearing about from him but it was also the best example that I had had seen at the time of my ideal version of faith

Scientist Palmer Joss Carl Sagan L. E. Ellie Carol Disisto Matthew Mcconaughey Jodie Foster Sparks School Teacher Elliott Eight Years Seven Years Ten Minutes Ten Seconds Four Years Two Weeks
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

06:24 min | 3 years ago

Munazza

"Hello. This is me. She yousef. And this is tell them I am. In twenty fifteen I went on a road trip from Chicago to Wisconsin. And we went like really far north. Like I think the nearest people to us were a hundred miles away, which now that I think about it was probably a dangerous situation. Anyway, it was stunning if you haven't been to Wisconsin, you're seriously missing out. So it was late summer like early fall. And as we get deeper into the night, it starts to get really chilly, kind of Chris, and in the middle of the night, I go out into the backyard of the house. We're staying and the night is so block that I had to just stand there for a second. Try to find my way. And after a while my eyes start to adjust and there's this brightness remember looking up at the sky, the stars were clear and more crowded than I had ever seen before. It was honestly like the stars where the crowd at a concert, and I was. Onset or something? And I swear I could see the curve of the sky, it was like I was wrapped in almost. It was so literally beyond my reach like forget figuratively. I felt so small in a good way. So the next morning, I'm sitting inside on the couch with my breakfast. The sun is, like, especially bright, the kind of right? That even if it's cold to kind of just warms you up. And there's the dust in the air and for a second. The sunlight, set this crowd of dust dancing. And I felt so small. My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant.

Carl Sagan Nyu Langone Wisconsin Annan Chicago Yousef Vanessa Costco Onset Pakistan India Chris United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark
Munazza

Tell Them, I Am

05:24 min | 3 years ago

Munazza

"My name is Vanessa all in the end. I am an astronomer. I think that is the primary way that identify myself when I, meet new people. Astronauts are on a lot of times ex military and engineers like they have survival skills versus strana mors are fabulous nerds. It's Uman to gaze up at the stars and contemplate the cosmos. There's a there's a Carl Sagan, quote, I'm probably paraphrasing at this point. It's not explaining science. Seems to me perverse, when you're in love, you want to tell the world. I grew up with my parents may data's from Pakistan. He moved to the US in the eighties. Horrible up getting. Okay. And my mom is from India, Mark from our message. Good. There. I have two sisters. We're very close knit family. We love hang out with each other like going home. It was always like the highlight of my day. My parents had this interesting parenting style, which I have started to now be more aware of I didn't have a bed time. I didn't have occurred few. I never had any like rules about how long it could stay on the computer or the or the TV or, or the phone, but it was kind of will lose things where if I wanted to do something by parents would be like that doesn't seem like such a good idea. And then I would kind of be like, oh, but I think it is. So they like, they'd say, well, go ahead, try it, and then I would try it, and it wouldn't be a good idea. And they come back like see. I feel like I'm humble Ryan about my parents really amazing people. When is engineers? I was a sophomore in college. My dad got extremely sick. So he was taking a medication for a rheumatoid arthritis treatment, the medicine was I N, H, I, E so Nisaan and it's known to be extremely toxic. We were not told that my dad was prescribed his medications, so he was told to take this six month course of I h and when he was done with the six months course than he could come back to start his Arthur treatment, well, five months in my dad's sorta getting extremely sick. I is getting very confused. And then one day he woke up and was just completely yellow like completely jaundiced. His is really his skin was yellow. And we took him to the to his primary didn't it turned out. He was having liver failure. Annan ver- when I heard that he was having liver failure. I didn't know what that meant, and I remember being scared, but not being sure why I was scared. A couple days after he started to get a lot worse. And there is one to remember it was the Saturday we were all home, and we had to do like basic errands, like grocery shopping. And we're all going to Costco, my favorite thing ever. And my dad was my dad was feed be used completely out of him. We started to get really concerned. So my mom colds, my dad's primary, who is also one of our good family friends. So he came by the evening, putting I remember who's putting on my dad's shoes for him. Like getting him ready to go to the hospital. And my dad was like kicking him in the face. And he eventually got my dad dressed enough to hospital. And like put him in the front seat of his car with a lot of struggle for my dad and drove him himself to to the hospital. NYU langone. Turned out that his liver was ninety eight percent necrosis, which means that ninety eight percent of his liver had died. It became very clear that he needed a new liver, and he needed a liver transplant. I just felt like as soon as, as soon as my dad was admitted hospital and this need for a transplant became a reality things kind of just felt completely different. And a couple of days into being in the hospital he fell into a coma. Apparently before my dad's slipped into the coma. He told the head transplant surgeon. Please help me get better because I have to take care of my family. I really was not processing like what was happening. Still going to all my classes I still hanging. All my problems, that's just kind of working on this autopilot mode, where I was going about my days, doing everything that I normally would going to my classes in the mornings, and they would take the six train down to NYU Langone and spend the rest of my day. There.

Nyu Langone Carl Sagan Coma Annan Vanessa Costco Pakistan India United States Nisaan Ryan Arthur Mark