35 Burst results for "Cardiff"

"cardiff" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

03:34 min | 10 months ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Planet Money

"So what <Speech_Male> Cardiff is saying <Speech_Male> and the <SpeakerChange> Department of <Speech_Male> the Treasury confirmed this <Speech_Male> to me, is <Speech_Music_Male> that lenders appear to <Speech_Male> be just the tiniest <Speech_Male> bit worried. <Speech_Male> They seem <Speech_Male> to think there is a <Speech_Male> minutely increased <Speech_Male> chance of something <Speech_Male> going wrong with the <Speech_Male> debt ceiling, which could <Speech_Male> mess up debt <Speech_Male> payments. <Speech_Male> And specifically, <Speech_Male> mess up the <Speech_Male> debt payments <Speech_Male> for the December <Speech_Male> 21st T <Silence> Bill, our <Speech_Male> T Bill. And <Speech_Male> we can see this <Speech_Male> in a kind of amazing <Speech_Male> way. <Speech_Male> There is <Speech_Male> like a cousin of <Speech_Male> our T bill <Speech_Male> that comes due <Speech_Male> a full month <Speech_Male> later. It's a <Speech_Male> longer term T Bill, <Silence> which is usually <Speech_Male> higher risk, <Speech_Male> but the market <Speech_Male> thinks it is less risky. <Speech_Male> It set the <Speech_Male> rate on that <Speech_Male> longer T bill <Speech_Male> at .05%, <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> which is that <Speech_Male> same laughably <Speech_Male> low rate that we <Speech_Male> were expecting <Speech_Male> for our T Bill. <Speech_Male> Yeah, and so <Speech_Male> what you can <Speech_Male> plausibly <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> infer from this <Speech_Male> is that <Speech_Male> there's a worry that <Speech_Male> there might be <Speech_Male> some kind of a debt <Speech_Male> ceiling standoff <Speech_Male> or some kind <Speech_Male> of confusion <Speech_Male> in the markets <Speech_Male> about the debt ceiling <Speech_Male> in December. <Speech_Male> But that by the <Silence> time the 8 <Speech_Male> week <Speech_Male> treasury matures, <Speech_Male> it'll <Speech_Male> be fixed and you'll <Speech_Male> definitely get <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> your payout <Speech_Male> on the 8 <Speech_Male> week. Back to the <Speech_Male> pencil shavings <Speech_Male> worth of interest. <Speech_Male> Yes. I mean, <Speech_Male> they're both pencils <Speech_Male> worth of interest. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> Pencil shavings. <Speech_Male> It rounds <Silence> up to <Speech_Male> a penny <Speech_Male> is what I would say. <Speech_Male> Is that it rounds <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> up to a penny. <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> From my perspective, <Speech_Male> this has worked out <Speech_Male> great. I'm getting <Speech_Male> double the interest <Speech_Male> I was expecting. <Speech_Male> It'll round up to <Speech_Male> like a whole <Speech_Male> penny instead of rounding <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> down to zero <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> pennies. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> But from the U.S. government's <Speech_Male> perspective, this is <Speech_Male> not so great. <Speech_Male> With these uncertainties <Speech_Male> around the debt ceiling, <Speech_Male> they have to <Speech_Male> pay twice as much <Speech_Male> to me and <Speech_Male> everyone else who loaned <Speech_Male> them money for <Speech_Male> this December 21st <Speech_Male> T Bill. You know, <Speech_Male> Cardiff part of this <Speech_Male> story was about <Speech_Male> buying the <Speech_Male> boring <Speech_Male> of <SpeakerChange> the boring <Speech_Male> of the boring assets. <Speech_Male> And <Speech_Male> it ended up being that <Speech_Male> is twice <Speech_Male> as interesting as we <Speech_Male> thought. <Speech_Male> Exactly right. <Speech_Male> What I would say is <Speech_Male> that boringness <Speech_Male> is important. Foreignness <Speech_Male> is useful, <Silence> boringness is <Speech_Male> good. Okay, <Speech_Male> you don't want a <Speech_Male> financial system <Speech_Male> that's <Speech_Male> spiking around all <Speech_Male> over the place, <Speech_Male> fluctuating. <Speech_Male> And so <Speech_Male> the U.S. <Speech_Male> offering the world, <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Male> exceptionally <Speech_Male> boring security <Speech_Male> is a good thing. <Speech_Male> It anchors <Speech_Male> the rest of <Speech_Male> the global financial <Speech_Male> system, <Speech_Male> which is why even <Speech_Male> the smallest <Speech_Male> threat <Speech_Male> to treasuries <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> is a risk that we <Speech_Male> really shouldn't be running. <Speech_Male> It's a dumb <Speech_Male> thing to be doing. <Speech_Male> So <Speech_Male> that is the <Speech_Male> only point I would make about <Speech_Male> things being boring. Boring <Speech_Male> is not bad. <Speech_Male> Boring is <Speech_Male> awesome. Mr. <Speech_Male> T Bill <Speech_Male> was designed <Speech_Male> to be our shortest, <Speech_Male> least <Speech_Male> dramatic planet <Speech_Male> money project. <Speech_Male> And there really <Silence> <Advertisement> are only two <Speech_Male> outcomes here. <Speech_Male> What will almost certainly <Speech_Male> happen is <Speech_Male> that next month, <Speech_Male> Congress will <Speech_Male> raise the debt ceiling, <Speech_Male> the government will have plenty <Speech_Male> of money to pay <Speech_Male> me when Mr. T <Speech_Male> bill reaches his ripe <Speech_Male> old age of <Speech_Male> 28 days. <Speech_Male> And that will be the <Speech_Male> end of our <Speech_Music_Male> Mr. T Bill experiment. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> But <Speech_Male> on that <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> infinitesimally <Speech_Music_Male> small chance that things do <Speech_Male> go wrong and <Speech_Male> December 21st <Speech_Male> comes and goes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with

Treasury confusion U.S. government Cardiff U.S. Congress
"cardiff" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:33 min | 10 months ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Planet Money

"Chapter one little. That's how the movie moonlight starts. In this case, a little T Bill. You're going to try to buy if I'm not mistaken, a treasury bill. Not try Cardiff. Buying government debt. We're gonna do it. Cardiff Garcia, former co host of planet money's indicator, current host of a new podcast called the new bizarre and exactly the kind of nerdy excitable companion, we would need on this mission. So let's start out with a little government loans one O one. Basically, all the time, the U.S. government spends more money than it brings in through taxes. And so it has to borrow lots of money, constantly to keep running. It has to issue debt. Okay, can you see my screen? Yes, I can. You are at the treasury direct website. Great. So these are debt options here. Bill's notes and bonds. So all of these are different kinds of government debt, but they each expire within different time frames. Okay. Bills notes and bonds are the three most common ways the government borrows money. If I buy a treasury note or a bond, that is like giving a longer term loan to the government, maybe two years, ten years, 30 years, a treasury bill is the shortest loan. It is less than a year. It is just about the single safest investment you can possibly make. With the possible exception of loaning me ten bucks. You personally Cardiff Garcia? Yeah, me for a salad or something. I'm good for it. The T Bill is incredibly low risk because like all government debt, it is a loan to the United States government, a stable country that gets to tax one of the biggest economies in the world. But because a T Bill in particular is the shortest loan that you can make to the government, it is the least risky kind of government loan. Like imagine if you were going to lend the government money for let's say 30 years, there's economic uncertainty built into that. There's even some teeny chance that the U.S. government falls apart between now and 30 years, but if I loan money to the government for four weeks, that's no problem. They are going to pay me back..

Cardiff Garcia treasury U.S. government Cardiff Bill
British queen appears to show irritation at climate inaction

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

British queen appears to show irritation at climate inaction

"Britain's Queen Elizabeth the second has been cool to microphone criticizing the global lack of action on climate change the ninety five year old Monica's films on someone's phone once a thing Welsh parliaments in Cardiff the queen commented to her doctrinal Camilla Duchess of Cornwall but she still didn't know who was coming to cop twenty six which she will be hosting England's guide several heads of state to governments including China's xi Jim paying have not said whether they will it's hands on the recording parts of which China will double the queen also appears to say it's irritating when they talk but they don't do her comments come around the same time her grandson prince William and his concern for the planet's walls criticizing the new trend for space tourism we needs some of the world's greatest brains and minds fixed on her iPad this planet's not trying to find the next place to go live contrast and then

Camilla Duchess Xi Jim Queen Elizabeth Britain Monica Cardiff Cornwall China England Prince William
"cardiff" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

05:02 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"But only kind of because people still wanted to see this fake giant. That had fooled all these people. So the giant became known instead as the of giant as old folksy which is just the best possible name and all the hoax. He traveled across the us visiting state fairs and carnivals and even the nineteen o one world's fair and four. This grand prank of his george hall made the equivalent of about seven hundred thousand dollars. But here's the rub. He got greedy within a decade. Having already been clearly outed as a trickster. He went to colorado where he claimed to find the remains of a seven foot tall man. This one had a tail so he change it up a little bit and like people were not having it so he actually lost a ton of money and died in obscurity in one thousand nine hundred to the cardiff giant itself was owned by a series of private collectors and they used it for a number of things including as a coffee table which like rude but in nineteen forty eight. The new york state historical association was able to purchase the giant. But hearing is the thing the giant wasn't made in new york it was made. It was carved of fort dodge gypsum. And so some people in iowa in fort dodge. They wanted this. Don't giant to come home. They wanted their own stone giant and they didn't have the money to buy the original back but they did have a lot of gypsum. So in the nineteen seventies a local sculptor named cliff. Carlson got to work and the artists said that As he took his chisel to gypsum the stone simply fell away revealing a giant toe and a few more hits. Reveal the giant foot at so. I suppose technically that's not a lie. It's sort of a metaphor about the artistic process. But in the end they had uncovered their own fort dodge giant. And from what. I can tell it. Seems like our caller. Sean probably got into the ground floor with this. For dodge replica. Like he probably. This was probably gist. Gone on display when he saw it but it. It didn't matter whether it was the card of giant or a replica. It all mannered was. This museum had a giant stone man in it and then his father winked at him and said that is absolutely real and eat. Inspired this sense of awe and curiosity for sean. That he said went way beyond just his childhood. I have since revisited on Older now and now fifty. Seven years old and i actually went and visited the giants again the day after the by and say hi like. It's an old friend. That image never left my head and that actually made me obsessed with oddities. In general i am one of the alice obscure founding members. So i i should say we started in two thousand twenty a membership program for people who wanted to kind of go deeper without less see more of what we do get special access to events and experiences and so i wanna thank sean for joining that membership program and we share sean and i and i think atlas obscure members in general this kind of joy in finding a giant in the corner of a civil war museum. This is the this is why you always go to like the weird county historical museum. There's a really good chance that somewhere in one of the exhibits is going to be something that you are going to say. How is this possibly here. So sean i can't tell you how much it means to me that this is you told us this story and inspired a lifetime of curiosity and i'm so glad that you're keeping in touch with your friend the giant. Thank you for this story and thank you to all of our listeners and callers for telling us your stories and being part of alice obscure up. Of course we love hearing from all of you are lines are open whether you're exploring a giant in a civil war museum or your own county's historical society we want to hear about it record a voice memo and send it to us at hello at alice. Obscure dot com or call and leave us a message at three one five nine two seven nine zero two. That's hello doubtless obscure dot com or three one five nine two seven nine zero to our podcast is a co production about less obscure and witnessed. Docs this episode was produced by katie thornton whom i called the giant of minneapolis. And i'm doing chris wishing you all the wonder in the world.

new york state historical asso george hall sean fort dodge cardiff Carlson colorado cliff iowa dodge Sean replica new york giants us katie thornton minneapolis
"cardiff" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

The Atlas Obscura Podcast

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Atlas Obscura Podcast

"I'm doing and this is alice. Obscure a celebration of the world. Strange incredible and wondrous places. And if you listen to the show regularly. You'll know that we really love to hear from all of you the listeners. And today i wanted to share a voice mail that sent me down a bit of a rabbit hole a really giant rabbit hole. Hi this is sean small. I remember the story. Because i'm up in the middle of nowhere iowa where. I was raised as a kid and i was about three or four years old. When my dad took me to the fort dodge newseum The fort dodge museum was a recreation of a civil war era fort in kind of north central island. He was very excited about bringing me to this museum. And it has a few old cabins old schoolhouse and old church. I don't remember much until my dad to the very back of the ford in the very back of the fort kind of right. Outside of the walls there was a little octagon building and it was separated off from everything else. I remember as a little kid going up the steps and my dad told me that. This building contained a giant petrified giant and he painted the picture that this was a real petrified giant and when he took me and you go around a wall and there was this ten plus foot. Gigantic stone petrified man laying there and everything about it was bigger than usual. I mean everything. And i just sat there amazed My dad had the biggest smile on his face and he just kept telling me this was a real giant and something lodged into my little brain at that time. The giants were real so first off. This is just one of the great joys of parenthood which is just lying to your children but it reminds me of just being a kid. And you know you're always sort of in in this magical creative space. You're always kind of making up stories about the places you go kids by nature. They're always sort of testing the boundaries of what is real and unreal and trying to figure out what's true and nachos and santa real or something. My parents are telling me and when kids in the course of some very unexciting thing that their parents want them to do like for example. Go to a civil war museum when kids are suddenly confronted with something that fits their world of imagination and and shows them that yes. In fact giants are real it all kind of snaps into place like of course there's a giant how good they're not be a giant but i should say that for this particular stone giant. It definitely wasn't just kids. Who are buying into this. I had heard of the giant before. But this voicemail gave me a chance to dig a little farther into the story it all started back in eighteen sixty eight with a guy named george hall and george was a cigar maker and a big time entrepreneur in upstate. New york in eighteen sixty eight. He went on a trip to fort dodge. The story goes that george hall got into a fierce argument with a preacher and the preacher at red line from the bible that says there were giants in the earth in those days. A little bibles got a lot of throwaway lines like this and and so the preacher insisted that this was in fact quite literally true and george. Hull was a vocal atheist and so he challenged the preacher about these giants and after he had this argument he started to form an idea. What george hall did is that. He found a nearby corey and he tried to buy. A huge chunk of gypsum and the story goes that he couldn't convince the corey owner to sell them the stone because whole story about what he wanted to with it kept changing real shifty like yeah yeah. I need it for some steps. Yeah anyway he found a guy who eventually for the right price was willing to go into the corey and cut out a five ton block of stone and once george had this block of gypsum. He took it on a road trip. All had the rock shift all the way to chicago chicago where he hired artists to carve it into untrue giant and the artists then even used sulfuric acid to age this piece of rock to make it look ancient george than had this finished age giant ship to upstate new york to his brother-in-law stub newell. Who had a farm in cardiff not too far from syracuse and together they buried this giant deep into the ground and come one year later. Georgia's brother-in-law stub had some neighbors. Come over and help him dig a l. Let's say right over there. Yeah yeah that's the spot. Turns out they struck something they kept digging and lo and behold together than earth. This giant petrified man. People lost their wreaking minds. They also managed to turn a little bit of a prophet george and his brother-in-law stub. They charge people fifty cents to see the giant which is almost twenty bucks today. But i imagine i would pay twenty dollars to see what seemed to be a real giant and it was such a big cash cow. Who came to buy it. I just like this is such a who's who of mid eighteen hundreds p.t. Barnum shows up to try. And buy it off of george and when george wouldn't sell it the barnum pulls the real p.t. Barnum and makes his own version of the giant and claims. That georgia's was the knockoff. Of course we then a few months. The card of giant was outed as an absolute hoax. The jig was up.

sean small george hall fort dodge newseum fort dodge museum north central island giants george alice iowa corey ford fort dodge upstate stub newell chicago Hull New york cardiff syracuse
"cardiff" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

The Stuttering John Podcast

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Stuttering John Podcast

"All they do is lie about me. And Cardiff electric felt the need to constantly DM me and tell me things that are going on on these sites after I told them don't. So I blocked them from my Twitter accounts because I've asked them on numerous occasions. I don't want to know. Why do you tell me these things? I don't care what these people say. They know where I am every day. Pickwick pub, I'll be there today right after I vote, no who on the recall, you have a problem with me, come there. So all I have to say want to be a tough guy come see me in. Okay. So, I'll be there. I'll be there. Pick with pub. I'll be there. You have a problem. But as far as that, doctor Steve, yeah, I don't want to know this stuff and, you know, and Cardiff just keeps on telling me and I've asked him not to. I have no problem with the man. I don't dislike the guy. So, you know, and I didn't block him from here. But, you know, let's see. Area 51 Republicans don't hang out at the capitol club of D.C.. How do you know that's where I'm going? But anyway, if you have a better idea or where they do hang out, please DM me, if anybody knows, where the G two P hangs out in D.C., please let me know. Because, you know, I'll find them. I'll do my best to find them. Only on with a microphone and a and a bunch of pages of questions. Nothing violent, just doing what I do best interviewing. All right, everybody, I'll see you here on Thursday at noon PST. This is stuttering John seeing.

Cardiff capitol club of D.C. Twitter Steve D.C. John
"cardiff" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Of a weird continued having Yeah that's nice man. That's really really nice. Especially that they're your friends and you continue to see it grow and things like that. But that's awesome russell. We appreciate it. Thank you so much for your time. If anybody has any questions or concerns or wants to reach out to you where can they find he s so you can find me. Development company is around. it it take property We have facebook page myself. My name is dr imran. My wife is mrs emily qassam. We have facebook pages instagram. Connect that way or you can email me email. My forty s property ltd anti male. Gotcha so guys. That's all going to be in the show notes below if you want to reach out to enron if you're listening and you're like oh mammy no one's properties from her definitely reach out to him to as well Or you can talk to continue the conversation on the dental market society. Facebook group too. But in ron thank you so much for being with us it was a pleasure and we'll hear from you but thank you so much. Thanks thank so much for tuning in an enron. Thank you so much for allowing us to be nosy in your life and dive deeper into your practice. Your business what you got going on right now. We truly appreciate it guys. If you haven't yet please please please feel free to leave a review on itunes to let us know how we're doing how i'm doing so if you can leave a review i would truly appreciate it only takes about one minute and if you win you can screenshot. Send me a picture of you. Writing the review. Or you assuming the review or that you can just me screenshots. Tell me hey. I left a review. I will send you some. Td swag so. I truly truly appreciate it guys. If you want to continue the conversation with this episode or any other episode or with any other guests that you've heard on the podcast feel free to join the dental market society facebook group. It's going to be the first link in the show notes below for guys. Thank you so much for tuning in as always. I really really really appreciate you and i will talk to you in the next episode..

dr imran mrs emily qassam Facebook dental market society enron russell ron
"cardiff" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

07:58 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"Forward and likes to be recognised every thing. So that's how did we really press on his ways. Where if you combine to the With be well together so he did this sort of personality traits in that and then we got the in interviewed them face to face. Give him the the outline and then when we actually decided to employ them we put them on massive Accompany weeks to see how they get along. I'm here that was really awesome of got you. Have you ever like really clicked with someone like. Let's just say where you're interviewing me right. And you're like michael cool and then you're like all but he's a alan. We already have an al. And that's not gonna work as or now you've got to have a bigger than You can't always be so hard on food. We only want his of person. So we do like you. But i'm sorry you're not hours on shorts obsolete caught with you say of sixty unique. You know it will all humanity house. Different personality traits of different things meet remain like about. You may not like about you. You just gotta choose the white person full of business and for the vision that that you have the business really to have no definitely and then the whole time that you had the practice was the same team always honor. Did you have to maybe let go of some some. Quit or anything like that or not yet. We did have. We did have a not so much issues but you know with off. Be quite phone with the tequila to say that you know the end of the day. It's all this and where the ones way a free don't do as whether you want to wear us financially knocks not being police. So we had a couple. I mean one go. One became clinton to oversee econ much about she owes snappy the tanks he we took a few a couple of people to some poses as well as development courses and we took that unfortunately was moving away so again not much. We can do about that. So i don't have any issues attempted of people leaving because they didn't want to work in the business rather that it was some other personal circumstances that dictated them. You know other things really. yeah editing. That were happening and things like that. I get you so then right now. Is there a lot of how saturated would you say dentistry is in the community that you opened up your practice and was there like a lot of 'cause i would think you guys have universal healthcare right he s. Oh how did that go like is there is a separate competition or now there is now industry. I'm sure it's probably the same and the us is very close community. So you know dentists from you know the hulk dentist joke nurses high genus everything. Everyone knows each other. A small world Industry so yes. There is competition by from where me and my wife will come in. I really wanted to see it too much as competition. Because i i was willing to another. I knew a into ona's like of advice from early. What happy to give us advice around where we set up. It's a very afterward community In in the radius of the fattest which the one of the reasons why set up adults relieved quite coast but in the Sales five mile radius is notice three or four. The private dental practices also more national healthcare. So is practice usa competing against the national health service appointment practice but also on the five minutes and you know we didn't want it to try to take patients away from boxes. You just showing what they do is they wanted to come. Join us then. We'll be happy to see them as customers in all projects died data. Gotcha so that's good man. That's the way you kind of everything you know like a whole as a whole and everything like that throughout the process. What is like a system that you guys have or had in your practice that you were like. This is a unique system. I love it. I wish we can tell everybody about this system whether it's either clinical or on the front office back office anything like that. Yeah okay so. I may say we install from we used to have a big massive Whiteboard we used to write down all on goes objectives. And i think this is another thing that initial this we read advice. The resume might on your consultation this week. How many of the near cases takeoff inside that that And then we used to have the stall sort of right down. One day goes and objectives. Your they won't to buy a new car at the end of the month award. I was nice because everybody could see when when we're having lunch things in the break you're going to see what what the objectives all the factors and off no then window was section and then speaking to patients on the phone you know who inquired about serves things or acquiring about particular service veneers or something like that they know that. Oh no well actually. We're behind on the number of week onto. Let's the stephen pushed aside now without being the pushy salesmen never wants to be that perspective patients but just by informing them values not without countries known coming in have a little cover a couple of even speak to one of the members of the team and see happy to stop him as you want uncles that that's probably one of the pinnacle and more management side of things. Another thing that we did was for customer experience American thing is well. you'll social practice. Yes these my social practice or suit. Jacket jack highly. Yeah we had them. We had one of those and window we have props and things saying like i know my dentist and things like that you know way we could actually patients kids used to come in and take photos and posted on social media and that was that was you know definitely i think must've been if not the water practice In the uk using that sort of thing no one of the very few in the uk re and that was great because it just you know in annesley the fees are very people are afraid of the. That's one of the exceptions that we wanted to try and get a custody is no need to be afraid when people come have a coffee with us and you get lung and hopefully enjoy. Yeah definitely man that's awesome. I like that a lot. Yeah because people get obviously the rest of the world has a different perspective a perception of the dentists and things like that it can be. It can be different and i like the fact that you i mean. Was it ever an issue in the back of your mind. You're like man. The team may know too much about production collection that they may ask me like..

michael cool alan national health service clinton us annesley stephen uk
"cardiff" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

The Dental Marketer

08:09 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Dental Marketer

"It was a supplies because we knew she was little bit ill that just sort of enforc- pasta wayne asleep on that day and Supply so difficult time applying but we upscale invested a love of money. And you know we just have to take on the mindset. That she's yes. She channel for going on us. Be proud and just wants us to succeed. Basically I'm sorry to hear that many. That could be a little bit of you in the back of your mind. Were you kind of like. I guess rushing the build because of that earlier was such a shock. Your mom passed away that you're like. I thought there was more time like that. The i don't think so. I think there were delays in construction. So we Opened out three or four months earlier But they the they use the delays. But i don't think it was the coolest us twice join anything. I'm just one of the things which happened on the way out which is one of the biggest things that could could happen. And yeah we just. We got on my wife. We have a ten year old daughter and my my wife was actually do second-order up in april. Axios wow what was happening them. Yeah who have so okay. Well so all that's happening you're opening up your practice. When did you start. How is the marketing and advertising in the uk because they know in every country. It's a little bit different. When did you start doing all that. How're you doing marketing and advertising and things to start in the uk. I don't know if from nova we have a system colder any just national. How steps is actually one of the best healthcare systems in the world because this is a uk citizen you get free dental and medical healthcare or is founded services. So you have any system that you also have private health guesses as well now in a medical i know is just private healthcare so in terms of marketing we didn't want to go national health service Because we knew that was worked when you unfortunately the funding is not bad news. The the highest quality materials act to be able to see you know a lo- a number of patients that could give them that customer experience on the hr system to make any money you know you're seeing him out as an associate. I was seeing about the patients every day to be able to to make money and to do things properly so we didn't want to go down that route. We decided once food. Private healthcare bring something different to the data. No hasn't been seen before. The dental is so marketing wise. Renew is going to be private. We have smart well. We started that mocking posts during the actual bill post. So i took an of inspiration from actually shows and everything but how they don't mention the whole bill facebook things out there so we took an organization. We get a lot of the happened to get a lot of ground. Malting stuff You know we get another event sam. We dated night. Charity events in school exhibitions festivals. We always prisoner as one day when we actually opened any johnny passed nine. T is when he knew who we love and we knew we were opening a new grace. That you know. Our biggest way was was through socially and the prisons in the in the community. Gotcha okay so then on opening day and after that. How many new patients were you. Kind of accumulating per month. Yeah so it grew slowly because in the uk the the private system of you have to put time into the moxie of institute to get the patients through the door and you have to because we were being something different if we had to make people realize that possibly our prices off slightly more than some of the But we really hope that you see that will providing. So that's what we're trying to get people in total. I mean we initially started. We pre bookings done which is good. So you're the first week or two Now at least three four patients a day which is not bad me and we were doing a lot of free consultations of things for cosmetic were like short term orthodontic some the knees or or this sort of stuff so it is quite nice because he was seen evaluate overspending time so we try not to see too many eight especially astonishing of things that were just adjusting to the new equipment. New staff everything. I just wanted to take it snow. But i mean i think in total in the first year we had a turnover so gross turnover of about one hundred sixty thousand pounds so see profit was no less than that because it will you outgoings knows pretty good. We thought is intended numbers. Were pretty hot and The number is this year was gone to. How many employees did you so we had. The i was the may atkinson. My wife was the may s. We would actually the only dentists and go there And then we had a Cost ice skate. also we. We had quite intense to interview wausau amendments. Because what we wanted to have was somebody that we had to have a dental nurse. Somebody on reception section could also get into his manager role as well we. Are we investing enough staff. Because they were taking off his show them exactly what coach we wanted to bring into. All this josh. So how do the interview process. Look like when you were in a yeah so no me and my wife who basically relied that. They became a cost that way. Anyway we know at the end of the day. It's also business and you won't ease employs with your full. You know many years to come and to develop with you know and we made it clear to them that you know we want you to have a role in the build. You know the bill of this practice. How we how. We should have gone in the area. So how many they interview posts advertising on social media and things people could see. What toes Us we were doing would of mouth recommendations and then the interview posts. I used a lotta them and i did her course on facebook and interviews and things that are how could think it was something about You have four four different personalities so people can have become either be a lion. Our were among -til my map day. So you everybody has one of these traits night for example the lion is like dominate. This year. the lead the pack sort of thing. A monkey is someone who does what they told us. Sort the same happy to be told what to do. A get a job done out of eight wise person might.

uk wayne nova johnny facebook sam atkinson josh
Dame Esther Rantzen and her garden frolics

My Wardrobe Malfunction

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Dame Esther Rantzen and her garden frolics

"When you start. You had your first appearance on television. Do you remember what you and did he have any. If you any guidance on that yes. It wasn't my actual very first appearance on television. Because i paid on a view startled panel. Now i can't remember what the name of the program was it was in the sixties in cardiff as a friend of mine was producing viewer complaints. Program and discussion of television and the discussion was weather. A woman would ever be allowed to read the news and a nurse said absolutely not because women lateral authority. And i said did she have a female nation and did she lack authority anyway. That was my berry. I first but then as a reporter was brightens we can do indeed remember what i will because i decided it was gonna be too difficult to think of something different every week so i got a friend who was good at serving to make me want was then known as a painful dress own. It was in two homes scott and tall and i i would wear it we come to and i would wear addition shows on nathan underneath it on week. Three we actually got a complaint from a man who said ads always wear the same thing bbc account. Remember my producer program. I said no. I can't afford this. I think they were paying me something minimal unless i cannot afford to spend low paying me on a different dress every week have to supply. I'm from now on for the next thirty nine years. The bbc paid for my clothes. I will as a reporter presenter

Cardiff Scott BBC
Cognitive Neuroscience in the Classroom with Dr Louise Allen Walker

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

04:10 min | 1 year ago

Cognitive Neuroscience in the Classroom with Dr Louise Allen Walker

"Welcome back everyone. To marin. Tom talk teaching. I am pleased to say that we are joined remotely today by another guest. A new guest to the podcast. So i'd like to extend a very warm. Welcome to dr louise allen walker. Welcome our great. Thanks very much. Thank you feel like on the radio. You kind of our. I'd like to see you. Yeah it's it's not the magic of live radio maybe one day. We'll we'll do that. Put the fear of god into our guest. St louis from the residents used the first place to start is that maybe you could tell listeners about your background and education. You actually work with us which probably say that off the bat. You're one of our colleagues although we haven't seen you in person in some months now it's been a long time a really highs so tell us about you. You'll patterns education and academia and the programs that you work on cardiff met absolutely so my specialist area is cognitive neuroscience On i did my phd at benghazi novosti on a it looked at this topic. So i use brain stimulation to look at predictive language function in an area of the brain. The everyone sort of thought did mussa planning but actually it. It really plays a predictive role in a bunch of different processes. and then what. I was doing my phd. I lecture alongside at bangor. And then once i finished my phd. I came here and that was just david three years ago and here i work on to program so i work on the undergraduate education psychology and special educational needs program and then also work. And i'm the program director for the msc psychology and education Which is bps credited on on. Both of those programs presumably teach topics around cognitive psychology near science cognitive neuroscience and research methods as well. So this is interesting for us because you know we. We hearing tombs like cognitive science new science things like that being thrown around in debates around teaching and you know how we how we teach effectively and it can be a little bit intimidating subdued tend to like to use that as a kind of way of saying i'm right and you're wrong so let's let's get right down to counter basics here. Can you explain to us what we actually mean before. We start getting into some of the really fun debates. What do we actually mean by cognitive neuroscience. Okay so in. When psychologists talk about commissions. Let's break out time down cognitive neuroscientists when when you think about cognition firstly. What we're thinking about is mental processes really so cognitive psychology and the study of cognition predates most while many of the sort of common biological measures. So back when we couldn't put someone in an scanner we would look at them mental processes as best. We could using behavioral measures on what i mean by mental processes. A things like for example learning memory. Attention problem solving all these of internal processes that that happened inside all minds and cognitive psychology. Obviously try to understand those processes as best as possible on on would trion model how they felt those processes worked so of step by step. What happens in you know. Just something simple like when you perceive an image. What are the steps that occur in that process and cognitive neuroscience is the study of the underlying biological and brain related processes that underpin those mental processes so. I saw joining together to fields. If he like

Dr Louise Allen Walker Mussa Msc Psychology And Education W Marin Benghazi St Louis Cardiff TOM Bangor David
A Culinary Tour Of Brexit

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:45 min | 1 year ago

A Culinary Tour Of Brexit

"Joined today by frank langfitt. Npr's lennon correspondent. Frank hi. hey it's great to be here. Cardiff great to have you so frank from what i understand. You are about to take us on a kind of culinary tour of brexit. Today's yes that's right so quick. Refresher on brexit cardiff. Uk voted to leave the you to escape red tape in brussels. So they'd be free to cut new free trade deals. This was like a number of years ago. Two thousand sixteen. The uk finally completely got out of the eu on new year's eve which means different things to different sectors here but today we're just going to focus on one of the hardest hit that's food as specifically we're look at wasters cheese and wine because we found his each item tells a different story about the real world consequences of brexit so far. So that's our plan. And here's the menu wine cheese or oysters cardiff if you want to start with. I don't know frank. I think i'm in the mood for oysters. Let's start there good choice. We're surrounded by water here in britain so the story of oysters is that when you suddenly face new regulations doing business is so much harder and no one is feeling this more than this. Fisherman that i met is his name. Is jonathan bailey very way this is late this is this is just rain rain water. I'll get some jonathan harvest oysters on a river in the southwest of england on the day that i met him. It was raining so we were bailing out his robot. Yeah i'm assuming Frank jonathan exports his own to europe. And that's why you're talking to him so a one eight tells how that's going for him now. That brexit is reality. Things are going really badly. So before brexit when the uk was in the eu there was seamless trade like between the states in the us and jonathan dredged up his oysters. They were shipped to europe and then they were cleaned which worked out just fine now. After brexit. Those british oysters are subject to eu rules about imports. Just like any other country outside the eu. so jonathan's wasters now have to be cleaned here on this side of the english channel. And i know this doesn't really sound like a big deal but if you're in the business it is and that's because it adds costs and it means there's less time to get those oysters on a european plates before they die. A bottom line are going to die in transit so this and other changes because of brexit have really hurt the fishing industry in fact shellfish and fish exports to the eu just in january. We're down more than eighty percent year-on-year now. The government likes to call this just teething problems in trade volumes overall are already rebounding. And that is. I gotta say a staggering dropped eighty percent plus. It is dead always tres and frank. I'm no expert on this. But i mean dead. Oysters are not good tasty oysters. No and you can't any money off them. Obviously so jonathan is one of like more than forty fishermen and women around here who are pretty much out of work. This season and i asked him when we're out on his boat like how he thinks it's going to impact them in the long run. Do you think that you'll keep fishing. Or i'm sixty six. I'm wondering whether this is the moment to say the. How would you feel about not fishing anymore. I would be very very very very upset. Okay so frank. Things clearly not looking good for the fishermen on the english coast. What's next on the menu where we're headed next in in our brexit tour so next off the whales for wine and then the northwest of england for cheese wine and cheese nice pairing classic traditional. Let's do that right after a quick break. This message comes from. Npr sponsor interactive brokers the professionals gateway to the world's markets. Their clients enjoy lowest cost access to stocks options futures and fixed income from a single integrated account. Learn more at i b. k. r. dot com. This message comes from npr sponsor. Microsoft teams helping priority. Bicycles transform. the way they work when the pandemic hit they started doing virtual visits on teams. Now people worldwide can come into their showroom more at microsoft dot com slash teams. Okay frank we're done with the delicious oyster chorus. So let's continue on with this brexit culinary tour and frank. I could really use a bevy. So what were you saying about. Wine is a really good example of a frankly how brexit can cost you in the checkout line. So let's head to wales and we're gonna meet daniel lambert who imports wine. So this is all little warehouse so daniel reports tens of thousands of cases of wine each year most of it of course from europe and for daniel. This used to be really easy. We used to just have to one very very simple simplistic but now because the uk's outside of the u. it's brexit. There's so much more. I have to send the order to the producer. The producer then produces pro forma invoice which they sent back to me on the pro forma invoice. They have two quite mild a number so hunting trip daniel down a bit because he actually went on. For more than a minute but describing. The avalanche of confusing forms now has to fill out. He said each separate set of forms cost seventy five bucks so scale of one to ten. How much are you enjoying this new system. Yeah it makes sense. I mean everybody hates paperwork. Super annoying. But frank did you ask him you know what about the real impact on his business. What he said is paperwork. Costs will be passed on to consumers but some small retailers won't be able to afford the extra paperwork cost ordering different kinds of wine so in the end that's actually going to mean less variety on the shelves.

EU Frank UK Frank Langfitt Frank Hi Cardiff Jonathan Bailey Jonathan Harvest Frank Jonathan Jonathan Europe Lennon NPR Brussels Britain English Coast Daniel Lambert Microsoft
Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

09:54 min | 1 year ago

Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

"Today i'm joined by ellison who's a student teacher on our secondary religious education program. Hi l. s. that thomas. Thanks for coming today. You've carried out a piece of literature based research for your lead partnership school who we can't name because of the terms of the ethic approval for the research project but this school and they gave you a topic to look into because of interest to them for their own kind of school development. So what was that topic that the school gave you said topic was an kind of split into three parts. They gave us a choice of either looking at vulnerable learners. And whatever that might be whether it's saw or more able and talented excetera ben. They said we could do a study on blended learning on how we teach in a blended learning environment or the third option was to combine those two together. So how do you help. Specific categories of vulnerable learners within a blended learning environment. And given the time that we're in to me that was the one of most interested. That's the one. I counted -able so vulnerable learners in the blended environment. And did you need to narrow that down tool anymore to make it manageable. Did you come from a subject tangled. Did you have to do anything with that topic. Once he picked option three from the hat yes exactly yeah so we had to narrow it much further because obviously vulnerable learners and such a white category and we a recommended that we could narrow that down to a a subject specific points of view a religious education point of view in my perspective in my work in my literature review after a loft inspiration. I actually didn't do that because going through the research i felt like it was applicable from what i knew to a wide range of topics so i didn't feel like bringing it down to a religious education spending was going to bring it was going to enhance it that much more but what i did do was never the butler winning side of things down to adhd specifically and. I did that in all honesty. Because i had an interest in learning more by. Adhd i'm really have a worked with many students with adhd. I didn't know too much about it. So i thought this was going to be a prime community within my sinement to try and understand. Adhd a little bit more given so pregnant and use it. Mapping it onto not blended learning environment saint tyne fascinating. Okay so you got your choice of adhd you justify your choice of looking beyond your subjects harry so then you were able to go out and search for literature and you had to pick six sources that will kind of help get a handle on that topic area so it might be a bit of a bit of a big question to ask but can you talk a street the six sources that you ended up with and so broad sense of what they were saying yes absolutely each so the one thing i should really mention i is that when i started this literature review trying to marry up trying to find resources which spoke about adhd within blended learning environment. There was next to nothing if not nothing at all and so it was a bit of panic. Could bit of a worry at the beginning. But i pushed through. I decided to do in. The end was focused on a selection of literature which focused on adhd specific late at some literature which focused on blended learning specifically. and then. i drew my own conclusions between those two. I'm using a variety of websites and sources as well to try in a match up in a meaningful way and i started by actually looking at the. Adhd you k charity website and there was a really interesting on on quite lamesa. Statistics on eighty nine percent of teachers teach or have taught students with adhd and yet sixty three percents of teachers feel that that training and of understanding adhd on supporting adhd students is a par inadequate So that was quite alarming statistics. So i started from that before. I took a deep dive into more literature. Adhd and blended learning specifically. That was loads of resources. When i looked at them separately. But i'll try and go through on now. My six down spitball. I'll just say best that. I looked into these articles mainly online because of the situation wherein they were mainly searches. Either through google laura our our learning platform at cardiff matt and i prioritized terms. Which article twits mentioned engagement mentioned. Adhd additional learning leads blended learning online learning hybrid learning excetera and the scope for narrowing down. Those obstacles was quite slim. Because as i said the amount of articles that looked at them together that what many of them so narrowing down was quite slim but i prioritized any which kinda did mention allen's on blended learning in one with was the best the easiest way to get more of a focus on my first article which i came across was by how graham relatively recent to the two thousand seventeen on it was titled learner engagement in a blended learning environment and it was a conceptual framework. And this what date. It had a huge skype through research. It had a thousand dollars. Coups chapters and other articles of engagement instruments have engagement. And what they really really. Interestingly came up with they spoke about the inconsistencies at the term engagement itself and then how that gets even more complicated when you transfer into online learning but they came up with indicators of engagements and that was what was really fascinating about this obstacle. We talk and teaching about. How can we. How can we facilitating gauge. How can we increase engagement. A little bit better argument was actually before we do any of that you need to know what the indicators aw. When do you know when your students are engaged. So that was what was really tickly interesting about this. And why recommended it to my league partnership school. They came up. With a whole framework within not they had six indicators of cognitive engagement and seven indicators emotional engagement which i thought were particular interests but within the cognitive engagement. One was based on attention. Which obviously i ate pricked my ears up because oh is robert. Because it was specific to eighty can be specific trade hd and what they aim to do is show you. What the indicates attention within within cognitive engagement by might look like and what you can do about it to understand it and enhance a little bit more now. Within this article on some of the things i thought were a little bit etched. Maybe for example under the intention indicator they said about how you might want to track rain whites or movement and it's not really sure that's going to be possibly the most affluent secondary schools around the country. But the undestanding is that you need to know when your students are engaged. Not indicated first before you can change your teaching style to enhance that facilitated and so it was my suggestion that maybe we could look at using. That's marks of teams with google cross. Rooms trying see when they are most engaged. See what the data. It's like really take a deep dive into that than students are engaged to take up over the second article most cattle again. It was a twenty seventeen obstacle a written. Interestingly was all about the motivations of adhd students so it was titled what motivates individuals they hd it was a qualitative analysis specifically for the adolescents. Point to the so what they did. They hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between motivation attitudes between students with adhd and their typically developing peers. And so they did this study which was largely in a more clinical environment. And that was one of my Concerns i suppose one of my hesitations about the article because they students were interviewed. Sorry the children were intimate in a psychology clinic. That was seven all those order. Which from a psychology background. So my argument was that if you brought in somebody from a different background to maybe the confidence in having no analysis response by us we may have a little bit more confident. That was different backgrounds. Connecticut election is still a valuable valuable. Be such an what they found was the rule. The motivation axe cheats. And this is interest. Day-today life it's not necessarily at school but additional attitudes between students with adhd and students non adhd rudely of very very similar. But there were two very distinct difference is which were really interesting. Adhd perspective the first one was the students with with adhd had a very specific aversion to the slow passing of time to time going slowly was just an absolute. No no for them. They just couldn't stand it on the second one was that students who didn't tough. Adhd also cased venue in having familiar and predictable tasks to toss it. They've done before they know how they works. They know what's expected of them. That value did not appear in students with

Excetera Ben Ellison Adhd Thomas Butler Harry Google Skype Matt Graham Allen Robert Connecticut
Explaining Threshold Concepts in Physical Education

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

03:54 min | 1 year ago

Explaining Threshold Concepts in Physical Education

"Spoke. That's just come out chamber alderson bryant threshold concepts in physical education design thinking approach. Now it may be that people listening. Don't know what some of those things are yet and we will come to that but first of all. How was it that the three of you came to collaborate on this book was the story behind it. Okay tom so i guess if i take you back a couple of years prosise really started. When funeral was applauded does student examiner for sporting p. program in the poorest folks in health sciences on. I believe it was really the first time i visited as an external examiner. Three arrests went for the coffee down. Cardiff pay before her return. Flight home it was really that conversation. Not coffee was where the magic or the seed for this book was prompted. I vividly remember the discussion that we were in the world to right within our own discipline. I think in particular some of the key critical questions we were asking each other centered around as a discipline of physical education. We clear what we were trying to achieve where we try to overclaim what we trying to do achieve was really possible for children and young people to achieve before they left school. So i guess the the most important question pursue our skin to establish with our listeners now is is this idea of threshold concepts and what. That's all about what is a threshold concept and why they so valuable to physical education so any discipline that we think about there are disciplined because they have these things called thresholds concepts. That's the only reason they're ever called a discipline. And i know that annan. Her previous answer mentioned as we believe that he was a disciplined or actually redick wondering about that ourselves. Is that actually the case. So if i give you some examples of threshold concepts first of all tonight on package little bit for you if we look at particular disciplines so for example in maths at threshold current set is an complex numbers if we look at design. Ambiguity is a concept. You have to grasp if you're a designer if you don't grasp what you can't call yourself a designer in law its presence. It's opportunity cost in economics. It's entropy maybe in physics so every discipline you can caboche if you were to lead the miles on the table. Every discipline that we know of has these threshold concepts and weirdly. We couldn't actually claim that for physical education. We couldn't literally sit down and go boom. That's what he eagles and we found that often. That was a problem because we felt that the reason of our subject area is often not valued is because we don't have these we haven't called the mouse definitively physical education offers. These are these threshold concepts so threshold concepts when their masters. They enabled students to look at problems in completely new ways. Antitank practice and talk in a manner of scholars of that discipline and the reason called threshold. Concepts is because you literally cross thresholds when you learned and you can never unlearn them. An maybe from maybe the fact that we're involved in movement riding a bike you never forget how to ride a bike so once you've learned tisch. It's not something that you can ever unlearn it's there it's embodied etc so quadruple would be described as admire land. Who don an awful lot of work in this area. It's like a portal so opens up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something and it represents a transformed way of understanding or interpreting our viewing something and without that the learner cannot progress in that particular discipline or ever call themselves a scholar at that discipline.

Alderson Bryant Cardiff Redick TOM Eagles Tisch
Decentralized Information Gathering

Data Skeptic

04:13 min | 1 year ago

Decentralized Information Gathering

"My name is speak glory. And i'm a postdoctoral researcher at the university of hamburg in germany. My research interests focused on mulligan systems and in particular the aspect of decision making in those systems so interested in particular in information-gathering tasks. So you can think of like a team of robots trying to find out something about the world and doing this in a collaborative fashion. So that's the kind of task climbing just end especially the decision making aspects of that a while ago when there were some mars missions being planned we ended up sending curiosity and forget the other one maybe opportunity there was some discussion of. Hey maybe instead of sending two rovers the cost a lot like million dollars we should send a million rovers. That cost one dollars. Something like this didn't happen but is that the kind of case that would be interesting to a researcher like you so my interest are maybe more so decided to to agent case so at least. That's the situation for now. Do the computational complexity of the problems that i'm involved in cardiff did they are the practical limitations that usually means that the more than a handful of agencies steel beyond the reach of kearns state of the art mittens. Ya the fact that your work has heuristic involved is what actually i attracted me to it. So maybe we should talk about the elephant. In the room a computational complexity what would it be like to try and solve one of these problems in a sort of a rigorous complete surly brute force but in exacting method. Maybe conceptual it's Quite instructive to think about how you could actually solve this kind of problems in this brute force manner typically have you have your set of agents than each of the agents has some possible actions that they can take and as a result of taking some of these actions. They're going to perceive that in some observations from the world or or the environment. You can kind of see the when you have multiple agents acting simultaneously of course their sudden exponential number of possible combinations of actions that the agents take so. This is already an indication that it's going to be quite complicated so then when you consider that depending on the observation or feedback that beach of the agents get then they have obviously a choice like what to do for each of these possible observation. You could improve simple employees that okay. I'm i come to take a particular action. And then if i received some feedback then conditional that feedback. These is going to be my next action. You then basically have such a police for each of the agents and in principle. If you want to solve this very exactly you should look for or look at all the possible combinations of all the policies for all the agents so it really quickly get into this domain of financial complexity that makes it really challenging confrontationally. And do the agents communicated all can they may be share information is that within scope of the problem is one of the factors that i wanted to specifically consider because i think that the law of the previous state of the art work in like information gathering for multi agent teams. They tend to make this assumption that there is some communication during the task. So what what i could do. If i don't have the luxury of communicating during the task. What what i decided to do is kind of split this task into two phases. So you have this kind of offline. Phase the takes part before the test execution Are planning what they should do during the task. But once the task execution starts so deploy a robot sore or whatever your agents are then you're not allowed to communicate anymore so you have to kind of make plans beforehand decide. How are you going to act in each of the possible situation arises could we zoom in on an information gathering task. Are there real world. Examples of where your sorts of Research areas might be deployed for industrial or practical applications. Maybe one of the Kind of running examples that used in several of my papers relating to search rescue robotics. So you might want to deploy a team of robots to survey a disaster sized and maybe locate. Some of the victims might still be out there so this one example of the potential application for my research work.

Mulligan Systems University Of Hamburg Kearns Cardiff Germany
Stylist Craig Chapman on the Evolution of HairDotCom

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

03:03 min | 1 year ago

Stylist Craig Chapman on the Evolution of HairDotCom

"Just shared with us is head dot com artie. What is head on comedy but maybe just take you back a little bit and high. We actually Actually came a rides I because this this quite story behind it really. It was something head called with something. That's I originally set up Ten years ago And cardiff really never put on the dog hole. But it was. It was mostly the fact that being a headdress. Dining cole will I worked with brands over the years. But i felt like was it was a really difficult task to be able to get involved in. Show work or Campaign work all the different elements within our industry Kinda felt isolated. Dining cole mullan even been linked up with Brown served years to get onto the autistic teams kind of always felt like we will be forgotten. Dining dinan sunny cold war which actually writing spice inside but but the so head dot com kind of started off raise as a basis for me to be able to get the opportunity to branch into other areas of the industry and it really started with a bunch of friends. It was all friends I worked with the industry. None of them working in london. Everybody was in the small times upside villages outside of london. And i kind of took myself to to really try and get tsitsi for people. The headdresses started settled owners. That what it to work within other sectors of the head world But didn't want to make that transition to london. Didn't want to move to london. I mean. I didn't have the blessings of big brands night So the opportunities always felt like they were They were further away than evening. Grasping range so. So i kind of just put my head diamonds. Did a lot of free work an awful lot. Free work a serious about if miles traveling from coal to whatever anybody wanted me to go to actually build it as as we as i was building it it was just friends friends that buddies of mine that will be within the industry that wants to get involved and i pulled him into fight shapes different campaigns and slowly into tv work as i entered into a tv hairdresser which would be old by. By six years ago now Head dot com kind of developed from that basis. So this lots of names within had dot com. Which will mentioned later that were were that right from the very beginning even before anybody even even before even you had co

Cole Mullan London Cole Brown
The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:38 min | 1 year ago

The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

"Today on the show. I am joined by planet money producer. Alexi horowitz ghazi and alexi. Hello first of all parody cardiff alexi. You've brought us a kind of pasta mystery. Not just any pasta. Cardiff dismissed all about a very particular. Pasta shape called bucatini. It's basically just spaghetti with a hole in it in. The story comes to us. By way of a self avowed bucatini fanatic new york magazine writer. rachel handler. When did you know that you were bucatini. Hat or bucatini bopper. Look what do we call ourselves. Ivan bucatini had because. I just think it's cute but i definitely didn't grow up in a bucatini household by any means we are definitely spaghetti. Family the mystery part of all of this began. When rachel started to notice last spring that her beloved bucatini seemed to be getting harder and harder to find at our local grocery stores in new york until eventually it seemed to be totally gone and then one day in the fall rachel was on the phone with her also pasta obsessed mother who lives in chicago and her mom kind of mentioned off hand that she was having the exact same problem. Racial literally haven't been able to find bucatini anywhere and she was talking specifically about to check out. The check is a one hundred and forty year old italian pasta company so when she said that i was like slow mo i was like because i thought it was like a new york problem like a very classic. Sort of like you know history. I can't find my bucatini. Whatever like who cares. But then i was a coli though. Sorry can i swear. Oh yeah okay okay. Great it's like holy if you can't find it that means that this is a real issue. And then she told me that she had actually reached out to the customer service department to check. Oh i just sent them an email. it's a classic move. It was like full of typos. Which is like a way. That mom's ready meals. But her email said i am a huge fan of bucatini pasta huge in all caps. I have not been able to find it for many weeks at any store. It is my favorite pasta cook than the sentences in all caps with four questionnaires. Are you still making it. Please tell me how to get some not too long afterwards. Rachel's mom gets a voicemail from a regional dicicco sales representative named brian. And then when. She played me voicemail from brian. I was like holy like this goes deep. There is a cover up like something weird is going on. Brian told rachel mom that she was likely having trouble. finding check. Oh bucatini. Because of an fda hiccup the hecker exactly for some reason the fda which is the food and drug administration seemed to have put a hold on the import of check. Obu katini and now. Brian was telling rachel's mom to sit tight and check the shelves a few months down the road and the fact that this little pasta mystery seemed to reach all the way to the federal government. That was something that had dogged. Journalists like rachel could not in good conscience. Look away from. This is the turning point for me. Yeah the next day. Rachel pitched the story to her editor but in the back of her mind. She wasn't sure it would go anywhere. And i'll just felt so big. And i think all of us figured nothing would really come event. At least i did. I was like i'm never going to figure out what's going on but began calling to check. Oh i reached out to like five or six different people. Email and phone call and voicemail and no one got back to me and then i was like something in santa's happening and i don't know and at that point i was like there's there's a story hammond

Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Cardiff Alexi Rachel Rachel Handler Ivan Bucatini Alexi New York Magazine Cardiff New York Food And Drug Administration Obu Katini Brian Chicago Hecker Federal Government Santa
The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

All Things Considered

03:29 min | 1 year ago

The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

"The international space station cost hundreds of billions of dollars to build for astronauts living on the space station. Though money is essentially useless, there's nowhere to spend it, but that does not mean there isn't an economy for the handful of astronauts living on board from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, Stacey Vanek, Smith and Cardiff, Garcia explained. The economy aboard the international space Station is all about trade. This is, according to astronaut Doug Wheelock. Actually, everybody at NASA calls me wheels. I'm one of the old grizzled veterans. So the early career astronauts call me Papa Wheels. Doug Papa Wheels served as the commander of the International space Station and lived there orbiting the Earth for six months. That interesting thing is with food, of course. Doug says that aboard the space station most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from Earth just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad they would throw like a bag of Fresh fruit like oranges, lemons, apples, vegetables as well. Everybody would only get one or two pieces of producer just wasn't that much of it. And so here is where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the Russians loved onions. But Doug loved fruit. Cuter. Your chicken was my commander. As said, Hey, theater. What trade An onion for do you have? Ah, Like an extra orange. He goes all you don't want your onion. Of course, the space station economy was not just about food, though. Services were also a big part of it Dug, for instance, has an engineering background And he says for him, one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station were all the scientific experiments. They had to do whatever their background this was just Part of what they did every day, the way out of it Economics. Doug discovered this a couple of weeks into his mission. When one of the scientists aboard the space station told him that there was a big problem, she said, Hey, the party's broken not what you want to hear aboard a space station, that's for sure. No, But Doug's background was an engineering, so he understands systems and he says, fixing things comes really naturally to him. And the scientists This woman named Shannon knew this about Doug Shannon looked at me, she said. If you fix the party Do all of your science for the rest of the day. I'm thinking like that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal, so I got my bike tool belt called Houston and said, You know, Houston, we have a problem. The party is broken, but the real commodity on the space stations is Doug. Was Earth itself. For example, Doug says, you just want to see and talk to other humans. Even if you don't know them. You want to drop in on other astronauts video chats and see their families and talk to their friends. You don't care. Yeah, because in space, humans are a precious commodity. And I asked if there was ever bartering around this like, hey, you can join my video chat with my family for an apple. Indexes. Actually, everybody needs human interactions so much they don't really trade it because it becomes sacred when you get back to earth, Doug says. Your idea of what's valuable is changed forever. It's completely changed my whole perspective. Especially especially rain. I am just like fascinated by rain now I made I just The smell of it the sound of it and just to feel against your skin I took for granted before you know Stacey Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

Doug Stacey Vanek Doug Wheelock Doug Papa Wheels International Space Station Cardiff Garcia Nasa Doug Shannon Smith Houston Shannon Apple Cardiff Garcia NPR
The Strategic Value Of Rare Earths

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:46 min | 1 year ago

The Strategic Value Of Rare Earths

"Hey cardiff parallel boy cough. Welcome back here. You've been to las vegas where you're obviously playing the slot machines and you're at the craps tables right. I wish i wish. I was closer to the blasio. But i was actually about an hour outside of las vegas in the desert. Oh and did you bring us anything back from the middle of the desert. I always have at present for you cardiff. this time. I brought you some pretty cool tape. Listen to this one. Nothing warms my heart like the sound of an explosion music to an economy nerds ears. So that is the sound of a blast at the mountain. Pass mine. This site in california cardiff. It's the only place in the us where we mind rare earths and we really really need these things. So if we're looking across the pit like everything in the very bottom bit of the existing bottom is all high-grade or at this time. So that's robbi roy. And he's talking to cnn international. He's the mine manager at mountain pass. He's showing our team. This huge open. Mind pit just packed. He says with these rare earth elements beautiful sites. See he says. This is the busiest. He's ever seated at mountain pass and cardiff one of the reasons. It's so impressive to see this. Bustling busy mine is that just two years ago. This mind was totally shut at that. Point china really take over this strategic industry. Okay that's fascinating in of itself. But i actually think we should step back for a minute and explain a little bit more. About what rare earths are so everyone go back to high school chemistry for just a moment just for a second. I had a great chemistry teacher. Mr goodman rare. Earths are of seventeen elements that appear on the periodic table and they are an essential ingredient in making like super strong super. Small magnets are used in a lot of electronics and by the military despite the name they are really not all that rare they naturally occur in a lot of places but the process to mine them labor intensive and it can be environmentally destructive. It can create lots of pollution and can even involve radioactive waste china. They put a lot of effort into building the mining and processing facilities for these rare earths and without the same environmental and labor standards that we have in the us. So china can produce earth's very cheaply and china started to actually dominate the industry. And in fact from about twenty fourteen to twenty seventeen the us imported eighty percent of its supply of rare earths from china as the relationship between the us and china started to get tense. The trade war china's state media. They basically made a thinly veiled threat. They implied that rare. Earths could be used as a weapon. In the trade war china could restrict exports basically cut off the flow of these elements to the us china's president xi jinping. He just happened to make a personal visit to a production facility. That made these products. I was just in the neighborhood and there were the rare earths over there. I thought i go check out just in case a camera sees him on on the other side of me right. Yeah and as a trade war has become nastier and nastier. This idea that china could restrict rare earth exports to the us it has spooks and people especially in washington. Because this is. The world has become more dependent on high tech electronics. It has also become more dependent on these elements on rare earths. This has focused a lot of attention on the mine. I went to mountain pass. It has actually been in operation since the nineteen fifties back then it produced europian which makes the red color in very early televisions. Yeah and the previous owner invested more than a billion dollars on a new environmentally friendly facility back in two thousand fifteen just as the rare earths price collapsed and so the company just went out of business in the minds shut and there was nowhere in the us producing these elements. Now the new owner of the mine mp materials they have spent two years rebuilding it and they say that they now produce about ten percent of the world's supply of rare earths. If there's going to be an american industry it's going to be led by us we it. That's james the ten ski on cnn. International he's the chairman of m. p. materials. He wants to create an alternative supply chain to china. But he's got a problem while he can dig these things out of the ground. He can't process them in the us. Everything needs to go back to china. In fact a chinese processor owns a ten percent non-voting stake in mp materials. Mountain pass produces bags and bags of this rare. Earths concentrate basically a brown dust. That got all over my shoes when i was there. Then it all gets into china because there isn't a processing plant anywhere in this country that turns rare earths into the products that companies want to buy next year n. p. materials. They plan to reopen the processing plant at mountain pass. And this way they can make processed rare earths to sell directly to global companies without going through china and the frankly there were a lot of people who who doubted that we can make this work and so we felt an extrovert and anna duty. And so we've had a sense of urgency from the very beginning. But i would say that. There's definitely been a heightened sense of awareness of what we're up to. When china started making its veiled threats some people questioned if the us to nationalize the rare earths industry to take it over but the experts. We talked to don't really think so. And they point to what is going on at mountain pass as proof that the market is already correcting for china's near-monopoly now that there's increased demand for rare earths and pressure by companies for sources that are more diverse and environmentally friendly suppliers. Outside of china are starting to grow and restricting earth exports. It's not a move. China's gonna make lately because it would hurt chinese businesses a lot of the rare earths they find their way into things that are manufactured inside china lake mobile phones to really completely cut the us off. China would have to tell chinese businesses to stop selling to the united states processed rare earths and rare earth magnets and all the electronics that use them. Chinese companies would lose a lot of business. The whole thing could hurt the chinese economy which is already suffering in the trade war the definition of a trade war. You can't hurt the other side without hurting yourself. Too messy business.

China Cardiff Blasio United States Robbi Roy Mr Goodman Las Vegas Mountain Pass CNN Cough Xi Jinping California Washington James
INTERPOL Warns People About Counterfeit Coronavirus Vaccines

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:11 min | 1 year ago

INTERPOL Warns People About Counterfeit Coronavirus Vaccines

"I took a year when the distribution of vaccines is so important. The international police organization has a serious warning also known as interpol. They're cautioning people about the dangers of counterfeit vaccines stacey vanik smith and cardiff garcia from our daily economics. Podcast the indicator from planet. Money wanted to find out more about this and so they took a trip into the dark web. The cova crisis has created a whole universe of opportunity for criminals fear and scarcity and high demand are very powerful market forces. china anderson has been watching these forces. Play out for months. He's a senior security researcher at domain tools. Were a cyber threat intelligence data company so we scan the entire internet as many times began every single day and give insights to customers based upon what we see and part of the whole internet is the so called dark web. That's the unregulated. Part of the web. Were a lot of illegal activity happens. Like what is the dark web like. There's many things when people talk about the dark way that most of the time what people are referring to is anonymous services illegal forums or illegal marketplace's illegal marketplaces where you can buy drugs or weapons or passports or cova vaccines so now starting to see some coronavirus vaccines you know looking at. Maybe two hundred different ads here. So can you read us some of the ads that you've found. Let me pull one up. I'm looking at here so You know the as ten covid. Nineteen vaccines The prices re thousand two hundred and seventy six euros. That's about four thousand. Us dollars so about four hundred dollars per vaccine. Yeah and for the record. Chad does not think that these vaccines are legit for one thing. The pfizer vaccine requires a very intense cold storage chain. The vaccines have to be kept at negative seventy degrees fahrenheit and also the kobe vaccine ads are mixed in with ads for all kinds of other things and chances that tends to be a red flag. Since we're in the sees you scroll up in there's cocaine You know scroll down. You've got your airline and You know molly matthew name it ashwell as you know. This site has firearms chances. The global cova crisis has been a massive opportunity for cybercriminals he says the online marketplaces are still a tiny part of it right now and most of the criminal activity has involved ransomware chad's because lives are at stake and there's so much chaos and now criminal organizations know that if they hack into the system of hospital they can demand and probably get a lot of money back in october. One hospital in new jersey paid cybercriminals more than six hundred and fifty thousand dollars after the criminals locked up their computer systems and threatened to publish all of their patient records. Chad expects that these kinds of attacks will become more frequent in coming months because after all the payoff for those kinds of attacks are much bigger than a couple thousand dollars for the covid vaccines. Although chad also expects the vaccine market place will continue to grow on the dark web. Stacey smith cardiff garcia. Npr news

International Police Organizat Stacey Vanik Smith Cardiff Garcia Molly Matthew Anderson China Pfizer Ashwell Chad United States New Jersey Stacey Smith Cardiff Garcia Npr News
U.K. Begins Mass Vaccination Against The Coronavirus

All Things Considered

04:13 min | 1 year ago

U.K. Begins Mass Vaccination Against The Coronavirus

"Has become the first Western country to begin a mass vaccination campaign against Cove. It 19. Thousands of Brits received the first dose today of the two dose Fizer by on tech vaccine. The country is starting with two highest priority groups. That is people over 80 years old. And health care workers on the front line of the fight against the virus. One of those health care workers is Dr Matthew Morgan. He works in the ICU at a hospital in Cardiff, Wales. Welcome. Thank you very much. Thank you. So I understand that you received your first dose today. Just a few hours ago. What was that like I did. It's being a good day. A busy day. I have an arm, which isn't taking a tall at the minute. There's a tiny little plaster on it. But other than that, I'm doing very well. Were you surprised that you haven't been feeling any side effects whatsoever? Well, I think his health care professionals, we have vaccinations quite regularly. I have the flu vaccine annually is part of work. And really, although the excitement of the day was there to some extent, he was just the same as any other vaccine. It was just the same as having the flu vaccine in terms of the process Interesting. Well as an ICU doctor. You and your colleagues have seen the worst of this disease, and I'm wondering if you could just talk about what's the mood been like today at your hospital? So we subpoena a nod mood in many ways. It's kind of a combination of feeling proud, hopeful but also realistic, and I say, proud because it was 38 weeks to the day. That we admitted the first critically ill patient with covert to our ICU on. It's remarkable to think that in less than the duration of the pregnancy 38 weeks, we now have gone from that. Actually having a vaccine, and that's a remarkable achievement for science for medicine and humanity. Ready. I'm also realistic because this changes Everything. But it changes nothing. And in many ways, the biggest danger of this vaccine is complacency. Well, I'm glad that you brought that up because I want to just underline that I mean, what exactly what substantively changes if anything at all changes. Because of the fact that you were now vaccinated. What changes as you continue to treat covert patients anything. Yeah, At the minute. Nothing changes, practically or physically will be wearing the same Peopie will be following the same advice for hand washing, not touch and faces social distance in but gradually As the days turned into weeks, and the weeks turned into months. I hope this will be the start of a new new normal well. The UK is hoping to administer hundreds of thousands of doses of the vaccine by the end of the year. But that could take many months to spread, You know, beyond the highest priority groups. So what's your message to your family? Your friends and your fellow Brits, as all of them await their turn for a vaccine. I think there's two things to say. Really. First of all, it's that there is hope. There is some light at the end of that tunnel. There's also been a lot of discussion about safety, but for me The most dangerous bit of having that vaccination. Today was the car journey to get there. You know, everything in life has risks. Driving has risks. But we do it because it has benefits on did. It's just the same as this vaccine. It has tiny risks, but it's got huge benefits. And if it's for me, not getting sick, hopefully My family not getting sick. My patients not getting sick. My colleagues not getting sick on even strangers. Hopefully not getting sick. Dr. Matthew Morgan is an ICU doctor at the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you all stay safe.

Dr Matthew Morgan FLU ICU Cove Cardiff Peopie Wales UK Dr. Matthew Morgan University Hospital Of Wales
"cardiff" Discussed on The Office Providers Talking Office Space and Flexible Workspace

The Office Providers Talking Office Space and Flexible Workspace

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Office Providers Talking Office Space and Flexible Workspace

"Provides co working spaces. Business lounges breakout areas. Meeting rooms and flexible. Seven offices in suite sizes suitable for teams requiring from two desks up to thirty six desks. This is a place to work. Read meet your team brainstorm answering your business from. It is popular startup space in cardiff as well as being popular with freelances solar preneurs and also has a community of established and growing companies popular features if this character full flexible workspace hub include no deposit office space twenty four hour security onsite coppa king all inclusive pricing at free gym membership for occupiers showers and the great networking opportunities both the city centre in cardiff bay within walking distance..

Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

02:18 min | 1 year ago

Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

"By the. Are you being the the the only covid secure university but actually you do have a compass and people work there and students study at it. So i'll be really really fascinated to know what your plans offer january and the year. Yeah we are in a different place. No sorts of ways compared to the rest of the sector which i think actually has been doing an amazing job but yes we we have a real campus milk gains and we've got sites in manchester and nottingham as well. Of course our nation offices in cardiff belfast and edinburgh very much a four nations university and always having to work with the different policies of the four governments. So we tend to adopt an approach at the moment of going with the most safe vicious and guidance of one of the four jurisdictions in terms of what we do across the four nations so just one example of the many ways we have to work as very much a four nations university in everything we do even more normal times so that's added an extra complication for us in terms of what guidance and what measures do we actually follow as one university across jurisdictions. But we've had our challenges in the first lock down. We had to move nearly four thousand stuff off our campus about four thousand of our staff. The ucla were already hung based so we've got a lot of understanding how homebase works. But we have to adopt. And we're still having to adopt. We research students and researchers on campus. Where that research is essential in terms of lab provision. We're not going to have to manage these huge population movements though of students going home coming back to campus which very much reflects the The unusual situation in the uk of how dominant the residential sector is in higher education with these huge mass migrations of young people Beginning and end of term. So yeah what we have to do is is different. But like every university in the sector putting the wellbeing and health of our staff and students First and that is how we are working But i wish the secto with managing the scale of these population movements over the coming weeks and months

Nottingham Belfast Cardiff Edinburgh Manchester Ucla UK
Thanksgiving Dinners Are The Cheapest They've Been In Decades

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:09 min | 2 years ago

Thanksgiving Dinners Are The Cheapest They've Been In Decades

"Every year before thanksgiving the american farm bureau sends volunteer shoppers into grocery stores. They note the prices of the ingredients. That go into thanksgiving dinner. Cardiff garcia and patty hirsch from npr. Podcast indicator from planet. Money discovered the cost of thanksgiving is going down. The american farm bureau is a group that represents farmers throughout the country and its annual survey. It found that the average cost of thanksgiving dinner for ten people. This year is forty six dollars and ninety cents on the farm bureau's chief economist. John newton says that figure is low really low down four percent of from what we saw last year and actually is the lowest level that we've seen since two thousand ten and that's what i'd adjusting for inflation. We asked john if he could tell us high. The cost of thanksgiving dinners changed when he does adjust for inflation and specifically. What we wanted to know was if it was possible. That thanksgiving dinner was actually the cheapest it had ever been since the survey was started back in nineteen eighty six way. Let me let me power a spreadsheet. Just a mayor sure for go for it. Yeah i check it out yes it is. It is the lowest that it's been thirty five years. Wait a minute what did you just tell me. The in inflation adjusted dollars. Thanksgiving dinner is going to be the lowest. It's been thirty five years. Are you stunned. You know i am actually. I don't know why didn't look at that particular statistic before you asked me so. John says that you basically have to understand two stories to also understand why thanksgiving dinner is so cheap this year. Because here's the first story what happened this year. The ingredient with the biggest decline in its price is the turkey turkey. Prices came in dollar twenty one per pound that was down seven percent from what we saw last year. Which means you can put a sixteen pound bird on the table. Offer less than twenty dollars this year and this could be partly because the pandemic has forced families not to gather together in the same big groups as they normally would so. There's just less demand for those big turkeys families usually by and it's also because a lot of grocery stores have discounted the price of turkey. Frankly just to get people through the door. According to the department of agriculture more than eighty percent of retailers were running promotions across the country. When we started this survey. So you'll see turkey. Prices that range anywhere from twenty nine cents a pound to two ninety nine a pound depending on what type of grocer your and then. There's the second the longer story to tell. And this is actually an easy one to explain. Because of new technologies and innovations in how to produce food over the last few decades farmers have simply become better at it more efficient which means that they can sell the food for cheaper. You got to recognize that we benefit from a higher quality very affordable food supply. You know we spend a small percentage of our disposable income on food. Food in the united states is very affordable now john and the farm bureau of course represent farmers so he's boosting his piece. They're a little bit but the general story that the agricultural sector in the us has become more and more efficient over time is definitely true.

American Farm Bureau Cardiff Garcia Patty Hirsch John Newton NPR John Turkey Department Of Agriculture Bureau Of Course United States
Hope Vs. Despair

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:48 min | 2 years ago

Hope Vs. Despair

"Everyone Stacey Incarnate Cardiff here. This is indicator from planet money and it has been a while since stacey naive put on our holsters stared across from each other for a good old fashioned gunslinger and shootout. Right we know Cardiff. That these things are very hard on you so try not to make them frequently you know as it or not. I am talking like I'm in a Sergio Leone flick. So because we should always be talking like we're in a Sergio Leone movie. We need the music fistful of dollars, the DOODOO. Of. The US economy is in this very uncertain place right now, there's the election coming up Congress and the White House have not agreed on a new bill to provide aid and stimulus, and the economic indicators are pointing all kinds of different directions. Yes. So based on those indicators is the case for hope stronger or weaker than the case for despair. To end the show station high debate, we take sides and to decide which side we're flipping a coin flip out at the O. K. Corral, Dang right? Heads I. Make the case for hope and Stacey you are despairing and if it's tails, you get to be hopeful. So I'm hoping for hope. It's tails, which means you get to be hopeful I. Spring the despair. Oh, I'm so excited I. I'm excited to be the voice of hope Cardiff. I feel like I feel like there's a part of you. That's excited to be the voice of despair. AM I. Wrong. Little bit a little bit. So yeah US economy after the break the good the bad and the I guess in our case the Smug League own nice. Prepare to rush Garcia prepared to do Rashed it's happening. Support for this podcast and the following message come from. Google, from updating their hours to adding takeout and delivery information. Small businesses around the country are using free google tools to adapt learn how at Google dot com slash grow. Okay folks. I will be arguing the case for pessimism for despair about the US economy stacey is arguing the case for hope. Stacey. You get to draw I. Okay. Cardiff here it is the case for hope the US economy is coming back. Economists are forecasting that the economy rebounded very strongly in the third quarter of this year after a very terrible second quarter the official numbers for the third quarter have not been released yet. They come out next week, but it is possible that the economy was up to eight percent bigger than it was in the second quarter that is just enormous definitely for sure it would be A. Really strong number but let's remember that the third quarter included the month of July when the economy was still running on the stimulus provided by the cares act that was the big government spending bill that provided an extra six hundred dollars a week in unemployment benefits to people who are out of work but those extra benefits expired at the end of July. So the stimulus by now is probably wearing off and also we still have almost seven million more unemployed people in the country. Then back in February before the pandemic started and I'm really worried about them now that they're not getting that extra help. Yes, you are totally Right that the high unemployment rate has been absolutely crushing, but the reason for hope is that Cardiff this very great that you referred to has actually been falling. So remember the worst economic damage from the pandemic was in the early months of March and April since then the unemployment rate has fallen from about fifteen percent where it peaked down to about eight percent as the economy has recovered, that is a huge recovery in a pretty short amount of time. That's true for sure and a hopeful sign but we have to recall that not all unemployment is the same most of the people who've already gotten their jobs back only. Lost those jobs fairly recently, but the number of long-term unemployed people is actually still going up each month. These are people who lost their jobs more than half a year ago and they have not been rehired and the longer they go without a job. The more likely it is that they're gonNA, lose their contacts and lose their skill sets and really struggled to find work again. Later you make some fair points Cardiff and I would respond that if the economy keeps growing though eventually those jobs will come back and there is a really good reason for hope that the economy will, in fact keep growing and that is consumer confidence. In September consumer confidence shot up by the most it has in seventeen years, which means that people in the US are planning to keep spending money because they are optimistic about the economy. For example, the sheriff people who are planning to buy a major appliance like a refrigerator, a stove or something like that is the highest it's been in seven months, and all that spending is going to keep the economy growing. There we go. Cardiff Garcia mic drop I. Think we should just call it right now I have one because consumers can be wrong I. Mean just because you're planning to buy the latest oxo coffeemaker with that sleek. Thermal Carafe does that mean you actually will if suddenly the economy goes bad but I would also point to a big split in precisely what people are spending money on. So specifically, yes people are spending more and more money on goods for the home like furniture and electron ix. But consumers are still not spending much money on services on things like eating at restaurants on traveling, and that's a problem because for example, restaurants and hotels are a huge source of employment for low income workers. So I'm just worried about people who rely on those jobs coming back especially since remember again, those extra benefits for the unemployed already expired. Almost three months ago card. If I think you should go ahead and splurge and buy yourself fancy coffee Raffin. Here's why. So you keep mentioning that the benefits for unemployed workers have expired and that is true but it is also true that not all of the money from those benefits with spent right away. A lot of that money was saved plus people who kept their jobs have also saved more money since the pandemic started because all the business lockdowns meant there were fewer opportunities to spend their money and you know people were maybe hunkering down a little bit too and what this means that a lot of households out. There still have money saved up money that they can start spending in the economy on things like fancy coffee carafe indeed though we also do know that a lot of the unemployed workers have already spent down a lot of their savings according to the J. P. Morgan, Chase Institute the unemployed spent about two thirds of their added savings in August that was the first month after the benefits expired, which means by now their finances could be getting really tightened. So they may have to cut back on some of their spending card. If you've now perfectly set up my final argument in the case for hope hated when I do that. That is policy. It is not too late for the president and Congress to make another deal before the election in order to stimulate the economy, those negotiations are still happening and also the Federal Reserve has been using monetary policy to help boost the economy. For example, low interest rates have given a big boost to the housing market, and historically the housing market has been a good sign of where the rest of the economy is headed and housing market is doing quite well. Yeah I definitely concede. The point about the Fed and the housing market. But the Federal Reserve itself has also said that what would be really useful for the economy is another bill like the cares act from the president and Congress, and all I'm saying to you is if the case for hope relies on politicians striking a deal agreeing on something that might be the most despairing

Cardiff United States Stacey Google Sergio Leone Congress Federal Reserve Doodoo President Trump Garcia O. K. Corral Smug League J. P. Morgan Official White House Chase Institute
RIP Business Suit?

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:10 min | 2 years ago

RIP Business Suit?

"Tina Ob is a professor of management at Babson College and she says, a lot of students will come to her. You know before they're interviewed for the first internships or first jobs and they will ask like Bush should I wear this job. So she thinks about the question of like how professional and professional norms a lot when I asked most people what is the most big symbol of the business world and visit professionalism almost everyone says the business eventually and Tina started thinking about why in about where these norms come from also she herself had a special relationship with the business suit because before she was in academia Tina worked in banking and I absolutely were businesses because We think about the prototype of a banker is that you have a tailored suits white man play golf. I'm a black woman doesn't play golf. So I had to get the soup right and they was. I mean I had the best. They were beautiful suits and they were tailored. It was by putting on a crown almost I felt special I. Felt you don't have on my uniform. This is my beautifully tailored uniform and people perceive me differently. So now Tina works in academia and she loves researching things and so all of this got her thinking like wait why is the business suit? The thing that we all wear to work like what about kilts or row observe why not something else so she started tracing the business suit back through time all the way back to its origins in the sixteen hundreds it turns out we have Charles the second to thank for the suit he was the. King, of England four hundred years ago. Yes and at the time when he became king, the fashion in the royal courts was like very very over the top men were these huge poofy wigs and they had these big sleeves on their clothes and crazy colors because di was very expensive. So it was a sign you were wealthy men wore high heeled shoes but all of his over the top nece in the royal courts it was it was starting to cause some problems for Charles getting all this criticism from religious and economic leaders who were saying that the royal family there were morally Herat's overly decorated, and so he was looking for a way to try to. Present himself and As more restraints, the sewage back then were made from wool instead of silk, and even though the colors were still kind of like Easter and colors just all over the place. This was still super restrained at the time and it starts getting even more strain. So details on the codes when Charles the second I started wearing, them were quite long but they got shorter and shorter and shorter and eventually the. Colors that people in suits became more muted product. We see today or at least what we used to see I, mean I actually can't remember the last time I saw someone in a suit, and you know says, she can't remember the last time. She wore one I have on a workout Sir Yoga pants but you know what typically going to work I wouldn't have the song. Oh, it's the same for me talk. It's so nice, oh. Yeah. I can actually there's been a lot of talk on social media and in all of these articles think pieces about how much people have been loving dressing down Lali living that yoga pants life right and it's not like working from home is going away. I. Mean millions of offices are closed through the rest of the year and beyond and. Even for people who do go back to the office, the setups probably going to be pretty different probably fewer people some partitions, maybe less reason to suit up there. Also Tina says that now the people have tasted this yoga pants life going back is going to be hard. There's something to say about the sigh of relief the collective sigh of relief I think the world. That tells you that there was labor associated with getting dressed in a professional way. Tina says for now she is advising her students to still put in that Labor for job interviews in banking and consulting jobs, or at least take care of the top part that people are GonNa zoom suit jacket suit jacket. Exactly and you know the suit has survived four hundred years of change electricity, the combustion engine, the Internet two world wars the suit has survived. All of that is working from home really going to be the thing that takes it down death by Yoga. Pants, seriously towards yoga pants that killed the I'm on. I like the idea of the suit as King Kong. But you know I don't know Cardiff because the business has been around as you say for a very long time for four hundred years I mean. Things change and maybe this is the business suits swansong like maybe it's time for us to start wearing other kinds of close. WE'RE NOT GONNA be wearing suits forever right drew I put this all to Tina and she said, you know if you want to know the fate of the suit right now, you've got to talk to people who work in fashion right look at fashion person at twin watcher about what we're seeing from shoppers and what designers are

Tina Ob Charles Golf Tina King Babson College Bush King Kong Professor Of Management Cardiff DI England Herat Lali
Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:12 min | 2 years ago

Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

"It egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that in prison, a man will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is a food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand, plus a fixed supply pushes up the price. And the price went way up nearly 200% in March, and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota, and they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics. Stacy Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

David Ortega Aeg Companies Smith Cardiff Garcia Stacy Vanik United States Stacy Vanek NPR Michigan State University New York Texas Hillandale Farms Attorney Minnesota West Virginia
"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

"Morning edition from NPR news. I'm Steve Inskeep, and I'm no well, king. So if you look at the state of the economy, you might assume that the housing market is a mess. That, though, is not true. Stacy Vanik Smith in Cardiff Garcia, who host our podcast, the indicator talked to the CEO of Redfin about a surprising housing boom. Glenn Kelman has been the CEO of Redfin for 15 years. And he says for all that time, people looking for a home always put this one thing as their top priority. What about the commute The commute to work? Yes, it's the old realestate mantra. Right of time. Immemorial, location, location, location. Yeah, and most of the time, those locations were big cities where most of the jobs were concentrated. And as a result, buying home in these cities had become a kind of blood sports, The New York real estate market, the San Francisco real estate market, These were insane markets cleanses smaller cities, rural areas, We're just a different world. In fact, over the last few years, housing sales have been a little sluggish. Yeah, that has changed. National Association of Realtors announced last week that from May to June just is a covert 19 crisis was bearing down on businesses and millions of people were losing their jobs. Pending home sales rose more than 16%. That's the biggest monthly rise on record. That is crazy to me, because you know, like one in every five Americans on unemployment, like it's like blowing my mind that homeownership rates might also be going up there that there's a kind of a really ST boom, but it sounds like there is Well, it's white collar professionals were able to work from home. In some ways. This is a sign that the economy has just officially split into. You have people who are worried about unemployment benefits running out and at the same time. Have other people who are able to work from home and thinking about the home all the time, and that's where they want to spend their money. Glenn says that for the people who were lucky enough to have kept their jobs A huge number of them are working from home now, so they're asking the question. Well, why do I have to live close to the office? Why can't I live near family? Why kind of live in a place that's more affordable, And that's changed everything. The traffic to listings that Aaron towns with populations of less than 50,000 people is up 87%. In other words, it's no longer location, location location. It's more like space space space. Glenn says, for example, that he is seeing a lot of requests for extra bedrooms for parents and grand parents. And he's seeing a lot of requests for extra rooms for offices and home gyms. I think some of this is just that people are thinking more about their home. And some of it is that they could finally live wherever they want, without asking their boss and Glenn says he's also seeing a big migration of people out of big cities like New York L. A Chicago in San Francisco to smaller cities like Palm Springs, Tucson, Austin, Grand Rapids in Nashville, and those tiny San Francisco and New York apartments that had people in a bidding war. People are leaving those apartments in droves. Stacy Vanek, Smith Cardiff Garcia NPR news Support for Planet money comes from progressive insurance committed to offering a streamline shopping experience where home and auto.

Glenn Kelman San Francisco Steve Inskeep NPR New York CEO Redfin Stacy Vanik Smith National Association of Realto Stacy Vanek Palm Springs Garcia Grand Rapids Tucson Chicago Nashville Austin
"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

"Companies around the world are racing to develop a code 19 vaccine. Ah, couple of vaccines under development in the U. S. Might start clinical trials as early as this month. But how much will people have to pay for it once the vaccine is ready? Cardiff Garcia and Patty Hearst from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet Money, dig into the economics of vaccine pricing. Michael Kinch is the author of between Hope and Fear, a book about the history of vaccines. And he says that making money on a vaccine is harder than making money on, say, a life saving cancer drug. A vaccine generally tends to be a relatively inexpensive short term therapy. You immunize everybody, but you really get that patient population once and at a relatively low price point. Compare that, for example, with a drug for metastatic cancer, where you can price that drug at hundreds of thousands, and now we're reaching the point of millions of dollars per person. And that's much more profitable both of the short term and in the long term In recent decades, the pharma industry has mostly focused on those lucrative drugs and not on vaccines. Which is why Michael argues that pharma companies have been caught flat footed by having to create a vaccine for covered 19. That's also influenced their scientific approach to making that vaccine. Most of the companies in the United States are taking technologies that were developed for, for example, cancer and repurposing them. For covert 19 on this approached by U. S companies has consequences, Michael says an American pharma company that develops a covered vaccine might not actually own the patents on those newer technologies. So for every patient that buys the vaccine, the company might end up having to pay a certain percentage to the other companies that do own the patents. There might be three or 45 or six different patents that you have to serve. Each of them may want a percent or two or three or four that starts to add up very, very quickly charging a lot of money for a vaccine. The public absolutely needs to immunize itself against Covad. Would be extremely controversial, especially controversial if the vaccines developed by one of the cos that's being subsidized by the U. S government certified, the governments pledged roughly $2.2 billion to five US pharma companies, the government and the pharma companies. Obviously both want a vaccine to be developed. But when it comes to pricing the vaccine Have some with different goals. Pharma companies want to charge enough to cover costs and make a profit, whereas the government in the public want prices to be affordable enough that everyone congee immunized. We don't want to dis incentivize the private sector for making a new vaccine. Instead, we want to figure out how do we balance that incentive with making sure that the drug is affordable and available to everyone? Not getting that balance. Right is one of the reasons that have been so few new vaccines developed in the last few decades. Pharma companies know they'll get lamb bastard if they charge too high a price. But charging a low price isn't really worth it to them. Because developing vaccines is expensive. Aligning the incentives of the public in the pharma companies is massively important because his urgent and terribly important is the fight against Cove. It is right now. It probably won't be the last against the threatening pandemic. Patty Hirsch, Cardiff Garcia NPR news.

Michael Kinch Planet Money United States Cardiff Garcia Patty Hearst cancer Patty Hirsch Covad NPR Cardiff U. S
"cardiff" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:34 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"To hit too credible and run alongside Cardiff but this this is what I see here Michael is having such dishes such horrible money problems his chance going crazy with at least a portion everything should have that ready ever take your job did you have to take a second job at a call center is next to an easy guy from India who has his nice spread a dinner out there while my causing a power bar vanilla crisp but he says the guy who did the Indian guys he's prejudiced Anderson I was it I was a surgeon back home in Michael says that one I would have I would have been chief of surgery back in your home however they said I think I think he's back and I think more Michael doesn't even see your because they are the justices I want to go back home yeah you are home I would've been chief of surgery so yeah the whole Michael Vick Michael does the quote to Polish point I would've what did it right back to the R. V. V. crumb is not his name is not impressed it ready get the fifty dollar plan and then I think I think at one point when Michael leaves having to do drop Saddam works there is like don't forget to sanitize your headset come back whenever you want so you can have a good one fix your headset come on back but anyway the point being is that I hear you on the dreams I will say this I only have one and I've told you guys we were the only one I have that passes for a recurring dream like lebron plan for the cowboys by the way he was calling it Irvine Texas he keeps in Irvine it's Irving as Bonnie Jill well knows I'm from southern California I live in I live down in so cal I think I failed my last class at UCLA Bible as literature which I swear to god was the most was the most terrifying I've ever been and I'm fine do I did everything because I blew off the most my spring semester my spring quarter I went into that final not knowing anything the guy handed me the finalizing I have no idea this is great if you're doing great in the kingdom of heaven hello this is great dude he turned into a what is it why you turned as a fail into a passing police are losing the fish thank you for this is for the masses do their Catholic education that's helped me well today may nineteenth at six oh four AM tonight show that says senator Peter Shelley and Doug Evans who Tommy theology and all that tuition you're paying all that tuition didn't look in our net sales and I was gonna do something with it more if I was going to be a pretty you for surgery I was going to go to a big school and even get out here right here listen to J..

Cardiff Michael
"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We made ourselves when we're done the room smells like a sterilized doctor's office when we go for walks if we see anyone we cross the street a block ahead the pick up all male disposable gloves leave it in the garage for twenty four hours we used to spray with myself first we agreed that was overkill but to be honest I still do it behind my family's back so in my mind there is no way any germ could break through are impenetrable disinfectant fortress but somehow after doing this day after day for seven straight weeks yeah I woke up fairly early in the morning and felt it I think I have a cold that's my husband Jeremy I was run down runny nose sore throat in a couple of days he was fine but I was like how the hell does that even happen how could he possibly have gotten a cold we've been super careful because he has an immune deficiency one that affects his respiratory system it keeps me up at night sometimes because of the cold virus made it into our house then the corona virus could to and then there was a crack in her armor I need to know where we had failed so Jeremy and I consulted an expert at a very safe social distance where are you I'm in Cardiff Wales United Kingdom I know I'm on the coast yes I'm looking out over the sea so I'm really well isolated this is Ron Echols who really knows about colts study them for fifty years here in a place called the common cold center at Cardiff university almost immediately I told them all the precautions we are taking I don't understand how this is like physically possible I'm just really want to know like how did this how did this happen like how could he have gotten well it's a bit of a mystery let me see if I can ask you some questions to what which rather like a detective you say you're not actually meant to anybody so I assume you're not physically touched anybody shaken hands orange anything like that no not at all what about the door handle out certainly does anybody else touch the door handle apps to open it's a cleaner or a delivery man well so here's what I've done every time we go out the house yesterday to spray the door handle with Lysol and and now I made the paint comes off so there's like a big street going down the middle of the night because I've skated so much I can personally guarantee that are.

Jeremy Cardiff Wales United Kingdom Ron Echols colts Cardiff university
"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:45 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

"Up or delivery which privilege I now than we do this insane disinfection process where we wipe everything down with a ninety percent rubbing alcohol ten percent water solution we made ourselves when we're done the room smells like a sterilized doctor's office when we go for walks if we see anyone we cross the street a block ahead the pick up all male with disposable gloves leave it in the garage for twenty four hours we used to spray with myself first we agreed that was over kill but to be honest I still do it behind my family's back so in my mind there is no way any germ could break through are impenetrable disinfectant fortress but somehow after doing this day after day for seven straight weeks yeah I woke up fairly early in the morning and felt it I think I have a cold that's my husband Jeremy I was run down runny nose sore throat in a couple of days he was fine but I was like how the hell did that even happen how could he possibly have gotten a cold we've been super careful because he has an immune deficiency when that affects his respiratory system it keeps me up at night sometimes because of the cold virus made it into our house then the corona virus could to and then there was a crack in her armor I need to know where we had failed so Jeremy and I consulted an expert at a very safe social distance where are you I'm in Cardiff Wales United Kingdom I know I'm on the coast yes I'm looking out over the sea so I'm really well isolated this is Ron Echols who really knows about colts study them for fifty years here in a place called the common cold center at Cardiff university almost immediately I told them all the precautions we are taking I don't understand how this is like physically possible I'm just really want to know like how did this how did this happen like how could he have gotten well it's a bit of a mystery let me see if I can ask you some questions to what which rather like a detective you say you're not actually meant to anybody so I assume you're not physically touched anybody shaken hands orange anything like that no not at all what about the door handle out certainly does anybody else touch the door handle perhaps to open it's a cleaner or a delivery man well so here's what I've done every time we go out the houses started to spray the door handle with Lysol and and now I made the paint come off so there's like a big street going down the middle of the night because I've skated so much I can personally guarantee that are not as.

Jeremy Cardiff Wales United Kingdom Ron Echols colts Cardiff university
"cardiff" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KOMO

"Meteorologist Kristen Cardiff get some showers in the Seattle area is forty four degrees right now come on news time five thirty six a deal between General Motors and apostle company that makes ventilators to ramp up production of the medical devices in high demand because of the pandemic is reportedly on hold details now from coal most Carlene Johnson well the bobble companies go all very intact they were teaming with General Motors working frantically around the clock and what they called project V. in response to the crisis United States only have about maybe two hundred thousand of the most ventilators that this society of critical care medicine has warned we could need up to a million of the machines because of a pandemic this is Chris Kimball with Advantech we're talking to federal state and local authorities from CDC to HHS as well as other states around the country we're talking to ministers of health and over sixty five different countries we are responding and the best way that we know how now the plan was to manufacture the ventilators at GM's electronics assembly plant in Kokomo Indiana and by may they said they would have several thousand more machines made for the Seattle times reports the federal government may be delaying the rollout they cite unnamed government officials with FEMA saying they wanted more time to assess whether the billion dollar price tag is too high and they said the deal isn't necessarily dead but the federal government's of quarterly waiting a dozen or more other proposals reporting live Carly Johnson calling his film the police have created an easy way to report people who are breaking the governors to stay home order they might build view app has a new section to report locations where people are gathering in groups as more reports are filed it shows police the hot spot so they can respond to those places and educate people about the distancing requirements they ask you not call nine one one that's for emergencies only a long time restaurant owner in Seattle has died from corona virus Liz Maher was the owner of the Kona kitchens in maple leaf and limb would she had celebrated her seventy second birthday on a ventilator and I see you on March thirteenth I spoke with Liz's daughter Angie she shared this heartfelt statement do not waste precious moments with your loved ones I took my mom to the E. are not realizing that I'd never get to talk with her again so I implore you to see what you want to say to your loved ones and have no regrets that's cool most Suzanne fonts questions are being raised over this week's emergency closure of the west Seattle bridge the Seattle department of transportation has issued a preliminary report stated a recent discovery of cracks led to the closure order former state senator Phil Talmadge who helped get the bridge built in nineteen eighty four tells The Seattle Times quote I find it strange they discovered this problem that emerged out of the blue as if this bridge was stuck struck by a comet if this was a wear and tear issue which should have been monitored over time with Seattle bridge could be closed for traffic for several weeks to.

Kristen Cardiff Seattle
"cardiff" Discussed on Classic Countdown Conversations

Classic Countdown Conversations

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Classic Countdown Conversations

"To cost accounting conversations i'm daniel cardiff i'm phillip austin bay and and this is a show about counting down the best and worst that media has to offer when we we feel like it too bad taste so oh today's episode is about regular show the the best day in cartoon for adults and children that there is no that's not true it is a good one for adults and children no i mean i'd definitely say like our charge there bender on comedy i guess that's a little bit of a common adventure times better than the show is adventure to entertainment for not right that one i i'll take that one but it's it's in there somewhere it's a good shop ten best like it's good for preteens especially the first just like season or twos really good for like teenagers yeah now younger on the younger side teenage and then it kind of gets more a little bit more kitty as it goes along mhm which is why i don't like the later seasons as much as a little law edgier towards the beginning they said things like screw and what what the h yeah they like say the the first letter of curse words they say what the age and things along those lines so that's why i like regular shows because it was a a little bit more risque and they drink coal and it makes them drunk they yeah and then the hawks are always said it for twenty and there's a lot of like inside ride jobs for adults to enjoy but did you ever watch regular show before you came around us know existed so tell tell me about like your introduction to it then oh so we'll hold on chewy explain white regular say that's probably for first order of things ingrid you like to tell our audience sure so regular shows a cartoon on cartoon network was it ended yet it's done now it's now on who i think it lasted like nine seasons yeah good for that show it's a basically the premise is a couple of friends uh-huh one is a bird one was the raccoon that are what do you call that in a more fiqh what is it when you're yeah they have like they have like human human characteristics yeah and there are also humans yet i've the creator j g intel has said the the main characters are people but they are just drawn as animals interesting so okay just to give the show more visual variety yeah but yeah so they are supposed to be people yeah but they're not they're not so anyway they work at a park uh-huh in a house the their they don't work in the house they stay in the house it's the best job ever yeah they always act like it's a crappy ah sweet living and basically they get into hijinks seems pretty regular yeah but but then as time goes on or the show is about to end things go nutso yeah it's really wacky usually 'cause they're slackers the two main characters are so usually it's like they try to find a way to not do their work and then backfires them but then it becomes very over the top and fantastical towards the the end yes that's that's not all the i mean a lot of episodes are like that other episodes or like like one they're trying to return a board game and stuff like that obey always starts out very normal very regular yeah and then turns into a crazy crazy like universe stopping in the end of the episode so there's normally some sort of world ending yes or and people just straight up dying the show yeah they do just like like ooh no no hesitation i think it's like the second episode it's it's the one where they have to set up the chairs you're and in.

daniel cardiff phillip austin
"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:17 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm re tomorrow and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning politicians need money to run a campaign but as we know from experience the candidate with the most money does not always win so it is more money mean more votes NPR politics reporter Daniel Kurtz Leben teamed up with Cardiff Garcia of NPR's planet money have a look at Hillary Clinton for example in twenty sixteen Hillary Clinton and the groups that supported how raise Donald Trump and his groups by more than three hundred million dollars in the twenty sixteen election and still he won the one big important thing we can say you do need a certain minimum amount of money to run seriously for president that's according to shore from hold executive director of the center for responsive politics it's essential but it's not sufficient on its own candidates need to have enough money to get their message out to pave the staff that will run their campaign their field offices there's also other basic stuff you need to be a competitive candidate like name recognition put ads out there do a lot of events and you can get more people to know who you are long story short according to Sheila money doesn't buy the message but it can be a heck of a bull horn even if they have good ideas and good charisma and they also need to have that money to be able to get that message out yeah but wait because we're focusing a lot on what money buys but it's a really limited way to look at all this which brings us to important point number two about campaign fund raising money isn't just about buying stuff right campaign money has a big signaling affect when a candidate gets a lot of money if first of all we'll get some media coverage but beyond that there's another important fact money begets more money it signals to other donors that yes I can do this yes I am a safe investment which means there's also a timing aspect to your political donations Sheila told me this and she referenced a popular democratic fundraising group this is the basis for bundling up. operations like Emily's list which stands for early money is like yeast that early money helps you raise that Joe whether it's done earlier late in the cycle there's one more point here fundraising just cost money often a lot of money and that might sound counterintuitive because of find Donald Trump for Elizabeth Warren or whoever I could just send out an email and let the money roll in because sending an email is free well that turns out not to be true though first of all you have to buy lists of email addresses and those can cost tens or even hundreds of thousands of dollars in order to even get on to the stage for those televised debates you may have seen candidates have to hit a certain polling threshold and get a certain number of donors so a lot of candidates are reaching out on line to their list saying listen just give me one dollar it's this weird situation where a one dollar donation is much more valuable than a dollar one staggering statistic here according to the center for responsive politics some democratic campaigns are spending thirty five dollars or more to get just one dollar through a Facebook ad campaigns are making a calculation that being on that stage being on national television taking a jab at an opponent that could be played on cable news the next day is worth it Daniel Kurtz leave.

Steve Inskeep NPR one dollar three hundred million dollars thirty five dollars