19 Burst results for "Carl Jung"

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

06:34 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Moral requirements setting the kingdom straight and so he runs back across the desert. There's all sorts of impressive music happening. And then he comes back to his kingdom and it's not looking good and that's the consequence of his his abandonment of it. That's a big part of it. So now it's dead. But also his abandonment of it to nothing but malevolence and chaos and so he's pretty taken back at what's happened and that he exaggerates guilt or it should anyways and nella shows up and and they decided they were going to do something about this. So in the meantime simba's mother is complaining about the fact that there's no food in the kingdom anymore and that they've gone as far as they can and scar doesn't want to hear this so he he attacks her and simba decides to go to war and so this is where he wakes up and he's willing to encounter the shadow at this point and so he confronts scar scarves. Very concerned about this. Because actually simba's looking pretty impressive now kind of thought he was dead besides and so he tries to use treachery and whining and and subordination to excuse himself but he's planning to overthrow simba nonetheless to resist so he tells scarred aleve him to the nether regions outside of the kingdom like scarred to him. Scar basically refuses and then a storm gathers right and lights the deadwood around the rock on fire so we have another descent into hell seen here very common and disney movies this notion of the hero fighting the evil force on the edge of something. That's burning it's quite common motif. You see it and sleeping beauty for example so they have a big war and scar ends up putting him but in the same position that foster was in and then he whispers to him that he killed his father so similar has been thinking all along that it was his fault and it is sort of his fault but he didn't know that there was a more architectural theme playing out in the background. Which is that. Societies are always endangered by malevolence always and that's independent to some degree of simba's decisions and his and his lack there of anyway scar tells them because he thinks he's one and that energizes simba to have this sort of final battle. He leaps out from the pit and they have a big fight and he pins them basically and the female lionesses come to his aid and semi tells them that again that he has to leave and so they have a big fight. That's a particularly good bit of animation. So there's real demonic aspect to scar their king of hell and but he loses and then he blames his minions. He blames the hyenas for everything. Terrible this happening forgetting that they can hear him. And then he falls off the cliff and hyenas go in and finish them off so it's pretty brutal ending for poor old scar eaten by his own. Minions and then scars dad and simba has one and so the rains come immediately and so what does that mean. Well it means that when proper order is restored in the kingdom then everything starts to flourish again and so the rains come and then well it's raining. Simba climbs up to the top of the rock and now he's completely mature right. The facial pathetic facial expression disappears entirely straightens himself up because now he's full of serotonin having defeated good old scar and all the lionesses a roaring and he climbs up pride rock and they roar at him which is good. There are tough. He's tough showing their teeth. It's it's not. It's not a society of naive and harmless creatures. It's something that's got some bite and the rains come and then the next thing you see the restoration of the kingdom and so basically what that means is that if the individual is willing to confront their own shadow and then to take on the malevolent forces that continuously undermine society then harmony can be restored and everyone can do well and so then we have a returned to the beginning right and so simba nella are now a couple along with puma and t moan and they have a baby and rafiki shows up and does the same thing you know. They're going to present the baby to the sun and have all the animals bow again and and that's the end of the movie. So that's all packed into an archetypal tail and so one of the things that young would point out is that you understood this right while you were watching it. Because otherwise at some level all these things made sense. They cohered and the narrative appeared to be an appropriate narrative. Even when you're a little kid because it strikes a chord inside you and well that cord the thing that strikes inside you. That's the archetype because if there wasn't something inside of you so to speak that this could communicate with an it would fall on deaf ears and it speaks to the part of you. That's most particularly human and it's a story of the development of the sovereign individual. That's that's the right way to think about a hero archetype. That's another way of thinking about it. And people are going to get that story one way or another and now and then a piece of public art comes along like this that does a good job is encapsulated captures. Everyone's imagination and so. That's why you've all seen it and why i presume you all enjoyed it when you were kids and maybe still enjoy it now so well. That was actually faster than i thought it would be. So this is what i'm going to do. We've got twenty minutes. So why don't you think for a minute or two. And i'll take some questions which i don't often do. But and they can be any questions about anything we've covered in class so take a minute and yes feel like.

simba disney
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

06:40 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Now one of the things. Carl rogers one of the clinicians that we'll talk about pointed out. Was that if if someone who's gonna come to psychotherapy there's some things that had to happen before they went into psychotherapy and one thing that had to happen was that they had to admit that there was something wrong and they had to want to change. You had to have that before you went into the psychotherapeutic situation and what happens here is simba is actually. He's dropped his arrogance. And he's looking upward kind like djupedal wishing on the star in pinocchio he's looking upwards he looking towards something higher and he wants to transform himself so he's asked the question. How can i change for the better. And he doesn't get announcer and then rafiki shows up. So what does that mean. It means that as soon as you know. You're wrong about something soon as you admit that you're wrong about something and you open the door to potential change. That part of you will respond so and you know this because think about this here thinking so you ask yourself a question because that's what you do when you're thinking and then you generate some answers. It's like it's very strange. Thinking will actually work. You can actually come up with answers if you think about something and so this. This issue is okay. I thought it was real good in my little impulsive paradise but that it turns out that. I'm just a half wit and i noticed that. Want to do something about so. The question is now the question is has now been posed and what you would say is the deeper part of yourself. The part that still contains your undeveloped potential will respond to that posed question and change the way that you look at things and change the way that you act. It'll start it'll start changing things so that you can tap those parts of yourself that are not yet developed and you certainly do that psychotherapy but you can do that. Young said that psychotherapy could be replaced by a supreme moral effort and by that he meant. Was that if you really wanted things to be better if you wanted to get your act together and you admitted that you were insufficient in your current state and you meditated on the issue and try to figure out what you should do next to make to put yourself together that you would be able to find out that there's something in you that guides the process of development. That's the self a higher. It's the higher self in some sense. It's the thing that remains constant across transformations. Because you're somewhere then you fall apart then you get somewhere else but there's something outside of that's guiding that process and that's that's also the self that's what you could be and you can communicate in some sense with what you could be and that's a very strange thing about human beings. Anyways rafiki shows up and samba is sitting by the water. Self reflecting there's a little pebble that drops into the pool to attract his attention and up pops the self and refusal. Trickster he tells them we're jokes and he hits them with the stick a bunch of times. Thank god because someone really needs to and he makes them stupid jokes about bananas and kind of entices simba into following him. He let them know that he has a secret and he entices simba into following him and so all of a sudden become interested in something. So if you ask yourself what the next developmental stages and you really wanna know that all of a sudden you're going to become interested in things that might move you to the next stage and that'll happen more or less unconsciously so anyways rafiki entices him and then runs away and simple follows him and well. That's where he reveals himself as sage and then he tells simba to follow him and he goes underground and this is the initiation seen right which we talked about at the beginning of the class. This is the descent into the underworld. And it's a it's a prerequisite to radical personality transformation so anyways he goes through this horrifying underground tunnel system. Where everything's all tangled up. Which is you know if you ever fall into. Chaos that everything. Down there in chaos tangled up. It's a tangled mess. And he's quite there's horrifying music going on in the background. He goes deeper and deeper until rafiki says he finds a pool in the middle of the chaos. A deep pool. that's another symbol of the self. It's it's the deep unconscious to something down. There that's alive that can be drawn up to the surface and so rafiki shows him the pool and simba who's quite terrified at this point looks in it. And the first thing he sees the only sees himself he only sees his own reflection and rafiki says. Look deeper now. You see what the animators do here. It's very cool so there's simba and there's his reflection but you see that is already half his father and you look at the difference in eyebrows and the and the look so there's a there's a tightness of jaw and firmness of face that starting to manifest itself there and that means that he's starting to see the man he could be beyond the adolescent. That's a good way of thinking about it and then all of a sudden well they're you know that's a whole different face. That's a seriously different face that everything's going in and out of my way because things are going to happen around me very judgmental as well so it's not it's not naive by any stretch of the imagination but we know his father's a good guy and so there's something archetypal about this and so he sees the man could be reflected back to him and then that's which is that actually becomes a cosmic event and we switch up to the sky instead and so move. Fossa manifests himself basically as a solar deity. Any tell simba that he's forgotten who he is. Which is the son of a king and that he should remember that and start acting like it and let's archetypal idea so if you're just a useless adolescent than forgotten who you are and the consequence of that is that the state is going to fall around fall apart around you and you're not going to do anything to fix it and you're not going to be good for anything and no one's going to be able to rely on you and you're going to be all whiny and resentful and then after that even gets worse and so that's basically what fafsa tells them and so simba's like blown away by this vision right because he sees what he also what he's not which is pretty damn horrifying so anyways the storm so to speak clear and rookie comes up and and simba's lot more thoughtful than not quite as whiny and resentful anymore and ricky leaves and so simba now knows what he's supposed to do supposed to stop being useless and take.

simba rafiki Carl rogers Fossa Young ricky
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

07:22 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Of the physiological addiction but you have to completely learn a new way of living. Because are you know you have to get rid of all your friends because there all drunks pretty much not at least people who are facilitating. You're drinking so you have to build a whole new social network. You don't know how to amuse yourself because of course the way you've done that is by going to the bar sitting at home drinking and so there's a huge hole in your life. You abandon the previous pathological mode about application but that just leaves you with nothing. And then you have to rebuild that thing from from from from scratch. It's extraordinarily difficult and that's why so. Many people fail when they're trying to overcome a major addiction. So all right so anyways simba's out there in the desert. He's left his family and the comforts of home and he's he's discovered by these by puma and a little rats name to to moan yes. He's a mere cat right which are very cool things and they discover them and this is sort of his transition into adolescence. And he he kind of finds and this is i would say more. Typical of the male transition in data lessons because females of course hit puberty so much younger the males who aren't very attractive when they're young and just starting to undergo puberty that are very attractive to females. They tend to clump together in in gangs and and manage the transition over seven years. So and that's what happens here. Is sim joins this. Little gang of these guys are all right but there are a little on the primordial side. You might say you know. One of them is basically just a walking gastrointestinal tract and the other one is. He's not so bad but he's like a foot high. Really what good is he. He's got some secondary companions out here past the desert but he enters he's out of childhood now enters lesson world and what happens. Here is very quickly in the film. He goes from being a little cub to a full full adolescence. In there's about a five minute transition. And so it's the next stage in his development and now he's out there in this paradise which is kinda strange because adolescence really is no no picnic but the idea here is that he really doesn't have any responsibilities right. None and that is one thing about is and even the stage of life that you guys are out. Is you have lots to do. But you're not really responsible for anyone other than yourself and so even though you might be quite burdened with your current responsibilities. It's nothing compared to what it would be like when you you have responsibility for for children for example or for the people that are working for you or or whatever so anyways out here. It's a kind of impulsive place as well and adolescence is like that we've had high school students try to do the future authoring program where they have to think three to five years down the road. Forget that they just can't do it. And i've watched them. And what happens is you. You immediately become aware of just how little high school students know. When they're like fifteen or sixteen three to five years forget it. They don't have the world knowledge to project themselves out that far in the future not even close and so we've built a high school version. That helps them design a better future three to six months down the road. And even that's really pushing it added leci- our more impulsive and they live more for the moment and there are some utility in that. I mean being impulsive. Living for the moment is one of the things that gets you pregnant as a teenager. And that is certainly one way that the species has managed to propagate itself and so positive emotion impulsivity are very tightly linked. And so he's out there in this adolescent delusional fantasy. That might be one way of thinking about it but more important. He's out there where he's in a domain now where the impulses of the moment basically take precedent. And so and i think they sing some song about. Yeah a kuna matata right which basically means do whatever you want and tomorrow we'll take care of itself or something like that so it's very impulsive and laxa responsibility one of the things that i would recommend to you. If you want to protect yourself from ideological possession shall we say. Is that when you hear. People speak politically and they don't say anything about your responsibilities. You should probably stop listening to them because whenever they're trying to offer you something if it doesn't come along with an equivalent cost there's something being hidden from you and they're appealing to the part of you. That's what i would say at best adolescent. So all right so anyways. He's out there in his little adolescent paradise santa with his chums and back at at pride rock. Things are not good right. Scar who's arrogant and refuses to learn. And who will not establish reasonable relationship with the females. All he does tyrannize over them. He ends up ruling overa- completely barren landscape. And that's really what happens until terry and states and we also know quite. Interestingly is that one of the best predictors of economic development in state is the degree to which the extend rights to women. It's one of the best predictors and i would say well if you're going to tear it is your own women you're gonna tear is everything you're going tyrannize ideas tyrannize structures like if you have to enslave your own women. You're you've adapted a pretty damn pathological view of the world and the probability that that narrow constrained restricted viewpoint is gonna pay off for you. Economically is extraordinarily low so anyways scar. It's like what happened. In the soviet union now part of the reason it collapsed by nineteen eighty. Nine is that it just could not move any farther. It was like this really complicated motor. That was worn completely out. That no one ever taken care of and it just ground to a halt working because it because it didn't work and so if you're totalitarian and won't update your system and adjust it then it wears out in grinds to a halt and everything becomes unproductive now. It's not easy to figure out what makes society productive because you might say. Well it's natural resources or something like that. First of all natural resources are very often occurs to country because they produce corruption call that the dutch disease. There's a reason for that. You can look it up. But natural resources in and of themselves are by no means sufficient to guarantee the wellbeing of country. Japan has virtually no natural resources at all. And it's really rich and one of the prime natural resources actually seems maybe there's two one is honesty and other is trust and if you can set up a society where people are roughly honest which means they do what they say they're going to do. And where the default bargaining position on both sides trust then the probability that that culture will become wealthy. It's very very high. So and a functional legal system is also a natural resource of tremendous tremendous value. Partly why people. In china. For example wealthy people in china are dumping their money into the real estate market north america. Like mad because one of the things you do know. If you buy real estate in north america's you actually own it. It still going to be yours. Twenty years in the future thirty years in the future..

china simba impulsivity gastrointestinal tract puma soviet union north america Japan terry
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

06:46 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"If if you're interested in this sort of thing you ever go read the writings of of of the columbine killers teens. They're very interesting. They're very much worth reading. Especially i think it's dylan klebold. Who was the more literate of of the two but he tells you exactly where he whipped after brooding and brooding and brooding on his his isolation at segregation for mankind. So he's out there beyond. He's out there in a chaotic domain. And because he's tortured by that. His thoughts taken unbelievably dark turn. It's unimaginably dark if you're interested in that sort of thing you could read that there's another book you could read called pens ram said ram and. It's a fascinating book. It's about this guy who i think he raped twelve hundred men. So that sort of tells you what sort of guy he was extraordinarily physically powerful and brutal and malevolent and he was kind of a juvenile delinquent type and they put them in a reform school and he was not well treated in that reform. School it's sort of like the worst of the canadian residential schools and when he came out he was not a happy boy and so he spent the rest of his life trying to be as destructive as he could possibly imagine and purely consciously with malevolent intent and then and believe me he was pretty destructive. He kept track of the dollar value of all the buildings he burned down. He tried to start a war between britain and the united states like he was all out for all out mayhem his dying words. They're going to hang him. He told the guy who going to hang them to. He said hurry up you. Who's your bastard. I could kill men in the time. It takes you to hang me. And that's exactly the sort of person he was and he made friends with this physician in in prison who he thought was like the first person who ever did something nice for him gave him a dollar for cigarettes if i remember correctly and the physician encouraged him to write his autobiography. And so we did and it's available and so if you want a view because you always think of people you think people have good intentions naive agreeable so all of you who are sitting there out there. Thinking people have good intentions. You're probably high agreeable but that's not always the case. People can have very dark. Motivations that are fully conscious and very well elaborated and panorama was no. He was smart and his book is very well written and he tells you exactly why he thought the way he thought. And so. it's a good glimpse of exactly this sort of thing where you can get to if you want to buy brooding on your specific misfortune. You know his his basic credo was that human beings were so reprehensible that they should be eliminated and believe me. That's what he was trying to do. And these people who do terrible things like the columbine shooters that's exactly what for block of a better word they're possessed by its sheer malevolence and the columbine kids had a much more spectacular catastrophe planned than the one that actually occurred and they knew it was going to be a full blown media circus and lots of these people who engage in those sorts of mass murderers. They know about the other mass murderers and they're engaged in a competition and the competition is who can do the most brutal thing the fastest something like that. So you can't just be thinking about people who've you know who have good intentions but have somehow gone wrong if you ever meet someone who isn't like that and you think that you're just a tree with ripe fruit to be plucked so you don't want to be in that situation you have to keep your eyes open and so anyways that's basically what's encapsulated in this part of the story. Now the hyenas go after the little lion obviously but they managed to escape. It's malevolent scene and move shows up at the last minute to rescue them. So and you know that there's also a mythological trope there which is that if you go outside your domain of competence and you encounter something you don't understand the first thing that you're going to do is look to the knowledge structures that you already possessed to explain it right and that's the you could say from symbolic perspective that that's the manifestation of the father. Of course that's what you're going to do and you know what's really interesting is because i've had a lot of clients who've had ptsd and without exception every single one of them was induced by one form of malevolence or another. They have to develop a very sophisticated philosophy of good and evil to get out of it because they have a world view in which those things don't really exist there's no such thing as pure malevolence Unless you encounter it and then as soon as you encounter it as soon as you encounter it you won't know what to do and then you won't be able to get on with your life you'll do nothing but think about that and think about it and think about it and think about it will disrupt your sleep. It'll put you into a permanent state of preparation for action. Because the part of your brain that's detected that which in my estimation by the way is the same part at least in part that detects snakes. It's the same damn circuit once seen something like that. It is not going to let you go till you figure it out. And that's basically what post traumatic stress disorder is and you know to some degree. Each of you will have experienced that. Maybe not all of you in here but many of you and you can tell that so if you go back and you think about your past and you have any memory that's more than about eighteen months old and when you think about it produces a fair bit of negative emotion. Then that's like that's like a place where there's a many post traumatic stress problem. And what's happened you remember. I showed you that hierarchy moving from tiny motor actions all the way up to high order abstractions. Well you can imagine say you have good person at the top and you use that. That scenario to construe other people people are basically good. Well then you run into someone who is not good and boom. The whole bloody system comes tumbling down because it's violated that highest order axiom sats post traumatic stress disorder if something has violated axiom. That's more differentiated closer to the actual motor output not quite so high in the obstruction chain. Then all it does is wipe out. That part of the structure doesn't wipe out the whole thing and you can tell if you have holes in your perceptual value structure by checking to see if you have memories that are still alive in a negative way. That are old enough so that they should have been incorporated into your personality and so one of the things you can do doing one of the exercises. that's on myself authoring site. You guys do the personality analysis. But there's another program there called the It's called the past authoring where you write down autobiography and thinking through these things that have happened to you. In your past that are negative is a good way of making them. Go away and thinking them through kind of means you have to figure out what happened.

dylan klebold ptsd britain united states
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

08:25 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"And they're using the damn big five. They can extract out big five information from your facebook likes. They've got a model of every single person in the united states. Big five and they helped trump craft political messages right down to the level of apartment buildings to appeal to people based on their big five. And that's all recent work and so one of the things that's very interesting is we. Are teaching computers to understand a so fast. You can't believe it and we really do risk walking into an electronic world where you will only see what you want to see. I mean obviously the marketers are trying to do that as fast as possible right. They only want to send you adds that you're going to be interested in because it's expensive and foolish to send you anything that will annoy you or that you'll ignore and so the marketers are trying like mad to map who you are even by watching your is. They're trying to figure out who you are so they can send you the right information but the danger is that that'll happen. Say in the domain of news and broader information increasing this tendency for people to be siloed in their exposure to the external world. It's a big pro sort of like each of us is becoming a micro. Celebrity surrounded by electronic sycophants who do nothing. But tell us exactly what we want to hear. It's a real problem. Karl popper famous philosopher. Science said that one of the things that you should do and this is akin to the view is you should always look for information that contradicts your current viewpoint. Now that's painful right because who wants their axioms contradicted. It can take you apart. But it's the only way that you can ensure that you're learning at the same time that you're maintaining your stability and that's another reason why it's really necessary to engage in dialogue with people that you do not agree with because they're the ones who will tell you that you don't know it's crew. It's of crucial importance. The maintenance of your own stability the worst thing that can happen to a person no because there's many horrible things that can happen but one of the worst things that can happen is that you find yourself in a situation where no one is offering you corrective feedback anymore because you rely on the corrective feedback provided by other people to keep yourself sane to keep moving in the ever changing environment and if you yourself off from that feedback then well then you end up static shrinking. It's really. it's really not good. You get less and less competent. You get less and less confident and the threats outside of you loom larger and larger. So that's all to do with the domain outside the light so you would also say that out in this domain. That sort of beyond what you understand. That's also where you encounter the archetypes of the collective unconscious now. That's a really really complicated idea. But what he means by that. Is that if you're put outside the domain of your competence. You're going to start to use fantasy to organize your world. So i can give you an example of that so you you i presume. Most of your old enough to have a conscious memory of win. The twin towers came crashing down. And so everybody in the days after that was wandering around like they were in the days and the reason they were in a daze is because what wasn't exactly clear what fell right. There is the physical towers fell but that was only a tiny bit of the problem because those physical towers were embedded in a network of meaning like very very sophisticated network of meaning but also a political network in an economic network in a military network like their nodes inside a very complex system so when they come crashing down you don't know what's come crashing down right so you're out there in Known and wondering what's going on and wandering around in a daze which is exactly what happened to people. And then what. Bush did george w was immediately turned that into a good versus evil drama instantly. And that's an archetypal idea. So that's when he came up with the idea of the axis of evil. I think that was iran north korea. And i don't remember the other one at the moment but but he he. He immediately turned the political landscape into a good versus evil drama. And he said to everyone in the world that they were either with him or against him. Fundamentally and that was the that was part of the retreating into a more protected landscape. That's one of the ways that human beings deal with the encounter with a traumatic threat. And so the reason you meet the unconscious and the collective unconscious on the border of your knowledge is because when you hit the border of your knowledge you start to use fantasy in order to bring the newest form of order out of the unknown so that you can start to make sense out of it. And that's what artists always do. That's what they do. And so from the union perspective people who are engaged in creative art are the ones who are on the perimeter of knowledge structures. And so what they're doing is taking the obsolete unknown. Which would be in rumsfield terms the unknown unknowns and turning them into partially known unknowns. That's what an artist does and especially the more classical artists to deal with mythological and religious themes which was the case for art right up until really until the late twentieth century. They're using these mythological ideas to sort of extend the domain of human knowledge beyond its current parameters and so artists do that and literary people do that and dramatists and they help us extend our knowledge. No that's where open people live. That's another way of thinking about so think about it this way so here in the city and the city has parts of it that degenerate and so you can think about his order degenerating into chaos and then the open people who are creative come along and they find places in the city that have degenerated but that's still have interesting potential right and then they move in there where it's cheap to and they start producing art. They start producing galleries. And then the coffee shops move in. And then the things starts to get civilized and then of course the the boar liberal conservative types move in those would be the yuppies roughly speaking so there. There are much more conservative than the artists. But they're still liberal compared to the bulk of the population and so the more daring people move in after the artists have civilized it and then after that then the chain stores start to move in and soon it's completely turned into zeller's or something like that and artists have to go somewhere else and find another place on the boundary where they can live. And it's a physical. It's a physical boundary as much as a mental boundary. Because you think each of those personality traits there's five dimensions each of them represent the possibility of inhabiting kind of niche. Right in ecological niche. So if you're an extroverted person. Your niche is the social environment. If you're an introverted person. The niche. I think nature. I don't know that for sure. Because i've never figured out exactly what introverts are adapted to but it's not exactly the social world off your niche relationships if you're disagreeable you're niches competition if you're conscientious your niche duty and effort and so and those niches are partly social because so much of our environment is social but there also partly natural because our social being is nested inside the natural world and so you can think about the big five traits as different kinds of adaptations to different kinds of niches. And that's the niche that the open people the open exploratory types arche by so that seems to make a higher order super factor extroversion and openness called plasticity as opposed to stability which is conscientiousness agreeable and emotional stability. And there's a playoff between those two things because the stable people obviously are stable but the plastic types of people are more dynamic. And they're they're more concerned with transformation and in order to get a system optimally stable and dynamic. You have to have a continual interplay of those factors because static doesn't work because everything changes that's the problem with conservatism and the problem with liberalism. Fundamentally is yes everything changes but you have to bring forward some structures from the past so it's very it's very very difficult to get that balance correct so all right so anyways out there in the underworld in the place beyond your current conceptualization. 's that's the place of death and nature and it's beyond the light and it's also the place of hell and that's what you see here. What do you. How do you conceptualize that. Well one of the things you'll see..

facebook united states Karl popper zeller Bush iran north korea george w
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

07:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"This episode. So we'll continue with our union analysis of the lion king. Today we ended at the point where remember mu fossa had taken simba up to the top of pride rock and described to him the fact that his kingdom essentially constituted everything that the light touched new can think about that as the domain of the roughly speaking of the great father with the domain of the great mother on the outside of that that being symbolically equivalent to the underworld or to death or to nature all of those things seem to be approximately equally true and he forbade simba from going to investigate what was beyond the confines of the light and in some sense. That's exactly what a tradition does for you because the tradition is precisely what defines the domain of the light and to be moral from the perspective of the tradition. It's kim to playing a game but only adhering to the rules you know how. Psg described the fact that when kids. I master a game. They learn they learn how to act it out and then they learn what the rules are and then they regard the rules in some sense as sacred. You can't go outside the rules and then later and moral development if they get to that stage then they start to recognize themselves also as formulators of the rule or formulator of the game and culture tells. You don't go beyond the rules. That's the definition of morality within the box of culture. And you don't go outside of that and so that's why move. Fossil plays a particular role. And it's wise because if you go outside the domain of what you already understand that it's dangerous out there clearly it's dangerous out there but the downside of that particular message and this is perhaps this is the mythological reason why move. Fossa isn't as aware as he could be of scar. You know his knowledge is bounded and he's not aware enough of what lies outside of that in this realm let's say of death and destruction and so scar is is able to overcome his his brother. Wonder you see this sort of thing happening to people very frequently for example who developed post traumatic stress disorder and one of the things. That's not as well known about post traumatic stress disorder as might be known as a. It happens to you if you encounter experienced that sort of blows out the axioms of your knowledge system that that's one way of looking at it. It's so unexpected that you can't account for it within the confines of the system that you're using to interpret the world not often happens to people when they encounter something that's truly malevolent and that can be within them or it can be in the form of someone else who is genuinely out to hurt them. They're often people who develop. Ptsd are often but not always somewhat naive. And they're not aware of the full catastrophe of the world. That might be one way of looking at it. And then they encounter someone who's truly out to hurt them and they can detect that even in the way the person's face looks or they encounter a part of them that's much more malevolent than they had ever imagined. It could possibly be and then they do something terrible and then they don't know what to do about it. So del aire canadian general wrote a book called shake hands with the devil and it was about what happened to him in rwanda when he was stationed there as a un warrior or soldier and was not naive but what he encountered was truly malevolent and it just blew him into pieces and and that. That's what happens and so there's real utility and staying within the bounded but the problem is is that there may be information. That's outside of that domain that you absolutely need to know and so part of the problem with being alive is that you have to continually determine how much you're going to maintain your stability and how much you're going to explore and you have to explore because the stable part of you gets out dated but if you explore too much or too to unwisely then you could encounter things that flip upside down to actually one of the problems with being high in trade openness. Especially if you're also high in neuroticism 'cause if you're open you're creative. You're always looking for for ideas that are outside of your current systematic way of thinking but if you're high neuroticism so you experience a lot of anxiety and emotional pain in that sort of thing you can continually upset your own apple cart now the other thing that you might want to think about. This is really useful. As far as i'm concerned is you might want to think about this politically and we've been doing a lot of work. I'm going to have one of my graduate students. Actually come and talk to you about the work. We'd be doing on personality and paul and political belief so what happens with political belief. Is that if you're high and openness and low in conscientiousness you tend to be a liberal the openness being the particularly important part of that and if you're low in openness and high in conscientiousness especially orderliness. You tend to be a conservative now. It's kinda strange. Because openness and conscientiousness aren't very highly correlated. So it's not obvious why those two traits would combine to determine political belief and the relationship is actually quite strong between temperament and political belief if you measure political belief comprehensively but it seems to me that the fundamental distinction and this is the political game at least along the liberal conservative axis boils down to one thing it boils down to how open borders should be compared to how close they should be and you can see that reflected for example in the attractiveness of trump to a large part of the general population. Because he's going to close the borders build a wall and fortified the borders and conservatives like that they like to have borders between things. Stay tight and they don't even care if it's state borders or political borders count borders or ethnic borders or borders between ideas or borders between sexual identities conservatives like to have things stay in the damn box where they belong part because they're orderly and partly because they're low in openness they don't get any real denarlie interested in what happens if you free up your conceptions all they see in that is pro probability of disorder whereas liberals who are high in openness and low in conscientiousness slash orderliness. They get a real charge out of letting things out of the box. So that they can creatively interplay. Now the issue is who's correct answer is you don't know because environment underneath the political landscape moves and so sometimes the right answer is tighten up the borders and fortify and sometimes the right answer is no no no loosen things up because everything's getting to static can tight and we need more information and dialogue that occurs in the political landscape with this is why dialogue is so important is fundamentally between these two opposing views of borders. Because you can't say with certainty which one is right at any given time an open dialogue has to maintain itself so that the entire political state can maneuver properly along not moving line. It's absolutely crucial. It's really really really useful to know that people vote their damn temperament. It gets you gives you more of an understanding at least in principle of your of those who sit on the other side of you on the political fence and there's been recent newspaper articles quite interesting. I tweeted a couple of them about this company and uk called cambridge analytics..

Fossa Ptsd kim rwanda Psg neuroticism uk apple paul
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

01:58 min | 2 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"I hope you enjoy this. Episode of jordan peterson podcast. I'm michaela peterson jordan's daughter. This is carl young part to part one was released last week. If you haven't left a review on the podcast or a rating we love seeing those and dad does check them more news from him coming in the next few weeks help and just here to read. Ads intros keep the podcast running and keep you folks updated as i can also to occasionally shamelessly advertise my own podcast. The michaela peterson podcast. For all the folks suffering from mood or autoimmune disorders out. there. I frequently have doctors on that. Have incredibly valuable information for healing with diet and lifestyle so i hope it helps people thank you very much to our podcast. Sponsor helix for making these episodes possible and supplying me with the best mattress. I've ever slept on helix. Sleep has a quiz at helixsleep dot com slash jordan. The takes just two minutes to complete and matches your body type and sleep preferences to the perfect mattress. Freehill helixsleep is rated the number one mattress by g. q. And wired and cnn called it the most comfortable mattress they've ever slept on. And you know how trustworthy is you. Don't know if i was being sarcastic or not to you. Well perhaps about cnn props. But certainly not about the helix mattress. I took the quiz and i was matched to the helix midnight. Locks the midnight locks is medium firm and designed for side sleepers perfect for me. I'm going to be one of those women that are all wrinkly on one side on their neck from squishing my shoulder up to my cheek when i sleep on my side but at least i sleep. Well they have a ten year. Warranty are made right in america. And you get to try it out for one hundred nights risk-free you'd buy it sleep on it for one hundred nights and then they'll pick it up for free if you don't love it but you will right now. Helix sleep is offering up to two hundred dollars off of all mattress orders at helixsleep dot com slash jordan. Get up to two hundred dollars off at helixsleep dot com slash jordan. Enjoyed.

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

07:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"You'll look into. You'll think i knew this was coming. I knew i wasn't paying attention. I knew i hadn't sorted things out and the consequences of that will have cascaded and wiped you out and then you're in real trouble because not only did you get wiped out but you also know what's your fault and that is not a good thing that makes you bitter and resentful and murderous happen so anyways scar is scarred right so what that implies is he's had a pretty rough life and he's kinda skinny and he said he was born in the low end of the gene pool and so he has reasons to be resentful. He's also hyper intelligent rational. And it's one of the things you see very commonly about the evil adversary of the state or of the individuals. Often intelligent hyper rational and The best commentator on that was probably john milton in paradise lost because that's how he represents lucifer satan who's the spirit of rationality and enlightenment strangely enough. Hence lucifer the bringer of light. And the reason for that. As far as i can tell. And this is something that milton figured out. When he compiled all these ancient stories about evil and tried to make them coherent. Was that the problem with irrationality with rationality is that it tends to fall in love with its productions right and so then it comes up with a theory that makes out a totality and then it won't let go so the rational mind has a totalitarian element and we know that to some degree because that kind of rationality seems more left hemisphere focused and the left hemisphere tends to impose structured order on the world and be updated by the right hemisphere and the right hemisphere generally updates it with negative information and with fantasy and so the left hemisphere will impose a coherent structure on the world which is really necessary for you live in it. But the problem is there's a tension between coherence and completeness and that's partly why you need to hemispheres you need one to represent the world and you need to keep track of the exceptions and to feed those slowly into the representation system so that it so they can stay updated without collapsing into complete chaos. So anyways scar and he's got this droopy mouth in this whiny arrogant voice and he feels hard done by and he's resentful and and in classic hero stories are stories of the state as well. This is an egyptian. Take on it or cyrus was was the god of the state and set who later became satan not name became satan as it transformed through coptic christianity. Oh cyrus had a brother named set and set he. He didn't pay attention to set enough attention and set was always ski scheming to overthrow the kingdom. Just like scars and the egyptian said straightforwardly that the reason that oh cyrus got overthrown by said he got chopped into pieces and his pieces distributed throughout the state in the mythological representation. Those pieces were actually the provinces of egypt. Technically speaking so. And that's what the egyptians thought so. That's quite cool. But the egyptian said explicitly that the reason that oh serious got overthrown by sat was because he was willfully blind old senile and willfully blind. Same ideas. The flood myth. You'll see that quite here. Because fossa is sort of onto set or to scar but scars more treacherous than mussa believes and he gets out he gets out who fossa by going through his son by by by playing on on impulsivity and juvenile qualities of his son. And so obviously there are some antagonism between these two as you can see by their facial expressions there and there's a good example of scar. You know he's got that droopy kind of whiny malevolent face and that malevolent voice that jeremy irons pulls off so incredibly well and he's he's always skulking he's a creature of the night he always skulks around. He's not a creature of the day in any sense of the word and obviously move golden like the sun and scars. That's another another clue another hint okay. There's the tree. The tree of life already talked about that. I think that represents the multiple levels at which you exist simaltaneously all the way from the subatomic all the way up to the cosmic so to speak. And that's different kind of dimension. And that's the. That's the place that the self inhabits and it can kind of move up and down those dimensions but anyways the shaman lives inside that tree and and that's our first introduction to him basically but he's the spirit of the ancient tree that's another way of thinking about very very common element in stories right the spirit of the ancient tree and so all right so now fossa has taken taken simba up to the top of the pyramid right. So that's the the aluminum place. Let's say or the place of the. I where you can really see a long ways. And he's explaining to him. What his kingdom is going to be and you see. The son of course appears at that to begin with and that's another hint about being at the top. That's the illuminated part of the pyramid. And so they're up there talking. And what move pasta tells simba his kingdom is every place. The light has touched. And that's so brilliant so one of the things you'll notice if you move into a new apartment you're like a cat cats don't like changing houses and they have to zoom around in every corner to see exactly what the hell's going on there before they calm down. They need to know where they can hide and where the potential dangers are. And what you'll find if you move into a new place that you will not be comfortable there until you've investigated potentially cleaned and repaired every single square inch of it. The more attention you pay to it the more it will become yours. That's far more than mere like material ownership which is also relevant but in order to feel comfortable somewhere and to dominate. That place to be in place you have to attend to it. You have to shine light on every corner and you have to do that with yourself and with your relationships as well and so anyways fos tells simba that his kingdom is everything that the light shines on and that's exactly right and then there's a metaphor there too. Which is that. What you've sean light on. Which is what you've come to understand. And master is surrounded by other world of all the things that you don't understand and some of those would be natural things and some of them would be tyrannical things and some of those would be things you don't wanna know about yourself but they're outside of where you've managed to shine the light and so that's exactly what fossa tells simba says we live in this pyramid. We're at the top. There's a domain of light around it. That's explored territory outside of that unexplored territory and that's partly the unconscious because you fill it with fantasy and it's partly what you just don't know and then move faucet tells simba and it's sort of like god telling out him and even in the garden of eden not to eat the apple mikasa tells simba there's this outside place that's dark that's not part of your kingdom and you should not go there and that's really interesting because simba doesn't even know about that place yet and so move. Fosset is doing something very contradictory there. It's like telling him that it exists and heightening his curiosity but also saying that he should go there almost ensuring that. That's exactly what simba's going to do you see this in. Pinocchio movie too where parochial is planning to jump into the ocean to go get japan from the underworld and he's following. His conscience is along with him. Jimmy cricket and the cricket is warning him about all the dangers that he'll face down there and telling him that he will be fish food personally and while he's doing that pinocchio ties naught around his donkey tail round rock so he can can and the little cricket help some tie naught so well..

simba cyrus john milton Jimmy cricket jeremy irons egypt impulsivity mussa japan Fosset fos apple mikasa
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

02:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Perfect you know and they stop and everybody claps like mad right and it's perfect and so then the next contestant comes out and they're basically real trouble because this person just got nine point seven out of ten and it was perfect. So how do you beat perfect. And so were they come out there and then you watch them and you're right on the edge of your seat because what you see them do is something extraordinarily disciplined just like the last person yet but they push themselves into that zone. That's just beyond their disciplined capacity. And you can tell every second year watching it that they're that close to disaster and so you're right on the edge of your seat and you know that they're doing a high wire act without a net and so when they finally land triumphantly you'll all stand up and clap spontaneously and it's because you've just witnessed someone who's a master at playing a game who's also a master improving how to play that game at the same time and people love that more than anything to see that it's just absolutely overwhelming. Because it's a testament to the human spirit and you'll respond automatically and unconsciously to that and that's why that's an analogy to why the animals all spontaneously bow when now what happens is he shows the lion king and the sun breaks and shines on the hero at the same time. So there's this concordance between an earthly event and so called heavenly event and you would call that synchronous. That's his idea of synchronicity. Where something important. Subjectively is also signified by something that appears in narrative keeping without in the outside world. It's one of the most controversial elements of his theory. But i've experienced a variety of synchronous events and they often happened in therapy especially around dreams. But they're very hard to communicate because they're so specific to the context in which it occurs. They're very difficult to explain. So anyways it's the synchronous event that makes drops all the animals to their knees. So there's the sun coming out and there's shining on the primates go mad for that and that's of course exactly what we do we applaud and then we switched to scar now scars boss's brother evil brother the king always has an evil brother and so does the hero the hero always has an adversary and the reason for that is the king always has an evil brother and that means that the state always has it. Tyrannical element and the toronto element exists. For two reasons. One is the state deteriorates of its own accord. And that's an entropy observation. What that means is that the state is a construction of the past right but the president isn't the same as the past and to the degree that the past is mismatched with the demands of the present. Then it's then it's then it's tyrannical. It's malfunctioning and so it's continual problem with the state. It's always two steps behind the environment. And so then that means that the awareness of living people has to update the state and so elliott murcia elliott. Who's a great.

president
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

08:37 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Yeah he's a very regal looking person lion he stands up straight and tall and that means that he's hired and serotonin because serotonin governs posture reflection. And if so if your dominant and near the top of hierarchies you tend to expand so that you look bigger than than you could if shrunk down and so if you're low dominant person you wander round like this so that you look small and weak and you don't pose a threat to anybody but if you're at the top you expand yourself so that you can command the space and that's why he has that particular kind of regal posture and if you look at his facial expression you see that it's quite severe. He's capable of kindness but he's also harsh and judgmental and that's what society is like. That's what the super he goes like. What that means is that. He's integrated his aggression. And i've seen this happen in my clinical clients when they come in and they're too agreeable. They looked like simba looks later in the movie when he's adolescent and he sort of like a deer in headlights everything is coming in and nothing is coming out but when the person integrates shadow and gets the aggressive part of themselves integrated into their personality. Their faces harden. And if you look at people you can tell because the people are agreeable look childlike and innocent and the people who are hyper aggressive person will look. I mean and cruel but i've seen people's face changes change face change in the course of therapy men and women so what happens is they start to look more mature and it's more like they're they're judging the world as well as interacting with it properly once they integrate that more disagreeable part of them. It's very very necessary. And that's part of the incorporation of the union shadow or the incorporation of the unconscious from a freudian perspective. But old mussa mustafa there. He's already got that he's already got that covered so and he's capable. Obviously he can smile and he's capable of the full range of expressions but he's a tough look and character and now this baboon who's supposed to be basically just a fool. When the story was first written he turned into what's essentially a shaman across time and so he represents the self from the union perspective now the self is everything you could be across time so you imagine that there's you and there's the potential inside you whatever that is and potentials and interesting idea because it's represent something that isn't yet real yet we act like it's real because people will say to. You should live up to your potential and that potential is partly what you could be if you interacted with the world in a manner that would gain you the most information right because you build yourself out of the information in the jetty and sense but it's deeper than that too because we know that if you take yourself and you put yourself in a new environment new genes nervous system. They encode for new proteins. And so you're full of biological potential. That won't be realized unless you move yourself around in the world into different challenging circumstances and that'll turn on different circuits. So it's not merely that you're incorporating information from the outside world in the constructivist sense. It's that by exposing yourself to different environments. You put different physiological demands on yourself all the way down to the genetic level and that manifests new elements of you and so one of the things that happens to people and this is a very common cultural notion is that you should go on pilgrimage at some point to somewhere central and that would be like the rock in the pride rock and the lion king because you take yourself out of your dopey little village and that's just a little bounded you that everyone knows that isn't very expanded and then you go somewhere dark dangerous to the central place and while you do that you have adventures and they tougher new and pull more out of you like partly because you're becoming informed which means in formation it means you're becoming more organized at every level of analysis but there's also more of you to and so that's a very classic idea and then in in cathedrals in europe especially at charter. There's a big maze on the floor. A circular maze which is a symbolic representation of the pilgrimage for people who couldn't do it and so it's a huge circle divided into quadrants which is a union mandela. And you enter the maze at one point and then you have to walk through the entire maze north east west and south before you get to the center and the center is symbolized by a flower. That's carved in stone. Looks like this big this as a. It's it's large so that you can walk it and that's a symbolic pilgrimage. It takes you the center. That's the center of the cross because it's cathedral and that's the point of acceptance of voluntary suffering. That's what that means. And so you walk through. You can call that a circum ambulation. You go to all the quarters of the world defined yourself and so well. The south is boon in this particular in this. I think he's a man drill actually in this particular representation and he lives in the tree. He lives in the tree of life. It's a baobab tree in this particular. So he's the spirit that inhabits the tree of life and he's the eternal wise man that's a way of thinking so is the king. He's he's sort of a super ordinate king. Outside king in some sense he's the repository of ancient wisdom and the king is the manner in which that wisdom is currently being acted out in the world and so their friends and that means that the king is a good king because if they if the king was a bad king he would alienated from himself and that would make him shallow and one dimensional and that would make him a bad ruler. No union with the traditions of the past to be a good ruler. You have to rescue your father from the underworld and integrate that and of course that's a main theme in this entire movie so okay so the hero was born and that's what the rising sun represents and everybody goes. Oh isn't that cute. And the reason for that is because you're biologically wired especially if you're agreeable to respond with caretaking activity cute to cuteness and cuteness button nose big eyes small mouth round head symmetry and helpless movements. And you'll respond to that across the entire class of mammalian of mammalian creatures. Even maybe down to lizards. Isn't that cute. It's no it's a lizard but you know so so so that's an archetype as well. That's the archetype of the vulnerable hero at but the vulnerable hero newly born and that should invoke a desire on the part of males to encourage and mostly on the part of females to nurik to nurture but males and females are quite crosswired among human beings and so there is encouragement from the women. And there's also a nurturing from the men and of course those those curves in some sense overlap so there's more nurturing males and more encouraging females but that's roughly the archetype and so he looks cute and everybody goes on and that's because the animators nailed that they caught the essential features of cuteness and he's also in the light right and so then the shaman mandrell basically baptize is essentially. What he's doing and he uses something that symbolic of the sudden which is this. Ripe fruit and fruits are symbolic of the sun. Because of course they need the sun to ripen and their round like the sun and so and people know that they need light but and so anyways the animators make a relationship between the fruit that the shaman is going to break and the sun and so he's also being baptized into the sun. And that means that. He's being baptized into the light or that he's being transformed into a hero and so then everyone's happy and that's basically the divine father and the divide mother and divine son and the south. Who's taking care of that. And there's a union between the baby and the wise old man because the baby is all the potential that's realized in the south and there's an old idea that the way to full maturity is to find what you lost as a child and regain it to brilliant idea and that that echoes through missile over the world. And that means you have to regain your capacity once you're disciplined and you know how to do something you have to regain your capacity for play and sorta for wide eyed wonder. And that's maybe the child like part of your spirit and the reintegration of that child. Part with the adult grownup part revivify grownup part and allows the child to manifest itself in a disciplined way in the world. And so that's all being hinted that there and then they showed the shaman shows. The baby do board hero to the crowd. And it's very cool. What happens in the movie all the animals spontaneously. Neil and i can give you an example of that kind of spontaneous action in a crowd. Imagine you're watching a Gymnastics performance right and and like a high level world class performance and someone comes out there and they do this routine. That's just dead letter..

europe Gymnastics simba mandela Neil
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

07:46 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"A good dream will do both at once. Anyways young was an astute student of freud's we'll cover freud next. Although generally in personality courses the order is reversed. Freud i then you because of their temporal of the temporal order of their thought. But i think it's better to start with you. Because it's as if you freud excavated into the basement and then you excavated into many many floors underneath the basement of the mind and so from if you're transitioning from an archaic understanding of archaic modes of thinking towards freud. It's better to go through yield. Because i think. I think freudian theory is a subset of union. Theory fundamentally just like newtonian. Physics is a subset of einsteinian physics. And i think that freud knew that even to some degree although he was very much opposed to any sort of religious thinking are mythological religious thinking i would say he was a real nineteenth century materialist and he didn't like the fact that young's work started to delve into religious themes in a manner that actually in some sense validated those themes. And so that's actually why they split. They split when published a book called symbols of transformation. Ewing was also a deep student of nietzsche. Nietzsche wrote a book called thus bakes era. Which is kind of an old testament revelation poetry kind of book. It's a strange one. And i wouldn't recommend if you want to read nici that you start with that one but most people do but you get a seminar on thus bakes air through stroke which is about. I've got this wrong. It somewhere between seven hundred and eleven hundred pages long and it only covers the first third of the book and thus speaks through stir is actually quite a short book and so well so you can imagine how much you had to know about. Nietzsche to derive that many words out of that few words and nietzsche was a well an absolute absolute genius and young. Was actually trying to answer the question that you posed fundamentally which is why part of the reason why it's incorrect historically to consider him a freudian. He was so nietzsche. Basically stated. let's say explicitly that scientific empiricism slash rationalism had resulted in the death of the mythological tradition of the west. Roughly speaking that's nietzsche's comment on the death of god and in that comment he also said that the fact that god was dead was going to produce tremendous and social historical upheavals that would result in the deaths of millions of people that that he didn't say all that in one place spread between part of its will to power and i can't remember the source of the other one. Some of its referenced. Industrial era but nietzsche believed that in order to overcome the collapse of traditional values with the idea of god. As its cornerstone people would have to become creatures that could produce their own values as a replacement that we would have to become capable of generating autonomous values ewing. But that's easier said than done because trying to impose a set of values on yourself is very difficult because you're not very cooperative and you know that if you try to get yourself to do something that you don't want to do or that's hard you just won't do it and so it's not like you can invent your own values and then go along with that. That just doesn't work. And so what young. And the freudian did freud i i would say was to start. Look into looking into people's fantasies tournament fantasies unconscious fantasies to see if they could to and discovered that values bubbled up of their own accord into those fantasies. And you can imagine for example if you've become enamored of someone that you might start fantasizing about them and if you read off the fantasy then you can tell what you're after and what you're up to the motivational force composes. The fantasy and for was more interested. Not in a personal sense so in so far as your fantasies might reveal your personal history so for example if you have burst of negative emotion in a clinical session. They'll be a fantasy that goes along with that of ideas that that kind of manifest themselves of their own accord and they're not necessarily coherent logical there linked by emotion. That's the free association technique in freudian psychology. And they also might manifest themselves in dreams and fantasies and so freud started doing the analysis of these spontaneous. Let's call them fantasies. And you linked that more fried did this first with the apple. Epo complex but then linked up spontaneous fantasies and dreams with with myth mythology and fantasy across history. of course piaget did the same thing from a completely different standpoint. And a lot of that's embedded in this movie so we might as well just walked through it so the first question might be well. Why is the lion king right. And because it make sense to people that aligned could be a king and of course a lion is an apex predator and so which means it's at the top of the food chain roughly speaking and it's sort of golden like the sun so that's also useful in maine that makes it look majestic and of course it's very physically powerful it's and it's intimidating and so it's something that you run away from as well. Right or you're awestruck by so the fact that you know it's like snail king just doesn't make any sense right but lion king networks and and you got to think about those things because it's not self evident why would work as a king but a snail wouldn't but it fits in with your metaphorical understanding of the way. The world works much better. And so the lion king makes sense and well and when things like that that aren't rationally self evident make sense. You have to ask yourself in. What metaphorical context. Do they make sense. So you have the lion king now. The movie opens with a sunrise and the sunrises equivalent to the dawn of consciousness so that in many archaic stories. The sun was a hero. I horace if i remember correctly was a solar king but but apollo in particular but apollo greek greek myth. The idea was that at the sun was the hero the hero who illuminated the sky in the day and so here wisdom and elimination and enlightenment tangled together metaphorically and then at night what would happen would be that. Sun would fight with the dragon of darkness basically or with evil all night and then re rise again victorious in the morning and so it's a death and rebirth theme and it's very very very very common mythological theme and the reason. The sun is associated with consciousness. As far as i can tell us that. We're not nocturnal creatures. Right where awake during the day and we're very very visual half. Our brain is devoted to visual processing and to be a lightened and illuminated means to develop to move towards a higher state of consciousness. And we naturally use light symbolism to to represent that you know like the lightbulb on the top of someone's head you don't say i was in darkened when you learn something new and so again that fits into this underlying metaphorical substrate that. I think. Deeply biologically grounded but also socio lot socially grounded. So it's a new day. It's the start of a new day and a day day actually means like french. Your name means day the day trek in some sense and how to comport yourself during the day is the fundamental question. The day is the canonical unit of time. And so you have to know how to comport yourself. During the day and part of that is a journey from consciousness into unconsciousness. And that's and that return so like apollo you you you descend into unconsciousness and then reemerge of course that's not metaphorical at all. That's exactly what you do. You descend into the underworld of darkness in dreams and strange. Things happened out narrow. So and then you awake if you're fortunate or unfortunate depending on your state of mind you awake.

freud nietzsche Ewing nici apple maine
"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

03:58 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

"Think the best way to continue to walk you through. The thinkers that we're planning to cover is to do that with examples. They stick better and they're more interesting. And it's very difficult to understand you outside of a narrative context and so i'm going to walk you through the lion king today. How many of you have seen the lion king. Yes so how many of you haven't right okay. So so you obviously were raised in a box somewhere out in the middle of the field so anyways you know it's it's an amazingly popular animated movie. I think it was the most highest grossing animated movie ever made made until frozen which i actually absolutely detested. But the lion king. The lion king is actually consciously influenced by archetypes as well as unconsciously influenced by them. So it's a bit of a cheat. I would say in some sense. But it doesn't i don't for the purposes that were using it for. I think it's just fine. And so partly what you might think about. Is that its relationship to archetypal themes that made it so overwhelmingly popular. Same the case with say books and movies. Like harry potter. The entire marvel series. Marvel series is quite interesting. I know somebody who wrote for batman and for wolverine batman isn't a marvel comic but one of the things that he told me. That was quite interesting. Was that once. These characters take off and establish a life of their own. They have a back story which becomes part of the mythology collectively held by the readers. And if you you can invent an alternative universe where you can muck about with the backstory but otherwise you'd better stick with it or the readers are going to write you and tell you that you've got the story wrong and so there's a bit of a collaboration between the writers and readers. After these things take on life of their own and so and of course they tend to the comic books in particular tend to tend towards mythological themes very very rapidly and so anyways carl young was a fascinating person. I think you can read. His biography autobiography slash biography which is called memories dreams and reflections. Which in many ways. I think is an unfortunate book because it's usually the only book that people read that's that is more or less by but and it is more popularly popularly accessible which is probably a good thing but it's also it's not as rigorous says his other books and so the problem with someone like young as you kind of have to read them as much as you can in the original because interpreting him is not a very straightforward matter. He was a very visionary person by which i mean. He had an incredible visual imagination and he used. That law used it in his therapy practice. I believe that most of his therapy clients were high trait openness. I have a lot of clients who were high and trade openness. They seek me out. Because i'm high in trade openness and they watched my videos and that sort of thing and they're interested in what i'm doing and many of them are astute dreamers and prolific dreamers and many open people in my experience have archetypal dreams whereas people who are lower and openness. They either don't dream at all or they don't remember their dreams as much or they're not interested in them and they're not interested in the mythological underpinnings of them. I've taught psychology roughly speaking to many different types of people including lawyers and lawyers and physicians and they tend to be hiring trait conscientiousness than openness. And they're much more interested in the practical applications of psychology and maybe the big five theories than they are in the narrative underpinnings. And you know people say that when they went to they head union dreams and then when they went to freud dead friday and dreams and i don't really believe that's exactly true. I think it was a matter of selection bias. A priority selection bias on the part of the people who are likely to go see either of those two and so i've been struck by some clients in particular how unbelievably continually they can generate deep archetypal.

batman carl young harry potter freud
"carl jung" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

The Alchemical Mind

04:15 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

"Because this is what would happen if you encounter totality if you reach infinity, you'll become no self because in order to be ultimate song You would be no self mean once you start putting in this work you start to see these things as self-evident, but sometimes it's very hard to get to that point because as you begin losing qualities you begin chipping away at the ego the self your true self becomes larger and larger until it becomes infinite. And so your self your lowercase self the I the ego the Martin father son daughter brother sister worker employee manager human, whatever you start chipping all these things away. The thing that makes you an object the qualities that make you objects can no longer really Encompass what it is that you're becoming because as you're losing qualities, you gain more and more qualities as you go deeper and deeper inside you become ever more infinite criatura is not in the pleroma, but in itself the pleroma is both beginning and end of created beings. It pervades them as the light of the sun everywhere pervades the are dead. Although the map pervades altogether you'd have created being know share thereof. Just as a wholly transparent body becomes the other light nor dark the light which pervades it. We are home the room itself or we are part of the Eternal in the infinite, but we have no share their of and as we are in the pleroma indefinitely removed not spiritually or temporarily but essentially if she's young X which is confined within time and space. Nobody's talking about here is actually ultimately the literal meaning of life raised Jesus Christ. And this is why so many people have had so many different ideas about what the Christ is or what is it a man? Is it a spirit that came down filled the man? Is it a spirit become man? Is it the union of spirit in man? Is it the dissolution of Spirited man? What is it? This is why you have a job. Numerology 666 for Jesus and in 888 for the Christ in Weston people have had so many different problems with it is that it's so difficult and impossible while you're living in a purely materialistic way of understanding the world how you can learn to combine the mature material and the spiritual. That's what Jesus Christ means because Jesus is dead in Christ is the spirit and what he say here we've explained in other words in other metaphors through other traditions where the pleroma the fullness God the sources and all things off. Right? So it's a new it's in me. It's in my water my computer in your car and your wife or your husband and your children and Donald Trump and Biden on Earth's in space aliens in Hitler and Jesus and the Buddha. It's in all these things but fullness means all of it. And so these things are not in themselves wage. Source they are part of source they are a minut slice a small perspective of the ultimate Mind Of God, this is kind of how young came about this idea of the Shadow Self because Source exists in all these things, but when they become manifest when they come real material physical objective objects, they're not the page of source themselves. They're a shadow of that realm. This is the whole symbology of As Above So Below where the material world where Earth is a physical representation of whatever lives in the cosmos the question arises, how did criatura originate created beings come to past not criatura has created being is the very quality of the pleroma as much as non creation, which is the Eternal death in all times and places is creation in old times and places is deaf diplome. Has all distinctiveness and non distinctiveness. This is very non-dual..

Christ Jesus Donald Trump Weston Biden
"carl jung" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

The Alchemical Mind

04:04 min | 3 weeks ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Alchemical Mind

"Sometimes it can be easy to get distracted as you begin analyzing ancient texts in the symbology of the work and I always talk about this kind of thing off for today's episode. I want to dive into something. That's a little more practical even though as I read it. It may not seem that way and what we're going to be discussing today is Carl Jung the seven servants to the dead welcome to the alchemical mind. I'm sure for many of you. I don't need to describe who Carl Jung was but I'll give you a little brief synopsis and kind of tie-in how this all relates to our series of gnosticism because what I'm about to read is going to blow some of your minds because this is coming not from an ancient source that could be found in the Nom wah tea or any of the other codices that contain Gnostic scripture, but it comes from Carl Jung himself who was instrumental in the development of modern psychology. Of course psychology has broken up into many different schools. But I would say that even today Still Remains true that the main schools of psychology still related to the work of Siegfried and Carl Young and these two guys were friends. They were working together to try to come up with a science of the Mind as you would say now one of the main differences between these two guys is in their approach to psychology through figuring out the signs of the mind and what will become very clear as we dive into this text. Is that these Jews young and so while at first Freud and Jung were kind of friends, they're working together trying to come up with some semblance of Truth for how the mind worked as it began diving deeper into the work. They had a split and the split happened roughly around the time when young began working on seven service of the dead and really dead. Probably even before that it it stems mainly from his work and the red book and if you've never read the red book then a highly recommend you do it is a an amazing piece of mystical literature, but really it's much more than that because remember as we dive into mysticism the more and more we dive into it. We see that these mystical truths that were reading about through various supposed to be schools in various Traditions that were talking about. These are not just purely spiritual things of fancy, right? These aren't discussions of God and superpowers and whatever else you might think is embedded in these texts. These are truths about the reality of The Human Experience the truth about the reality of life experience. And if you take these things too, literally you start coming off with some crazy dogmatic thing and in which there is no limitation to the amount of fancy that dog Instill into it now with that said I'm not saying that there are no entities that there's no Angels or demons or goblins or unicorns a Santa Claus. What I'm saying is the opposite of saying that all these things are true all these things exists in this relates very deeply to the work that young was doing and if you're not familiar with Young's work, you should look up his work on archetypes which has been key in understanding a lot of different disciplines obviously mythology and the comparative religious studies is one of them but also in how people begin to understand life and how the mind creates the world that is around us. So even though this has become a very material realistic concrete science the the tenets of jungian psychology at least again Freud went a different direction stem from these deeply seated archetypes are embedded in your brain, and I've talked about this at length Never really mentioning young but of course as should be fairly evident by now..

Carl Jung Freud Siegfried The Human Experience
Mind, Body Connection

The Oprah Winfrey Show: The Podcast

04:52 min | 6 months ago

Mind, Body Connection

"Hi Everyone, I'm Oprah. Winfrey would you answer true or false? Two the following statement my emotions and my thoughts have a direct bearing on how physically healthy I am, and I'm sick and my mental attitude can help to make me well well. My guest say that both are true that there is a crucial link between the mind and the body. My first guest is a surgeon who works with cancer patients that other doctors have sent home to die. He tells them. To Abandon Conventional Treatments like chemotherapy, but to combine them with a whole new belief system about life, and the purpose for living his remarkable results are documented in his book. It's called. Love Medicine and miracle. Welcome Dr Bernie, Siegel to. My second guest says that there is a direct connection between our emotions and our vulnerability to disease. Specifically, he says that certain emotions increase the risk of strokes and may even trigger certain viruses to cause disease. He even says that tumors have been known to shrink if a patient thinks them smaller welcome, clinical psychologist and author of Super Immunity, Dr Paul Pierce saw walking. If you can think certain tumors smaller, why can't you think other things? Why can't you if you have colon cancer? Why can't you think that you don't have it or if you have a heart murmur? Why can't you think that you don't have it? Why do you have control over some things and not control over others point a great deal of control everything right ideas at every thought you. You have results in a shower of chemicals that alter the body. It's defense system its immune system. It's healing capacity. There's a healer within that we have control over there is disease. There are things that break in US illnesses, a natural part of living, but we all get sick. Sometimes we can find that healer within somebody what said it. You know that God cures. The doctor sends the bill. That must have been dad who said back. And you have documented many many cases of people who? Appear to have miracles in their life, but you say there's no such thing as Miracle Yeah. Needs in his book cancer ward used the term self-induced healing. Yes, the interesting thing about medicine. If you get back to bills in business medicine, the only business that has not studied suggests we do a lot to people who don't do well. Nobody stops and says why don't you get cancer? Why don't you AIDS when you meet the AIDS virus? And what I'm saying is? If you study survivors and you study success, you have something to teach. It is not an accident when you don't die when you're supposed to according to a doctor. What is it? It is a change in you and a change in your life. That's part of what we're talking about. There are things called. Neuro receptors you our body mind. You are not a body and mind if you change your disease changes because your body changes really yes. You're not your body and mind. You're not just a body, or you want some interesting. Yeah, facts, things like people with multiple personalities, yes, can have a disease in one personality, not in another can have an allergy in personality, not in another studying, and this goes all around the planet. This fascinating, yes. Yeah nobody ever told me that in medical school. Nobody ever told me in nineteen, thirty three I think it was Carl Jung interpreted the dream and made a physical diagnosis so I work with dreams with drawings. You're what's going on in your body. We can bring that awareness out. So does this mean that each of us has control over our diseases remarkably slow listen to a bunch of surprising things never taught me in school, either where the only animal in the world dies on a given day of the week more than other days. That is Mondays people, the majority of people who have a heart home let me. Let me interrupt this for one second, because that's very important statement number one is we all die someday? Get the bad news over in the beginning of the program. Death is not a failure. Okay, but the hospital everybody dies at two in the morning. We have incredible control over when we die now there's a reason i. Well my communist try dying Newnan Hospital. They won't let because reputation is based on. You're not dying and the other is families that you don't say to each other I love you, you say. You're rotten, mother, kid, you know father, so you die at two in the families asleep or left, but if you have that kind of control over turning off your live. You also have a lot of control over turning the mind. Remarkably so when you have gall bladder surgery. Room faces trees instead of a wall. You're out about a week earlier

Colon Cancer Winfrey Dr Paul Pierce Newnan Hospital United States Aids Carl Jung Dr Bernie Siegel
Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

BSP: Believer Skeptic Podcast

08:38 min | 1 year ago

Aaahh!!! Classic Monsters

"We thought we would talk. Hello Classic movie monsters or I guess. A derivative thereof You know all the films like Frankenstein Dracula creature the Black Lagoon and salon boy. Oh boy so yeah so we are. Actually we each picked one classic creature. We're going to be sharing history in details about that creature in the story about the story about them so should we. Should we drinks. Yeah okay so I'm going to actually hand the mic over to Tracy and you because I she has forty drinks that she's going to be sure they're all so I'm focusing on vampires and at total wine there was actually quite a bit to choose from uh-huh depending on how elaborate you WanNa get with the topic. There was even like walking dead wine assume that seemed like sheeting. That seemed like that would be better for his. Obviously yeah it's because it's actually from the TV exactly. So I can't have rick on the cover and be thinking of Bram Stoker works for me with that said that I brought three drinks because being hungover and being two o'clock in me not having lunch it just seems weird like crack. Open a bottle of wine right now but I do have Francis Coppola diamond red plans talk a little bit about Coppola going on. Because you can't really talk about Dracula directly without talking about Coppola and then I also because I don't like I said if I'm going to open that I also brought four. They use my teeth to pull the bag out. I have a lovely temper neo. Oh I love to drag on. And we'll talk a little bit about what dragons dragons relates reverse dragged him the vampire at least in literature but like I said that's a bit heavy so honestly what I think I'm going to start with. Breath is a nice blood. Orange Margarita and S- To serve it in as they said I just live seven houses down I brought on my own Hamilton Sippy Cup when I say Hola pouring that that's awesome chewing that All amazing choices see. That doesn't take a random rationalization cody did you notice that mixture. You have doesn't actually have to kill it in it. Oh I I forgot I also brought my own patrol. Never leave home without it. So the monster I chose today is Where wolves so what? I'm drinking today. Is a Lithuanian heritage. Beer called where wolf it's literally called Werewolf and it has a quite a high alcohol content. So that's so funny because just right before for the show Tracy and I were talking about how we like picking drinks. That aren't just the name. They require narrative. Chris here's where we'll there's nothing with that sound so bitchy all right so Chris is still looking to see what kind of beer is is it. Strong connect have a taste. Today makes one of us. Oh that is delicious is really good. That's dangerous Oh my God. I'm just GonNa Covet this break a command. It's a Belgian dark El okay. I'M GONNA try that too. Yeah so for my drink. I'm actually Old England. I'm actually doing Frankenstein. And so and that was that was what I was GONNA do. I was I went into English. Oh I hear terrible and like you know what. I just can't drink this after my night. I'm going to get something good. Mary Shelley found something actually liked Mary. Shelley well well I whenever you look at all these old stories. I what I think of it is. They all kind of intertwined sometimes in ways and they're just kind of these wild crazy stories stories. So I've found a blackberry merlot called twisted Vine Ohio. Yeah good expected to get a couple. I rolls maybe like really all right so with that I will get into history I didn't want to do anything like Hollywood movie. Poor history because that would have been very long and excessive in instead I thought I would give a weird overview on the history of monsters the word monster itself derives from the Latin word monstrum meaning to demonstrate or monarch meaning to warn There's also the Latin word monstrum which Just means abnormal or supernatural but can also mean wonder or miracle generally speaking monsters are physical whether real or imagined representation of those things society as Dean leaned unknown or unnatural and most mostly those things that we fear and cannot explain physically. Speaking a monster may have some unusual characteristics. In fact one time things such as two-headed cavs or babies born with abnormalities were considered monsters so basically anything that was outside of what society claimed as quote. Normal aw was seen as monstrous of course as we know in addition to the physical characteristics. Munster's we'll do some terrible things or act out on the way beyond the standing of society being set that any one of us in this room could be considered a monster me with my blue hair and you both being super tall me with my gay so monsters there's all of you There are a ton of tons of monsters that go back in history. There were monsters that were found in cave paintings represented by animal human hybrids which unlikely cliches in real life hence monsters or at least at the conclusion that historians drew in Greek and Roman mythology monsters were perceived as a form of displeasure from the gods examples being cyclops Gorgon. Medusa Centaurs Sirens and so on. It seems that in religion like Judaism Christianity and Islam. They avoided talking about monsters aside from stories related to Satan and the power of evil in Hinduism monsters. A lot more prevalent. you see gods depicted with extra limbs or as an animal human hybrid and in native American culture. You have creatures such as the Wendy Go. Skin walkers and even sasquatch after the renaissance period with science becoming a new a fairly new thing. It really tried to attempt to explain what exactly monsters were to no avail in the gothic period we were graced. With two of the most infamous monsters Frankenstein and Dracula as well as some of the creepiest fairy tales by the brothers Grimm in psychology. Carl Jung tried to explain monsters as any central part of development might in that they were seen as the quote otherness within ourselves. I kind of discussed with this with you. Cody Day in that how I was talking how we need to balance the light with dark so I think that's the same thing it's arguing and our gang. We all have a fascination with monsters. This podcast is an example. Cody are armchair. Chair crypto zoologists. That even if these creatures don't exist it's that innate curiosity of the possibility of their existence as society changes the faces of monsters changing. We'll continue you to do so when before we used to be freed of things like trolls and elves. Today's where we fear things such as candyman or to say that once monsters collection of our society and then all the terrible things in it as well as an escape from those terrible things monsters are ever evolving and as long as we have fears and terrible things going on in our world they will. Oh not go away in my opinion. That's escapism at its best interest inc.. I have like a believer skeptic question but I guess I wanNA save it maybe. For debunk okay. But I'm afraid that I'm going to. I'm going to forget it. I'm going to ask now for both of Y'all are there any monsters or creatures that either of you actually believe in. Yes yes. That's probably what got me. Hooked on your podcast in the first place you were immediately talking about things that I have seen with my own eyes so I can only to Chris as a believer in many of the things. He's seen. Yeah I'm sitting there at work. Listen to going. Oh my God I saw that too says yes shadow people. I can't talk about that right now. Is Definitely I've had encounters encounters with shadow people. But as far as what we're talking about today. The closest is a boyfriend who thought he was a vampire. Oh Shit are you talking about that in your story. No I wasn't going to because it's complicated and messy advocates network. Deep Ball Game L.. Dated someone who thought he was a vampire sidelining. I think he was just really sexually confused. Needed to explore some things and that arena. He had seen the horror many

Cody Day Francis Coppola Chris Mary Shelley Tracy Black Lagoon Cavs Bram Stoker Carl Jung Rick Hollywood Old England Wendy Go Munster Dean Grimm Vine Ohio
"carl jung" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

Knowledge@Wharton

03:27 min | 2 years ago

"carl jung" Discussed on Knowledge@Wharton

"Six six or if you'd like Senator. A comment on Twitter at biz radio one thirty two or my Twitter account, which is at Dan loan yellow anyway, twenty one I wanna go back for a second. If we can't because as as the mother daughter, the Briggs is were putting this this this together was there a concern? And even though she had done the momma done a lot of reading with Carl Jung. As you mentioned that they didn't have any formal training in psychology. Well, you know, I don't think there was that concern, and I'll tell you for two reasons, you know, the first was because psychology at that point with a relatively new discipline. It really had not been institutionalized for very long within higher education. And so the distance between what Katherine Briggs was doing in her home or Isabel Briggs Myers doing in her home. And what somebody like Henry Murray was doing at the Harvard psychology clinic or Donald MacKinnon was doing it. Oh, SS that distance was much much much. Smaller than it would seem today. So that's one reason why I don't think it was alarming. The second reason is I think many people have sort of wrongly taken my. Have wrongly taken. My my focus on the fact that this was a mother and daughter to mean that it should be dismissed because it was two women who had no formal training, and one of the things that I'm especially interested in both sort of, you know, auto by graphically as a as a mother is the fact that, you know, motherhood as an experience can initiate you into a different process of knowing different kind of knowledge. And I think these women were very very convinced that the work that they were doing as wives and mothers had taught them something not just about personality, but about how to manage the different kinds of personalities that jostle you for your time and your attention on any given day. And that is I mean, what is that but management work? I mean that that is form of managerial labor, and I think these women understood that, you know, intuitively, even if they didn't quite know how to articulate it you have the expectation that we will continue to see the need. Or the want to give tests like Myers, Briggs and others in our society in general. I do. Yeah. I mean, I think if it's not Myers Briggs and something else will fill its place. I think we are hungry for the kind of self knowledge that it presents. We are seduced by the fact that it presents that knowledge in a painless and easily digestible way, I think we are also incredibly compelled by the fact that enough other people enough people around us know, the language of type, so that if I tell you I many NT j you know, exactly what that means. And you might even be able to conjure up some famous people or literary characters or you know, TV stars. Who's types are also ENT J. So, you know, it is it is a way of making meaning of a world that is messy and complicated. And so I don't see that desire to have a language. That anchors us to go away. Anytime soon the book again is the person. Brokers the strange history of Myers, Briggs and the birth of of personality testing Merv AM Ray of from the university of Oxford. Joining us on the show your comments at eight four four Wharton eight four four nine four two seven eight six.

Katherine Briggs Isabel Briggs Myers Twitter Senator Carl Jung Donald MacKinnon Henry Murray university of Oxford Wharton Merv
"carl jung" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"carl jung" Discussed on WRVA

"Welcome. Back Dr said Haas with us on I did not ask you about the ancient practice of alchemy and how that relates to healing Have you looked at that love it you know l. alchemy, was originally the it's a pre, cursor of chemistry and it was the idea of changing metals into. Gold and, and achieving the philosopher's stone which is kind, of life's perfection but really the the. Area that interests me was Carl Jung's work I mean as I started to explore healing and medicine I realize the psyche was so important and so the, idea of the chemistry and it really, is a, model in my in my. Understanding and writing about it is that when we become ill there's usually a conflict of disconnect between you know are are masculine and feminine the part of this wants, to do. And the part of us wants, to be in the Volve and the alchemist the chemistry we're trying to reconnect and about young Wrote about is, that we have a conscious subconscious conflict going on and that we really want to achieve that harmony and that was the whole, idea we, did about guided imagery and looking at your dreams. And and achieving like what's what's out, of balance here and so I, love reading about in his work in the mystical marriage which is the unification of the, of all parts of us basically, yeah with mystical marriage go back it goes back to religious times. With you, know married to Christ and in the whole, idea but really from the psycho emotional. Side than what young wrote about is this reuniting as I said all all the factions are particular masculine and feminine earlier he talked about our anima and, animus are conscious of some conscious so, it's really, about that healing where we. Feel at unity and it is a, sense of peace instead of fighting and I encourage I talked to a lot of my patients about relationships and yeah we my My. New medicine book I have this whole section of my favorite pieces I wrote is on how it's, called the art and practice of peacefully not getting. Along so how do you really you know have disagreements with your significant. Other your spouse your kids or your co workers and not, come from a defensive attack mode but more from a sense of how do we really listen to each other how do we. Really respect, each other Know it's not much different than doctor patient relationship which I write about new, medicine also about you? Know respect for people's. Time and they're thinking you know finding someone that you have a synchronous belief system with that you feel comfortable working with so you know. Not everybody has that experience, in medicine, as hard because you're on your, insurance you, have.

Carl Jung Haas Volve
"carl jung" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

The Psychology Podcast

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"carl jung" Discussed on The Psychology Podcast

"Yeah this is a really interesting issue and it goes back to the origin of the idea of extroversion introversion with carl jung's theories and so for young extroversion meant people who had their energy on attention focused outward whereas introversion was people had their energy attention focus inward the prefix is extra intro out we're in an inward but so part of what the problem was is that you know youngest theory although very insightful very intellectual it was based on his own personal intuitions in his clinical experience and it turns out that what she describes his introversion is actually more like what today we think of as open right so young talk about introversion as people who are interested in a magic nation and fantasy in the world of ideas and he thought about was essentially the opposite of being outgoing and talkative and sociable and gregarious but it turns out that's not actually true so when personality psychologists today talk about introversion as the opposite of extroversion that word is sort of leftover from youngster nology but we are not talking about the same thing as the opposite of extroversion that he was and that's just because empirically it's not right so it turns out that what's the other end of the dimension from extroversion is busy the tendency to be quiet and reserved happing you know less energy lesson boozy azam but that doesn't necessarily go along with being intellectual imaginative so it turns out that that's a separate dimension that's the open it's dimension so you can have experts who are high in openness imaginative and bought full and you know even introspective and you can have introverts who are imaginative in open introspective but that's a you know it's a different trade roles but this is where things get a little controversial because not only you didn't go far enough actually the research suggests that introversion is typically negatively correlated with what young actually referred to as introversion well okay right yes this is true but the problem is that you don't wanna miss lead people because i think is often tendency when you say something that's correlated with something else than they think.

carl jung