35 Burst results for "Cardiff"

"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:04 min | 6 months ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Talking about thirty eight jobs. Fridays six episodes about the yield curve. That i could find the yield curve. Inverted the yields curve try to contain. I still don't really understand it going to be one hundred percent honest here card. I'm surprised it's only six. I'm a little disappointed. i didn't get to double digits. On the yield curve. Episodes three episodes about mixed martial arts spoiler alert. Were not my idea. In general the shows about sports that was you but still one. Recession one pandemic. The dow jones industrial average has climbed eight thousand seven hundred and sixty nine points and of course zero days that i did not feel really lucky and really enjoy working with you. That's very sweet. That indicator of course applies to me as well and and working with you. Six thousand minutes of talking six thousand but now i mean working on the show has been Just unbelievably rewarding and Yeah i'm gonna. I'm gonna miss the team minimum issue and also going to miss our listeners who've been so awesome and need to keep listening to the indicator because Under your helmets. It's just gonna keep getting better and better and for that reason if no other i will definitely be back. to bask in the glory of what it will continue to be and i can't wait for that you know i'm happy that you know we're gonna keep like a great relationship and it's really special to i don't know here's to seven hundred fifty shows six thousand minutes and your new venture which we're all excited here about and we'll have you back to talk about it. This episode of the indicator was produced by jamila huxtable. And fact check by san sai. It was edited by. Julie myers and indicator is a production of npr..

eight thousand six thousand Julie myers jamila huxtable six episodes Six thousand minutes one hundred percent san sai zero days seven hundred sixty nine points thirty eight jobs six Fridays Episodes three episodes six thousand minutes seven hundred fifty shows double digits Recession one
"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:57 min | 6 months ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Stacey and cardiff here. This is the indicator from planet money and welcome to a special thursday edition of indicators of the week stacey. We're off tomorrow. yes we are. Because the markets are closed and so we have the day off so it is our early indicators of the week thursday edition indicators of course is when stacy and i share with each other and with our listeners. An indicator from the week that we came across in that we thought was striking fun. Interesting something that just stuck with us. We kind of ambush each other with those indicators. Because we haven't told each other what they're going to be. It's not an ambush there. No blood is shed typically not yet. But there's a first time for everything so find out after the break. Yeah whether or not any blood will be shed in the sharing of today's indicators of the week also if cardiff can break his devastating rock paper scissors lose extra devastating and mathematically almost impossible. I'm over the last four. But i think this is in. Think you're set you sensing turnaround okay. This message comes from npr sponsor. Agian agian is the payments platform for today tomorrow and whatever comes next with adnan single solution. It's simple to accept all kinds of payments and app online in store touch free and beyond and it seamlessly adapts with your business so keep your customers happy and your business growing with agian business. Not boundaries visit a d. y. e. n. dot com slash. Npr this message comes from npr sponsor. Microsoft teams microsoft teams is helping priority bicycles reinvent. The way they work when the pandemic hit the bike shop had to close their new york city showroom. They found a way to reopen by doing virtual visits on teams. Now the team can meet with two or three the number of customers and they could before and people from all over. The world can visit their showroom learn more about their story and others at microsoft dot com slash teams. Stacey always you. And i play rock paper scissors. Who goes first in sharing our indicator of the week. I've lost four in a row. Okay four in a row. We should clarify that. You've lost every single time we've ever played rock paper scissors. Yes four times. I just like the way that sounds already on three one two three five zero in row. I can't rang leads. Scissors indeed precious. I can't believe it if for this one. you know. it's winners choice. I imagine right. 'cause i rocked it. I would like you to go first okay. You're going to let me go first this time. I'm just classy like that. Yeah all right. Excellent here is my indicator of the week. It is twenty six point six million barrels per day that is the gasoline demand for the whole world in the year. Twenty nineteen and. Here's why that's such a big deal. A new report from the i. e. a. the international energy agency predicts that that year was peak gasoline demand that we may not actually get back to that amount of gasoline. Demand ever again. And there's a couple of reasons why this might be the case like the whole globe was shut down because of the pandemic so one of the reasons is like a little rough right just for twenty twenty right so twenty twenty everything kind of collapsed but the is essentially saying even after the pandemic ends. We won't get back to the pre pandemic peak in gasoline. Demand and one reason is simple. It's just greater fuel efficiency so you keep getting better mileage for gallon of gas that you put in your car. That means you just don't need to buy as much gas another is you can imagine. There are some societal trends. Like more teleworking that will lead to a bit less driving but the big one seems to be that. That's been simmering for a very long time. And which just hasn't gone to market is now finally here and seems like it's ready for mass adoption and that's electric vehicles in the case of gm involve vote. They've announced targets for when they are no longer going to even sell gas powered vehicles. They're going electric. And so i think there's a big lesson to draw here in. It includes issues like political incentives to adopt newer technologies. Right which is that. We've been hearing for so long. That electric vehicles are going to be a thing Long enough that. I think a lot of us have become kind of cynical right but this is actually quite common for technology to be improving to be tinkering but not yet be adopted because a number of things have to happen. First one is that you need like new infrastructure to be built to accommodate that technology. Another is the technology itself doesn't just need to improve. Needs to improve to the point where it's cheaper than other alternatives. But another thing you need is for the overall like environment to be ready for that technology to become useful to the masses and one of the things that helps is when the government does provide incentives for that technology to finally be adopted. Like what's happening in california and a lot of other places where you know. Electric vehicles have either been subsidized or gas. Powered vehicles have been discouraged. And that is what it seems. The i e as expecting and why gasoline demand for the whole world may have already peaked. That is a beautiful indicator. Nice work scissors. So that was winners choice. I went i for the first time. Ever thank you for that. That was very gracious of you. I tried to be in good winners. Be like my lot in life winning. That was the pity go. I say see so. That's my indicator. What is your indicator of the week. Mine is a little sound q. So hopefully you can hear this okay. I'm of course you. And i'm stacey vanik smith. This is the indicator from planet. Money a show about work business and the economy that is that sounds like a very very very early indicators from the earliest days of the indicator it wasn't fact our very first indicator it was the very first time that we said those words and in fact we have said them almost seven hundred and fifty times since then in the like three plus years that we have been doing the show that is my indicator today one hundred and fifty that is quite a milestone but yeah i think i know why you brought it up of course cardiff. The reason that i am bringing this up is that you are leaving the indicator. This is your last indicator of the week. You're moving on. You're starting your own podcast or starting a company. It's a very exciting time for you very sad for me. It's also sad for me. I mean leaving to go do this project. I'd been dreaming about for a very long time. But obviously i'm going to be ambivalent about it because it means leaving behind this great experience of having made the indicator and and most of all of of having partnered with you from the very beginning and having gotten to do all these great shows together am. I don't know. I'm i'm i'm also very sad and i'm so proud of like how hard we worked and of the shows that we made together. It's been it's been really awesome but you're right this. This is today my my last indicator as a full on member of the indicator team. So yeah it's i don't even know what to say. I'm getting a little emotional over here. I have some sub indicators that i can give you to give you a minute. Let's go seven hundred and fifty ish indicators. Over the last three years that is six thousand minutes of us.

Microsoft california stacey vanik smith new york Stacey six thousand minutes microsoft tomorrow today two one hundred and fifty Twenty nineteen twenty six point cardiff three three plus years four times First one stacey stacy
Dame Esther Rantzen and her garden frolics

My Wardrobe Malfunction

01:56 min | 6 months ago

Dame Esther Rantzen and her garden frolics

"When you start. You had your first appearance on television. Do you remember what you and did he have any. If you any guidance on that yes. It wasn't my actual very first appearance on television. Because i paid on a view startled panel. Now i can't remember what the name of the program was it was in the sixties in cardiff as a friend of mine was producing viewer complaints. Program and discussion of television and the discussion was weather. A woman would ever be allowed to read the news and a nurse said absolutely not because women lateral authority. And i said did she have a female nation and did she lack authority anyway. That was my berry. I first but then as a reporter was brightens we can do indeed remember what i will because i decided it was gonna be too difficult to think of something different every week so i got a friend who was good at serving to make me want was then known as a painful dress own. It was in two homes scott and tall and i i would wear it we come to and i would wear addition shows on nathan underneath it on week. Three we actually got a complaint from a man who said ads always wear the same thing bbc account. Remember my producer program. I said no. I can't afford this. I think they were paying me something minimal unless i cannot afford to spend low paying me on a different dress every week have to supply. I'm from now on for the next thirty nine years. The bbc paid for my clothes. I will as a reporter presenter

Cardiff Scott BBC
Cognitive Neuroscience in the Classroom with Dr Louise Allen Walker

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

04:10 min | 6 months ago

Cognitive Neuroscience in the Classroom with Dr Louise Allen Walker

"Welcome back everyone. To marin. Tom talk teaching. I am pleased to say that we are joined remotely today by another guest. A new guest to the podcast. So i'd like to extend a very warm. Welcome to dr louise allen walker. Welcome our great. Thanks very much. Thank you feel like on the radio. You kind of our. I'd like to see you. Yeah it's it's not the magic of live radio maybe one day. We'll we'll do that. Put the fear of god into our guest. St louis from the residents used the first place to start is that maybe you could tell listeners about your background and education. You actually work with us which probably say that off the bat. You're one of our colleagues although we haven't seen you in person in some months now it's been a long time a really highs so tell us about you. You'll patterns education and academia and the programs that you work on cardiff met absolutely so my specialist area is cognitive neuroscience On i did my phd at benghazi novosti on a it looked at this topic. So i use brain stimulation to look at predictive language function in an area of the brain. The everyone sort of thought did mussa planning but actually it. It really plays a predictive role in a bunch of different processes. and then what. I was doing my phd. I lecture alongside at bangor. And then once i finished my phd. I came here and that was just david three years ago and here i work on to program so i work on the undergraduate education psychology and special educational needs program and then also work. And i'm the program director for the msc psychology and education Which is bps credited on on. Both of those programs presumably teach topics around cognitive psychology near science cognitive neuroscience and research methods as well. So this is interesting for us because you know we. We hearing tombs like cognitive science new science things like that being thrown around in debates around teaching and you know how we how we teach effectively and it can be a little bit intimidating subdued tend to like to use that as a kind of way of saying i'm right and you're wrong so let's let's get right down to counter basics here. Can you explain to us what we actually mean before. We start getting into some of the really fun debates. What do we actually mean by cognitive neuroscience. Okay so in. When psychologists talk about commissions. Let's break out time down cognitive neuroscientists when when you think about cognition firstly. What we're thinking about is mental processes really so cognitive psychology and the study of cognition predates most while many of the sort of common biological measures. So back when we couldn't put someone in an scanner we would look at them mental processes as best. We could using behavioral measures on what i mean by mental processes. A things like for example learning memory. Attention problem solving all these of internal processes that that happened inside all minds and cognitive psychology. Obviously try to understand those processes as best as possible on on would trion model how they felt those processes worked so of step by step. What happens in you know. Just something simple like when you perceive an image. What are the steps that occur in that process and cognitive neuroscience is the study of the underlying biological and brain related processes that underpin those mental processes so. I saw joining together to fields. If he like

Dr Louise Allen Walker Mussa Msc Psychology And Education W Marin Benghazi St Louis Cardiff TOM Bangor David
A Culinary Tour Of Brexit

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:45 min | 6 months ago

A Culinary Tour Of Brexit

"Joined today by frank langfitt. Npr's lennon correspondent. Frank hi. hey it's great to be here. Cardiff great to have you so frank from what i understand. You are about to take us on a kind of culinary tour of brexit. Today's yes that's right so quick. Refresher on brexit cardiff. Uk voted to leave the you to escape red tape in brussels. So they'd be free to cut new free trade deals. This was like a number of years ago. Two thousand sixteen. The uk finally completely got out of the eu on new year's eve which means different things to different sectors here but today we're just going to focus on one of the hardest hit that's food as specifically we're look at wasters cheese and wine because we found his each item tells a different story about the real world consequences of brexit so far. So that's our plan. And here's the menu wine cheese or oysters cardiff if you want to start with. I don't know frank. I think i'm in the mood for oysters. Let's start there good choice. We're surrounded by water here in britain so the story of oysters is that when you suddenly face new regulations doing business is so much harder and no one is feeling this more than this. Fisherman that i met is his name. Is jonathan bailey very way this is late this is this is just rain rain water. I'll get some jonathan harvest oysters on a river in the southwest of england on the day that i met him. It was raining so we were bailing out his robot. Yeah i'm assuming Frank jonathan exports his own to europe. And that's why you're talking to him so a one eight tells how that's going for him now. That brexit is reality. Things are going really badly. So before brexit when the uk was in the eu there was seamless trade like between the states in the us and jonathan dredged up his oysters. They were shipped to europe and then they were cleaned which worked out just fine now. After brexit. Those british oysters are subject to eu rules about imports. Just like any other country outside the eu. so jonathan's wasters now have to be cleaned here on this side of the english channel. And i know this doesn't really sound like a big deal but if you're in the business it is and that's because it adds costs and it means there's less time to get those oysters on a european plates before they die. A bottom line are going to die in transit so this and other changes because of brexit have really hurt the fishing industry in fact shellfish and fish exports to the eu just in january. We're down more than eighty percent year-on-year now. The government likes to call this just teething problems in trade volumes overall are already rebounding. And that is. I gotta say a staggering dropped eighty percent plus. It is dead always tres and frank. I'm no expert on this. But i mean dead. Oysters are not good tasty oysters. No and you can't any money off them. Obviously so jonathan is one of like more than forty fishermen and women around here who are pretty much out of work. This season and i asked him when we're out on his boat like how he thinks it's going to impact them in the long run. Do you think that you'll keep fishing. Or i'm sixty six. I'm wondering whether this is the moment to say the. How would you feel about not fishing anymore. I would be very very very very upset. Okay so frank. Things clearly not looking good for the fishermen on the english coast. What's next on the menu where we're headed next in in our brexit tour so next off the whales for wine and then the northwest of england for cheese wine and cheese nice pairing classic traditional. Let's do that right after a quick break. This message comes from. Npr sponsor interactive brokers the professionals gateway to the world's markets. Their clients enjoy lowest cost access to stocks options futures and fixed income from a single integrated account. Learn more at i b. k. r. dot com. This message comes from npr sponsor. Microsoft teams helping priority. Bicycles transform. the way they work when the pandemic hit they started doing virtual visits on teams. Now people worldwide can come into their showroom more at microsoft dot com slash teams. Okay frank we're done with the delicious oyster chorus. So let's continue on with this brexit culinary tour and frank. I could really use a bevy. So what were you saying about. Wine is a really good example of a frankly how brexit can cost you in the checkout line. So let's head to wales and we're gonna meet daniel lambert who imports wine. So this is all little warehouse so daniel reports tens of thousands of cases of wine each year most of it of course from europe and for daniel. This used to be really easy. We used to just have to one very very simple simplistic but now because the uk's outside of the u. it's brexit. There's so much more. I have to send the order to the producer. The producer then produces pro forma invoice which they sent back to me on the pro forma invoice. They have two quite mild a number so hunting trip daniel down a bit because he actually went on. For more than a minute but describing. The avalanche of confusing forms now has to fill out. He said each separate set of forms cost seventy five bucks so scale of one to ten. How much are you enjoying this new system. Yeah it makes sense. I mean everybody hates paperwork. Super annoying. But frank did you ask him you know what about the real impact on his business. What he said is paperwork. Costs will be passed on to consumers but some small retailers won't be able to afford the extra paperwork cost ordering different kinds of wine so in the end that's actually going to mean less variety on the shelves.

EU Frank UK Frank Langfitt Frank Hi Cardiff Jonathan Bailey Jonathan Harvest Frank Jonathan Jonathan Europe Lennon NPR Brussels Britain English Coast Daniel Lambert Microsoft
Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

09:54 min | 6 months ago

Supporting pupils with ADHD in the blended learning environment with Ellis Seddon

"Today i'm joined by ellison who's a student teacher on our secondary religious education program. Hi l. s. that thomas. Thanks for coming today. You've carried out a piece of literature based research for your lead partnership school who we can't name because of the terms of the ethic approval for the research project but this school and they gave you a topic to look into because of interest to them for their own kind of school development. So what was that topic that the school gave you said topic was an kind of split into three parts. They gave us a choice of either looking at vulnerable learners. And whatever that might be whether it's saw or more able and talented excetera ben. They said we could do a study on blended learning on how we teach in a blended learning environment or the third option was to combine those two together. So how do you help. Specific categories of vulnerable learners within a blended learning environment. And given the time that we're in to me that was the one of most interested. That's the one. I counted -able so vulnerable learners in the blended environment. And did you need to narrow that down tool anymore to make it manageable. Did you come from a subject tangled. Did you have to do anything with that topic. Once he picked option three from the hat yes exactly yeah so we had to narrow it much further because obviously vulnerable learners and such a white category and we a recommended that we could narrow that down to a a subject specific points of view a religious education point of view in my perspective in my work in my literature review after a loft inspiration. I actually didn't do that because going through the research i felt like it was applicable from what i knew to a wide range of topics so i didn't feel like bringing it down to a religious education spending was going to bring it was going to enhance it that much more but what i did do was never the butler winning side of things down to adhd specifically and. I did that in all honesty. Because i had an interest in learning more by. Adhd i'm really have a worked with many students with adhd. I didn't know too much about it. So i thought this was going to be a prime community within my sinement to try and understand. Adhd a little bit more given so pregnant and use it. Mapping it onto not blended learning environment saint tyne fascinating. Okay so you got your choice of adhd you justify your choice of looking beyond your subjects harry so then you were able to go out and search for literature and you had to pick six sources that will kind of help get a handle on that topic area so it might be a bit of a bit of a big question to ask but can you talk a street the six sources that you ended up with and so broad sense of what they were saying yes absolutely each so the one thing i should really mention i is that when i started this literature review trying to marry up trying to find resources which spoke about adhd within blended learning environment. There was next to nothing if not nothing at all and so it was a bit of panic. Could bit of a worry at the beginning. But i pushed through. I decided to do in. The end was focused on a selection of literature which focused on adhd specific late at some literature which focused on blended learning specifically. and then. i drew my own conclusions between those two. I'm using a variety of websites and sources as well to try in a match up in a meaningful way and i started by actually looking at the. Adhd you k charity website and there was a really interesting on on quite lamesa. Statistics on eighty nine percent of teachers teach or have taught students with adhd and yet sixty three percents of teachers feel that that training and of understanding adhd on supporting adhd students is a par inadequate So that was quite alarming statistics. So i started from that before. I took a deep dive into more literature. Adhd and blended learning specifically. That was loads of resources. When i looked at them separately. But i'll try and go through on now. My six down spitball. I'll just say best that. I looked into these articles mainly online because of the situation wherein they were mainly searches. Either through google laura our our learning platform at cardiff matt and i prioritized terms. Which article twits mentioned engagement mentioned. Adhd additional learning leads blended learning online learning hybrid learning excetera and the scope for narrowing down. Those obstacles was quite slim. Because as i said the amount of articles that looked at them together that what many of them so narrowing down was quite slim but i prioritized any which kinda did mention allen's on blended learning in one with was the best the easiest way to get more of a focus on my first article which i came across was by how graham relatively recent to the two thousand seventeen on it was titled learner engagement in a blended learning environment and it was a conceptual framework. And this what date. It had a huge skype through research. It had a thousand dollars. Coups chapters and other articles of engagement instruments have engagement. And what they really really. Interestingly came up with they spoke about the inconsistencies at the term engagement itself and then how that gets even more complicated when you transfer into online learning but they came up with indicators of engagements and that was what was really fascinating about this obstacle. We talk and teaching about. How can we. How can we facilitating gauge. How can we increase engagement. A little bit better argument was actually before we do any of that you need to know what the indicators aw. When do you know when your students are engaged. So that was what was really tickly interesting about this. And why recommended it to my league partnership school. They came up. With a whole framework within not they had six indicators of cognitive engagement and seven indicators emotional engagement which i thought were particular interests but within the cognitive engagement. One was based on attention. Which obviously i ate pricked my ears up because oh is robert. Because it was specific to eighty can be specific trade hd and what they aim to do is show you. What the indicates attention within within cognitive engagement by might look like and what you can do about it to understand it and enhance a little bit more now. Within this article on some of the things i thought were a little bit etched. Maybe for example under the intention indicator they said about how you might want to track rain whites or movement and it's not really sure that's going to be possibly the most affluent secondary schools around the country. But the undestanding is that you need to know when your students are engaged. Not indicated first before you can change your teaching style to enhance that facilitated and so it was my suggestion that maybe we could look at using. That's marks of teams with google cross. Rooms trying see when they are most engaged. See what the data. It's like really take a deep dive into that than students are engaged to take up over the second article most cattle again. It was a twenty seventeen obstacle a written. Interestingly was all about the motivations of adhd students so it was titled what motivates individuals they hd it was a qualitative analysis specifically for the adolescents. Point to the so what they did. They hypothesized that there are qualitative differences between motivation attitudes between students with adhd and their typically developing peers. And so they did this study which was largely in a more clinical environment. And that was one of my Concerns i suppose one of my hesitations about the article because they students were interviewed. Sorry the children were intimate in a psychology clinic. That was seven all those order. Which from a psychology background. So my argument was that if you brought in somebody from a different background to maybe the confidence in having no analysis response by us we may have a little bit more confident. That was different backgrounds. Connecticut election is still a valuable valuable. Be such an what they found was the rule. The motivation axe cheats. And this is interest. Day-today life it's not necessarily at school but additional attitudes between students with adhd and students non adhd rudely of very very similar. But there were two very distinct difference is which were really interesting. Adhd perspective the first one was the students with with adhd had a very specific aversion to the slow passing of time to time going slowly was just an absolute. No no for them. They just couldn't stand it on the second one was that students who didn't tough. Adhd also cased venue in having familiar and predictable tasks to toss it. They've done before they know how they works. They know what's expected of them. That value did not appear in students with

Excetera Ben Ellison Adhd Thomas Butler Harry Google Skype Matt Graham Allen Robert Connecticut
Explaining Threshold Concepts in Physical Education

Emma & Tom's PGCE Podcast

03:54 min | 7 months ago

Explaining Threshold Concepts in Physical Education

"Spoke. That's just come out chamber alderson bryant threshold concepts in physical education design thinking approach. Now it may be that people listening. Don't know what some of those things are yet and we will come to that but first of all. How was it that the three of you came to collaborate on this book was the story behind it. Okay tom so i guess if i take you back a couple of years prosise really started. When funeral was applauded does student examiner for sporting p. program in the poorest folks in health sciences on. I believe it was really the first time i visited as an external examiner. Three arrests went for the coffee down. Cardiff pay before her return. Flight home it was really that conversation. Not coffee was where the magic or the seed for this book was prompted. I vividly remember the discussion that we were in the world to right within our own discipline. I think in particular some of the key critical questions we were asking each other centered around as a discipline of physical education. We clear what we were trying to achieve where we try to overclaim what we trying to do achieve was really possible for children and young people to achieve before they left school. So i guess the the most important question pursue our skin to establish with our listeners now is is this idea of threshold concepts and what. That's all about what is a threshold concept and why they so valuable to physical education so any discipline that we think about there are disciplined because they have these things called thresholds concepts. That's the only reason they're ever called a discipline. And i know that annan. Her previous answer mentioned as we believe that he was a disciplined or actually redick wondering about that ourselves. Is that actually the case. So if i give you some examples of threshold concepts first of all tonight on package little bit for you if we look at particular disciplines so for example in maths at threshold current set is an complex numbers if we look at design. Ambiguity is a concept. You have to grasp if you're a designer if you don't grasp what you can't call yourself a designer in law its presence. It's opportunity cost in economics. It's entropy maybe in physics so every discipline you can caboche if you were to lead the miles on the table. Every discipline that we know of has these threshold concepts and weirdly. We couldn't actually claim that for physical education. We couldn't literally sit down and go boom. That's what he eagles and we found that often. That was a problem because we felt that the reason of our subject area is often not valued is because we don't have these we haven't called the mouse definitively physical education offers. These are these threshold concepts so threshold concepts when their masters. They enabled students to look at problems in completely new ways. Antitank practice and talk in a manner of scholars of that discipline and the reason called threshold. Concepts is because you literally cross thresholds when you learned and you can never unlearn them. An maybe from maybe the fact that we're involved in movement riding a bike you never forget how to ride a bike so once you've learned tisch. It's not something that you can ever unlearn it's there it's embodied etc so quadruple would be described as admire land. Who don an awful lot of work in this area. It's like a portal so opens up a new and previously inaccessible way of thinking about something and it represents a transformed way of understanding or interpreting our viewing something and without that the learner cannot progress in that particular discipline or ever call themselves a scholar at that discipline.

Alderson Bryant Cardiff Redick TOM Eagles Tisch
Decentralized Information Gathering

Data Skeptic

04:13 min | 7 months ago

Decentralized Information Gathering

"My name is speak glory. And i'm a postdoctoral researcher at the university of hamburg in germany. My research interests focused on mulligan systems and in particular the aspect of decision making in those systems so interested in particular in information-gathering tasks. So you can think of like a team of robots trying to find out something about the world and doing this in a collaborative fashion. So that's the kind of task climbing just end especially the decision making aspects of that a while ago when there were some mars missions being planned we ended up sending curiosity and forget the other one maybe opportunity there was some discussion of. Hey maybe instead of sending two rovers the cost a lot like million dollars we should send a million rovers. That cost one dollars. Something like this didn't happen but is that the kind of case that would be interesting to a researcher like you so my interest are maybe more so decided to to agent case so at least. That's the situation for now. Do the computational complexity of the problems that i'm involved in cardiff did they are the practical limitations that usually means that the more than a handful of agencies steel beyond the reach of kearns state of the art mittens. Ya the fact that your work has heuristic involved is what actually i attracted me to it. So maybe we should talk about the elephant. In the room a computational complexity what would it be like to try and solve one of these problems in a sort of a rigorous complete surly brute force but in exacting method. Maybe conceptual it's Quite instructive to think about how you could actually solve this kind of problems in this brute force manner typically have you have your set of agents than each of the agents has some possible actions that they can take and as a result of taking some of these actions. They're going to perceive that in some observations from the world or or the environment. You can kind of see the when you have multiple agents acting simultaneously of course their sudden exponential number of possible combinations of actions that the agents take so. This is already an indication that it's going to be quite complicated so then when you consider that depending on the observation or feedback that beach of the agents get then they have obviously a choice like what to do for each of these possible observation. You could improve simple employees that okay. I'm i come to take a particular action. And then if i received some feedback then conditional that feedback. These is going to be my next action. You then basically have such a police for each of the agents and in principle. If you want to solve this very exactly you should look for or look at all the possible combinations of all the policies for all the agents so it really quickly get into this domain of financial complexity that makes it really challenging confrontationally. And do the agents communicated all can they may be share information is that within scope of the problem is one of the factors that i wanted to specifically consider because i think that the law of the previous state of the art work in like information gathering for multi agent teams. They tend to make this assumption that there is some communication during the task. So what what i could do. If i don't have the luxury of communicating during the task. What what i decided to do is kind of split this task into two phases. So you have this kind of offline. Phase the takes part before the test execution Are planning what they should do during the task. But once the task execution starts so deploy a robot sore or whatever your agents are then you're not allowed to communicate anymore so you have to kind of make plans beforehand decide. How are you going to act in each of the possible situation arises could we zoom in on an information gathering task. Are there real world. Examples of where your sorts of Research areas might be deployed for industrial or practical applications. Maybe one of the Kind of running examples that used in several of my papers relating to search rescue robotics. So you might want to deploy a team of robots to survey a disaster sized and maybe locate. Some of the victims might still be out there so this one example of the potential application for my research work.

Mulligan Systems University Of Hamburg Kearns Cardiff Germany
"cardiff" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

AM 1590 WCGO

02:24 min | 8 months ago

"cardiff" Discussed on AM 1590 WCGO

"Shame on America. It's enough. But Asle E. To Robin, actually, but trying to telephone the exam it, Gloria. The job in Cardiff Party, Marie and Zamata Julia can tweet on text Ian emailed eater. A C or a radio a gmail dot com in tech student cattle, a parameter lattice. Ledgerwood Been the telephone. Well, Howie, turn Percy Maraba and the butt. Shuttling faggoty to harmony attic treatable dot on a mobile. Lucien a month. That's my Camilla sama Triana. That touch ated Sadam or banana? Headed you but McLaren shipment Yeah. Ports in heaven, hallowed be thy name Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done on Earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses. As we forgive those who trespass against us and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen..

Camilla sama Triana Ledgerwood Cardiff Party Asle E. Lucien Percy Maraba McLaren Zamata Julia Howie America Gloria Ian Marie Robin
Stylist Craig Chapman on the Evolution of HairDotCom

How To Cut It in the Hairdressing Industry

03:03 min | 8 months ago

Stylist Craig Chapman on the Evolution of HairDotCom

"Just shared with us is head dot com artie. What is head on comedy but maybe just take you back a little bit and high. We actually Actually came a rides I because this this quite story behind it really. It was something head called with something. That's I originally set up Ten years ago And cardiff really never put on the dog hole. But it was. It was mostly the fact that being a headdress. Dining cole will I worked with brands over the years. But i felt like was it was a really difficult task to be able to get involved in. Show work or Campaign work all the different elements within our industry Kinda felt isolated. Dining cole mullan even been linked up with Brown served years to get onto the autistic teams kind of always felt like we will be forgotten. Dining dinan sunny cold war which actually writing spice inside but but the so head dot com kind of started off raise as a basis for me to be able to get the opportunity to branch into other areas of the industry and it really started with a bunch of friends. It was all friends I worked with the industry. None of them working in london. Everybody was in the small times upside villages outside of london. And i kind of took myself to to really try and get tsitsi for people. The headdresses started settled owners. That what it to work within other sectors of the head world But didn't want to make that transition to london. Didn't want to move to london. I mean. I didn't have the blessings of big brands night So the opportunities always felt like they were They were further away than evening. Grasping range so. So i kind of just put my head diamonds. Did a lot of free work an awful lot. Free work a serious about if miles traveling from coal to whatever anybody wanted me to go to actually build it as as we as i was building it it was just friends friends that buddies of mine that will be within the industry that wants to get involved and i pulled him into fight shapes different campaigns and slowly into tv work as i entered into a tv hairdresser which would be old by. By six years ago now Head dot com kind of developed from that basis. So this lots of names within had dot com. Which will mentioned later that were were that right from the very beginning even before anybody even even before even you had co

Cole Mullan London Cole Brown
The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

The Indicator from Planet Money

03:38 min | 8 months ago

The Straw That Broke The Bucatini Supply Chain

"Today on the show. I am joined by planet money producer. Alexi horowitz ghazi and alexi. Hello first of all parody cardiff alexi. You've brought us a kind of pasta mystery. Not just any pasta. Cardiff dismissed all about a very particular. Pasta shape called bucatini. It's basically just spaghetti with a hole in it in. The story comes to us. By way of a self avowed bucatini fanatic new york magazine writer. rachel handler. When did you know that you were bucatini. Hat or bucatini bopper. Look what do we call ourselves. Ivan bucatini had because. I just think it's cute but i definitely didn't grow up in a bucatini household by any means we are definitely spaghetti. Family the mystery part of all of this began. When rachel started to notice last spring that her beloved bucatini seemed to be getting harder and harder to find at our local grocery stores in new york until eventually it seemed to be totally gone and then one day in the fall rachel was on the phone with her also pasta obsessed mother who lives in chicago and her mom kind of mentioned off hand that she was having the exact same problem. Racial literally haven't been able to find bucatini anywhere and she was talking specifically about to check out. The check is a one hundred and forty year old italian pasta company so when she said that i was like slow mo i was like because i thought it was like a new york problem like a very classic. Sort of like you know history. I can't find my bucatini. Whatever like who cares. But then i was a coli though. Sorry can i swear. Oh yeah okay okay. Great it's like holy if you can't find it that means that this is a real issue. And then she told me that she had actually reached out to the customer service department to check. Oh i just sent them an email. it's a classic move. It was like full of typos. Which is like a way. That mom's ready meals. But her email said i am a huge fan of bucatini pasta huge in all caps. I have not been able to find it for many weeks at any store. It is my favorite pasta cook than the sentences in all caps with four questionnaires. Are you still making it. Please tell me how to get some not too long afterwards. Rachel's mom gets a voicemail from a regional dicicco sales representative named brian. And then when. She played me voicemail from brian. I was like holy like this goes deep. There is a cover up like something weird is going on. Brian told rachel mom that she was likely having trouble. finding check. Oh bucatini. Because of an fda hiccup the hecker exactly for some reason the fda which is the food and drug administration seemed to have put a hold on the import of check. Obu katini and now. Brian was telling rachel's mom to sit tight and check the shelves a few months down the road and the fact that this little pasta mystery seemed to reach all the way to the federal government. That was something that had dogged. Journalists like rachel could not in good conscience. Look away from. This is the turning point for me. Yeah the next day. Rachel pitched the story to her editor but in the back of her mind. She wasn't sure it would go anywhere. And i'll just felt so big. And i think all of us figured nothing would really come event. At least i did. I was like i'm never going to figure out what's going on but began calling to check. Oh i reached out to like five or six different people. Email and phone call and voicemail and no one got back to me and then i was like something in santa's happening and i don't know and at that point i was like there's there's a story hammond

Alexi Horowitz Ghazi Cardiff Alexi Rachel Rachel Handler Ivan Bucatini Alexi New York Magazine Cardiff New York Food And Drug Administration Obu Katini Brian Chicago Hecker Federal Government Santa
The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

All Things Considered

03:29 min | 8 months ago

The Economy Aboard The International Space Station

"The international space station cost hundreds of billions of dollars to build for astronauts living on the space station. Though money is essentially useless, there's nowhere to spend it, but that does not mean there isn't an economy for the handful of astronauts living on board from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, Stacey Vanek, Smith and Cardiff, Garcia explained. The economy aboard the international space Station is all about trade. This is, according to astronaut Doug Wheelock. Actually, everybody at NASA calls me wheels. I'm one of the old grizzled veterans. So the early career astronauts call me Papa Wheels. Doug Papa Wheels served as the commander of the International space Station and lived there orbiting the Earth for six months. That interesting thing is with food, of course. Doug says that aboard the space station most of the food is actually pretty bland. But every three months a big event would happen. Doug and his crew would get a shipment from Earth just before they closed the hatch on the launch pad they would throw like a bag of Fresh fruit like oranges, lemons, apples, vegetables as well. Everybody would only get one or two pieces of producer just wasn't that much of it. And so here is where the trade comes in. Doug knew that the Russians loved onions. But Doug loved fruit. Cuter. Your chicken was my commander. As said, Hey, theater. What trade An onion for do you have? Ah, Like an extra orange. He goes all you don't want your onion. Of course, the space station economy was not just about food, though. Services were also a big part of it Dug, for instance, has an engineering background And he says for him, one of his least favorite parts of life aboard the space station were all the scientific experiments. They had to do whatever their background this was just Part of what they did every day, the way out of it Economics. Doug discovered this a couple of weeks into his mission. When one of the scientists aboard the space station told him that there was a big problem, she said, Hey, the party's broken not what you want to hear aboard a space station, that's for sure. No, But Doug's background was an engineering, so he understands systems and he says, fixing things comes really naturally to him. And the scientists This woman named Shannon knew this about Doug Shannon looked at me, she said. If you fix the party Do all of your science for the rest of the day. I'm thinking like that is a deal and a half. I'll take that deal, so I got my bike tool belt called Houston and said, You know, Houston, we have a problem. The party is broken, but the real commodity on the space stations is Doug. Was Earth itself. For example, Doug says, you just want to see and talk to other humans. Even if you don't know them. You want to drop in on other astronauts video chats and see their families and talk to their friends. You don't care. Yeah, because in space, humans are a precious commodity. And I asked if there was ever bartering around this like, hey, you can join my video chat with my family for an apple. Indexes. Actually, everybody needs human interactions so much they don't really trade it because it becomes sacred when you get back to earth, Doug says. Your idea of what's valuable is changed forever. It's completely changed my whole perspective. Especially especially rain. I am just like fascinated by rain now I made I just The smell of it the sound of it and just to feel against your skin I took for granted before you know Stacey Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

Doug Stacey Vanek Doug Wheelock Doug Papa Wheels International Space Station Cardiff Garcia Nasa Doug Shannon Smith Houston Shannon Apple Cardiff Garcia NPR
The Strategic Value Of Rare Earths

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:46 min | 9 months ago

The Strategic Value Of Rare Earths

"Hey cardiff parallel boy cough. Welcome back here. You've been to las vegas where you're obviously playing the slot machines and you're at the craps tables right. I wish i wish. I was closer to the blasio. But i was actually about an hour outside of las vegas in the desert. Oh and did you bring us anything back from the middle of the desert. I always have at present for you cardiff. this time. I brought you some pretty cool tape. Listen to this one. Nothing warms my heart like the sound of an explosion music to an economy nerds ears. So that is the sound of a blast at the mountain. Pass mine. This site in california cardiff. It's the only place in the us where we mind rare earths and we really really need these things. So if we're looking across the pit like everything in the very bottom bit of the existing bottom is all high-grade or at this time. So that's robbi roy. And he's talking to cnn international. He's the mine manager at mountain pass. He's showing our team. This huge open. Mind pit just packed. He says with these rare earth elements beautiful sites. See he says. This is the busiest. He's ever seated at mountain pass and cardiff one of the reasons. It's so impressive to see this. Bustling busy mine is that just two years ago. This mind was totally shut at that. Point china really take over this strategic industry. Okay that's fascinating in of itself. But i actually think we should step back for a minute and explain a little bit more. About what rare earths are so everyone go back to high school chemistry for just a moment just for a second. I had a great chemistry teacher. Mr goodman rare. Earths are of seventeen elements that appear on the periodic table and they are an essential ingredient in making like super strong super. Small magnets are used in a lot of electronics and by the military despite the name they are really not all that rare they naturally occur in a lot of places but the process to mine them labor intensive and it can be environmentally destructive. It can create lots of pollution and can even involve radioactive waste china. They put a lot of effort into building the mining and processing facilities for these rare earths and without the same environmental and labor standards that we have in the us. So china can produce earth's very cheaply and china started to actually dominate the industry. And in fact from about twenty fourteen to twenty seventeen the us imported eighty percent of its supply of rare earths from china as the relationship between the us and china started to get tense. The trade war china's state media. They basically made a thinly veiled threat. They implied that rare. Earths could be used as a weapon. In the trade war china could restrict exports basically cut off the flow of these elements to the us china's president xi jinping. He just happened to make a personal visit to a production facility. That made these products. I was just in the neighborhood and there were the rare earths over there. I thought i go check out just in case a camera sees him on on the other side of me right. Yeah and as a trade war has become nastier and nastier. This idea that china could restrict rare earth exports to the us it has spooks and people especially in washington. Because this is. The world has become more dependent on high tech electronics. It has also become more dependent on these elements on rare earths. This has focused a lot of attention on the mine. I went to mountain pass. It has actually been in operation since the nineteen fifties back then it produced europian which makes the red color in very early televisions. Yeah and the previous owner invested more than a billion dollars on a new environmentally friendly facility back in two thousand fifteen just as the rare earths price collapsed and so the company just went out of business in the minds shut and there was nowhere in the us producing these elements. Now the new owner of the mine mp materials they have spent two years rebuilding it and they say that they now produce about ten percent of the world's supply of rare earths. If there's going to be an american industry it's going to be led by us we it. That's james the ten ski on cnn. International he's the chairman of m. p. materials. He wants to create an alternative supply chain to china. But he's got a problem while he can dig these things out of the ground. He can't process them in the us. Everything needs to go back to china. In fact a chinese processor owns a ten percent non-voting stake in mp materials. Mountain pass produces bags and bags of this rare. Earths concentrate basically a brown dust. That got all over my shoes when i was there. Then it all gets into china because there isn't a processing plant anywhere in this country that turns rare earths into the products that companies want to buy next year n. p. materials. They plan to reopen the processing plant at mountain pass. And this way they can make processed rare earths to sell directly to global companies without going through china and the frankly there were a lot of people who who doubted that we can make this work and so we felt an extrovert and anna duty. And so we've had a sense of urgency from the very beginning. But i would say that. There's definitely been a heightened sense of awareness of what we're up to. When china started making its veiled threats some people questioned if the us to nationalize the rare earths industry to take it over but the experts. We talked to don't really think so. And they point to what is going on at mountain pass as proof that the market is already correcting for china's near-monopoly now that there's increased demand for rare earths and pressure by companies for sources that are more diverse and environmentally friendly suppliers. Outside of china are starting to grow and restricting earth exports. It's not a move. China's gonna make lately because it would hurt chinese businesses a lot of the rare earths they find their way into things that are manufactured inside china lake mobile phones to really completely cut the us off. China would have to tell chinese businesses to stop selling to the united states processed rare earths and rare earth magnets and all the electronics that use them. Chinese companies would lose a lot of business. The whole thing could hurt the chinese economy which is already suffering in the trade war the definition of a trade war. You can't hurt the other side without hurting yourself. Too messy business.

China Cardiff Blasio United States Robbi Roy Mr Goodman Las Vegas Mountain Pass CNN Cough Xi Jinping California Washington James
INTERPOL Warns People About Counterfeit Coronavirus Vaccines

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:11 min | 9 months ago

INTERPOL Warns People About Counterfeit Coronavirus Vaccines

"I took a year when the distribution of vaccines is so important. The international police organization has a serious warning also known as interpol. They're cautioning people about the dangers of counterfeit vaccines stacey vanik smith and cardiff garcia from our daily economics. Podcast the indicator from planet. Money wanted to find out more about this and so they took a trip into the dark web. The cova crisis has created a whole universe of opportunity for criminals fear and scarcity and high demand are very powerful market forces. china anderson has been watching these forces. Play out for months. He's a senior security researcher at domain tools. Were a cyber threat intelligence data company so we scan the entire internet as many times began every single day and give insights to customers based upon what we see and part of the whole internet is the so called dark web. That's the unregulated. Part of the web. Were a lot of illegal activity happens. Like what is the dark web like. There's many things when people talk about the dark way that most of the time what people are referring to is anonymous services illegal forums or illegal marketplace's illegal marketplaces where you can buy drugs or weapons or passports or cova vaccines so now starting to see some coronavirus vaccines you know looking at. Maybe two hundred different ads here. So can you read us some of the ads that you've found. Let me pull one up. I'm looking at here so You know the as ten covid. Nineteen vaccines The prices re thousand two hundred and seventy six euros. That's about four thousand. Us dollars so about four hundred dollars per vaccine. Yeah and for the record. Chad does not think that these vaccines are legit for one thing. The pfizer vaccine requires a very intense cold storage chain. The vaccines have to be kept at negative seventy degrees fahrenheit and also the kobe vaccine ads are mixed in with ads for all kinds of other things and chances that tends to be a red flag. Since we're in the sees you scroll up in there's cocaine You know scroll down. You've got your airline and You know molly matthew name it ashwell as you know. This site has firearms chances. The global cova crisis has been a massive opportunity for cybercriminals he says the online marketplaces are still a tiny part of it right now and most of the criminal activity has involved ransomware chad's because lives are at stake and there's so much chaos and now criminal organizations know that if they hack into the system of hospital they can demand and probably get a lot of money back in october. One hospital in new jersey paid cybercriminals more than six hundred and fifty thousand dollars after the criminals locked up their computer systems and threatened to publish all of their patient records. Chad expects that these kinds of attacks will become more frequent in coming months because after all the payoff for those kinds of attacks are much bigger than a couple thousand dollars for the covid vaccines. Although chad also expects the vaccine market place will continue to grow on the dark web. Stacey smith cardiff garcia. Npr news

International Police Organizat Stacey Vanik Smith Cardiff Garcia Molly Matthew Anderson China Pfizer Ashwell Chad United States New Jersey Stacey Smith Cardiff Garcia Npr News
U.K. Begins Mass Vaccination Against The Coronavirus

All Things Considered

04:13 min | 10 months ago

U.K. Begins Mass Vaccination Against The Coronavirus

"Has become the first Western country to begin a mass vaccination campaign against Cove. It 19. Thousands of Brits received the first dose today of the two dose Fizer by on tech vaccine. The country is starting with two highest priority groups. That is people over 80 years old. And health care workers on the front line of the fight against the virus. One of those health care workers is Dr Matthew Morgan. He works in the ICU at a hospital in Cardiff, Wales. Welcome. Thank you very much. Thank you. So I understand that you received your first dose today. Just a few hours ago. What was that like I did. It's being a good day. A busy day. I have an arm, which isn't taking a tall at the minute. There's a tiny little plaster on it. But other than that, I'm doing very well. Were you surprised that you haven't been feeling any side effects whatsoever? Well, I think his health care professionals, we have vaccinations quite regularly. I have the flu vaccine annually is part of work. And really, although the excitement of the day was there to some extent, he was just the same as any other vaccine. It was just the same as having the flu vaccine in terms of the process Interesting. Well as an ICU doctor. You and your colleagues have seen the worst of this disease, and I'm wondering if you could just talk about what's the mood been like today at your hospital? So we subpoena a nod mood in many ways. It's kind of a combination of feeling proud, hopeful but also realistic, and I say, proud because it was 38 weeks to the day. That we admitted the first critically ill patient with covert to our ICU on. It's remarkable to think that in less than the duration of the pregnancy 38 weeks, we now have gone from that. Actually having a vaccine, and that's a remarkable achievement for science for medicine and humanity. Ready. I'm also realistic because this changes Everything. But it changes nothing. And in many ways, the biggest danger of this vaccine is complacency. Well, I'm glad that you brought that up because I want to just underline that I mean, what exactly what substantively changes if anything at all changes. Because of the fact that you were now vaccinated. What changes as you continue to treat covert patients anything. Yeah, At the minute. Nothing changes, practically or physically will be wearing the same Peopie will be following the same advice for hand washing, not touch and faces social distance in but gradually As the days turned into weeks, and the weeks turned into months. I hope this will be the start of a new new normal well. The UK is hoping to administer hundreds of thousands of doses of the vaccine by the end of the year. But that could take many months to spread, You know, beyond the highest priority groups. So what's your message to your family? Your friends and your fellow Brits, as all of them await their turn for a vaccine. I think there's two things to say. Really. First of all, it's that there is hope. There is some light at the end of that tunnel. There's also been a lot of discussion about safety, but for me The most dangerous bit of having that vaccination. Today was the car journey to get there. You know, everything in life has risks. Driving has risks. But we do it because it has benefits on did. It's just the same as this vaccine. It has tiny risks, but it's got huge benefits. And if it's for me, not getting sick, hopefully My family not getting sick. My patients not getting sick. My colleagues not getting sick on even strangers. Hopefully not getting sick. Dr. Matthew Morgan is an ICU doctor at the University Hospital of Wales in Cardiff. Thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you all stay safe.

Dr Matthew Morgan FLU ICU Cove Cardiff Peopie Wales UK Dr. Matthew Morgan University Hospital Of Wales
Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

02:18 min | 10 months ago

Tim Blackman, Vice Chancellor at the Open University, Discusses The Return to Campus

"By the. Are you being the the the only covid secure university but actually you do have a compass and people work there and students study at it. So i'll be really really fascinated to know what your plans offer january and the year. Yeah we are in a different place. No sorts of ways compared to the rest of the sector which i think actually has been doing an amazing job but yes we we have a real campus milk gains and we've got sites in manchester and nottingham as well. Of course our nation offices in cardiff belfast and edinburgh very much a four nations university and always having to work with the different policies of the four governments. So we tend to adopt an approach at the moment of going with the most safe vicious and guidance of one of the four jurisdictions in terms of what we do across the four nations so just one example of the many ways we have to work as very much a four nations university in everything we do even more normal times so that's added an extra complication for us in terms of what guidance and what measures do we actually follow as one university across jurisdictions. But we've had our challenges in the first lock down. We had to move nearly four thousand stuff off our campus about four thousand of our staff. The ucla were already hung based so we've got a lot of understanding how homebase works. But we have to adopt. And we're still having to adopt. We research students and researchers on campus. Where that research is essential in terms of lab provision. We're not going to have to manage these huge population movements though of students going home coming back to campus which very much reflects the The unusual situation in the uk of how dominant the residential sector is in higher education with these huge mass migrations of young people Beginning and end of term. So yeah what we have to do is is different. But like every university in the sector putting the wellbeing and health of our staff and students First and that is how we are working But i wish the secto with managing the scale of these population movements over the coming weeks and months

Nottingham Belfast Cardiff Edinburgh Manchester Ucla UK
Thanksgiving Dinners Are The Cheapest They've Been In Decades

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:09 min | 10 months ago

Thanksgiving Dinners Are The Cheapest They've Been In Decades

"Every year before thanksgiving the american farm bureau sends volunteer shoppers into grocery stores. They note the prices of the ingredients. That go into thanksgiving dinner. Cardiff garcia and patty hirsch from npr. Podcast indicator from planet. Money discovered the cost of thanksgiving is going down. The american farm bureau is a group that represents farmers throughout the country and its annual survey. It found that the average cost of thanksgiving dinner for ten people. This year is forty six dollars and ninety cents on the farm bureau's chief economist. John newton says that figure is low really low down four percent of from what we saw last year and actually is the lowest level that we've seen since two thousand ten and that's what i'd adjusting for inflation. We asked john if he could tell us high. The cost of thanksgiving dinners changed when he does adjust for inflation and specifically. What we wanted to know was if it was possible. That thanksgiving dinner was actually the cheapest it had ever been since the survey was started back in nineteen eighty six way. Let me let me power a spreadsheet. Just a mayor sure for go for it. Yeah i check it out yes it is. It is the lowest that it's been thirty five years. Wait a minute what did you just tell me. The in inflation adjusted dollars. Thanksgiving dinner is going to be the lowest. It's been thirty five years. Are you stunned. You know i am actually. I don't know why didn't look at that particular statistic before you asked me so. John says that you basically have to understand two stories to also understand why thanksgiving dinner is so cheap this year. Because here's the first story what happened this year. The ingredient with the biggest decline in its price is the turkey turkey. Prices came in dollar twenty one per pound that was down seven percent from what we saw last year. Which means you can put a sixteen pound bird on the table. Offer less than twenty dollars this year and this could be partly because the pandemic has forced families not to gather together in the same big groups as they normally would so. There's just less demand for those big turkeys families usually by and it's also because a lot of grocery stores have discounted the price of turkey. Frankly just to get people through the door. According to the department of agriculture more than eighty percent of retailers were running promotions across the country. When we started this survey. So you'll see turkey. Prices that range anywhere from twenty nine cents a pound to two ninety nine a pound depending on what type of grocer your and then. There's the second the longer story to tell. And this is actually an easy one to explain. Because of new technologies and innovations in how to produce food over the last few decades farmers have simply become better at it more efficient which means that they can sell the food for cheaper. You got to recognize that we benefit from a higher quality very affordable food supply. You know we spend a small percentage of our disposable income on food. Food in the united states is very affordable now john and the farm bureau of course represent farmers so he's boosting his piece. They're a little bit but the general story that the agricultural sector in the us has become more and more efficient over time is definitely true.

American Farm Bureau Cardiff Garcia Patty Hirsch John Newton NPR John Turkey Department Of Agriculture Bureau Of Course United States
Hope Vs. Despair

The Indicator from Planet Money

07:48 min | 11 months ago

Hope Vs. Despair

"Everyone Stacey Incarnate Cardiff here. This is indicator from planet money and it has been a while since stacey naive put on our holsters stared across from each other for a good old fashioned gunslinger and shootout. Right we know Cardiff. That these things are very hard on you so try not to make them frequently you know as it or not. I am talking like I'm in a Sergio Leone flick. So because we should always be talking like we're in a Sergio Leone movie. We need the music fistful of dollars, the DOODOO. Of. The US economy is in this very uncertain place right now, there's the election coming up Congress and the White House have not agreed on a new bill to provide aid and stimulus, and the economic indicators are pointing all kinds of different directions. Yes. So based on those indicators is the case for hope stronger or weaker than the case for despair. To end the show station high debate, we take sides and to decide which side we're flipping a coin flip out at the O. K. Corral, Dang right? Heads I. Make the case for hope and Stacey you are despairing and if it's tails, you get to be hopeful. So I'm hoping for hope. It's tails, which means you get to be hopeful I. Spring the despair. Oh, I'm so excited I. I'm excited to be the voice of hope Cardiff. I feel like I feel like there's a part of you. That's excited to be the voice of despair. AM I. Wrong. Little bit a little bit. So yeah US economy after the break the good the bad and the I guess in our case the Smug League own nice. Prepare to rush Garcia prepared to do Rashed it's happening. Support for this podcast and the following message come from. Google, from updating their hours to adding takeout and delivery information. Small businesses around the country are using free google tools to adapt learn how at Google dot com slash grow. Okay folks. I will be arguing the case for pessimism for despair about the US economy stacey is arguing the case for hope. Stacey. You get to draw I. Okay. Cardiff here it is the case for hope the US economy is coming back. Economists are forecasting that the economy rebounded very strongly in the third quarter of this year after a very terrible second quarter the official numbers for the third quarter have not been released yet. They come out next week, but it is possible that the economy was up to eight percent bigger than it was in the second quarter that is just enormous definitely for sure it would be A. Really strong number but let's remember that the third quarter included the month of July when the economy was still running on the stimulus provided by the cares act that was the big government spending bill that provided an extra six hundred dollars a week in unemployment benefits to people who are out of work but those extra benefits expired at the end of July. So the stimulus by now is probably wearing off and also we still have almost seven million more unemployed people in the country. Then back in February before the pandemic started and I'm really worried about them now that they're not getting that extra help. Yes, you are totally Right that the high unemployment rate has been absolutely crushing, but the reason for hope is that Cardiff this very great that you referred to has actually been falling. So remember the worst economic damage from the pandemic was in the early months of March and April since then the unemployment rate has fallen from about fifteen percent where it peaked down to about eight percent as the economy has recovered, that is a huge recovery in a pretty short amount of time. That's true for sure and a hopeful sign but we have to recall that not all unemployment is the same most of the people who've already gotten their jobs back only. Lost those jobs fairly recently, but the number of long-term unemployed people is actually still going up each month. These are people who lost their jobs more than half a year ago and they have not been rehired and the longer they go without a job. The more likely it is that they're gonNA, lose their contacts and lose their skill sets and really struggled to find work again. Later you make some fair points Cardiff and I would respond that if the economy keeps growing though eventually those jobs will come back and there is a really good reason for hope that the economy will, in fact keep growing and that is consumer confidence. In September consumer confidence shot up by the most it has in seventeen years, which means that people in the US are planning to keep spending money because they are optimistic about the economy. For example, the sheriff people who are planning to buy a major appliance like a refrigerator, a stove or something like that is the highest it's been in seven months, and all that spending is going to keep the economy growing. There we go. Cardiff Garcia mic drop I. Think we should just call it right now I have one because consumers can be wrong I. Mean just because you're planning to buy the latest oxo coffeemaker with that sleek. Thermal Carafe does that mean you actually will if suddenly the economy goes bad but I would also point to a big split in precisely what people are spending money on. So specifically, yes people are spending more and more money on goods for the home like furniture and electron ix. But consumers are still not spending much money on services on things like eating at restaurants on traveling, and that's a problem because for example, restaurants and hotels are a huge source of employment for low income workers. So I'm just worried about people who rely on those jobs coming back especially since remember again, those extra benefits for the unemployed already expired. Almost three months ago card. If I think you should go ahead and splurge and buy yourself fancy coffee Raffin. Here's why. So you keep mentioning that the benefits for unemployed workers have expired and that is true but it is also true that not all of the money from those benefits with spent right away. A lot of that money was saved plus people who kept their jobs have also saved more money since the pandemic started because all the business lockdowns meant there were fewer opportunities to spend their money and you know people were maybe hunkering down a little bit too and what this means that a lot of households out. There still have money saved up money that they can start spending in the economy on things like fancy coffee carafe indeed though we also do know that a lot of the unemployed workers have already spent down a lot of their savings according to the J. P. Morgan, Chase Institute the unemployed spent about two thirds of their added savings in August that was the first month after the benefits expired, which means by now their finances could be getting really tightened. So they may have to cut back on some of their spending card. If you've now perfectly set up my final argument in the case for hope hated when I do that. That is policy. It is not too late for the president and Congress to make another deal before the election in order to stimulate the economy, those negotiations are still happening and also the Federal Reserve has been using monetary policy to help boost the economy. For example, low interest rates have given a big boost to the housing market, and historically the housing market has been a good sign of where the rest of the economy is headed and housing market is doing quite well. Yeah I definitely concede. The point about the Fed and the housing market. But the Federal Reserve itself has also said that what would be really useful for the economy is another bill like the cares act from the president and Congress, and all I'm saying to you is if the case for hope relies on politicians striking a deal agreeing on something that might be the most despairing

Cardiff United States Stacey Google Sergio Leone Congress Federal Reserve Doodoo President Trump Garcia O. K. Corral Smug League J. P. Morgan Official White House Chase Institute
RIP Business Suit?

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:10 min | 1 year ago

RIP Business Suit?

"Tina Ob is a professor of management at Babson College and she says, a lot of students will come to her. You know before they're interviewed for the first internships or first jobs and they will ask like Bush should I wear this job. So she thinks about the question of like how professional and professional norms a lot when I asked most people what is the most big symbol of the business world and visit professionalism almost everyone says the business eventually and Tina started thinking about why in about where these norms come from also she herself had a special relationship with the business suit because before she was in academia Tina worked in banking and I absolutely were businesses because We think about the prototype of a banker is that you have a tailored suits white man play golf. I'm a black woman doesn't play golf. So I had to get the soup right and they was. I mean I had the best. They were beautiful suits and they were tailored. It was by putting on a crown almost I felt special I. Felt you don't have on my uniform. This is my beautifully tailored uniform and people perceive me differently. So now Tina works in academia and she loves researching things and so all of this got her thinking like wait why is the business suit? The thing that we all wear to work like what about kilts or row observe why not something else so she started tracing the business suit back through time all the way back to its origins in the sixteen hundreds it turns out we have Charles the second to thank for the suit he was the. King, of England four hundred years ago. Yes and at the time when he became king, the fashion in the royal courts was like very very over the top men were these huge poofy wigs and they had these big sleeves on their clothes and crazy colors because di was very expensive. So it was a sign you were wealthy men wore high heeled shoes but all of his over the top nece in the royal courts it was it was starting to cause some problems for Charles getting all this criticism from religious and economic leaders who were saying that the royal family there were morally Herat's overly decorated, and so he was looking for a way to try to. Present himself and As more restraints, the sewage back then were made from wool instead of silk, and even though the colors were still kind of like Easter and colors just all over the place. This was still super restrained at the time and it starts getting even more strain. So details on the codes when Charles the second I started wearing, them were quite long but they got shorter and shorter and shorter and eventually the. Colors that people in suits became more muted product. We see today or at least what we used to see I, mean I actually can't remember the last time I saw someone in a suit, and you know says, she can't remember the last time. She wore one I have on a workout Sir Yoga pants but you know what typically going to work I wouldn't have the song. Oh, it's the same for me talk. It's so nice, oh. Yeah. I can actually there's been a lot of talk on social media and in all of these articles think pieces about how much people have been loving dressing down Lali living that yoga pants life right and it's not like working from home is going away. I. Mean millions of offices are closed through the rest of the year and beyond and. Even for people who do go back to the office, the setups probably going to be pretty different probably fewer people some partitions, maybe less reason to suit up there. Also Tina says that now the people have tasted this yoga pants life going back is going to be hard. There's something to say about the sigh of relief the collective sigh of relief I think the world. That tells you that there was labor associated with getting dressed in a professional way. Tina says for now she is advising her students to still put in that Labor for job interviews in banking and consulting jobs, or at least take care of the top part that people are GonNa zoom suit jacket suit jacket. Exactly and you know the suit has survived four hundred years of change electricity, the combustion engine, the Internet two world wars the suit has survived. All of that is working from home really going to be the thing that takes it down death by Yoga. Pants, seriously towards yoga pants that killed the I'm on. I like the idea of the suit as King Kong. But you know I don't know Cardiff because the business has been around as you say for a very long time for four hundred years I mean. Things change and maybe this is the business suits swansong like maybe it's time for us to start wearing other kinds of close. WE'RE NOT GONNA be wearing suits forever right drew I put this all to Tina and she said, you know if you want to know the fate of the suit right now, you've got to talk to people who work in fashion right look at fashion person at twin watcher about what we're seeing from shoppers and what designers are

Tina Ob Charles Golf Tina King Babson College Bush King Kong Professor Of Management Cardiff DI England Herat Lali
Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:12 min | 1 year ago

Egg Prices Skyrocket During The Pandemic

"It egg gree GIs or just good egg economics. The price of eggs skyrocketed during the pandemic, and now some states are suing AEG companies for price gouging Stacy Vanik, Smith and Cardiff Garcia from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet money, tell us exactly what's going on with egg prices. We eat a lot of eggs in this country. The average American eats almost an egg a day and during the pandemic, we really got excited about eggs. Grocery stores were ordering six times more eggs than normal and a lot of store shelves were still empty. Yes, so demand for eggs went crazy and the supply could not increase right away because there are only so many egg laying hens in the US and you know that in prison, a man will lead to a rise in prices. That is David Ortega. He is a food economist at Michigan State University, and David says it's all about supply and demand. A spike in demand, plus a fixed supply pushes up the price. And the price went way up nearly 200% in March, and now a bunch of states have responded by suing AEG companies for price gouging. Thes states included Texas, West Virginia in Minnesota, and they also included New York, where the attorney general accused egg company Hillandale Farms of taking in $4 million in revenues from overcharging people for eggs and with egg prices. Here is where things get tricky. I mean, Did eight companies commit a crime by charging more for eggs. Were they just being good free market citizens? Also challenging really happens when you purposefully set the price of a commodity, you know, significantly above the traditional price level that incorporates costs and other forces, David says. Part of the issue here is that costs went up for eight companies to labor transports. Supplies were all hard to get and often expensive in the early days of the pandemic, But did those costs go up? By three or 400%, like their prices did that is the question being hashed out in courts now, and it's kind of complicated and part of the issue. Here, of course, is the egg itself, right? I mean, if I scream prices or caviar prices or wine prices or something like that went up by 200%. It probably wouldn't be a legal issue a price gouging accusation. But the idea here is that eggs are a staple in a stable that really vulnerable people count on, especially in a crisis, and this idea that companies were profiting off of vulnerable people in time of crisis makes it seem kind of wrong, David says. It's especially tricky here because there was a time when pretty much all food prices were going up. In fact, between March and April, food prices saw their biggest jump in 46 years. But you know it's really difficult to draw the line as to what is a appropriate price response due to the shock versus what isthe sort of This type of illicit behavior that's trying to take advantage of the situation, David says. We will have to see what the courts decide about egg prices and whether it was price gouging or just, you know, faire economics or maybe unfair but legal economics. Stacy Vanek, Smith. Cardiff Garcia NPR news

David Ortega Aeg Companies Smith Cardiff Garcia Stacy Vanik United States Stacy Vanek NPR Michigan State University New York Texas Hillandale Farms Attorney Minnesota West Virginia
The Looming Eviction Crisis

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:41 min | 1 year ago

The Looming Eviction Crisis

"Kathy Seeker is fifty five. She lives in an apartment that she rents in Camden South Carolina with her husband before the coronavirus pandemic, Cathy was working multiple jobs. She ran the cafe at a bookstore and she also worked as a server at a restaurant, but the pandemic would shut down both of those workplaces and in March Kathy started a new job at an assisted living facility working with dementia patients she likes to work, but it only pays twelve dollars an hour and overtime pay is not available to her so when I took the new job for my career. It then sent our rent back. Months just months, I don't make enough money to support myself. My husband had a stroke at forty four years ago so he's not able to work. By August Kathy had fallen thousands of dollars behind on her rent and twelve dollars an hour. She just was not making enough money to both pay her full rent and cover her other bills like eletricity and car insurance and her husband's medications and my landlord was wonderful to so patient with us really was wonderful but. He has to make money you know and I had reconciled in my head like how I was going to get rid of our stuff how we're gonNA live in the car. And that was just going to be okay. Kennedy says there was some dark moments then when the stress from the possibility of being addicted was just overwhelming to be in that desperate situation. To be in that desperate situation and really feel like you've done everything you possibly can you know I'm a Frugal Person I home schooled my children for years I know how to. Pinch a good penny but I there was no panic. This is indicated for planet money. I'm Cardiff Garcia and I'm Stacey Smith Today on the show evictions millions possibly tens of millions of renters throughout the US could soon face a similar situation to the one that Kathy was facing the loss of jobs and income. So many of these renters has left the country with a possible evictions crisis and that crisis could have catastrophic consequences both for the renter's themselves and also for the whole economy. This message comes from NPR. Sponsor Microsoft the world has changed and Microsoft teams is there to help us stay connected teams is the safe and secure way to chat meet call and collaborate to learn more visit Microsoft dot com slash teams. Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google Google has a variety of free tools and resources to help small businesses adapt from trainings to on-demand classes through grow with Google explore Google's free tools for small businesses at Google Dot, com slash small business. The rent for the apartment the Kathy Kirchner shares with her husband in Camden South Carolina is six, hundred, ninety, five dollars a month, and she cannot afford that on her wages from the assisted living facility where she now works it's really difficult. My paycheck today was five, hundred, ninety, five dollars and and that's for two weeks even before the covert pandemic roughly one out of every four renting households in the US. was already paying more than half of their monthly income in rent. So. Were already paying their rent paycheck to paycheck. But when the pandemic started the federal government along with state and local governments did respond they responded with policies to help avoid an immediate surge fictions for a lot of these renters congress and the president expanded unemployment benefits in the cares act passed in late March, which helped people who lost their jobs, keep paying their bills, things like rent plus a lot of state and local governments with these moratoriums in place that would stop landlords from a visiting tenants. The federal government added its own moratorium on fictions for a lot of housing complexes that it subsidizes but the expanded unemployment benefits expired at the end of July in the moratoriums on. In at least twenty, four of the states that had them had also expired by the end of July. Including the moratorium in Kathy's own State of South Carolina. The Federal Moratorium has also expired and all of these reasons why so many housing experts are now warning that innovations crisis could start soon and the people who are most vulnerable to innovations. Crisis are low income renters according to the Urban Institute. Low income renters are more likely to have held jobs that have been lost in the Cova pandemic especially jobs in food. Services and the retail sector. In fact, two of the jobs that Kathy Secrets your work before the pandemic in a restaurant and in a bookstore were in those two sectors. The new job she took at the assisted living facility did not pay her nearly enough to offset the income she lost, but the economy is still in rough shape. So finding the kind of works used to do is just still really hard this hard when you're willing to work three four jobs like I'm not afraid to work, but you can't find work. A lot of Americans can't find work right now and many are struggling to pay their rent according to the Census Bureau roughly one out of five renters could not pay their rent on time in July and August could be worse nearly one out of three renters said the either had no confidence only slight confidence that they could pay their August rent for months. Kathy says that she herself could only pay partial rent her landlord kept growing tab for her running. into thousands of dollars and I would ask him every couple of months to show us what where we work because I was trying to make payments I would I would keep making payments, but it would be like three hundred dollars for the month. Well, that's less than half of what I, what I them, even though I have a job that's a you know a decent job, but it was it was a challenge. You know it's very stressful to live under that. Environment, if innovations crisis does become a reality communities of color would also be disproportionately hurt partly because a much higher share of black and Latino. Households are renters instead of homeowners there about twice as likely as white households to rent, and before the pandemic, they were already much more likely to face eviction than white households. If there is any good news here, it's just evictions. Crisis is not actually started yet. The warning signs are flashing red but so far evictions. Are actually quite low in a lot of major cities that of course does not mean that everything is fine. Remember that the expanded unemployment benefits and the state moratoriums on fictions only just expired a few weeks ago and it could take a bit of time before the struggles that people are having in paying their rent translate into actual evictions and it also means of course that there is still time for federal state and local policymakers to act again and possibly avert. Meanwhile. In at least some parts of the country hundreds of rental systems, programs have been directing their money to help prevent evictions and a lot of them have received money from the federal government for this very purpose and one of those organizations ended up helping Kathy. In fact, it was actually her landlord who put her in touch with the local program from the United Way that Helps Fight Homelessness this program called New Day Kathy applied and got a grant from new day. She was approved to receive about four thousand dollars and that money cleared all the background Kathy owed her landlord a felt like I. Finally had a chance to get my head. Slightly above water so that I could breathe and it would give me that time that I needed. To get my life together again, and by the first of September, we'll be able to put the rest of my rent down like I'll be able to breathe. Of course, a new start does not mean everything will continue to be fine in the future Kathy's hopeful that as the economy recovers, she'll be able to find other jobs to supplement her income but that partly also depends on whether it becomes safe to work those jobs while there is still a pandemic, there is no certainty about this or about whether the economy will keep recovering. So in the meantime, Kathy has a message for policymakers. Anything can turn on a dime and there are people who are really hard working. who really don't want take charity but don't have a choice. And if it is something that can help people even. Anybody. I would absolutely begged them to consider to continue these programs. We need them people that want to make their rent they want. To, pay their bills. They don't. WanNa take charity they and they're working as hard as they can. You know, and then when you add in the stress of. VID. And going out. Even, if you don't have to work environment like, I do just to go out, it's it's so mentally exhausting. The the mental anguish of not being able to pay your bills is overwhelming. Overwhelming And I don't. I don't. Know How funding works but I do know that if there had not been this funding. I'd, be in my car.

Kathy Federal Government Kathy Seeker Kathy Kirchner Kathy Secrets South Carolina Google Microsoft Camden South Carolina NPR Cathy Census Bureau Urban Institute Camden Kennedy United States Cova Congress US.
"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KCRW

"Companies around the world are racing to develop a code 19 vaccine. Ah, couple of vaccines under development in the U. S. Might start clinical trials as early as this month. But how much will people have to pay for it once the vaccine is ready? Cardiff Garcia and Patty Hearst from our daily economics podcast, the indicator from Planet Money, dig into the economics of vaccine pricing. Michael Kinch is the author of between Hope and Fear, a book about the history of vaccines. And he says that making money on a vaccine is harder than making money on, say, a life saving cancer drug. A vaccine generally tends to be a relatively inexpensive short term therapy. You immunize everybody, but you really get that patient population once and at a relatively low price point. Compare that, for example, with a drug for metastatic cancer, where you can price that drug at hundreds of thousands, and now we're reaching the point of millions of dollars per person. And that's much more profitable both of the short term and in the long term In recent decades, the pharma industry has mostly focused on those lucrative drugs and not on vaccines. Which is why Michael argues that pharma companies have been caught flat footed by having to create a vaccine for covered 19. That's also influenced their scientific approach to making that vaccine. Most of the companies in the United States are taking technologies that were developed for, for example, cancer and repurposing them. For covert 19 on this approached by U. S companies has consequences, Michael says an American pharma company that develops a covered vaccine might not actually own the patents on those newer technologies. So for every patient that buys the vaccine, the company might end up having to pay a certain percentage to the other companies that do own the patents. There might be three or 45 or six different patents that you have to serve. Each of them may want a percent or two or three or four that starts to add up very, very quickly charging a lot of money for a vaccine. The public absolutely needs to immunize itself against Covad. Would be extremely controversial, especially controversial if the vaccines developed by one of the cos that's being subsidized by the U. S government certified, the governments pledged roughly $2.2 billion to five US pharma companies, the government and the pharma companies. Obviously both want a vaccine to be developed. But when it comes to pricing the vaccine Have some with different goals. Pharma companies want to charge enough to cover costs and make a profit, whereas the government in the public want prices to be affordable enough that everyone congee immunized. We don't want to dis incentivize the private sector for making a new vaccine. Instead, we want to figure out how do we balance that incentive with making sure that the drug is affordable and available to everyone? Not getting that balance. Right is one of the reasons that have been so few new vaccines developed in the last few decades. Pharma companies know they'll get lamb bastard if they charge too high a price. But charging a low price isn't really worth it to them. Because developing vaccines is expensive. Aligning the incentives of the public in the pharma companies is massively important because his urgent and terribly important is the fight against Cove. It is right now. It probably won't be the last against the threatening pandemic. Patty Hirsch, Cardiff Garcia NPR news.

Michael Kinch Planet Money United States Cardiff Garcia Patty Hearst cancer Patty Hirsch Covad NPR Cardiff U. S
"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"Now hosts being I think it's a member of the M furniture jewellery the blue arrows which is kind of the your tickets at the cycling PODCAST DOT Com we go from Bristol to Cardiff.

Bristol Cardiff
"cardiff" Discussed on Racing Post

Racing Post

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Racing Post

"Once a twenty Huddersfield to to find food on to thirteen Cardiff thirteen to ten Bernie twenty one or twenty three to ten conscious. Mon righty Newcastle. And it's ten bucks is looking like they'll classically boys used a lover. It's any extra Maxine he three from five, isn't it? Yeah. I mean, south up to the left Alvin points wise, I off still one point above the bottom three. But I do agree. They are applying a lot better. Now, probably will get out of it. But I'll think alka faded, and I was so science die. I think Fulham still Galvin. I think how does feel clearly going off to, you know, fighting zippy cowardice but that game as well. How would you about Cardiff? And that's a guy if if you're looking for the rest of the season Cardiff, so many points, you go to get your home to how does field and really they were holding on for a draw. How does food thumb and I it the game that would really worry for college. If I think they'll go an artist. I think full of still got the quality to put a Rana winds together at some sites. They've got the ability out front Royal star to improve a little bit in the back. I mean, the guy way to goes at Burnley, I think keep a clean sheet at home, sir. How does field and a to Newcastle says a few signs of improvement in their an honest new call could be vulnerable. Everybody signed Benitez. We'll Kate them up. But there's a very real like a quality offensively in that saw it, and you know, the end of the die you need. So we can games not just draw them. And I'll still think I could be I could be in trouble. So you'll three a Huddersfield caught if new okay mock, I mean, you've you've done three hour talksport findings about this and guardian post costs. So you know, talking about every mine bit..

Cardiff Huddersfield alka Fulham Maxine Bernie Newcastle Alvin Benitez Galvin Burnley
"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Rachel Martin. And I'm David Greene. Three of the most important economists in this country, set down for a panel at an economic conference in Atlanta last week, former fed chair, Ben Bernanke, he and Janet Yellen along with the current pitcher Jay Powell were talking shop and also talking about the latest jobs report, but as Cardiff Garcia and Stacey Smith from our planet money podcast, the indicator. Tell us a stellar jobs report is not always a good thing. It was a pretty stellar report. Three hundred twelve thousand jobs added in December strong wage growth and. Of course, unemployment is still below four percent. And then here's Jay Powell's response. That's quite welcome. And also for me at this time does not raise concerns about to high inflation does not raise concerns about to high inflation that seems like a weird comment to make right? We add it all these jobs. But that doesn't mean I'm worried about inflation, but it communists, discussed a relationship between unemployment and inflation all the time that relationship is sometimes referred to as the Phillips curve. And that's this idea that if enough people are working, it will cause inflation the prices of the things that we buy will start going up, and according to the Phillips curve, the reverse is also true. So if unemployment goes up then inflation should come down because then companies don't have to raise wages to compete for workers. There's more workers out there who needed job, and we got kind of test of this back in the late seventies and early eighties. Inflation seemed to be getting out of control prices were rising up and up and up and get inflate. Under control, Paul car. He was the head of the Federal Reserve at the time raised interest rates all the way to twenty percent by comparison, by the way, short-term interest rates right now are two percent. But will Volker did lead to a week or economy and unemployment went up all the way up to ten percent inflation. No did come down. And so everybody's wondering is chair pal to worry about inflation and easy then gonna keep raising interest rates to prevent inflation from spiking higher for me. At this time does not raise concerns about to high inflation. Powell saying the even though unemployment is low and wage growth is rising. It doesn't necessarily mean that higher inflation will follow. So this relationship between inflation in jobs, even though the Phillips curve predicts it Powell's not really seen it. Let's curvy so NICKY Phillips curve dead to use a slaying, economic jargon. This is an indulgence phenomenon. Dodges phenomenon. Exactly, I was just thinking that basically what banenky saying is that the relationship between unemployment and inflation has changed people saw that the Federal Reserve would raise interest rates really high. If it needed to to bring inflation back down and ever since then inflation has stayed low. And here's the key people and companies act accordingly because if they worry that inflation was going to be much higher in the future. They would spend more money now and companies would raise prices to try to get ahead of the trend and that would contribute to inflation going higher right now. But that's not happening. What Ben Bernanke you saying is it precisely because of what the fed did in the past that the link between low unemployment and high inflation is weaker than it used to be. And that's the quote endogenous reason why the Phillips curve is so flat. So economists still strongly debate whether the Phillips curve is really dead or just resting. But if it is then it was possibly killed by the people in this room people with this job. Fed chair. Other words, it's indigenous. Stacey Vanek Smith Cardiff Garcia NPR news..

NICKY Phillips Jay Powell Ben Bernanke Federal Reserve Rachel Martin David Greene Stacey Vanek Smith Stacey Smith Cardiff Garcia Paul car Atlanta Janet Yellen NPR Volker Dodges twenty percent four percent ten percent two percent
"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

04:55 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"After that. I was talking to you the phone, and you said, you know, what I did notice that after FRANZ that Thomas. Stop following me on Twitter understanding why he was furious. Well, nine nine. Very interesting. I mean, we have an Email actually after our after we played into your couple of weeks ago from somebody who said that they felt that we completely underestimated them through me and writing him off in the way that I did I didn't write him off clear Cardiff. Do I what? I wish that thought to say this to the time to nice to win the Twitter fronts Francois says, but lots of people always say, she always used to say you need that you need that Riddler straight. You know, you need to be prepared to crop people photographs. There's a there's a real ruthless selfish streak that the winters require. But then you know, when we talked about this couple weeks ago, Larry war bus disputed that. He said he knew guys who were when was the example. He cited the somebody who is a winner can also be nice guy. I'm not saying Chris is no nice guy. There is there is a ruthless. This to him on doubtedly that we've seen on occasion. I I think we would have seen the tour if he'd had the legs nothing ultimately didn't. But. No matter he was on the jersey broom if he'd be able to try when the tour he would have tried to win the tour. Through undoubtedly pros. Well, white bring a bit more history to the device. Perhaps we can and. He was right. I mean, the that we recorded the Causton an error celebration because we were weak into the rice a week nine. Don't turn it on our bother. Yeah. And and you within as long as the tour. The whole history of the rights if Doma ninety by people dominated Merck's indoor I Armstrong we're very very used to the tool being over sometime before even begun. I wonder sometimes how we would covering the seventies tours of Eddy Merckx where used to win the prologue and then his team win the team time trial, and then he'd win the first with any kind of hailing it on stage three or four yellow and that would literally and then he'd win by seven nine minutes are used to being finally balanced, but what is kind of what was really unusual about. This is that it was kind of finally balanced without the suspense because I think we knew that would have to he would almost have to implode to to lose the tour and as the day when own just look. That I was going to happen saying to you is why all right sherri's most of his team didn't thank he was going to win at that stage. I was in the team sky car with Rhode Island the following day when he went up out and roll was the only person that I heard he said, bloody Hal he he's gonna win it. Now, there's nothing to stop him taking yellow all the way to Paris. And even not say Java surprised because I expected I guess maybe more official line from rural. But I thought well, we'll he'd be giving up freedom starts to be able to raise four himself. But we were all expecting some states. They typical Thomas bad luck to kick. It. I'm from reading his book. It seems like the most of the rest of the team didn't necessarily expect him to win until midway through the final week. I mean, I was. The guy after party in Paris. Guarantee on the celebrate. His way and he'd had a few Drake. So the truth was finally starting to come out some lots of and he was thanking all of his team. But he said that whenever you cross the line in the show's Elise had his arms in the air. He said one of his first was bloody hell to pay all these lots of bonus ni-. And then a second thought was actually I only have to pay them for three days. That's all the time that the work for him. And he was joking too. Three days. The rest of the team is going to the point the port the reason for the flatness was the tool was over in the census go, I kind of held the destiny of the rice hands and like almost pick and choose and when you saw over the counter could win.

Chris Twitter FRANZ Doma Thomas Paris Eddy Merckx Francois Cardiff Rhode Island Merck Elise sherri official seven nine minutes Three days three days
"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

The Cycling Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Cycling Podcast

"We're hearing tonight not the whole thing. Remember danger getting over-excited knee material? I should say we're instant Davis whole the invitation of John John who works here. There's a listener to the podcast when she heard our tour earlier this year around various venues in went sulfur coupling yours or not the Glasgow Edinburgh London. And she wrote to us asking if we could come and dinovite in Cardiff sometime late in the so here, we are that day has has come in. We're expecting a big. Audience and really looking forward to it sold out, isn't it three hundred and something people. Jangling times cutting up and. Can we have some kind of drink to settlement? Yeah. We'll we'll order that. In a moment. I'm before we do. I mean, this is we are eleven show that we've done this year you've been most of the thing. Our quite a lot of them. Anyway, what's the kind of the routine? Well, usually what we have been doing is reading from our chapter from our garbage bags journey through the cycling ear an- an-. Not least of discussion with chat this. I cling year. That's been going on then opened the Florida question. Not always a good better than night from eight note that there has out game. But it's nerve wracking when you're reading out your own writing live on stage, isn't it? It's very exposing. But the questions, and is all nice, and relaxing, good, fun and everything. So I'm expecting lots and lots of Garin Thomas themed questions this evening being are. We are. A community around the world stories and films with the most compelling characters. The world's finest apparel. Explore the world of cycling with Rafa. Thank you very much to.

John John Glasgow Edinburgh London Davis Garin Thomas Cardiff Florida
"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:24 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"So Cardiff, I was recently on vacation her member very lucky person. I went to Greece which I highly recommend lot of history there too. I spent a lot of time in museums. Because I am me. Asked you to spend a lot of time on the beach and not nerd ING out on economics and finance. I mean, you know, but they called to me. I, you know, I just I love these places. They have all these relics and old manuscripts and stuff. I was in heaven anyway, most of the older manuscripts. They're like in Greece thousand years old. It's amazing mostly bible text bible text bible texts was going through this museum. And then I saw on the far while this museum this huge parchment scroll here chicken you haven't seen this yet. Wow. It's like bigger than person it's taller than a person and about half as wide it seems it's like seven feet long just this long scroll at this. Big gold seal on very fancy, but guess what it was about. What? Taxes? Yes. Of course, of course, it was about taxes because you couldn't help yourself geeking out on economic stuff while on vacation in Greece is about tag. I was beside myself. I was so excited. In fact, according to this museum, this long seven foot, scroll was a list of tax exemptions. That was granted to a particular monastery from Alexia the first emperor of Byzantium in ten eight and this time he thinking because like, I know the taxes are important, right, obviously raising money is important for a government for an emperor. Like are. They this important. I mean, why are tax exemptions worthy of of this? I mean, the two things on manuscripts in this museum were like, our immortal souls and taxes, maybe Byzantium had at lobbying for for tax breaks to totally possible. I, but I started thinking have I been thinking about taxes the wrong way? This whole time. This is the indicator. I'm Stacey management. And I'm someone who knows how to take a proper vacation where I'm not thinking about work the whole time. My name's Cardiff Garcia, the show the history of taxes and their relationship with democracy..

Greece Byzantium Cardiff Cardiff Garcia thousand years seven feet seven foot
"cardiff" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

The Empire Film Podcast

03:35 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Empire Film Podcast

"A-List is basically coming together full Kurdish experience for several months while people shaping these shows. The Hamilton guy is there at the moment. He's posting videos with his wife, being terrified driving through country lanes. Vice pool. Man, I wouldn't even drive in the country. I couldn't do it because they'll be a whole mile stretch of a tiny, teeny tiny word. And if you start heading down truck comes toward you, you screwed. I don't know survival. Scary. Best in restaurants in Cardiff are amazing months. Now, very impressed tonight conscious need to be survived. Cardiff is Newport. Does. Con if we really enjoy, I did anyway, was sort of out of really in the city away to go from the played golf and times in between. Far away Williams like you, you're. Shooting. Time on like lines. Today, kid in my car says Jesus. Yes, he did. Tips for next time. Yes, really dumb question to ask you have the chance to ask anyone before. So you'll character name in the show is also Matthew that really is that a help or hindrance? Is that looking annoying thing on Saturday, someone's Matthew, and you let you Good good. question. I mean, I mean, ultimately days when you're not necessarily with it. Probably still time I need. Whereas if someone's cooling the Adam the my and you're just way with the ferries, then union it Mina works. I don't really think about it that much the vampire stuff that was tough, not the name, but yeah, down Pat down Pat. Impression makes we'll have it is this. Dropped his voice. I can active lower in his done. That's all he has today. Everyone. Really. Just doing voice being. Basically, just Jerry sense the literal sense. He pretty much played a vampire in Stoker in the film. He's very, he's quiet. Saying this on just to phoning in the same. I see it coming on pace. No, that was great. I'm a massive fan. He likes to work with joy and it was like Bebel. So you were working with a translation. He's very, very, very hush, and needs to get used to look at when when your speaking and get that fairly quickly. But if I find it really soothing the Korean language as well. So just be a Bill for the of relaxing, but he's the, he's so his ability. He looks at the smallest things he's like when not filming today in this room, changing those things because the rules are not yet the same color as this egg. Wow. Okay. He's one of the most brilliant. I I have probably a. have a weapon. You're saying..

Pat Cardiff Matthew Jesus Stoker Mina Williams Bebel Jerry Newport
"cardiff" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

Gettin' Grown

02:51 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Gettin' Grown

"And then if I if like I just imagine her, you know, calling in on her little reinforcements and trying to get her, you know, yes, men together. Yeah. Like, you know, to get her read together like exactly what she. She was gathering all of her documentation in receipts, and she was just gathering all of her intil in all of her nigga together so that she could have this. I don't know something informed show and she got on their sound craziest cat. It has ever only heard clips from the internet because I refuse to actively go in, press play and give her downloads for her show. But I mean, we've seen how Nikki's behaved through this entire situation and you know, Amanda so's made a really great point. You know, people are saying like it was the wrong time for Cardiff fight. You don't fight in these type of setting so forth, and so on. It is never the wrong time to fight. Amanda. That spoke to my soul. Never wrong time to fight. You see bitch, it's time to get busy. Out to the just do it. My favorite. My favorite just do it me if tomorrow is not promised, run up on that before today. Oh, what a War? I was like one top for one time to a modern day. Modern day. Lots of the age old adage snow time like the present. Day even. I mean. You know when when the door open in front of you, you are, you are to walk through it. I mean, several people have asked via Twitter and just kinda even in like day to day conversations since this blessed event. My thoughts feelings about about whether or not it was appropriate or should or shouldn't cushite Cardi have done. It shouldn't have done it. A five agit feel like we can all offer our own speculations in, you know, ideas about what should or should not have happened. But at the end of the day, Cardi is gonna Cardi and throwing shoes is a part of her practice. If we would just think back to that faithful Levin hip hop reunion, talk girl was going off at the mouth. Remember who it was, wasn't Mariah wanted them..

Cardi cushite Cardi Amanda Twitter Cardiff Nikki Levin Mariah
"cardiff" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

The Two Shot Podcast

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on The Two Shot Podcast

"Yeah but i'm more certainly more privileged people would over the nice he was a kind of a mixture but it was it was it was lots i think i don't think i was aware of that kind of social divided that time i just all i knew was i was in cardiff the beastie boys on his mind mates are coming down from the valleys we are gonna we're gonna have a laugh yeah and then they told they told me off a lot for that people who run the national yeah but they also in the other they did say to me i think potential you could go and do acting you encouraging in particular yeah he was quite nice he said i think maybe you should look at drama school gadget plays and dramas drums so i came back from that which was fun joleon your mean yeah more of a jolly eighteen sit back and go undertake says this is the beginning of my path because he was done on shore i suppose still unsure and also still from i didn't i sank comfortable as well because of my background you know if we didn't your mate while think were you made to feel uncomfortable no 'cause without note was four on your show i think it's always being my no i think it's about me and it was always about me i just think it was a different world you know he's always putting you you know we we had this is not about talking about poverty but we didn't have much you know and go into room in cardiff and they give me a room to share and he was really nice it was a dorm it was like he's one of my doing here you know what i mean do i belong.

cardiff
"cardiff" Discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

Courtside with Seth Greenberg

01:36 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Courtside with Seth Greenberg

"Cardiff its purdue of its nova i think they'd bangemann diglas in a contest enough who 3s they do good job guard a three and then i have michigan state of virginia could he got i got on us all right and if if it's not ohio state anyone 78 it was not all state governments you can state winning eighty one 78 all right i've got i've got i've got michigan submission states played virginia knocked him out of term it twice they play against a lot of pack lined defense which i think is important and i think they'd bangemann glass when i was gonna ask you how important is it to get to the offense the last hour important is it to push it against virginia why no one of those two best things we should stay does they put right and as i'm your leg gets tom izzo steam you've got to say we got to get back on defense and we gotta get on the defense aback ports period i'll tell you there's this bat that's about as good as it gets america you're welcome paul you are darn well cable the africa folks in america i that'll do it for court sides march madness bracket preview at lake to thank our sponsors who cloud and sipc cruder reminder listeners to rate review the show and apple podcast wherever they listen to the show and also a reminder to fill out your brackets on the tournament challenge on espn dot com and stay tuned to the feed is will be having multiple episodes week all throughout the incidentally tournament thank you for listening to court side with greenberg and jock itch you can listen it subscribe to wall espn podcast elicit jabba the spr that including the latest from the nba and the who collective podcast available in the esp an app for apple podcast.

Cardiff virginia america apple greenberg nba esp michigan ohio tom izzo africa espn
"cardiff" Discussed on In Our Time

In Our Time

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on In Our Time

"This is the bbc thanks for downloading this episode had been our time there's a reading is to go with it on our website and you can get news about our programmes if you follow us on twitter bbc in our time i hope you enjoyed the programmes hello our planet is home to millions of species of fungi and the role it plays vital without funky life on earth as we note simply wouldn't exist they also play an important part in our everyday lives the making of bread and beer and wine wouldn't be possible if argument available in the field of medicine a bean part of their production of certain antibiotics since penicillin however there are other fungus which can cause nessan diseases in humans and destroy trees some tongi or even toxic to humans and can kill if consumed despite the significance much of the way in which me operate remains a mystery women to discuss peng are serega professor food security in the buyer sizes department at the university of exeter then body purpose of fungal ecology at cardiff university and debbie johnson nhs in microbial ecology at the university of manchester then body what is a fungus and what did they look like well funky not plants and animals they know bacteria their kingdom of their own you could be forgiven i suppose to thinking that their plants because the front bodies the things which we think of his toadstools all brackets on trees i suppose superficially they look a bit like the flowers or fruits of plants but then then then not the the flowers and fruits of plans wink we know that's not the only part of aplomb as the leaves and roots in the schoups and in the same way the fungus has much more to it than toadstools we see when we warmed through the woods the toast was just the tip of the iceberg underground we have the the main body of the fungus the my cgm my cdm is a a network of fine filaments that's the body of the fungus this is what sets funky apart from all other organisms it's the law.

penicillin cardiff university bbc professor university of exeter university of manchester
"cardiff" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

02:07 min | 4 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Amanpour

"Welcome back to the program live from north london you can see a significant police presence here behind us near finsbury mark at loss now british media outlets are now reporting the darren osborne from cardiff wales is the man who allegedly drove a van into a crowd of worshippers early on monday here's what else we know this hour the worshippers were leaving evening ramadan prayers and just after midnight at the finsbury mosque when 47yearold osborne is suspected of steering a van into the crowd nine people were hospitalized one man was found dead at the scene all of the victims are from the muslim community the crowd wrestled the driver to the round and held him until police arrived is now being is on suspicion of terrorism offenses the home office tell cnn he was not previously known to security services counter terrorism police are now investigating the attack they say they believe the attacker acted alone witnesses say this was a deliberate attack on muslim certainly it has shaken the local community to its core for the finsbury park mosque and the surrounding area had been through hard times before take a look since berry park sits in one of the most diverse regions of london home to historic irish in afrocaribbean communities and large muslim and jewish population that's one of the reasons this attack feel so raw to the local people and met police commissioner christa the dick paid tribute to that community cohesion this is a highly integrated rbs and multicultural place people who perpetrate attacks like this thing they will break our society down uncle's division between us and they went through the odds when they weren't win this is a very resilient city and this is a very very resilient set of communities the finsbury park mosque is at the heart of this community.

london media outlets darren osborne wales finsbury mosque cnn security services finsbury park mosque berry park police commissioner finsbury cardiff afrocaribbean christa
"cardiff" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

Target USA Podcast by WTOP

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"cardiff" Discussed on Target USA Podcast by WTOP

"Yes in order syria these jerry and democratic forces have been the cardiff worse that has had the most success against isis and we've seen their success recently and man bitch voicing their success in top form and they are the force made up of both syrian arabs in syrian kurds who are poised to liberate rocker here in the very near future once that's operation starts what are we expect to see you said it should start very soon the liberation operation is they're going to be similar to what we saw in in in mozell or is this a different animal oh while mozell is certainly much larger men are seen estimates that a muzzle is about the same size as this city of philadelphia rocker is not that large but rocco holds e uh weren't significance to isis and similar to the amount of time that isis has had to dig in a prepared answers is very similar to mozell we very much expect to see the same types of tactics that isis has used in mozell in particular of their use of the car bomb or the vehicle born improvised explosive device and a coalition as continued to support at the isolation and will be there to support the liberation albon in the last week alone we have been able to kenner 23 strikes mainly are defensive positions that isis is trying to develop in and build up and also there're vehicle worn and provide explosive devices that we find in factories that produce these of the bids or these car bombs.

syria cardiff mozell isis explosive devices car bombs philadelphia rocco improvised explosive device