35 Burst results for "Cardiovascular Disease"

Aspirin (MM #4053)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Aspirin (MM #4053)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Science, medicine. They've come under the microscope for the last couple of years because of COVID-19. And the one thing I've always said is doctors don't know definitive answers. They learn as they get more data. For example, for years, we've been hearing medical experts tell us that once you hit your 50s, you may want to think about taking a baby aspirin or taking one of those low dose 100 milligram aspirins once a day. It kind of staves off potential heart attacks, cardiovascular disease, and guess what? They've changed that opinion now. In new guidance, doctors are saying you probably shouldn't even start taking an aspirin in your 40s or 50s. And even for people 60 and older, it won't necessarily prevent the first heart attack or stroke. And more interesting news, there's little benefit to continuing an aspirin regimen beyond 75 years old. And while I've had to start thinking about taking those baby aspirins, looks like I don't have to now. And my dad who's been taking them for years, he doesn't need to anymore because he's long past 75.

Kevin Mason Mason Heart Attacks Cardiovascular Disease Stroke
Aspirin (MM #4053)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Aspirin (MM #4053)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Science, medicine. They've come under the microscope for the last couple of years because of COVID-19. And the one thing I've always said is doctors don't know definitive answers. They learn as they get more data. For example, for years, we've been hearing medical experts tell us that once you hit your 50s, you may want to think about taking a baby aspirin or taking one of those low dose 100 milligram aspirins once a day. It kind of staves off potential heart attacks, cardiovascular disease, and guess what? They've changed that opinion now. In new guidance, doctors are saying you probably shouldn't even start taking an aspirin in your 40s or 50s. And even for people 60 and older, it won't necessarily prevent the first heart attack or stroke. And more interesting news, there's little benefit to continuing an aspirin regimen beyond 75 years old. And while I've had to start thinking about taking those baby aspirins, looks like I don't have to now. And my dad who's been taking them for years, he doesn't need to anymore because he's long past 75.

Kevin Mason Mason Heart Attacks Cardiovascular Disease Stroke
Aspirin (MM #4053)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | Last month

Aspirin (MM #4053)

"The mason minute. With Kevin mason. Science, medicine. They've come under the microscope for the last couple of years because of COVID-19. And the one thing I've always said is doctors don't know definitive answers. They learn as they get more data. For example, for years, we've been hearing medical experts tell us that once you hit your 50s, you may want to think about taking a baby aspirin or taking one of those low dose 100 milligram aspirins once a day. It kind of staves off potential heart attacks, cardiovascular disease, and guess what? They've changed that opinion now. In new guidance, doctors are saying you probably shouldn't even start taking an aspirin in your 40s or 50s. And even for people 60 and older, it won't necessarily prevent the first heart attack or stroke. And more interesting news, there's little benefit to continuing an aspirin regimen beyond 75 years old. And while I've had to start thinking about taking those baby aspirins, looks like I don't have to now. And my dad who's been taking them for years, he doesn't need to anymore because he's long past 75.

Mason Minute Kevin Mason Baby Boomers Life Culture Society Musings Mason Heart Attacks Cardiovascular Disease Stroke
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

WABE 90.1 FM

08:00 min | Last month

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on WABE 90.1 FM

"Daniel estrin And I'm Ari Shapiro One of the most prestigious journals in medicine is about to get a new editor in chief Doctor Kirsten bibbins Domingo studies cardiovascular disease and health equity at the University of California San Francisco When she officially starts her new job this summer she will be the first person of color to leave jama the journal of the American medical association Her predecessor was asked to resign after a controversy involving questions about structural racism in medicine Doctor bibbins Domingo welcomed all things considered Thanks for having me I want to briefly review the events that led to your predecessor's departure Basically in a podcast two white doctors and editors for jama questioned whether structural racism exists in medicine As a doctor as a person of color as someone who studies health equity how did you feel watching that play out Well the issues regarding bias racism in science and medicine are no different than the way they play out in the rest of society And one of the challenges is that science and medicine we oftentimes think of as being separate from these larger forces And one of the most important things that I think we're faced with right now is for science and medicine to really understand that those of us who practice medicine those of us who conduct science are shaped by the same sets of forces that shape the larger society the issues of bias of racism of sexism And it's really important then if we're going to address these issues that do have an impact on our patients that do have an impact on how scientific knowledge is generated and communicated that we name these forces and that we work in every way possible to overcome them And of course this is all playing out during a pandemic that has had huge inequities in death and hospitalization across racial lines Exactly right those of us who study the way in which health is sometimes distributed across lines that really highlight the inequities in society We're not surprised to see these things play out But the pandemic really exposed them in a way that I think highlighted them for many And I think we're at this extraordinary time where we see these incredible scientific advances in the vaccines and the treatments But we also know that the access to these scientific technologies the access to the types of treatments And the ways in which many of our policies play out also reflect the types of inequities that we see in society And there's never been a better time I think to highlight them to think how we can in science and medicine work to improve the health of all of our communities and to do it in a trusted way because the other theme in this pandemic is the amount of mistrust people have about science and medicine And I think it's important for a really outstanding voice like jama and the jama network to play a role in helping to improve in this area Can you identify one or two steps that you're really eager to take once you start the job that you think will move jam it in the right direction Yeah I think one of the things that I'm most excited by is to think about the voices that we oftentimes don't hear in scientific publications I'm really excited to make sure that the entire process that leads to publication that we really expand the number of voices at the table I think this is about publishing the best science but also putting the best science in context for the larger challenges that we face in actually making sure that a scientific discovery actually leads to improvements in health for all communities in the U.S. As you've said this is a problem across science across medicine And so how does the work you're describing at one scientific journal fit into the larger ecosystem that you're talking about here Right I think that this is just one journal but it is a journal with a very both prominent voice and a broad reach And you see that the larger scientific enterprise which includes the funders of science the people who conduct science the communities who are involved in participate in science The ways in which science is translated into medicine all of those have their own parts that they need to play in this process but I think movement in any one of those also moves the larger enterprise in the direction we'd like to see it going And do you feel like the goals you're describing are reflected across the field or is everyone kind of working in silos right now and some are doing it better and faster than others and some are just not doing it at all To be Frank I would say that it is unfortunate and I say this as a physician myself that we go into medicine because we want to serve our patients and then it sometimes harder for us to acknowledge that the same biases that we have and that we are shaped by also influences how we care for our patients So I would say medicine and science probably has been slower to address some of these issues I think acknowledging that these forces exist should not come as a surprise to anyone but rather is the first step to trying to make sure that science and medicine is something that really is working for the betterment of improving health for all Doctor Kirsten bibbins Domingo is the incoming editor in chief of jama Thank you for speaking with us Thank you To honor poetry month we're hearing from the four finalists to become the 2022 national youth poet laureate Today we meet Elizabeth schwarz the northeast regional ambassador I go by Liz and I am 17 I'm from New York City I'm from Staten Island This poem is titled at least In my dreams I am king Midas Specter sinner saints I don't want to be another spectator I swallow sunbeams Slick lips revel in the golden glut of busting streets here they've unclenched their fists with the cobblestones clatter to the ground This is the type of city that burns its maps A firework is a fickle attempt to bottle miracles but can't we say we try can't we say the mosaics here were beautiful I wrote about my experience looking within my community and sort of finding something I was in awe of and something that I wanted to change And so and Staten Island it's not really known for it's not the most popular borough and it has this stereotype of being really monolithic and that's not something that I experienced but I also knew that gentrification was a huge issue And witnessing how my parents were treated navigating being a first generation Russian Jewish American and a lot of my culture is in this poem too So I wanted to write with hope And that's why I talk about king Midas and the touch of gold And instead of bulldozing the bodegas for the celery juice station or the karate dojo for the soul cycle swap the school desks for the stage keep the children's playground keep the Russian store keep the parrots and point you don't sanitize our roots America promises alimony but we've rescheduled a court date until our pavement becomes the Paradise we deserve I just love the feeling of being able to make someone question their beliefs or to make someone feel hopeful and just by performing a three to 5 minute poem that is such a powerful thing to do and so grounding they say we should draw a solid draw straight draw the first number that comes to mind the gap between the pothole and the picket fence in my dreams I am king made it Specter sinner saint someday what I touch.

Kirsten bibbins Domingo Daniel estrin Ari Shapiro jama the journal of the Americ bibbins Domingo jama cardiovascular disease University of California San Francisco Elizabeth schwarz Staten Island America Frank Liz New York City karate
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

05:05 min | 2 months ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"One that you mentioned was around this increase background fish intake within the population, and you made a really important point that we try and emphasize a lot here in relation to nutrition studies that there is no zero nutrient exposure in the same way that we would have with a drug. And so you start getting into trouble when you start trying to look at some of these nutrient trials in the same way you would look at biomedical trials typically. You also mentioned that because treatments have got better, this may be a problem. And again, I suppose from one side it's great for people that there are less events and less people dying, but from a research point of view that kind of tends to play havoc with your FX size and so on. And then this intervention duration is particularly interesting and most poignant because we're talking about heart disease. And when we think of that time course that you mentioned, we know that this is a cumulative exposure for a lot of these processes related to cardiovascular disease that happened over decades. And so thinking that we can intervene and see some results in a short period of time is problematic. So with that, I did want to ask about a couple of those trials specifically because I think they serve as a good example of what we've just said. Two of the big ones that get put forward on either side is one on one side we have something like the reduce it trial, where we see these really big effect sizes. We see these massive results that seem to be kind of completely changed game and this could be a really, really important finding. And then on the other side, the one that probably most people tend to look at then is something like vital where the most common at least mainstream reporting of that is that there are no findings, right? And that's people what they think of that. Although there is probably some nuance to that..

cardiovascular disease
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

05:36 min | 3 months ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"One of the risk factors for cardiovascular disease, they could use data coming from the microbiome in order to predict a person's level of triglycerides which provides another stronger proof to the possible causal association between the two features. Do you think that some of the confounding factors in the many, many studies that have been done, for example, on saturated fat and the role of saturated fat in cardiovascular disease risk or in certain biomarkers that indicate cardiovascular disease risk like high cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, for example, do you think that there's conflicting? There's conflicting data where it's not always bad, but it does seem to be bad. So is there a microbiome component like in the way your body responds to saturated fat? I think that the specific answer is I don't know, but the conceptual answer is that in every study that we look or conduct, we find that inter individual differences in.

cardiovascular disease cardiovascular disease risk
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Art Beauty

Art Beauty

05:52 min | 5 months ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Art Beauty

"Of the time in your lab work, you're just going to see something called TSH, which is thyroid stimulating hormone. That doesn't tell me what's going on with thyroid. What I need to know is are you making the different types of thyroid hormone? I know you're taking the inactive form and getting it to the active form. So what you really want to do is just ask your practitioner for a full thyroid panel. That's super important. For women, a full sex hormone panel is really important as well, especially if you're a woman in your 40s. You know, we want to we want to keep menopause at bay as much as we can. You want to be having periods, but I know it sounds like estrogen is so protective or have periods for as long as we can. And then the other thing with women is that we often neglect our heart health, but once we've gone through menopause, we're as likely as men to develop cardiovascular disease. So getting a full cholesterol panel. So not just cholesterol, but cholesterol, lipids, HDL, LDL, and your cholesterol ratio as well. So getting a little deeper into the numbers. And as I say, if your PCP won't do these for you, there's a ton of great at affordable at home testing options now as well. And yeah, and like I said again, getting all of this tests don't think that they have to take like a thousand tubes of blood they don't. It's like one tube and you can get a whole lot of information. So, okay, so that to you is like if you're gonna do one thing like a really make this one difference is like go see, go get your blood work done. Get your blood get your blood work done because here's the thing, chances are everything's gonna be fine. But the quicker that we can detect something and I'm not just not talking about detecting a disease, but just an imbalance. Right..

cardiovascular disease
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

Sigma Nutrition Radio

01:51 min | 5 months ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Sigma Nutrition Radio

"Ago, it was recognized that diet plays an important component of this. Because inorganic nitrate, which is found naturally primarily in green leafy vegetables, it was popularized more than a decade ago in beats. In nitrate can then be converted to nitrite and nitric oxide to compensate for the loss of the enzymatic production of nitric oxide. So they both kind of balance the weight of nitric oxide production. If you don't eat a good diet and you're young and healthy, you're endothelial production can compensate for a poor diet. If you have endothelial dysfunction and you eat a good diet, then you can overcome some of those effects of loss of endothelial nitric oxide production. If you have endothelial dysfunction in your dietary pathway is an intact, then you become completely devoid of nitric oxide, and that's when things start to go bad. You start to develop symptoms. You start to get sick. And it's a slippery slope then to development of cardiovascular disease, which is the number one killer of men and women worldwide. Along with another a number of other symptoms in indices. So with those disease states where we see this loss of nitric oxide production, maybe one question and that people would have is how clear are we on the causality or the direction here that's going on? Is it that we see this loss of nitric oxide production and that then caused leads to these things? Or are we seeing something else cause this drop of nitroglycerin production when someone has a certain disease state? How do we parse amongst all of that? Well, it's a vicious cycle. It's a feed forward cycle. And the best example is, you know, when we do animal studies in basic science, there's no technology that you can knock out the enzyme that makes nitric oxide. And so when you do this in mice, if you knock out the.

cardiovascular disease
8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:09 min | 7 months ago

8 Things That Children Are More Likely to Die From Than COVID-19

"8 things that children are more likely to die from than COVID. Cancer significantly. Almost 20 times more likely vehicle accident suicide homicide. Cardiovascular disease drowning flu and pneumonia. We live in a world with numerous threats. It's part of existence. And there's also a false promise in safetyism, too. There's a false promise and you see this in the people that are vaccinated, which has always been one of my complaints about the way that they've been pushing the vaccine is it gives people a false sense of security. And no one wants to talk about this. The false sense of security of someone who gets vaccinated, and then they believe they can resume regular life, and then all of a sudden they have a breakthrough case, and they don't know what to do. They thought they had the protection. They thought they had the same sort of protection that they would get from the measles mumps rubella or polio vaccine. And all of a sudden they get a breakthrough case and they get caught by surprise. Maybe they would have made different social decisions. Maybe they wouldn't have gone to big gatherings. Maybe they would have handled things differently. Maybe they would have prepared themselves with azithromycin Ivermectin hydroxyl chloroquine, monoclonal antibody treatment centers or aspirin. Instead, there is a false sense of security that comes in with the overemphasis of we as the government we as the CDC we as NA 8 NIH we as the medical industrial elite, we're going to protect you. And what it does is it erodes what it does is it diminishes its suppresses humans own responsibility to take ownership of their actions. It's a false sense of security. When in reality, our leader should have said, look, if you want to get this vaccine fine, we're going to be very honest about what it can do what it can't do. But also, if you get it, you better be ready to treat it. We're now 70% of all deaths in the United Kingdom are vaccinated people. Why? They had a false sense of

Measles Mumps Rubella Cardiovascular Disease Pneumonia FLU Cancer Polio NIH CDC United Kingdom
Why Do We Need to Be Vaccinating Children?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | 7 months ago

Why Do We Need to Be Vaccinating Children?

"Why do we need to be vaccinating children? Our children at a considerable risk of dying from the Fauci virus. Our children at a considerable risk, absent other daily activities, from dying from the virus. The CDC's own data, which has been published, shows that children one to four year olds per 100,000 deaths the most common death is drowning. At 2.8 per 100,000. Then vehicle accidents at 2.3 per 100,000. Homicide, 2.2 per 100,000. Cancer, two per 100,000. Cardiovascular disease, one death per 100,000. Flu and pneumonia, .8 deaths per 100,000. And that's annual deaths among children per 100,000. I'm not exactly sure how they tabulate this, but the numbers themselves of what actually that the most at risk for is very, very helpful. A child is four times more likely ages one to four to die from the Fauci virus to die from flu pneumonia than from the Fauci virus. Four times more likely. And that's the CDC's own data. .2 for COVID. How about children 5 to 14 years old? Is there a massive risk of children 5 to 14 years old? Such a massive risk that we now need to forcibly inoculate children using either Pfizer Johnson & Johnson Moderna vaccine. With side effects that are growing and questions that are increasing. What's the number one cause of death for children ages 5 to 14? Answer cancer. The next cause of death? Vehicle accidents. So if a school is going to be consistent, if the school is going to start mandating vaccines, if the state of California is going to be consistent and start mandating vaccines, they need to say young children ages 5 to 14 are not allowed to ride in cars anymore. If it's all about safety, it's the fair thing

CDC Flu Pneumonia Cardiovascular Disease Pneumonia Pfizer Johnson & Johnson Moder Cancer FLU California
Masks on Kids: Science or Abuse?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:56 min | 8 months ago

Masks on Kids: Science or Abuse?

"Have to ask ourselves. The question is the chinese corona virus. The chief virus a serious threat to children. That's the first question. And so dr maccari wrote a story wrote a piece. I should say for the wall street journal where he studied. Tens of thousands of over forty thousand children with the virus was not able to find one child that died from the virus that did not have underlying health conditions and didn't have Some sort of immuno-compromised condition. And so you look even more broadly than that. This is from the new york times. I just wanna read this. Which has annual deaths among children in the united states. now this is per one hundred thousand people so children five fourteen years old. Have a two point one per one hundred thousand chance of dying from cancer. A one point nine per one hundred thousand chance of dying from vehicle accidents one point five per one hundred thousand die from suicide. We'll get back to that in the second point. Seven from homicide point six from cardiovascular disease point five from drowning point three from flu and point to from cova no that's not percentage that's per one hundred thousand so the question is if children are at greater risk of writing a clark school than while the sudden we now mandate the mass for children's. I think we're talking about two different things. And i think we'll have a fun time. Going back and forth at the unscripted part of this is do. Schools have the ability in the authority. And is it a good idea. I'm gonna start with whether it's a good idea that we can get into the other one. It's an awful idea. it's bad for interaction. it's bad for childhood development. We already see the increase in mental health issues that i will go through some numbers associated with that but everyone is kind of experienced that in their own way and saying to a child who is not at considerable risk of dying from a certain virus. That you must change the way you interact. I think it's child

Dr Maccari The Wall Street Journal The New York Times Cova Cardiovascular Disease United States Cancer FLU
The Role of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Chronic Diseases

Physical Activity Researcher

02:35 min | 9 months ago

The Role of Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Chronic Diseases

"Have done research white widely on different teams on sedentary behavior. What what is the thing at the moment that you get most excited about while i get some way. We've been researching copied for more than ten years now and I think what Really defined our research program is that we attempt to align epidemiological research with experimental research. And now as we move into real life interventions and to try and link all that evidence onto give out in what we call in ten triangulation of the the data and i guess what excites me. The most is that over that Appeared of time. We had started to gather evidence to really support the Up approach in the management and prevention of taught to beattie's of reducing sitting on and moving more frequently throughout the day we are highlighting. How shot change could lead to improvements in glucose management and also reduction in Some of the mighty complications of top wti light co. cardiovascular disease. Yeah yeah and you mentioned that you are trying to align the epidemiological and experimental research. Is there some mismatch that you wondering. Where does it come from No i guess on what we have let from a most recent iteration of the us Physical activity guidelines which was a really comprehensive Review of the evidence Specifically was a subcommittee form to look at the influence of and terry behavior on chronic diseases. And i think what what's important is that Within that review that identified that there is now strong evidence linking high amounts of seeking to an increased risk of talk to dr babies incidents and i. Now it's our job to stop to understand. Well why is this link between fifteen time and taught to diabetes and that has laid off seem to i a number laboratory based interventions here at the baker. And now i'm in an exciting development. We're now pushing this out to a long term intervention in the office workplace for people with diabetes

Beattie Cardiovascular Disease Chronic Diseases Terry United States Diabetes
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

05:01 min | 10 months ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on DNA Today

"Get actionable genetic insights today to benefit your family of tomorrow. So april four okay. We've known about this protein since the nineteen sixties as well and then in the nineteen seventies. We found out that there was a mutation in it and it was mostly related to cardiovascular disease back then and so it wasn't until in the early nineties. They discovered people with e four mutation or snip..

cardiovascular disease
How Deadly Heat Waves Are Affecting Our Cities

Nature Podcast

02:01 min | 11 months ago

How Deadly Heat Waves Are Affecting Our Cities

"Is absolutely an underappreciated. Whether related natural disaster it's really easy to understand flooding when like a big hurricane comes in. It's really easy to understand. Wildfires threatening your house they to get out of the way but heat is. It's a killer. It's it's steady and people don't really recognize that. This often lack of information on heat related deaths a lot of times a medical examiner on a death certificate will just say this person died of exhaustion. This person died of hypertension. This person died of cardiovascular disease but the death certificate notice that that person was an apartment with no air conditioning and it was one hundred and five degrees for five days in a row. If you're older if you're younger if you have pre existing conditions like heart conditions or asthma you are much more likely to be affected by heat. People don't think about he as being a keller but it is. An event of this magnitude really sends shockwaves through society. This is action this our infrastructure system. Our ecosystems and society at large are not well equipped to be able to handle this level of intensity feedback is a professor of climate adaptation at portland state. University and part of his research has involved monitoring heat in different places in cities such as portland oregon and looking at how heatwave effects people and which people are most affected. We've been talking several folks who live in multifamily residential apartments these are low income social housing and the windows aren't applicable or they just opened a few centimetres. The sun solar radiation is hitting those apartment buildings it's being pushed in often through the materials at the apartment. Buildings were built with and then temperatures in there. We were noticing from some informal stations. We have set up. It was getting up to fifty seven sixty degrees in doors. In some of these apartment complexes in that's very very dangerous for human health

Cardiovascular Disease Hypertension Portland Asthma Oregon
Using a Digital Cognitive Behavior Therapy to Treat Diabetes

The Bio Report

01:43 min | 1 year ago

Using a Digital Cognitive Behavior Therapy to Treat Diabetes

"David thanks for joining us. I'm happy to be here. Thanks for having me dating. We're gonna talk about better therapeutics. Its efforts to improve outcomes for patients with cardio metabolic conditions through what you call your nutritional cognitive behavior therapy and your prescription digital health products. Let's start with the diseases. you're targeting. how big healthcare problem do they represented a over half of. Us adults have one or more major cardio metabolic disease including diabetes hypertension in hybrid. Dania maids a yard. It's a we use the word epidemic for a lot of things. But i think it applies. Here it's a it's a massive problem to what extent are cardiovascular diseases and diabetes and related conditions driven by behaviors opposed to biology and perhaps more to the point. To what extent. Can these be treated by behavioral therapy rather than pharmacologic interventions so You know a fascinating a fascinating topic. So if you if you think about our evolutionary history i you know we didn't we didn't really have ancestors with cardio metabolic disease yup in in order to in order to survive and thrive and reproduce You know people were lean and fit. And and those are things that seem tend to reduce or eliminate cardio metabolic disease

Cardio Metabolic Disease Diabetes Hypertension Dania David Cardiovascular Diseases Diabetes United States
Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

Nutrition Facts with Dr. Greger

02:00 min | 1 year ago

Why Is Obesity Such a Serious Condition?

"Today. We look at a condition that comes with a multitude of serious health issues. Obesity and we start with the best ways to figure out our optimal weight based on our height. We seem to become inured to the mortal threat of obesity. Go back medical issue. A half century or so when obesity wasn't just run of the mill. The descriptions are much more grim. Obesity is always tragic and its hazards are terrify but it's not just obesity of four million deaths every year tribute excess by nearly forty percent of the victim are just overweight or obese. According to two famous. Harvard studies weight gain of as little as eleven pounds from early adulthood through middle age increases risk of major chronic diseases such as diabetes cardiovascular disease and cancer the flip side though is that even modest weight loss can major health benefits. What's the optimal bmi The largest is in the united states and around the world found that having a normal body mass index a bmi from twenty to twenty five associate with the longest lifespan. Put all the best available stays with the longest follow up together and that can be narrowed down even further to a bmi of twenty two twenty two. that'd be about between one hundred and twenty four hundred thirty six pounds for someone who stands five foot six but even with a normal bmi the risk of developing chronic diseases such as type two diabetes heart disease and several types of cancer starts to rise towards the upper end even starting as low as a bmi one a bmi five eighteen point five and twenty four point five or both considered within the normal range but a bmi five maybe shared with twice the heart disease risk compared eighteen point for just as there are gradations risk within a normal bmi range their spectrum with an

Obesity Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Harvard Cancer Diabetes Heart Disease United States Heart Disease
The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:18 min | 1 year ago

The Functional Medicine Approach To Oral Health with Dr. Todd LePine

"People who go to medical school. We don't really learn much about the mouth gum disease or you can have sores in your mouth and we a few things here and there. But it's just amazing. How much of a vacuum and our education or health is but in the turns out it's been linked to everything from alzheimer's to heart disease to cancer and to autoimmune diseases and on and on and on and the question is you know what is going on with abs the connection between our oral health and overall so take us down that pathway. Then we'll talk about you know. Basically how to address dental health a functional medicine perspective. Yeah so mark Just a just a little bit of background. Probably have mentioned this before. But i come from family of dentists so my grandfather was a dentist. He went to the university of maryland in the late eighteen. Hundreds my father went to university of maryland. Nineteen four days. My brother went to u. penn dental school and then his two sons are dentists and my two sisters are dental hygiene. So this is a topic. That's near and dear to me. And i'm sure the black sheep of the family and we know that in functional medicine the gut is sort of where everything starts and it can either lead you down the path of health or can lead you down the path of disease and the beginning of the gut the mouth so as you mentioned you know in in medical school. We didn't learn anything about them out. That was like for the dentist. We'll just ignore that and the dentist just basically stay them out and they don't really realize that there's a whole body connected mild or some of the dentist don't and this is where i think. A lot of even functional medicine physicians and dentists really miss a connection. So unless you're working with a a holistic Smart dentist or a functional medicine doctor. Who's aware of the connection between on the mouth in the gut ends systemic the yoon system You're going to be missing a lot of things and and as you mentioned before You know there are a host of conditions including premature birth obesity diabetes cardiovascular disease rheumatoid arthritis inflammatory bowel disease and even dementia that are directly connected to poor or health.

Alzheimer's Mark Just University Of Maryland Penn Dental School Autoimmune Diseases Heart Disease Cancer Diabetes Cardiovascular Diseas Obesity Dementia
Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

Cardionerds

03:07 min | 1 year ago

Managing Atrial Fibrillation With Lifestyle Changes Dr. Christine Albert

"Thought we could start by discussing some of your major contributions to the management of atrial fibrillation even since my medical school days. It seems like the emphasis. On lifestyle management for diseases such as atrial fibrillation has increased exponentially as we learn more about arrhythmia mechanisms and now we specifically screen patients for sleep apnea diet alcohol use et cetera. So from all of the landmark clinical research that you've conducted over your career. That's far could you. Maybe summarize for us. What you feel are the biggest takeaways whether in eighth hundred prevention or in any of your other areas that sudden cardiac death. Thank you when i started doing. Research on the epidemiology of heart rhythm disorders really wasn't an emphasis as you say on. Risk factors for h. fibrillation or sudden cardiac death. And then you know a group of us not just myself but amelia benjamin in the premium study and patrick eleanor. We all started to get interested in looking at atrial fibrillation as you would cardiovascular disease and some of the major findings are really related to lifestyle and how it can impact each relation including body mass index. And wait and wait reduction. We've done several studies. One who first authors tetreault who's also electro physiologist at brigham women's hospital and she published a very important study in jack. Where we showed in bunks women. Even being slightly overweight had elevated to risk of fibrillation. And then if you lost weight you lower that risk. And in addition some of the other research we did was around. Exercise and showing that exercise is beneficial to atrial fibrillation. But as we all know too much. Exercise can actually have an adverse effect and this again was a study that was done by tony acer who was also an electro physiologist and his now at nyu worked with me for a while. So both of those manuscripts were very important. With regards management of atrial fibrillation. In addition we also published one of the first studies looking at alcohol intake and h fibrillation. Now there have been multiple multiple studies showing that alcohol is related to atrial fibrillation. And as you know a randomized trial now that shows that if you abstained from alcohol you lower your risk of atrial fibrillation so all of these studies are not just by myself but multiple. Investigators have really changed the practice where we as clinicians think about lowering. Risk factors as electra physiologists event and approach sanders. Work in australia really took it to another level by actually doing clinical trial in showing that reduction of weight and modifying risk factors lowers incidence of atrial fibrillation. So now it's really one of our pillars of treatment and it is rewarding to see something go from observational research to clinical trials in actually to

Atrial Fibrillation Cardiac Death Amelia Benjamin Patrick Eleanor Tetreault Brigham Women's Hospital Apnea Tony Acer Cardiovascular Disease NYU Sanders Australia
The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

02:58 min | 1 year ago

The Problem of Gestational Diabetes With Dr. Elizabeth Boham

"We're gonna be talking about conditions pretty common This one hundred percent preventable. A hundred percent reversible that is managed often in very weird ways by traditional medicine and something that's called just station diabetes which is essentially diabetes of pregnancy. So liz tell us how common is this problem. And why should we even care. Be worried about it. Yeah well thanks mark. thanks for having me. It's great to be on with you again and It's really common actually say up to ten percent of women have diabetes which means their blood. Sugar is too high during pregnancy and as a result. What happens when their blood sugar too high during pregnancy is the babies grow too big right so they will get. They will get over weight when they're born so they can grow big. Those offspring often have increased risk of insulin resistance and diabetes and waking when they're adults so when women have just diabetes during their pregnancy. It makes it harder for that baby to maintain healthy weight. When they're an adult so it's trans-generational absolutely not only. Is it dangerous for the baby. During that pregnancy they have a higher rate of of problems with birth. They've increased rate of c-section but their metabolism is damaged. So they have a harder. Time with maintaining normal weight as an adult. They have an increased risk of obesity. They have an increased risk of insulin. Resistance and For that mother to if they had just stations diabetes they have a much higher rates of diabetes post pregnancy. Both type one and type two which is interesting. So they also have a higher rate of cardiovascular disease. they say that a third will develop metabolic syndrome when the within the next five years. So you know it's it is definitely a risk so if if you were told during your pregnancy that you had just diabetes or you you're at risk for just station diabetes. It's important that you are paying attention to your blood sugar to your insulin level to that waist to hip ratio postpartum. Because because you don't want you wanna be be picking this up early. 'cause it's really much easier to reverse if you pick it up early. Imposed ten percent of women who have pregnancies have this problem which is a lot At but when you think about the fact that one and two americans has prediabetes or type two diabetes. You know that's pretty significant. And the question i am is if ten percent have actual just diabetes which means your blood sugar is over a hundred forty after a glucose tolerance test one hundred. Twenty six fasting. How many have prediabetes. Who are pregnant. Yeah because it might be the same ratio as with regular dhabi might be like ten percent and another forty percent of the population might have prediabetes pregnant and that also comes with risks.

Diabetes LIZ Insulin Resistance Obesity Cardiovascular Disease Dhabi
Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Eating this ratio of fruit and veggies could help you live longer, study suggests

"Your mom probably told you to eat your fruits and veggies to stay healthy. Now there's new evidence showing she was right. The American Heart Association study took about 30 years and 29 countries that it shows those who ate more fruits and veggies reduce the risk of dying related to cancer, cardiovascular disease, potentially respiratory disease. Harvard Medical school doctor and Thorndike says Not all veggies are created equal. For example, starches you want to get these other types of more healthful fruits and vegetables, and then you can also eat the potatoes or corn or Pete. If you choose, study says to daily servings of fruit. Three of veggies could help you live

American Heart Association Respiratory Disease Thorndike Cardiovascular Disease Harvard Medical School Cancer Pete
What’s considered ‘high’ blood pressure may be different for women and men, new research reveals

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

What’s considered ‘high’ blood pressure may be different for women and men, new research reveals

"High blood pressure? Well, there's new research out that suggests the answer to that depends on your gender. A lot of what we do in medicine is based on large studies that may not have traditionally included. Women Cardiologists Rachel Burger with Virginia Heart and women, as opposed to men may have different goals. Blood pressure, for example, lower than 1 20 over a V is considered normal, but new Findings based on 30. Years of data evaluated by the Smith Heart Institute at Cedars Sinai finds women who have blood pressures of even 110 over 80 may be at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Later on, consult with your Doctor Christi King. W T o P News.

Rachel Burger Smith Heart Institute Cedars Sinai Virginia Cardiovascular Disease Christi King
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation

05:19 min | 1 year ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

"Sabella do a presentation about from dyson canadian. Paul university is he threw data. See a woman. Educated was host. Komo drew komo cc. Rama lepre mir coaster decide that is indicative vein exiting few commerce appalachia own cooperative book clues community curly mobilised focus to only as the style calling me stare esi malcolm pri tina polity rush extraordinaire because it s asamoah corner kumasi mattiello's genetic molecule airily lee nouvelle technique dollar demand in not the point. Vcr speaking in the next on the two point view room annoyed that initiative. Because they're look without convy. Staley sante mcgill a professor. The meeting at investing mcgill on stinky. Leon viejo point sink million can agenda A cardiac suda from soi increase kelsey zalesak who the porter's of took honorees bypass organiz. You plessey eighty pablo aimar not academy over the past year away develope in melody county. Ac marriage shucked Lee problem genetic men or medical rescue of to last thursday holes in john. Lee jane key performance. Jack precursors an exempt from prison. Casey liebeck familial kiet apricot comic mill. Kennedy repair rest memories. Mind ninety feet Says you melody. A fast domestic. She's got presenters. Your inaugural lee called god. Dan lewis you masive. The formed the practical quantum leap party in a ilya. Productivity typically property in shekar oles with the santi in analogy in is likud debate. Callisto halimi glove. Kerr lhamo debunk list. All the adiel cholesterol a notre keeper. Ryozo on you will only cover book. Khuda key country Assays animated quasi in liberally. Dema a miracle dilemma. Deep pupa metal. The the new visit new therapeutic message. Retrial me combustion. On demand leap. Kyo left them community. Callisto familial premier actually scaled ceac at saint in them in several minardi. Pass janda da vinci. Mdc needed adequate tread. Mommy's come out to deduct blame shift paseo new permit that he wore da. Take your dvd. Efficacy a downer to across asia. She'll do a operator in the total. Evita de nederlandse your navigate. The nikon of sierra leone compete competent monopolies dealers while the roosevelt missile trig. Who can edgy keys. Appel f ashu. If it beca familial canada in the vomit areso solar web keanu pyramid. The kept you're really paseo. The methodologies aided of to the boeing deputize unique project fi chrissy new law. Dp stars are cascade the pal or degree doozy me towards him degree dollar beauty new missile torpedo freer denouvelle modality the threat ma key so mid-nineties pointy bucuvalas doctors. Andy don't over eight pm on never less political modest the demerge exempt. The russia calls negative. The moya russia's nick i will do nouvelle protean corner penola s Enough to deza the pizza dick. We're parent dr. Nabil say either may not preserve migita kiwis at any basit put in avid. there is absolutely my extraordinaire newswoman. A company a beautiful magic cure. Meet komo key demand uku limitless your whole new laissez. Your nouveau december. She knew passer. Aba along with gandhi to clinic down. Sound the rush lassitude saint johnny duvet cover of war fears jane. He dots few processing metabol- leak. Create the molecule keeper. Shanji sesame metabolic. It will be the novelty. Happy being souvanah. Lunde bar yeah. Alexei or new massacre li li paseo nurse.

Sabella Lee Jack Andy Dan lewis Nabil Kennedy asia appalachia johnny duvet janda da vinci Paul university Casey liebeck two point eight pm kumasi mattiello mid-nineties december dr. jane
Going red for women and heart health, raising awareness

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

Going red for women and heart health, raising awareness

"Today is national Wear Red Day It's aimed at raising awareness of women's heart health. Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer of women in the U. S. And effects about 44 million people. CBS views. Senior medical correspondent Dr Terror in the ruler who's a cardiologists and a spokesperson for the American Heart Association, appeared on CBS this morning with more on women's heart health. If a woman arrives at the hospital, she's going to wait longer than a man to be seen for chest pain Less often, she's going to get aspirin or guideline directed medical therapy or diagnostic testing. This is a big problem. I have a lot of patients telling me my doctor told me I'm just anxious. I'm just stressed out when in fact they have a real problem. Alarming new survey by the Cleveland Clinic found coronavirus confront Could coronavirus concerns Rather are preventing some heart disease patients from going to the doctor?

Dr Terror CBS Heart Disease U. American Heart Association Cleveland Clinic
Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

The Bio Report

06:18 min | 1 year ago

Tapping Psychedelics for their Anti-Inflammatory Powers

"Joining us daniel pleasure. We're going to talk about the therapeutic. Potential of psychedelics loose and it's pipelines experimental therapies that extend well beyond mental health indications. There's a growing interest in psychedelics. as medicines what's led to the transformation of this area from one of illicit substances to wonder drugs. Well i think that science has led the way And really it's been clinical research conducted at the top universities around the world Principally johns hopkins to start and now all over imperial college yale university new york university etc Very much led by the science. I i think that When you the question of wonder drugs though is interesting because i think that Silla sabin like ketamine are drugs that have a tremendous amount of promise for the treatment of depression within psychiatry and these drugs have therapeutic potential and other drugs beyond psychiatry but The classification wonder always brings the kind of and probably justifiable skepticism of Is the hype real. And what's really kind of the fundamental Potential and also what are the stumbling blocks for these therapies. And so all of those things are really the focus of the company in in in looking to develop These therapies both within and beyond psychiatry. How restrictive an area is this to work in today. And historically how hampered his research been it has never been more easy to do research in this area You know over the last forty fifty years. Things have dramatically changed. I think that What's what's really notable is the amount of knowledge that the regulators have in this space. The fda ema are very well informed about both the therapeutic potential of these drugs as well as the the risks associated with their development and use. And so i think you have a very informed regulatory audience and you also have increasingly Investors and other sources of capital that are willing to explore and develop these therapies. So i don't see really the limitation being that of a regulatory or legal wine and it's much more about The you know the the aspects of clinical development and really how do you take something with potential and translate that into a solution to address. Unmet needs there's long been interest in the potential of these substances to treat depression and addiction. But you're looking at a broader range of diseases. Among other things you're looking at these substances potential anti inflammatories. What's understood about the potential use of these drugs as anti inflammatories. I think that you know. Our company is is really notable for the fact that we have the the world's leading scientists and clinical developers focused on the full range of potential. Both within and beyond psychiatry. Interestingly when people think about serotonin they think about it in the context of depression they think about it in the context of psychiatry but actually serotonin is a modulator of basic function throughout the body And in fact there's more serotonin in our in our gut than in our brain and in particular the primary target of psychedelics. The new the The primary receptor which mediates the psychedelic effects of serotonin. Two a receptor is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body. It's on all immune cells. It's on all major organ systems and so fundamentally We have been away dazzled and and a bit distracted by the profound psychiatric potential of these drugs and certainly their perceptual effects. But in reality there is a much broader potential because these appear to modulate Stress response in a variety of ways. You know you if you think of it in the context of psychiatry than depression or anxiety or substance abuse are all in a way related to the kind of inappropriate or maladaptive response to stress in the rest of the body. You know whether it's Due to aging whether it's due to an inappropriate immune response we see. Similar type of modulating where the serotonin receptor seems to be implicated in a variety of chronic. Inflammatory diseases the initial discovery of the potent anti inflammatory effects of some psychedelic. Compounds was was. I made by our scientific founder. Professor charles nichols at lsu. The that research That kind of kicked off a long Research campaign in the development of anti of the anti inflammatory potential psychedelics has less through A number of very interesting discovery specifically that some psychedelics are potently anti inflammatory in models of allergic asthma in cardiovascular disease and in a variety of different models of of inflammatory disease associated with ophthalmology related to diabetic. Retinopathy macular degeneration in addition to which there is potential in neuro degeneration and a variety of other conditions and so fundamentally the potential is massive and the key. Question is and really. I think we've addressed this and we're we're very excited to kind of take the next is. How do you bias the psychedelic from its perceptual effects. And make it purely a anti-inflammatory or immunomodulators medicine and that's something that we are

Daniel Pleasure World Principally Johns Hopkin Imperial College Yale Universi Silla Sabin Depression FDA Professor Charles Nichols Allergic Asthma Anxiety Retinopathy Macular Degenerati LSU Inflammatory Disease Cardiovascular Disease Diabetic
Reviewing Dapagliflozin For Chronic Kidney Disease With Dr. Jennifer N. Clements

iForumRx.org

03:18 min | 1 year ago

Reviewing Dapagliflozin For Chronic Kidney Disease With Dr. Jennifer N. Clements

"In the commentary wrote for i former ex. You reviewed the study entitled deputy flows in patients with chronic kidney disease which was published in the new england journal of medicine in late september. Two thousand and twenty. And while i think everyone in our audiences should read the paper for themselves. We provide a link to the paper on her. I former x website. But can you give us a brief synopsis of the study methods and results. The data stay k. D. trial was an international double blind placebo. Controlled trial conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of day Ten milligrams orly once-daily among participants with chronic kidney disease with or without type two diabetes to elaborate on chronic kidney disease participants had macro albumen urea and stage two through four kidney disease following one. To one random association each group received stable doses of either an ace inhibitor or arb for at least four weeks. The primary outcome was composite endpoint of a time to event analysis and included declined of gfr fifty percent in stage kidney disease and reno or cardiovascular death. There was a secondary composite outcome. In this included the primary outcome with cardiovascular death or hospitalization for heart failure when looking at baseline characteristics both groups were similar in terms of age females race. Gfr as far as cardiovascular disease and standard of care the gfr main was about forty three and a majority of these participants could be classified as stage three. B in addition thirty seven percent of these participants had cardiovascular disease and ninety eight percent. Did receive the ace inhibitor. Or a are now after three years dabba cliff flows and reduce the primary composite outcome by thirty nine percent with a benefit. Sharon individual outcomes of decline jeff for fifty percent in stage kidney disease and long-term dialysis as saying other trials with dabba gla flows in. There was a reduction of nine percent in the composite of cardiovascular endpoint of cardiovascular death or hospitalization for heart failure now discontinuation was low and similar between both groups. But it's important to look at some safety outcomes volume. Depletion was statistically higher with dabba in than placebo even though there was no statistically significant finding placebo group did have a higher percentage of participants experiencing a reno related adverse event than compared to flows in and lastly there was no cases of you. Glycemic kato acidosis among those. That received

Chronic Kidney Disease Cardiovascular Death Kidney Disease New England Journal Of Medicin Cardiovascular Disease Heart Failure Diabetes Reno Sharon Jeff
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, obesity, hypertension is probably leading risk factor in that regard on alert. Yeah, there are a number of them, but you know, one of the other lessons of it is that it's really not about stimulating the immune system. We're seeing that people were wondering why people who Had very strong, very hearty immune systems were having oftentimes of really bad reaction to the virus and things because the immune system is really about balance is about immune modulation is about being able turn on and off and react appropriately rather than overreact. You know, That's how we I'm sure everybody's heard Maura about side of kind storms in the last six months, but they probably have in the last decades of their life and things and that's that overreaction of the immune system, and that's what I think sets apart the immune health basics product. From many of the others, If not most of the other immune products out there is that it's an immune modulator is activating the immune system. So you know if we think of our immune cells as as troops What it's doing is putting the troops on alert. It's reading them getting them prepared, so if something happens, they can respond immediately. It's not stimulating them. It's not like you know, making him charge down. You know, down the field or anything or launch attacks and things like that which gets into that overreaction is all about activating the immune system. The other thing That's really interesting about it, sticking with the analogy of being troops, you know our immune cells being troops is that it actually activate the immune cells called neutrophils and neutrophils are the the ground troops, so to speak of our immune system is what we have more of than any other type of immune cells. It could be anywhere from like 40 to 80% of our immune cells or neutrophils. Jenny, these immune cells have a fairly limited the activity range. They're very primitive, so called immune cells, so to speak. And that they deal with, you know, fungal infections and things of that sort. What? Taking the immune health basics product with activates these neutrophils but also activates him against a greater range of things. So they're now they're gonna get involved in Bali in all sorts of other immune disorders, not just the limited range. Of immunity. So many different things that you know that it brings to the table. It's been shown DA increase the numbers of these active immune cells and increases mobilization. So troops get to the site that you know the battle site more quickly more easily. It increases the process called Fabulous I toeses which is ah, basically, the your immune cells appetite, you know, so they give yourselves actually eat more invaders or, in this case, more virus cells or whatever they may be. It could improve. The removal of the virus is their passages from the body, which is really important cause even dead viruses. They're dead cells infected with virus ran through her body can be problematic. They reduce inflammation, so there are a number of benefits that brings to the table. It's really all about making your are immune system operate in a more balanced man or being prepared for when things do. Come along. You know when you're Besides someone who sneezes or whatever it may be, or you don't get enough sleep in your music room gets a little suppressed. You know, it's just in the sense of prepping your immune system in a healthy manner so that we don't have to worry about That overreaction, which again I think is one of the lessons. That code has taught us that the immune system is really about and, most importantly, about balance about, you know the proper reaction. The proper response. Right right now. Dr Canter. We need to balance our content with the commercials and, uh, advertorial, if you will s O. We need to take a brief commercial break, but we'll be back with more information for your good health. You're on Dr Health with my guest, Dr. Mark Taylor. If you're just joining us, we're talking about community and how to enhance yours Not necessarily overstimulated, but enhance it to its to the greatest degree possible. And we'll tell you how to, um, are the doses that Dr Kayla is talking about? Well, I wanna ask him about that on this particular supplements, which is available over the counter without a prescription. So we'll be back with more information on immune health here on Dr L don't go anywhere if you want to stay healthy. After this, As Dr Health Radio continues,.

Cardiovascular disease Dr Kayla Maura Dr Canter Dr. Mark Taylor Bali Jenny
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Cardiovascular disease? And is it does it have to do a genetics? Is it more with what you do in the environment? Is it a combination of both? But how does the disease actually progress which could become life threatening? It's a very complex question to answer scientifically with this venue. But what I can tell you is that disease process specifically, heart disease is related to multiple risks. And so it's not that one risk that you have means you will have the disease. It just increases your probability. And so we know they're multiple risk that can increase your risk for coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease and inclusion, ethics, family history, They kind of lifestyle you have and the amount of stress I'm safe family history. Is that going back to just your parents? You try look across generational or 100 that war because they always ask that question. You know your dad have this or did you have that? Usually For most part, it's probably immediately one or two levels of ancestry. There are some diseases that are genetic that could potentially skip Shouldn't a level of passage. In other words, Your father might have not had it, but your grandfather might have had it. So they are some diseases like that. But generally speaking, we look directly at your siblings and your mother and father to see what processes they had, such as heart disease, cholesterol, diabetes or coronary disease. Well, you know, it seems like there's new medications coming. We're gonna talk about that a little bit later. But getting back to cardiovascular disease and right now we're going to the Corona pandemic. We're gonna talk about that future program. But I think would really help people to take ownership of their health. And as you got, he said, to go out and say, Listen, I haven't had a check up in a year or two. But I feel great. But you don't know what star could be behind this below the surface. Do you? Absolutely nothing. It's interested. You you're brought up covert 19 little bit over a week ago, I was the invited guest speaker to speak for cardiovascular issues, according basket disease. To a general audience of physicians for their annual medical conference. And so the lecture I gave did focus on Kubrick. But one of its greatest focus for the physicians were where the underlying calm abilities that we saw patients who suffered the most tragic consequences of covert 19 and why it's important to know those camo babies. Because perhaps before they become infected, But covert 19. We can be very aggressive and addressing those things with them both with pharmacologically, you know medicines, in other words, or what they could do it home to improve their odds s o that if they do come down with covert 19 dead, the highest level of survival. And getting through it successfully. Well, you mentioned risk people at risk of having a risky lifestyle. Some people don't really realize the food that they're eating or what they're doing. Their environment during has are putting their entire body under risk, especially for cardiovascular disease. So what are some of the I said you mentioned a few of them. But what are some of the most direct Risk factors for developing cardiovascular disease. Absolutely. We are under the assumption that people are aware of what is risk. But believe it or not, Many people are not aware of what is risk and we think it's common sense so we can touch on that family history. There is nothing You can probably do about it. But.

Cardiovascular disease
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

05:23 min | 1 year ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on Extraordinary Women Radio with Kami Guildner

"What the added added or one needs to be abandoned because i no longer makes sense from and what needs to radically change and then you and that doesn't need to take a year now a day honestly and i do a lot of strategy work with my clients in a couple of days because you you need to adjust in real time not just adjusted grant may gang and getting the money out the door but your overarching strategy and if you didn't have one or you had a really old strategy you know that you never really looked at i think now is the time to create one right right and let's just chat about that a little bit because i'm thinking of You know in other there's family foundations that are out there there's community foundations that better out there. How do you guide those those foundations to to knowing what the truth is what it is that they want to stand for me. Wonder some of the most important questions that you ask your clients as you're helping them you know. Put in place those strategies. Why a couple things one is to remember that you don't have to figure out the answer. That question perfectly in hold to it for the end of time running bright very overwhelming. You can think. Oh my god i have. What is my purpose like. I don't know but like you instead of that. Think about the next year. Think about you know what kind of philanthropists one hundred philanthropic family and we want to be a year now. What kind of impact wanna be having as a funder a year now and then honestly look at where you are right today and what you need to. These are the three or four issues that we care about. We care about you know mental health treatment we care about cardiovascular disease whatever it is right so in a year we want to have explorer. These issues made some grants in these areas and within a year hick to that we want to focus on and then you a year later you do that and then you keep moving. You know what i mean so it's not just it's not just you make the decision once in just keep hold- holding course you actually are are revealing and thinking about these questions on our on a regular basis because to me. That's it's more practical. It's more helpful to more realistic. And it builds momentum and what i love about this. Is this almost questions you just asked. And kind of that that that journey took us on could be applied. If you're if you're a have a family trust.

cardiovascular disease
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Of cardiovascular disease nerve and kidney damage and problems with the eyes and feet one is a disease in which the you're already immune system destroys the insulin secreting cells in your pancreas are called beta cells type two is a disease in which a variety of factors combination and barman jeans conspire so that you're no longer able to secrete enough insulin in the operative word is enough but you may be heavy maybe centers your body needs more but for some reason your papers can compensate the problem according to endocrinologist Dr Robert Rizza is that you can have diabetes and not know it that's why he encourages folks to be tested this is using a blood test and if you have a elevated watcher denture things you can do to stop it but you Gardendale for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit Mayo Clinic dot org no broadcasting from the underground command post from the files of the heaven somewhere under the brick and steel over nondescript building we once again made contact without a leader hello everybody mark living here are number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one as.

Dr Robert Rizza diabetes cardiovascular disease kidney damage Mayo Clinic dot
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:52 min | 2 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Of cardiovascular disease nerve and kidney damage and problems with the eyes and feet one is a disease in which the Europort immune system destroys the insulin secreting cells in your pancreas are called beta cells type two is a disease in which a variety of factors combination and barman in jeans conspire so that you're no longer able to secrete enough insulin in the operative word is enough but you may be heavy maybe centers your body needs more but for some reason your papers can compensate the problem according to endocrinologist Dr Robert Rizza is that you can have diabetes and not know it that's why he encourages folks to be tested this is using a blood test and if you have a elevated watcher denture things you can do to stop it but you gotta know for more information talk with your healthcare provider or visit Mayo Clinic dot org great news we found a pot at the end of the rainbow but it wasn't full of gold it was full of four thousand dollars in cash and we want to give it to you I think you have the luck of the Irish teacher to win the luck of the Irish giveaway today and you could win our pot full of cash this will be a Saint paddy's day holiday you'll never forget to add or stop by our site today and try your luck at winning the luck of the Irish giveaway fans try to take part in the envelope was your mother had to yell back at this lady what happened in Raleigh mark Titus and Tate Frazier are two basketball die hards talking NBA NC double a and all things sports you don't know anyone yes they don't know anything what is wrong with these guys into that we would say listen and subscribe to Titus and Tate free wherever you get your podcasts for the Westwood One podcast network where the conversation starts great news we found a pot at the end of the rainbow but it wasn't full of gold it was full of four thousand dollars in cash and we want to give it to you I think you have the luck of the Irish teacher to win the luck of the.

Dr Robert Rizza diabetes Saint paddy mark Titus Tate Frazier basketball cardiovascular disease kidney damage Mayo Clinic Raleigh NBA Westwood One
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on KOMO

"Cardiovascular disease has increased over the past few decades Dave Schreiber ABC news nine fourteen Alcamo traffic every ten minutes on the force with here Jordan working with a crash right now in shoreline this is traveling eastbound on a hundred and forty fifth at fifteen then it looks like two right lanes are currently blocked there we have a crash on the shoulders the long term crash north and I. five near JBL and main gate we have back ups all the way into Lacy it's going to take you at least an hour and ten minutes to go from Olympia to Tacoma north by five is also heavy at a federal way to five sixteen and slow again for mid Boeing field to the ship canal bridge we've been working with a crash in ever itself but I five approaching the Boeing freeway has now been moved over to the shoulder in the back ups there are improving but not improving as are solid drive on south five to twenty eight to five twenty west bound I ninety four oh five looks like we have an install that's blocking the right center lane in that drive it's just been a mess this morning from French street most of the way to I five it is a quite a Seattle that's taking just over an hour when the bell B. with sixty five minutes rented the bell B. just under an hour right now northbound ninety nine that's going to be slow most of the way from fourteenth to the end of the tunnel we've had a lot of closures due to water over the roadway and now we have a new one in Bothell two hundred and forty at this closed in both the east and westbound directions between wouldn't bill Snohomish road and seventy fifth our next caller traffic at nine twenty four como Egorov forecast clouds that rain sticking with us throughout the day today with highs near fifty rain tonight tomorrow was well with highs in the low fifties rain falling.

Dave Schreiber Jordan JBL Lacy Olympia ship canal bridge Seattle Bothell como Egorov ABC Tacoma Boeing
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Studies indicate Toren is a safe effective therapeutic tool in the management of various types of cardiovascular disease. research indicates supplementation with Korean deli reduce sharing cholesterol. compared to placebo regulates intracellular calcium levels thereby protecting heart muscle from. imbalances which can lead to cell death and my car deal damage your death the heart chills Tories use and preventing cardiac arrest me is like a tool for relation is well documented. and it works by modulating potassium flocks and enough to cardiac muscle cells. so it is really important at the most basic preventable level. for protecting your heart protecting the rhythm of the heart preventing that that the partials but it has a positive and the tropic of factual makes. it makes your heart sure. a lot of things we can shake ridge mall pollution having a big belly high blood sugar high cholesterol high triglycerides oldest and change of heart Tory refers. they show that it helps improves the clinical manifestations of of of congestive heart. those people log is very important to transfer the. it stabilizes the hard to make sure your. and it's really. that magnesium. magnesian controls energy. blood pressure blood sugar and then there's a fourth one which improves blood flow to. Jolie. helps improve your blood pressure and I hope you. grave she opens up blood vessels improve blood flow should..

cardiovascular disease
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

16:23 min | 3 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"There might be questions related to medications or supplements or access to healthy foods again it begins with a discussion with your healthcare provider. Okay. And and that healthcare provider should be. I mean, should it be an internist or primary care or should people when they reach a certain age, maybe see someone like yourself? That's so involved in in lifestyle changes and work with the cardiologists to what do you think about that? Even though maybe you don't have a heart condition right now. But maybe you're at risk because you know, maybe a little bit overweight. Maybe your sugars aren't so great. Maybe have high blood pressure. Right. So the best the best approach is to start with a primary care physician or an internist if you are younger and at risk at that point. But also, especially for women a lot of women. They're only doctor is there OBGYN. So one of the things that I've done is they're gatekeepers to women's heart health. And I partnered with our colleagues that are addressing women's heart health at younger ages thing might be in childbearing years. They might be pregnant, but primary care physicians and gatekeepers of health. Like OBGYN's are who we as cardiology experts need to work with and provide more team based lifelong care. Okay. And if you we hear so much about diet these days, you know, I don't really know what the best diet is a lot of people doing the intermittent fasting diet Kito Janik diet. What what what is the best diet? Do you think for for people that well, just in general, let's say, but for those that are, you know, like, you're saying that are increased risk for cardiovascular disease already have cardiovascular cardiovascular disease, and I guess what is the most effective weight loss strategy that you know, because this is what you deal with every day. Right. So it's a great question. It's the first question that I'm asked by most people and the first question related specifically to diet is how can I lose weight? So when January comes around that's when an unusually analogy again, most patients come to me for their tuneup. They've gone through the holidays. They've added that extra ten pounds because of the holiday season in October November and December. And now, they're ready to reboot. So what I tell every individual whether they're a patient of mine or the community at large is let's start with some basic overall guidelines. There are so many different diets and fads many of which whether it's the Kito diet, the vegetarian vegan the Pesca tearing the flesh guitar, Ian. There are so many diets out there that we still don't have enough information about, but what we do know is that going towards a more wholefoods based diet or what I call more of a Mediterranean lifestyle. Eating pattern diet is such a negative term that I tell patients try not to use that in your language because it makes you feel like you're being deprived of something. If you if your mindset is I'm just going to change my lifestyle, eat healthier, and you're more likely that only in the short term, but in the long term to keep that weight off. And to keep eating healthier long-term. So what are the tips that? I tell patients the first thing you need to do is identify. What it is. You are currently doing most individuals have no idea how much salt they're taking how much they're taking or how many calories they're taking so to take stock in or LAN, maybe two three or seven days worth of what you put in your mouth, and that includes both solid foods as well as liquids. So that like being fast food, it might be meat red meat, it might be alcohol. So take stock and log what it is that goes annual mouth, and then bring that to someone like myself or saw a dietitian or someone who can really look at what it is you're eating and drinking and how we can tweak that to shave off calories. If we lost is something that you're interested in or swap out. Sodium, rich diet with something that's less salt, rich. So this is the first thing that I tell patients get along then in general, you just want you to look at what it is you want to do and then add more color color in foods, whole foods, specifically gives you more vitamins and more minimal minerals. So tomato gives you read vitamins and minerals are in foods, like sweet potatoes. Give you beta carotene. So the more color, the better and more wholefoods. The better the mortar mother nature as we say more, fruits and vegetables and make fruits and vegetables. At least fifty percent of what you have on your plate and any given time increase your whole, fiber and swap out the simple fibers like white bread white rice is and we know now more and more that red meat is not something that we should include in our diet on. Every single day. Unfortunately, and I'm not sure if this was the case with you, Dr cats, but I'm sure most of the listeners that we have on call right now were raised in the meat and potatoes family. So you always sit down you have that that hamburger or that steak and Tim starch on the side some potatoes. What we're noticing more and more is that animal protein is really not good for our heart health, and we're getting away from that. However, we have a lifelong habit of eating this. So it's not something we can do overnight baby steps even if we start with meatless Monday. So one of the seventies. You do not eat meat. Are you do after a month or so and then at another day more and more than? We're going. Yeah. Okay. Maybe once maybe meatless Monday meatless Monday, or maybe. Friday. Okay. So add more color, and what about and I like the idea of the law. But then you see you keep a log, and then you should take that to a you said a dietitian or nutritionist. I believe. People find that. Not everywhere. I mean you. That's an issue that we're dealing with now. And the good news is with with the invention, smart technology. There are programs out there that we have access to that. If you don't have the financial means for a registered dietitian, or you don't have a healthcare provider that is has the time to devote to doing this. There are some online programs at you can go to to to plug in. What it is that you're eating and really get a snapshot. But I work with the cardiologists in my group, and we can't team. So my job in my practice at Winthrop is to say, okay. You have a cardiologists you've been at risk you've been identified as having in my case. Many of our patients have had heart attacks or have high blood pressure or have diabetes. And now what I'm going to do is work with you and really really addressed those lifestyle issues, including. Diet. So that's where I will take that information, and I'll break it down. And then we can follow up the console with what it is that we can do to tweak your diet. Now, again, this is a really difficult thing to do initially and for most patients or most individuals, I will tell you they try and do Chaba goals and try with one goal at a time. It's overwhelming to try to change lifelong habits all at once and for long term compliance. I highly recommend small reachable goals. Yeah. I mean, that's very true. And and also, you know, people will start out like you said at the first of the year, they're very excited, they're energetic. They want to lose weight. And then they you know, typical human behavior. Which is so common. It's, you know, by February back to the old days, the old ways and without having somebody maybe to follow up with them, or that's calling them or that's involved with them on a daily or weekly basis. It's it's it's hard for people to maintain it. I'm sure you see this all the time. It's very hard. And that and that brings me to a really exciting area that we are exploring here at NYU Winthrop, which is okay and taking advantage of newer smart technologies. And and social media. It has is located us. It's not really social and try to get back to the group dynamic and encouraging each other getting back into communities trying to create a buddy system where you're not alone. We recognize this is a difficult thing to do individually. But together, we can address our issues. One of the things that we are exploring within the division of cardiology team based care and also if we can provide a text message or a phone call a lot of times, I call patients once a week, and I'll tell them how you doing how you doing with that diet have how about the things we talked about at your initial. Evaluation. Is there something else that you have questions about that? We can address at this time. So the ongoing communication is key critical. Like, I said for lifelong changes. Absolutely. And you you talked earlier you mentioned earlier about the relationship between, you know, heart health and mental health and this connection, and we talked a little bit about you. We're going to get into stress but since the half hours is running by quickly. Maybe you can tell us a little bit about that. So so we we know now that there is an absolute connection between our mental wellness and our physical health, and specifically heart health, they are intimately connected, there are two different factors that we're looking at. So whether you have a condition like, depression or anxiety, or chronic stressors, low social support, your your isolated low socioeconomic status work stress, marital stress or caregivers strain, many of us that are baby boomers are now dealing with aging parents as well as children, these are all chronic stressors, along with mental conditions that we can address the first thing we need to do again, like our other lifestyle risk factors is is identify whether or not someone is depressed. And if that depression requires immediate attention, we screen our patients to see if they do have depression, and if the. Do they referred to what national health professional? They might need medication to address that. If it's someone for example, that has had bypass surgery or had a heart attack. And now, they're feeling blue, but they are not necessarily it clinically depressed. These are folks where we say started program like a cardiac rehabilitation program where you can be around individuals, socialize with individuals get physical activity, physical activity is an extremely important component of mental wellness and do the other things like eating healthier less alcohol and medications if needed but again addressing your lifestyle will also help your heart. How your heart health, but also help your mental wellness? What about diet and beyond diet? But supplements, you know, we hear a lot about, you know, fish oils, co Q ten other dietary supplements, d do you believe in that do do you think that they have a role? So when it comes to heart health and supplements, most of the data does not support routine supplements by patients meaning going to one of these chain stores and going down, and I'll and seeing things like risk thera trowel so research while is something that's contained in red wine. And a lot of our patients will say I don't drink alcohol. However, I I take the research while Pell. Well, it's been shown that most of the supplements are expensive they're not regulated they don't necessarily they're not necessarily safe. So if it says that it's natural that is it's not necessarily safe. And there are. Interactions with many of our medications. So we caution patients not to take it upon themselves to supplement without speaking to the healthcare provider having said that there are some supplements that when you do meet with your healthcare provider, you might have a deficiency, and you might benefit from a supplement. So across the board. I tell patients don't do anything unless you've spoken with your primary your healthcare provider, and if need be under the guidance of your healthcare provider supplements are okay, but most supplements in general have a risk and could potentially be. Interacting with the medications that you're currently taking. Now, the problem is though is that a lot of the practitioners don't really know much about supplements. You know, they really weren't trained or educated on it. So, but you know, I think I'm not a cardiovascular person, but you know, being in my late fifties now and someone that's at risk because we're all at risk when I do the best that I can with diet and exercise I personally take co Q ten because I was told that if you're on a stat, and if you're on the tour, that's that's a reasonable thing to do because it can deplete your body, and there has been evidence that fish oils, although it can maybe thin your blood a little bit. And so like I hear what you're saying. If you're on already on a blood thinner aspirin, you may want to consult with your physician, but I think those those things that I found in my research have been helpful. There is some evidence that that it may reduce risk even further with, of course, watching your cholesterol, and and taking a statin if you cholesterol is too high, but maybe adding co Q ten or or fish oil. Right. And I I totally agree. And that's what brings me back to consulting with your provider because co Q ten and fish oils, there is some data and but again for the for the mass. Industry of supplements. I caution patients to go out there and just start taking it upon themselves to add a supplement based on again going back to Dr Google or seeing something on the internet or something on television. That says if you take this then you will do better. So typically patients don't tell their healthcare providers wet, they're supplementing again, I tell my patients bring that list in with you, and you can review what it is that you can stay on. What does not pose a risk, and what possibly or potentially could be a benefit which brings me back to the education of your healthcare provider. And I agree with you. Many of our medical community was not trained in lifestyle. Whether it be exercise or diet or supplements..

Winthrop aspirin smart technologies Ian NYU Winthrop Tim starch depression diabetes Dr Google Pell fifty percent seven days ten pounds
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

10:47 min | 3 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Levels. Most of the time had an elevated level and thanks to our new approach to treat hypertension, and as a city cardiovascular disease. I mean, that's type attention hurts fater, but there is also potential for although indication we seamlessly decrees the person released we decrease the sympathy sympathetic nerve activity and wing pries, the Bowery flex. So at the end of the day, we have three actions if I miss it that wing priest diaries, which is unitary enemy nation. We lower vascular Ariston's, and we control it hurts. Right. So that's why this innovative drying target new Suntron from a digital pathway. Leading to both, hyper anti-impotency, fakes and call you protection. And is there a way you can actually test a patient to determine whether this would be the best approach for them. Can you tell if they have an elevated level of this enzyme to to begin with? There is not the compensatory misty for that. But we don't need that. Because you know, the resistant hypertension patient is a patient treated by sweet products as I mentioned before one of them being Darah, dick. And then this is very simply in a way that if the patient is not a target and the target is hundred forty for the study blood pressure, and and many megrim. Macrey? I'm sorry ninety. I read it year, and I'm forty and ninety then if the patient is not the tar head then absolutely mandatory to initiate treatment, you know, to treat the patient. I think of most treatments having a systemic of vent are rather systemic affect your training, the an enzyme in the brain here does this have to cross the blood brain barrier to to work. You are absolutely right. And this is what's Siri bus that that they have to work a lot or on three because when we defined let's say the palm and it started with a neuro biology person at Sunday insurrection, which is researching student France. And then we had a lot of chemistry development in order. To make sure that our product here that was patriot in the brain. I how exactly does the product work. Simply maybe shown of the fifty a in the brand, which will let's say blocks the conversion offense in to enjoy having two hundred three. So that's very eighteen. Even they will blocking in the cascade. Also, one of the enzyme what's different with our product is that we act in the brain. And this is the first unique product controlling hypertension, and many resistant, hypertension, right anyting design at the Brian Little you actually got multiple products in your pipeline. What's the pipeline? Look like an and where's your lead therapeutic product in development? So the league countdown is furious tax. I spent thirty years in the in different the pharma company, and it's you know, it's very common to Evelyn count on and backup program. So we also working on different backup products being more protests or cheaper to prove that sorta ten me we in hypertension difficult to treat patients and hurt tater while lead compound, which is very best that so we just finished, by the way, the new hope study. The study was run only in the US in soda yet centers. And I were PI was to kiss Fairview. No way the purpose of medicine at the University School of medicine in New Orleans, and and not to be consistent with what I told you before they say to be clinical try on unroll, overweight or obese patient with prime very happen. Tensions station known to have increased incidence of treatment resistant, hypertension, such as black Hispanic has and senior population. And we got extremely good reasons. And then have two common those results if you one, and that's the reason why now we will initiate the people face retrial in registering, hypertension, which will lead to restrain him. What about the? Protest from a clinical point of view in terms of safety or efficacy. When we got. Extremely good. If he gets that. And we had a very good safety profile interface in the in the new study again and this product is. Product. We were we had OB station we tension and to station. I mean, we know that obesity increased by five phone the risk to be resistant to the treatment. And in those patients, we had the six month. Let's say we were six months and schedule, and we were able to use the offices to blood pressure from baseline Vina's, racial nine point six meter of macrey, which was highly significant because the target was defined by the and I were steering committee or target was to decrease the office pressure by sentiment of. So we've nine point six we were we happy with the results, and what will actually mentioned. So here is that we that. She could see was also senior in the black and then black populations the contrary to of on T, hypertensive classes, and this is what you'll be the the the arts. They don't work in such relation. And we were also weta righted and we were able to demonstrate an accent on metabolic, and and the safety profile. So that's why they on the results we will initiate face repeal. Don't try in eastern, hypertension, and we very you're also developing a treatment for heart failure, this is using the same platform of the same drug. Yes. This is this is a sensory we based on the exit. If she gets that in animals and good fifty profane pilots today. We will initiate this is working progress face to betrayal, and that would be without if he can see and sixteen patients with reduced ejection fraction after acute myocardial infarction and head to head the versus the reference therapy and the restaurants there is and as a hummy premium what happens in heart failure. And why does this mechanism mechanism of action seemed to if at these patients? Where you know in her chair? It's it's difficult is many many products of try and the simply not succeed because the nicotine is my action. I would say is not as simple as it is in hypertension. Most of the time the patients are suffering from different disease, which was switch more competed to treat the patient. What we have demonstrated is our TV on the Reynolds synthetic nerve activity and also our TV on the exemption fraction wearing that's different TV. What we want to to months writing in heart failure. And how's the the company finance to date and how far will confronting take? You. Well. We have I would say enough money in the Bank to finance all our project this year in twenty nineteen. So the project is to finance the face to be proof consensus in heart failure, the people try to face three in resistant. Hypertension will also working on the ones that they formulation today. We have the ID twice a day, and for resistant, hypertension, it's very important to have once formulation. So we're also working on that. And and we have enough money in the dank to silence all those projects at the same. Time Wong, Chris contact with a lot of pharma companies who have demonstrated an interest in our product because I want tension is to to sign the punisher. And if all goes, well, what's the? The path to market has soon might you be able to file. And by the end of twenty twenty two JP moth CEO of quantum genomics, J P. Thanks so much for your time today. Thank. Any? Thanks

hypertension resistant hypertension fater acute myocardial infarction US University School of medicine New Orleans CEO Siri mechanism of action Fairview nicotine weta France Wong Reynolds Vina Chris thirty years
"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

06:29 min | 3 years ago

"cardiovascular disease" Discussed on The Bio Report

"Leading a startup team whether delivering a sugar rush stocking coffee or getting a regular delivery of snacks. Office Depot has solutions that fit every startup culture from getting those first business cards and stationery to ordering fleece pullovers with your new logo to learn. How Office Depot and the California technology council. Have partnered to bring you savings on all of these startup essentials and more go to California technology dot org forward slash member benefits. I'm Daniel Levin. And this is the bio report. One third of the dull suffer from high blood pressure and nine point four million people a year will die from complications relating to the condition. In fact, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death worldwide. Quantum genomics is developing a new class of drugs that target an enzyme in the brain for the treatment of high blood pressure and the prevention of related cardiovascular disease. We spoke to P Milan CEO of quantum genomics about its platform technology, how it works and why it may have promise as an approach to treating both, hypertension and heart failure. JP? Thanks for joining us today. Good were gonna talk about quantum genomics. It's that by platform and its efforts to develop a new class of therapeutics to treat cardiovascular disease were in a world where a lot of the efforts that develop innovative therapies are are geared towards cancer. Nevertheless, cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death. How big a problem is hypertension and related cardiovascular disease today. Well, treatment resistant have tension affects misdemeanor often and fifty million people worldwide and visiting almost ten million. This from complications U2. to the pressure each year. Nonetheless, there is currently MU accepted pharmacological stand out for tweet Mond and with limited treatment options available for treatment regimen act attention. They should women at increased cardiovascular risk and susceptible to the compensation socio with chronic hypertension include an increased risk of Pataudi. The number of therapeutic strategies for treating hypertension that was either tension generally treated today. Why are you have today? A lot of different vegetable treatments. You are. Absolutely. Right. That this back that resistant, hypertension, twenty with sweep products, and they either at an arm custom Shannon, Bricker, bataille broker and loose of the deficient. They have sweet products one of them being one, directing and Steed. Unfortunately, there there is currently no available treatment to treat hypertensive patients. The one who are resistant, and as I mentioned before fifteen percent of them are suffering from registered. More common or so in in minorities such as that act, Hispanic she met and obese populations when you think about the problems with existing therapies today. What what's wrong? Well, I think the the problem is mainly that some products like the HEB there's and the art this simply don't work in black patients, for example. She's very well. None. So this is one example of why people are seeing dang from resistant, hypertension. Genomics is working on a platform called that pay of. That's an acronym. What does it stand for? States for brand petty does any bitter, and that's a total new mechanism of action and the new therapy class and Parnham, Geno. Mix is the only company developing product in this new therapeutic class. So this is definitively. Let's say new because ferry fat our product works by crossing the brand very air and mother being the rice and restaurants. For raining engines is time so motivating the rest locally to limit vasoconstriction and promote visitation thereby decreasing pressure. This is totally new because if you work at the brand level with feared that and in the brand sooner best that causes the of the in the name of this enzyme is. I mean. Oh pity. Hey. So we blocked his online. So the name of the platform is brand. I mean pitchy. Does innovator and innovating this? I'm fifty a fear best that decreased levels of hundred in three in the brand. Which is a key in that dries vessel constriction. This is a normally occurring enzyme what's normal function. What's its relationship to elevated blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease and do people with this problem have elevated levels. There's just just the way to to lower hypertension in people with elevated levels.

elevated blood pressure Office Depot California technology council Daniel Levin California Pataudi Mond CEO P Milan Steed mechanism of action Parnham Shannon bataille Bricker fifteen percent