35 Burst results for "Cardiff"

Venus: Possible signs of life discovered on planet

Lynne Hayes-Freeland

00:30 sec | 5 d ago

Venus: Possible signs of life discovered on planet

"Looking at the atmosphere in neighboring Venus see something that might just be a sign of life. They found the chemical signature of a noxious gas called Foss Feen. Cardiff University is Jane Greaves is one of the astronomers making the announcement today There is a longstanding theory that some of the smallest forms of life, these micro organisms might have been able to evolve upwards into the high clouds. Outside experts and the study authors themselves say say the the research research is is tantalizing, tantalizing, but but not not yet yet convincing. convincing.

Jane Greaves Foss Feen Cardiff University
Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:12 min | Last week

Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

"It egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that in prison, a man will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is a food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand, plus a fixed supply pushes up the price. And the price went way up nearly 200% in March, and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota, and they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics. Stacy Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

David Ortega Aeg Companies Smith Cardiff Garcia Stacy Vanik United States Stacy Vanek NPR Michigan State University New York Texas Hillandale Farms Attorney Minnesota West Virginia
The Looming Eviction Crisis

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:41 min | Last month

The Looming Eviction Crisis

"Kathy Seeker is fifty five. She lives in an apartment that she rents in Camden South Carolina with her husband before the coronavirus pandemic, Cathy was working multiple jobs. She ran the cafe at a bookstore and she also worked as a server at a restaurant, but the pandemic would shut down both of those workplaces and in March Kathy started a new job at an assisted living facility working with dementia patients she likes to work, but it only pays twelve dollars an hour and overtime pay is not available to her so when I took the new job for my career. It then sent our rent back. Months just months, I don't make enough money to support myself. My husband had a stroke at forty four years ago so he's not able to work. By August Kathy had fallen thousands of dollars behind on her rent and twelve dollars an hour. She just was not making enough money to both pay her full rent and cover her other bills like eletricity and car insurance and her husband's medications and my landlord was wonderful to so patient with us really was wonderful but. He has to make money you know and I had reconciled in my head like how I was going to get rid of our stuff how we're gonNA live in the car. And that was just going to be okay. Kennedy says there was some dark moments then when the stress from the possibility of being addicted was just overwhelming to be in that desperate situation. To be in that desperate situation and really feel like you've done everything you possibly can you know I'm a Frugal Person I home schooled my children for years I know how to. Pinch a good penny but I there was no panic. This is indicated for planet money. I'm Cardiff Garcia and I'm Stacey Smith Today on the show evictions millions possibly tens of millions of renters throughout the US could soon face a similar situation to the one that Kathy was facing the loss of jobs and income. So many of these renters has left the country with a possible evictions crisis and that crisis could have catastrophic consequences both for the renter's themselves and also for the whole economy. This message comes from NPR. Sponsor Microsoft the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat meet call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google Google has a variety of free tools and resources to help small businesses adapt from trainings to on-demand classes through grow with Google explore Google's free tools for small businesses at Google Dot, com slash small business. The rent for the apartment the Kathy Kirchner shares with her husband in Camden South Carolina is six, hundred, ninety, five dollars a month, and she cannot afford that on her wages from the assisted living facility where she now works it's really difficult. My paycheck today was five, hundred, ninety, five dollars and and that's for two weeks even before the covert pandemic roughly one out of every four renting households in the US. was already paying more than half of their monthly income in rent. So. Were already paying their rent paycheck to paycheck. But when the pandemic started the federal government along with state and local governments did respond they responded with policies to help avoid an immediate surge fictions for a lot of these renters congress and the president expanded unemployment benefits in the cares act passed in late March, which helped people who lost their jobs, keep paying their bills, things like rent plus a lot of state and local governments with these moratoriums in place that would stop landlords from a visiting tenants. The federal government added its own moratorium on fictions for a lot of housing complexes that it subsidizes but the expanded unemployment benefits expired at the end of July in the moratoriums on. In at least twenty, four of the states that had them had also expired by the end of July. Including the moratorium in Kathy's own State of South Carolina. The Federal Moratorium has also expired and all of these reasons why so many housing experts are now warning that innovations crisis could start soon and the people who are most vulnerable to innovations. Crisis are low income renters according to the Urban Institute. Low income renters are more likely to have held jobs that have been lost in the Cova pandemic especially jobs in food. Services and the retail sector. In fact, two of the jobs that Kathy Secrets your work before the pandemic in a restaurant and in a bookstore were in those two sectors. The new job she took at the assisted living facility did not pay her nearly enough to offset the income she lost, but the economy is still in rough shape. So finding the kind of works used to do is just still really hard this hard when you're willing to work three four jobs like I'm not afraid to work, but you can't find work. A lot of Americans can't find work right now and many are struggling to pay their rent according to the Census Bureau roughly one out of five renters could not pay their rent on time in July and August could be worse nearly one out of three renters said the either had no confidence only slight confidence that they could pay their August rent for months. Kathy says that she herself could only pay partial rent her landlord kept growing tab for her running. into thousands of dollars and I would ask him every couple of months to show us what where we work because I was trying to make payments I would I would keep making payments, but it would be like three hundred dollars for the month. Well, that's less than half of what I, what I them, even though I have a job that's a you know a decent job, but it was it was a challenge. You know it's very stressful to live under that. Environment, if innovations crisis does become a reality communities of color would also be disproportionately hurt partly because a much higher share of black and Latino. Households are renters instead of homeowners there about twice as likely as white households to rent, and before the pandemic, they were already much more likely to face eviction than white households. If there is any good news here, it's just evictions. Crisis is not actually started yet. The warning signs are flashing red but so far evictions. Are actually quite low in a lot of major cities that of course does not mean that everything is fine. Remember that the expanded unemployment benefits and the state moratoriums on fictions only just expired a few weeks ago and it could take a bit of time before the struggles that people are having in paying their rent translate into actual evictions and it also means of course that there is still time for federal state and local policymakers to act again and possibly avert. Meanwhile. In at least some parts of the country hundreds of rental systems, programs have been directing their money to help prevent evictions and a lot of them have received money from the federal government for this very purpose and one of those organizations ended up helping Kathy. In fact, it was actually her landlord who put her in touch with the local program from the United Way that Helps Fight Homelessness this program called New Day Kathy applied and got a grant from new day. She was approved to receive about four thousand dollars and that money cleared all the background Kathy owed her landlord a felt like I. Finally had a chance to get my head. Slightly above water so that I could breathe and it would give me that time that I needed. To get my life together again, and by the first of September, we'll be able to put the rest of my rent down like I'll be able to breathe. Of course, a new start does not mean everything will continue to be fine in the future Kathy's hopeful that as the economy recovers, she'll be able to find other jobs to supplement her income but that partly also depends on whether it becomes safe to work those jobs while there is still a pandemic, there is no certainty about this or about whether the economy will keep recovering. So in the meantime, Kathy has a message for policymakers. Anything can turn on a dime and there are people who are really hard working. who really don't want take charity but don't have a choice. And if it is something that can help people even. Anybody. I would absolutely begged them to consider to continue these programs. We need them people that want to make their rent they want. To, pay their bills. They don't. WanNa take charity they and they're working as hard as they can. You know, and then when you add in the stress of. VID. And going out. Even, if you don't have to work environment like, I do just to go out, it's it's so mentally exhausting. The the mental anguish of not being able to pay your bills is overwhelming. Overwhelming And I don't. I don't. Know How funding works but I do know that if there had not been this funding. I'd, be in my car.

Kathy Federal Government Kathy Seeker Kathy Kirchner Kathy Secrets South Carolina Google Microsoft Camden South Carolina NPR Cathy Census Bureau Urban Institute Camden Kennedy United States Cova Congress US.
Science, Economics And Vaccines

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:32 min | Last month

Science, Economics And Vaccines

"Dr Stanley Plotkin develop vaccines for some of the world's deadliest modern viruses. He's very familiar with the cost and the process of producing vaccines, and he says the process tends to be slow and ferry expensive developing vaccine is likely to cause something on the order of five hundred, million dollars five hundred, million dollars status is today's indicator five, hundred million dollars to get a vaccine Stanley, says. For drug companies and universities and labs that monumental cost is often one of the biggest obstacles to creating vaccine after all at the end of the process, you don't know if you ever will actually debt vaccine some viruses like HIV still don't have successful vaccines even after decades of trying and billions of dollars invested if covid nineteen vaccine can't be found or if it takes decades the social. Economic and cultural impacts would be devastating. So the White House has done something pretty unheard of it's created a plan called operation warp speed to try to speed up the vaccine process. The White House says it's already invested more than twelve billion dollars in the plan and how the plan works. The White House is basically created contracts with drug companies like Pfizer Novak's Moderna Therapeutics and AstraZeneca. Few others and those contracts promise these companies billions of dollars if they can get a vaccine ready to go and have a hundred million doses at the ready by the first part of next year with so much money being funneled toward the problem I'm wondering if that will do you think speed up the process of getting a vaccine or does it just take the time it takes or? It definitely speeds things up. Stanley says with a strong cash incentive like this and so much support companies can out a bunch of different tactics in their search for a vaccine. He says, there are more than a hundred different approaches that scientists know of, and they can try a bunch of them labs all over the world flooded with resources racing for vaccine that should help speed up the arrival of the vaccine at least that is the hope but that is as yet. a hope. Nothing nothing is certain is certain. if everything goes well. I think having a vaccine by the end of the year is not impossible, but it's based on everything going. Well, Stanley says even with all the money in the world getting a vaccine ready for the public quickly is really hard. The Rubella vaccine that he developed was a relatively quick process in terms of vaccines. It took him about two years to discover it to develop the vaccine itself, and then five years to tested and scale up the production of IT and just get to the market, and here's why for one thing it's a messy process. You have a biological problem It's a complicated process and there isn't any single wave. Doing that also, he says there are parts of the process that you cannot speed up no matter how much money you have Stanley says trials for vaccines for instance, typically take longer than trials for regular drugs because vaccines will be used on much larger swath of the population. So you have to test the vaccine on all different kinds of people, different ages, ethnicities, people with different underlying health conditions, and that typically means trials involving tens of thousands of people. Also, you have to give the vaccine time to work time to assess side effects. Many vaccines fail in this trial phase, and there is a danger in going too fast of course the. is to avoid making mistakes. While you're speeding up mistakes and research or in manufacturing the vaccine or in not taking enough time to test these things can have. Consequences he says in the nineteen fifties, some batches of the polio vaccine created the contained an active virus the samples at past the safety tests yet thousands of people contracted polio from the vaccine dozens of people were paralyzed as a result Stanley says rushing vaccine is a balancing act between good science and good economics in you you yourself are working on a vaccine is that correct? Well, I know lawyer you know I'm I'm eighty eight years old I? No longer have a laboratory but I'm giving advice left and right so. I'm working in the a sense of giving advice. What kind of advice are you giving? What questions do people have at this stage which? Are Important what have you and responses one should be trying to get. What dosage? Interval between doses I mean the things that one learns with any vaccine. Are you taking dozens of calls like a week. I see why you have very limited time. I. Should let you go but I can't thank you enough for taking some of your precious time to talk with me. By by by conversation is over I, mean I would be hurt but like the man has lives to save, right? Oh. Yeah Oh. Yeah. Impressive Dude. Also fun fact Cardiff. He learned to fly a plane when he was seventy four and you don't do that kind of thing by spending all your time talking to journalists. The man is flying planes and saving the world. So he gets overpass

Polio Vaccine Dr Stanley Plotkin White House Polio Cardiff Astrazeneca Pfizer Novak Moderna Therapeutics
"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 2 months ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

"Companies around the world are racing to develop a code 19 vaccine. Ah, couple of vaccines under development in the U. S. Might start clinical trials as early as this month. But how much will people have to pay for it once the vaccine is ready? Cardiff Garcia and Patty Hearst from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet Money, dig into the economics of vaccine pricing. Michael Kinch is the author of between Hope and Fear, a book about the history of vaccines. And he says that making money on a vaccine is harder than making money on, say, a life saving cancer drug. A vaccine generally tends to be a relatively inexpensive short term therapy. You immunize everybody, but you really get that patient population once and at a relatively low price point. Compare that, for example, with a drug for metastatic cancer, where you can price that drug at hundreds of thousands, and now we're reaching the point of millions of dollars per person. And that's much more profitable both of the short term and in the long term In recent decades, the pharma industry has mostly focused on those lucrative drugs and not on vaccines. Which is why Michael argues that pharma companies have been caught flat footed by having to create a vaccine for covered 19. That's also influenced their scientific approach to making that vaccine. Most of the companies in the United States are taking technologies that were developed for, for example, cancer and repurposing them. For covert 19 on this approached by U. S companies has consequences, Michael says an American pharma company that develops a covered vaccine might not actually own the patents on those newer technologies. So for every patient that buys the vaccine, the company might end up having to pay a certain percentage to the other companies that do own the patents. There might be three or 45 or six different patents that you have to serve. Each of them may want a percent or two or three or four that starts to add up very, very quickly charging a lot of money for a vaccine. The public absolutely needs to immunize itself against Covad. Would be extremely controversial, especially controversial if the vaccines developed by one of the cos that's being subsidized by the U. S government certified, the governments pledged roughly $2.2 billion to five US pharma companies, the government and the pharma companies. Obviously both want a vaccine to be developed. But when it comes to pricing the vaccine Have some with different goals. Pharma companies want to charge enough to cover costs and make a profit, whereas the government in the public want prices to be affordable enough that everyone congee immunized. We don't want to dis incentivize the private sector for making a new vaccine. Instead, we want to figure out how do we balance that incentive with making sure that the drug is affordable and available to everyone? Not getting that balance. Right is one of the reasons that have been so few new vaccines developed in the last few decades. Pharma companies know they'll get lamb bastard if they charge too high a price. But charging a low price isn't really worth it to them. Because developing vaccines is expensive. Aligning the incentives of the public in the pharma companies is massively important because his urgent and terribly important is the fight against Cove. It is right now. It probably won't be the last against the threatening pandemic. Patty Hirsch, Cardiff Garcia NPR news.

Michael Kinch Planet Money United States Cardiff Garcia Patty Hearst cancer Patty Hirsch Covad NPR Cardiff U. S
When Pilots Want to Visit The Beach

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

03:15 min | 3 months ago

When Pilots Want to Visit The Beach

"Okay the first one you know. We're all kind of tired of the sheltering in place nonsense, and apparently somebody and the UK also just kind of got fed up with it Let's see this is from UK Aviation News? A privately owned aircraft landed at a closed RAF base without permission on bank holiday Monday, according to the Modi's air safety, information, management system, or I like to call it. Assumes A S I M S. The report filed set. Asked him. Adam's okay assumes. Let's just say. Let's just call it the air. Safety Information Management System has. Okay! That's enough plugs for them. The report filed says that pilots PAC twelve November four one to Mike. Douglas took off from fair. Oaks airfield in Surrey and flew to F- Valley on Anglesey. As. It was a bank holiday or a valley was closed in work was being carried out on runway, one nine, according to the report, the pilot attempted to call the tower frequency several times, but despite receiving no response landed on runway, one nine RAF, Valley's fire crews all the aircraft, and assuming it was in distress, attended the seen as an emergency. It was quickly determined though that the aircraft was not an emergency and the military provost guard service. The MPG s attended the scene to find out what happened. I guess neck with these people would like machine guns. And coming to check things out it's it's a training base in these Sort of government policemen okay so now. I doubt that it would be a different reception at a an American military base I O. K. The pilot told them he had flown from London to go to the beach. When the pilot was informed about the restrictions in place in Wales, due to corona virus. He told them that Oh. It was okay I had it two months ago. Shouldn't have to worry about me. Honesty. The pilot went on to inform the MPG. That he had found the airfield on Google Earth. That's a great way to do your flight planning. Planning. And wait a minute. He also looked it up on wikipedia. He read that it handled civilian traffic as well. Aria Valley is also home to Anglesey airport, which sees daily flights from Cardiff airport only, but has a strict prior permission required system PTR system, which obviously he didn't use. We have now on the screen. A photo of the young Captain Nick and a a matches the very beach that is. In fact soon I think we're GonNa see a PC twelve going right. On why he would wanna go visit that beach because it's full of pebbles is hardly any sand the me, but that that Bank of The bank that is literally the edge of the field in fact, run the top left corner. Tiny. Little Sign, which says administrative offense property

F- Valley Modi Aria Valley Captain Nick Oaks Airfield UK Uk Aviation News PAC Adam Provost Wales London Douglas Anglesey Surrey Mike Cardiff
The Bankruptcy Question

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:48 min | 5 months ago

The Bankruptcy Question

"Jennifer. Hensel is a tour guide in Philadelphia. She gives private tours to students. Corporate groups families. She's been in business for nine years. She's forty-one she is passionate about history and she really loves her job not tour the historic area. Philadelphia is complete without including independence hall behind me. This process she makes about fifty thousand dollars year as a tour guide. But it's a funny business. She says it's very seasonal. The winners pretty dead and the spring. That's when we're starting to get our tour. That's when we're starting to pick up but right win things. Were starting to pick up about a month ago. Jennifer got a call. It was a tour group cancelling and then she got another call and another call and another call like even just talking about it. Like my heart. 'cause I remember there was literally one day where I just had. Maybe three to four months worth of work. Just cancel on me like in one afternoon. I remember standing the the street corner at fourth and market waiting for the bus and try not to cry like I've not a crier but it was just like I it was just I couldn't this business. Jennifer built up over nine. Years was just gone. Decimated is maybe the word that comes to mind and Jennifer's head started spinning going. How do I pay my rent? How to pay my bills rent? I was like okay my landlord. He's actually a pretty cool guy. I could probably talk to him and work something out food. Pb and J. Rahman I probably could manage but Jennifer also had this other debt. I have medical that I had surgery last year because I had a cancer scare. I credit card debt like most Americans and it seems to grow faster than you pay down that credit card debt and those medical bills totaled twenty five thousand dollars and with no income on the horizon and the tour industry just looking like it might be very slow to come back that debt just starting to seem overwhelming as she was riding on the bus and more and more people were calling her and e mailing her to cancel their tours. This word started coming into Jennifer's head. This word that seemed simultaneously like a huge relief in escape hatch and also terrifying and unthinkable a word that now hundreds of thousands of people and businesses across the. Us are thinking of right now bankruptcy. This is the indicator from planet money. I'm Stacey Manic Smith at Cardiff Garcia. Today on the show bankruptcy the bankruptcy process can be confusing an emotional expensive but is unemployment in the. Us moves towards twenty percent credit card delinquencies rise into the millions. Many businesses and individuals are seeing bankruptcy as

Jennifer Jennifer. Hensel Philadelphia United States Stacey Manic Smith Cardiff Garcia Cancer PB J. Rahman
Small Businesses On Their Own

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:30 min | 5 months ago

Small Businesses On Their Own

"Molly Moon Knight's will is the CEO of Molly Moon's homemade ice cream in Seattle Washington. She opened her business twelve years ago yet. Twelve years ago that was two thousand and eight right is the. Us economy was sinking into a massive recession. Molly was terrified back then but actually her shop did well and one of the things that I learned. Is that ice? Cream is one of the most recession proof businesses or products when people can't get themselves more expensive things going on vacation or or like buying their kids a new bike. They treat themselves to smaller treats. Less expensive treats more often throughout the great recession. Molly's business grew in fact the little shop did so well molly did something. She never expected to do opened more shops by January of this year she had eight shops all around Seattle. At about one hundred employees molly started selling her ice cream to supermarkets and is actually in the middle of building a giant wholesale facility where she can make larger batches of salted caramel melted chocolate scout. Meant which actually has pieces of thin mint cookies in it. That sounds fantastic. And apparently I'm not the only person who thinks so because molly sold almost eight million dollars worth of ice cream last year. I've been really optimistic that I would break the ten million dollar mark in revenue in a year and very very very few female owned businesses ever crossed the ten million dollar mark. So I've been kind of focused on that number and really excited and proud of us and then current virus set and then corona virus. It molly had to clues oliver shops in fact right now. Mali's just struggling to survive. Yes she's counting on money from the government coming through as part of the two point two trillion dollar cares act that Congress passed last month. Small Business owners like molly can apply for loans of up to two million dollars to keep their heads above water. While this economic shutdown continues at least that was idea the billions in aid that Congress directed to small businesses. Only seems to be getting to a tiny number of them. This is the indicator from planet. Money I'm Stacey Vanik Smith and I'm Cardiff Garcia. Today on the show small business aid as of this morning. That fund from the government is out of money and thousands of small businesses including. Mali's are kinda tight dry right now wondering if they will be able to get any help at all wondering if they're gonNA be able to survive

Molly Moon Seattle CEO Mali Congress United States Stacey Vanik Smith Cardiff Garcia Washington
Accelerating Innovation

Healthy Thinking

07:14 min | 6 months ago

Accelerating Innovation

"Simple question. Why do we need a program? Accelerate and how pioneering is it Shawn? Okay thanks Keith Unwelcome everybody accelerate to think is Is Important to the the Welsh economy. The WHO he thought of it was kind of speed up the development of innovation within the life science sector but also the sport Deanna Jess and charitable organizations. That they're trying to do things to better health care and to improve wellbeing and in the principality so I think accelerate in that sense is really essential to the future. Wales okay. So let's imagine you'd Entrepreneur I with innovation that you think could benefit the health service and ultimately patients and you're very excited about it but Bit Slack about where to go next for example with get access to clinicians patients. If I wanted to test that perhaps perhaps you can tell us about the options there. Yeah so for Cardiff University. We've got that link between Cardiff unveil health boards answer the clinical innovation partnership where we often hold an MD tea. Which is a multidisciplinary team meeting every Monday? Where people can come along and present such projects so in front of this project board. We've seen people such as clinicians porters nurses academics medical students come present their ideas to us. We've had a number of industries. Come in as well with some project ideas who are required that link our understanding that clinicians and academics can support and provide through this forum. So that's the important part for for us within Cardiff University. As well as that's wash economic development is linked to patients clinicians and academia to see that health economic benefit as well as patient benefit strikes. Me As being really interesting areas. It's not just about established businesses. But you're taking soundings ideas and suggestions frahm individuals students clinicians and even patient troops in some cases. That's the your Europe she based in Swansea in your research. Experience includes things like in vitro bench test in what way through to support clinical investigation the medical devices launching products evaluation etc. I mean how how in your experience how difficult is product onto the market and how can accelerate or htc help in that respect. Y- apparently being based with an SME who went from basic patent on a piece of paper through to launch products. It's not easy. It is difficult. Lots of different challenges for me I think is about having the right expertise around you and expertise early on so that informs all our D. That you do away thought. H D C can help have technology centre and Swansea. University is that we have a team of sixteen people. They're all multi skilled. They've got Fast Array of expertise talk that we also can tap into the the academic staff within the school of Medicine as well on the wider university. So we've got a lot of expertise that to try and help them get. Get people that knowledge on those people around them to help them early on. I think one of the more challenging things is the regulatory pathway. Potentially making sure you've got the right people around you to support you show. Attic is particularly interested in assistive technologies. That's right isn't it? Yeah I mean that's the that's kind of the core of The the attic offering but to be honest We we're finding it working across a wide spectrum of Different sectors so A NASCAR exciting. I mean it could be you know digital products and services through to physical products and so it's I think is important to kind of understand. The science sector is is quite broad. Which means that you know Attic and got involved in You know in terms use a testing and analysis of sort of medical products or things which are a little bit more cutting edge like the Internet of things type sensors that people can then use to monitor elderly people in home for example so so it is quite broad in that sense but also I think Moscow exciting is starting to recognize that there are companies out there. On the periphery of the license actor. That may be astonished to consider moving into it So we can also help them as well with product development and an Kenneth Challenges that they might have in terms of innovation process. And you know it's so it's It's it's beyond just what we can initially considered to be the life science sectors much broader opportunity in an ns be clear. The collaboration element is is clever across the partners but we also collaborate in between the partners and the and the company's not providing direct funding. Were not doing stuff for them exactly. This is kind of a shared activity. Bus Right isn't it absolutely? Yes so everything we do. We we aim to go. We aim for effective. Rnd collaboration so we put in fifty percent. The company's fifty cents on a very much a joy joint venture Anna's Shawn's already mentioned in some of the benefits of that is we can transfer knowledge between the university so the company from the company to the university. So you know. We're all in rural from the experience is really important. And Sean fifty percent is not is not necessarily about money is it. This is about time this is about expertise is about facilities and equipment as well. Yeah it definitely I think One of the crucial things is that the the program allows companies to get access to stuff that they would normally be able to access And they might have a law plans for commercial development But they just simply don't have the capacity so the the accelerate program unlocks the potential by providing additional staff time resources and an inability to research particular challenges and problems that the company needs to overcome. But because they don't have the capacity you know they maybe go so far but then they they hit war base. At Lisa's is the accelerate program is unlocking opportunity than for them. So and another important aspect of this is well is the you know we can. We can do quite small pieces of work with a company that then provide them with inhabitants. Base that can they can then look for additional funding and draw down money from other sources than actual money to develop the product and take it take it to market a bit quicker than so so we kind of You know we provide in a kind of like for like service really if they if they want to develop within in the commitment to do that we can weaken our commitment to that to make sure that it actually can become a tangible output. At the end of the

Cardiff University Swansea Shawn Wales Bit Slack Cardiff Deanna Jess Keith Europe HTC Product Development Lisa Nascar School Of Medicine Moscow Sean Kenneth Anna
The Nrburgring

CarStuff

09:11 min | 6 months ago

The Nrburgring

"I'm your host Scott Benjamin and I am Kirk Garin. I'm super excited about this show this week because we've got a topic that's got a lot of meat to it and something that. I think that Is going to be just right for conversation between the two of us because we both have an interest in the sort of thing anyway in a little bit of track driving a little bit of Little Thrill seeking. I guess. Maybe we're both kind of Not Adrenalin Junkies. But we both like to Kinda chest limits of our vehicles kind of you know. Just get out there and have a little bit of fun on them. And I think this is something that a lot of people can relate to. Maybe not a lot of people have done this in the past. Of course. I think we're GONNA find very few of our listeners. Have actually done this but there are a couple of examples that that I'll tell you about in just a moment so let's just jump right into it and I'll tell our listeners. What we're GONNA be talking about today in. It was kind of a question that I had. And it's something that I I know. I voiced on my other show on car stuff in the past and and I think maybe answered it a little bit and we've even discussed this track and Ha- I'll get to all of this. You understand in just a moment but my question is about the nurburgring and the nurburgring has in the past. I don't know decade or maybe even twelve fifteen years seemed to be the place that manufacturers have taken their automobiles to test limits to see how fast they can lap the nurburgring and it was a specific part of the nurburgring. That they do. This in. There's it's it's a It's a certain loop that they tested on. We'll talk about it. What it is is. It's kind of like a a level playing field for all manufacturers to be able to go and say we can run this track at this speed in this amount of time in this car and it. That's where cars the best and if you think you can top it go do it. Yeah and it offers a bunch of different types of conditions as well through the surface of the course and the terrain and weather and all sorts of other obstacles that make it interesting and kind of like a something to brag about though absolutely. We're we'll talk about all of this because there's some really believe it or not. Even the weather is a fascinating topic on this track. So as the surface material because it changes over over time Over distance rather and maybe one of the coolest things about this is that you can go and drive on this track if you just have a few dollars in your pocket. It doesn't really cost that much money. It's officially a toll road and I know I'm probably not giving anything away by saying that right now and then there's some fascinating things that go along with this whole thing. Now here's a little bit of background and I. I want temper this with this thought. It was a car stuff episode on the Nurburgring and we went through a lot of history. We went through the details of how they modify the track. And you know like the different curves and all that stuff and and the The barriers and I. It's just a lot of information about the track itself. So there's a ton of history. There's a ton of material there about Grand Prix or about Grand Prix racing in about You know the switch over Formula One and all of that. It's all there So I don't Wanna I don't WANNA double up on too much of that and I know that's tough not to step on that so we're GONNA WE'RE GONNA have a little bit of overlap but not a whole lot now. There's a few things that I do. I do feel like we need to repeat. This is just because there's some really interesting things about this. Track that thinker important and one number one. Probably the most important thing that we need to know about this track is that it's insanely dangerous. Insanely dangerous. I mean it really is and it was designed a long time ago. I think the track was built in one thousand nine hundred eighty five and I. It's like it's a huge huge track. It's it's what Woke in its current Form I think that the overall lap if you the norge left's norge sleep that we're GonNa talk about which is the north loop Is about fourteen I. It's over fourteen. Miles right yeah okay. So one hundred fifty turns. Yeah Oh yeah. That's right that's right. Yeah that's another important point. This is this. Of course it goes through the mountains. I'd like to see with allocation changes. Of course that I think that I think that I read somewhere that the elevation changes over a thousand feet Between the start and finish of the of the tracks so really an interesting track. It's fascinating what did you say? One hundred and fifty some turns you Y. They had more. They tried to make it safer and And that's partly due to Jackie Stewart in fact. It's it's mostly due to Jackie Stewart and a lot of other f one drivers that got together and said we are actually where they're actually going to boycott this race if they didn't make some changes in this. This wasn't always the case because early on you know Formula One. It was a little bit different. Who is it was? It was faster but it wasn't quite as fast and it wasn't quite as dangerous as it was in the late nineteen sixties and they started adding some wings to the cars and add a little. More downforce You know where the car stuck to the track exactly so when they when they would over some of the more pronounced elevation quick elevation changes. Maybe the car would get lighter than it should have been or trying to figure out why the drivers were so afraid of this particular track. And that's all I could come up with Scott wasn't that the course changed course exactly. Yeah the car's got faster in. The cars changed more dependent on air flowing flowing around it in a certain way. Absolutely not cars aren't supposed to get too far off the caress service. Yeah exactly right. Cars DESIGNED TO BE ON THE TRACK SURFACE. And we've talked about this with you know the thrust S. S. C. And you know all the other cars that are going fast and essentially every card. We talked about so far on the fast track But cars are designed to stay low to stay kind of stuck to the ground. The faster you go the more downforce. They have to have in order to stay on the ground. And what happens is that there's some dramatic elevation changes and whether it's just a little rise or You know it's like you're coming over a crest and you can't see what's going on and on the other side of it In a drops right off at this point. The cars were going so fast that they were becoming airborne and part of the problem. Was that with the way that the downforce was Designed these cars I. It was meant to act like a reverse wing to push the car down so when you get air underneath the car it acts in the opposite way. It acts like it's GonNa WanNa lift off and we've seen that in recent years of course with lemond other tracks as well. It's not just it's not just the neubergring But but tracks were cars become airborne these road courses are really really dangerous for drivers that are going super super fast and Back then you know back in the delete sick making sixties Jackie Stewart was saying at the time and I think I've mentioned this and other podcasts. Even though the F. One podcast is that you know a lot of his friends. Were dying on this on this. Unease circuits on these Research in the nurburgring was especially dangerous. In fact One of the facts that came out of the last Cardiff episode. And I think it was. Something that Ben mentioned is that this is hard to believe in. I don't know where he dug this up but I but I do remember him saying that. F One drivers had a two thirds chance over five years of competition that they would be killed in competition in five years. Two thirds chance that sixty six percent chance that you would die in a race if you raise for five years or longer. Nfl competition at the time. And this is like during the late nineteen sixties early nineteen seventies. So Jackie Stewart had a very valid point. You know he said. You know I'm losing. I'm losing friends every weekend on these tracks. Safeties got improve in some way. Let's start with cars of course but let's move onto you know safety equipment and tracks and everything. So he wanted improvements everywhere the Nurburgring. They responded they changed a lot of the a lot of the track. You know they slowed down some of the corners and you know it made it a little bit safer in a lot of ways and there's a lot of ways they can design corners to make them a little bit better but overall still. The Nurburgring is just an inherently dangerous. Course for a lot of reasons and I I think you you already know a couple of reasons. Why Yeah Yeah. I think I know what you're trying to get. At the fact that the track is kind of laid right on top of these extremely rolling hills and in the middle of a forest It's a lot narrower than a lot of modern day race tracks are designed to be The surface is different. The weather conditions are different. And then just the general speed at which you're going Of course was designed at a time when cars didn't see speeds like they see now sure they were fast but they weren't quite as fast as now we're in the sixties and seventies and then even now. I mean they're they're incredibly fast and you know. I think I want to mention this right now. If that's all right I I wanted to take just a second to say that I think the last German Grand Prix that was run at the nurburgring. And that's very specific. We'll we'll talk about that in a second but the last one was run at the nurburgring was in two thousand thirteen and You know of course there were other journ Grand Prix is I mean. The latest one was in twenty eighteen. I believe right or was there one in twenty nineteen there might have been the German Green. Just had it okay. All right But but they kind of like skip around so it's not always run at Hockenheim ring or at the nurburgring. It's kind of a mix the two or sometimes it's just not even either one of those you know depending on whether they're gonna run something else

Jackie Stewart Grand Prix Scott Benjamin HA Wanna Kirk Garin Miles Cardiff NFL BEN Lemond
Your Coronavirus Questions Answered

Short Wave

09:11 min | 8 months ago

Your Coronavirus Questions Answered

"So our first question comes from Amanda in Chicago. My question is how does the corona virus spread and can I catch it from simply being the same public spaces someone. For example airport. We got a lot of questions. About how the corona virus spreads so talk taping. I talked to Dr Lynn Chen. She has up the Travel Medicine Center at Mount Auburn Hospital in Cambridge Massachusetts and she says it mostly spreads person to person through droplets. Let's and Snot so for example of somebody is coughing sneezing and the lands on your face or near you or Liana surface. Where are you then touch? And then some help bring the droplet close to her face nose and mouth. That's how it can spread. It seems to be you less contagious than the flu. Or measles which you can literally just like breathe out and it hangs around in the air and then somebody else breathes it in Yep so if outside or even inside at a place like the airport. You don't have to be awkward about it. You don't glare people for sneezing but just try and keep some space between you and someone who looks sick she says the CDC puts that distance at about six feet away and as always good hand. Washing is really really key. after touching anything being before touching the phase before touching food. You gotTa wash those pause paying. Yeah Mattie it's a germ and like most germs. You can kill it or you can wash it off with soap and water but if you absolutely don't have access to a sink then you can arm yourself with some alcohol wipes and some strong hand sanitizer but what about the people that can spread read it without seeming sick or even knowing they're sick themselves so there's been some debate around this as symtomatic transmission. It's the idea that people could be walking around. I'm feeling totally fine. And still giving it to other people which is kind of a scary thought and last week there is a paper and the New England Journal of Medicine. It was a bad case in Germany. Where or woman who didn't seem sick still gave the virus? Her Co workers but the problem was that the authors didn't actually talk to the woman right and win other people did talk to her. It turns out that she actually was feeling sick. She just took some medicine and went to work. Yeah so it's not actually clear yet whether a symptomatic transmission is or isn't happening but but even if it is happening health officials say that it's really not a big driver in this outbreak. And they're actually much more concerned about people who really are a little bit sick but are still going to school unto work right and then. There's the question of masks this one came from. Alex in Hong Kong are surgical masks or and ninety. Five masks can help us Out at all. Yeah and I would say if you're going to be that person who goes to work sick and I am not naming. Any names would probably help. If you wore a mask. Logic would suggest that it probably does decrease some spread of germs from somebody who actually is ill. That's Stockton Mary. Beth sexton At emory university. So if you yourself are sick mask maybe a good idea right and so in hospitals at least wearing a mask helps catch sputum and Snot and keep it from spreading and like Alex said. There are two types of masks right. Yeah let's right. Mattie that is the end ninety five respirator mask ask which fits tight to your face and it blocks. Most airborne particles among their surgical masks. Are these gauzy rectangular pieces of cloth or paper and you loop them around your ears. Here's and cover your nose and mouth okay. So those end ninety five respirator masks kind of the stiff ones. That have kind of like little half dome. They're recommended for hospital settings but but not for the general public yeah. They're said to be pretty uncomfortable and they might make it hard to breathe and for people who want to prevent themselves from getting sick masks might not do a whole lot. Sexton says it depends on the setting like walking around outdoors with a mask isn't really helpful. It's really going to be an enclosed spaces with people who are contagious that you have the most risk of transmission and so those are probably the situation where you might see some benefit from wearing the mask but again. I think that the emphasis officially on the mask could even be counterproductive because we really need people to wash their hands and to not expose other people if they're symptomatic so so like people might put on a mask and be like Oh. I'm protected and give you kind of a false sense of security. Yeah right in a bunch of people who really aren't used to wearing them they might be touching their faces a lot or they may keep wearing the same mask over and over and that could actually do more harm than good. Another thing that we got questions about a lot is this thing called an are not. It's a number. It's super complicated and it's something that people get wrong. All the time and Christine Garzke from Columbus Ohio O.. H. I hi L.. She asked us about it. Do we know what the are not of this. Current Corona virus is. Okay here we go you ready. Think so so so are not. Is the number of people one sick person could infect on average and that's in a population that's totally susceptible that's important so a group of people in which nobody's vaccinated or has gotten the virus yet. You can kind of think about it as contagious nece but a little more complicated. How so lots of things go into into this intense calculation slash mathematical model? That spits out this number stuff like how long a person's contagious. How likely am I to pass the virus to you do if I'm sick and we've made what's called effective contact with each other right and it's not actually necessarily a constant exactly in multiple ways as we learn more and more about the biology the virus the number will change and it also changes based on the population? You're talking about so factors like the way People Act Act. How many people come in contact with each other? In that population think super congested city versus a rural population. Okay Mattie but back to Christine's original class who what is the actual number fine okay. It's actually a range. Here's Marina van Kerckhove Atop World Health the organization official estimates the reproduction number range from one point four to four point nine so above one where we see human to human transmission but again these estimates maybe refined as more data becomes available. Okay so that actually sounds kind of bad and lake one person getting five. More people sick is a lot of people. Yeah Yeah I hear you but the first thing to keep in mind is that this number was calculated based on the population in China. Right so not the states and again we need to learn a lot more To feel super confident in that range or that number in the final note. Hi are not doesn't mean that. A virus super deadly. It also doesn't talk about like how fast it will spread. It's not a rate calculation. And no doubt this is a cause for concern but I don't think it's really a cause for panic at least not for us here in the. US US okay. So keep calm yes a little bit for now and so are not. Let's leave that right there by itself. Okay Okay Mattie I've left it all right last ask question yell at a lot of people asking about how panic shabby. Why is the media so all over this? Yes we did. Here's one from David Kessler Antler. Why is the corona virus being reported on so much? I do not intend to be callous or obtuse. But I'm curious what element is here. That makes this virus so alarming coming as compared to Cardiff's the US deaths by gun or even our current flu epidemic. That has taken so many more lives. Yeah I think this is actually a pretty great question like one that I actually think about a lot as a human scientist and journalist what do you feel about paying so I think I think it's a fair point that there's a lot aww breathless coverage going on right now about the corona virus and I know that we're contributing to we've been talking about the current virus a lot all the time and it's everywhere and so that it might give people a feeling that we might be dying of it at any given moment sure but the fact is that in the United States the actually really low right and I think it depends on who you are. So if you're a person in China this probably doesn't feel like too much coverage but in the US it could seem overkill. Yeah and something else I think we you need to be aware of in the. US pass is not to vilify the people who are the victims of the virus when he talked about the markets where the viruses thought to have come from and what people eat in China. Yeah I mean we've even talked about that stuff on the show and I feel like we could do better but in the defense of this abundant media coverage. Here's the thing we don't. I don't actually know that much about this virus in that is scary and so I think from a public health perspective. There's a good idea that we should take this extremely seriously really that we should have a strong position. So that we can stamp it out because there are legitimate fears about this getting a foothold and becoming. You know like a new flu Lou. That's always around to deal with over and over again and part of the way you contain potentially global threat like this is to have a lot out of coverage to hear from experts and to share information as much as you can

Mattie United States China Beth Sexton Christine Garzke Dr Lynn Chen Liana Surface New England Journal Of Medicin Alex FLU Amanda Germany Stockton Sneezing Travel Medicine Center Chicago CDC Cambridge Massachusetts Hong Kong
Why The Cost Of Air Ambulances Is Rising

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:08 min | 8 months ago

Why The Cost Of Air Ambulances Is Rising

"Two thousand and two the. US Government introduced a new policy that allow private players to enter the air ambulance industry. This decision brought more competition into the market yet. The cost of an air ambulance trip sword. So why do the normal rules of supply and demand not apply. Here's Cardiff Garcia and Rachel Cohn from our daily Economics podcast the indicator from planet. Money to understand how air ambulance services became so expensive. You actually have to go back to a time when they they were cheaper a time when hospitals were the largest provider of the service ambulances really grew out of emergency rooms that decided. Hey we won't have a way to get people here faster. They were owned by hospitals. They were part of the hospital system. They were on the master hospital bill and often covered by insurance because it was a hospital service. So that is Dr Marty mccarey. He's a surgeon and professor of Health Policy and management at Johns Hopkins University. He says that for a long time hospitals were not making money from their air ambulances. They provided that service is because they could start charging patients. Once they got to the hospitals there were virtually actually no for profit providers companies that were trying to make a profit but in two thousand and two this began to change. The government rolled out a new policy. That change just the amount of money that area meals providers could make from transporting Medicare and Medicaid patients. But basically what you need to know. Is that the new policy made it more lucrative for independent independent ambulance providers that groups other than hospitals to offer the service and what this did was to incentivize outside group's thinking of investing in air ambulances. Silence is because now they were assured more money for transporting Medicare and Medicaid patients but also they could provide these services for this whole other group of patients. People not not covered by Medicare and Medicaid in other words people who had private insurance the result is that the number of air ambulances in the US nearly doubled in the vast majority today are owned by for profit providers and so here is where the normal dynamics of supply and demand start to go skew. They start to get a little weird see in a normal. Oh market that big increase in supply. The supply of air ambulance providers would usually mean a good thing for consumers because consumers now have more choice means more competition competition between those providers in usually means cheaper prices for consumers but in the area relents market. That's not what happens. That's because customers in in this market can't shop around and compare prices and services in an emergency situation. The customer doesn't choose which air ambulance provider to call the ritual. You spoke to a a couple who experienced this firsthand so the story takes place back in two thousand eight back then. This man named David Jones Scott into a terrible accident on a New Jersey highway. He was driving with his girlfriend at the time now. His wife Juliet when their car flipped over and tumbled at sixty five miles an hour onto the highway shoulder. First responders honors arrived at the scene and called an ambulance. David was flown out. I so I remember that hearing the ambulance land I was completely out of the car. Getting entreated to Juliette was actually still trapped in the car so emergency services had to cut her out which took awhile and so they ended up calling second air ambulance a few hours later eventually vincent. They made a full recovery but a nasty surprise awaited them exactly so they were actually going over their bills for their treatment together when they realized that they were charged. Different announce for their area blitz transports had a note written contemporaneous. Like it's funny just looking at the the no it says You know seventeen hundred for me and thirteen thousand for Juliette. Seventeen hundred for David in thirteen thousand dollars for Juliette even even though they were transported the exact same distance from the same accident site to the same hospital. I mean there was one difference aside from the price and that's who flew them so David was flown by a public provider but Juliet was flown by a for profit company. So this big increase in supply. It doesn't bring down the price for people getting air transported so the medium price for example charged by an air ambulance for a helicopter transport in the United States. That is now more than thirty six thousand dollars if you ask the Association of Air Medical Services About this there the industry group that represents air ambulances. They suggest that ambulances have become more expensive to provide but Dr mccarey he sees things differently so he says that the main reason these companies are charging so much for their services is because they can. There's nothing to stop them and so quickly. This second back industry grew of private equity companies. Buying up these air ambulances from hospitals managing the services services and price gouging patients going around the Master Hospital Bill. This has created a situation where people have gotten into a lot of debt and are straining straining their finances just to be able to pay off their hefty air ambulance Bill Rachel Code Cardiff Garcia N._p._R.. News.

Master Hospital Bill David Jones Scott Dr Marty Mccarey Juliette Association Of Air Medical Ser Medicaid United States Juliet Us Government Medicare Bill Rachel Code Professor Of Health Policy Cardiff Garcia Johns Hopkins University Rachel Cohn New Jersey Daily Economics
Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:27 min | 8 months ago

Gender Bias Reveals Consequences For Female Artists

"Okay for music to art. How many feet famous female artists can you name? No not beyond say or Riana artists like Frida Kahlo and Mary Cassatt. If you're having trouble thinking of more than a handful you may be onto a major problem in the art world. We've been artists are routinely left out of museum exhibits and the work is on average valued much less less than that of their meal. Peers Selley herships and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics. podcast the indicator from planet money. How that story there was this? This artist named Joan Mitchell. She was an abstract expressionist. She died in the nineteen nineties but she painted a lot. Joan Mitchell was hugely successful and to our world insiders. She's a big deal. But if you're thinking I've never heard of her you would not be alone. KRISTA LATCHFORD IS CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. She's doing remarkably well at auction. The prices are very high but are they. High in relative to Jackson pollock no way are they high relative to Kooning nope paintings by the KOONING and pollock have gone for sixty to one hundred sixty million dollars. KRISTA says there is no record of Joan Mitchell getting. We're close to that kind of money for her work. which brings us to a big part of the reason that people have trouble naming famous women? Artists Artwork by women and men is just valued differently. Rene teaches finance at Oxford and she and some of her colleagues did an experiment. They picked paintings at random and they showed them to viewers. There's and ask them to guess if the artist was a man or a woman on average the Experiment subjects couldn't guess it was painted by man or woman. Renee says it is practically impossible to look at painting and figure out the gender of the artist but she says if the subjects guessed that the painting was painted by a woman they like the painting less renee looked millions of records from auction sales and she found out that on average work by women. Artists sells for forty percent less than work by male artists and because art by women is valued for less museums by less of it and that is how less artwork by women ends up on display in museums. Ziems at the Baltimore Museum of art only four percent of the collection is women artists. The problem is the same major museums around the country. Christopher Bedford heard the museum's director he says that's why next year any new artwork. The museum buys will be by women the various different filters that we put in place to consider acquisitions nations and have always had them. Placed considerable additions and that system comes together in various different forms specific to the museum to filter the history of art and to include or exclude. Unfortunately in the case of women artists often museums have been excluding. KRISTA says anyone who's buying art museums included has to be careful of what's called the superstar effect sales of female artists represent just the tiniest slice just two percent of the market but of the two percent. Forty forty percent is five women. That's what can happen with the superstar. Effect a tiny number of artists. Become like Tokens or symbols and art buyers or museums ziems or individuals. Feel like they've bought something by a lady and so they feel like they don't have to do anything else but then museums can essentially say okay. I've done my female show will move back to our normal Sally herships Cardiff Garcia N._p._R..

Joan Mitchell Krista Latchford Baltimore Museum Of Art Joan Mitchell Foundation Selley Herships Frida Kahlo Mary Cassatt Jackson Pollock Kooning Cardiff Garcia Renee Rene Christopher Bedford CEO Oxford Director
How Amazon's Counterfeit Products Threaten Safety

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:45 min | 8 months ago

How Amazon's Counterfeit Products Threaten Safety

"After I started digging into this whole counterfeit issue on Amazon together with some of my colleagues leagues. We wanted to see firsthand. What was going on so Cardiff? We decided to order a car seat from Amazon. This carseat looks like a copy of the Dune. A brand the Dune Lebron's Iran. It's just kind of fancy brand kind of combination carseat and stroller and it retails for about five hundred dollars a lot of celebrities own them and it's an attractive you've target for counterfeiters. The listing on Amazon. It didn't use the brand name Duna but it showed photos of real donors including one of vodka trump with hers when the product arrived. It also looked a lot like do not including copying elements of the design. The company says it has patented. We showed the seat to this woman at least bear. She's better are known as the car seat lady. She's a car she lady. Yep She's got quite a following. She's a pediatrician. And car. Seat safety advocate all the interviews. You'll hear in this podcast caster from my piece for CNN. If you look here it says `I ways not always use seatbelt if you noticed spelling errors in the labeling of the a car seat that should be a red flag manufacturers are very diligent about the grammar and the spell checking of their labeling and instructions. She also noticed some other things that she thought were red flags like labeling in the wrong language stitching that went through the webbing of the safety harness thing. She said you wouldn't normally see in a car seat and and of course you might think that there's no way to actually tell if a car seat is safer not unless you like crash it really quickly into the wall with your kid in there and you're not GonNa do do that Pamela. Had to get around that so we crash tested it. Oh okay right not with a real kid of course with approved dumbing. I'll take your word for for it. We sent the car seat to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute they ran it through a basic thirty mile an hour crash test. This is something that all car seats that are sold in the. US are supposed to pass and it failed. They were bits of plastic flying off of it and the car seat with a toddler inside it actually slid forward and twisted a bit and Pamela. You said that bear and another pediatrician looked at this video and said that a child in this seat would have been at serious risk of head and neck injuries so really scary stuff. For comparison. We did run the same test on a real dune and it passed. The seat stayed in one piece and in place. I'm ED. Raviv Dune as commercial manager manager said that his company there flagging these fakes to Amazon regularly. We've taken down just this year more than forty pages which had infringing aging products are fake products just on the Amazon platform alone. And if you -SSUME that each one of these pages is up for you know three to seven days. Then you're talking about the good period of the year in which fake products dangerous products are being sold on Amazon. We sent the results of this crash test Amazon and after that they e mailed customers to urge them to stop abusing it immediately and they offer them a full refund all right so like service journalism. You get some results. We're happy to see that all done car seats are just one example of this problem though. We also bought a toy with magnets that didn't meet federal safety standards. I spoke to a company that made swallows for babies. They had a customer return one because his zipper pulled off a potential choking hazard and when they got this Waddell into their office they realized it was a counterfeit. Okay and Pamela. You actually did reach out to Amazon and were they. He said was. These are isolated incidents. That safety is a top priority for the company Amazon also made the point that sellers themselves are responsible for meeting Amazon's high bar for the quality of products for complying with laws and regulations. Now Amazon they are trying to tackle this counterfeit problem more than two hundred thousand brands issue. Something called the Amazon Brand Registry. This gives them tools to help them find and flag suspected counterfeits and Amazon also use automation to scan and proactively remove move suspicious listings. Yeah there's other Amazon program as well called transparency which lets companies tag each product with a unique code and that code can then be scanned to verify a five. The product is real. Although companies in that case need to buy the labels themselves in absorb the cost of adding these coach their products Amazon also starting to let some brands remove counterfeit listings on their own. The companies. I spoke to say Amazon's efforts. They have really helped especially in the last two years but they still oh complain. The responsibility and the cost of policing fakes feels like it. Falls on them. Rather than on Amazon they all describe it as an endless game of whack. A mole against counterfeits. Take one down another one pops up. Here's Ommiad Raviv again from tuna. It will be great if Amazon steps up and works with the brands and with the different advocates in the US in order to prevent these products from ever coming to the platform as opposed to removing them. Worse than what we there for. It's part Amazon on said that it invested four hundred million dollars in two thousand eighteen to build programs make sure the products that offers on its platform or safe and comply with regulations relations. So Cardiff something. I thought was really interesting. was that a couple of the people I spoke to. They mentioned they thought the current situation is only going to really change if Amazon and other ECOMMERCE platforms are held liable for safety defects trademark issues related to these goods sold by third parties. Yeah something interesting that you told me Pamela. was that right now. Courts don't see Amazon as the legal seller in these cases of third party sales so they treat Amazon kind of like a flea market. There's a problem. The liability is with the vendor. The stall at the flea market not Amazon which is like the landlord that oversees the space where the flea market stall is a lot of dates back to a ten year old case involving tiffany the jewelry brand and Ebay it set up this idea that the law treats ecommerce really differently differently from a physical store like a target or your corner grocery those physical stores. They may not make the products they sell. But they're still liable for problems with them But this could change recently. An appeals court rejected. This interpretation for the first time the judges in that case they were like look Amazon has so so much knowledge and control over it sales platform and it's so hard for the average person to try and track down and sue a third party seller. We should hold Amazon reliable. That court decision is going to be reviewed next month by the entire Third Circuit Court of Appeals. The legal community is watching really closely three different lawyers. I spoke with thought a change might be coming. It might be this case. It might be another one but they sense that something is starting to shift

How Amazon's Counterfeit Products Threaten Safety

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:45 min | 8 months ago

How Amazon's Counterfeit Products Threaten Safety

"After I started digging into this whole counterfeit issue on Amazon together with some of my colleagues leagues. We wanted to see firsthand. What was going on so Cardiff? We decided to order a car seat from Amazon. This carseat looks like a copy of the Dune. A brand the Dune Lebron's Iran. It's just kind of fancy brand kind of combination carseat and stroller and it retails for about five hundred dollars a lot of celebrities own them and it's an attractive you've target for counterfeiters. The listing on Amazon. It didn't use the brand name Duna but it showed photos of real donors including one of vodka trump with hers when the product arrived. It also looked a lot like do not including copying elements of the design. The company says it has patented. We showed the seat to this woman at least bear. She's better are known as the car seat lady. She's a car she lady. Yep She's got quite a following. She's a pediatrician. And car. Seat safety advocate all the interviews. You'll hear in this podcast caster from my piece for CNN. If you look here it says `I ways not always use seatbelt if you noticed spelling errors in the labeling of the a car seat that should be a red flag manufacturers are very diligent about the grammar and the spell checking of their labeling and instructions. She also noticed some other things that she thought were red flags like labeling in the wrong language stitching that went through the webbing of the safety harness thing. She said you wouldn't normally see in a car seat and and of course you might think that there's no way to actually tell if a car seat is safer not unless you like crash it really quickly into the wall with your kid in there and you're not GonNa do do that Pamela. Had to get around that so we crash tested it. Oh okay right not with a real kid of course with approved dumbing. I'll take your word for for it. We sent the car seat to the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute they ran it through a basic thirty mile an hour crash test. This is something that all car seats that are sold in the. US are supposed to pass and it failed. They were bits of plastic flying off of it and the car seat with a toddler inside it actually slid forward and twisted a bit and Pamela. You said that bear and another pediatrician looked at this video and said that a child in this seat would have been at serious risk of head and neck injuries so really scary stuff. For comparison. We did run the same test on a real dune and it passed. The seat stayed in one piece and in place. I'm ED. Raviv Dune as commercial manager manager said that his company there flagging these fakes to Amazon regularly. We've taken down just this year more than forty pages which had infringing aging products are fake products just on the Amazon platform alone. And if you -SSUME that each one of these pages is up for you know three to seven days. Then you're talking about the good period of the year in which fake products dangerous products are being sold on Amazon. We sent the results of this crash test Amazon and after that they e mailed customers to urge them to stop abusing it immediately and they offer them a full refund all right so like service journalism. You get some results. We're happy to see that all done car seats are just one example of this problem though. We also bought a toy with magnets that didn't meet federal safety standards. I spoke to a company that made swallows for babies. They had a customer return one because his zipper pulled off a potential choking hazard and when they got this Waddell into their office they realized it was a counterfeit. Okay and Pamela. You actually did reach out to Amazon and were they. He said was. These are isolated incidents. That safety is a top priority for the company Amazon also made the point that sellers themselves are responsible for meeting Amazon's high bar for the quality of products for complying with laws and regulations. Now Amazon they are trying to tackle this counterfeit problem more than two hundred thousand brands issue. Something called the Amazon Brand Registry. This gives them tools to help them find and flag suspected counterfeits and Amazon also use automation to scan and proactively remove move suspicious listings. Yeah there's other Amazon program as well called transparency which lets companies tag each product with a unique code and that code can then be scanned to verify a five. The product is real. Although companies in that case need to buy the labels themselves in absorb the cost of adding these coach their products Amazon also starting to let some brands remove counterfeit listings on their own. The companies. I spoke to say Amazon's efforts. They have really helped especially in the last two years but they still oh complain. The responsibility and the cost of policing fakes feels like it. Falls on them. Rather than on Amazon they all describe it as an endless game of whack. A mole against counterfeits. Take one down another one pops up. Here's Ommiad Raviv again from tuna. It will be great if Amazon steps up and works with the brands and with the different advocates in the US in order to prevent these products from ever coming to the platform as opposed to removing them. Worse than what we there for. It's part Amazon on said that it invested four hundred million dollars in two thousand eighteen to build programs make sure the products that offers on its platform or safe and comply with regulations relations. So Cardiff something. I thought was really interesting. was that a couple of the people I spoke to. They mentioned they thought the current situation is only going to really change if Amazon and other ECOMMERCE platforms are held liable for safety defects trademark issues related to these goods sold by third parties. Yeah something interesting that you told me Pamela. was that right now. Courts don't see Amazon as the legal seller in these cases of third party sales so they treat Amazon kind of like a flea market. There's a problem. The liability is with the vendor. The stall at the flea market not Amazon which is like the landlord that oversees the space where the flea market stall is a lot of dates back to a ten year old case involving tiffany the jewelry brand and Ebay it set up this idea that the law treats ecommerce really differently differently from a physical store like a target or your corner grocery those physical stores. They may not make the products they sell. But they're still liable for problems with them But this could change recently. An appeals court rejected. This interpretation for the first time the judges in that case they were like look Amazon has so so much knowledge and control over it sales platform and it's so hard for the average person to try and track down and sue a third party seller. We should hold Amazon reliable. That court decision is going to be reviewed next month by the entire Third Circuit Court of Appeals. The legal community is watching really closely three different lawyers. I spoke with thought a change might be coming. It might be this case. It might be another one but they sense that something is starting to shift

Amazon Pamela Cardiff Raviv Dune Third Circuit Court Of Appeals Duna Iran CNN University Of Michigan Transpo Neck Injuries Ommiad Raviv Waddell Commercial Manager United States Ebay
The Popularity Of (And Problem With) Municipal Bonds

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:54 min | 9 months ago

The Popularity Of (And Problem With) Municipal Bonds

"Nunis I've been reading quite a lot about this recently in the press hearing hearing Sort of financial TV wise the market for municipal bonds. So hot right neue. Bottom line ever since The trump administration past their new tax tax laws and ever since we are only able to write off a maximum of ten thousand dollars of state against federal and we are really a hamstring. About what our deductions are people. Don't WANNA pay taxes. What is the one area that has left municipal? Oh bonds and it isn't that they are some juicy and high yielding no. It's just that they have been relatively safe and You earn interest. I federal tax free. And if you buy municipals in your state from your state they will be State tax free so all the big tide tax states California Illinois Annoy Massachusetts New York Blah Blah Blah. You know the names those are. The resident said have been buying municipal bonds like crazy road. So they're all after this type. They're basically after taxpayer. They want to save money on Texas. They are but here's the thing about municipal bonds little people think that all Muniz tax exempt. But that's not the case right. That's correct there. There are taxable municipal bonds. And the reason why they created those is the The cities that counties the entities that issue municipal bonds almost almost all have some kind of ceiling on how much they can issue annually and one say reach that ceiling then they can no longer issue tax free bonds and they have to issue issue taxable municipal bonds which are pretty competitive with yields on corporate bonds but my understanding is that those taxable bonds are still just as popular all pillar the tax exempt bonds between the municipal world. Why would that be? It's it's the race for Yael. Everybody wants wants yield and we even find foreigners are buying both tax free and taxable income. Yeah well and you say why would they do that. When you've got negative yields in Japan and in the euro-zone all they want is a rate of return on their money? They don't WanNa deposit their money and have to pay the depository money to hold that money. So we I have this crazy thirst for yield right now. Why why do we have that? Why does that exist? Well we have it because Number one the negative yielding global. Oh bonds have never been more powerful number two if you are an actuary meaning a pension plan A insurance company that has actuary reliability. You have made You have made promises that you're going to be able to produce x amount of income and X.. Amount of capital capital gains a year and that x amount of income has become more and more difficult with the negative yielding bonds globally. So people want to save save they want to invest and they WANNA positive rate of return. So where do they go. The United States of America Corporate Bonds Immune E bonds attacks won't Mini-van so busy because interest us rates are so low. It means that you're not getting the yield on the normal stuff that we used to get sort of ten years ago that yielded quite nice returns to now. You've got to go to more risky things. You absolutely absolutely do or just suck it up and say well. I guess I'm GonNa only earn one point. Four percent on a California general obligation bond in ten years much sex due to go to the junk bond market well the perils. They're quite different than the muny market. But junk bonds are quite popular right now. My understanding is I was reading something the day. WHOA whoa speaking about junk bonds? We should also talk talk a little bit of bites. I don't if you know but this becky with the good yield you know about this becky. No yes you know becky because you spoke to us when we bought a junk bond for Cardiff Garcia. Oh yes MRS homebake off shore drilling just a company that he did not so call becky with the good yields and actually that bond is not jim typically where we bought it to ninety today. It's trading at a bite de to seventy four ninety two so were down a little bit. But that's actually across the junk bond market. The prices are up because people are chasing that healed. And how what does that mean for the economy. Is that a dangerous thing if people are chasing after this high yield dangerous if the economy stumbles not just the US US economy but the global economy. And a Becky I understand then must be in the In the energy area is that correct so one of the worst performing areas in the United States all of last year. And what's happened in the energy space just like the regular investment in space is that corporations have taken on so much debt we are talking trillions and if the economy stumbles and Business starts to your road revenues. Then go down. Interest coverage on the debt starts to deteriorate. And we're going to start seeing it when that happens happens. Many more defaults domino's right the domino theory thing goes on the whole goes on a very very quickly whenever you're leveraged switch or could go slowly because so many people especially in the in the junk bond market last year thought hall. This is the year. We're GONNA have major defaults and it didn't happen to any consequence foot skip onto Muniz. So what else should investors be worried by looking at municipal bonds right no well. The CONGA line is pretty long as far as natural disasters and You know hurricanes and everything that's climate change but I would say one of the big things now that we watch every day that we have a person that scans every news news feed around is cyber attacks cyber-attacks exactly city of Baltimore has been attacked. There have been multiple attacks in small cities in In Florida there was a trauma one health center in New York that was attacked and because they didn't pay the ransom they were down for over two months. And and what does that mean to a bondholder. Why should they care? You have many of those and they have to pay the ransom number one which was not budgeted for or their insurance difference for cyber-attacks. Goes up astronomically. Then you as a bondholder. The amount of money that they're taking in annually starts to get skimpier and skimpier because they have have to pay all these bills that they hadn't budgeted for and you the bondholder have less and less security interesting. Do you think that these risks whether it be the climate change inge risks or these kind of security risk cybersecurity risk are they priced into the bones in your opinion not at all not at all. It's too it's too early for them to have priced it into the bonds uh-huh and I only see cyber attacks getting bigger and stronger and more profitable for the cyber thieves a more devastating for the bondholders holders

United States California Becky New York Texas Japan Muniz Muny Domino Florida Massachusetts Cardiff Garcia Baltimore Illinois
The Business Behind The Color Of The Year

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:25 min | 9 months ago

The Business Behind The Color Of The Year

"Today's indicator is Nineteen Dash Forty fifty. Two that is the exact shade of Pantheon's official color of this year classic blue and it had a lot of competition. Pantalone has identified more than twenty three hundred colors. It print them out on its famous color chips in a factory in New Jersey. Pretty the people that work there have special vision tests that ensure their ability to expertly distinguish subtle differences in shade and tone. Laurie pressman is is the vice president of the Pan Tone Color Institute. She's worked there for twenty years. She's been there basically since Pinto unsorted picking out. Its colors at the year. She is a bona fide color expert. So I- astor astor. Radio and color is a color. I asked her to describe classic blue to somebody who could not see it so when we think about classic Blue Tanto One thousand nine hundred fifty two classic blue. If you think about the sky at dusk think about a blue that speaks to the end of the day. It has that that reassuring qualities that we associate with blue. The dependability the stability. Because it's something that we see every day and yet there's a little bit more color depth to it. There's a little bit of a a red undertone but please don't mistake this classic shade to be that Cardigan sweater or that university jacket. Because it's more more modern I was just GonNa say like Navy blue. Yeah I was just GonNa say that. That's a fascinating. Look into the mind of a color expert right. I mean I don't know anything about color As you know card if I were like black and gray basically every day I try to blend in with the pavement but as I was looking at this colored there was something striking about even to my untutored eye. And that was that you know the colors for the last few years have been very vibrant and lively and this one just isn't last caller was called living coral bright and lively In two thousand eighteen there was pretty lavender color your before that was this kind of Kermit. The Frog Green and then they came out with classic blue and I wanted to ask ask her about it because it just looked so kinda Blah yeah this blues like it doesn't seem that young to me. It seems a little Lake Doc. It's the color of my bank card. Now see okay and I say you have to go back to the red. And that's the really interesting I would say taint or undertone or influence to this color so I don't think of it as corporate you know this is not your IBM blue. That's not what this is. This is a really fresh and more vibrant blue so it has all those great things that we love about the blues. The reassurance the calm that we're looking for the confidence inspiring us to connect at the same time. There's an energy I don't know it looks like a bank card to me. Here's here's a sample of the color which Panta sent me so this is printed out on their printers and I am now putting my chase bank card right on top of it. And they're close. I think the chase bank blue is slightly darker but other than that distinct cards more vibrant. I think you're right and it's more metallic I don't know honestly when you I know. Pan Tone has turned and color precision into this multi million dollar business companies from all over the world in all kinds of industries. Actually pay pan tone to help them choose colors for their logos and their spring bring lines and their packaging and their products. Barbie Victoria's secret tiffany schweppes. They have all worked with Pan Tone to develop their signature color color. The year is supposed to be more of a cultural statement though. Panton collects data from all over the world to see what colors are being used and tries to think about why certain colors are becoming more popular. What what are you looking to to get that? It's really product what we're seeing in movies. It's art you know it. All the different materials we see coming through do all the different Focus on different travel destinations and once the color set everybody pays attention. That's according to Regina Blah's check. She is a professor of business history at the University of Leeds. And she's the author of the Color Revolution. She says hand tones color of the year becomes kind of celebrity within the industry. I think antone has made a color into a celebrity for this for this year. I think I think that's what it's about and much like celebrity. Classic blue has some high profile haters a lot of articles of come out saying Classic Lewis Boring and Corporate Regina's. Yes it is and it was really a brilliant choice my lean. Okay okay so I am so interested here because to me it just looks like my bank card like it is. That's what caught your bank card and I think that's the whole point is it. Looks like your bank card. It looks like the IBM I b. m. logo it looks like the binders that are lining up here in my office. It's very safe very safe and very secure and very very familiar. And I think what they're suggesting is that in this era of turmoil that we need to have there is a desire an underlying desire to move towards some stability and that Bankcard blue suggests that stability and it is bankcard blue that will be featured in a million million product meetings all over the world as clothing companies home decor companies carmakers hotels electronics makers and countless other businesses. Consider it in their buying decisions. Any business today Who is concerned with producing products for the consumer is concerned with with the latest color trends? If you're an Taylor or banana republics you WANNA be on trends you WANNA follow the trend and so and and what do you think uh of classic blood you like it. I think it's an interesting color. I like blue. I wear blue and green and pink. Because I'm blonde so works for me. Oh interesting saying okay Do you buy stuff and classic blue. I just bought a classic Blue Blazer. So I'm all set you did is it. And by the way Cardiff Panton does not just consider classic blue a color. It's a whole experience in ambience. They sent a box of like a handled handled. It's like the smell of classic blue and some Jelly that's the taste of classic blue and was also blue and grows Sorry and the feel of classical and they also have the sound of classic blue. It's so here is the song that is supposed to be the sound of classic blue

Pan Tone Color Institute Pan Tone Bankcard Blue IBM New Jersey Astor Astor Pantalone Laurie Pressman Pinto Official Cardiff Panton Regina Blah Vice President Lake Doc Panton Regina Navy Panta Barbie Victoria
The Bubble That Broke Kuwait

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:41 min | 9 months ago

The Bubble That Broke Kuwait

"And we've got got a doozy for you today. I'm joined by. Dr Is Rafi on Darius I cardiff Yes today I've got a story for you about one of the greatest stock bubbles of all time which occurred in of all places Kuwait Kuwait. Yes and the story begins in the late. Nineteen seventies during what is known as Kuwait's golden era so Kuwait had been this kind of sleepy desert outpost and then due to the massive influx of oil money. It became this bustling metropolis list. And I actually talked to a man named Saba Araya's who was a prominent businessman in Kuwait around this time and he talks about what Kuwait looked like when he was a kid. Growing growing up like Trinity. We have running water up happening structure The there was no air conditioning for looks up over elevators. And by the late nineteen seventies Kuwait had become this modern metropolis and it also become the financial center of the Middle East because they region was rocked by turmoil. At this point in Kuwait with its really well regulated financial sector and it's relatively stable political. Climate became came this magnet for all of this money that was fleeing turmoil. Elsewhere in the region is a pretty classic emerging markets story starts doing some things right and then all this money he starts coming in from other places And obviously that drove up prices in Kuwait's official stock market but it was very very tightly. Regulated it you know. There are lots of regulations about what kinds of companies could be listed there who was allowed to invest. How are they allowed to invest and made it very stable but it also made it kind of a boring place to invest all this money? That wants to invest in Kuwaiti companies. And if it can't do their maybe it will find some other way to invest invest in them. Well it did find another way. Basically right across the street from the official Kuwaiti stock market. A sort of love informal unofficial stock market developed it was known as the soup ALMANAC and it was literally in a air conditioned parking garage on the site eight of the old camel market and sugamo knock literally translates to the market at the place where the camels rest traders started gathering there and trading trading stocks amongst each other. And I spoke to Ben Craig who is a economic policy adviser for the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland. And he's written a lot about the suit GALMOC Manakh And I have to clarify here. That everything he said in our interview only represents his personal views. He doesn't represent the views of the Federal Reserve. But I talked to him about this sort of informal formal market that developed. It was seen as an area where you could have fun but what Claes stays in the soup. I don't think I've heard that one before for we'll basically the government said hey. We like having this innovative kind of risky market with big returns. But we don't want the risk to infect the rest has to the economy so they put all these rules in place that said banks are not allowed to touch the super. They can't lend money to people who are investing there. It's got to be completely cut off from the financial sector her but of course traders don't like this because they don't want to just trade with the money they have in their pocket they WANNA borrow money in and you know potentially get even higher returns turns and so the system developed between the traders in the soup that I think was a little bit ingenious. The couldn't borrow money from the bank. So what they did is they had this system of writing post dated checks so basically card if I want to buy a stock for meal. It's worth one hundred dollars now and I think it's going to go up in the future. All right you a check I I say one hundred ten dollars and date it for a year from now you know like if your rent is due on the first you don't get paid till the third. Yeah date your check on the third. That's right that's what they were doing but they would do it for a year and in that situation. It's like you just lent me money for a year but then this sort of interesting thing happened with check check itself became a little bit like cash so suppose that maybe I want to buy some of that stock. I don't have any cash but I have that posted hosted shack and so I just passed that posted check onto a nar trader. It was essentially a way for these traders to print their own money and then Craig cautions against drawing any comparison to other markets. But in my opinion it's not all that different from what happened. In the run-up to the financial central crisis where mortgage-backed securities became much bigger than mortgages in this case the checks that were backed by stocks became much bigger than the stocks themselves selves. And thanks to this. System of kind of endless unregulated credit the Kuwaiti stock market skyrocketed. It became the third heard largest stock market in the world. Bigger even than London and Sobowale riotous says that this was turning people into instant millionaires. He recounted the story to me of going to his friend's apartment and I saw this huge big plate full with the new caveat. You know they by the House and then it was. Ten Cuba's maybe have the token of caveat on on the table I couldn't believe David and this market is started to draw in teachers and students and and he he talks about how you know. Doctors are quitting their jobs to run down to the Sukhoi ANOC and start trading eating stocks. It just became this national obsession that classic mania everybody sees it going up they think it will continue going up and we'll tell you how they started.

Kuwait Ben Craig Official Dr Is Rafi Federal Reserve Middle East Saba Araya Federal Reserve Bank Claes Cleveland Wanna Cuba NAR London David Sobowale
WeWork And The Future Of Coworking

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:54 min | 11 months ago

WeWork And The Future Of Coworking

"This message comes from NPR sponsor xfinity some things are slow like simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply after investors took a close look at the company's books and lost confidence in what they found there here is Stacey Vanek Smith and Cardiff Garcia from NPR's Daily Economics podcast. The came we work we work was not boring or beige it was this whole new way London earlier this year the company was estimated to be worth forty seven billion dollars Sir look at we works books and investors freaked out the companies rolling company I'm all Sarda is the CEO of a company called Motel which he would basically no tell does compete with we work yeah though Amal does say that they have different companies and it will probably benefit from we works implosion though a mall says probably L. Answers or working for tiny startups most of us just worked for big boring companies enterprises. They believe they're big oh in the last couple of years we worked did start to target bigger binny's on the other hand tend to make for more stable tenants and also they just have more money five hundred dollars a month and that is just for access to the lounge common area if you want in extremely price sensitive and they have much cheaper options and if those

NPR CEO Stacey Vanek Smith Daily Economics Cardiff Garcia Amal London Forty Seven Billion Dollars Five Hundred Dollars
"cardiff" Discussed on The SodShow

The SodShow

06:00 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The SodShow

"Why did do what they do? And why I think last night I said to add anybody who can bring that amount of happiness to somebody who is so hard down under look was voters notice respect. But but the reasons I don't watch television reasons, I don't mind newspapers. The tend to some sometimes say not all the time just in sections. But at least it's reported. It seems to be the headline seem to be the negative stuff. Apprenticeships get the walk in the door. What what things are falling apart around you. I'm much somehow make it better on. I couldn't ask too. When when I asked why it went to Cardiff versus Hampton, Dir, Coppola reasons. One is. I think I'm under I Irish one. It's your first time. Yeah. Perennials first time see deer volved. We've amazing team really have. Amazing. Ciardi player sites under one hundred eighty nine versity. We could have got a. One. We could have got a better metal. On bigger stages. It's not a fair with of course, 'cause we could have done. But I think the thing as I said before the peel was the location of being in Cardiff was ideal for Perennials purposes as well. So we. Box-ticking exercise in that respect. You know, let's spread the word further than just where it's normally Oreo already been spread. So I think that's probably an overriding factor really for for them. And and and it means a lot to us. So why wouldn't we won't we do that? All right. We're partly true. I got an order food on starving on free. Freezing a little not the minute probably warm on a day. You listen to this. But freeze so I got a bowl the soup. You just keep listen. But in real time. We've got into DeLorean typed in October twenty fifth nineteen ninety-five for you back to the future. We'll talk to you. After policies. We got the Roche. We're not walking down the street just off too. But Waterloo, which I think is. There's a photograph Dr touch on Twitter. Sends you we're. We're in Hempstead. Yeah. Lovely. Suburbs of Hempstead. Two in the second. Promise you okay, with me euro, okay in real time. All right. Okay. So we've had two planes trains automobiles isn't. Hundred miles an hour where we head into Gatwick where we know we're leaving approaching. Well, we had involved presets. Okay. So stay we are promise of evac, which is already. Play. Kraken, Shan crack and channel fairness. Okay. Talk to you seconds. So we're we're still we're still can traffic in somewhere Shire. We in now in you'll. Y'all. The accent isn't get it you you will get into this. We I can't remember where we were apart from Wilkin industry at. Yeah. We will. I think we were trying to talk about. Don't know you are home up see turn around and say that was only treatments go when in fact, it's it's sorta, but we're. We're plugging away. Undis- unrelenting dare memories of the bit wonky on what was said in real time. Two hours ago at this states came on all forms of transportation later talked to me a little bit about building. The building of a show garden small big are large. What makes a bills go? According to plan. Water the factors outside of I suppose, the trees plants into colors under style the paving that makes click together because there is a there's almost like a secondary level of morale on wetter on. I was going to say decent food. But when you're cold and wet and hungry and tired, and it's nine o'clock in the evening on something is just a an endurance test..

Hempstead Cardiff Twitter Roche Undis Gatwick Coppola Wilkin industry Shire Waterloo Hampton twenty fifth Two hours
"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene. Three of the most important economists in this country, set down for a panel at an economic conference in Atlanta last week, former fed chair, Ben Bernanke, he and Janet Yellen along with the current pitcher Jay Powell were talking shop and also talking about the latest jobs report, but as Cardiff Garcia and Stacey Smith from our planet money podcast, the indicator. Tell us a stellar jobs report is not always a good thing. It was a pretty stellar report. Three hundred twelve thousand jobs added in December strong wage growth and. Of course, unemployment is still below four percent. And then here's Jay Powell's response. That's quite welcome. And also for me at this time does not raise concerns about to high inflation does not raise concerns about to high inflation that seems like a weird comment to make right? We add it all these jobs. But that doesn't mean I'm worried about inflation, but it communists, discussed a relationship between unemployment and inflation all the time that relationship is sometimes referred to as the Phillips curve. And that's this idea that if enough people are working, it will cause inflation the prices of the things that we buy will start going up, and according to the Phillips curve, the reverse is also true. So if unemployment goes up then inflation should come down because then companies don't have to raise wages to compete for workers. There's more workers out there who needed job, and we got kind of test of this back in the late seventies and early eighties. Inflation seemed to be getting out of control prices were rising up and up and up and get inflate. Under control, Paul car. He was the head of the Federal Reserve at the time raised interest rates all the way to twenty percent by comparison, by the way, short-term interest rates right now are two percent. But will Volker did lead to a week or economy and unemployment went up all the way up to ten percent inflation. No did come down. And so everybody's wondering is chair pal to worry about inflation and easy then gonna keep raising interest rates to prevent inflation from spiking higher for me. At this time does not raise concerns about to high inflation. Powell saying the even though unemployment is low and wage growth is rising. It doesn't necessarily mean that higher inflation will follow. So this relationship between inflation in jobs, even though the Phillips curve predicts it Powell's not really seen it. Let's curvy so NICKY Phillips curve dead to use a slaying, economic jargon. This is an indulgence phenomenon. Dodges phenomenon. Exactly, I was just thinking that basically what banenky saying is that the relationship between unemployment and inflation has changed people saw that the Federal Reserve would raise interest rates really high. If it needed to to bring inflation back down and ever since then inflation has stayed low. And here's the key people and companies act accordingly because if they worry that inflation was going to be much higher in the future. They would spend more money now and companies would raise prices to try to get ahead of the trend and that would contribute to inflation going higher right now. But that's not happening. What Ben Bernanke you saying is it precisely because of what the fed did in the past that the link between low unemployment and high inflation is weaker than it used to be. And that's the quote endogenous reason why the Phillips curve is so flat. So economists still strongly debate whether the Phillips curve is really dead or just resting. But if it is then it was possibly killed by the people in this room people with this job. Fed chair. Other words, it's indigenous. Stacey Vanek Smith Cardiff Garcia NPR news..

NICKY Phillips Jay Powell Ben Bernanke Federal Reserve Rachel Martin David Greene Stacey Vanek Smith Stacey Smith Cardiff Garcia Paul car Atlanta Janet Yellen NPR Volker Dodges twenty percent four percent ten percent two percent
"cardiff" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

02:11 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"A good drive cars converted to key third downs on this drive to keep it alive. Used sets Roberts. Recharge these perfect. Derek is on this drives three of three forty nine yards over conferring coach Gruden now. He'll truck back to the. Sean Williams of safety came over to the sideline walked off on his own the accord standing up. So I think he's okay. Just a little shaken up second down and six the ball is at the Bengals thirty one yard. I Martin back in the running back car will take the snap from Hudson back into the shotgun. Cardiff throw deflected. He caught it. And he goes right down the forty yard. I you got to knock that wall down one Derek better decision making. Why would you catch it? So, unfortunately. You can't you just you just you cannot do that you got to be smarter than knock it down. Third down fourteen wall at the thirty nine. I understand he's trying to make a play. But you is nothing. He could do you're not gonna be able to outrun anybody especially from position. So just knock you down. Nine yard loss. Short in. Can they convert on third at fourteen they're going to throw it underneath the Rashard trying to set a screen charges to thirty two. Well, short of the first down. And are they close enough? Because they're going to give field goal. Try Daniel Carlson. Trots onto the field. That's actually a good screen. Well, well-designed sprains. They give them enough for the I doubt. But it did put them back Joe boat position. So this'll be a fifty yard field goal. He's made one fifty order. Here we go. This is a big to cut it to ten fifty yard attempt by Daniel Carlson. All is good. Is on its way is long enough and good Daniel Carlson. What.

Hudson Daniel Carlson Derek Sean Williams Gruden Roberts Bengals Cardiff Martin Rashard three forty nine yards thirty one yard ten fifty yard fifty yard forty yard Nine yard
"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"After that. I was talking to you the phone, and you said, you know, what I did notice that after FRANZ that Thomas. Stop following me on Twitter understanding why he was furious. Well, nine nine. Very interesting. I mean, we have an Email actually after our after we played into your couple of weeks ago from somebody who said that they felt that we completely underestimated them through me and writing him off in the way that I did I didn't write him off clear Cardiff. Do I what? I wish that thought to say this to the time to nice to win the Twitter fronts Francois says, but lots of people always say, she always used to say you need that you need that Riddler straight. You know, you need to be prepared to crop people photographs. There's a there's a real ruthless selfish streak that the winters require. But then you know, when we talked about this couple weeks ago, Larry war bus disputed that. He said he knew guys who were when was the example. He cited the somebody who is a winner can also be nice guy. I'm not saying Chris is no nice guy. There is there is a ruthless. This to him on doubtedly that we've seen on occasion. I I think we would have seen the tour if he'd had the legs nothing ultimately didn't. But. No matter he was on the jersey broom if he'd be able to try when the tour he would have tried to win the tour. Through undoubtedly pros. Well, white bring a bit more history to the device. Perhaps we can and. He was right. I mean, the that we recorded the Causton an error celebration because we were weak into the rice a week nine. Don't turn it on our bother. Yeah. And and you within as long as the tour. The whole history of the rights if Doma ninety by people dominated Merck's indoor I Armstrong we're very very used to the tool being over sometime before even begun. I wonder sometimes how we would covering the seventies tours of Eddy Merckx where used to win the prologue and then his team win the team time trial, and then he'd win the first with any kind of hailing it on stage three or four yellow and that would literally and then he'd win by seven nine minutes are used to being finally balanced, but what is kind of what was really unusual about. This is that it was kind of finally balanced without the suspense because I think we knew that would have to he would almost have to implode to to lose the tour and as the day when own just look. That I was going to happen saying to you is why all right sherri's most of his team didn't thank he was going to win at that stage. I was in the team sky car with Rhode Island the following day when he went up out and roll was the only person that I heard he said, bloody Hal he he's gonna win it. Now, there's nothing to stop him taking yellow all the way to Paris. And even not say Java surprised because I expected I guess maybe more official line from rural. But I thought well, we'll he'd be giving up freedom starts to be able to raise four himself. But we were all expecting some states. They typical Thomas bad luck to kick. It. I'm from reading his book. It seems like the most of the rest of the team didn't necessarily expect him to win until midway through the final week. I mean, I was. The guy after party in Paris. Guarantee on the celebrate. His way and he'd had a few Drake. So the truth was finally starting to come out some lots of and he was thanking all of his team. But he said that whenever you cross the line in the show's Elise had his arms in the air. He said one of his first was bloody hell to pay all these lots of bonus ni-. And then a second thought was actually I only have to pay them for three days. That's all the time that the work for him. And he was joking too. Three days. The rest of the team is going to the point the port the reason for the flatness was the tool was over in the census go, I kind of held the destiny of the rice hands and like almost pick and choose and when you saw over the counter could win.

Chris Twitter FRANZ Doma Thomas Paris Eddy Merckx Francois Cardiff Rhode Island Merck Elise sherri official seven nine minutes Three days three days
"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"So Cardiff, I was recently on vacation her member very lucky person. I went to Greece which I highly recommend lot of history there too. I spent a lot of time in museums. Because I am me. Asked you to spend a lot of time on the beach and not nerd ING out on economics and finance. I mean, you know, but they called to me. I, you know, I just I love these places. They have all these relics and old manuscripts and stuff. I was in heaven anyway, most of the older manuscripts. They're like in Greece thousand years old. It's amazing mostly bible text bible text bible texts was going through this museum. And then I saw on the far while this museum this huge parchment scroll here chicken you haven't seen this yet. Wow. It's like bigger than person it's taller than a person and about half as wide it seems it's like seven feet long just this long scroll at this. Big gold seal on very fancy, but guess what it was about. What? Taxes? Yes. Of course, of course, it was about taxes because you couldn't help yourself geeking out on economic stuff while on vacation in Greece is about tag. I was beside myself. I was so excited. In fact, according to this museum, this long seven foot, scroll was a list of tax exemptions. That was granted to a particular monastery from Alexia the first emperor of Byzantium in ten eight and this time he thinking because like, I know the taxes are important, right, obviously raising money is important for a government for an emperor. Like are. They this important. I mean, why are tax exemptions worthy of of this? I mean, the two things on manuscripts in this museum were like, our immortal souls and taxes, maybe Byzantium had at lobbying for for tax breaks to totally possible. I, but I started thinking have I been thinking about taxes the wrong way? This whole time. This is the indicator. I'm Stacey management. And I'm someone who knows how to take a proper vacation where I'm not thinking about work the whole time. My name's Cardiff Garcia, the show the history of taxes and their relationship with democracy..

Greece Byzantium Cardiff Cardiff Garcia thousand years seven feet seven foot
"cardiff" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"Center. Here's Cardiff Falco. We're going to be watching brake lights in New Jersey southbound side of the Garden State Parkway, it's going to be a heavy ride from seventy eight down towards route twenty two because of construction into the city and the northbound side of the Henry Hudson jammed up seventy-second up towards ninety six you're also gonna see brake lights on the westbound side of the B Q E Atlantic. I've all the way to the outbound Gwanda south towards thirty ninth street. Westbound side of the LIE is going to be jammed up from the clear view as you make your way back out towards boulevard. And then here's what we see on long island's big three three Nassau County. Ally is quiet for you in northern and southern state. Parkway's move. Well. And here's what you need to know about your bridges and tunnels, Queens-bound queens midtown tunnel. It's going to be a slow ride Manhattan. Van side has some minor delays Queensboro bridge as going to be slow in both directions. Traffic and transit every ten minutes on the one's and breaking traffic alerts when they happen. I'm carried the Falco on ten ten wins. Another year stuck paying your timeshares annual maintenance fees. If your timeshare is no longer working for you. And you need out call timeshare exit team eight four four nine six one exit eight four four nine six one exit visit timeshare exit team dot com wins news time eleven thirty two the ten ten wins AccuWeather four day forecast. Here's meteorologist Steve Travis and a nice, clear sky outside. Now, we're going to see that continue right through the overnight hours. Ended could become pretty chilly outside already feeling cool but down to a low right around forty in midtown dropping well into the thirties, and money suburbs. Some spots especially north or west of.

Cardiff Falco Parkway Queensboro bridge Henry Hudson AccuWeather New Jersey Gwanda Nassau County long island Manhattan B Q E Atlantic Steve Travis Van side seventy-second ten minutes four day
"cardiff" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Just before the end of the war he mentioned married my mother had three children myself my oldest system out in my younger sister janet and life was proceeding normally unsuccessfully when one role full year nineteen seventy six my younger sister who was twenty two at the time and it was a cub reporter in south of wales in cardiff was involved in a motorcycle accident and she ended up in a hospital in cardiff on a life support and it was a very sad situation my parents came across from their holiday jersey which is an island off the south of england i traveled from london i stood my sister and we join together in a hospital room in in this in this hospital in cardiff and we saw my late sister janet lying on the bed with a head swathed in bandages because she'd had serious head injuries two black eyes and she was in a hospital gown and she looked extremely full on and we anguish over the next few hours and it became apparent that the other thing to do switch off the lifesupport machine which we did and so she died my parents stayed on to deal with formalities night took the train back to london.

janet reporter wales cardiff london
"cardiff" Discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"Cardiff its purdue of its nova i think they'd bangemann diglas in a contest enough who 3s they do good job guard a three and then i have michigan state of virginia could he got i got on us all right and if if it's not ohio state anyone 78 it was not all state governments you can state winning eighty one 78 all right i've got i've got i've got michigan submission states played virginia knocked him out of term it twice they play against a lot of pack lined defense which i think is important and i think they'd bangemann glass when i was gonna ask you how important is it to get to the offense the last hour important is it to push it against virginia why no one of those two best things we should stay does they put right and as i'm your leg gets tom izzo steam you've got to say we got to get back on defense and we gotta get on the defense aback ports period i'll tell you there's this bat that's about as good as it gets america you're welcome paul you are darn well cable the africa folks in america i that'll do it for court sides march madness bracket preview at lake to thank our sponsors who cloud and sipc cruder reminder listeners to rate review the show and apple podcast wherever they listen to the show and also a reminder to fill out your brackets on the tournament challenge on espn dot com and stay tuned to the feed is will be having multiple episodes week all throughout the incidentally tournament thank you for listening to court side with greenberg and jock itch you can listen it subscribe to wall espn podcast elicit jabba the spr that including the latest from the nba and the who collective podcast available in the esp an app for apple podcast.

Cardiff virginia america apple greenberg nba esp michigan ohio tom izzo africa espn
"cardiff" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

Liberty Talk FM

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Liberty Talk FM

"Visit we get this all the time you know people coming up for follow up in flabbergasted they have to pay a copay that patients lead their own their own now in medical insurance contracts and they should do that we look at the cardiff says just because you have the car doesn't mean you have they're not gonna get benefits they don't even be that small print but i can the people you take responsibility youths your contract and honestly doctors have been really nice about this if you really think about it we could be in a position of you pay us and then you go back and get it from your insurance and you work with them we could do that and it is done in other countries and i think it's a lot smoother because it makes the patient totally aware and and and not sit back and see what happens kind of mentality and i think there's a lot less trauma really that goes on when the patient has to deal with the insurance company there are a lot nice to the patient than they are to us the other thing that the reason uh uh why i'm in a basement are very frustrated and so what ends up happening is that the frustration i heard on dis online review uh so we kinda get the run up the anger in the frustration so you know for example like we part about that uh have to pay copays so uh not understanding their insurance not a banning that those are the rules that we have to buy but we are the ones that gift lease uh for that or you know or the fact that it it does and what that is that there are so many amazing position uh that are you know according to other physicians are considered the back doctors out there and yet you read their reviews and you realize wow this terrible because they're not be judged on the who they are clinically foot rather how how much co pay or how long they were feeding her how rush they were though unfortunately for patients who look at these reviews they need not be getting.

cardiff
"cardiff" Discussed on Channel 955

Channel 955

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Channel 955

"Who mud a mole vein soon nia long in azeem lives is melting snow but i don't want a crash uh wannacry whoa not one of the obama era in any mo vaughn owlry channel nine five discovery music song what the video i love the living color when it was on bruno mars cardiff v bath ray examiners have been much quite street then eclair found that both of inactivity martic thought that he feels social faith that all the more total kc abuse not the top of of jehnny beth you hey good this is a very they will azure no phil perry by the way no the eric frein hich no day day nasa living his though hear fears way jim next year this way lorde no the suit the hinge viall the thank you eighty six daniel and xiaomi and liam payne well knows no than he john all we got it.

phil perry lorde liam payne azeem obama cardiff eric frein nasa jim daniel
"cardiff" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on In Our Time

"This is the bbc thanks for downloading this episode had been our time there's a reading is to go with it on our website and you can get news about our programmes if you follow us on twitter bbc in our time i hope you enjoyed the programmes hello our planet is home to millions of species of fungi and the role it plays vital without funky life on earth as we note simply wouldn't exist they also play an important part in our everyday lives the making of bread and beer and wine wouldn't be possible if argument available in the field of medicine a bean part of their production of certain antibiotics since penicillin however there are other fungus which can cause nessan diseases in humans and destroy trees some tongi or even toxic to humans and can kill if consumed despite the significance much of the way in which me operate remains a mystery women to discuss peng are serega professor food security in the buyer sizes department at the university of exeter then body purpose of fungal ecology at cardiff university and debbie johnson nhs in microbial ecology at the university of manchester then body what is a fungus and what did they look like well funky not plants and animals they know bacteria their kingdom of their own you could be forgiven i suppose to thinking that their plants because the front bodies the things which we think of his toadstools all brackets on trees i suppose superficially they look a bit like the flowers or fruits of plants but then then then not the the flowers and fruits of plans wink we know that's not the only part of aplomb as the leaves and roots in the schoups and in the same way the fungus has much more to it than toadstools we see when we warmed through the woods the toast was just the tip of the iceberg underground we have the the main body of the fungus the my cgm my cdm is a a network of fine filaments that's the body of the fungus this is what sets funky apart from all other organisms it's the law.

penicillin cardiff university bbc professor university of exeter university of manchester
"cardiff" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"It has a high note in advance i was so funny to me so i found this credit card in a school yard near me when i was walking the dog and i i looked up the person's name and there was a local person but i just i didn't feel comfortable knocking on the door their house and saying is this your credit card so i called the credit card company and the guy said destroy it and i was like okay i'll shredded luge is what i do with everything else but on the cardiff as do not shred metal because it's meddle in it so i tried i tried cutting it with you know a regular purse irs that i tried using my gordon pruning scheers okay that didn't work uh i thought about running it over with my car but that wasn't going to work either and so i ask it nicely two vans no no i think it it's a credit card it's an amazon prime credit card but it's got meddle in it and it just it didn't i tried to bed it didn't bendon so i decided here's here's what we're gonna do because i don't have the ship me what what what is it that people told me the metal cutters i don't have metal cutters in my house them a girl i just don't i don't retain those i decided this is the easy way to get rid of it throwing into the canister of old cat litter and no one will ever find it i mean it's going to throw it out the old you know all the old cat litter and no one ever find it well i would hope that was at you call the credit card company the card is now been the act just throw it out right except he told me to destroy it ended in the part of the my brain is that how do you destroy a metal credit card that's what i've been asking melted down to any kind of uh all started i love it in your house and now a light favor baby now if you kind of his indestructible like this i don't understand wisely do we say we live in exactly i have no idea what i.

cardiff
"cardiff" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"The new point defiance bypass route it was the like you said a multi millions of dollars project that began several years ago there was a new amtrak station that opened in tacoma which is just north of where the accident took place and it would reduce the length of that trip seattle the portland overall by 10 minutes that's it but the important part was it was going to take the amtrak passenger trains off of the freight lines because usually when they would run together they would have to wait for one diarrhea at a fast ours yes that was the problem is that it was taking up that's what was adding so much to the time of of travel between seattle and poor that whole ten minutes what we know are there seventy eight passengers and five crew on this train that derailed their were vehicles underneath that over on i five that were also affected cairo more detailed than that at this point have seen three did so the room dead okay and what we can tell you is one of the cars on this train is underneath the car or detailed than that at this point have seen three did so the room dead okay and what we can tell you is one of the cars on this train is underneath the cardiff seen in the pictures is upside down yes others it that i mean if you'd it there will be multiple fatalities it's going to be higher than three a wooden we've seen in the pictures is upside down yes others it that i mean if you it there will be multiple fatalities it's going to be higher than three i wouldn't be top of it that's the other parties we can't see just based on the low case shen of the tv cameras and the shots that they've been able to get we can't see the number of cars the final number of cars at actually derailed there are still people trapped yeah they're still doing this is a rescue thing now this this is that a developing story right now and it's one that is going to be updated through the course of our show so when there is some sort of a uh an a news update a a news conference whatever we will bring it to you because this is.

tacoma seattle portland cardiff ten minutes 10 minutes
"cardiff" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"And by the way like big daily calendar outdoors on facebook and you're going to get bonus added entry opportunities as well i it doesn't matter if you have an upland dog or at retriever my buddy tom docking from his famous oak ridge kimmel's in northfield minnesota has a training tip that all of us can put to use with our pups hey tom welcome back to the show eight billion got another grading kip your or you this week at good to be back on the show a crane technique of people kind of mit in ignore earlyon with her starting their young god and i can start started creating brought that up either earliest sevenweek the vague and talk about getting a dog attention and turning them on learning technique in probably second to none when you're getting a puppy at cardiff it crete trading nothing revolutionary nothing new nothing above and beyond what has been done before and i'll point out why it told ort one thing about a puppy feerick he's and extremely short extremely short but what are we going to do it what can we used to be able to capitalize on that puppy learning experience but not beat him board of the paint time though it creating nothing new nothing revolutionary but i'm going to tell you how we do it and how quickly you can get your dog responding command now being that the attention span is so short what i wanted to download create that i'm going to be very small little cable you wanna make sure you have something special for your god i use reigning created the dammambased of it by recreate hell and and i really like it could have got a lot of a walmart through it now take little pieces of it it who knew your puppy will pay dumping otti your hand and believe me you can argue with proposed today youth it for the come command you'll become command upi come here and even.

facebook minnesota cardiff tom northfield sevenweek
"cardiff" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"In cardiff the new stuck 850 wpr news' brain golfer tiger woods is due in court today in palm beach county in just a few hours he'll be arraigned on charges of reckless driving and proper stopping and driving under the influence woods was arrested in jupiter in may when police found him asleep at the wheel of his mercedes benz if expected to plead guilty to reckless driving and enter a pretrial diversion program president trump wants to speed up repairs to the herbert hoover dyke around lake okeechobee the dykstra rounds lake oh offering flood protection to south florida it was identified by the army corps of engineers to be at high risk of failure during the early 2000s east past few days have seen a rise in shootings in broad daylight in palm beach county yesterday afternoon to students got into a fight on a bus and royal palm beach when they got off the bus one of the students allegedly shot the other one in the foot and ran off wednesday there were three shootings in west palm beach prompting the mayor jerry moyo to meet with her police chief to discuss how they could stop the bloodshed according to the mayor of the shootings aren't random shooting seemed to be targetted shootings something that randle these guys slow each other and appear to be after each other and he survived desert storm but a retired marine is dead he was killed in his own backyard well he was barbecue a broward county sheriff's office says forty six yearold trevor mitchell was shot to death last night in palm beach w say the shooter emptied an entire clip reloaded and shot a second clip as mitchell was cooking on his backyard grill a man arrested after a car crash about an hour later could be the suspect is ricky both fake news talk 850 wft pope francis as communicating with the heavens he called astronauts aboard the international space station yesterday american astronaut randy bresnick spoke about how the things that separate us on earth are invisible from space there's no boarders there is no conflict is choose peaceful and you see the finnace of the.

trevor mitchell pope francis ricky broward county randle florida dykstra rounds lake president randy bresnick cardiff police chief jerry moyo west palm beach lake okeechobee herbert hoover dyke trump woods palm beach county
"cardiff" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Amanpour

"Welcome back to the program live from north london you can see a significant police presence here behind us near finsbury mark at loss now british media outlets are now reporting the darren osborne from cardiff wales is the man who allegedly drove a van into a crowd of worshippers early on monday here's what else we know this hour the worshippers were leaving evening ramadan prayers and just after midnight at the finsbury mosque when 47yearold osborne is suspected of steering a van into the crowd nine people were hospitalized one man was found dead at the scene all of the victims are from the muslim community the crowd wrestled the driver to the round and held him until police arrived is now being is on suspicion of terrorism offenses the home office tell cnn he was not previously known to security services counter terrorism police are now investigating the attack they say they believe the attacker acted alone witnesses say this was a deliberate attack on muslim certainly it has shaken the local community to its core for the finsbury park mosque and the surrounding area had been through hard times before take a look since berry park sits in one of the most diverse regions of london home to historic irish in afrocaribbean communities and large muslim and jewish population that's one of the reasons this attack feel so raw to the local people and met police commissioner christa the dick paid tribute to that community cohesion this is a highly integrated rbs and multicultural place people who perpetrate attacks like this thing they will break our society down uncle's division between us and they went through the odds when they weren't win this is a very resilient city and this is a very very resilient set of communities the finsbury park mosque is at the heart of this community.

london media outlets darren osborne wales finsbury mosque cnn security services finsbury park mosque berry park police commissioner finsbury cardiff afrocaribbean christa